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Sample records for combining dna pooling

  1. Carbon source accounting for fish using combined DNA and stable isotope analyses in a regulated lowland river weir pool.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Christopher M; Krull, Evelyn S; Hartley, Diana M; Oliver, Roderick L

    2010-01-01

    Determining the source and flow of carbon, energy and nutrients through food webs is essential for understanding ecological connectivity and thus determining the impact of management practices on biodiversity. We combined DNA sequencing, microarrays and stable isotope analyses to test whether this approach would allow us to resolve the carbon flows through food webs in a weir pool on the lower Murray River, a highly impacted, complex and regulated ecosystem in southern Australia. We demonstrate that small fish in the Murray River consume a wide range of food items, but that a significant component of carbon and nitrogen entering the food web during dry periods in summer, but not spring, is derived from nonconventional sources other than in-channel primary producers. This study also showed that isotopic analyses alone cannot distinguish food sources and that a combined approach is better able to elucidate food-consumer dynamics. Our results highlight that a major river ecosystem, stressed by reduced environmental flows, can rapidly undergo significant and previously undetected changes that impact on the ecology of the system as a whole.

  2. New algebraic constructions for pooling design in DNA library screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Zengti; Gao, Suogang; Du, Hongjie; Shi, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Pooling design is an important mathematical tool in DNA library screening. It has been showed that using pooling design, the number of tests in DNA library screening can be greatly reduced. In this paper, we present some new algebraic constructions for pooling design.

  3. Combination fence and solar heater for swimming pools

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, D.L.

    1981-07-28

    A combination fence and solar heater for swimming pools comprises a fence shaped for extending about the periphery of the pool to restrict ingress and egress therefrom. A tubular heat exchanger is formed in at least one section of the fence, includes an exterior surface adapted to absorb solar energy, and communicates with the water in the swimming pool. The number of heat exchanger fence sections can be varied in accordance with the climate in which the pool is located. A pump flows the water in the swimming pool through the heat exchanger fence sections during daylight hours, thereby simultaneously heating the water in the pool, and providing an attractive and protective safety barrier about the swimming pool.

  4. DNA methylation profiling using bisulfite-based epityping of pooled genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Sophia J; Davis, Oliver S P; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert; Mill, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DNA methylation plays a vital role in normal cellular function, with aberrant methylation signatures being implicated in a growing number of human pathologies and complex human traits. Methods based on the modification of genomic DNA with sodium bisulfite are considered the 'gold-standard' for DNA methylation profiling on genomic DNA; however they require large amounts of DNA and may be prohibitively expensive when used on the large sample sizes necessary to detect small effects. DNA pooling approaches are already widely used in large-scale studies of DNA sequence and gene expression. In this paper, we describe the application of this economical DNA pooling technique to the study of DNA methylation profiles. This method generates accurate quantitative assessments of group DNA methylation averages, reducing the time, cost and amount of DNA starting material required for large-scale epigenetic investigation of disease phenotypes.

  5. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism.

  6. POOLED ANALYSIS OF STUDIES ON DNA ADDUCTS AND DIETARY VITAMINS

    PubMed Central

    Ragin, Camille; Minor, Aerie; Agudo, Antonio; Farmer, Peter; Garte, Seymour; Gonzales, Carlos; Kalina, Ivan; Matullo, Pino; Popov, Todor; Palli, Domenico; Peluso, Marco; Riccieri, Fulvio; Sram, Radim; Vineis, Paolo; Taioli, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    Objectives There is some evidence that dietary components that are rich in antioxidant and vitamins are inversely associated with DNA adduct levels induced by environmental carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, although the epidemiologic data are inconsistent. This study addresses the association between vitamins, DNA adducts and smoking. Methods A combined analysis of individual data on the association between bulky DNA adducts and dietary vitamins were conducted. A Medline search was performed to identify studies on healthy subjects in which smoking and vitamins intake information were available, and bulky DNA adducts were measured in peripheral blood with 32P post labeling. Eight published studies met the eligibility criteria, and individual data from 7 data sets including 2,758 subjects were obtained. GSTM1 and GSTT1 were also available on all the subjects. Results Vitamin E was inversely significantly associated with DNA adducts after adjustment for possible confounding factors. Vitamin A and C were not independent predictors of DNA adducts. A stratified analysis showed that vitamin A had a significant inverse association with DNA adducts in ever smokers only. Conclusions This result is relevant to planning any future chemo-preventive interventions directed to high risk subgroups of the population, for cancer prevention. PMID:20399891

  7. Comparison of fecal pooling methods and DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mita, Akiko; Mori, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Tetsuo; Tasaki, Tomoko; Utiyama, Katsuo; Mori, Hitomi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a sensitive method using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) with pooled fecal samples for the screening of Johne's disease (JD). Manufacturer-specified and our new pooling method in combination with five commercial kits for DNA extraction and purification were compared. Different volumes of pooled fecal suspensions were tested, and the results were compared for individual samples and three pool sizes (5, 10, and 50 samples); each of the fecal suspensions, which were prepared from healthy dairy and beef cattle was spiked with 0, 10, 100, or 1000 cultured Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) organisms or was mixed with fecal suspensions from experimentally infected cattle. The MAP DNA detection proportion with our pooling method in combination with Johne-Spin kit (Fasmac, Japan) was 100% for all models and all pool sizes, except for the low shedder model with a pool size of 50. There was no loss of sensitivity in pools of 10 subjects or less by using the new method. These results suggest that new method is a sensitive, practical, and cost-effective screening test for the detection of MAP-infected cattle and the monitoring of JD-free herds.

  8. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  9. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munné, Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2009-01-01

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival, as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multiclone and multicolor mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol, described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD, accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as 3 to 4 days. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:587–597, 2009) PMID:19223294

  10. High-Throughput SNP Allele-Frequency Determination in Pooled DNA Samples by Kinetic PCR

    PubMed Central

    Germer, Søren; Holland, Michael J.; Higuchi, Russell

    2000-01-01

    We have developed an accurate, yet inexpensive and high-throughput, method for determining the allele frequency of biallelic polymorphisms in pools of DNA samples. The assay combines kinetic (real-time quantitative) PCR with allele-specific amplification and requires no post-PCR processing. The relative amounts of each allele in a sample are quantified. This is performed by dividing equal aliquots of the pooled DNA between two separate PCR reactions, each of which contains a primer pair specific to one or the other allelic SNP variant. For pools with equal amounts of the two alleles, the two amplifications should reach a detectable level of fluorescence at the same cycle number. For pools that contain unequal ratios of the two alleles, the difference in cycle number between the two amplification reactions can be used to calculate the relative allele amounts. We demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the assay on samples with known predetermined SNP allele frequencies from 5% to 95%, including pools of both human and mouse DNAs using eight different SNPs altogether. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and known frequencies having an r2 = 0.997. The loss of sensitivity as a result of measurement error is typically minimal, compared with that due to sampling error alone, for population samples up to 1000. We believe that by providing a means for SNP genotyping up to thousands of samples simultaneously, inexpensively, and reproducibly, this method is a powerful strategy for detecting meaningful polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans. PMID:10673283

  11. A whole genome association study of neuroticism using DNA pooling

    PubMed Central

    Shifman, S; Bhomra, A; Smiley, S; Wray, NR; James, MR; Martin, NG; Hettema, JM; An, SS; Neale, MC; van den Oord, EJCG; Kendler, KS; Chen, X; Boomsma, DI; Middeldorp, CM; Hottenga, JJ; Slagboom, PE; Flint, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multistage approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with neuroticism, a personality trait that shares genetic determinants with major depression and anxiety disorders. Whole genome association with 452 574 SNPs was performed on DNA pools from ~2000 individuals selected on extremes of neuroticism scores from a cohort of 88 142 people from southwest England. The most significant SNPs were then genotyped on independent samples to replicate findings. We were able to replicate association of one SNP within the PDE4D gene in a second sample collected by our laboratory and in a family-based test in an independent sample; however, the SNP was not significantly associated with neuroticism in two other independent samples. We also observed an enrichment of low P-values in known regions of copy number variations. Simulation indicates that our study had ~80% power to identify neuroticism loci in the genome with odds ratio (OR) > 2, and ~50% power to identify small effects (OR = 1.5). Since we failed to find any loci accounting for more than 1% of the variance, the heritability of neuroticism probably arises from many loci each explaining much less than 1%. Our findings argue the need for much larger samples than anticipated in genetic association studies and that the biological basis of emotional disorders is extremely complex. PMID:17667963

  12. Genetic linkage analysis using pooled DNA and infrared detection of tailed STRP primer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetting, William S.; Wildenberg, Scott C.; King, Richard A.

    1996-04-01

    The mapping of a disease locus to a specific chromosomal region is an important step in the eventual isolation and analysis of a disease causing gene. Conventional mapping methods analyze large multiplex families and/or smaller nuclear families to find linkage between the disease and a chromosome marker that maps to a known chromosomal region. This analysis is time consuming and tedious, typically requiring the determination of 30,000 genotypes or more. For appropriate populations, we have instead utilized pooled DNA samples for gene mapping which greatly reduces the amount of time necessary for an initial chromosomal screen. This technique assumes a common founder for the disease locus of interest and searches for a region of a chromosome shared between affected individuals. Our analysis involves the PCR amplification of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRP) to detect these shared regions. In order to reduce the cost of genotyping, we have designed unlabeled tailed PCR primers which, when combined with a labeled universal primer, provides for an alternative to synthesizing custom labeled primers. The STRP pattern is visualized with an infrared fluorescence based automated DNA sequencer and the patterns quantitated by densitometric analysis of the allele pattern. Differences in the distribution of alleles between pools of affected and unaffected individuals, including a reduction in the number of alleles in the affected pool, indicate the sharing of a region of a chromosome. We have found this method effective for markers 10 - 15 cM away from the disease locus for a recessive genetic disease.

  13. Estimating the effect of SNP genotype on quantitative traits from pooled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies to detect associations between DNA markers and traits of interest in humans and livestock benefit from increasing the number of individuals genotyped. Performing association studies on pooled DNA samples can provide greater power for a given cost. For quantitative traits, the effect of an SNP is measured in the units of the trait and here we propose and demonstrate a method to estimate SNP effects on quantitative traits from pooled DNA data. Methods To obtain estimates of SNP effects from pooled DNA samples, we used logistic regression of estimated allele frequencies in pools on phenotype. The method was tested on a simulated dataset, and a beef cattle dataset using a model that included principal components from a genomic correlation matrix derived from the allele frequencies estimated from the pooled samples. The performance of the obtained estimates was evaluated by comparison with estimates obtained using regression of phenotype on genotype from individual samples of DNA. Results For the simulated data, the estimates of SNP effects from pooled DNA are similar but asymptotically different to those from individual DNA data. Error in estimating allele frequencies had a large effect on the accuracy of estimated SNP effects. For the beef cattle dataset, the principal components of the genomic correlation matrix from pooled DNA were consistent with known breed groups, and could be used to account for population stratification. Correctly modeling the contemporary group structure was essential to achieve estimates similar to those from individual DNA data, and pooling DNA from individuals within groups was superior to pooling DNA across groups. For a fixed number of assays, pooled DNA samples produced results that were more correlated with results from individual genotyping data than were results from one random individual assayed from each pool. Conclusions Use of logistic regression of allele frequency on phenotype makes it possible to estimate SNP

  14. Interval mapping of quantitative trait loci with selective DNA pooling data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Koehler, Kenneth J; Dekkers, Jack CM

    2007-01-01

    Selective DNA pooling is an efficient method to identify chromosomal regions that harbor quantitative trait loci (QTL) by comparing marker allele frequencies in pooled DNA from phenotypically extreme individuals. Currently used single marker analysis methods can detect linkage of markers to a QTL but do not provide separate estimates of QTL position and effect, nor do they utilize the joint information from multiple markers. In this study, two interval mapping methods for analysis of selective DNA pooling data were developed and evaluated. One was based on least squares regression (LS-pool) and the other on approximate maximum likelihood (ML-pool). Both methods simultaneously utilize information from multiple markers and multiple families and can be applied to different family structures (half-sib, F2 cross and backcross). The results from these two interval mapping methods were compared with results from single marker analysis by simulation. The results indicate that both LS-pool and ML-pool provided greater power to detect the QTL than single marker analysis. They also provide separate estimates of QTL location and effect. With large family sizes, both LS-pool and ML-pool provided similar power and estimates of QTL location and effect as selective genotyping. With small family sizes, however, the LS-pool method resulted in severely biased estimates of QTL location for distal QTL but this bias was reduced with the ML-pool. PMID:18053576

  15. Detection of QTL for growth rate in the blacklip abalone (Haliotis rubra Leach) using selective DNA pooling.

    PubMed

    Baranski, M; Rourke, M; Loughnan, S; Hayes, B; Austin, C; Robinson, N

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify QTL for growth rate in the blacklip abalone Haliotis rubra using selective DNA pooling. Three full-sibling families of H. rubra derived from crosses of wild broodstock were used. DNA was extracted from the largest and smallest 10% of progeny and combined into two pools for each phenotypic tail. The DNA pools were typed with 139 microsatellites, and markers showing significant differences between the peak height ratios of alleles inherited from the parents were individually genotyped and analysed by interval mapping. A strong correlation (r = 0.94, P < 0.001) was found between the t-values from the analysis of pools and the t-values from the analysis of individual genotypes. Based on the interval mapping analysis, QTL were detected on nine linkage groups at a chromosome-wide P < 0.01 and one linkage group at a chromosome-wide P < 0.05. The study demonstrated that selective DNA pooling is efficient and effective as a first-pass screen for the discovery of QTL in an aquaculture species.

  16. Optimal DNA pooling-based two-stage designs in case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yihong; Wang, Shuang

    2009-01-01

    Study cost remains the major limiting factor for genome-wide association studies due to the necessity of genotyping a large number of SNPs for a large number of subjects. Both DNA pooling strategies and two-stage designs have been proposed to reduce genotyping costs. In this study, we propose a cost-effective, two-stage approach with a DNA pooling strategy. During stage I, all markers are evaluated on a subset of individuals using DNA pooling. The most promising set of markers is then evaluated with individual genotyping for all individuals during stage II. The goal is to determine the optimal parameters (pi(p)(sample ), the proportion of samples used during stage I with DNA pooling; and pi(p)(marker ), the proportion of markers evaluated during stage II with individual genotyping) that minimize the cost of a two-stage DNA pooling design while maintaining a desired overall significance level and achieving a level of power similar to that of a one-stage individual genotyping design. We considered the effects of three factors on optimal two-stage DNA pooling designs. Our results suggest that, under most scenarios considered, the optimal two-stage DNA pooling design may be much more cost-effective than the optimal two-stage individual genotyping design, which use individual genotyping during both stages. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Optimal DNA Pooling-Based Two-Stage Designs in Case-Control Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yihong; Wang, Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Study cost remains the major limiting factor for genome-wide association studies due to the necessity of genotyping a large number of SNPs for a large number of subjects. Both DNA pooling strategies and two-stage designs have been proposed to reduce genotyping costs. In this study, we propose a cost-effective, two-stage approach with a DNA pooling strategy. During stage I, all markers are evaluated on a subset of individuals using DNA pooling. The most promising set of markers is then evaluated with individual genotyping for all individuals during stage II. The goal is to determine the optimal parameters (πpsample, the proportion of samples used during stage I with DNA pooling; and πpmarker, the proportion of markers evaluated during stage II with individual genotyping) that minimize the cost of a two-stage DNA pooling design while maintaining a desired overall significance level and achieving a level of power similar to that of a one-stage individual genotyping design. We considered the effects of three factors on optimal two-stage DNA pooling designs. Our results suggest that, under most scenarios considered, the optimal two-stage DNA pooling design may be much more cost-effective than the optimal two-stage individual genotyping design, which use individual genotyping during both stages. PMID:18931509

  18. Lyophilized combination pools of enterovirus equine antisera: new LBM pools prepared from reserves of antisera stored frozen for two decades

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Joseph L.; Wimberly, Ira L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation and test procedures for a second batch of lyophilized LBM combination antiserum pools, A through H, used for identifying 42 enteroviruses. Each pool is selectively composed of 10 or 11 of 42 individual enterovirus equine sera so that it contains 500 antibody units of each serum component per 0.1 ml. The new pools have been constituted from equine monovalent antisera that were prepared during the period 1962-67 and then evaluated and standardized in a series of collaborative international studies. An essential aspect of preparing the new pools was ensuring that the individual sera had retained high antibody titres through the long period of storage. At the time of retesting, the original stocks of these monovalent sera had been stored frozen at -20°C for periods ranging from 16 to 20 years. PMID:2994900

  19. Discovery of rare mutations in extensively pooled DNA samples using multiple target enrichment.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xu; Zhang, Yingchun; Xue, Zheyong; Feng, Laibao; Liu, Huaqing; Wang, Feng; Qi, Xiaoquan

    2014-08-01

    Chemical mutagenesis is routinely used to create large numbers of rare mutations in plant and animal populations, which can be subsequently subjected to selection for beneficial traits and phenotypes that enable the characterization of gene functions. Several next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based target enrichment methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in target DNA regions. However, most of these methods aim to sequence a large number of target regions from a small number of individuals. Here, we demonstrate an effective and affordable strategy for the discovery of rare mutations in a large sodium azide-induced mutant rice population (F2 ). The integration of multiplex, semi-nested PCR combined with NGS library construction allowed for the amplification of multiple target DNA fragments for sequencing. The 8 × 8 × 8 tridimensional DNA sample pooling strategy enabled us to obtain DNA sequences of 512 individuals while only sequencing 24 samples. A stepwise filtering procedure was then elaborated to eliminate most of the false positives expected to arise through sequencing error, and the application of a simple Student's t-test against position-prone error allowed for the discovery of 16 mutations from 36 enriched targeted DNA fragments of 1024 mutagenized rice plants, all without any false calls. © 2014 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Maximum-parsimony haplotype frequencies inference based on a joint constrained sparse representation of pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Jajamovich, Guido H; Iliadis, Alexandros; Anastassiou, Dimitris; Wang, Xiaodong

    2013-09-08

    DNA pooling constitutes a cost effective alternative in genome wide association studies. In DNA pooling, equimolar amounts of DNA from different individuals are mixed into one sample and the frequency of each allele in each position is observed in a single genotype experiment. The identification of haplotype frequencies from pooled data in addition to single locus analysis is of separate interest within these studies as haplotypes could increase statistical power and provide additional insight. We developed a method for maximum-parsimony haplotype frequency estimation from pooled DNA data based on the sparse representation of the DNA pools in a dictionary of haplotypes. Extensions to scenarios where data is noisy or even missing are also presented. The resulting method is first applied to simulated data based on the haplotypes and their associated frequencies of the AGT gene. We further evaluate our methodology on datasets consisting of SNPs from the first 7Mb of the HapMap CEU population. Noise and missing data were further introduced in the datasets in order to test the extensions of the proposed method. Both HIPPO and HAPLOPOOL were also applied to these datasets to compare performances. We evaluate our methodology on scenarios where pooling is more efficient relative to individual genotyping; that is, in datasets that contain pools with a small number of individuals. We show that in such scenarios our methodology outperforms state-of-the-art methods such as HIPPO and HAPLOPOOL.

  1. Selective DNA Pooling for Determination of Linkage between a Molecular Marker and a Quantitative Trait Locus

    PubMed Central

    Darvasi, A.; Soller, M.

    1994-01-01

    Selective genotyping is a method to reduce costs in marker-quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage determination by genotyping only those individuals with extreme, and hence most informative, quantitative trait values. The DNA pooling strategy (termed: ``selective DNA pooling'') takes this one step further by pooling DNA from the selected individuals at each of the two phenotypic extremes, and basing the test for linkage on marker allele frequencies as estimated from the pooled samples only. This can reduce genotyping costs of marker-QTL linkage determination by up to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical analysis of selective DNA pooling shows that for experiments involving backcross, F(2) and half-sib designs, the power of selective DNA pooling for detecting genes with large effect, can be the same as that obtained by individual selective genotyping. Power for detecting genes with small effect, however, was found to decrease strongly with increase in the technical error of estimating allele frequencies in the pooled samples. The effect of technical error, however, can be markedly reduced by replication of technical procedures. It is also shown that a proportion selected of 0.1 at each tail will be appropriate for a wide range of experimental conditions. PMID:7896115

  2. Endogenous DNA replication stress results in expansion of dNTP pools and a mutator phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Marta B; Katou, Yuki; Keszthelyi, Andrea; Sing, Tina L; Xia, Tian; Ou, Jiongwen; Vaisica, Jessica A; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Marjavaara, Lisette; Myers, Chad L; Chabes, Andrei; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Brown, Grant W

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the genome depends on diverse pathways that regulate DNA metabolism. Defects in these pathways result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. Deletion of ELG1 in budding yeast, when combined with hypomorphic alleles of PCNA results in spontaneous DNA damage during S phase that elicits upregulation of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity. Increased RNR activity leads to a dramatic expansion of deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools in G1 that allows cells to synthesize significant fractions of the genome in the presence of hydroxyurea in the subsequent S phase. Consistent with the recognized correlation between dNTP levels and spontaneous mutation, compromising ELG1 and PCNA results in a significant increase in mutation rates. Deletion of distinct genome stability genes RAD54, RAD55, and TSA1 also results in increased dNTP levels and mutagenesis, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon. Together, our data point to a vicious circle in which mutations in gatekeeper genes give rise to genomic instability during S phase, inducing expansion of the dNTP pool, which in turn results in high levels of spontaneous mutagenesis. PMID:22234187

  3. Nucleotide pools dictate the identity and frequency of ribonucleotide incorporation in mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoberg, Emily; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Taylor, Robert W.; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Falkenberg, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the presence of ribonucleotides in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the present study we use a genome-wide approach to precisely map the location of these. We find that ribonucleotides are distributed evenly between the heavy- and light-strand of mtDNA. The relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides reflect that DNA polymerase γ discriminates the four ribonucleotides differentially during DNA synthesis. The observed pattern is also dependent on the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools and disease-causing mutations that change these pools alter both the absolute and relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides. Our analyses strongly suggest that DNA polymerase γ-dependent incorporation is the main source of ribonucleotides in mtDNA and argues against the existence of a mitochondrial ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in human cells. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that when dNTP pools are limiting, ribonucleotides serve as a source of building blocks to maintain DNA replication. Increased levels of embedded ribonucleotides in patient cells with disturbed nucleotide pools may contribute to a pathogenic mechanism that affects mtDNA stability and impair new rounds of mtDNA replication. PMID:28207748

  4. DNA--a molecule in search of additional functions: recipient of pool wave emissions? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Almost the entire nucleotide sequence of human DNA is functionally unaccounted for, although large parts of the human genome are transcribed. The genes, as defined by current molecular biology, comprise about 1.5-2% of the DNA molecule. It is proposed that DNA encodes additional, hitherto unrecognized functions. In this discussion, the total information inside and outside the universe we live in is termed the pool or the sum total, known or unknown, of all laws, matter, energy, concepts and events. In a hypothetical model, a Gedankenexperiment, it is suggested that the total of all information emits pool waves of an unknown physical nature. They could be related to black energy or have completely different qualities. The designation pool waves should not imply any similarity to electromagnetism. Further, DNA is suggested to have the capability of interacting with the pool waves and thus permit humans - to some partly genetically determined and yet very limited extent - to perceive information from the pool. Pool emissions might be one of the forces that have been instrumental in and are still driving evolution from simple oligonucleotides to DNA with ever more complex recipient capacities. It will be a major challenge for researchers in the field to unravel these and less hypothetical undetected coding principles in DNA. It is uncertain whether the current trend to search the available DNA sequences with ever more refined computer technology on the basis of our present understanding of biology will detect unknown coding systems. For molecular medicine, research into the genetics of the most common human diseases could profit from the elucidation of presently still ephemeral codes in human DNA. Young scientists with a proven record of original research deserve support for the pursuit of unconventional ideas. This concept of granting priorities will be of the utmost importance in advancing the field beyond current concepts in molecular biology.

  5. A pooling-based approach to mapping genetic variants associated with DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplow, Irene M.; MacIsaac, Julia L.; Mah, Sarah M.; McEwen, Lisa M.; Kobor, Michael S.; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2015-04-24

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a key role in gene regulation. Previous studies have investigated its genetic basis by mapping genetic variants that are associated with DNA methylation at specific sites, but these have been limited to microarrays that cover <2% of the genome and cannot account for allele-specific methylation (ASM). Other studies have performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on a few individuals, but these lack statistical power to identify variants associated with DNA methylation. We present a novel approach in which bisulfite-treated DNA from many individuals is sequenced together in a single pool, resulting in a truly genome-wide map of DNA methylation. Compared to methods that do not account for ASM, our approach increases statistical power to detect associations while sharply reducing cost, effort, and experimental variability. As a proof of concept, we generated deep sequencing data from a pool of 60 human cell lines; we evaluated almost twice as many CpGs as the largest microarray studies and identified more than 2000 genetic variants associated with DNA methylation. Here we found that these variants are highly enriched for associations with chromatin accessibility and CTCF binding but are less likely to be associated with traits indirectly linked to DNA, such as gene expression and disease phenotypes. In summary, our approach allows genome-wide mapping of genetic variants associated with DNA methylation in any tissue of any species, without the need for individual-level genotype or methylation data.

  6. A pooling-based approach to mapping genetic variants associated with DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Kaplow, Irene M; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; McEwen, Lisa M; Kobor, Michael S; Fraser, Hunter B

    2015-06-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a key role in gene regulation. Previous studies have investigated its genetic basis by mapping genetic variants that are associated with DNA methylation at specific sites, but these have been limited to microarrays that cover <2% of the genome and cannot account for allele-specific methylation (ASM). Other studies have performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on a few individuals, but these lack statistical power to identify variants associated with DNA methylation. We present a novel approach in which bisulfite-treated DNA from many individuals is sequenced together in a single pool, resulting in a truly genome-wide map of DNA methylation. Compared to methods that do not account for ASM, our approach increases statistical power to detect associations while sharply reducing cost, effort, and experimental variability. As a proof of concept, we generated deep sequencing data from a pool of 60 human cell lines; we evaluated almost twice as many CpGs as the largest microarray studies and identified more than 2000 genetic variants associated with DNA methylation. We found that these variants are highly enriched for associations with chromatin accessibility and CTCF binding but are less likely to be associated with traits indirectly linked to DNA, such as gene expression and disease phenotypes. In summary, our approach allows genome-wide mapping of genetic variants associated with DNA methylation in any tissue of any species, without the need for individual-level genotype or methylation data.

  7. Pooling optimal combinations of energy thresholds in spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Runz, Armin; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-03-01

    Photon counting detectors used in spectroscopic CT are often based on small pixels and therefore offer only limited space to include energy discriminators and their associated counters in each pixel cell. For this reason, it is important to make efficient use of the available energy discriminators in order to achieve an optimized material contrast at a radiation dose as low as possible. Unfortunately, the complexity of evaluating every possible combination of energy thresholds, given a fixed number of counters, rapidly increases with the resolution at which this search is performed, and makes brute-force approaches to this problem infeasible. In this work, we introduce methods from machine learning, in particular sparse regression, to perform a feature selection to determine optimal combinations of energy thresholds. We will demonstrate how methods enforcing row-sparsity on a linear regression's coefficient matrix can be applied to the multiple response problem in spectroscopic CT, i.e. the case in which a single set of energy thresholds is sought to simultaneously retrieve concentrations pertaining to a multitude of materials in an optimal way. These methods are applied to CT images experimentally obtained with a Medipix3RX detector operated in charge summing mode and with a CdTe sensor at a pixel pitch of 110μm. We show that the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso), generalized to the multiple response case, chooses four out of 20 possible threshold positions that allow discriminating PMMA, iodine and gadolinium in a contrast agent phantom at a higher accuracy than with equally spaced thresholds. Finally, we illustrate why it might be unwise to use a higher number of energy thresholds than absolutely necessary.

  8. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  9. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  10. Modulation of mutagenesis in eukaryotes by DNA replication fork dynamics and quality of nucleotide pools

    PubMed Central

    Waisertreiger, Irina S.-R.; Liston, Victoria G.; Menezes, Miriam R.; Kim, Hyun-Min; Lobachev, Kirill S.; Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri. I.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of mutations in eukaryotes depends on a plethora of factors and is not immediately derived from the fidelity of DNA polymerases (Pols). Replication of chromosomes containing the anti-parallel strands of duplex DNA occurs through the copying of leading and lagging strand templates by a trio of Pols α, δ and ε, with the assistance of Pol ζ and Y-family Pols at difficult DNA template structures or sites of DNA damage. The parameters of the synthesis at a given location are dictated by the quality and quantity of nucleotides in the pools, replication fork architecture, transcription status, regulation of Pol switches, and structure of chromatin. The result of these transactions is a subject of survey and editing by DNA repair. PMID:23055184

  11. Scalable gene synthesis by selective amplification of DNA pools from high-fidelity microchips.

    PubMed

    Kosuri, Sriram; Eroshenko, Nikolai; Leproust, Emily M; Super, Michael; Way, Jeffrey; Li, Jin Billy; Church, George M

    2010-12-01

    Development of cheap, high-throughput and reliable gene synthesis methods will broadly stimulate progress in biology and biotechnology. Currently, the reliance on column-synthesized oligonucleotides as a source of DNA limits further cost reductions in gene synthesis. Oligonucleotides from DNA microchips can reduce costs by at least an order of magnitude, yet efforts to scale their use have been largely unsuccessful owing to the high error rates and complexity of the oligonucleotide mixtures. Here we use high-fidelity DNA microchips, selective oligonucleotide pool amplification, optimized gene assembly protocols and enzymatic error correction to develop a method for highly parallel gene synthesis. We tested our approach by assembling 47 genes, including 42 challenging therapeutic antibody sequences, encoding a total of ∼35 kilobase pairs of DNA. These assemblies were performed from a complex background containing 13,000 oligonucleotides encoding ∼2.5 megabases of DNA, which is at least 50 times larger than in previously published attempts.

  12. Mutation analysis of 18 nephronophthisis associated ciliopathy disease genes using a DNA pooling and next generation sequencing strategy.

    PubMed

    Otto, Edgar A; Ramaswami, Gokul; Janssen, Sabine; Chaki, Moumita; Allen, Susan J; Zhou, Weibin; Airik, Rannar; Hurd, Toby W; Ghosh, Amiya K; Wolf, Matthias T; Hoppe, Bernd; Neuhaus, Thomas J; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Milford, David V; Soliman, Neveen A; Antignac, Corinne; Saunier, Sophie; Johnson, Colin A; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-02-01

    Nephronophthisis associated ciliopathies (NPHP-AC) comprise a group of autosomal recessive cystic kidney diseases that includes nephronophthisis (NPHP), Senior-Loken syndrome (SLS), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS). To date, causative mutations in NPHP-AC have been described for 18 different genes, rendering mutation analysis tedious and expensive. To overcome the broad genetic locus heterogeneity, a strategy of DNA pooling with consecutive massively parallel resequencing (MPR) was devised. In 120 patients with severe NPHP-AC phenotypes, five pools of genomic DNA with 24 patients each were prepared which were used as templates in order to PCR amplify all 376 exons of 18 NPHP-AC genes (NPHP1, INVS, NPHP3, NPHP4, IQCB1, CEP290, GLIS2, RPGRIP1L, NEK8, TMEM67, INPP5E, TMEM216, AHI1, ARL13B, CC2D2A, TTC21B, MKS1, and XPNPEP3). PCR products were then subjected to MPR on an Illumina Genome-Analyser and mutations were subsequently assigned to their respective mutation carrier via CEL I endonuclease based heteroduplex screening and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. For proof of principle, DNA from patients with known mutations was used and detection of 22 out of 24 different alleles (92% sensitivity) was demonstrated. MPR led to the molecular diagnosis in 30/120 patients (25%) and 54 pathogenic mutations (27 novel) were identified in seven different NPHP-AC genes. Additionally, in 24 patients only single heterozygous variants of unknown significance were found. The combined approach of DNA pooling followed by MPR strongly facilitates mutation analysis in broadly heterogeneous single gene disorders. The lack of mutations in 75% of patients in this cohort indicates further extensive heterogeneity in NPHP-AC.

  13. Mutation Analysis of 18 Nephronophthisis-associated Ciliopathy Disease Genes using a DNA Pooling and Next-Generation Sequencing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Edgar A.; Ramaswami, Gokul; Janssen, Sabine; Chaki, Moumita; Allen, Susan J.; Zhou, Weibin; Airik, Rannar; Hurd, Toby W.; Ghosh, Amiya K.; Wolf, Matthias T.; Hoppe, Bernd; Neuhaus, Thomas J.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Milford, David V.; Soliman, Neveen A.; Saunier, Sophie; Johnson, Colin A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-01-01

    Background Nephronophthisis-associated ciliopathies (NPHP-AC) comprise a group of autosomal recessive cystic kidney diseases that includes nephronophthisis (NPHP), Senior-Loken syndrome (SLS), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS). To date, causative mutations in NPHP-AC have been described for 18 different genes, rendering mutation analysis tedious and expensive. To overcome the broad genetic locus heterogeneity we devised a strategy of DNA pooling with consecutive massively parallel resequencing (MPR). Methods In 120 patients with severe NPHP-AC phenotypes we prepared 5 pools of genomic DNA with 24 patients each which were used as templates in order to PCR-amplify all 376 exons of 18 NPHP-AC genes (NPHP1, INVS, NPHP3, NPHP4, IQCB1, CEP290, GLIS2, RPGRIP1L, NEK8, TMEM67, INPP5E, TMEM216, AHI1, ARL13B, CC2D2A, TTC21B, MKS1, and XPNPEP3). PCR products were then subjected to MPR on a Illumina Genome-Analyzer and mutations were subsequently assigned to their respective mutation carrier via CEL I endonuclease-based heteroduplex screening and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Results For proof of principle we used DNA from patients with known mutations and demonstrated the detection of 22 out of 24 different alleles (92% sensitivity). MPR led to the molecular diagnosis in 30/120 patients (25%) and we identified 54 pathogenic mutations (27 novel) in 7 different NPHP-AC genes. Additionally, in 24 patients we only found single heterozygous variants of unknown significance. Conclusions The combined approach of DNA pooling followed by MPR strongly facilitates mutation analysis in broadly heterogeneous single-gene disorders. The lack of mutations in 75% of patients in our cohort indicates further extensive heterogeneity in NPHP-AC. PMID:21068128

  14. Bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells: a pooled analysis of 3600 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ricceri, Fulvio; Godschalk, Roger; Peluso, Marco; Phillips, David H.; Agudo, Antonio; Georgiadis, Panos; Loft, Steffen; Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Palli, Domenico; Perera, Frederica; Vermeulen, Roel; Taioli, Emanuela; Sram, Radim J.; Munnia, Armelle; Rosa, Fabio; Allione, Alessandra; Matullo, Giuseppe; Vineis, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background Bulky DNA adducts are markers of exposure to genotoxic aromatic compounds, which reflect an individual’s ability to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) represent a major class of carcinogens that are capable of forming such adducts. Factors that have been reported to be related to DNA adduct levels include smoking, diet, body mass index (BMI), genetic polymorphisms, the season of collection of biologic material, and air pollutants. Methods We pooled eleven studies (3,600 subjects) in which bulky DNA adducts were measured in human white blood cells with similar 32P-postlabelling techniques and for which a similar set of variables was available, including individual data on age, gender, ethnicity, batch, smoking habits, BMI, season of blood collection and a limited set of gene variants. Results Lowest DNA adduct levels were observed in the spring (median 0.50 adducts per 108 nucleotides), followed by summer (0.64), autumn (0.70) and winter (0.85) (p=0.006). The same pattern emerged in multivariate analysis, but only among never smokers (p=0.02). Adduct levels were significantly lower (p=0.001) in Northern Europe (the Netherlands, Denmark) (mean 0.60, median 0.40) than in Southern Europe (Italy, Spain, France, Greece) (mean 0.79, median 0.60). Conclusions In this large pooled analysis, we have found only weak associations between bulky DNA adducts and exposure variables. Seasonality (with higher adducts levels in winter) and air pollution may partly explain some of the inter-area differences (North vs South Europe), but most inter-area and inter-individual variation in adduct levels still remain unexplained. Impact Our study describes the largest pooled analysis of bulky DNA adducts so far, showing that inter-individual variation is still largely unexplained, though seasonality appears to play a role. PMID:20921335

  15. Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA: comparison of three PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Stefan; Hemminki, Kari; Thirumaran, Ranjit Kumar; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Bonn, Stefan; Försti, Asta; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-12-01

    Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a powerful and efficient tool for large-scale association studies. In this study, we tested and compared three PCR-based methods for accuracy, reproducibility, cost, and convenience. The methods compared were: (i) real-time PCR with allele-specific primers, (ii) real-time PCR with allele-specific TaqMan probes, and (iii) quantitative sequencing. Allele frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in three different genes were estimated from pooled DNA. The pools were made of genomic DNA samples from 96 cases with basal cell carcinoma of the skin and 96 healthy controls with known genotypes. In this study, the allele frequency estimation made by real-time PCR with allele-specific primers had the smallest median deviation (MD) from the real allele frequency with 1.12% (absolute percentage points) and was also the cheapest method. However; this method required the most time for optimization and showed the highest variation between replicates (SD = 6.47%). Quantitative sequencing, the simplest method, was found to have intermediate accuracies (MD = 1.44%, SD = 4.2%). Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, a convenient but very expensive method, had an MD of 1.47% and the lowest variation between replicates (SD = 3.18%).

  16. A pooling-based approach to mapping genetic variants associated with DNA methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Kaplow, Irene M.; MacIsaac, Julia L.; Mah, Sarah M.; ...

    2015-04-24

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a key role in gene regulation. Previous studies have investigated its genetic basis by mapping genetic variants that are associated with DNA methylation at specific sites, but these have been limited to microarrays that cover <2% of the genome and cannot account for allele-specific methylation (ASM). Other studies have performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on a few individuals, but these lack statistical power to identify variants associated with DNA methylation. We present a novel approach in which bisulfite-treated DNA from many individuals is sequenced together in a single pool, resulting in a trulymore » genome-wide map of DNA methylation. Compared to methods that do not account for ASM, our approach increases statistical power to detect associations while sharply reducing cost, effort, and experimental variability. As a proof of concept, we generated deep sequencing data from a pool of 60 human cell lines; we evaluated almost twice as many CpGs as the largest microarray studies and identified more than 2000 genetic variants associated with DNA methylation. Here we found that these variants are highly enriched for associations with chromatin accessibility and CTCF binding but are less likely to be associated with traits indirectly linked to DNA, such as gene expression and disease phenotypes. In summary, our approach allows genome-wide mapping of genetic variants associated with DNA methylation in any tissue of any species, without the need for individual-level genotype or methylation data.« less

  17. A molecular bar-coded DNA repair resource for pooled toxicogenomic screens.

    PubMed

    Rooney, John P; Patil, Ashish; Zappala, Maria R; Conklin, Douglas S; Cunningham, Richard P; Begley, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    DNA damage from exogenous and endogenous sources can promote mutations and cell death. Fortunately, cells contain DNA repair and damage signaling pathways to reduce the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of DNA damage. The identification of specific DNA repair proteins and the coordination of DNA repair pathways after damage has been a central theme to the field of genetic toxicology and we have developed a tool for use in this area. We have produced 99 molecular bar-coded Escherichia coli gene-deletion mutants specific to DNA repair and damage signaling pathways, and each bar-coded mutant can be tracked in pooled format using bar-code specific microarrays. Our design adapted bar-codes developed for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-deletion project, which allowed us to utilize an available microarray product for pooled gene-exposure studies. Microarray-based screens were used for en masse identification of individual mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). As expected, gene-deletion mutants specific to direct, base excision, and recombinational DNA repair pathways were identified as MMS-sensitive in our pooled assay, thus validating our resource. We have demonstrated that molecular bar-codes designed for S. cerevisiae are transferable to E. coli, and that they can be used with pre-existing microarrays to perform competitive growth experiments. Further, when comparing microarray to traditional plate-based screens both overlapping and distinct results were obtained, which is a novel technical finding, with discrepancies between the two approaches explained by differences in output measurements (DNA content versus cell mass). The microarray-based classification of Deltatag and DeltadinG cells as depleted after MMS exposure, contrary to plate-based methods, led to the discovery that Deltatag and DeltadinG cells show a filamentation phenotype after MMS exposure, thus accounting for the discrepancy. A novel biological finding is the observation that while

  18. Tracing European founder lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA pool.

    PubMed

    Richards, M; Macaulay, V; Hickey, E; Vega, E; Sykes, B; Guida, V; Rengo, C; Sellitto, D; Cruciani, F; Kivisild, T; Villems, R; Thomas, M; Rychkov, S; Rychkov, O; Rychkov, Y; Gölge, M; Dimitrov, D; Hill, E; Bradley, D; Romano, V; Calì, F; Vona, G; Demaine, A; Papiha, S; Triantaphyllidis, C; Stefanescu, G; Hatina, J; Belledi, M; Di Rienzo, A; Novelletto, A; Oppenheim, A; Nørby, S; Al-Zaheri, N; Santachiara-Benerecetti, S; Scozari, R; Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J

    2000-11-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2, 804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans.

  19. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-10-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties.

  20. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    PubMed Central

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  1. Detection of obesity QTLs on mouse chromosomes 1 and 7 by selective DNA pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.A.; Phillips, S.J.

    1996-06-15

    The inheritance of obesity has been analyzed in an intercross between the lean 129/Sv mouse strain and the obesity-prone EL/Suz mouse strain. The weights of three major fat pads were determined on 4-month-old mice, and the sum of these weights, divided by body weight, was used as an adiposity index. The strategy of selective DNA pooling was used as a primary screen to identify putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting adiposity index. DNA pools representing the leanest 15% and fattest 15% of the F2 progeny were compared for differential allelic enrichment using widely dispersed microsatellite variants. To evaluate putative QTLs, individual genotyping and interval mapping were employed to estimate QTL effects and assess statistical significance. One QTL affecting adiposity index, which accounted for 12.3% of phenotypic variance in gender-merged data, was mapped to the central region of Chromosome (Chr) 7. The QTL allele inherited from EL conferred increased adiposity. A second QTL that accounts for 6.3% of phenotypic variance was identified on Chr 1 near D1Mitt211. At both QTLs, the data are consistent with dominant inheritance of the allele contributing to obesity. The possible relationships between these QTLs and previously described obesity QYLs, major obesity mutations, and candidate genes are discussed. 42 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. A BAC pooling strategy combined with PCR-based screenings in a large, highly repetitive genome enables integration of the maize genetic and physical maps

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Young-Sun; Moak, Patricia; Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Musket, Theresa A; Close, Pamela; Klein, Patricia E; Mullet, John E; McMullen, Michael D; Fang, Zheiwei; Schaeffer, Mary L; Gardiner, Jack M; Coe, Edward H; Davis, Georgia L

    2007-01-01

    Background Molecular markers serve three important functions in physical map assembly. First, they provide anchor points to genetic maps facilitating functional genomic studies. Second, they reduce the overlap required for BAC contig assembly from 80 to 50 percent. Finally, they validate assemblies based solely on BAC fingerprints. We employed a six-dimensional BAC pooling strategy in combination with a high-throughput PCR-based screening method to anchor the maize genetic and physical maps. Results A total of 110,592 maize BAC clones (~ 6x haploid genome equivalents) were pooled into six different matrices, each containing 48 pools of BAC DNA. The quality of the BAC DNA pools and their utility for identifying BACs containing target genomic sequences was tested using 254 PCR-based STS markers. Five types of PCR-based STS markers were screened to assess potential uses for the BAC pools. An average of 4.68 BAC clones were identified per marker analyzed. These results were integrated with BAC fingerprint data generated by the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI) and the Arizona Genomics Computational Laboratory (AGCoL) to assemble the BAC contigs using the FingerPrinted Contigs (FPC) software and contribute to the construction and anchoring of the physical map. A total of 234 markers (92.5%) anchored BAC contigs to their genetic map positions. The results can be viewed on the integrated map of maize [1,2]. Conclusion This BAC pooling strategy is a rapid, cost effective method for genome assembly and anchoring. The requirement for six replicate positive amplifications makes this a robust method for use in large genomes with high amounts of repetitive DNA such as maize. This strategy can be used to physically map duplicate loci, provide order information for loci in a small genetic interval or with no genetic recombination, and loci with conflicting hybridization-based information. PMID:17291341

  3. Use of Redundant Exclusion PCR To Identify a Novel Bacillus thuringiensis Cry8 Toxin Gene from Pooled Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Shu, Changlong; Crickmore, Neil; Li, Yanqiu; Song, Fuping; Liu, Chunqin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT With the aim of optimizing the cloning of novel genes from a genomic pool containing many previously identified homologous genes, we designed a redundant exclusion PCR (RE-PCR) technique. In RE-PCR, a pair of generic amplification primers are combined with additional primers that are designed to specifically bind to redundant, unwanted genes that are a subset of those copied by the amplification primers. During RE-PCR, the specific primer blocks amplification of the full-length redundant gene. Using this method, we managed to clone a number of cry8 or cry9 toxin genes from a pool of Bacillus thuringiensis genomic DNA while excluding amplicons for cry9Da, cry9Ea, and cry9Eb. The method proved to be very efficient at increasing the number of rare genes in the resulting library. One such rare (and novel) cry8-like gene was expressed, and the encoded toxin was shown to be toxic to Anomala corpulenta. IMPORTANCE Protein toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are being increasingly used as biopesticides against a wide range of insect pests, yet the search for new or improved toxins is becoming more difficult, as traditional methods for gene discovery routinely isolate previously identified clones. This paper describes an approach that we have developed to increase the success rate for novel toxin gene identification through reducing or eliminating the cloning of previously characterized genes. PMID:27084017

  4. International Lung Cancer Consortium: Pooled Analysis of Sequence Variants in DNA Repair and Cell Cycle Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Rayjean J.; Christiani, David C.; Risch, Angela; Popanda, Odilia; Haugen, Aage; Zienolddiny, Shan; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Lan, Qing; Spitz, Margaret R.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; LeMarchand, Loic; Vineis, Paolo; Matullo, Giuseppe; Kiyohara, Chikako; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Pezeshki, Benhnaz; Harris, Curtis; Mechanic, Leah; Seow, Adeline; Ng, Daniel P.K.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Zaridze, David; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Bencko, Vladimir; Caporaso, Neil; Chen, Chu; Duell, Eric J.; Goodman, Gary; Field, John K.; Houlston, Richard S.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua; McLaughlin, John; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shen, Hongbing; Stucker, Isabelle; Tajima, Kazuo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Thun, Michael; Yang, Ping; Wiencke, John; Andrew, Angeline S.; Monnier, Stephanie; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background The International Lung Cancer Consortium was established in 2004. To clarify the role of DNA repair genes in lung cancer susceptibility, we conducted a pooled analysis of genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, whose associations have been investigated by at least 3 individual studies. Methods Data from 14 studies were pooled for 18 sequence variants in 12 DNA repair genes, including APEX1, OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, ERCC1, XPD, XPF, XPG, XPA, MGMT, and TP53. The total number of subjects included in the analysis for each variant ranged from 2,073 to 13,955 subjects. Results Four of the variants were found to be weakly associated with lung cancer risk with borderline significance: these were XRCC3 T241M [heterozygote odds ratio (OR), 0.89; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.79–0.99 and homozygote OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71–1.00] based on 3,467 cases and 5,021 controls from 8 studies, XPD K751Q (heterozygote OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.89–1.10 and homozygote OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02–1.39) based on 6,463 cases and 6,603 controls from 9 studies, and TP53 R72P (heterozygote OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00–1.29 and homozygote OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02–1.42) based on 3,610 cases and 5,293 controls from 6 studies. OGG1 S326C homozygote was suggested to be associated with lung cancer risk in Caucasians (homozygote OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01–1.79) based on 2,569 cases and 4,178 controls from 4 studies but not in Asians. The other 14 variants did not exhibit main effects on lung cancer risk. Discussion In addition to data pooling, future priorities of International Lung Cancer Consortium include coordinated genotyping and multistage validation for ongoing genome-wide association studies. PMID:18990748

  5. Tracing European Founder Lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent; Hickey, Eileen; Vega, Emilce; Sykes, Bryan; Guida, Valentina; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; Cruciani, Fulvio; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Thomas, Mark; Rychkov, Serge; Rychkov, Oksana; Rychkov, Yuri; Gölge, Mukaddes; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Hill, Emmeline; Bradley, Dan; Romano, Valentino; Calì, Francesco; Vona, Giuseppe; Demaine, Andrew; Papiha, Surinder; Triantaphyllidis, Costas; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Hatina, Jiři; Belledi, Michele; Di Rienzo, Anna; Oppenheim, Ariella; Nørby, Søren; Al-Zaheri, Nadia; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Scozzari, Rosaria; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2,804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans. PMID:11032788

  6. Investigation of rare and low-frequency variants using high-throughput sequencing with pooled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Skoog, Tiina; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Kaartokallio, Tea; Laivuori, Hannele; Grauers, Anna; Gerdhem, Paul; Hytönen, Marjo; Lohi, Hannes; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing using pooled DNA samples can facilitate genome-wide studies on rare and low-frequency variants in a large population. Some major questions concerning the pooling sequencing strategy are whether rare and low-frequency variants can be detected reliably, and whether estimated minor allele frequencies (MAFs) can represent the actual values obtained from individually genotyped samples. In this study, we evaluated MAF estimates using three variant detection tools with two sets of pooled whole exome sequencing (WES) and one set of pooled whole genome sequencing (WGS) data. Both GATK and Freebayes displayed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy when detecting rare or low-frequency variants. For the WGS study, 56% of the low-frequency variants in Illumina array have identical MAFs and 26% have one allele difference between sequencing and individual genotyping data. The MAF estimates from WGS correlated well (r = 0.94) with those from Illumina arrays. The MAFs from the pooled WES data also showed high concordance (r = 0.88) with those from the individual genotyping data. In conclusion, the MAFs estimated from pooled DNA sequencing data reflect the MAFs in individually genotyped samples well. The pooling strategy can thus be a rapid and cost-effective approach for the initial screening in large-scale association studies. PMID:27633116

  7. Design of DNA pooling to allow incorporation of covariates in rare variants analysis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weihua; Li, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in next-generation sequencing technologies facilitate genetic association studies of an increasingly wide array of rare variants. To capture the rare or less common variants, a large number of individuals will be needed. However, the cost of a large scale study using whole genome or exome sequencing is still high. DNA pooling can serve as a cost-effective approach, but with a potential limitation that the identity of individual genomes would be lost and therefore individual characteristics and environmental factors could not be adjusted in association analysis, which may result in power loss and a biased estimate of genetic effect. For case-control studies, we propose a design strategy for pool creation and an analysis strategy that allows covariate adjustment, using multiple imputation technique. Simulations show that our approach can obtain reasonable estimate for genotypic effect with only slight loss of power compared to the much more expensive approach of sequencing individual genomes. Our design and analysis strategies enable more powerful and cost-effective sequencing studies of complex diseases, while allowing incorporation of covariate adjustment.

  8. Admixture Aberration Analysis: Application to Mapping in Admixed Population Using Pooled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Geiger, Dan

    Admixture mapping is a gene mapping approach used for the identification of genomic regions harboring disease susceptibility genes in the case of recently admixed populations such as African Americans. We present a novel method for admixture mapping, called admixture aberration analysis (AAA), that uses a DNA pool of affected admixed individuals. We demonstrate through simulations that AAA is a powerful and economical mapping method under a range of scenarios, capturing complex human diseases such as hypertension and end stage kidney disease. The method has a low false-positive rate and is robust to deviation from model assumptions. Finally, we apply AAA on 600 prostate cancer-affected African Americans, replicating a known risk locus. Simulation results indicate that the method can yield over 96% reduction in genotyping. Our method is implemented as a Java program called AAAmap and is freely available.

  9. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce T; Robinson, Joshua D; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam.

  10. Genome-wide copy number analysis using copy number inferring tool (CNIT) and DNA pooling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-hsing; Huang, Mei-chu; Li, Ling-hui; Wu, Jer-yuarn; Chen, Yuan-tsong; Fann, Cathy S J

    2008-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has become an important genomic structure element in the human population, and some CNVs are related to specific traits and diseases. Moreover, analysis of human genomes has been potentiated by the use of high-resolution microarrays that assess single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Although many programs have been designed to analyze data from Affymetrix SNP microarrays, they all have high false-positive rates (FPRs) in copy number (CN) analyses. Copy number analysis tool (CNAT) 4.0 is a recently developed program that offers improved CN estimation, but small amplifications and deletions are lost when using the smoothing procedure. Here, we propose a copy number inferring tool (CNIT) algorithm for the 100K SNP microarray to investigate CNVs at 29.6-kb resolution. CNIT estimated SNP allelic and total CN with reliable P values based on intensity data. In addition, the hidden Markov model (HMM) method was applied to predict regions having altered CN by considering contiguous SNPs. Based on a CN analysis of 23 unrelated Taiwanese and 30 HapMap Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) trios, CNIT showed higher accuracy and power than other programs. The FPRs and false-negative rates (FNRs) of CNIT were 0.1% and 0.16%, respectively. CNIT also showed better sensitivity for detecting small amplifications and deletions. Furthermore, DNA pooling of 10 and 30 normal unrelated individuals were applied to the 100K SNP microarray, respectively, and 12 common CN-variable regions were identified, suggesting that DNA pooling can be applied to discover common CNVs.

  11. Whole-genome resequencing of 100 healthy individuals using DNA pooling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobin; Sui, Weiguo; Wu, Weiqing; Hou, Xianliang; Ou, Minglin; Xiang, Yueying; Dai, Yong

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of next-generation sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has significantly decreased. However, sequencing costs remain high for large-scale studies. In the present study, DNA pooling was applied as a cost-effective strategy for sequencing. The sequencing results for 100 healthy individuals obtained via whole-genome resequencing and using DNA pooling are presented in the present study. In order to minimise the likelihood of systematic bias in sampling, paired-end libraries with an insert size of 500 bp were prepared for all samples and then subjected to whole-genome sequencing using four lanes for each library and resulting in at least a 30-fold haploid coverage for each sample. The NCBI human genome build37 (hg19) was used as a reference genome for the present study and the short reads were aligned to the reference genome achieving 99.84% coverage. In addition, the average sequencing depth was 32.76. In total, ~3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, of which 99.88% were in the NCBI dbSNP database. Furthermore, ~600,000 small insertion/deletions, 500,000 structure variants, 5,000 copy number variations and 13,000 single nucleotide variants were identified. According to the present study, the whole genome has been sequenced for a small sample subjects from southern China for the first time. Furthermore, new variation sites were identified by comparing with the reference sequence, and new knowledge of the human genome variation was added to the human genomic databases. Furthermore, the particular distribution regions of variation were illustrated by analyzing various sites of variation, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:27882129

  12. Oligonucleotide Based Magnetic Bead Capture of Onchocerca volvulus DNA for PCR Pool Screening of Vector Black Flies

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Hemavathi; Hassan, Hassan K.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Toé, Laurent D.; Lustigman, Sara; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Entomological surveys of Simulium vectors are an important component in the criteria used to determine if Onchocerca volvulus transmission has been interrupted and if focal elimination of the parasite has been achieved. However, because infection in the vector population is quite rare in areas where control has succeeded, large numbers of flies need to be examined to certify transmission interruption. Currently, this is accomplished through PCR pool screening of large numbers of flies. The efficiency of this process is limited by the size of the pools that may be screened, which is in turn determined by the constraints imposed by the biochemistry of the assay. The current method of DNA purification from pools of vector black flies relies upon silica adsorption. This method can be applied to screen pools containing a maximum of 50 individuals (from the Latin American vectors) or 100 individuals (from the African vectors). Methodology/Principal Findings We have evaluated an alternative method of DNA purification for pool screening of black flies which relies upon oligonucleotide capture of Onchocerca volvulus genomic DNA from homogenates prepared from pools of Latin American and African vectors. The oligonucleotide capture assay was shown to reliably detect one O. volvulus infective larva in pools containing 200 African or Latin American flies, representing a two-four fold improvement over the conventional assay. The capture assay requires an equivalent amount of technical time to conduct as the conventional assay, resulting in a two-four fold reduction in labor costs per insect assayed and reduces reagent costs to $3.81 per pool of 200 flies, or less than $0.02 per insect assayed. Conclusions/Significance The oligonucleotide capture assay represents a substantial improvement in the procedure used to detect parasite prevalence in the vector population, a major metric employed in the process of certifying the elimination of onchocerciasis. PMID:22724041

  13. Dose-response effect of the lercanidipine/enalapril combination: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano

    2016-10-01

    The dose-effect relationship of fixed-dose combinations of anti-hypertensive drugs has been only poorly explored. This pooled analysis investigates the dose-response relationship of fixed-dose lercanidipine + enalapril in patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. This was an individual patient data analysis of four randomized studies (n = 2340). The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline in sitting diastolic blood pressure (SDBP). Secondary variables were change from baseline in sitting systolic BP (SSBP), proportion of responder patients, and safety. All fixed-dose combinations were superior to placebo in the reduction of SDBP. The greatest effect was observed with the market-available combination lercanidipine 20 mg/enalapril 20 mg (-15.3 mmHg vs. baseline; p < 0.05). The reduction in SDBP associated with the other two marketed fixed combinations of lercanidipine/enalapril were -10.7 mmHg for the 10 mg/20 mg combination and -9.8 mmHg for the 10 mg/10 mg combination (p < .05 for both comparisons). Similar findings were reported for SSBP reduction: the greatest effect was observed with lercanidipine 20 mg/enalapril 20 mg (-19.2 mmHg). The reduction in SSBP was -12.5 mmHg for the 10 mg/20 mg combination and -11.1 mmHg for the 10 mg/10 mg combination (p < .05 for all comparisons). The highest responder rate was reported with lercanidipine 20 mg/enalapril 20 mg (75.0%); this figure was 56.1% with the 10 mg/20 mg and 53.0% with the 10/10 mg combination. No safety concerns were reported. This pooled analysis of four randomized studies shows evidence of a dose-response effect in BP reduction with different fixed combinations of lercanidipine + enalapril. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis investigating the dose-response effect of a specific fixed-dose combination of anti-hypertensive agents. Further studies on this intriguing topic are however necessary.

  14. Combining of different data pools for calculating a reliable POD for real defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, Daniel; Müller, Christina; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-01

    Real defects are essential for the evaluation of the reliability of non destructive testing (NDT) methods, especially in relation to the integrity of components. But in most of the cases the amount of available real defects is not sufficient to evaluate the system. Model-assisted and transfer functions are one way to handle that challenge. This study is focused on a combination of different data pools to create a sufficient amount of data for the reliability estimation. A widespread approach for calculating the Probability of Detection (POD) was used on a radiographic testing (RT) method. The highest contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of each indication is usually selected as the signal in the "â vs. a" (signal-response) approach for RT. By combining real and artificial defects (flat bottom holes, side drill holes, flat bottom squares, notches, etc) in RT the highest signals are close to each other, but the process of creating and evaluating real defects is much more complex. The solution is seen in the combination of real and artificial data using a weighted least square approach. The weights for real or artificial data were based on the importance, the value and the different detection behavior of the different data. For comparison, the alternative combination through the Bayesian Updating was also applied. As verification, a data pool with a large amount of real data was available. In an advanced approach for evaluating the digital RT data, the size of the indication (perpendicular to the X-ray beam) was introduced as additional information. The signal now consists of the CNR and the area of the indication. The detectability is changing depending on the area of the indication, a fact that was ignored in the previous POD calculations for RT. This points out that a weighted least square approach to pool the data might no longer be adequate. The Bayesian Updating of the estimated parameters of the relationship between the signal field (the area of the indication) and

  15. Combining of different data pools for calculating a reliable POD for real defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzler, Daniel E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Müller, Christina E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-31

    Real defects are essential for the evaluation of the reliability of non destructive testing (NDT) methods, especially in relation to the integrity of components. But in most of the cases the amount of available real defects is not sufficient to evaluate the system. Model-assisted and transfer functions are one way to handle that challenge. This study is focused on a combination of different data pools to create a sufficient amount of data for the reliability estimation. A widespread approach for calculating the Probability of Detection (POD) was used on a radiographic testing (RT) method. The highest contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of each indication is usually selected as the signal in the 'â vs. a' (signal-response) approach for RT. By combining real and artificial defects (flat bottom holes, side drill holes, flat bottom squares, notches, etc) in RT the highest signals are close to each other, but the process of creating and evaluating real defects is much more complex. The solution is seen in the combination of real and artificial data using a weighted least square approach. The weights for real or artificial data were based on the importance, the value and the different detection behavior of the different data. For comparison, the alternative combination through the Bayesian Updating was also applied. As verification, a data pool with a large amount of real data was available. In an advanced approach for evaluating the digital RT data, the size of the indication (perpendicular to the X-ray beam) was introduced as additional information. The signal now consists of the CNR and the area of the indication. The detectability is changing depending on the area of the indication, a fact that was ignored in the previous POD calculations for RT. This points out that a weighted least square approach to pool the data might no longer be adequate. The Bayesian Updating of the estimated parameters of the relationship between the signal field (the area of the indication) and

  16. Impact of combining chlorine dioxide and chlorine on DBP formation in simulated indoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyun; Ates, Nuray; Kaplan Bekaroglu, Sehnaz Sule; Selbes, Meric; Karanfil, Tanju

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the combined use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and chlorine (Cl2) on the speciation and kinetics of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in swimming pools using synthetic pool waters prepared with a body fluid analog (BFA) and/or fresh natural water. At 1:25 (mass ratio) of ClO2 to Cl2, there was no significant reduction in the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) for both BFA solution and natural water compared to the application of Cl2 alone. When the mass ratio of ClO2 to Cl2 increased to 1:1, substantial decreases in both THMs and HAAs were observed in the natural water, while there was almost no change of DBP formations in the BFA solution. Haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes levels in both water matrices remained similar. In the presence of bromide, the overall DBP formation increased in both BFA solution and natural water. For the DBP formation kinetics, after 72hr of contact time, very low formation of THMs and HAAs was observed for the use of ClO2 only. Compared to Cl2 control, however, applying the 1:1 mixture of ClO2/Cl2 reduced THMs by >60% and HAAs by >50%. Chlorite was maintained below 1.0mg/L, while the formation of chlorate significantly increased over the reaction time. Finally, in a bench-scale indoor pool experiment, applying ClO2 and Cl2 simultaneously produced less THMs compared to Cl2 control and kept chlorite at <0.4mg/L, while HAAs and chlorate accumulated over 4-week operation period. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Disinfection of herbal spa pool using combined chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in public spa pools poses a serious threat to human health. The problem is particularly acute in herbal spas, in which the herbs and microorganisms may interact and produce undesirable consequences. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effectiveness of a combined disinfectant containing chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in improving the water quality of a public herbal spa in Taiwan. Water samples were collected from the spa pool and laboratory tests were then performed to measure the variation over time of the microorganism content (total CFU and total coliforms) and residual disinfectant content given a single disinfection mode (SDM) with disinfectant concentrations of 5.2 × 10, 6.29 × 10, 7.4 × 10, and 11.4 × 10(-5) N, respectively. Utilizing the experience gained from the laboratory tests, a further series of on-site investigations was performed using three different disinfection modes, namely SDM, 3DM (once every 3 h disinfection mode), and 2DM (once every 2 h disinfection mode). The laboratory results showed that for all four disinfectant concentrations, the CFU concentration reduced for the first 6 h following SDM treatment, but then increased. Moreover, the ANOVA results showed that the sample treated with the highest disinfectant concentration (11.4 × 10(-5) N) exhibited the lowest rate of increase in the CFU concentration. In addition, the on-site test results showed that 3DM and 2DM treatments with disinfectant concentrations in excess of 9.3 × 10 and 5.5 × 10(-5) N, respectively, provided an effective reduction in the total CFU concentration. In conclusion, the experimental results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for spa businesses seeking to improve the water quality of their spa pools.

  18. Sequencing of Pooled DNA Samples (Pool-Seq) Uncovers Complex Dynamics of Transposable Element Insertions in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schlötterer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile genetic elements that parasitize genomes by semi-autonomously increasing their own copy number within the host genome. While TEs are important for genome evolution, appropriate methods for performing unbiased genome-wide surveys of TE variation in natural populations have been lacking. Here, we describe a novel and cost-effective approach for estimating population frequencies of TE insertions using paired-end Illumina reads from a pooled population sample. Importantly, the method treats insertions present in and absent from the reference genome identically, allowing unbiased TE population frequency estimates. We apply this method to data from a natural Drosophila melanogaster population from Portugal. Consistent with previous reports, we show that low recombining genomic regions harbor more TE insertions and maintain insertions at higher frequencies than do high recombining regions. We conservatively estimate that there are almost twice as many “novel” TE insertion sites as sites known from the reference sequence in our population sample (6,824 novel versus 3,639 reference sites, with on average a 31-fold coverage per insertion site). Different families of transposable elements show large differences in their insertion densities and population frequencies. Our analyses suggest that the history of TE activity significantly contributes to this pattern, with recently active families segregating at lower frequencies than those active in the more distant past. Finally, using our high-resolution TE abundance measurements, we identified 13 candidate positively selected TE insertions based on their high population frequencies and on low Tajima's D values in their neighborhoods. PMID:22291611

  19. Tagging the signatures of domestication in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by means of pooled DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Papa, Roberto; Bellucci, Elisa; Rossi, Monica; Leonardi, Stefano; Rau, Domenico; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Attene, Giovanna

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to use an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based, large-scale screening of the whole genome of Phaseolus vulgaris to determine the effects of selection on the structure of the genetic diversity in wild and domesticated populations. Using pooled DNA samples, seven each of wild and domesticated populations of P. vulgaris were studied using 2506 AFLP markers (on average, one every 250 kb). About 10 % of the markers were also analysed on individual genotypes and were used to infer allelic frequencies empirically from bulk data. In both data sets, tests were made to determine the departure from neutral expectation for each marker using an F(ST)-based method. The most important outcome is that a large fraction of the genome of the common bean (16 %; P < 0.01) appears to have been subjected to effects of selection during domestication. Markers obtained in individual genotypes were also mapped and classified according to their proximities to known genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of the domestication syndrome. Most of the markers that were found to be potentially under the effects of selection were located in the proximity of previously mapped genes and QTLs related to the domestication syndrome. Overall, the results indicate that in P. vulgaris a large portion of the genome appears to have been subjected to the effects of selection, probably because of linkage to the loci selected during domestication. As most of the markers that are under the effects of selection are linked to known loci related to the domestication syndrome, it is concluded that population genomics approaches are very efficient in detecting QTLs. A method based on bulk DNA samples is presented that is effective in pre-screening for a large number of markers to determine selection signatures.

  20. Pooled DNA resequencing of 68 myocardial infarction candidate genes in French canadians.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Mélissa; Lo, Ken Sin; N'Diaye, Amidou; Rivas, Manuel A; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Laplante, Nathalie; Phillips, Michael S; Rioux, John D; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lettre, Guillaume

    2012-10-01

    Familial history is a strong risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD), especially for early-onset myocardial infarction (MI). Several genes and chromosomal regions have been implicated in the genetic cause of coronary artery disease/MI, mostly through the discovery of familial mutations implicated in hyper-/hypocholesterolemia by linkage studies and single nucleotide polymorphisms by genome-wide association studies. Except for a few examples (eg, PCSK9), the role of low-frequency genetic variation (minor allele frequency [MAF]) ≈0.1%-5% on MI/coronary artery disease predisposition has not been extensively investigated. We selected 68 candidate genes and sequenced their exons (394 kb) in 500 early-onset MI cases and 500 matched controls, all of French-Canadian ancestry, using solution-based capture in pools of nonindexed DNA samples. In these regions, we identified 1852 single nucleotide variants (695 novel) and captured 85% of the variants with MAF≥1% found by the 1000 Genomes Project in Europe-ancestry individuals. Using gene-based association testing, we prioritized for follow-up 29 low-frequency variants in 8 genes and attempted to genotype them for replication in 1594 MI cases and 2988 controls from 2 French-Canadian panels. Our pilot association analysis of low-frequency variants in 68 candidate genes did not identify genes with large effect on MI risk in French Canadians. We have optimized a strategy, applicable to all complex diseases and traits, to discover efficiently and cost-effectively DNA sequence variants in large populations. Resequencing endeavors to find low-frequency variants implicated in common human diseases are likely to require very large sample size.

  1. A simple method for analyzing microsatellite allele image patterns generated from DNA pools and its application to allelic association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, J; Holmans, P; Williams, N; Turic, D; McGuffin, P; Plomin, R; Owen, M J

    1998-01-01

    Allelic association studies provide the most powerful method for locating genes of small effect contributing to complex diseases and traits. However, in outbred populations, allelic association is usually maintained only over distances of <=1 cM. Therefore, systematic searches over large regions are costly. Here we present a method involving DNA pooling that can be used as a rapid preliminary screen for allelic association with the most common class of polymorphic markers, single-sequence repeats. Patient and control samples are pooled separately, and markers are typed in the two pools. By use of primers with fluorescent 5' ends, PCR products can be analyzed on an automated sequencing apparatus. Allele image patterns (AIPs) produced for the two groups are overlaid and differences in pattern area between pools computed. From this, a DeltaAIP statistic is calculated from the difference in areas between the two AIPs expressed as a fraction of the total shared and nonshared area. AIPs of a range of different-sized pools were generated by computer simulation for markers with a range of allele sizes and frequencies. DeltaAIPs from pools and chi2 values for individual genotypings were compared, with both simulated and real data from microsatellite markers. The results demonstrated a high correlation between DeltaAIP and chi2 values. DeltaAIP analysis of real microsatellite data indicated the feasibility of using this method in systematic searches for allelic association and generated a small number of false positives but few false negatives. We conclude that DeltaAIP analysis of DNA pools can be used effectively and efficiently as a rapid screen for allelic association in case-control studies. PMID:9545387

  2. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals.

  3. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  4. Bulk de novo mitogenome assembly from pooled total DNA elucidates the phylogeny of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea).

    PubMed

    Gillett, Conrad P D T; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Jordal, Bjarte H; Emerson, Brent C; Vogler, Alfried P

    2014-08-01

    Complete mitochondrial genomes have been shown to be reliable markers for phylogeny reconstruction among diverse animal groups. However, the relative difficulty and high cost associated with obtaining de novo full mitogenomes have frequently led to conspicuously low taxon sampling in ensuing studies. Here, we report the successful use of an economical and accessible method for assembling complete or near-complete mitogenomes through shot-gun next-generation sequencing of a single library made from pooled total DNA extracts of numerous target species. To avoid the use of separate indexed libraries for each specimen, and an associated increase in cost, we incorporate standard polymerase chain reaction-based "bait" sequences to identify the assembled mitogenomes. The method was applied to study the higher level phylogenetic relationships in the weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea), producing 92 newly assembled mitogenomes obtained in a single Illumina MiSeq run. The analysis supported a separate origin of wood-boring behavior by the subfamilies Scolytinae, Platypodinae, and Cossoninae. This finding contradicts morphological hypotheses proposing a close relationship between the first two of these but is congruent with previous molecular studies, reinforcing the utility of mitogenomes in phylogeny reconstruction. Our methodology provides a technically simple procedure for generating densely sampled trees from whole mitogenomes and is widely applicable to groups of animals for which bait sequences are the only required prior genome knowledge. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Power analysis of QTL detection in half-sib families using selective DNA pooling.

    PubMed

    Baro JA; Carleos, C; Corral, N; López, T; Cañón, J

    2001-01-01

    Individual loci of economic importance (QTL) can be detected by comparing the inheritance of a trait and the inheritance of loci with alleles readily identifiable by laboratory methods (genetic markers). Data on allele segregation at the individual level are costly and alternatives have been proposed that make use of allele frequencies among progeny, rather than individual genotypes. Among the factors that may affect the power of the set up, the most important are those intrinsic to the QTL: the additive effect of the QTL, and its dominance, and distance between markers and QTL. Other factors are relative to the choice of animals and markers, such as the frequency of the QTL and marker alleles among dams and sires. Data collection may affect the detection power through the size of half-sib families, selection rate within families, and the technical error incurred when estimating genetic frequencies. We present results for a sensitivity analysis for QTL detection using pools of DNA from selected half-sibs. Simulations showed that conclusive detection may be achieved with families of at least 500 half-sibs if sires are chosen on the criteria that most of their marker alleles are either both missing, or one is fixed, among dams.

  6. Clines of nuclear DNA markers suggest a largely neolithic ancestry of the European gene pool.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, L; Destro-Bisol, G; Bertorelle, G; Pascali, V; Barbujani, G

    1998-07-21

    Comparisons between archaeological findings and allele frequencies at protein loci suggest that most genes of current Europeans descend from populations that have been expanding in Europe in the last 10, 000 years, in the Neolithic period. Recent mitochondrial data have been interpreted as indicating a much older, Paleolithic ancestry. In a spatial autocorrelation study at seven hypervariable loci in Europe (four microsatellites, two larger, tandem-repeat loci, and a sequence polymorphism) broad clinal patterns of DNA variation were recognized. The observed clines closely match those described at the protein level, in agreement with a possible Near Eastern origin for the ancestral population. Separation times between populations were estimated on the basis of a stepwise mutation model. Even assuming low mutation rates and long generation times, we found no evidence for population splits older than 10,000 years, with the predictable exception of Saami (Lapps). The simplest interpretation of these results is that the current nuclear gene pool largely reflects the westward and northward expansion of a Neolithic group. This conclusion is now supported by purely genetic evidence on the levels and patterns of microsatellite diversity, rather than by correlations of biological and nonbiological data. We argue that many mitochondrial lineages whose origin has been traced back to the Paleolithic period probably reached Europe at a later time.

  7. Power analysis of QTL detection in half-sib families using selective DNA pooling

    PubMed Central

    Baro, Jesús Á; Carleos, Carlos; Corral, Norberto; López, Teresa; Cañón, Javier

    2001-01-01

    Individual loci of economic importance (QTL) can be detected by comparing the inheritance of a trait and the inheritance of loci with alleles readily identifiable by laboratory methods (genetic markers). Data on allele segregation at the individual level are costly and alternatives have been proposed that make use of allele frequencies among progeny, rather than individual genotypes. Among the factors that may affect the power of the set up, the most important are those intrinsic to the QTL: the additive effect of the QTL, and its dominance, and distance between markers and QTL. Other factors are relative to the choice of animals and markers, such as the frequency of the QTL and marker alleles among dams and sires. Data collection may affect the detection power through the size of half-sib families, selection rate within families, and the technical error incurred when estimating genetic frequencies. We present results for a sensitivity analysis for QTL detection using pools of DNA from selected half-sibs. Simulations showed that conclusive detection may be achieved with families of at least 500 half-sibs if sires are chosen on the criteria that most of their marker alleles are either both missing, or one is fixed, among dams. PMID:11403746

  8. Bulk De Novo Mitogenome Assembly from Pooled Total DNA Elucidates the Phylogeny of Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Conrad P.D.T.; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Timmermans, Martijn J.T.N.; Jordal, Bjarte H.; Emerson, Brent C.; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2014-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial genomes have been shown to be reliable markers for phylogeny reconstruction among diverse animal groups. However, the relative difficulty and high cost associated with obtaining de novo full mitogenomes have frequently led to conspicuously low taxon sampling in ensuing studies. Here, we report the successful use of an economical and accessible method for assembling complete or near-complete mitogenomes through shot-gun next-generation sequencing of a single library made from pooled total DNA extracts of numerous target species. To avoid the use of separate indexed libraries for each specimen, and an associated increase in cost, we incorporate standard polymerase chain reaction-based “bait” sequences to identify the assembled mitogenomes. The method was applied to study the higher level phylogenetic relationships in the weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea), producing 92 newly assembled mitogenomes obtained in a single Illumina MiSeq run. The analysis supported a separate origin of wood-boring behavior by the subfamilies Scolytinae, Platypodinae, and Cossoninae. This finding contradicts morphological hypotheses proposing a close relationship between the first two of these but is congruent with previous molecular studies, reinforcing the utility of mitogenomes in phylogeny reconstruction. Our methodology provides a technically simple procedure for generating densely sampled trees from whole mitogenomes and is widely applicable to groups of animals for which bait sequences are the only required prior genome knowledge. PMID:24803639

  9. Combined UV treatment and ozonation for the removal of by-product precursors in swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Waqas A; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2017-03-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. UV treatment is the most common approach, as it is particularly efficient at removing combined chlorine. However, the UV treatment of pool water increases chlorine reactivity and the formation of chloro-organic DBPs such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine, we hypothesised that the created reactivity to chlorine, as a result of the UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in swimming pool water, might also be expressed as increased reactivity to ozone. Moreover, ozonation might saturate the chlorine reactivity created by UV treatment and mitigate increased formation of a range of volatile DBPs. We found that UV treatment makes pool water highly reactive to ozone. The subsequent reactivity to chlorine decreases with increasing ozone dosage prior to contact with chlorine. Furthermore, ozone had a half-life of 5 min in non-UV treated pool water whereas complete consumption of ozone was obtained in less than 2 min in UV treated pool water. The ozonation of UV-treated pool water induced the formation of some DBPs that are not commonly reported in this medium, in particular trichloronitromethane, which is noteworthy for its genotoxicity, though this issue was removed by UV treatment when repeated combined UV/ozone treatment interchanging with chlorination was conducted over a 24-h period. The discovered reaction could form the basis for a new treatment method for swimming pools. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Singular and combined effects of blowdown, salvage logging, and wildfire on forest floor and soil mercury pools.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Carl P J; Kolka, Randall K; Fraver, Shawn

    2012-08-07

    A number of factors influence the amount of mercury (Hg) in forest floors and soils, including deposition, volatile emission, leaching, and disturbances such as fire. Currently the impact on soil Hg pools from other widespread forest disturbances such as blowdown and management practices like salvage logging are unknown. Moreover, ecological and biogeochemical responses to disturbances are generally investigated within a single-disturbance context, with little currently known about the impact of multiple disturbances occurring in rapid succession. In this study we capitalize on a combination of blowdown, salvage logging and fire events in the sub-boreal region of northern Minnesota to assess both the singular and combined effects of these disturbances on forest floor and soil total Hg concentrations and pools. Although none of the disturbance combinations affected Hg in mineral soil, we did observe significant effects on both Hg concentrations and pools in the forest floor. Blowdown increased the mean Hg pool in the forest floor by 0.76 mg Hg m(-2) (223%). Salvage logging following blowdown created conditions leading to a significantly more severe forest floor burn during wildfire, which significantly enhanced Hg emission. This sequence of combined events resulted in a mean loss of approximately 0.42 mg Hg m(-2) (68% of pool) from the forest floor, after conservatively accounting for potential losses via enhanced soil leaching and volatile emissions between the disturbance and sampling dates. Fire alone or blowdown followed by fire did not significantly affect the total Hg concentrations or pools in the forest floor. Overall, unexpected consequences for soil Hg accumulation and by extension, atmospheric Hg emission and risk to aquatic biota, may result when combined impacts are considered in addition to singular forest floor and soil disturbances.

  11. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  12. Numerical analysis of intensity signals resulting from genotyping pooled DNA samples in beef cattle and broiler chicken.

    PubMed

    Reverter, A; Henshall, J M; McCulloch, R; Sasazaki, S; Hawken, R; Lehnert, S A

    2014-05-01

    Pooled genomic DNA has been proposed as a cost-effective approach in genomewide association studies (GWAS). However, algorithms for genotype calling of biallelic SNP are not adequate with pooled DNA samples because they assume the presence of 2 fluorescent signals, 1 for each allele, and operate under the expectation that at most 2 copies of the variant allele can be found for any given SNP and DNA sample. We adapt analytical methodology from 2-channel gene expression microarray technology to SNP genotyping of pooled DNA samples. Using 5 datasets from beef cattle and broiler chicken of varying degrees of complexity in terms of design and phenotype, continuous and dichotomous, we show that both differential hybridization (M = green minus red intensity signal) and abundance (A = average of red and green intensities) provide useful information in the prediction of SNP allele frequencies. This is predominantly true when making inference about extreme SNP that are either nearly fixed or highly polymorphic. We propose the use of model-based clustering via mixtures of bivariate normal distributions as an optimal framework to capture the relationship between hybridization intensity and allele frequency from pooled DNA samples. The range of M and A values observed here are in agreement with those reported within the context of gene expression microarray and also with those from SNP array data within the context of analytical methodology for the identification of copy number variants. In particular, we confirm that highly polymorphic SNP yield a strong signal from both channels (red and green) while lowly or nonpolymorphic SNP yield a strong signal from 1 channel only. We further confirm that when the SNP allele frequencies are known, either because the individuals in the pools or from a closely related population are themselves genotyped, a multiple regression model with linear and quadratic components can be developed with high prediction accuracy. We conclude that when

  13. A genome-wide association study of essential hypertension in an Australian population using a DNA pooling approach.

    PubMed

    Fowdar, Javed Y; Grealy, Rebecca; Lu, Yi; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in detecting genetic loci involved in complex traits, few susceptibility genes have been detected for essential hypertension (EH). We aimed to use pooled DNA GWAS approach to identify and validate novel genomic loci underlying EH susceptibility in an Australian case-control population. Blood samples and questionnaires detailing medical history, blood pressure, and prescribed medications were collected for 409 hypertensives and 409 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched normotensive controls. Case and control DNA were pooled in quadruplicate and hybridized to Illumina 1 M-Duo arrays. Allele frequencies agreed with those reported in reference data and known EH association signals were represented in the top-ranked SNPs more frequently than expected by chance. Validation showed that pooled DNA GWAS gave reliable estimates of case and control allele frequencies. Although no markers reached Bonferroni-corrected genome-wide significance levels (5.0 × 10(-8)), the top marker rs34870220 near ASGR1 approached significance (p = 4.32 × 10(-7)), as did several candidate loci (p < 1 × 10(-6)) on chromosomes 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 17. Four markers (located in or near genes NHSL1, NKFB1, GLI2, and LRRC10) from the top ten ranked SNPs were individually genotyped in pool samples and were tested for association between cases and controls using the χ (2) test. Of these, rs1599961 (NFKB1) and rs12711538 (GLI2) showed significant difference between cases and controls (p < 0.01). Additionally, four top-ranking markers within NFKB1 were found to be in LD, suggesting a single strong association signal for this gene.

  14. DNA Profiling of Convicted Offender Samples for the Combined DNA Index System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    The cornerstone of forensic chemistry is that a perpetrator inevitably leaves trace evidence at a crime scene. One important type of evidence is DNA, which has been instrumental in both the implication and exoneration of thousands of suspects in a wide range of crimes. The Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a network of DNA databases, provides…

  15. DNA Profiling of Convicted Offender Samples for the Combined DNA Index System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    The cornerstone of forensic chemistry is that a perpetrator inevitably leaves trace evidence at a crime scene. One important type of evidence is DNA, which has been instrumental in both the implication and exoneration of thousands of suspects in a wide range of crimes. The Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a network of DNA databases, provides…

  16. The blue man: burn from muriatic acid combined with chlorinated paint in an adult pool construction worker.

    PubMed

    O'Cleireachain, Marc R; Macias, Luis H; Richey, Karen J; Pressman, Melissa A; Shirah, Gina R; Caruso, Daniel M; Foster, Kevin N; Matthews, Marc R

    2014-01-01

    Muriatic acid (hydrochloric acid), a common cleaning and resurfacing agent for concrete pools, can cause significant burn injuries. When coating a pool with chlorinated rubber-based paint, the pool surface is initially cleansed using 31.45% muriatic acid. Here we report a 50-year-old Hispanic male pool worker who, during the process of a pool resurfacing, experienced significant contact exposure to a combination of muriatic acid and blue chlorinated rubber-based paint. Confounding the clinical situation was the inability to efficiently remove the chemical secondary to the rubber-based nature of the paint. Additionally, vigorous attempts were made to remove the rubber paint using a variety of agents, including bacitracin, chlorhexidine soap, GOOP adhesive, and Johnson's baby oil. Resultant injuries were devastating fourth-degree burns requiring an immediate operative excision and amputation. Despite aggressive operative intervention and resuscitation, he continued to have severe metabolic derangements and ultimately succumbed to his injuries. We present our attempts at debridement and the system in place to manage patients with complex chemical burns.

  17. Sequence evaluation of four pooled-tissue normalized bovine cDNA libraries and construction of a gene index for cattle.

    PubMed

    Smith, T P; Grosse, W M; Freking, B A; Roberts, A J; Stone, R T; Casas, E; Wray, J E; White, J; Cho, J; Fahrenkrug, S C; Bennett, G L; Heaton, M P; Laegreid, W W; Rohrer, G A; Chitko-McKown, C G; Pertea, G; Holt, I; Karamycheva, S; Liang, F; Quackenbush, J; Keele, J W

    2001-04-01

    An essential component of functional genomics studies is the sequence of DNA expressed in tissues of interest. To provide a resource of bovine-specific expressed sequence data and facilitate this powerful approach in cattle research, four normalized cDNA libraries were produced and arrayed for high-throughput sequencing. The libraries were made with RNA pooled from multiple tissues to increase efficiency of normalization and maximize the number of independent genes for which sequence data were obtained. Target tissues included those with highest likelihood to have impact on production parameters of animal health, growth, reproductive efficiency, and carcass merit. Success of normalization and inter- and intralibrary redundancy were assessed by collecting 6000-23,000 sequences from each of the libraries (68,520 total sequences deposited in GenBank). Sequence comparison and assembly of these sequences was performed in combination with 56,500 other bovine EST sequences present in the GenBank dbEST database to construct a cattle Gene Index (available from The Institute for Genomic Research at http://www.tigr.org/tdb/tgi.shtml). The 124,381 bovine ESTs present in GenBank at the time of the analysis form 16,740 assemblies that are listed and annotated on the Web site. Analysis of individual library sequence data indicates that the pooled-tissue approach was highly effective in preparing libraries for efficient deep sequencing.

  18. Two Distinct Cdc2 Pools Regulate Cell Cycle Progression and the DNA Damage Response in the Fission Yeast S.pombe.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Thomas; Hilditch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The activity of Cdc2 (CDK1) kinase, which coordinates cell cycle progression and DNA break repair, is blocked upon its phosphorylation at tyrosine 15 (Y15) by Wee1 kinase in the presence of DNA damage. How Cdc2 can support DNA repair whilst being inactivated by the DNA damage checkpoint remains to be explained. Human CDK1 is phosphorylated by Myt1 kinase at threonine 14 (T14) close to its ATP binding site before being modified at threonine 161 (T167Sp) in its T-loop by the CDK-activating kinase (CAK). While modification of T161 promotes association with the cyclin partner, phosphorylation of T14 inhibits the CDK1-cyclin complex. This inhibition is further enforced by the modification of Y15 by Wee1 in the presence of DNA lesions. In S.pombe, the dominant inhibition of Cdc2 is provided by the phosphorylation of Y15 and only a small amount of Cdc2 is modified at T14 when cells are in S phase. Unlike human cells, both inhibitory modifications are executed by Wee1. Using the novel IEFPT technology, which combines isoelectric focusing (IEF) with Phos-tag SDS electrophoresis (PT), we report here that S.pombe Cdc2 kinase exists in seven forms. While five forms are phosphorylated, two species are not. Four phospho-forms associate with cyclin B (Cdc13) of which only two are modified at Y15 by Wee1. Interestingly, only one Y15-modified species carries also the T14 modification. The fifth phospho-form has a low affinity for cyclin B and is neither Y15 nor T14 modified. The two unphosphorylated forms may contribute directly to the DNA damage response as only they associate with the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Chk1. Interestingly, cyclin B is also present in the unphosphorylated pool. We also show that the G146D mutation in Cdc2.1w, which renders Cdc2 insensitive to Wee1 inhibition, is aberrantly modified in a Wee1-dependent manner. In conclusion, our work adds support to the idea that two distinct Cdc2 pools regulate cell cycle progression and the response to DNA damage.

  19. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  20. Uniparental Genetic Heritage of Belarusians: Encounter of Rare Middle Eastern Matrilineages with a Central European Mitochondrial DNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Kushniarevich, Alena; Sivitskaya, Larysa; Danilenko, Nina; Novogrodskii, Tadeush; Tsybovsky, Iosif; Kiseleva, Anna; Kotova, Svetlana; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Metspalu, Ene; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Reidla, Maere; Rootsi, Siiri; Parik, Jüri; Reisberg, Tuuli; Achilli, Alessandro; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Gandini, Francesca; Olivieri, Anna; Behar, Doron M.; Torroni, Antonio; Davydenko, Oleg; Villems, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Ethnic Belarusians make up more than 80% of the nine and half million people inhabiting the Republic of Belarus. Belarusians together with Ukrainians and Russians represent the East Slavic linguistic group, largest both in numbers and territory, inhabiting East Europe alongside Baltic-, Finno-Permic- and Turkic-speaking people. Till date, only a limited number of low resolution genetic studies have been performed on this population. Therefore, with the phylogeographic analysis of 565 Y-chromosomes and 267 mitochondrial DNAs from six well covered geographic sub-regions of Belarus we strove to complement the existing genetic profile of eastern Europeans. Our results reveal that around 80% of the paternal Belarusian gene pool is composed of R1a, I2a and N1c Y-chromosome haplogroups – a profile which is very similar to the two other eastern European populations – Ukrainians and Russians. The maternal Belarusian gene pool encompasses a full range of West Eurasian haplogroups and agrees well with the genetic structure of central-east European populations. Our data attest that latitudinal gradients characterize the variation of the uniparentally transmitted gene pools of modern Belarusians. In particular, the Y-chromosome reflects movements of people in central-east Europe, starting probably as early as the beginning of the Holocene. Furthermore, the matrilineal legacy of Belarusians retains two rare mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, N1a3 and N3, whose phylogeographies were explored in detail after de novo sequencing of 20 and 13 complete mitogenomes, respectively, from all over Eurasia. Our phylogeographic analyses reveal that two mitochondrial DNA lineages, N3 and N1a3, both of Middle Eastern origin, might mark distinct events of matrilineal gene flow to Europe: during the mid-Holocene period and around the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, respectively. PMID:23785503

  1. Comparison of genotyping using pooled DNA samples (allelotyping) and individual genotyping using the affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Ernst, Florian D; Wiechert, Anja; Uhr, Katharina; Nauck, Matthias; Petersmann, Astrid; Völzke, Henry; Völker, Uwe; Homuth, Georg

    2013-07-26

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using array-based genotyping technology are widely used to identify genetic loci associated with complex diseases or other phenotypes. The costs of GWAS projects based on individual genotyping are still comparatively high and increase with the size of study populations. Genotyping using pooled DNA samples, as also being referred as to allelotyping approach, offers an alternative at affordable costs. In the present study, data from 100 DNA samples individually genotyped with the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 were used to estimate the error of the pooling approach by comparing the results with those obtained using the same array type but DNA pools each composed of 50 of the same samples. Newly developed and established methods for signal intensity correction were applied. Furthermore, the relative allele intensity signals (RAS) obtained by allelotyping were compared to the corresponding values derived from individual genotyping. Similarly, differences in RAS values between pools were determined and compared. Regardless of the intensity correction method applied, the pooling-specific error of the pool intensity values was larger for single pools than for the comparison of the intensity values of two pools, which reflects the scenario of a case-control study. Using 50 pooled samples and analyzing 10,000 SNPs with a minor allele frequency of >1% and applying the best correction method for the corresponding type of comparison, the 90% quantile (median) of the pooling-specific absolute error of the RAS values for single sub-pools and the SNP-specific difference in allele frequency comparing two pools was 0.064 (0.026) and 0.056 (0.021), respectively. Correction of the RAS values reduced the error of the RAS values when analyzing single pool intensities. We developed a new correction method with high accuracy but low computational costs. Correction of RAS, however, only marginally reduced the error of true differences

  2. Design and Discovery of New Combinations of Mutant DNA Polymerases and Modified DNA Substrates.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Sydney L; Weiden, Aurora G; Lewis, Eliza L; Ogonowsky, Alexie L; Chia, Hannah E; Barrett, Susanna E; Liu, Mira D; Leconte, Aaron M

    2017-04-18

    Chemical modifications can enhance the properties of DNA by imparting nuclease resistance and generating more-diverse physical structures. However, native DNA polymerases generally cannot synthesize significant lengths of DNA with modified nucleotide triphosphates. Previous efforts have identified a mutant of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus DNA (SFM19) as capable of synthesizing a range of short, 2'-modified DNAs; however, it is limited in the length of the products it can synthesize. Here, we rationally designed and characterized ten mutants of SFM19. From this, we identified enzymes with substantially improved activity for the synthesis of 2'F-, 2'OH-, 2'OMe-, and 3'OMe-modified DNA as well as for reverse transcription of 2'OMe DNA. We also evaluated mutant DNA polymerases previously only tested for synthesis for 2'OMe DNA and showed that they are capable of an expanded range of modified DNA synthesis. This work significantly expands the known combinations of modified DNA and Taq DNA polymerase mutants. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Constructing a Multiplexed DNA Pattern by Combining Precise Magnetic Manipulation and DNA-Driven Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingwei; Cheng, Mengjiao; Wang, Yue; Shi, Feng

    2017-09-26

    There is an urgent demand to construct multiplexed biomolecular patterns to obtain more biological information from a single experiment. However, with only limited reports focusing on defective top-down approaches, challenges remain to develop a bottom-up strategy for multiplexed patterning. To this end, a novel strategy has been proposed to fabricate multiplexed DNA patterns via macroscopic assembly through combined precise magnetic manipulation and DNA hybridization-driven self-assembly. Therefore, a multiplexed DNA pattern composed of glass fibers loaded with multiple specific strands of DNA was constructed, and its potential application in simultaneous detection of multiplex target DNA was demonstrated. Moreover, the fabricated multiplexed DNA pattern shows an erasable behavior because the hybridized DNA can be disassembled by strand displacement.

  4. Factors affecting the onset of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis during wheat embryo germination. Study of the changes in DNA polymerases A, B and C and the pool of DNA precursors.

    PubMed

    Castroviejo, M; Tharaud, D; Mocquot, B; Litvak, S

    1979-07-01

    DNA synthesis starts about 12 h after water imbibition in wheat embryos. We have determined that noticeable amounts of labelled thymidine are found inside the embryo only after 6 hr of germination. DNA polymerase C from ungerminated wheat embryos decreased markedly in activity during the first hours of germination, whereas the activities of DNA polymerases A and B increased, having a maximum at about 15 h or germination. Serological evidence has suggested a clear antigenic relationship between DNA polymerases A and C. Although the pool of ATP increases rapidly after water imbibition, the increase in the pool of dNTP species was much slower.

  5. Probing DNA-DNA Interactions with a Combination of Quadruple-Trap Optical Tweezers and Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Ineke; King, Graeme A; Heller, Iddo; Biebricher, Andreas S; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2017-01-01

    DNA metabolism and DNA compaction in vivo involve frequent interactions of remote DNA segments, mediated by proteins. In order to gain insight into such interactions, quadruple-trap optical tweezers have been developed. This technique provides an unprecedented degree of control through the ability to independently manipulate two DNA molecules in three dimensions. In this way, discrete regions of different DNA molecules can be brought into contact with one another, with a well-defined spatial configuration. At the same time, the tension and extension of the DNA molecules can be monitored. Furthermore, combining quadruple-trap optical tweezers with microfluidics makes fast buffer exchange possible, which is important for in situ generation of the dual DNA-protein constructs needed for these kinds of experiments. In this way, processes such as protein-mediated inter-DNA bridging can be studied with unprecedented control. This chapter provides a step-by-step description of how to perform a dual DNA manipulation experiment using combined quadruple-trap optical tweezers and microfluidics.

  6. Genome-Wide Footprints of Pig Domestication and Selection Revealed through Massive Parallel Sequencing of Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Andreia J.; Ferretti, Luca; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A.; Nie, Haisheng; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastian E.; Perez-Enciso, Miguel; Schook, Lawrence B.; Groenen, Martien A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Artificial selection has caused rapid evolution in domesticated species. The identification of selection footprints across domesticated genomes can contribute to uncover the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity. Methodology/Main Findings Genome wide footprints of pig domestication and selection were identified using massive parallel sequencing of pooled reduced representation libraries (RRL) representing ∼2% of the genome from wild boar and four domestic pig breeds (Large White, Landrace, Duroc and Pietrain) which have been under strong selection for muscle development, growth, behavior and coat color. Using specifically developed statistical methods that account for DNA pooling, low mean sequencing depth, and sequencing errors, we provide genome-wide estimates of nucleotide diversity and genetic differentiation in pig. Widespread signals suggestive of positive and balancing selection were found and the strongest signals were observed in Pietrain, one of the breeds most intensively selected for muscle development. Most signals were population-specific but affected genomic regions which harbored genes for common biological categories including coat color, brain development, muscle development, growth, metabolism, olfaction and immunity. Genetic differentiation in regions harboring genes related to muscle development and growth was higher between breeds than between a given breed and the wild boar. Conclusions/Significance These results, suggest that although domesticated breeds have experienced similar selective pressures, selection has acted upon different genes. This might reflect the multiple domestication events of European breeds or could be the result of subsequent introgression of Asian alleles. Overall, it was estimated that approximately 7% of the porcine genome has been affected by selection events. This study illustrates that the massive parallel sequencing of genomic pools is a cost-effective approach to identify footprints of selection

  7. Determination of Compartmented Metabolite Pools by a Combination of Rapid Fractionation of Oat Mesophyll Protoplasts and Enzymic Cycling 1

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Rüdiger; Goller, Marion; Füllgraf, Helene

    1984-01-01

    In vivo pool sizes of a range of metabolites have been determined in subcellular fractions of darkened and illuminated mesophyll protoplasts of Avena sativa L. These estimations were made by combining a method of rapid protoplast fractionation with enzymic cycling techniques. Results are given for reduced and oxidized pyridine nucleotides, triose phosphates, 3-phosphoglycerate, inorganic phosphate, aspartate, malate, oxaloacetate, glutamate, 2-oxoglutarate, and citrate, from chloroplasts, mitochondria, and a fraction representing the remainder of the protoplast. The results indicate distinct differences of compartmented levels of certain metabolites between darkened and illuminated protoplasts. PMID:16663726

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of the Gomphales based on nuc-25S-rDNA, mit-12S-rDNA, and mit-atp6-DNA combined sequences

    Treesearch

    Admir J. Giachini; Kentaro Hosaka; Eduardo Nouhra; Joseph Spatafora; James M. Trappe

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Geastrales, Gomphales, Hysterangiales, and Phallales were estimated via combined sequences: nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (nuc-25S-rDNA), mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal DNA (mit-12S-rDNA), and mitochondrial atp6 DNA (mit-atp6-DNA). Eighty-one taxa comprising 19 genera and 58 species...

  9. DNA precursor pool: a significant target for N-methyl-N-nitrosourea in C3H/10T1/2 clone 8 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Topal, M D; Baker, M S

    1982-01-01

    Synchronized C3H/10T1/2 clone 8 cells were treated in vitro with a nontoxic dose of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea during their S phase. Chromatographic isolation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA precursor pool and measurement of the precursor content per cell showed that a nucleic acid residue in the precursor pool is 190-13,000 times more susceptible to methylation than a residue in the DNA duplex, depending on the site of methylation. This conclusion comes from measurements indicating that, for example, the N-1 position of adenine in dATP is 6.3 times more methylated than the same position in the DNA, even though the adenine content of the pool is only a fraction (0.0005) of the adenine content of the DNA helix. The comparative susceptibility between pool and DNA was found to vary with the site of methylation in the order the N-1 position of adenine greater than phosphate greater than the N-3 position of adenine greater than the O6 position of guanine greater than the N-7 position of guanine. The significance of these results for chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:6954535

  10. Quantitative trait locus mapping in chickens by selective DNA pooling with dinucleotide microsatellite markers by using purified DNA and fresh or frozen red blood cells as applied to marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, E; Fulton, J; Cheng, H; Yonash, N; Soller, M

    2002-03-01

    Many large, half-sib sire families are an integral component of chicken genetic improvement programs. These family structures include a sufficient number of individuals for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) at high statistical power. However, realizing this statistical power through individual or selective genotyping is yet too costly to be feasible under current genotyping methodologies. Genotyping costs can be greatly reduced through selective DNA pooling, involving densitometric estimates of marker allele frequencies in pooled DNA samples. When using dinucleotide microsatellite markers, however, such estimates are often confounded by overlapping "shadow" bands and can be confounded further by differential amplification of alleles. In the present study a shadow correction procedure provided accurate densitometric estimates of allele frequency for dinucleotide microsatellite markers in pools made from chicken purified DNA samples, fresh blood samples, and frozen-thawed blood samples. In a retrospective study, selective DNA pooling with thawed blood samples successfully identified two QTL previously shown by selective genotyping to affect resistance in chickens to Marek's disease. It is proposed that use of selective DNA pooling can provide relatively low-cost mapping and use in marker-assisted selection of QTL that affect production traits in chickens.

  11. Novel quantitative real-time LCR for the sensitive detection of SNP frequencies in pooled DNA: method development, evaluation and application.

    PubMed

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos; Banos, Georgios

    2011-01-19

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have proven to be powerful genetic markers for genetic applications in medicine, life science and agriculture. A variety of methods exist for SNP detection but few can quantify SNP frequencies when the mutated DNA molecules correspond to a small fraction of the wild-type DNA. Furthermore, there is no generally accepted gold standard for SNP quantification, and, in general, currently applied methods give inconsistent results in selected cohorts. In the present study we sought to develop a novel method for accurate detection and quantification of SNP in DNA pooled samples. The development and evaluation of a novel Ligase Chain Reaction (LCR) protocol that uses a DNA-specific fluorescent dye to allow quantitative real-time analysis is described. Different reaction components and thermocycling parameters affecting the efficiency and specificity of LCR were examined. Several protocols, including gap-LCR modifications, were evaluated using plasmid standard and genomic DNA pools. A protocol of choice was identified and applied for the quantification of a polymorphism at codon 136 of the ovine PRNP gene that is associated with susceptibility to a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep. The real-time LCR protocol developed in the present study showed high sensitivity, accuracy, reproducibility and a wide dynamic range of SNP quantification in different DNA pools. The limits of detection and quantification of SNP frequencies were 0.085% and 0.35%, respectively. The proposed real-time LCR protocol is applicable when sensitive detection and accurate quantification of low copy number mutations in DNA pools is needed. Examples include oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, infectious diseases, pathogenic bacteria, fungal species, viral mutants, drug resistance resulting from point mutations, and genetically modified organisms in food.

  12. Novel Quantitative Real-Time LCR for the Sensitive Detection of SNP Frequencies in Pooled DNA: Method Development, Evaluation and Application

    PubMed Central

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos; Banos, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have proven to be powerful genetic markers for genetic applications in medicine, life science and agriculture. A variety of methods exist for SNP detection but few can quantify SNP frequencies when the mutated DNA molecules correspond to a small fraction of the wild-type DNA. Furthermore, there is no generally accepted gold standard for SNP quantification, and, in general, currently applied methods give inconsistent results in selected cohorts. In the present study we sought to develop a novel method for accurate detection and quantification of SNP in DNA pooled samples. Methods The development and evaluation of a novel Ligase Chain Reaction (LCR) protocol that uses a DNA-specific fluorescent dye to allow quantitative real-time analysis is described. Different reaction components and thermocycling parameters affecting the efficiency and specificity of LCR were examined. Several protocols, including gap-LCR modifications, were evaluated using plasmid standard and genomic DNA pools. A protocol of choice was identified and applied for the quantification of a polymorphism at codon 136 of the ovine PRNP gene that is associated with susceptibility to a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep. Conclusions The real-time LCR protocol developed in the present study showed high sensitivity, accuracy, reproducibility and a wide dynamic range of SNP quantification in different DNA pools. The limits of detection and quantification of SNP frequencies were 0.085% and 0.35%, respectively. Significance The proposed real-time LCR protocol is applicable when sensitive detection and accurate quantification of low copy number mutations in DNA pools is needed. Examples include oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, infectious diseases, pathogenic bacteria, fungal species, viral mutants, drug resistance resulting from point mutations, and genetically modified organisms in food. PMID:21283808

  13. DNA methyltransferase detection based on digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine DNA with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Yunlei; Wang, Haiyan; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-06-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) has received a large amount of attention due to its catalyzation of DNA methylation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. Herein, a novel electrochemical strategy based on Dpn I digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine (polyA) DNA with a gold nanoparticles functioned glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GCE), is developed for the simple and efficient detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. Only one methylene blue (MB)-labeled DNA hairpin probe and two enzymes are involved in this designed method. In the presence of Dam MTase, the hairpin probe can be methylated and then cleaved by the restriction endonuclease. Thus, a MB-labeled polyA signal-stranded DNA product is introduced to the surface of AuNPs/GCE through the effect between polyA and AuNPs, resulting in an obvious electrochemical signal. On the contrary, in the absence of Dam MTase, the DNA probe cannot be cleaved and a relatively small electrochemical response can be observed. As a result, the as-proposed biosensor offered an efficient way for Dam MTase activity monitoring with a low detection of 0.27 U/mL, a wide linear range and good stability. Additionally, this assay holds great potential for further application in real biological matrices and inhibitors screening, which is expected to be useful in disease diagnosis and drug discovery.

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Nivolumab Alone or in Combination With Ipilimumab in Patients With Mucosal Melanoma: A Pooled Analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Sandra P; Larkin, James; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Lebbé, Celeste; Brady, Benjamin; Neyns, Bart; Schmidt, Henrik; Hassel, Jessica C; Hodi, F Stephen; Lorigan, Paul; Savage, Kerry J; Miller, Wilson H; Mohr, Peter; Marquez-Rodas, Ivan; Charles, Julie; Kaatz, Martin; Sznol, Mario; Weber, Jeffrey S; Shoushtari, Alexander N; Ruisi, Mary; Jiang, Joel; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2017-01-10

    Purpose Mucosal melanoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor response to conventional therapies. The efficacy and safety of nivolumab (a programmed death-1 checkpoint inhibitor), alone or combined with ipilimumab (a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 checkpoint inhibitor), have not been reported in this rare melanoma subtype. Patients and Methods Data were pooled from 889 patients who received nivolumab monotherapy in clinical studies, including phase III trials; 86 (10%) had mucosal melanoma and 665 (75%) had cutaneous melanoma. Data were also pooled for patients who received nivolumab combined with ipilimumab (n = 35, mucosal melanoma; n = 326, cutaneous melanoma). Results Among patients who received nivolumab monotherapy, median progression-free survival was 3.0 months (95% CI, 2.2 to 5.4 months) and 6.2 months (95% CI, 5.1 to 7.5 months) for mucosal and cutaneous melanoma, with objective response rates of 23.3% (95% CI, 14.8% to 33.6%) and 40.9% (95% CI, 37.1% to 44.7%), respectively. Median progression-free survival in patients treated with nivolumab combined with ipilimumab was 5.9 months (95% CI, 2.8 months to not reached) and 11.7 months (95% CI, 8.9 to 16.7 months) for mucosal and cutaneous melanoma, with objective response rates of 37.1% (95% CI, 21.5% to 55.1%) and 60.4% (95% CI, 54.9% to 65.8%), respectively. For mucosal and cutaneous melanoma, respectively, the incidence of grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse events was 8.1% and 12.5% for nivolumab monotherapy and 40.0% and 54.9% for combination therapy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the largest analysis of data for anti-programmed death-1 therapy in mucosal melanoma to date. Nivolumab combined with ipilimumab seemed to have greater efficacy than either agent alone, and although the activity was lower in mucosal melanoma, the safety profile was similar between subtypes.

  15. Identification of resistance to new virulent races of rust in sunflowers and validation of DNA markers in the gene pool.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lili; Gulya, Tom; Seiler, Gerald J; Hulke, Brent S; Vick, Brady A

    2011-02-01

    Sunflower rust, caused by Puccinia helianthi, is a prevalent disease in many countries throughout the world. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Agricultural Research Service, Sunflower Research Unit has released rust resistant breeding materials for several decades. However, constantly coevolving rust populations have formed new virulent races to which current hybrids have little resistance. The objectives of this study were to identify resistance to race 336, the predominant race in North America, and to race 777, the most virulent race currently known, and to validate molecular markers known to be linked to rust resistance genes in the sunflower gene pool. A total of 104 entries, including 66 released USDA inbred lines, 14 USDA interspecific germplasm lines, and 24 foreign germplasms, all developed specifically for rust resistance, were tested for their reaction to races 336 and 777. Only 13 of the 104 entries tested were resistant to both races, whereas another six were resistant only to race 336. The interspecific germplasm line, Rf ANN-1742, was resistant to both races and was identified as a new rust resistance source. A selection of 24 lines including 19 lines resistant to races 777 and/or 336 was screened with DNA markers linked to rust resistance genes R(1), R(2), R(4u), and R(5). The results indicated that the existing resistant lines are diverse in rust resistance genes. Durable genetic resistance through gene pyramiding will be effective for the control of rust.

  16. Pooled genomic indexing of rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Harris, Ronald A.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Ken J.; Hodgson, Anne; Cree, Andrew; Dai, Weilie; Csuros, Miklos; Zhu, Baoli; de Jong, Pieter J.; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Pooled genomic indexing (PGI) is a method for mapping collections of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones between species by using a combination of clone pooling and DNA sequencing. PGI has been used to map a total of 3858 BAC clones covering ∼24% of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) genome onto 4178 homologous loci in the human genome. A number of intrachromosomal rearrangements were detected by mapping multiple segments within the individual rhesus BACs onto multiple disjoined loci in the human genome. Transversal pooling designs involving shuffled BAC arrays were employed for robust mapping even with modest DNA sequence read coverage. A further innovation, short-tag pooled genomic indexing (ST-PGI), was also introduced to further improve the economy of mapping by sequencing multiple, short, mapable tags within a single sequencing reaction. PMID:15687293

  17. Quantitative trait loci mapping for conjugated linoleic acid, vaccenic acid and ∆(9) -desaturase in Italian Brown Swiss dairy cattle using selective DNA pooling.

    PubMed

    Strillacci, M G; Frigo, E; Canavesi, F; Ungar, Y; Schiavini, F; Zaniboni, L; Reghenzani, L; Cozzi, M C; Samoré, A B; Kashi, Y; Shimoni, E; Tal-Stein, R; Soller, M; Lipkin, E; Bagnato, A

    2014-08-01

    A selective DNA pooling approach was applied to identify QTL for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), vaccenic acid (VA) and Δ(9) -desaturase (D9D) milk content in Italian Brown Swiss dairy cattle. Milk samples from 60 animals with higher values (after correction for environmental factors) and 60 animals with lower values for each of these traits from each of five half-sib families were pooled separately. The pools were genotyped using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip. Sire allele frequencies were compared between high and low tails at the sire and marker level for SNPs for which the sires were heterozygous. An r procedure was implemented to perform data analysis in a selective DNA pooling design. A correction for multiple tests was applied using the proportion of false positives among all test results. BTA 19 showed the largest number of markers in association with CLA. Associations between SNPs and the VA and Δ(9) -desaturase traits were found on several chromosomes. A bioinformatics survey identified genes with an important role in pathways for milk fat and fatty acids metabolism within 1 Mb of SNP markers associated with fatty acids contents. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  18. Genome-wide Association Study of Subtype-Specific Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Alleles Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Swenerton, Kenneth D.; Chenevix–Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia–Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Flanagan, James M.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks–Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS (56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC), selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging 6 loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P<0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR=1.17, P=0.029, n=1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P=0.014, n=2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR=0.86, P=0.0043, n=892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR=0.84, P=0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P<0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  19. Identifying DNA Binding Motifs by Combining Data from Different Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Linyong; Resat, Haluk; Nagib Callaos; Katsuhisa Horimoto; Jake Chen; Amy Sze Chan

    2004-07-19

    A transcription factor regulates the expression of its target genes by binding to their operator regions. It functions by affecting the interactions between RNA polymerases and the gene's promoter. Many transcription factors bind to their targets by recognizing a specific DNA sequence pattern, which is referred to as a consensus sequence or a motif. Since it would remove the possible biases, combining biological data from different sources can be expected to improve the quality of the information extracted from the biological data. We analyzed the microarray gene expression data and the organism's genome sequence jointly to determine the transcription factor recognition sequences with more accuracy. Utilizing such a data integration approach, we have investigated the regulation of the photosynthesis genes of the purple non-sulphur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The photosynthesis genes in this organism are tightly regulated as a function of environmental growth conditions by three major regulatory systems, PrrB/PrrA, AppA/PpsR and FnrL. In this study, we have detected a previously undefined PrrA consensus sequence, improved the previously known DNA-binding motif of PpsR, and confirmed the consensus sequence of the global regulator FnrL.

  20. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M; Swenerton, Kenneth D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Thompson, Pamela J; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H; Flanagan, James M; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.

  1. Ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA assay based on counting of single magnetic nanobeads by a combination of DNA amplification and enzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Linlin; Li, Lu; Chen, Jia; Zou, Guizheng; Si, Zhikun; Jin, Wenrui

    2009-03-01

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical method for determination of DNA is developed based on counting of single magnetic nanobeads (MNBs) corresponding to single DNA sequences combined with a double amplification (DNA amplification and enzyme amplification). In this method, target DNA (t-DNA) is captured on a streptavidin-coated substrate via biotinylated capture DNA. Then, MNBs functionalized with first-probe DNAs (p1-DNA-MNBs) are conjugated to t-DNA sequences with a ratio of 1:1. Subsequently, the p1-DNA-MNBs are released from the substrate via dehybridization. The released p1-DNA-MNBs are labeled with alkaline phosphatase (AP) using biotinylated second-probe DNAs (p2-DNAs) and streptavidin-AP conjugates. The resultant AP-p2-DNA-p1-DNA-MNBs with enzyme substrate disodium phenyl phosphate (DPP) are continuously introduced through a capillary as the microsampler and microreactor at 40 degrees C. AP on the AP-p2-DNA-p1-DNA-MNBs converts a huge number of DPP into its product phenol, and phenol zones are produced around each moving AP-p2-DNA-p1-DNA-MNB. The phenol zones are continuously delivered to the capillary outlet and detected by a carbon fiber disk bundle electrode at 1.05 V. An elution curve with peaks is obtained. Each peak is corresponding to a phenol zone relative to single t-DNA sequence. The peaks on the elution curve are counted for quantification. The number of the peaks is proportional to the concentration of t-DNA in a range of 5.0 x 10(-16) to 1.0 x 10(-13) mol/L.

  2. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  3. Singular and combined effects of blowdown, salvage logging, and wildfire on forest floor and soil mercury pools

    Treesearch

    Carl P.J. Mitchell; Randall K. Kolka; Shawn. Fraver

    2012-01-01

    A number of factors influence the amount of mercury (Hg) in forest floors and soils, including deposition, volatile emission, leaching, and disturbances such as fire. Currently the impact on soil Hg pools from other widespread forest disturbances such as blowdown and management practices like salvage logging are unknown. Moreover, ecological and biogeochemical...

  4. Next generation semiconductor based sequencing of bitter taste receptor genes in different pig populations and association analysis using a selective DNA pool-seq approach.

    PubMed

    Ribani, A; Bertolini, F; Schiavo, G; Scotti, E; Utzeri, V J; Dall'Olio, S; Trevisi, P; Bosi, P; Fontanesi, L

    2017-02-01

    Taste perception in animals affects feed intake and may influence production traits. In particular, bitter is sensed by receptors encoded by the family of TAS2R genes. In this research, using a DNA pool-seq approach coupled with next generation semiconductor based target resequencing, we analysed nine porcine TAS2R genes (TAS2R1, TAS2R3, TAS2R4, TAS2R7, TAS2R9, TAS2R10, TAS2R16, TAS2R38 and TAS2R39) to identify variability and, at the same time, estimate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies in several populations and testing differences in an association analysis. Equimolar DNA pools were prepared for five pig breeds (Italian Duroc, Italian Landrace, Pietrain, Meishan and Casertana) and wild boars (5-10 individuals each) and for two groups of Italian Large White pigs with extreme and divergent back fat thickness (50 + 50 pigs). About 1.8 million reads were obtained by sequencing amplicons generated from these pools. A total of 125 SNPs were identified, of which 37 were missense mutations. Three of them (p.Ile53Phe and p.Trp85Leu in TAS2R4; p.Leu37Ser in TAS2R39) could have important effects on the function of these bitter taste receptors, based on in silico predictions. Variability in wild boars seems lower than that in domestic breeds potentially as a result of selective pressure in the wild towards defensive bitter taste perception. Three SNPs in TAS2R38 and TAS2R39 were significantly associated with back fat thickness. These results may be important to understand the complexity of taste perception and their associated effects that could be useful to develop nutrigenetic approaches in pig breeding and nutrition. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  5. Identification by genomic immunization of a pool of DNA vaccine candidates that confer protective immunity in mice against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    PubMed

    Yero, Daniel; Pajón, Rolando; Pérez, Yusleydis; Fariñas, Mildrey; Cobas, Karem; Diaz, Daiyana; Solis, Rosa L; Acosta, Armando; Brookes, Charlotte; Taylor, Stephen; Gorringe, Andrew

    2007-07-09

    We have shown previously that expression library immunization is viable alternative approach to induce protective immunity against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. In this study we report that few rounds of library screening allow identification of protective pools of defined antigens. A previously reported protective meningococcal library (L8, with 600 clones) was screened and two sub-libraries of 95 clones each were selected based on the induction of bactericidal and protective antibodies in BALB/c mice. After sequence analysis of each clone within these sub-libraries, we identified a pool of 20 individual antigens that induced protective immune responses in mice against N. meningitidis infection, and the observed protection was associated with the induction of bactericidal antibodies. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that ELI combined with sequence analysis is a powerful and efficient tool for identification of candidate antigens for use in a meningococcal vaccine.

  6. Optimization of hydrogen bonds for combined DNA/collagen complex.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, Ramana M; Svintradze, David V; Shan, Yingfeng; Yokota, Hiroki

    2009-01-21

    Many natural and biological systems including collagen and DNA polymers are formed by a process of molecular self-assembly. In this paper, we developed two novel structural models and built heterogeneous DNA/collagen complexes through a preferable arrangement of multiple hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) between DNA and collagen molecules. The simulation results based on three sets of criteria indicate that one of the models with five collagen molecules, which are positioned around each strand of DNA molecules emerged to form a suitable polymer complex with the maximum number of H-bonds. Our predictions quantitatively validated and agreed with the molecular structure reported by Mrevlishvili and Svintradze [2005. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 36, 324-326].

  7. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  8. Increase in dNTP pool size during the DNA damage response plays a key role in spontaneous and induced-mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gon, Stéphanie; Napolitano, Rita; Rocha, Walter; Coulon, Stéphane; Fuchs, Robert P

    2011-11-29

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to UV light increases expression of NrdAB, the major ribonucleotide reductase leading to a moderate increase in dNTP levels. The role of elevated dNTP levels during translesion synthesis (TLS) across specific replication-blocking lesions was investigated. Here we show that although the specialized DNA polymerase PolV is necessary for replication across UV-lesions, such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct, Pol V per se is not sufficient. Indeed, efficient TLS additionally requires elevated dNTP levels. Similarly, for the bypass of an N-2-acetylaminofluorene-guanine adduct that requires Pol II instead of PolV, efficient TLS is only observed under conditions of high dNTP levels. We suggest that increased dNTP levels transiently modify the activity balance of Pol III (i.e., increasing the polymerase and reducing the proofreading functions). Indeed, we show that the stimulation of TLS by elevated dNTP levels can be mimicked by genetic inactivation of the proofreading function (mutD5 allele). We also show that spontaneous mutagenesis increases proportionally to dNTP pool levels, thus defining a unique spontaneous mutator phenotype. The so-called "dNTP mutator" phenotype does not depend upon any of the specialized DNA polymerases, and is thus likely to reflect an increase in Pol III's own replication errors because of the modified activity balance of Pol III. As up-regulation of the dNTP pool size represents a common physiological response to DNA damage, the present model is likely to represent a general and unique paradigm for TLS pathways in many organisms.

  9. Increase in dNTP pool size during the DNA damage response plays a key role in spontaneous and induced-mutagenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gon, Stéphanie; Napolitano, Rita; Rocha, Walter; Coulon, Stéphane; Fuchs, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to UV light increases expression of NrdAB, the major ribonucleotide reductase leading to a moderate increase in dNTP levels. The role of elevated dNTP levels during translesion synthesis (TLS) across specific replication-blocking lesions was investigated. Here we show that although the specialized DNA polymerase PolV is necessary for replication across UV-lesions, such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct, Pol V per se is not sufficient. Indeed, efficient TLS additionally requires elevated dNTP levels. Similarly, for the bypass of an N-2-acetylaminofluorene-guanine adduct that requires Pol II instead of PolV, efficient TLS is only observed under conditions of high dNTP levels. We suggest that increased dNTP levels transiently modify the activity balance of Pol III (i.e., increasing the polymerase and reducing the proofreading functions). Indeed, we show that the stimulation of TLS by elevated dNTP levels can be mimicked by genetic inactivation of the proofreading function (mutD5 allele). We also show that spontaneous mutagenesis increases proportionally to dNTP pool levels, thus defining a unique spontaneous mutator phenotype. The so-called “dNTP mutator” phenotype does not depend upon any of the specialized DNA polymerases, and is thus likely to reflect an increase in Pol III's own replication errors because of the modified activity balance of Pol III. As up-regulation of the dNTP pool size represents a common physiological response to DNA damage, the present model is likely to represent a general and unique paradigm for TLS pathways in many organisms. PMID:22084087

  10. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting milk somatic cell score in Israeli and Italian Holstein cows by means of selective DNA pooling with single- and multiple-marker mapping.

    PubMed

    Tal-Stein, R; Fontanesi, L; Dolezal, M; Scotti, E; Bagnato, A; Russo, V; Canavesi, F; Friedmann, A; Soller, M; Lipkin, E

    2010-10-01

    Mastitis is an important and common dairy cattle disease affecting milk yield, quality, and consumer safety as well as cheese yields and quality. Animal welfare and residues of the antibiotics used to treat mastitis cause public concern. Considerable genetic variation may allow selection for increased resistance to mastitis. Because of high genetic correlation to milk somatic cell score (SCS), SCS can serve as a surrogate trait for mastitis resistance. The present study intended to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting SCS in Israeli and Italian Holstein dairy cattle (IsH and ItH, respectively), using selective DNA pooling with single and multiple marker mapping. Milk samples of 4,788 daughters of 6 IsH and 7 ItH sires were used to construct sire-family high- and low-tail pools, which were genotyped at 123 (IsH) and 133 (ItH) microsatellite markers. Shadow correction was used to obtain pool allele frequency estimates. Frequency difference between the tails and empirical standard error of D, SE(D), were used to obtain P-values. All markers significant by single marker mapping were also significant by multiple marker mapping, but not vice versa. Combining both populations, 22 QTL on 21 chromosomes were identified; all corresponded to previous reports in the literature. Confidence intervals were set by chi-squared drop method. Heterozygosity of QTL was estimated at 44.2%. Allele substitution effects ranged from 1,782 to 4,930 cells/mL in estimated breeding value somatic cell count units. Most (80%) of the observed variation in estimated breeding value somatic cell score could be explained by the QTL identified under the stringent criteria. The results found here can be used as a basis for further genome-wide association studies for the same trait. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening Yield of HIV Antigen/Antibody Combination and Pooled HIV RNA Testing for Acute HIV Infection in a High-Prevalence Population.

    PubMed

    Peters, Philip J; Westheimer, Emily; Cohen, Stephanie; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Moss, Nicholas; Tsoi, Benjamin; Hall, Laura; Fann, Charles; Daskalakis, Demetre C; Beagle, Steve; Patel, Pragna; Radix, Asa; Foust, Evelyn; Kohn, Robert P; Marmorino, Jenni; Pandori, Mark; Fu, Jie; Samandari, Taraz; Gay, Cynthia L

    2016-02-16

    Although acute HIV infection contributes disproportionately to onward HIV transmission, HIV testing has not routinely included screening for acute HIV infection. To evaluate the performance of an HIV antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assay to detect acute HIV infection compared with pooled HIV RNA testing. Multisite, prospective, within-individual comparison study conducted between September 2011 and October 2013 in 7 sexually transmitted infection clinics and 5 community-based programs in New York, California, and North Carolina. Participants were 12 years or older and seeking HIV testing, without known HIV infection. All participants with a negative rapid HIV test result were screened for acute HIV infection with an HIV Ag/Ab combination assay (index test) and pooled human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA testing. HIV RNA testing was the reference standard, with positive reference standard result defined as detectable HIV-1 RNA on an individual RNA test. Number and proportion with acute HIV infections detected. Among 86,836 participants with complete test results (median age, 29 years; 75.0% men; 51.8% men who have sex with men), established HIV infection was diagnosed in 1158 participants (1.33%) and acute HIV infection was diagnosed in 168 participants (0.19%). Acute HIV infection was detected in 134 participants with HIV Ag/Ab combination testing (0.15% [95% CI, 0.13%-0.18%]; sensitivity, 79.8% [95% CI, 72.9%-85.6%]; specificity, 99.9% [95% CI, 99.9%-99.9%]; positive predictive value, 59.0% [95% CI, 52.3%-65.5%]) and in 164 participants with pooled HIV RNA testing (0.19% [95% CI, 0.16%-0.22%]; sensitivity, 97.6% [95% CI, 94.0%-99.4%]; specificity, 100% [95% CI, 100%-100%]; positive predictive value, 96.5% [95% CI, 92.5%-98.7%]; sensitivity comparison, P < .001). Overall HIV Ag/Ab combination testing detected 82% of acute HIV infections detectable by pooled HIV RNA testing. Compared with rapid HIV testing alone, HIV Ag/Ab combination testing

  12. Combined ribosomal DNA and morphological analysis of individual gyrodactylid monogeneans.

    PubMed

    Harris, P D; Cable, J; Tinsley, R C; Lazarus, C M

    1999-04-01

    A method is presented for the isolation and analysis of hamuli, marginal hooks, and bars from individual gyrodactylid monogeneans using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while simultaneously processing parasites for rDNA analysis using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The haptors of ethanol-fixed gyrodactylids were protease digested to liberate hooks for SEM, whereas DNA extracted from the bodies was used for PCR. The method resulted in hooks and hamuli being prepared from more than 90% of Gyrodactylus turnbulli individuals, a significant improvement on previously published digestion-based SEM techniques. PCR on the same parasites was less successful, but sequence data were obtained from 50% of individuals. Amplification of rDNA internal-transcribed spacer regions from individual worms used for SEM gave PCR products consistent with those predicted from our previous sequence analysis. This method allows the correlation of morphology and DNA sequence from the same individual and can be applied to ethanol-fixed material, such as field collected and museum specimens.

  13. The allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay, a new real-time PCR method for fine quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Billard, A; Laval, V; Fillinger, S; Leroux, P; Lachaise, H; Beffa, R; Debieu, D

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of fungicide resistance within populations of plant pathogens must be monitored to develop management strategies. Such monitoring often is based on microbiological tests, such as microtiter plate assays. Molecular monitoring methods can be considered if the mutations responsible for resistance have been identified. Allele-specific real-time PCR approaches, such as amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR and mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, are, despite their moderate efficacy, among the most precise methods for refining SNP quantification. We describe here a new real-time PCR method, the allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay (ASPPAA PCR). This method makes use of mixtures of allele-specific minor groove binder (MGB) TaqMan probes and allele-specific primers for the fine quantification of SNPs from a pool of DNA extracted from a mixture of conidia. It was developed for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is responsible for resistance to the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide fenhexamid, resulting in the replacement of the phenylalanine residue (encoded by the TTC codon) in position 412 of the enzymatic target (3-ketoreductase) by a serine (TCC), valine (GTC), or isoleucine (ATC) residue. The levels of nonspecific amplification with the ASPPAA PCR were reduced at least four times below the level of currently available allele-specific real-time PCR approaches due to strong allele specificity in amplification cycles, including two allele selectors. This new method can be used to quantify a complex quadriallelic SNP in a DNA pool with a false discovery rate of less than 1%.

  14. CPS1 maintains pyrimidine pools and DNA synthesis in KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Hu, Zeping; Cai, Ling; Li, Kailong; Choi, Eunhee; Faubert, Brandon; Bezwada, Divya; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Villalobos, Pamela; Lin, Yu-Fen; Ni, Min; Huffman, Kenneth E; Girard, Luc; Byers, Lauren A; Unsal-Kacmaz, Keziban; Peña, Christopher G; Heymach, John V; Wauters, Els; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Castrillon, Diego H; Chen, Benjamin P C; Wistuba, Ignacio; Lambrechts, Diether; Xu, Jian; Minna, John D; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic reprogramming by oncogenic signals promotes cancer initiation and progression. The oncogene KRAS and tumour suppressor STK11, which encodes the kinase LKB1, regulate metabolism and are frequently mutated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Concurrent occurrence of oncogenic KRAS and loss of LKB1 (KL) in cells specifies aggressive oncological behaviour. Here we show that human KL cells and tumours share metabolomic signatures of perturbed nitrogen handling. KL cells express the urea cycle enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 (CPS1), which produces carbamoyl phosphate in the mitochondria from ammonia and bicarbonate, initiating nitrogen disposal. Transcription of CPS1 is suppressed by LKB1 through AMPK, and CPS1 expression correlates inversely with LKB1 in human NSCLC. Silencing CPS1 in KL cells induces cell death and reduces tumour growth. Notably, cell death results from pyrimidine depletion rather than ammonia toxicity, as CPS1 enables an unconventional pathway of nitrogen flow from ammonia into pyrimidines. CPS1 loss reduces the pyrimidine to purine ratio, compromises S-phase progression and induces DNA-polymerase stalling and DNA damage. Exogenous pyrimidines reverse DNA damage and rescue growth. The data indicate that the KL oncological genotype imposes a metabolic vulnerability related to a dependence on a cross-compartmental pathway of pyrimidine metabolism in an aggressive subset of NSCLC.

  15. Radiation Combined Injury: DNA Damage, Apoptosis, and Autophagy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    the course of their disease (5) represents another significant source of exposure as normal tissues are subjected to radiation injury. Those charged...that luminal microbiota com- position may influence the host’s intestinal response to radiation and may change in those developing postirradiation... disease . Annu. Rev. Pathol. Mecha. Dis. 3: 247-255, 2008. 41. Kurz, E.U. and Lees-Miller, S.P. DNA damage-induced activation of ATM and ATM

  16. An Antifungal Combination Matrix Identifies a Rich Pool of Adjuvant Molecules that Enhance Drug Activity Against Diverse Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Nicole; Spitzer, Michaela; Yu, Tennison; Cerone, Robert P.; Averette, Anna K.; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Heitman, Joseph; Sheppard, Donald C.; Tyers, Mike; Wright, Gerard D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for fungal infections. By combining sub-lethal concentrations of the known antifungals fluconazole, caspofungin, amphotericin B, terbinafine, benomyl and cyprodinil with ~3600 compounds in diverse fungal species, we generated a deep reservoir of chemical-chemical interactions termed the Antifungal Combinations Matrix (ACM). Follow-up susceptibility testing against a fluconazole resistant isolate of C. albicans unveiled ACM combinations capable of potentiating fluconazole in this clinical strain. We used chemical genetics to elucidate the mode-of-action of the antimycobacterial drug clofazimine, a compound with unreported antifungal activity that synergized with several antifungals. Clofazimine induces a cell membrane stress for which the Pkc1 signaling pathway is required for tolerance. Further tests against additional fungal pathogens, including Aspergillus fumigatus, highlighted that clofazimine exhibits efficacy as a combination agent against multiple fungi. Thus, the ACM is a rich reservoir of chemical combinations with therapeutic potential against diverse fungal pathogens. PMID:26549450

  17. Digital subtraction radiographic analysis of the combination of bioabsorbable membrane and bovine morphogenetic protein pool in human periodontal infrabony defects

    PubMed Central

    GUIMARÃES, Maria do Carmo Machado; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT’ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; TABA JUNIOR, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the bone density gain and its relationship with the periodontal clinical parameters in a case series of a regenerative therapy procedure. Material and Methods Using a split-mouth study design, 10 pairs of infrabony defects from 15 patients were treated with a pool of bovine bone morphogenetic proteins associated with collagen membrane (test sites) or collagen membrane only (control sites). The periodontal healing was clinically and radiographically monitored for six months. Standardized presurgical and 6-month postoperative radiographs were digitized for digital subtraction analysis, which showed relative bone density gain in both groups of 0.034 ± 0.423 and 0.105 ± 0.423 in the test and control group, respectively (p>0.05). Results As regards the area size of bone density change, the influence of the therapy was detected in 2.5 mm2 in the test group and 2 mm2 in the control group (p>0.05). Additionally, no correlation was observed between the favorable clinical results and the bone density gain measured by digital subtraction radiography (p>0.05). Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that the clinical benefit of the regenerative therapy observed did not come with significant bone density gains. Long-term evaluation may lead to a different conclusions. PMID:20835573

  18. Evaluation of large-scale genetic structure in complex demographic and historical scenarios: the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome pools of the Iberian Atlantic façade.

    PubMed

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Roca, Agustín; García-Vazquez, Eva; López, Belén

    2014-04-01

    Genetic structural patterns of human populations are usually a combination of long-term evolutionary forces and short-term social, cultural, and demographic processes. Recently, using mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome loci, various studies in northern Spain have found evidence that the geographical distribution of Iron Age tribal peoples might have influenced current patterns of genetic structuring in several autochthonous populations. Using the wealth of data that are currently available from the whole territory of the Iberian Peninsula, we have evaluated its genetic structuring in the spatial scale of the Atlantic façade. Hierarchical tree modeling procedures, combined with a classic analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), were used to model known sociocultural divisions from the third century BCE to the eighth century CE, contrasting them with uniparental marker data. Our results show that, while mountainous and abrupt areas of the Iberian North bear the signals of long-term isolation in their maternal and paternal gene pools, the makeup of the Atlantic façade as a whole can be related to tribal population groups that predate the Roman conquest of the Peninsula. The maintenance through time of such a structure can be related to the numerous geographic barriers of the Iberian mainland, which have historically conditioned its settlement patterns and the occurrence of genetic drift processes.

  19. Enhancement of anti-proliferative activities of Metformin, when combined with Celecoxib, without increasing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Asad; Ashraf, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Attiq, Ali; Ali, Sarwat

    2016-07-01

    Pathophysiological changes in diabetes like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia predispose cells to malignant transformation and damage DNA repair mechanism. This study was designed to explore the potential synergistic toxic effects of anti-diabetic drug (Metformin), and an analgesic drug (Celecoxib) at cellular level. MTT assay run on Vero cell line revealed that the combinations of Metformin and Celecoxib augment the anti-proliferative effects, whereas Single cell gel electrophoresis spotlighted that Metformin produce non-significant DNA damage with the threshold concentration of 400μg/ml in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (lymphocytes and monocytes), while Celecoxib produced significant (P<0.05) DNA damage (class III comets) above the concentration of 75μg/ml, however the DNA damage or DNA tail protrusions by combinations of both drugs were less than what was observed with Celecoxib alone. Metformin or Celecoxib did not appear mutagenic against any mutant strains (TA 100 and TA 98) but their combination exhibited slight mutagenicity at much higher concentration. The results obtained at concentrations higher than the therapeutic level of drugs and reflect that Metformin in combination with Celecoxib synergistically inhibits the cell proliferation in a concentration dependent pattern. Since, this increase in cytotoxicity did not confer an increase in DNA damage; this combination could be adopted to inhibit the growth of malignant cell without producing any genotoxic or mutagenic effects at cellular level.

  20. Genome-wide quantitative trait locus association scan of general cognitive ability using pooled DNA and 500K single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, L M; Davis, O S P; Craig, I W; Plomin, R

    2008-01-01

    General cognitive ability (g), which refers to what cognitive abilities have in common, is an important target for molecular genetic research because multivariate quantitative genetic analyses have shown that the same set of genes affects diverse cognitive abilities as well as learning disabilities. In this first autosomal genome-wide association scan of g, we used a two-stage quantitative trait locus (QTL) design with pooled DNA to screen more than 500 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on microarrays, selecting from a sample of 7000 7-year-old children. In stage 1, we screened for allele frequency differences between groups pooled for low and high g. In stage 2, 47 SNPs nominated in stage 1 were tested by individually genotyping an independent sample of 3195 individuals, representative of the entire distribution of g scores in the full 7000 7-year-old children. Six SNPs yielded significant associations across the normal distribution of g, although only one SNP remained significant after a false discovery rate of 0.05 was imposed. However, none of these SNPs accounted for more than 0.4% of the variance of g, despite 95% power to detect associations of that size. It is likely that QTL effect sizes, even for highly heritable traits such as cognitive abilities and disabilities, are much smaller than previously assumed. Nonetheless, an aggregated ‘SNP set’ of the six SNPs correlated 0.11 (P < 0.00000003) with g. This shows that future SNP sets that will incorporate many more SNPs could be useful for predicting genetic risk and for investigating functional systems of effects from genes to brain to behavior. PMID:18067574

  1. Arsenic-Induced Antioxidant Depletion, Oxidative DNA Breakage, and Tissue Damages are Prevented by the Combined Action of Folate and Vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a grade I human carcinogen. It acts by disrupting one-carbon (1C) metabolism and cellular methyl (-CH3) pool. The -CH3 group helps in arsenic disposition and detoxification of the biological systems. Vitamin B12 and folate, the key promoters of 1C metabolism were tested recently (daily 0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w. of rat for 28 days) to evaluate their combined efficacy in the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakage and tissue damages. The selected tissues like intestine (first-pass site), liver (major xenobiotic metabolizer) and lung (major arsenic accumulator) were collected from arsenic-ingested (0.6 ppm/same schedule) female rats. The hemo-toxicity and liver and kidney functions were monitored. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed humans can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the supplementation of physiological/therapeutic dose of vitamin B12 and folate protected the rodents significantly from arsenic-induced DNA damage (DNA fragmentation and comet assay) and hepatic and renal tissue degeneration (histo-architecture, HE staining). The level of arsenic-induced free-radical products (TBARS and conjugated diene) was significantly declined by the restored actions of several antioxidants viz. urate, thiol, catalase, xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the tissues of vitamin-supplemented group. The alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, urea and creatinine (hepatic and kidney toxicity marker), and lactate dehydrogenase (tissue degeneration marker) were significantly impaired in the arsenic-fed group. But a significant protection was evident in the vitamin-supplemented group. In conclusion, the combined action of folate and B12 results in the restitution in the 1C metabolic pathway and cellular methyl pool. The cumulative outcome from the enhanced arsenic methylation and antioxidative capacity was protective against arsenic induced mutagenic DNA breakages and tissue damages.

  2. Combined therapy with cyclophosphamide and DNA preparation inhibits the tumor growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Alyamkina, Ekaterina A; Dolgova, Evgenia V; Likhacheva, Anastasia S; Rogachev, Vladimir A; Sebeleva, Tamara E; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Popova, Nelly A; Orishchenko, Konstantin E; Strunkin, Dmitriy N; Chernykh, Elena R; Zagrebelniy, Stanislav N; Bogachev, Sergei S; Shurdov, Mikhail A

    2009-01-01

    Background When cyclophosphamide and preparations of fragmented exogenous genomic double stranded DNA were administered in sequence, the regressive effect on the tumor was synergic: this combined treatment had a more pronounced effect than cyclophosphamide alone. Our further studies demonstrated that exogenous DNA stimulated the maturation and specific activities of dendritic cells. This suggests that cyclophosphamide, combined with DNA, leads to an immune response to the tumors that were grafted into the subjects post treatment. Methods Three-month old CBA/Lac mice were used in the experiments. The mice were injected with cyclosphamide (200 mkg per 1 kg body weight) and genomic DNA (of human, mouse or salmon sperm origin). The DNA was administered intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. After 23 to 60 days, one million tumor cells were intramuscularly grafted into the mice. In the final experiment, the mice were pre-immunized by subcutaneous injections of 20 million repeatedly thawed and frozen tumor cells. Changes in tumor growth were determined by multiplying the three perpendicular diameters (measured by caliper). Students' t-tests were used to determine the difference between tumor growth and average survival rate between the mouse groups and the controls. Results An analysis of varying treatments with cyclophosphamide and exogenous DNA, followed by tumor grafting, provided evidence that this combined treatment had an immunizing effect. This inhibitory effect in mice was analyzed in an experiment with the classical immunization of a tumor homogenate. The strongest inhibitory action on a transplanted graft was created through the following steps: cyclophosphamide at 200 mg/kg of body weight administered as a pretreatment; 6 mg fragmented exogenous DNA administered over the course of 3 days; tumor homogenate grafted 10 days following the final DNA injection. Conclusion Fragmented exogenous DNA injected with cyclophosphamide inhibits the growth of tumors that are

  3. Novel vaccine against Venezuelan equine encephalitis combines advantages of DNA immunization and a live attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Lukashevich, Igor S; Glass, Pamela; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2013-02-04

    DNA vaccines combine remarkable genetic and chemical stability with proven safety and efficacy in animal models, while remaining less immunogenic in humans. In contrast, live-attenuated vaccines have the advantage of inducing rapid, robust, long-term immunity after a single-dose vaccination. Here we describe novel iDNA vaccine technology that is based on an infectious DNA platform and combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. We applied this technology for vaccination against infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), an alphavirus from the Togaviridae family. The iDNA vaccine is based on transcription of the full-length genomic RNA of the TC-83 live-attenuated virus from plasmid DNA in vivo. The in vivo-generated viral RNA initiates limited replication of the vaccine virus, which in turn leads to efficient immunization. This technology allows the plasmid DNA to launch a live-attenuated vaccine in vitro or in vivo. Less than 10 ng of pTC83 iDNA encoding the full-length genomic RNA of the TC-83 vaccine strain initiated replication of the vaccine virus in vitro. In order to evaluate this approach in vivo, BALB/c mice were vaccinated with a single dose of pTC83 iDNA. After vaccination, all mice seroconverted with no adverse reactions. Four weeks after immunization, animals were challenged with the lethal epidemic strain of VEEV. All iDNA-vaccinated mice were protected from fatal disease, while all unvaccinated controls succumbed to infection and died. To our knowledge, this is the first example of launching a clinical live-attenuated vaccine from recombinant plasmid DNA in vivo.

  4. Heteroduplex mobility assay-guided sequence discovery: elucidation of the small subunit (18S) rDNA sequences of Pfiesteria piscicida and related dinoflagellates from complex algal culture and environmental sample DNA pools.

    PubMed

    Oldach, D W; Delwiche, C F; Jakobsen, K S; Tengs, T; Brown, E G; Kempton, J W; Schaefer, E F; Bowers, H A; Glasgow, H B; Burkholder, J M; Steidinger, K A; Rublee, P A

    2000-04-11

    The newly described heterotrophic estuarine dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida has been linked with fish kills in field and laboratory settings, and with a novel clinical syndrome of impaired cognition and memory disturbance among humans after presumptive toxin exposure. As a result, there is a pressing need to better characterize the organism and these associations. Advances in Pfiesteria research have been hampered, however, by the absence of genomic sequence data. We employed a sequencing strategy directed by heteroduplex mobility assay to detect Pfiesteria piscicida 18S rDNA "signature" sequences in complex pools of DNA and used those data as the basis for determination of the complete P. piscicida 18S rDNA sequence. Specific PCR assays for P. piscicida and other estuarine heterotrophic dinoflagellates were developed, permitting their detection in algal cultures and in estuarine water samples collected during fish kill and fish lesion events. These tools should enhance efforts to characterize these organisms and their ecological relationships. Heteroduplex mobility assay-directed sequence discovery is broadly applicable, and may be adapted for the detection of genomic sequence data of other novel or nonculturable organisms in complex assemblages.

  5. Combining H/D exchange mass spectroscopy and computational docking reveals extended DNA-binding surface on uracil-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Victoria A.; Pique, Michael E.; Hsu, Simon; Li, Sheng; Slupphaug, Geir; Rambo, Robert P.; Jamison, Jonathan W.; Liu, Tong; Lee, Jun H.; Tainer, John A.; Ten Eyck, Lynn F.; Woods, Virgil L.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides excellent structural data on protein–DNA interfaces, but crystallographic complexes typically contain only small fragments of large DNA molecules. We present a new approach that can use longer DNA substrates and reveal new protein–DNA interactions even in extensively studied systems. Our approach combines rigid-body computational docking with hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). DXMS identifies solvent-exposed protein surfaces; docking is used to create a 3-dimensional model of the protein–DNA interaction. We investigated the enzyme uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), which detects and cleaves uracil from DNA. UNG was incubated with a 30 bp DNA fragment containing a single uracil, giving the complex with the abasic DNA product. Compared with free UNG, the UNG–DNA complex showed increased solvent protection at the UNG active site and at two regions outside the active site: residues 210–220 and 251–264. Computational docking also identified these two DNA-binding surfaces, but neither shows DNA contact in UNG–DNA crystallographic structures. Our results can be explained by separation of the two DNA strands on one side of the active site. These non-sequence-specific DNA-binding surfaces may aid local uracil search, contribute to binding the abasic DNA product and help present the DNA product to APE-1, the next enzyme on the DNA-repair pathway. PMID:22492624

  6. A whole genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting milk protein percentage in Israeli-Holstein cattle, by means of selective milk DNA pooling in a daughter design, using an adjusted false discovery rate criterion.

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, M O; Lipkin, E; Khutoreskaya, G; Tchourzyna, E; Soller, M; Friedmann, A

    2001-01-01

    Selective DNA pooling was employed in a daughter design to screen all bovine autosomes for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting estimated breeding value for milk protein percentage (EBVP%). Milk pools prepared from high and low daughters of each of seven sires were genotyped for 138 dinucleotide microsatellites. Shadow-corrected estimates of sire allele frequencies were compared between high and low pools. An adjusted false discovery rate (FDR) method was employed to calculate experimentwise significance levels and empirical power. Significant associations with milk protein percentage were found for 61 of the markers (adjusted FDR = 0.10; estimated power, 0.68). The significant markers appear to be linked to 19--28 QTL. Mean allele substitution effects of the putative QTL averaged 0.016 (0.009--0.028) in units of the within-sire family standard deviation of EBVP% and summed to 0.460 EBVP%. Overall QTL heterozygosity was 0.40. The identified QTL appear to account for all of the variation in EBVP% in the population. Through use of selective DNA pooling, 4400 pool data points provided the statistical power of 600,000 individual data points. PMID:11290723

  7. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing for DNA using quantum dots combined with restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Lou, Jing; Tu, Wenwen; Bao, Jianchun; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-01-21

    A universal and sensitive electrochemical biosensing platform for the detection and identification of DNA using CdSe quantum dots (CdSe QDs) as signal markers was designed. The detection mechanism was based on the specific recognition of MspI endonuclease combined with the signal amplification of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). MspI endonuclease could recognize its specific sequence in the double-strand DNA (dsDNA) and cleave the dsDNA fragments linked with CdSe QDs from the electrode. The remaining attached CdSe QDs can be easily read out by square-wave voltammetry using an electrodeposited bismuth (Bi) film-modified glass carbon electrode. The concentrations of target DNA could be simultaneously detected by the signal of metal markers. Using mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DNA as a model, under the optimal conditions, the proposed biosensor could detect Mtb DNA down to 8.7 × 10(-15) M with a linear range of 5 orders of magnitude (from 1.0 × 10(-14) to 1.0 × 10(-9) M) and discriminate mismatched DNA with high selectivity. This strategy presented a universal and convenient biosensing platform for DNA assay, and its satisfactory performances make it a potential candidate for the early diagnosis of gene-related diseases.

  8. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  9. Combining bleach and mild predigestion improves ancient DNA recovery from bones.

    PubMed

    Boessenkool, Sanne; Hanghøj, Kristian; Nistelberger, Heidi M; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Gondek, Agata T; Orlando, Ludovic; Barrett, James H; Star, Bastiaan

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of genome-scale studies from archaeological material remains critically dependent on the ability to access endogenous, authentic DNA. In the majority of cases, this represents a few per cent of the DNA extract, at most. A number of specific pre-extraction protocols for bone powder aimed to improve ancient DNA recovery before library amplification have recently been developed. Here, we test the effects of combining two of such protocols, a bleach wash and a predigestion step, on 12 bone samples of Atlantic cod and domestic horse aged 750-1350 cal. years before present. Using high-throughput sequencing, we show that combined together, bleach wash and predigestion consistently yield DNA libraries with higher endogenous content than either of these methods alone. Additionally, the molecular complexity of these libraries is improved and endogenous DNA templates show larger size distributions. Other library characteristics, such as DNA damage profiles or the composition of microbial communities, are little affected by the pre-extraction protocols. Application of the combined protocol presented in this study will facilitate the genetic analysis of an increasing number of ancient remains and will reduce the cost of whole-genome sequencing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    SciTech Connect

    Barends, Thomas R. M.; Brosi, Richard W. W.; Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten; Seidel, Ralf; Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine; Bittl, Robert; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal part of T. thermophilus DnaJ unexpectedly showed an ordered GF domain and guided the design of a construct enabling the first structure determination of a complete DnaJ cochaperone molecule. By combining the crystal structures with spin-labelling EPR and cross-linking in solution, a dynamic view of this flexible molecule was developed. Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ.

  11. Effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) administration on the residual virus pool in a model of combination antiretroviral therapy-mediated suppression in SIVmac239-infected indian rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Trubey, Charles M; Fast, Randy; Schneider, Douglas K; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Freemire, Brandi; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Quiñones, Octavio A; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Sanchez, Rosa I; Wai, John S; Tan, Christopher M; Alvord, W Gregory; Hazuda, Daria J; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2014-11-01

    Nonhuman primate models are needed for evaluations of proposed strategies targeting residual virus that persists in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) models of cART-mediated suppression have proven challenging to develop. We used a novel three-class, six-drug cART regimen to achieve durable 4.0- to 5.5-log reductions in plasma viremia levels and declines in cell-associated viral RNA and DNA in blood and tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected Indian-origin rhesus macaques, then evaluated the impact of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) on the residual virus pool. Ex vivo SAHA treatment of CD4(+) T cells obtained from cART-suppressed animals increased histone acetylation and viral RNA levels in culture supernatants. cART-suppressed animals each received 84 total doses of oral SAHA. We observed SAHA dose-dependent increases in acetylated histones with evidence for sustained modulation as well as refractoriness following prolonged administration. In vivo virologic activity was demonstrated based on the ratio of viral RNA to viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a presumptive measure of viral transcription, which significantly increased in SAHA-treated animals. However, residual virus was readily detected at the end of treatment, suggesting that SAHA alone may be insufficient for viral eradication in the setting of suppressive cART. The effects observed were similar to emerging data for repeat-dose SAHA treatment of HIV-infected individuals on cART, demonstrating the feasibility, utility, and relevance of NHP models of cART-mediated suppression for in vivo assessments of AIDS virus functional cure/eradication approaches.

  12. Cell-free DNA testing after combined test: factors affecting the uptake.

    PubMed

    Maiz, Nerea; Alzola, Irune; Murua, Emerson J; Rodríguez Santos, Javier

    2016-11-01

    First, to assess what was the uptake of cell free DNA (cfDNA) testing after a combined test and the maternal and fetal factors that influenced this decision, and second, to assess the uptake and factors that influence the choice of invasive testing. This observational retrospective study included 1083 singleton pregnancies who had a combined test for screening for Down syndrome between 11 (+) (0) and 13 (+) (6) weeks. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine which factors affected the uptake of cfDNA test and invasive testing among risk for trisomies 21, 18, and 13, maternal characteristics and fetal nuchal translucency (NT) thickness. Two-hundred fifty-seven (23.7%) women had a cfDNA test, 89 (8.2%) had an invasive test, and 737 (68.1%) had no further test. The uptake of cfDNA increased with the risk for trisomies (p < 0.001), maternal age (p = 0.013), and was higher in nulliparous women (p = 0.004). The uptake of invasive test increased with the risk for trisomies (p < 0.001) and NT thickness (p < 0.001). This study shows that the uptake of cfDNA testing increases with the risk for trisomies, maternal age, and is higher in nulliparous, whereas the uptake of invasive testing increases with the risk for trisomies and NT thickness.

  13. Mechanism-based drug combinations with the DNA-strand-breaking nucleoside analog, CNDAC

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Yingjun; Nowak, Billie; Hargis, Sarah; Plunkett, William

    2016-01-01

    CNDAC (2’-C-cyano-2’-deoxy-1-β-D-arabino-pentofuranosyl-cytosine, DFP10917) and its orally bioavailable prodrug, sapacitabine, are undergoing clinical trials for hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The unique action mechanism of inducing DNA strand breaks distinguishes CNDAC from other deoxycytidine analogs. To optimize the clinical potentials of CNDAC, we explored multiple strategies combining CNDAC with chemotherapeutic agents targeting distinct DNA damage repair pathways that are currently in clinical use. The ability of each agent to decrease proliferative potential, determined by clonogenic assays, was determined in paired cell lines proficient and deficient in certain DNA repair proteins. Subsequently each agent was used in combination with CNDAC at fixed concentration ratios. The clonogenicity was quantitated by median effect analysis, and a combination index was calculated. The c-Abl kinase inhibitor, imatinib, had synergy with CNDAC in HCT116 cells, regardless of p53 status. Inhibitors of PARP1 that interfere with homologous recombination (HR) repair or base excision repair (BER) and agents such as temozolomide that cause DNA damage repaired by the BER pathway were also synergistic with CNDAC. The toxicity of the nitrogen mustards, bendamustine and cytoxan, or of platinum compounds, which generate DNA adducts repaired by nucleotide excision repair and HR, was additive with CNDAC. An additive cell killing was also achieved by the combination of CNDAC with taxane mitotic inhibitors (paclitaxel and docetaxel). At concentrations which allow survival of the majority of wild type cells, the synergistic or additive combination effects were selective in HR-deficient cells. This study provides mechanistic rationales for combining CNDAC with other active drugs. PMID:27474148

  14. Combining qualitative and quantitative imaging evaluation for the assessment of genomic DNA integrity: The SPIDIA experience.

    PubMed

    Ciniselli, Chiara Maura; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Pazzagli, Mario; Hartmann, Christina C; Ibrahim-Gawel, Hady; Verderio, Paolo

    2015-06-15

    In this note, we present an ad hoc procedure that combines qualitative (visual evaluation) and quantitative (ImageJ software) evaluations of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) images to assess the genomic DNA (gDNA) integrity of analyzed samples. This procedure could be suitable for the analysis of a large number of images by taking into consideration both the expertise of researchers and the objectiveness of the software. We applied this procedure on the first SPIDIA DNA External Quality Assessment (EQA) samples. Results show that the classification obtained by this ad hoc procedure allows a more accurate evaluation of gDNA integrity with respect to a single approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA; a model with nearest interactions].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the earlier developed combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA, a model with all nearest interactions between nucleobases is proposed. It is shown that the transfer rates for various types of nucleotide sequences calculated within this model are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  16. The temperature dependence of the cross section for the energy pooling process Na(3P)+Na(3P) to Na(4D)+Na(3S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvatic, V.; Movre, M.; Vadla, C.

    1999-10-01

    We report the measurements of the temperature dependence of the cross section σ4D for the energy pooling process Na(3P)+Na(3P) to Na(4D)+Na(3S). The latest two, as yet undisputed, results for σ4D obtained by different authors at T = 597 K and T = 483 K suggest that this cross section decreases with increasing T, which contradicts the theory and other experiments on similar processes. To resolve this controversy and to examine the temperature trend of the cross section, we have measured the σ4D in the temperature range 567-705 K, covering the high-temperature region that has not yet been investigated experimentally. To determine σ4D we have excited sodium atoms in the quasistatic wing of the D1 line using a cw dye laser and measured the fluorescence intensity for the 4D to 3P3/2 transition, relative to the intensity of the optically thin quasistatic wing of the D2 line. The spatial distribution of the number density of the sodium atoms in the 3P3/2 state and the sodium ground-state number density were measured too. The method used for the determination of the cross section is advantageous since it entirely circumvents the need to account for the radiation trapping of 3P level radiation, which was substantial under experimental conditions of the ground-state densities being 1014-1016 cm-3. The measurements of the cross section σ4D in the investigated temperature range have shown that it increases as ~exp(-Δ E/kT). From the experiment we obtained Δ E = (608±95) cm-1, which is in excellent agreement with the energy defect (613 cm-1) for the considered process, and in fair agreement with the values which follow from recent theoretical calculations.

  17. Imaging of DNA and Protein by SFM and Combined SFM-TIRF Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grosbart, Małgorzata; Ristić, Dejan; Sánchez, Humberto; Wyman, Claire

    2018-01-01

    Direct imaging is invaluable for understanding the mechanism of complex genome transactions where proteins work together to organize, transcribe, replicate and repair DNA. Scanning (or atomic) force microscopy is an ideal tool for this, providing 3D information on molecular structure at nm resolution from defined components. This is a convenient and practical addition to in vitro studies as readily obtainable amounts of purified proteins and DNA are required. The images reveal structural details on the size and location of DNA bound proteins as well as protein-induced arrangement of the DNA, which are directly correlated in the same complexes. In addition, even from static images, the different forms observed and their relative distributions can be used to deduce the variety and stability of different complexes that are necessarily involved in dynamic processes. Recently available instruments that combine fluorescence with topographic imaging allow the identification of specific molecular components in complex assemblies, which broadens the applications and increases the information obtained from direct imaging of molecular complexes. We describe here basic methods for preparing samples of proteins, DNA and complexes of the two for topographic imaging and quantitative analysis. We also describe special considerations for combined fluorescence and topographic imaging of molecular complexes.

  18. Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B.; Chaplin, M.

    1993-10-06

    This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.

  19. Combined loss of three DNA damage response pathways renders C. elegans intolerant to light.

    PubMed

    van Bostelen, Ivo; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2017-06-01

    Infliction of DNA damage initiates a complex cellular reaction - the DNA damage response - that involves both signaling and DNA repair networks with many redundancies and parallel pathways. Here, we reveal the three strategies that the simple multicellular eukaryote, C. elegans, uses to deal with DNA damage induced by light. Separately inactivating repair or replicative bypass of photo-lesions results in cellular hypersensitivity towards UV-light, but impeding repair of replication associated DNA breaks does not. Yet, we observe an unprecedented synergistic relationship when these pathways are inactivated in combination. C. elegans mutants that lack nucleotide excision repair (NER), translesion synthesis (TLS) and alternative end joining (altEJ) grow undisturbed in the dark, but become sterile when grown in light. Even exposure to very low levels of normal daylight impedes animal growth. We show that NER and TLS operate to suppress the formation of lethal DNA breaks that require polymerase theta-mediated end joining (TMEJ) for their repair. Our data testifies to the enormous genotoxicity of light and to the demand of multiple layers of protection against an environmental threat that is so common. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Updated Phylogenies of the Phasianidae Based on Combined Data of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yong-Yi; Dai, Kun; Cao, Xue; Murphy, Robert W.; Shen, Xue-Juan; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of species in the Phasianidae, Order Galliformes, are the object of intensive study. However, convergent morphological evolution and rapid species radiation result in much ambiguity in the group. Further, matrilineal (mtDNA) genealogies conflict with trees based on nuclear DNA retrotransposable elements. Herein, we analyze 39 nearly complete mitochondrial genomes (three new) and up to seven nuclear DNA segments. We combine these multiple unlinked, more informative genetic markers to infer historical relationships of the major groups of phasianids. The nuclear DNA tree is largely congruent with the tree derived from mt genomes. However, branching orders of mt/nuclear trees largely conflict with those based on retrotransposons. For example, Gallus/Bambusicola/Francolinus forms the sister-group of Coturnix/Alectoris in the nuclear/mtDNA trees, yet the tree based on retrotransposable elements roots the former at the base of the tree and not with the latter. Further, while peafowls cluster with Gallus/Coturnix in the mt tree, they root at the base of the phasianids following Gallus in the tree based on retrotransposable elements. The conflicting branch orders in nuclear/mtDNA and retrotransposons-based trees in our study reveal the complex topology of the Phasianidae. PMID:24748132

  1. Strategic Combination of DNA-Damaging Agent and PARP Inhibitor Results in Enhanced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2013-01-01

    PARP inhibitors (PARPi) are under clinical trial for combination cancer chemotherapy. In the presence of a PARPi, PARP-1 binds DNA strand breaks but cannot produce poly(ADP-ribose) polymers or undergo auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. DNA binding is persistent, hindering DNA repair. Methylated bases formed as a result of cellular exposure to DNA-methylating agents are repaired by DNA polymerase β (pol β)-dependent base excision repair (BER) producing a 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (5′-dRP) repair intermediate. PARP-1 binds and is activated by the 5′-dRP, and PARPi-mediated sensitization to methylating agents is considerable, especially in pol β-deficient cells. Cells deficient in the BER factor XRCC1 are less sensitized by PARPi than are wild-type cells. PARPi sensitization is reduced in cells expressing forms of XRCC1 deficient in interaction with either pol β or PARP-1. In contrast, agents producing oxidative DNA damage and 3′- rather than 5′-repair intermediates are modestly PARPi sensitized. We summarize PARPi experiments in mouse fibroblasts and confirm the importance of the 5′-dRP repair intermediate and functional pol β and XRCC1 proteins. Understanding the chemistry of repair is key to enhancing the clinical success of PARPi. PMID:24137565

  2. A phylogenetic study of Laeliinae (Orchidaceae) based on combined nuclear and plastid DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Cássio; Higgins, Wesley E.; Dressler, Robert L.; Whitten, W. Mark; Soto-Arenas, Miguel A.; Chase, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Laeliinae are a neotropical orchid subtribe with approx. 1500 species in 50 genera. In this study, an attempt is made to assess generic alliances based on molecular phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data. Methods Six DNA datasets were gathered: plastid trnL intron, trnL-F spacer, matK gene and trnK introns upstream and dowstream from matK and nuclear ITS rDNA. Data were analysed with maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian analysis with mixed models (BA). Key Results Although relationships between Laeliinae and outgroups are well supported, within the subtribe sequence variation is low considering the broad taxonomic range covered. Localized incongruence between the ITS and plastid trees was found. A combined tree followed the ITS trees more closely, but the levels of support obtained with MP were low. The Bayesian analysis recovered more well-supported nodes. The trees from combined MP and BA allowed eight generic alliances to be recognized within Laeliinae, all of which show trends in morphological characters but lack unambiguous synapomorphies. Conclusions By using combined plastid and nuclear DNA data in conjunction with mixed-models Bayesian inference, it is possible to delimit smaller groups within Laeliinae and discuss general patterns of pollination and hybridization compatibility. Furthermore, these small groups can now be used for further detailed studies to explain morphological evolution and diversification patterns within the subtribe. PMID:19423551

  3. Pooled safety analysis of the fixed-dose combination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium (QVA149), its monocomponents, and tiotropium versus placebo in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Dahl, Ronald; Buhl, Roland; Schubert-Tennigkeit, Agnes; Chen, Hungta; D'Andrea, Peter; Fogel, Robert; Banerji, Donald

    2014-10-01

    To further assess the safety profile of the fixed-dose combination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium (QVA149) and its monocomponents; we investigated the impact of individual patient-level factors and time by integrating the patient-level safety data from the QVA149 clinical programme with relevant information from the independent indacaterol and glycopyrronium safety databases. Data from 11,404 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were pooled from 14 clinical studies of QVA149, indacaterol and glycopyrronium of ≥3 month's duration with at least two of the treatment groups: QVA149 110/50 μg, glycopyrronium 50 μg, indacaterol 150 μg, placebo or tiotropium 18 μg. Overall hazard ratio (HR) was assessed between the active treatments and placebo and in various subgroups related to severity of airways obstruction, inhaled corticosteroid use, cardiovascular risk factors, sex, age and body mass index for death, serious cases of cardio- and cerebrovascular (CCV) events, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), pneumonia, COPD exacerbations requiring hospitalisation or atrial flutter/fibrillation (AF/F). The HR for QVA149 versus placebo showed no significant increase in the overall risk for death (HR [95% confidence interval]: 0.93 [0.34-2.54]); CCV events (0.60 [0.29-1.24]); MACE (1.04 [0.45-2.42]); pneumonia (1.10 [0.54-2.25]); COPD exacerbations (0.60 [0.40-0.91]); and AF/F (1.03 [0.49-2.18]). Similar results were observed for indacaterol, glycopyrronium and tiotropium versus placebo for overall risk and in analysed subgroups. There was no increase in the risk for the investigated safety endpoints for the fixed-dose combination QVA149, and it had a comparable safety profile as its monocomponents and tiotropium versus placebo. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Flow cytometric detection of micronuclei by combined staining of DNA and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, J.M.; Nuesse, M.

    1995-03-01

    A new staining method is presented for flow cytometric measurement of micronuclei (MN) in cell cultures and human lymphocytes using membrane-specific fluorescent dyes in addition to DNA staining. Several combinations of fluorescent membrane and DNA dyes were studied for a better discrimination of MN from debris in a suspension of nuclei and micronuclei. For staining of membranes, the lipophilic dyes 2-hydroxyethyl-7,12,17-tris(methoxyethyl)porphycene (HEPn) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) were used in combination with ethidium bromide (EB), proflavine (PF), and Hoechst 33258 (HO). Due to their spectral properties, HO or EB combined with HEPn were not as suitable for the discrimination of MN from debris as was HEPn in combination with PF. With HEPn in combination with PF, however, additional noise was found at low fluorescence intensities, probably due to free fluorescent dye molecules in the solution. The optimal simultaneous staining of membranes and DNA was obtained using a combination of DPH and EB. The induction of MN in Chinese hamster and mouse NIH-3T3 cells by UV-B illumination was studied with this new staining technique. UV-B illumination (280-360 nm) induced MN in both cell lines. Chinese hamster cells were found to be more sensitive to these wavelengths. Illumination with wavelengths above 360 nm did not induce MN in either cell line. The results obtained from human lymphocytes using the combination of EB or DPH were comparable to the results obtained with the combination of EB and HO. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  5. [Release of Extracellular DNA after Administration of Radioprotective Combination of α-Tocopherol and Ascorbic Acid].

    PubMed

    Vasilyeval, I N; Bespalov, V G

    2015-01-01

    Radioprotective and apoptotic activities of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) have been studied in 180 Wistar male rats. Rats were administered a single oral dose with vitamin E, vitamin C or their combination at prophylactic doses before or after the single whole body exposure to irradiation at the doses of 2 or 8 Gy. The radioprotective effect was evaluated by the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at metaphase plates of the bone marrow cells, apoptotic--by the level of circulating low-molecular-weight DNA (ImwDNA) in the blood plasma of irradiated rats. Administration of the combination of vitamins E and C before and after the irradiation at the dose of 2 Gy reduced the number of the cells with chromosomal aberrations thus providing the radioprotective effect, but separately administration of these vitamins did not show the significant radioprotective activity. Administration of the combination of vitamins E and C before irradiation with 8 Gy increased the lmwDNA in blood thus providing the apoptotic effect. So, synergy of radioprotective activities has been revealed in vitamins E and C action at prophylactic doses. Radioprotective effect of the combination of vitamins E and C can be associated with the apoptotic activity and can be explained by elimination of the least viable irradiated cells from the cell population.

  6. Synergic Effect of Genistein and Daidzein on UVB-Induced DNA Damage: An Effective Photoprotective Combination

    PubMed Central

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Gasparri, Franco; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities of individual isoflavones are well established although little is known about the photoprotective effect of their combination. The aim of this study was to investigate the photoprotective effects of different concentrations of genistein and daidzein individually or combined. We measured the expression levels of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible (Gadd45) genes, which are involved in inflammation and DNA repair, respectively, in BJ-5ta human skin fibroblasts irradiated with 60 mJ/cm2 UVB. We also determined the cellular response to UVB-induced DNA damage by Comet assay. We report that genistein and daidzein when administered combined, and at a specific concentration and ratio, exerted a synergistic photoprotective effect that was greater than the effect obtained with each isoflavone alone. The results reported herein suggest that low concentrations of genistein and daidzein combined may be good candidate ingredients for protective agents against UV-induced photodamage. PMID:21785564

  7. Synergic Effect of Genistein and Daidzein on UVB-Induced DNA Damage: An Effective Photoprotective Combination.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Gasparri, Franco; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities of individual isoflavones are well established although little is known about the photoprotective effect of their combination. The aim of this study was to investigate the photoprotective effects of different concentrations of genistein and daidzein individually or combined. We measured the expression levels of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible (Gadd45) genes, which are involved in inflammation and DNA repair, respectively, in BJ-5ta human skin fibroblasts irradiated with 60 mJ/cm(2) UVB. We also determined the cellular response to UVB-induced DNA damage by Comet assay. We report that genistein and daidzein when administered combined, and at a specific concentration and ratio, exerted a synergistic photoprotective effect that was greater than the effect obtained with each isoflavone alone. The results reported herein suggest that low concentrations of genistein and daidzein combined may be good candidate ingredients for protective agents against UV-induced photodamage.

  8. Synergistic DNA-damaging effect in multiple myeloma with the combination of zalypsis, bortezomib and dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    López-Iglesias, Ana-Alicia; González-Méndez, Lorena; San-Segundo, Laura; Herrero, Ana B.; Hernández-García, Susana; Martín-Sánchez, Montserrat; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; Paíno, Teresa; Avilés, Pablo; Mateos, María-Victoria; San-Miguel, Jesús F.; Garayoa, Mercedes; Ocio, Enrique M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite new advances in multiple myeloma treatment and the consequent improvement in overall survival, most patients relapse or become refractory to treatment. This suggests that new molecules and combinations that may further inhibit important survival pathways for these tumor cells are needed. In this context, zalypsis is a novel compound, derived from marine organisms, with a powerful preclinical anti-myeloma effect based on the sensitivity of malignant plasma cells to DNA-damage induction; and it has already been tested in a phase I/II clinical trial in multiple myeloma. We hypothesized that the addition of this compound to the combination of bortezomib plus dexamethasone may improve efficacy with acceptable toxicity. The triple combination demonstrated strong synergy and higher efficacy compared with double combinations; not only in vitro, but also ex vivo and, especially, in in vivo experiments. The triple combination triggers cell death, mainly through a synergistic induction of DNA damage and a decrease in the nuclear localization of nuclear factor kappa B. Our findings support the clinical evaluation of this combination for relapsed and refractory myeloma patients. PMID:27540138

  9. Synergistic DNA-damaging effect in multiple myeloma with the combination of zalypsis, bortezomib and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    López-Iglesias, Ana-Alicia; González-Méndez, Lorena; San-Segundo, Laura; Herrero, Ana B; Hernández-García, Susana; Martín-Sánchez, Montserrat; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Paíno, Teresa; Avilés, Pablo; Mateos, María-Victoria; San-Miguel, Jesús F; Garayoa, Mercedes; Ocio, Enrique M

    2017-01-01

    Despite new advances in multiple myeloma treatment and the consequent improvement in overall survival, most patients relapse or become refractory to treatment. This suggests that new molecules and combinations that may further inhibit important survival pathways for these tumor cells are needed. In this context, zalypsis is a novel compound, derived from marine organisms, with a powerful preclinical anti-myeloma effect based on the sensitivity of malignant plasma cells to DNA-damage induction; and it has already been tested in a phase I/II clinical trial in multiple myeloma. We hypothesized that the addition of this compound to the combination of bortezomib plus dexamethasone may improve efficacy with acceptable toxicity. The triple combination demonstrated strong synergy and higher efficacy compared with double combinations; not only in vitro, but also ex vivo and, especially, in in vivo experiments. The triple combination triggers cell death, mainly through a synergistic induction of DNA damage and a decrease in the nuclear localization of nuclear factor kappa B. Our findings support the clinical evaluation of this combination for relapsed and refractory myeloma patients.

  10. Determination of formylated DNA and RNA by chemical labeling combined with mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Liu, Ting; Guo, Ning; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2017-08-15

    Nucleic acids carry diverse chemical modifications that exert critical influences in a variety of cellular processes in living organisms. In addition to methylation, the emerging DNA and RNA formylation has been reported to play functional roles in various physiological processes. However, the amounts of formylated DNA and RNA are extremely low and detection of DNA and RNA formylation is therefore a challenging task. To address this issue, we developed a strategy by chemical labeling combined with in-tube solid-phase microextraction - ultra high performance liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry (in-tube SPME-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis for the sensitive determination of DNA and RNA formylation. Using the developed method, we were able to simultaneously measure six formylated nucleosides, including 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-fodC), 5-formylcytidine (5-forC), 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-fodU), 5-formyluridine (5-forU), 2'-O-methyl-5-formylcytidine (5-forCm) and 2'-O-methyl-5- formyluridine (5-forUm), from DNA and RNA of cultured human cells and multiple mammalian tissues. The detection limits of these formylated nucleosides improved by 307-884 folds using Girard's P (GirP) labeling coupled with in-tube SPME-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. It was worth noting that 5-forU, 5-forCm and 5-forUm which have not been detected in human sample before, were discovered in cultured human cells and tissues in the current study. In addition, we observed significant increase of 5-forC and 5-forU in RNA (p = 0.027 for 5-forC; p = 0.028 for 5-forU) and 5-fodU in DNA (p = 0.002) in human thyroid carcinoma tissues compared to normal tissues adjacent to the tumor using synthesized stable isotope GirP (d5-GirP)-assisted quantification. Our results indicated that aberrant DNA and RNA formylation may contribute to the tumor formation and development. In addition, monitoring of DNA and RNA formylation may also serve as indicator for cancer diagnostics

  11. Nanoparticles and DNA - a powerful and growing functional combination in bionanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-04-01

    Functionally integrating DNA and other nucleic acids with nanoparticles in all their different physicochemical forms has produced a rich variety of composite nanomaterials which, in many cases, display unique or augmented properties due to the synergistic activity of both components. These capabilities, in turn, are attracting greater attention from various research communities in search of new nanoscale tools for diverse applications that include (bio)sensing, labeling, targeted imaging, cellular delivery, diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics, bioelectronics, and biocomputing to name just a few amongst many others. Here, we review this vibrant and growing research area from the perspective of the materials themselves and their unique capabilities. Inorganic nanocrystals such as quantum dots or those made from gold or other (noble) metals along with metal oxides and carbon allotropes are desired as participants in these hybrid materials since they can provide distinctive optical, physical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties. Beyond this, synthetic polymer-based and proteinaceous or viral nanoparticulate materials are also useful in the same role since they can provide a predefined and biocompatible cargo-carrying and targeting capability. The DNA component typically provides sequence-based addressability for probes along with, more recently, unique architectural properties that directly originate from the burgeoning structural DNA field. Additionally, DNA aptamers can also provide specific recognition capabilities against many diverse non-nucleic acid targets across a range of size scales from ions to full protein and cells. In addition to appending DNA to inorganic or polymeric nanoparticles, purely DNA-based nanoparticles have recently surfaced as an excellent assembly platform and have started finding application in areas like sensing, imaging and immunotherapy. We focus on selected and representative nanoparticle-DNA materials and highlight their

  12. A Platform for Combined DNA and Protein Microarrays Based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax. PMID:22438738

  13. Combining single-molecule manipulation and imaging for the study of protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Monico, Carina; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S; Capitanio, Marco

    2014-08-27

    The paper describes the combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence detection for the study of protein-DNA interaction. The method offers the opportunity of investigating interactions occurring in solution (thus avoiding problems due to closeby surfaces as in other single molecule methods), controlling the DNA extension and tracking interaction dynamics as a function of both mechanical parameters and DNA sequence. The methods for establishing successful optical trapping and nanometer localization of single molecules are illustrated. We illustrate the experimental conditions allowing the study of interaction of lactose repressor (lacI), labeled with Atto532, with a DNA molecule containing specific target sequences (operators) for LacI binding. The method allows the observation of specific interactions at the operators, as well as one-dimensional diffusion of the protein during the process of target search. The method is broadly applicable to the study of protein-DNA interactions but also to molecular motors, where control of the tension applied to the partner track polymer (for example actin or microtubules) is desirable.

  14. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  15. Combining Single-molecule Manipulation and Imaging for the Study of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Monico, Carina; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence detection for the study of protein-DNA interaction. The method offers the opportunity of investigating interactions occurring in solution (thus avoiding problems due to closeby surfaces as in other single molecule methods), controlling the DNA extension and tracking interaction dynamics as a function of both mechanical parameters and DNA sequence. The methods for establishing successful optical trapping and nanometer localization of single molecules are illustrated. We illustrate the experimental conditions allowing the study of interaction of lactose repressor (lacI), labeled with Atto532, with a DNA molecule containing specific target sequences (operators) for LacI binding. The method allows the observation of specific interactions at the operators, as well as one-dimensional diffusion of the protein during the process of target search. The method is broadly applicable to the study of protein-DNA interactions but also to molecular motors, where control of the tension applied to the partner track polymer (for example actin or microtubules) is desirable. PMID:25226304

  16. Fabrication of a microarray using a combination of the large circular sense and antisense DNA.

    PubMed

    Doh, Kyung-Oh; Lee, Yun-Han; Han, Kil-Hwan; Uhm, Seok-Yong; Kim, Jong-Pil; Bae, Yun-Ui; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Moon, Ik-Jae; Park, Jong-Gu

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, single-stranded large circular (LC)-sense molecules were utilized as probes for DNA microarrays and showed stronger binding signals than those of PCR-amplified cDNA probes. A microarray experiment using 284 LC-sense DNA probes found 6 upregulated and 7 downregulated genes in A549 cells as compared to WI38VA13 cells. Repeated experiments showed largely consistent results, and microarray data strongly correlated with data acquired from quantitative real-time RT-PCR. A large array comprising 5,079 LC-sense DNA was prepared, and analysis of the mean differential expression from dye-swap experiments revealed 332 upregulated and 509 downregulated genes in A549 cells compared to WI38VA13 cells. Subsequent functional analysis using an LC-antisense library of overexpressed genes identified 28 genes involved in A549 cell growth. These experiments demonstrated the proper features of LC-sense molecules as probe DNA for microarray and the potential utility of the combination of LC-sense and -antisense libraries for an effective functional validation of genes.

  17. Association between Salivary Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Chronic Fatigue according to Combined Symptoms in Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jinyoung; Kim, Kyong Chol; Lee, Duk Chul; Lee, Hye Ree; Shim, Jae Yong

    2017-07-01

    We examined the association between salivary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and chronic fatigue combined with depression and insomnia. This cross-sectional study included 58 healthy adults with moderate to severe fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory [BFI] ≥4) for longer than 6 months. Subjects were classified as those without combined symptoms, with either depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] ≥13) or insomnia (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI] ≥5), or with both depression and insomnia. Salivary mtDNA copy number was measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The association was evaluated using a general linear model. About 76% of participants had either depression or insomnia as additional symptoms. These subjects were predominately female, drank more alcohol, and exercised less than those without combined symptoms (P<0.05). The group with both depression and insomnia exhibited significantly higher BFI and lower mtDNA copy number than those without combined symptoms (P<0.05). After adjusting for confounding factors, significant negative associations between mtDNA copy number and usual fatigue were found in the group without combined symptoms, whereas the negative associations in the group with combined symptoms were attenuated. BDI and PSQI were not associated with mtDNA copy number. Chronic fatigue is negatively associated with salivary mtDNA copy number. Salivary mtDNA copy number may be a biological marker of fatigue with or without combined symptoms, indicating that a separate approach is necessary.

  18. DNA repair in human fibroblasts treated with a combination of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, F.E.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-07-01

    Excision repair of DNA damage was measured by the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum group C fibroblasts (XP C) treated with a combination of the carcinogens N-acetoxy-2-acetylamino fluorene (AAAF), and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO). Repair was additive in normal and XP C cells treated with AAAF plus 4NQO, indicating that there are different rate limiting steps for removal of 4NQO and AAAF lesions.

  19. Augmentation of French grunt diet description using combined visual and DNA-based analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hargrove, John S.; Parkyn, Daryl C.; Murie, Debra J.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Austin, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Trophic linkages within a coral-reef ecosystem may be difficult to discern in fish species that reside on, but do not forage on, coral reefs. Furthermore, dietary analysis of fish can be difficult in situations where prey is thoroughly macerated, resulting in many visually unrecognisable food items. The present study examined whether the inclusion of a DNA-based method could improve the identification of prey consumed by French grunt, Haemulon flavolineatum, a reef fish that possesses pharyngeal teeth and forages on soft-bodied prey items. Visual analysis indicated that crustaceans were most abundant numerically (38.9%), followed by sipunculans (31.0%) and polychaete worms (5.2%), with a substantial number of unidentified prey (12.7%). For the subset of prey with both visual and molecular data, there was a marked reduction in the number of unidentified sipunculans (visual – 31.1%, combined &ndash 4.4%), unidentified crustaceans (visual &ndash 15.6%, combined &ndash 6.7%), and unidentified taxa (visual &ndash 11.1%, combined &ndash 0.0%). Utilising results from both methodologies resulted in an increased number of prey placed at the family level (visual &ndash 6, combined &ndash 33) and species level (visual &ndash 0, combined &ndash 4). Although more costly than visual analysis alone, our study demonstrated the feasibility of DNA-based identification of visually unidentifiable prey in the stomach contents of fish.

  20. Idelalisib and bendamustine combination is synergistic and increases DNA damage response in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Modi, Prexy; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Yang, Qingshan; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Gandhi, Varsha

    2017-02-07

    Idelalisib is a targeted agent that potently inhibits PI3Kδ which is exclusively expressed in hematological cells. Bendamustine is a well-tolerated cytotoxic alkylating agent which has been extensively used for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Both these agents are FDA-approved for CLL. To increase the potency of idelalisib and bendamustine, we tested their combination in primary CLL lymphocytes. While each compound alone produced a moderate response, combination at several concentrations resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity. Idelalisib enhanced the bendamustine-mediated DNA damage/repair response, indicated by the phosphorylation of ATM, Chk2, and p53. Each drug alone activated γH2AX but combination treatment further increased the expression of this DNA damage marker. Compared with the control, idelalisib treatment decreased global RNA synthesis, resulting in a decline of early-response and short-lived MCL1 transcripts. In concert, there was a decline in total Mcl-1 protein in CLL lymphocytes. Isogenic mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking MCL1 had higher sensitivity to bendamustine alone or in combination compared to MCL1 proficient cells. Collectively, these data indicate that bendamustine and idelalisib combination therapy should be investigated for treating patients with CLL.

  1. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  2. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  3. A possible mechanism for combined arsenic and fluoride induced cellular and DNA damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Flora, Swaran J S; Mittal, Megha; Pachauri, Vidhu; Dwivedi, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and fluoride are major contaminants of drinking water. Mechanisms of toxicity following individual exposure to arsenic or fluoride are well known. However, it is not explicit how combined exposure to arsenic and fluoride leads to cellular and/or DNA damage. The present study was planned to assess (i) oxidative stress during combined chronic exposure to arsenic and fluoride in drinking water, (ii) correlation of oxidative stress with cellular and DNA damage and (iii) mechanism of cellular damage using IR spectroscopy. Mice were exposed to arsenic and fluoride (50 ppm) either individually or in combination for 28 weeks. Arsenic or fluoride exposure individually led to a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated oxidative stress in blood, liver and brain. Individual exposure to the two toxicants showed significant depletion of blood glutathione (GSH) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, and single-stranded DNA damage using a comet assay in lymphocytes. We also observed an increase in the activity of ATPase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and a decreased, reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH : GSSG) ratio in the liver and brain. Antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were decreased and increased in liver and brain respectively. The changes were more pronounced in liver compared to brain suggesting liver to be more susceptible to the toxic effects of arsenic and fluoride. Interestingly, combined exposure to arsenic and fluoride resulted in less pronounced toxic effects compared to their individual effects based on biochemical variables, IR spectra, DNA damage (TUNEL and comet assays) and histopathological observations. IR spectra suggested that arsenic or fluoride perturbs the strength of protein and amide groups; however, the shifts in peaks were not pronounced during combined exposure. These results thus highlight the role of

  4. Predictors of global methylation levels in blood DNA of healthy subjects: a combined analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhong-Zheng; Hou, Lifang; Bollati, Valentina; Tarantini, Letizia; Marinelli, Barbara; Cantone, Laura; Yang, Allen S; Vokonas, Pantel; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fustinoni, Silvia; Pesatori, Angela C; Bonzini, Matteo; Apostoli, Pietro; Costa, Giovanni; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Chow, Wong-Ho; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Background Estimates of global DNA methylation from repetitive DNA elements, such as Alu and LINE-1, have been increasingly used in epidemiological investigations because of their relative low-cost, high-throughput and quantitative results. Nevertheless, determinants of these methylation measures in healthy individuals are still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether age, gender, smoking habits, alcohol drinking and body mass index (BMI) are associated with Alu or LINE-1 methylation levels in blood leucocyte DNA of healthy individuals. Methods Individual data from five studies including a total of 1465 healthy subjects were combined. DNA methylation was quantified by PCR-pyrosequencing. Results Age [β = −0.011% of 5-methyl-cytosine (%5mC)/year, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.020 to −0.001%5mC/year] and alcohol drinking (β = −0.214, 95% CI −0.415 to −0.013) were inversely associated with Alu methylation. Compared with females, males had lower Alu methylation (β = −0.385, 95% CI −0.665 to −0.104) and higher LINE-1 methylation (β = 0.796, 95% CI 0.261 to 1.330). No associations were found with smoking or BMI. Percent neutrophils and lymphocytes in blood counts exhibited a positive (β = 0.036, 95% CI 0.010 to 0.061) and negative (β = −0.038, 95% CI −0.065 to −0.012) association with LINE-1 methylation, respectively. Conclusions Global methylation measures in blood DNA vary in relation with certain host and lifestyle characteristics, including age, gender, alcohol drinking and white blood cell counts. These findings need to be considered in designing epidemiological investigations aimed at identifying associations between DNA methylation and health outcomes. PMID:20846947

  5. Microdosimetry calculations for monoenergetic electrons using Geant4-DNA combined with a weighted track sampling algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famulari, Gabriel; Pater, Piotr; Enger, Shirin A.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate microdosimetric distributions for low energy electrons simulated using the Monte Carlo track structure code Geant4-DNA. Tracks for monoenergetic electrons with kinetic energies ranging from 100 eV to 1 MeV were simulated in an infinite spherical water phantom using the Geant4-DNA extension included in Geant4 toolkit version 10.2 (patch 02). The microdosimetric distributions were obtained through random sampling of transfer points and overlaying scoring volumes within the associated volume of the tracks. Relative frequency distributions of energy deposition f(>E)/f(>0) and dose mean lineal energy (\\bar{y}D ) values were calculated in nanometer-sized spherical and cylindrical targets. The effects of scoring volume and scoring techniques were examined. The results were compared with published data generated using MOCA8B and KURBUC. Geant4-DNA produces a lower frequency of higher energy deposits than MOCA8B. The \\bar{y}D values calculated with Geant4-DNA are smaller than those calculated using MOCA8B and KURBUC. The differences are mainly due to the lower ionization and excitation cross sections of Geant4-DNA for low energy electrons. To a lesser extent, discrepancies can also be attributed to the implementation in this study of a new and fast scoring technique that differs from that used in previous studies. For the same mean chord length (\\bar{l} ), the \\bar{y}D calculated in cylindrical volumes are larger than those calculated in spherical volumes. The discrepancies due to cross sections and scoring geometries increase with decreasing scoring site dimensions. A new set of \\bar{y}D values has been presented for monoenergetic electrons using a fast track sampling algorithm and the most recent physics models implemented in Geant4-DNA. This dataset can be combined with primary electron spectra to predict the radiation quality of photon and electron beams.

  6. Genotoxicity of water concentrates from recreational pools after various disinfection methods.

    PubMed

    Liviac, Danae; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mitch, William A; Altonji, Matthew J; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Swimming and hot tub bathing are popular exercises and diversions. Disinfection of recreational pools is essential to prevent outbreaks of infectious disease. Recent research demonstrated an association between the application of disinfectants to recreational pools and adverse health outcomes. These pool waters represent extreme cases of disinfection that differ from disinfecting drinking waters. Pool waters are continuously exposed to disinfectants over average residence times extending to months. Disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors include natural humic substances plus inputs from bathers through urine, sweat, hair, skin, and consumer products including cosmetics and sunscreens. This study presents a systematic mammalian cell genotoxicity analysis to evaluate different recreational waters derived from a common tap water source. The data demonstrated that all disinfected recreational pool water samples induced more genomic DNA damage than the source tap water. The type of disinfectant and illumination conditions altered the genotoxicity of the water. Accordingly, care should be taken in the disinfectant employed to treat recreational pool waters. The genotoxicity data suggest that brominating agents should be avoided. Combining chlorine with UV may be beneficial as compared to chlorination alone. During the recycling of pool water the organic carbon could be removed prior to disinfection. Behavior modification by swimmers may be critical in reducing the genotoxicity of pool water. Actions such as showering before entering the water and informing patrons about the potential harm from urinating in a pool could reduce the precursors of toxic DBPs.

  7. Heterogeneous Cell Density and Genetic Structure of Bacterial Pools Associated with Various Soil Microenvironments as Determined by Enumeration and DNA Fingerprinting Approach (RISA).

    PubMed

    Ranjard; Poly; Combrisson; Richaume; Gourbière; Thioulouse; Nazaret

    2000-05-01

    The cell density and the genetic structure of bacterial subcommunities (further named pools) present in the various microenvironments of a silt loam soil were investigated. The microenvironments were isolated first using a procedure of soil washes that separated bacteria located outside aggregates (outer part) from those located inside aggregates (inner part). A nondestructive physical fractionation was then applied to the inner part in order to separate bacteria located inside stable aggregates of different size (size fractions, i.e., two macroaggregate fractions, two microaggregate fractions, and the dispersible day fraction). Bacterial densities measured by acridine orange direct counts (AODC) and viable heterotrophic (VH) cell enumerations showed the heterogeneous quantitative distribution of cells in soil. Bacteria were preferentially located in the inner part with 87.6% and 95.4% of the whole AODC and VH bacteria, respectively, and in the microaggregate and dispersible clay fractions of this part with more than 70% and 80% of the whole AODC and VH bacteria, respectively. The rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) was used to study the genetic structure of the bacterial pools. Different fingerprints and consequently different genetic structures were observed between the unfractionated soil and the microenvironments, and also among the various microenvironments, giving evidence that some populations were specific to a given location in addition to the common populations of all the microenvironments. Cluster and multivariate analysis of RISA profiles showed the weak contribution of the pools located in the macroaggregate fractions to the whole soil community structure, as well as the clear distinction between the pool associated to the macroaggregate fractions and the pools associated to the microaggregate ones. Furthermore, these statistical analyses allowed us to ascertain the influence of the clay and organic matter content of microenvironments on the genetic

  8. What Combined Measurements From Structures and Imaging Tell Us About DNA Damage Responses

    PubMed Central

    Brosey, Chris A.; Ahmed, Zamal; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Tainer, John A.

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage outcomes depend upon the efficiency and fidelity of DNA damage responses (DDRs) for different cells and damage. As such, DDRs represent tightly regulated prototypical systems for linking nanoscale biomolecular structure and assembly to the biology of genomic regulation and cell signaling. However, the dynamic and multifunctional nature of DDR assemblies can render elusive the correlation between the structures of DDR factors and specific biological disruptions to the DDR when these structures are altered. In this chapter, we discuss concepts and strategies for combining structural, biophysical, and imaging techniques to investigate DDR recognition and regulation, and thus bridge sequence-level structural biochemistry to quantitative biological outcomes visualized in cells. We focus on representative DDR responses from PARP/PARG/AIF damage signaling in DNA single-strand break repair and nonhomologous end joining complexes in double-strand break repair. Methods with exemplary experimental results are considered with a focus on strategies for probing flexibility, conformational changes, and assembly processes that shape a predictive understanding of DDR mechanisms in a cellular context. Integration of structural and imaging measurements promises to provide foundational knowledge to rationally control and optimize DNA damage outcomes for synthetic lethality and for immune activation with resulting insights for biology and cancer interventions. PMID:28668129

  9. An integrated strategy combining DNA walking and NGS to detect GMOs.

    PubMed

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; Papazova, Nina; De Loose, Marc; Deforce, Dieter; Ruttink, Tom; Roosens, Nancy H

    2017-10-01

    Recently, we developed a DNA walking system for the detection and characterization of a broad spectrum of GMOs in routine analysis of food/feed matrices. Here, we present a new version with improved throughput and sensitivity by coupling the DNA walking system to Pacific Bioscience® Next-generation sequencing technology. The performance of the new strategy was thoroughly assessed through several assays. First, we tested its detection and identification capability on grains with high or low GMO content. Second, the potential impacts of food processing were investigated using rice noodle samples. Finally, GMO mixtures and a real-life sample were analyzed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed strategy in routine GMO analysis. In all tested samples, the presence of multiple GMOs was unambiguously proven by the characterization of transgene flanking regions and the combinations of elements that are typical for transgene constructs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of DNA primase inhibitors via a combined fragment-based and virtual screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, Stefan; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard; Richardson, Charles C.; Akabayov, Barak

    2016-11-01

    The structural differences between bacterial and human primases render the former an excellent target for drug design. Here we describe a technique for selecting small molecule inhibitors of the activity of T7 DNA primase, an ideal model for bacterial primases due to their common structural and functional features. Using NMR screening, fragment molecules that bind T7 primase were identified and then exploited in virtual filtration to select larger molecules from the ZINC database. The molecules were docked to the primase active site using the available primase crystal structure and ranked based on their predicted binding energies to identify the best candidates for functional and structural investigations. Biochemical assays revealed that some of the molecules inhibit T7 primase-dependent DNA replication. The binding mechanism was delineated via NMR spectroscopy. Our approach, which combines fragment based and virtual screening, is rapid and cost effective and can be applied to other targets.

  11. Multiplexed Dynamic Imaging of Genomic Loci by Combined CRISPR Imaging and DNA Sequential FISH.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yodai; Shah, Sheel; Harvey, Sho; Qi, Lei S; Cai, Long

    2017-05-09

    Visualization of chromosome dynamics allows the investigation of spatiotemporal chromatin organization and its role in gene regulation and other cellular processes. However, current approaches to label multiple genomic loci in live cells have a fundamental limitation in the number of loci that can be labeled and uniquely identified. Here we describe an approach we call "track first and identify later" for multiplexed visualization of chromosome dynamics by combining two techniques: CRISPR imaging and DNA sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our approach first labels and tracks chromosomal loci in live cells with the CRISPR-Cas9 system, then barcodes those loci by DNA sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization in fixed cells and resolves their identities. We demonstrate our approach by tracking telomere dynamics, identifying 12 unique subtelomeric regions with variable detection efficiencies, and tracking back the telomere dynamics of respective chromosomes in mouse embryonic stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibitors of DNA Methylation, Histone Deacetylation, and Histone Demethylation: A Perfect Combination for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zahnow, C A; Topper, M; Stone, M; Murray-Stewart, T; Li, H; Baylin, S B; Casero, R A

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing and inappropriate activation of gene expression are frequent events during the initiation and progression of cancer. These events involve a complex interplay between the hypermethylation of CpG dinucleotides within gene promoter and enhancer regions, the recruitment of transcriptional corepressors and the deacetylation and/or methylation of histone tails. These epigenetic regulators act in concert to block transcription or interfere with the maintenance of chromatin boundary regions. However, DNA/histone methylation and histone acetylation states are reversible, enzyme-mediated processes and as such, have emerged as promising targets for cancer therapy. This review will focus on the potential benefits and synergistic/additive effects of combining DNA-demethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors or lysine-specific demethylase inhibitors together in epigenetic therapy for solid tumors and will highlight what is known regarding the mechanisms of action that contribute to the antitumor response.

  13. Identification of DNA primase inhibitors via a combined fragment-based and virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Stefan; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard; Richardson, Charles C.; Akabayov, Barak

    2016-01-01

    The structural differences between bacterial and human primases render the former an excellent target for drug design. Here we describe a technique for selecting small molecule inhibitors of the activity of T7 DNA primase, an ideal model for bacterial primases due to their common structural and functional features. Using NMR screening, fragment molecules that bind T7 primase were identified and then exploited in virtual filtration to select larger molecules from the ZINC database. The molecules were docked to the primase active site using the available primase crystal structure and ranked based on their predicted binding energies to identify the best candidates for functional and structural investigations. Biochemical assays revealed that some of the molecules inhibit T7 primase-dependent DNA replication. The binding mechanism was delineated via NMR spectroscopy. Our approach, which combines fragment based and virtual screening, is rapid and cost effective and can be applied to other targets. PMID:27805033

  14. Stochastic pooling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, Mark D.; Amblard, Pierre-Olivier; Stocks, Nigel G.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and define the concept of a stochastic pooling network (SPN), as a model for sensor systems where redundancy and two forms of 'noise'—lossy compression and randomness—interact in surprising ways. Our approach to analysing SPNs is information theoretic. We define an SPN as a network with multiple nodes that each produce noisy and compressed measurements of the same information. An SPN must combine all these measurements into a single further compressed network output, in a way dictated solely by naturally occurring physical properties—i.e. pooling—and yet cause no (or negligible) reduction in mutual information. This means that SPNs exhibit redundancy reduction as an emergent property of pooling. The SPN concept is applicable to examples in biological neural coding, nanoelectronics, distributed sensor networks, digital beamforming arrays, image processing, multiaccess communication networks and social networks. In most cases the randomness is assumed to be unavoidably present rather than deliberately introduced. We illustrate the central properties of SPNs for several case studies, where pooling occurs by summation, including nodes that are noisy scalar quantizers, and nodes with conditionally Poisson statistics. Other emergent properties of SPNs and some unsolved problems are also briefly discussed.

  15. Clinical variability in neurohepatic syndrome due to combined mitochondrial DNA depletion and Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Harvengt, Julie; Wanty, Catherine; De Paepe, Boel; Sempoux, Christine; Revencu, Nicole; Smet, Joél; Van Coster, Rudy; Lissens, Willy; Seneca, Sara; Weekers, Laurent; Sokal, Etienne; Debray, François-Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    A 1-year-old girl born to consanguineous parents presented with unexplained liver failure, leading to transplantation at 19 months. Subsequent partial splenectomy for persistent cytopenia showed the presence of foamy cells, and Gaucher disease was confirmed by homozygosity for the p.Leu483Pro mutation in the GBA gene. She was treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Clinical follow-up showed mild developmental delay, strabismus, nystagmus and oculomotor apraxia. Biochemical studies revealed multiple respiratory chain deficiencies and a mosaic pattern of deficient complex IV immunostaining in liver and fibroblast. Molecular analysis identified a mtDNA depletion syndrome due to the homozygous p.Pro98Leu mutation in MPV17. A younger sister unaffected by mtDNA depletion, presented with pancytopenia and hepatosplenomegaly. ERT for Gaucher disease resulted in visceral normalization without any neurological symptom. A third sister, affected by both conditions, had marked developmental delay, strabismus and ophthalmoplegia but no liver cirrhosis. In conclusion, intrafamilal variability occurs in MPV17-related disease. The combined pathological effect of Gaucher and mitochondrial diseases can negatively impact neurological and liver functions and influence the outcome in consanguineous families. The immunocytochemical staining of OXPHOS protein in tissues and cultured cells is a powerful tool revealing mosaic pattern of deficiency pointing to mtDNA-related mitochondrial disorders.

  16. Combined sequencing of mRNA and DNA from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mertes, Florian; Kuhl, Heiner; Wruck, Wasco; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2016-06-01

    Combined transcriptome and whole genome sequencing of the same ultra-low input sample down to single cells is a rapidly evolving approach for the analysis of rare cells. Besides stem cells, rare cells originating from tissues like tumor or biopsies, circulating tumor cells and cells from early embryonic development are under investigation. Herein we describe a universal method applicable for the analysis of minute amounts of sample material (150 to 200 cells) derived from sub-colony structures from human embryonic stem cells. The protocol comprises the combined isolation and separate amplification of poly(A) mRNA and whole genome DNA followed by next generation sequencing. Here we present a detailed description of the method developed and an overview of the results obtained for RNA and whole genome sequencing of human embryonic stem cells, sequencing data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE69471.

  17. LinguisticBelief and PoolEvidence

    SciTech Connect

    DARBY, JOHN

    2008-03-11

    LinguisticBelief allows the creation and analysis of combinations of linguistic variables with epistemic uncertainty for decision making. The model is solved using approximate reasoning to implement the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for combinations of variables expressed as purely linguistic fuzzy sets. PoolEvidence pools evidence for linguistic variables from many experts for input into LinguisticBelief.

  18. Determination of DNA adducts by combining acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chromatographic analysis of the carcinogen-modified nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elvis M K; Deng, Kailin; Wong, Tin-Yan; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used method of analyzing carcinogen-induced DNA adducts involves the hydrolysis of carcinogen-modified DNA samples by using a mixture of enzymes, followed by (32)P-postlabeling or liquid chromatography (LC)-based analyses of carcinogen-modified mononucleotides/nucleosides. In the present study, we report the development and application of a new approach to DNA adduct analysis by combining the H(+)/heat-catalyzed release of carcinogen-modified nucleobases and the use of LC-based methods to analyze DNA adducts. Results showed that heating the carcinogen-modified DNA samples at 70 °C for an extended period of 4 to 6 h in the presence of 0.05% HCl can efficiently induce DNA depurination, releasing the intact carcinogen-modified nucleobases for LC analyses. After optimizing the hydrolysis conditions, DNA samples with C8- and N (2) -modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, as well as N (6) -modified 2'-deoxyadenosine, were synthesized by reacting DNA with 1-nitropyrene, acetaldehyde, and aristolochic acids, respectively. These samples were then hydrolyzed, and the released nucleobase adducts were analyzed using LC-based analytical methods. Analysis results demonstrated a dose-dependent release of target DNA adducts from carcinogen-modified DNA samples, indicating that the developed H(+)/heat-catalyzed hydrolysis method was quantitative. Comparative studies with enzymatic digestion method on carcinogen-modified DNA samples revealed that the two hydrolysis methods did not yield systematically different results.

  19. DNA-quantum dot sensing platform with combined Förster resonance energy transfer and photovoltaic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huijie; Wang, Lixiang; Wong, Ka-wai; Du, Zuliang

    2009-04-01

    A special DNA sensing platform based on a network of hybrid DNA-quantum dot system was designed and fabricated. Upon attachment of hybridized complementary DNA sequences, the molecular switch system can exhibit both photoinduced Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and photovoltaic (PV) effects simultaneously, but will give much weakened or no effect for the capture of hybridized products from "mismatched" DNA sequences. This dual sensing scheme based on combined FRET and PV effects can safeguard the accuracy of sensing, as FRET and PV can be singly induced even in the case of mismatch.

  20. Combining natural and man-made DNA tracers to advance understanding of hydrologic flow pathway evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Walter, M. T.; Lyon, S. W.; Rosqvist, G. N.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying and characterizing the sources, pathways and residence times of water and associated constituents is critical to developing improved understanding of watershed-stream connections and hydrological/ecological/biogeochemical models. To date the most robust information is obtained from integrated studies that combine natural tracers (e.g. isotopes, geochemical tracers) with controlled chemical tracer (e.g., bromide, dyes) or colloidal tracer (e.g., carboxilated microspheres, tagged clay particles, microorganisms) applications. In the presented study we explore how understanding of sources and flow pathways of water derived from natural tracer studies can be improved and expanded in space and time by simultaneously introducing man-made, synthetic DNA-based microtracers. The microtracer used were composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated. Tracer experiments using both natural tracers and the DNA-based microtracers were conducted in the sub-arctic, glacierized Tarfala (21.7 km2) catchment in northern Sweden. Isotopic hydrograph separations revealed that even though storm runoff was dominated by pre-event water the event water (i.e. rainfall) contributions to streamflow increased throughout the summer season as glacial snow cover decreased. This suggests that glaciers are a major source of the rainwater fraction in streamflow. Simultaneous injections of ten unique DNA-based microtracers confirmed this hypothesis and revealed that the transit time of water traveling from the glacier surface to the stream decreased fourfold over the summer season leading to instantaneous rainwater contributions during storm events. These results highlight that integrating simultaneous tracer injections (injecting tracers at multiple places at one time) with traditional tracer methods (sampling multiple times at one place) rather than using either approach in isolation can

  1. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. PMID:27369379

  2. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-09-30

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Synergistic antileukemic action of a combination of inhibitors of DNA methylation and histone methylation.

    PubMed

    Momparler, Richard L; Idaghdour, Youssef; Marquez, Victor E; Momparler, Louise F

    2012-08-01

    DNA methylation and histone methylation are both involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and their dysregulation can play an important role in leukemogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation has been reported to silence the expression of tumor suppressor genes in leukemia. Overexpression of the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, a subunit of the polycomb group repressive complex 2 (PRC2), was observed to promote oncogenesis. This is due to aberrant gene silencing by the trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) by EZH2. Since both these epigenetic silencing events are reversible, they are interesting targets for chemotherapeutic intervention by using an inhibitor of DNA methylation, such as 5-aza-2'-deoxcytidine (5-AZA-CdR), and 3-deazaneplanocin-A (DZNep), an inhibitor of the EZH2. Human HL-60 and murine L1210 leukemic cells exposed in vitro to 5-AZA-CdR and DZNep in combination showed a synergistic loss of clonogenicity in a colony assay as compared to each agent alone. This positive chemotherapeutic interaction was also observed in mice with L1210 leukemia. Quantitative PCR showed that the combination also produced a remarkable synergistic activation of the tumor suppressor genes, CDKN1A and FBXO32. Microarray analysis showed that 5-AZA-CdR plus DZNep produced a synergistic activation of >150 genes. Our results indicate that 5-AZA-CdR plus DZNep can reactivate target genes that are silenced by two distinct epigenetic mechanisms leading to a loss of the proliferative potential of leukemic cells.

  4. Influence of smoking combined with another risk factor on the risk of mortality from coronary heart disease and stroke: pooled analysis of 10 Japanese cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koshi; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Sakurai, Masaru; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Irie, Fujiko; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Okamura, Tomonori; Miura, Katsuyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the importance of a multifactorial approach to preventing cardiovascular disease in smokers, most information on the combined adverse effects of smoking and hypertension or high serum cholesterol on cardiovascular disease has been derived from Western populations, and coronary heart disease was often used as the only endpoint. Therefore, the present large-scale pooled analysis attempted to provide reliable information on the adverse effects of the coexistence of smoking and hypertension or high serum cholesterol on the risk of mortality from coronary heart disease and stroke in both, individuals and the entire population in Japan. A total of 27,385 male and 39,207 female participants aged 40-89 years were enrolled from 10 well-qualified Japanese cohort studies with a mean follow-up of 10.1 years. Hazard ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals in smokers who had hypertension or high serum cholesterol were estimated for men and women separately using a Cox proportional hazards regression model that included age, body mass index, cohort and either serum total cholesterol or systolic blood pressure as covariates. Fractions of deaths attributable to the coexistence of these risk factors were also calculated. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios in male and female current smokers with hypertension, compared with those with neither factor were 2.57 (95% confidence intervals, 1.51-4.38) and 6.14 (3.49-10.79) for coronary heart disease, and 3.28 (1.89-5.71) and 1.61 (0.81-3.18) for cerebral infarction, respectively. The fractions of deaths attributable to the coexistence of current smoking and hypertension in men and women were 24.6 and 9.6% for coronary heart disease and 28.1 and 2.0% for cerebral infarction, respectively. Smokers with high serum cholesterol were broadly comparable to hypertensive smokers only with respect to coronary mortality risk; the hazard ratios, compared with those with neither factor were 4.19 (2.33-7.53) for men and

  5. Combined single-molecule manipulation and localization for the study of lac Repressor 1D-diffusion along DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcastro, G.; Mónico, C.; Capitanio, M.; Vanzi, F.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-09-01

    The maintenance of intact genetic information, as well as the deployment of transcription for specific sets of genes, critically rely on a family of proteins interacting with DNA and recognizing specific sequences or features. The mechanisms by which these proteins search for target DNA are the subject of intense investigations employing a variety of methods in biology. A large interest in these processes stems from the faster-than-diffusion association rates, explained in current models by a combination of 3D and 1D diffusion. Here, we describe the combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence detection for the study of protein-DNA interaction. The method offers the opportunity of investigating interactions occurring in solution (thus avoiding problems due to closeby surfaces as in other single molecule methods), controlling the DNA extension and tracking interaction dynamics as a function of both mechanical parameters and DNA sequence.

  6. ECS DAAC Data Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiebuzinski, A. B.; Bories, C. M.; Kalluri, S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of its Earth Observing System (EOS), NASA supports operations for several satellites including Landsat 7, Terra, and Aqua. ECS (EOSDIS Core System) is a vast archival and distribution system and includes several Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) located around the United States. EOSDIS reached a milestone in February when its data holdings exceeded one petabyte (1,000 terabytes) in size. It has been operational since 1999 and originally was intended to serve a large community of Earth Science researchers studying global climate change. The Synergy Program was initiated in 2000 with the purpose of exploring and expanding the use of remote sensing data beyond the traditional research community to the applications community including natural resource managers, disaster/emergency managers, urban planners and others. This included facilitating data access at the DAACs to enable non-researchers to exploit the data for their specific applications. The combined volume of data archived daily across the DAACs is of the order of three terabytes. These archived data are made available to the research community and to general users of ECS data. Currently, the average data volume distributed daily is two terabytes, which combined with an ever-increasing need for timely access to these data, taxes the ECS processing and archival resources for more real-time use than was previously intended for research purposes. As a result, the delivery of data sets to users was being delayed in many cases, to unacceptable limits. Raytheon, under the auspices of the Synergy Program, investigated methods at making data more accessible at a lower cost of resources (processing and archival) at the DAACs. Large on-line caches (as big as 70 Terabytes) of data were determined to be a solution that would allow users who require contemporary data to access them without having to pull it from the archive. These on-line caches are referred to as "Data Pools." In the Data Pool concept

  7. Combination Platinum-based and DNA Damage Response-targeting Cancer Therapy: Evolution and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Basourakos, Spyridon P; Li, Likun; Aparicio, Ana M; Corn, Paul G; Kim, Jeri; Thompson, Timothy C

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability is a critical determinant of cell survival and is necessary for growth and progression of malignant cells. Interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agents, including platinum-based agents, are first-line chemotherapy treatment for many solid human cancers. In malignant cells, ICL triggers the DNA damage response (DDR). When the damage burden is high and lesions cannot be repaired, malignant cells are unable to divide and ultimately undergo cell death either through mitotic catastrophe or apoptosis. The activities of ICL agents, in particular platinum-based therapies, establish a "molecular landscape," i.e., a pattern of DNA damage that can potentially be further exploited therapeutically with DDR-targeting agents. If the molecular landscape created by platinum-based agents could be better defined at the molecular level, a systematic, mechanistic rationale(s) could be developed for the use of DDR-targeting therapies in combination/maintenance protocols for specific, clinically advanced malignancies. New therapeutic drugs such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are examples of DDR-targeting therapies that could potentially increase the DNA damage and replication stress imposed by platinum-based agents in tumor cells and provide therapeutic benefit for patients with advanced malignancies. Recent studies have shown that the use of PARP inhibitors together with platinum-based agents is a promising therapy strategy for ovarian cancer patients with "BRCAness", i.e., a phenotypic characteristic of tumors that not only can involve loss-of-function mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, but also encompasses the molecular features of BRCA-mutant tumors. On the basis of these promising results, additional mechanism-based studies focused on the use of various DDR-targeting therapies in combination with platinum-based agents should be considered. This review discusses, in general, (1) ICL agents, primarily platinum-based agents, that establish a

  8. Single step plasmid DNA purification using methacrylate monolith bearing combination of ion-exchange and hydrophobic groups.

    PubMed

    Smrekar, Vida; Smrekar, Franc; Strancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2013-02-08

    Purification of high quantities of human grade plasmid DNA is one of the most intensive production steps. Because of that several methods have been proposed, among them also chromatographic purification using methacrylate monoliths. Recently, a process comprising the combination of hydrophobic interaction (HIC) monolith and ion-exchange monolith was developed. In this work both chemistries were tried to be introduced on a single monolith. Methacrylate monoliths bearing octylamine groups, combination of butyl (C4) grafted methacrylate groups and diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) groups as well as grafted chains bearing both C4 and DEAE groups were prepared. All monoliths were investigated for their ionic and protein capacity and compared to conventional epoxy, C4, and DEAE methacrylate monoliths. Octylamine monolith and monolith bearing combination of C4 grafted methacrylate groups and DEAE groups were found to be the most promising candidates and were further tested for plasmid DNA (pDNA) dynamic binding capacity under ion-exchange (IEX) and HIC binding conditions and ability to separate open circular (OC) from supercoiled (SC) pDNA forms and RNA from pDNA. Since monolith bearing combination of grafted C4 methacrylate groups and DEAE groups was superior in all three tested features, exhibiting pDNA dynamic binding capacity of 4.7 mg/ml under IEX conditions and 2.1mg/ml under HIC conditions, it was used for the development of a single step purification method and tested with pure pDNA as well as with cell lysate. Developed method removed over 99% of RNA, host cell proteins (HCP) and genomic DNA (gDNA) demonstrating capacity to purify around 1.5mg of pDNA/ml of monolith from cell lysate.

  9. Combining a Ru(II) "Building Block" and Rapid Screening Approach to Identify DNA Structure-Selective "Light Switch" Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Erin; Moyá, Diego; Glazer, Edith C

    2017-02-13

    A chemically reactive Ru(II) "building block", able to undergo condensation reactions with substituted diamines, was utilized to create a small library of luminescent "light switch" dipyrido-[3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine (dppz) complexes. The impact of substituent identity, position, and the number of substituents on the light switch effect was investigated. An unbiased, parallel screening approach was used to evaluate the selectivity of the compounds for a variety of different biomolecules, including protein, nucleosides, single stranded DNA, duplex DNA, triplex DNA, and G-quadruplex DNA. Combining these two approaches allowed for the identification of hit molecules that showed different selectivities for biologically relevant DNA structures, particularly triplex and quadruplex DNA.

  10. Laser microtreatment for genetic manipulations and DNA diagnostics by a combination of microbeam and photonic tweezers (laser microbeam trap)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl-Otto; Monajembashi, Shamci; Celeda, D.; Endlich, N.; Eickhoff, Holger; Hoyer, Carsten; Leitz, G.; Weber, Gerd; Scheef, J.; Rueterjans, H.

    1994-12-01

    Genomes of higher organisms are larger than one typically expects. For example, the DNA of a single human cell is almost two meters long, the DNA in the human body covers the distance Earth-Sun approximately 140 times. This is often not considered in typical molecular biological approaches for DNA diagnostics, where usually only DNA of the length of a gene is investigated. Also, one basic aspect of sequencing the human genome is not really solved: the problem how to prepare the huge amounts of DNA required. Approaches from biomedical optics combined with new developments in single molecule biotechnology may at least contribute some parts of the puzzle. A large genome can be partitioned into portions comprising approximately 1% of the whole DNA using a laser microbeam. The single DNA fragment can be amplified by the polymerase chain reaction in order to obtain a sufficient amount of molecules for conventional DNA diagnostics or for analysis by octanucleotide hybridization. When not amplified by biotechnological processes, the individual DNA molecule can be visualized in the light microscope and can be manipulated and dissected with the laser microbeam trap. The DNA probes obtained by single molecule biotechnology can be employed for fluorescence in situ introduced into plant cells and subcellular structures even when other techniques fail. Since the laser microbeam trap allows to work in the interior of a cell without opening it, subcellular structures can be manipulated. For example, in algae, such structures can be moved out of their original position and used to study intracellular viscosities.

  11. The clinical research of Thinprep Cytology Test (TCT) combined with HPV-DNA detection in screening cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Zhang, L; Zhao, G; Che, L; Zhang, H; Fang, J

    2017-02-28

    Our objective is to explore the clinical value of thinprep cytologic test (TCT) combined with HPV-DNA detection in screening cervical cancer. 420 cervical cancer patients admitted in our hospital between April, 2011-April, 2014 were selected. All patients received TCT and HPV-DNA detection, and cervical tissue biopsy was used to confirm the diagnosis. TCT screening results showed that there were 175 patients were >ASCUS and the positive rate was 41.7%, histopathological screening showed that there were 199 patients were ≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I and the positive rate was 47.4%. HPV-DNA detection showed 180 patients were positive which was 42.9%, and the positive rate of HPV-DNA detection was increased as the disease severity increased. The sensitivity of TCT combined with HPV-DNA detection was higher than single TCT or HPV-DNA, however the specificity was relatively low, and the positive predictive value and negative predictive value were higher which were similar to pathological results. TCT combined with HPV-DNA detection has high sensitivity and accuracy in screening cervical cancer, which is worthy of clinical application.

  12. Augmentation of immune responses to SARS coronavirus by a combination of DNA and whole killed virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zakhartchouk, Alexander N; Liu, Qiang; Petric, Martin; Babiuk, Lorne A

    2005-08-15

    We studied the immunogenicity of a DNA SARS-vaccine, a whole killed virus, or a whole killed and DNA vaccine combination. The DNA vaccine contained a plasmid encoding the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S protein under the control of the human CMV promoter and intron A. The whole killed virus vaccine was comprised of SARS-CoV, propagated in Vero-E6 cells, with subsequent beta-propilactone inactivation and formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Mice immunized twice with the DNA vaccine and once with the whole killed virus elicited higher antibody responses than mice immunized three times with the DNA vaccine or once with the whole killed virus vaccine. Mice immunized twice with the whole killed virus vaccine elicited higher antibody responses than mice immunized three times with the DNA vaccine or once with the whole killed virus vaccine. However, a combination of the vaccines induced T-helper type 1 (Th1) immune responses while the whole killed virus vaccine induced T helper type 2 (Th2) immune response. These results demonstrate that combination of the DNA vaccine and the whole killed virus vaccine can be used to enhance the magnitude and change the bias of the immune responses to SARS-CoV.

  13. [Extraction of sperm DNA from mixed stain by the modified differential lysis method combined with silicon bead method].

    PubMed

    Han, Hai-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Hong; Yang, Min; Yi, Hai; Yang, Geng-Ye; Jia, Dong-Tao; Lu, Da-Ru

    2014-02-01

    To extract sperm DNA from mixed stain by the modified differential lysis method combined with silicon bead method and to evaluate its application value. Fifty-two mixed stains containing female STR genotypes detected by differential lysis method were collected. The sperm DNA was extracted by the modified method combined with silicon bead method, then genotyped with the Identifiler Kit, and compared with the results of genotyping by the conventional differential lysis method as control. Of the 52 samples, 38 samples with sole male STR genotypes in all loci were detected. The detection rate of male STR genotypes was 98.08% through the modified method combined with silicon bead method. The modified differential lysis method combined with silicon bead method can be used in extraction of sperm DNA from mixed stain.

  14. A combined approach of hollow microneedles and nanocarriers for skin immunization with plasmid DNA encoding ovalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Pamornpathomkul, Boonnada; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of different types of microneedles (MNs) and nanocarriers for in vitro skin permeation and in vivo immunization of plasmid DNA encoding ovalbumin (pOVA). In vitro skin permeation studies indicated that hollow MNs had a superior enhancing effect on skin permeation compared with solid MN patches, electroporation (EP) patches, the combination of MN and EP patches, and untreated skin. Upon using hollow MNs combined with nanocarriers for pOVA delivery, the skin permeation was higher than for the delivery of naked pOVA, as evidenced by the increased amount of pOVA in Franz diffusion cells and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses. When the hollow MNs were used for the delivery of nanocarrier:pOVA complexes into the skin of mice, they induced a stronger IgG immune response than conventional subcutaneous (SC) injections. In addition, immunization of mice with the hollow MNs did not induce signs of skin infection or pinpoint bleeding. Accordingly, the hollow MNs combined with a nanocarrier delivery system is a promising approach for delivering pOVA complexes to the skin for promoting successful immunization. PMID:28184159

  15. A combined approach of hollow microneedles and nanocarriers for skin immunization with plasmid DNA encoding ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Pamornpathomkul, Boonnada; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of different types of microneedles (MNs) and nanocarriers for in vitro skin permeation and in vivo immunization of plasmid DNA encoding ovalbumin (pOVA). In vitro skin permeation studies indicated that hollow MNs had a superior enhancing effect on skin permeation compared with solid MN patches, electroporation (EP) patches, the combination of MN and EP patches, and untreated skin. Upon using hollow MNs combined with nanocarriers for pOVA delivery, the skin permeation was higher than for the delivery of naked pOVA, as evidenced by the increased amount of pOVA in Franz diffusion cells and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses. When the hollow MNs were used for the delivery of nanocarrier:pOVA complexes into the skin of mice, they induced a stronger IgG immune response than conventional subcutaneous (SC) injections. In addition, immunization of mice with the hollow MNs did not induce signs of skin infection or pinpoint bleeding. Accordingly, the hollow MNs combined with a nanocarrier delivery system is a promising approach for delivering pOVA complexes to the skin for promoting successful immunization.

  16. DNA bases assembled on the Au(110)/electrolyte interface: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Princia; Nazmutdinov, Renat R; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-02-19

    Among the low-index single-crystal gold surfaces, the Au(110) surface is the most active toward molecular adsorption and the one with fewest electrochemical adsorption data reported. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemically controlled scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been employed in the present study to address the adsorption of the four nucleobases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T), on the Au(110)-electrode surface. Au(110) undergoes reconstruction to the (1 × 3) surface in electrochemical environment, accompanied by a pair of strong voltammetry peaks in the double-layer region in acid solutions. Adsorption of the DNA bases gives featureless voltammograms with lower double-layer capacitance, suggesting that all the bases are chemisorbed on the Au(110) surface. Further investigation of the surface structures of the adlayers of the four DNA bases by EC-STM disclosed lifting of the Au(110) reconstruction, specific molecular packing in dense monolayers, and pH dependence of the A and G adsorption. DFT computations based on a cluster model for the Au(110) surface were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and geometry of the DNA bases in different adsorbate orientations. The optimized geometry is further used to compute models for STM images which are compared with the recorded STM images. This has provided insight into the physical nature of the adsorption. The specific orientations of A, C, G, and T on Au(110) and the nature of the physical adsorbate/surface interaction based on the combination of the experimental and theoretical studies are proposed, and differences from nucleobase adsorption on Au(111)- and Au(100)-electrode surfaces are discussed.

  17. DNA damage and radiosensitizers: M. luteus sensitive sites for misonidazole-TAN combination

    SciTech Connect

    Skov, K.A.; Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1982-10-01

    It has been shown previously that TAN does not enhance production of single-strand breaks (SSB) in DNA of Chinese hamster cells irradiated under hypoxia. In contrast, misonidazole does enhance the yield of SSB, but this SSB enhancement by misonidazole is reduced if TAN is present with misonidazole during irradiation. It was also shown that each of these sensitizers enhances base/sugar damage, measured with the aid of bacterial enzymes (MLS). The results presented here for MLS damage in mammalian cells irradiated in the presence of the misonidazole-TAN combination indicate that the two drugs act independently in enhancing MLS damage, and hence they interact with different types of lesions to produce base/sugar damage. It is proposed that the protection by TAN in mammalian cells observed at the survival level is due to repair of some of that type of damage which would otherwise become a misonidazole-enhanced SSB.

  18. CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 suppresses DNA repair response triggered by DNA-targeted anticancer drugs and augments efficacy: mechanistic rationale for drug combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; Bliesath, Joshua; Macalino, Diwata; Omori, Mayuko; Huser, Nanni; Streiner, Nicole; Ho, Caroline B; Anderes, Kenna; Proffitt, Chris; O'Brien, Sean E; Lim, John K C; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Ryckman, David M; Rice, William G; Drygin, Denis

    2012-04-01

    Drug combination therapies are commonly used for the treatment of cancers to increase therapeutic efficacy, reduce toxicity, and decrease the incidence of drug resistance. Although drug combination therapies were originally devised primarily by empirical methods, the increased understanding of drug mechanisms and the pathways they modulate provides a unique opportunity to design combinations that are based on mechanistic rationale. We have identified protein kinase CK2 as a promising therapeutic target for combination therapy, because CK2 regulates not just one but many oncogenic pathways and processes that play important roles in drug resistance, including DNA repair, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling, Hsp90 machinery activity, hypoxia, and interleukin-6 expression. In this article, we show that CX-4945, a clinical stage selective small molecule inhibitor of CK2, blocks the DNA repair response induced by gemcitabine and cisplatin and synergizes with these agents in models of ovarian cancer. Mechanistic studies show that the enhanced activity is a result of inactivation of XRCC1 and MDC1, two mediator/adaptor proteins that are essential for DNA repair and that require phosphorylation by CK2 for their function. These data position CK2 as a valid pharmacologic target for intelligent drug combinations and support the evaluation of CX-4945 in combination with gemcitabine and platinum-based chemotherapeutics in the clinical setting. ©2012 AACR.

  19. Skewing the T-cell repertoire by combined DNA vaccination, host conditioning, and adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Bins, Adriaan D; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2008-04-01

    Approaches for T-cell-based immunotherapy that have shown substantial effects in clinical trials are generally based on the adoptive transfer of high numbers of antigen-specific cells, and the success of these approaches is thought to rely on the high magnitude of the tumor-specific T-cell responses that are induced. In this study, we aimed to develop strategies that also yield a T-cell repertoire that is highly skewed toward tumor recognition but do not rely on ex vivo generation of tumor-specific T cells. To this end, the tumor-specific T-cell repertoire was first expanded by DNA vaccination and then infused into irradiated recipients. Subsequent vaccination of the recipient mice with the same antigen resulted in peak CD8(+) T-cell responses of approximately 50%. These high T-cell responses required the presence of antigen-experienced tumor-specific T cells within the graft because only mice that received cells of previously vaccinated donor mice developed effective responses. Tumor-bearing mice treated with this combined therapy showed a significant delay in tumor outgrowth, compared with mice treated by irradiation or vaccination alone. Furthermore, this antitumor effect was accompanied by an increased accumulation of activated and antigen-specific T cells within the tumor. In summary, the combination of DNA vaccination with host conditioning and adoptive transfer generates a marked, but transient, skewing of the T-cell repertoire toward tumor recognition. This strategy does not require ex vivo expansion of cells to generate effective antitumor immunity and may therefore easily be translated to clinical application.

  20. HPV status of oropharyngeal cancer by combination HPV DNA/p16 testing: biological relevance of discordant results.

    PubMed

    Hong, Angela; Jones, Deanna; Chatfield, Mark; Lee, C Soon; Zhang, Mei; Clark, Jonathan; Elliott, Michael; Harnett, Gerald; Milross, Christopher; Rose, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes up to 70 % of oropharyngeal cancers (OSCC). HPV positive OSCC has a more favorable outcome, thus HPV status is being used to guide treatment and predict outcome. Combination HPV DNA/p16(ink4) (p16) testing is commonly used for HPV status, but there are no standardized methods, scoring or interpretative criteria. The significance of discordant (HPV DNA positive/p16 negative and HPV DNA negative/p16 positive) cancers is controversial. In this study, 647 OSCCs from 10 Australian centers were tested for HPV DNA/p16 expression. Our aims are to determine p16 distribution by HPV DNA status to inform decisions on p16 scoring and to assess clinical significance of discordant cancers. HPV DNA was identified using a multiplex tandem HPV E6 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and p16 expression by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry. p16 distribution was essentially bimodal (42 % of cancers had ≥ 70 % positive staining, 52 % <5 % positive, 6 % between 5 and 70 %). Cancers with 5 to <50 % staining had similar characteristics to the p16 negative group, and cancers with 50 to <70 % staining were consistent with the ≥ 70 % group. Using a p16 cut-point of 50 %, there were 25 % HPV DNA positive/p16 negative cancers and 1 % HPV DNA negative/p16 positive cancers. HPV DNA positive/p16 negative cancers had outcomes similar to HPV DNA negative/p16 negative cancers. 50 % is a reasonable cut-point for p16; HPV DNA positive/p16 negative OSCCs may be treated as HPV negative for clinical purposes; HPV DNA/p16 testing may add no prognostic information over p16 alone.

  1. Prediction of nucleosome DNA formation potential and nucleosome positioning using increment of diversity combined with quadratic discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiujuan; Pei, Zhiyong; Liu, Jia; Qin, Sheng; Cai, Lu

    2010-11-01

    In this work, a novel method was developed to distinguish nucleosome DNA and linker DNA based on increment of diversity combined with quadratic discriminant analysis (IDQD), using k-mer frequency of nucleotides in genome. When used to predict DNA potential for forming nucleosomes, the model achieved a high accuracy of 94.94%, 77.60%, and 86.81%, respectively, for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens, and Drosophila melanogaster. The area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of our classifier was 0.982 for S. cerevisiae. Our results indicate that DNA sequence preference is critical for nucleosome formation potential and is likely conserved across eukaryotes. The model successfully identified nucleosome-enriched or nucleosome-depleted regions in S. cerevisiae genome, suggesting nucleosome positioning depends on DNA sequence preference. Thus, IDQD classifier is useful for predicting nucleosome positioning.

  2. Apoptotic DNA Degradation into Oligonucleosomal Fragments, but Not Apoptotic Nuclear Morphology, Relies on a Cytosolic Pool of DFF40/CAD Endonuclease*

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Gil-Guiñon, Estel; Gabernet, Gisela; García-Belinchón, Mercè; Sánchez-Osuna, María; Casanelles, Elisenda; Comella, Joan X.; Yuste, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is characterized by nuclear fragmentation and oligonucleosomal DNA degradation, mediated by the caspase-dependent specific activation of DFF40/CAD endonuclease. Here, we describe how, upon apoptotic stimuli, SK-N-AS human neuroblastoma-derived cells show apoptotic nuclear morphology without displaying concomitant internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Cytotoxicity afforded after staurosporine treatment is comparable with that obtained in SH-SY5Y cells, which exhibit a complete apoptotic phenotype. SK-N-AS cell death is a caspase-dependent process that can be impaired by the pan-caspase inhibitor q-VD-OPh. The endogenous inhibitor of DFF40/CAD, ICAD, is correctly processed, and dff40/cad cDNA sequence does not reveal mutations altering its amino acid composition. Biochemical approaches show that both SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS resting cells express comparable levels of DFF40/CAD. However, the endonuclease is poorly expressed in the cytosolic fraction of healthy SK-N-AS cells. Despite this differential subcellular distribution of DFF40/CAD, we find no differences in the subcellular localization of both pro-caspase-3 and ICAD between the analyzed cell lines. After staurosporine treatment, the preferential processing of ICAD in the cytosolic fraction allows the translocation of DFF40/CAD from this fraction to a chromatin-enriched one. Therefore, the low levels of cytosolic DFF40/CAD detected in SK-N-AS cells determine the absence of DNA laddering after staurosporine treatment. In these cells DFF40/CAD cytosolic levels can be restored by the overexpression of their own endonuclease, which is sufficient to make them proficient at degrading their chromatin into oligonucleosome-size fragments after staurosporine treatment. Altogether, the cytosolic levels of DFF40/CAD are determinants in achieving a complete apoptotic phenotype, including oligonucleosomal DNA degradation. PMID:22253444

  3. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  4. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  5. Combined shared and distributed memory ab-initio computations of molecular-hydrogen systems in the correlated state: Process pool solution and two-level parallelism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biborski, Andrzej; Kądzielawa, Andrzej P.; Spałek, Józef

    2015-12-01

    An efficient computational scheme devised for investigations of ground state properties of the electronically correlated systems is presented. As an example, (H2)n chain is considered with the long-range electron-electron interactions taken into account. The implemented procedure covers: (i) single-particle Wannier wave-function basis construction in the correlated state, (ii) microscopic parameters calculation, and (iii) ground state energy optimization. The optimization loop is based on highly effective process-pool solution - specific root-workers approach. The hierarchical, two-level parallelism was applied: both shared (by use of Open Multi-Processing) and distributed (by use of Message Passing Interface) memory models were utilized. We discuss in detail the feature that such approach results in a substantial increase of the calculation speed reaching factor of 300 for the fully parallelized solution. The scheme elaborated in detail reflects the situation in which the most demanding task is the single-particle basis optimization.

  6. Improving poly-3-hydroxybutyrate production in Escherichia coli by combining the increase in the NADPH pool and acetyl-CoA availability.

    PubMed

    Centeno-Leija, Sara; Huerta-Beristain, Gerardo; Giles-Gómez, Martha; Bolivar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo; Martinez, Alfredo

    2014-04-01

    The biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB), a biodegradable bio-plastic, requires acetyl-CoA as precursor and NADPH as cofactor. Escherichia coli has been used as a heterologous production model for P3HB, but metabolic pathway analysis shows a deficiency in maintaining high levels of NADPH and that the acetyl-CoA is mainly converted to acetic acid by native pathways. In this work the pool of NADPH was increased 1.7-fold in E. coli MG1655 through plasmid overexpression of the NADP(+)-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gapN) from Streptococcus mutans (pTrcgapN). Additionally, by deleting the main acetate production pathway (ackA-pta), the acetic acid production was abolished, thus increasing the acetyl-CoA pool. The P3HB biosynthetic pathway was heterologously expressed in strain MG1655 Δack-pta/pTrcgapN, using an IPTG inducible vector with the P3HB operon from Azotobacter vinelandii (pPHB Av ). Cultures were performed in controlled fermentors using mineral medium with glucose as the carbon source. Accordingly, the mass yield of P3HB on glucose increased to 73 % of the maximum theoretical and was 30 % higher when compared to the progenitor strain (MG1655/pPHB Av ). In comparison with the wild type strain expressing pPHB Av , the specific accumulation of PHB (gPHB/gDCW) in MG1655 Δack-pta/pTrcgapN/pPHB Av increased twofold, indicating that as the availability of NADPH is raised and the production of acetate abolished, a P3HB intracellular accumulation of up to 84 % of the E. coli dry weight is attainable.

  7. Efficacy of etravirine combined with darunavir or other ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors in HIV-1-infected patients: an observational study using pooled European cohort data.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, J; Calvez, V; Flandre, P; Marcelin, A-G; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F; Perno, C-F; Mercedes Santoro, M; Bateson, R; Nelson, M; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Grarup, J; Lundgren, J; Incardona, F; Kaiser, R; Sonnerborg, A; Clotet, B; Paredes, R; Günthard, H F; Ledergerber, B; Hoogstoel, A; Nijs, S; Tambuyzer, L; Lavreys, L; Opsomer, M

    2015-05-01

    This observational study in antiretroviral treatment-experienced, HIV-1-infected adults explored the efficacy of etravirine plus darunavir/ritonavir (DRV group; n = 999) vs. etravirine plus an alternative boosted protease inhibitor (other PI group; n = 116) using pooled European cohort data. Two international (EuroSIDA; EUResist Network) and five national (France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and UK) cohorts provided data (collected in 2007-2012). Stratum-adjusted (for confounding factors) Mantel-Haenszel differences in virological responses (viral load < 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL) and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived. Baseline characteristics were balanced between groups except for previous use of antiretrovirals (≥ 10: 63% in the DRV group vs. 49% in the other PI group), including previous use of at least three PIs (64% vs. 53%, respectively) and mean number of PI resistance mutations (2.3 vs. 1.9, respectively). Week 24 responses were 73% vs. 75% (observed) and 49% vs. 43% (missing = failure), respectively. Week 48 responses were 75% vs. 73% and 32% vs. 30%, respectively. All 95% CIs around unadjusted and adjusted differences encompassed 0 (difference in responses) or 1 (ORs). While ORs by cohort indicated heterogeneity in response, for pooled data the difference between unadjusted and adjusted for cohort ORs was small. These data do not indicate a difference in response between the DRV and other PI groups, although caution should be applied given the small size of the other PI group and the lack of randomization. This suggests that the efficacy and virology results from DUET can be extrapolated to a regimen of etravirine with a boosted PI other than darunavir/ritonavir. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  8. Characterizing convective cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drager, Aryeh J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2017-06-01

    Cold pools produced by convective storms play an important role in Earth's climate system. However, a common framework does not exist for objectively identifying convective cold pools in observations and models. The present study investigates convective cold pools within a simulation of tropical continental convection that uses a cloud-resolving model with a coupled land-surface model. Multiple variables are assessed for their potential in identifying convective cold pool boundaries, and a novel technique is developed and tested for identifying and tracking cold pools in numerical model simulations. This algorithm is based on surface rainfall rates and radial gradients in the density potential temperature field. The algorithm successfully identifies near-surface cold pool boundaries and is able to distinguish between connected cold pools. Once cold pools have been identified and tracked, composites of cold pool evolution are then constructed, and average cold pool properties are investigated. Wet patches are found to develop within the centers of cold pools where the ground has been soaked with rainwater. These wet patches help to maintain cool surface temperatures and reduce cold pool dissipation, which has implications for the development of subsequent convection.

  9. The science of pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  10. A novel method for detection of HBVcccDNA in hepatocytes using rolling circle amplification combined with in situ PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yanwei; Hu, Shuangye; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Yulai; Xu, Dongping; Zhao, Yanqing; Zhao, Jingmin; Li, Zhibin; Zhang, Xiuchang; Zhang, Hongfei; Li, Jin

    2014-12-03

    Intrahepatic hepatitis B virus (HBV) covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is the original template for HBV replication. The persistence of cccDNA is responsible for the recurrence of HBV infection. The detection of cccDNA can help the development of new antiviral drugs against HBV replication links, and reduce the resistance and recurrence as well as to discover extrahepatic HBV infection. In situ polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR) can be used to determine the distribution and localization of cccDNA in liver tissues, but it is hampered by its low sensitivity and specificity. We developed a novel method to detect HBV cccDNA using rolling circle amplification (RCA) combined with IS-PCR. Biopsy liver tissues were obtained from 26 patients with HBV infection, including 10 chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 6 liver cirrhosis (LC) and 10 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Four pairs of primers were designed to mediating RCA for the first round amplification of HBV cccDNA specifically. The liver tissue sections from patients were treated by plasmid-safe ATP-dependent DNase (PSAD) prior to RCA. After RCA, HBV cccDNA was further amplified by a pair of selective primers labeled digoxigenin that target the gap region between the two direct repeat regions (DR1 and DR2) of the virus via IS-PCR. HBVcccDNA was expressed and located in hepatocyte nucleus in 19 patients (73.07%). Compared with the IS-PCR, the introduction of RCA increase the limit of detection. RCA combined with IS-PCR yielded strong positive signals in HCC liver tissue in spite of low copy number cccDNA (2 copies of target sequence per cell), meanwhile, no positive signal was detected via negative control. RCA combined with IS-PCR is an effective and practicable method which could detect the presence of low copy number of cccDNA sensitively and specifically, and reflect the relationship between cccDNA expression level and liver tissue pathological characteristics.

  11. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    PubMed

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  12. Biodiversity of pig breeds from China and Europe estimated from pooled DNA samples: differences in microsatellite variation between two areas of domestication

    PubMed Central

    Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Crooijmans, Richard PMA; Cristobal, Magali San; Hui, Xiao; Li, Ning; Groenen, Martien AM

    2008-01-01

    Microsatellite diversity in European and Chinese pigs was assessed using a pooled sampling method on 52 European and 46 Chinese pig populations. A Neighbor Joining analysis on genetic distances revealed that European breeds were grouped together and showed little evidence for geographic structure, although a southern European and English group could tentatively be assigned. Populations from international breeds formed breed specific clusters. The Chinese breeds formed a second major group, with the Sino-European synthetic Tia Meslan in-between the two large clusters. Within Chinese breeds, in contrast to the European pigs, a large degree of geographic structure was noted, in line with previous classification schemes for Chinese pigs that were based on morphology and geography. The Northern Chinese breeds were most similar to the European breeds. Although some overlap exists, Chinese breeds showed a higher average degree of heterozygosity and genetic distance compared to European ones. Between breed diversity was even more pronounced and was the highest in the Central Chinese pigs, reflecting the geographically central position in China. Comparing correlations between genetic distance and heterozygosity revealed that China and Europe represent different domestication or breed formation processes. A likely cause is a more diverse wild boar population in Asia, but various other possible contributing factors are discussed. PMID:18096118

  13. Aerosol Foam Formulation of Fixed Combination Calcipotriene Plus Betamethasone Dipropionate is Highly Efficacious in Patients With Psoriasis Vulgaris: Pooled Data From Three Randomized Controlled Studies.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda; Lebwohl, Mark; Menter, Alan; Villumsen, John; Rosen, Monika; Koo, John

    2016-08-01

    Calcipotriene 0.005% (Cal)/betamethasone dipropionate 0.064% (BD) aerosol foam was developed as a new treatment option for patients with psoriasis. This pooled analysis evaluated the efficacy of this formulation for 4 weeks of treatment.
    Patients aged ≥18 years with mild-severe psoriasis were enrolled into three Phase II/III studies (nCT01536886, nCT01536938, nCT01866163); each study evaluated Cal/BD aerosol foam versus different comparators. Endpoints included: proportion of patients clear/almost clear with ≥2-step improvement in physician's global assessment of disease severity ('treatment success'); modified (excluding head) psoriasis area and severity index (mPASI); proportion of patients with ≥75% reduction in mPASI (PASI75); change in itch (according to visual analog scale [VAS]).
    1104 patients were included in the pooled analysis: Cal/BD aerosol foam (n=564), Cal/BD ointment (n=135), BD aerosol foam (n=101), Cal aerosol foam (n=101), aerosol foam vehicle (n=152), ointment vehicle (n=51). At week 4, 51% of Cal/BD aerosol foam patients achieved treatment success, a higher proportion than in all other groups (Cal/BD ointment, 43%; BD aerosol foam, 31%; Cal aerosol foam, 15%; aerosol foam vehicle, 5%; ointment vehicle, 8%). Greater percentage mean decrease in mPASI with Cal/BD aerosol foam was noted versus other treatments at week 4 (72% vs 63%, 53%, 43%, 32%, and 33%, respectively); week 4 PASI75 rate was also greater (51% vs 41%, 34%, 18%, 7%, and 10%, respectively). Cal/BD aerosol foam was efficacious irrespective of baseline disease severity and on all body areas assessed (arms, legs, trunk). Cal/BD aerosol foam alleviated itch as early as week 1 (change in itch VAS: -30 mm), maintained to week 4 (change in itch VAS: -41 mm).
    Cal/BD aerosol foam was significantly more effective than Cal/BD ointment and the individual active ingredients for treating psoriasis vulgaris, resulting in greater and faster reduction in disease severity

  14. Specific and sensitive detection of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase by DNA-scaffolded silver nanoclusters combined with an aptamer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Xian; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Wong, Wai-Chung; Tanner, Julian A; Li, Hong-Wei; Wu, Yuqing

    2017-02-27

    Innovative nanomaterials offer significant potential for diagnosis of severe diseases of the developing world such as malaria. Small sized silver nanoclusters have shown promise for diagnostics due to their intense fluorescence emission and photo-stabilities. Here, double-stranded DNA-scaffolded silver nanoclusters (AgNCs-dsDNA) were prepared to detect the established malaria biomarker, Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH). Significant luminescence enhancement over a wide concentration range of PfLDH was demonstrated. In addition, a low limit of detection at 0.20 nM (7.4 pg μL(-1)) was achieved for PfLDH in buffer solution, sensitive enough for practical use correlating with the clinical level of PfLDH in plasma from malaria-infected patients. Unique specificity was observed towards Plasmodium falciparum over Plasmodium vivax and human lactate dehydrogenase, as well as other non-specific proteins, by combining the use of AgNCs-dsDNA with a DNA aptamer against PfLDH. Moreover, the intrinsic mechanism was revealed in detail for the two-step luminescence response. The combination of DNA-scaffolded silver nanoclusters coupled to a selective single-stranded DNA aptamer allows for a highly specific and sensitive detection of PfLDH with significant promise for malaria diagnosis in future.

  15. DNA fragment separations by on-line combination of capillary isotachophoresis-capillary zone electrophoresis with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Fraňo, Milan; Džuganová, Katarína; Koiš, Pavol; Masár, Marián

    2016-12-01

    A high-speed DNA fragment separation system based on an on-line combination of capillary ITP with CZE (CITP-CZE) and using UV detection at 260 nm was developed. A novel CITP-CZE buffer system of pH 6.1 was designed for the separation of ten DNA fragments with sizes ranging from 100 to 1000 bp. An effect of underivatized α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins on the resolution of DNA fragments in the CZE step of the CITP-CZE combination was systematically investigated. Methylhydroxyethylcellulose present in the BGE was used to eliminate the EOF. DNA ladder fragments were separated within 10 min with LODs in the range of 1-5 ng/μL (S/N = 3). The RSDs of the migration time and peak area of individual DNA fragments were in the range of 1-3 and 3-9%, respectively. The developed CITP-CZE system was further applied to the analysis of digest plasmid DNA samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Combined hybridization capture and shotgun sequencing for ancient DNA analysis of extinct wild and domestic dromedary camel.

    PubMed

    Mohandesan, Elmira; Speller, Camilla F; Peters, Joris; Uerpmann, Hans-Peter; Uerpmann, Margarethe; De Cupere, Bea; Hofreiter, Michael; Burger, Pamela A

    2017-03-01

    The performance of hybridization capture combined with next-generation sequencing (NGS) has seen limited investigation with samples from hot and arid regions until now. We applied hybridization capture and shotgun sequencing to recover DNA sequences from bone specimens of ancient-domestic dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and its extinct ancestor, the wild dromedary from Jordan, Syria, Turkey and the Arabian Peninsula, respectively. Our results show that hybridization capture increased the percentage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recovery by an average 187-fold and in some cases yielded virtually complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes at multifold coverage in a single capture experiment. Furthermore, we tested the effect of hybridization temperature and time by using a touchdown approach on a limited number of samples. We observed no significant difference in the number of unique dromedary mtDNA reads retrieved with the standard capture compared to the touchdown method. In total, we obtained 14 partial mitochondrial genomes from ancient-domestic dromedaries with 17-95% length coverage and 1.27-47.1-fold read depths for the covered regions. Using whole-genome shotgun sequencing, we successfully recovered endogenous dromedary nuclear DNA (nuDNA) from domestic and wild dromedary specimens with 1-1.06-fold read depths for covered regions. Our results highlight that despite recent methodological advances, obtaining ancient DNA (aDNA) from specimens recovered from hot, arid environments is still problematic. Hybridization protocols require specific optimization, and samples at the limit of DNA preservation need multiple replications of DNA extraction and hybridization capture as has been shown previously for Middle Pleistocene specimens. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Combined analysis of DNA methylation and cell cycle in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Desjobert, Cécile; El Maï, Mounir; Gérard-Hirne, Tom; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Carrier, Arnaud; Pottier, Cyrielle; Arimondo, Paola B; Riond, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a chemical modification of DNA involved in the regulation of gene expression by controlling the access to the DNA sequence. It is the most stable epigenetic mark and is widely studied for its role in major biological processes. Aberrant DNA methylation is observed in various pathologies, such as cancer. Therefore, there is a great interest in analyzing subtle changes in DNA methylation induced by biological processes or upon drug treatments. Here, we developed an improved methodology based on flow cytometry to measure variations of DNA methylation level in melanoma and leukemia cells. The accuracy of DNA methylation quantification was validated with LC-ESI mass spectrometry analysis. The new protocol was used to detect small variations of cytosine methylation occurring in individual cells during their cell cycle and those induced by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AzadC). Kinetic experiments confirmed that inheritance of DNA methylation occurs efficiently in S phase and revealed a short delay between DNA replication and completion of cytosine methylation. In addition, this study suggests that the uncoupling of 5AzadC effects on DNA demethylation and cell proliferation might be related to the duration of the DNA replication phase.

  18. Validation of Pooled Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing in Arabidopsis lyrata

    PubMed Central

    Fracassetti, Marco; Griffin, Philippa C.; Willi, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing pooled DNA of multiple individuals from a population instead of sequencing individuals separately has become popular due to its cost-effectiveness and simple wet-lab protocol, although some criticism of this approach remains. Here we validated a protocol for pooled whole-genome re-sequencing (Pool-seq) of Arabidopsis lyrata libraries prepared with low amounts of DNA (1.6 ng per individual). The validation was based on comparing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies obtained by pooling with those obtained by individual-based Genotyping By Sequencing (GBS). Furthermore, we investigated the effect of sample number, sequencing depth per individual and variant caller on population SNP frequency estimates. For Pool-seq data, we compared frequency estimates from two SNP callers, VarScan and Snape; the former employs a frequentist SNP calling approach while the latter uses a Bayesian approach. Results revealed concordance correlation coefficients well above 0.8, confirming that Pool-seq is a valid method for acquiring population-level SNP frequency data. Higher accuracy was achieved by pooling more samples (25 compared to 14) and working with higher sequencing depth (4.1× per individual compared to 1.4× per individual), which increased the concordance correlation coefficient to 0.955. The Bayesian-based SNP caller produced somewhat higher concordance correlation coefficients, particularly at low sequencing depth. We recommend pooling at least 25 individuals combined with sequencing at a depth of 100× to produce satisfactory frequency estimates for common SNPs (minor allele frequency above 0.05). PMID:26461136

  19. Structural fluctuations and quantum transport through DNA molecular wires: a combined molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, R.; Caetano, R.; Woiczikowski, P. B.; Kubar, T.; Elstner, M.; Cuniberti, G.

    2010-02-01

    Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer (DD)) in the presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations, arising either from the solvent fluctuations or from base-pair vibrational modes, can be taken into account in a straightforward way through the time series of the effective DNA electronic parameters, evaluated at snapshots along the MD trajectory. We show that charge transport can be promoted through the coupling to solvent fluctuations, which gate the on-site energies along the DNA wire.

  20. Combined optical and topographic imaging reveals different arrangements of human RAD54 with presynaptic and postsynaptic RAD51-DNA filaments.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Humberto; Kertokalio, Aryandi; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2013-07-09

    Essential genome transactions, such as homologous recombination, are achieved by concerted and dynamic interactions of multiple protein components with DNA. Which proteins do what and how, will be reflected in their relative arrangements. However, obtaining high-resolution structural information on the variable arrangements of these complex assemblies is a challenge. Here we demonstrate the versatility of a combined total internal reflection fluorescence and scanning force microscope (TIRF-SFM) to pinpoint fluorescently labeled human homologous recombination protein RAD54 interacting with presynaptic (ssDNA) and postsynaptic (dsDNA) human recombinase RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments. Labeled proteins were localized by superresolution imaging on complex structures in the SFM image with high spatial accuracy. We observed some RAD54 at RAD51 filament ends, as expected. More commonly, RAD54 interspersed along RAD51-DNA filaments. RAD54 promotes RAD51-mediated DNA strand exchange and has been described to both stabilize and destabilize RAD51-DNA filaments. The different architectural arrangements we observe for RAD54 with RAD51-DNA filaments may reflect the diverse roles of this protein in homologous recombination.

  1. Sperm DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential combined are better for predicting natural conception than standard sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Malić Vončina, Slađana; Golob, Barbara; Ihan, Alojz; Kopitar, Andreja Nataša; Kolbezen, Mojca; Zorn, Branko

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate whether DNA fragmentation and/or mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) predict natural conception better than standard sperm parameters. Prospective cross-sectional study. University medical center. Eighty-five infertile and 51 fertile men. Assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation, MMP, and standard semen parameters over a 6- to 12-month observation period. Comparison between the results of DNA fragmentation, MMP, and standard sperm parameters alone or combined and achievement of natural conception. Twenty-six of the 85 (31%) men from infertile couples conceived naturally. The median values of DNA fragmentation and MMP in the men who conceived within the observation period were similar to those in the fertile controls. Optimal threshold values of DNA fragmentation and MMP were 25% as determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve [AUC], 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.82) and 62.5% (AUC, 0.68, 95% CI 0.56-0.80), respectively. The men in the infertile group with values of DNA fragmentation ≤25% and with MMP values ≥62.5% had significantly higher odds for conception (odds ratio [OR], 5.22; 95% CI 1.82-14.93] and OR, 4.67; 95% CI 1.74-12.5, respectively). Normal semen analysis alone had no predictive value for natural conception (OR, 1.84; 95% CI 0.67-5.07]). Both sperm function tests combined had significant odds for natural conception (OR, 8.24; 95% CI 2.91-23.33]), with a probability of 0.607 (60.7%) for both normal values and 0.158 (15.8%) for abnormal values. Sperm DNA fragmentation and MMP combined may be superior to standard semen parameters for the prediction of natural conception. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Creating Protein Affinity Reagents by Combining Peptide Ligands on Synthetic DNA Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Berea A. R.; Diehnelt, Chris W.; Belcher, Paul; Greving, Matthew; Woodbury, Neal W.; Johnston, Stephen A.; Chaput, John C.

    2009-01-01

    A full understanding of the proteome will require ligands to all of the proteins encoded by genomes. While antibodies represent the principle affinity reagents used to bind proteins, their limitations have created a need for new ligands to large numbers of proteins. Here we propose a general concept to obtain protein affinity reagents that avoids animal immunization and iterative selection steps. Central to this process is the idea that small peptide libraries contain sequences that will bind to independent regions on a protein surface, and that these ligands can be combined on synthetic scaffolds to create high affinity bivalent reagents. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, an array of 4,000 unique 12-mer peptides was screened to identify sequences that bind to non-overlapping sites on the yeast regulatory protein Gal80. Individual peptide ligands were screened at different distances using a novel DNA linking strategy to identify the optimal peptide pair and peptide pair separation distance required to transform two weaker ligands into a single high affinity protein capture reagent. A synthetic antibody or synbody was created with 5 nM affinity to Gal80 that functions in conventional ELISA and pull-down assays. We validated our synthetic antibody approach by creating a second synbody to human transferrin. In both cases, we observed an increase in binding affinity of ∼1000-fold (ΔΔG = ∼4.1 kcal/mol) between the individual peptides and final bivalent synbody construct. PMID:19894711

  3. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies DNA Repair Pathways that Sensitize Cancer Cells to Combined ATR Inhibition and Cisplatin Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Thompson, Petria S.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Glick, Gloria G.; Pendleton, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR may be a useful cancer therapeutic target. ATR inhibition synergizes with loss of ERCC1, ATM, XRCC1 and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents. Clinical trials have begun using ATR inhibitors in combination with cisplatin. Here we report the first synthetic lethality screen with a combination treatment of an ATR inhibitor (ATRi) and cisplatin. Combination treatment with ATRi/cisplatin is synthetically lethal with loss of the TLS polymerase ζ and 53BP1. Other DNA repair pathways including homologous recombination and mismatch repair do not exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with ATRi/cisplatin, even though loss of some of these repair pathways sensitizes cells to cisplatin as a single-agent. We also report that ATRi strongly synergizes with PARP inhibition, even in homologous recombination-proficient backgrounds. Lastly, ATR inhibitors were able to resensitize cisplatin-resistant cell lines to cisplatin. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of DNA repair pathways that exhibit synthetic lethality with ATR inhibitors when combined with cisplatin chemotherapy, and will help guide patient selection strategies as ATR inhibitors progress into the cancer clinic. PMID:25965342

  4. Combining the PASSCAL and EarthScope Texan instrument pools for 3D and 3C imaging of the High Lava Plains, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. M.; Keller, G. R.; Harder, S.; Klemperer, S.; Team, H.

    2008-12-01

    In early September 2008, 67 scientists, students, and volunteers deployed 2612 Texan short-period seismic recorders and 120 RT-130 recorders from the PASSCAL and EarthScope instrument pools, and fired 15 seismic sources spaced across the High Lava Plains (HLP) of eastern Oregon and adjacent parts of Idaho and Nevada. This massive effort is the largest number of instruments deployed in an on-land controlled- source seismic experiment. This army of helpers includes 42 students from 12 different universities, mainly the University of Oklahoma, Oregon State, Arizona State, MIT, Stanford, Miami-Ohio, University of Texas at Dallas, and Rhode Island, ably assisted by 6 staff members from the PASSCAL/EarthScope Instrument Center. This deployment takes advantage of 100 broadband seismometers in the existing HLP array placed during the past three years by Carnegie Institution and Arizona State University. The University of Oregon, Michigan Tech, and the U. S. Geological Survey also deployed an array in the Newberry volcano area to record earthquakes and the seismic source. Together, these efforts will provide a deep and three- dimensional image of the structure of this region. New instrumentation built by PASSCAL allowed us to carry out 3C recording using the Texan facility to study crustal anisotropy. The seismometers were located to provide high-resolution images of the mantle and crust directly beneath the path of volcanism that dotted the High Lava Plains during the past 16 Ma. In addition to the seismic component, the overarching project, funded by the National Science Foundation's Continental Dynamics program, includes field geologists, petrologists, and geodynamicists interested in resolving the origin of the sudden massive outpouring of basalt volcanism 16 million years ago and a puzzling trend of age-progressive rhyolite domes that reaches west toward Newberry volcano, the youngest complex in the trend.

  5. The molecular dissection of mtDNA haplogroup H confirms that the Franco-Cantabrian glacial refuge was a major source for the European gene pool.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Magri, Chiara; Battaglia, Vincenza; Olivieri, Anna; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio; Zeviani, Massimo; Briem, Egill; Carelli, Valerio; Moral, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Roostalu, Urmas; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Kivisild, Toomas; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Richards, Martin; Villems, Richard; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A Silvana; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    Complete sequencing of 62 mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) belonging (or very closely related) to haplogroup H revealed that this mtDNA haplogroup--by far the most common in Europe--is subdivided into numerous subhaplogroups, with at least 15 of them (H1-H15) identifiable by characteristic mutations. All the haplogroup H mtDNAs found in 5,743 subjects from 43 populations were then screened for diagnostic markers of subhaplogroups H1 and H3. This survey showed that both subhaplogroups display frequency peaks, centered in Iberia and surrounding areas, with distributions declining toward the northeast and southeast--a pattern extremely similar to that previously reported for mtDNA haplogroup V. Furthermore, the coalescence ages of H1 and H3 (~11,000 years) are close to that previously reported for V. These findings have major implications for the origin of Europeans, since they attest that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area was indeed the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe from ~15,000 years ago. This has also some implications for disease studies. For instance, the high occurrence of H1 and H3 in Iberia led us to re-evaluate the haplogroup distribution in 50 Spanish families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation. The survey revealed that the previously reported excess of H among these families is caused entirely by H3 and is due to a major, probably nonrecent, founder event.

  6. The Molecular Dissection of mtDNA Haplogroup H Confirms That the Franco-Cantabrian Glacial Refuge Was a Major Source for the European Gene Pool

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Magri, Chiara; Battaglia, Vincenza; Olivieri, Anna; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio; Zeviani, Massimo; Briem, Egill; Carelli, Valerio; Moral, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Roostalu, Urmas; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Kivisild, Toomas; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Richards, Martin; Villems, Richard; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Complete sequencing of 62 mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) belonging (or very closely related) to haplogroup H revealed that this mtDNA haplogroup—by far the most common in Europe—is subdivided into numerous subhaplogroups, with at least 15 of them (H1–H15) identifiable by characteristic mutations. All the haplogroup H mtDNAs found in 5,743 subjects from 43 populations were then screened for diagnostic markers of subhaplogroups H1 and H3. This survey showed that both subhaplogroups display frequency peaks, centered in Iberia and surrounding areas, with distributions declining toward the northeast and southeast—a pattern extremely similar to that previously reported for mtDNA haplogroup V. Furthermore, the coalescence ages of H1 and H3 (∼11,000 years) are close to that previously reported for V. These findings have major implications for the origin of Europeans, since they attest that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area was indeed the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe from ∼15,000 years ago. This has also some implications for disease studies. For instance, the high occurrence of H1 and H3 in Iberia led us to re-evaluate the haplogroup distribution in 50 Spanish families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation. The survey revealed that the previously reported excess of H among these families is caused entirely by H3 and is due to a major, probably nonrecent, founder event. PMID:15382008

  7. Highly sensitive detection of human IgG using a novel bio-barcode assay combined with DNA chip technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Haiqing; Lu, Feng; Liu, Tianjun; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang

    2013-09-01

    A simple and ultrasensitive detection of human IgG based on signal amplification using a novel bio-barcode assay and DNA chip technology was developed. The sensing platform was a sandwich system made up of antibody-modified magnetic microparticles (Ab-MMPs)/human IgG/Cy3-labeled single-stranded DNA and antibody-modified gold nanoparticles (Cy3-ssDNA-Ab-AuNPs). The MMPs (2.5 μm in diameter) modified with mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal-antibodies could capture human IgG and further be separated and enriched via a magnetic field. The AuNPs (13 nm in diameter) conjugated with goat anti-human IgG polyclonal-antibodies and Cy3-ssDNA could further combine with the human IgG/Ab-MMP complex. The Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs was then released by TCEP to hybridize with the DNA chip, thus generating a detectable signal by the fluorescence intensity of Cy3. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a three-level cascaded signal amplification was developed: (1) The MMP enrichment as the first-level; (2) Large quantities of Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs as the second-level; (3) The Cy3-ssDNA conjugate with DNA chip as the third-level. The highly sensitive technique showed an increased response of the fluorescence intensity to the increased concentration of human IgG through a detection range from 1 pg mL-1 to 10 ng mL-1. This sensing technique could not only improve the detection sensitivity for the low concentration of human IgG but also present a robust and efficient signal amplification model. The detection method has good stability, specificity, and reproducibility and could be applied in the detection of human IgG in the real samples.

  8. Peptidomics combined with cDNA library unravel the diversity of centipede venom.

    PubMed

    Rong, Mingqiang; Yang, Shilong; Wen, Bo; Mo, Guoxiang; Kang, Di; Liu, Jie; Lin, Zhilong; Jiang, Wenbin; Li, Bowen; Du, Chaoqin; Yang, Shuanjuan; Jiang, Hui; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-30

    Centipedes are one of the oldest venomous arthropods using toxin as their weapon to capture prey. But little attention was focused on them and only few centipede toxins were demonstrated with activity on ion channels. Therefore, more deep works are needed to understand the diversity of centipede venom. In the present study, we use peptidomics combined with cDNA library to uncover the diversity of centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans L. Koch. 192 peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS and 79 precursors were deduced by cDNA library. Surprisingly, the signal peptides of centipede toxins were more complicated than any other animal toxins and even exhibited large differences in homologues. Meanwhile, a large number of variants generated by alternative cleavage sites were detected by mass spectra. Odd number of cystein (3, 5, 7) found in the mature peptides were seldom seen in peptide toxins. In additional, two novel cysteine frameworks (C-C-C-CCC, C-C-C-C-CC-CC) were identified from 16 different cysteine frameworks from centipede peptides. Only 29 precursors have clear targets, while others may provide a potential diversity function for centipede. These findings highlight the extensive diversity of centipede toxins and provide powerful tools to understand the capture and defense weapon of centipede. Peptide toxins from venomous animal have attracted increasing attentions due to their extraordinary chemical and pharmacological diversity. Centipedes are one of the most used Chinese traditional medicines, but little was known about the active components. The venom of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans L. Koch is first deeply analyzed in this work and most of peptides were never discovered before. Interestingly, the number and arrangement of cysteine showed a larger different to known peptide toxins such spider or scorpion toxins. Moreover, only 29 peptides from this centipede venom were identified with known function. It suggested that our work not only important to

  9. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  10. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  11. Weighted pooling—practical and cost-effective techniques for pooled high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Golan, David; Erlich, Yaniv; Rosset, Saharon

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Despite the rapid decline in sequencing costs, sequencing large cohorts of individuals is still prohibitively expensive. Recently, several sophisticated pooling designs were suggested that can identify carriers of rare alleles in large cohorts with a significantly smaller number of pools, thus dramatically reducing the cost of such large-scale sequencing projects. These approaches use combinatorial pooling designs where each individual is either present or absent from a pool. One can then infer the number of carriers in a pool, and by combining information across pools, reconstruct the identity of the carriers. Results: We show that one can gain further efficiency and cost reduction by using ‘weighted’ designs, in which different individuals donate different amounts of DNA to the pools. Intuitively, in this situation, the number of mutant reads in a pool does not only indicate the number of carriers, but also their identity. We describe and study a powerful example of such weighted designs, using non-overlapping pools. We demonstrate that this approach is not only easier to implement and analyze but is also competitive in terms of accuracy with combinatorial designs when identifying rare variants, and is superior when sequencing common variants. We then discuss how weighting can be incorporated into existing combinatorial designs to increase their accuracy and demonstrate the resulting improvement using simulations. Finally, we argue that weighted designs have enough power to facilitate detection of common alleles, so they can be used as a cornerstone of whole-exome sequencing projects. Contact: saharon@post.tau.ac.il PMID:22689761

  12. [Chlorine concentrations in the air of indoor swimming pools and their effects on swimming pool workers].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; Gallardo, Leonor; Tamaral, Francisco Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To describe chlorine levels in the air of indoor swimming pools in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain) and relate them to other chemical parameters in the installation and to the health problems perceived by swimming pool workers. We analyzed 21 pools with chlorine as chemical treatment in Castilla-La Mancha. The iodometry method was applied to measure chlorine concentrations in the air. The concentrations of free and combined chlorine in water, pH and temperature were also evaluated. Health problems were surveyed in 230 swimming pool workers in these facilities. The mean chlorine level in the air of swimming pools was 4.3 ± 2.3mg/m(3). The pH values were within the legal limits. The temperature parameters did not comply with regulations in 17 of the 21 pools analyzed. In the pools where chlorine values in the air were above the legal regulations, a significantly higher percentage of swimming pool workers perceived eye irritation, dryness and irritation of skin, and ear problems. Chlorine values in the air of indoor swimming pools were higher than those reported in similar studies. Most of the facilities (85%) exceeded the concentration of 1.5mg/m(3) established as the limit for the risk of irritating effects. The concentration of chlorine in indoor swimming pool air has a direct effect on the self-perceived health problems of swimming pool workers. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Eukaryotic transcriptomics in silico: optimizing cDNA-AFLP efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stölting, Kai N; Gort, Gerrit; Wüst, Christian; Wilson, Anthony B

    2009-11-30

    Complementary-DNA based amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) is a commonly used tool for assessing the genetic regulation of traits through the correlation of trait expression with cDNA expression profiles. In spite of the frequent application of this method, studies on the optimization of the cDNA-AFLP assay design are rare and have typically been taxonomically restricted. Here, we model cDNA-AFLPs on all 92 eukaryotic species for which cDNA pools are currently available, using all combinations of eight restriction enzymes standard in cDNA-AFLP screens. In silco simulations reveal that cDNA pool coverage is largely determined by the choice of individual restriction enzymes and that, through the choice of optimal enzyme combinations, coverage can be increased from <40% to 75% without changing the underlying experimental design. We find evidence of phylogenetic signal in the coverage data, which is largely mediated by organismal GC content. There is nonetheless a high degree of consistency in cDNA pool coverage for particular enzyme combinations, indicating that our recommendations should be applicable to most eukaryotic systems. We also explore the relationship between the average observed fragment number per selective AFLP-PCR reaction and the size of the underlying cDNA pool, and show how AFLP experiments can be used to estimate the number of genes expressed in a target tissue. The insights gained from in silico screening of cDNA-AFLPs from a broad sampling of eukaryotes provide a set of guidelines that should help to substantially increase the efficiency of future cDNA-AFLP experiments in eukaryotes. In silico simulations also suggest a novel use of cDNA-AFLP screens to determine the number of transcripts expressed in a target tissue, an application that should be invaluable as next-generation sequencing technologies are adapted for differential display.

  14. Combined DNA extraction and antibody elution from filter papers for the assessment of malaria transmission intensity in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Baidjoe, Amrish; Stone, Will; Ploemen, Ivo; Shagari, Shehu; Grignard, Lynn; Osoti, Victor; Makori, Euniah; Stevenson, Jennifer; Kariuki, Simon; Sutherland, Colin; Sauerwein, Robert; Cox, Jonathan; Drakeley, Chris; Bousema, Teun

    2013-08-02

    Informing and evaluating malaria control efforts relies on knowledge of local transmission dynamics. Serological and molecular tools have demonstrated great sensitivity to quantify transmission intensity in low endemic settings where the sensitivity of traditional methods is limited. Filter paper blood spots are commonly used a source of both DNA and antibodies. To enhance the operational practicability of malaria surveys, a method is presented for combined DNA extraction and antibody elution. Filter paper blood spots were collected as part of a large cross-sectional survey in the Kenyan highlands. DNA was extracted using a saponin/chelex method. The eluate of the first wash during the DNA extraction process was used for antibody detection and compared with previously validated antibody elution procedures. Antibody elution efficiency was assessed by total IgG ELISA for malaria antigens apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and merozoite-surface protein-1 (MSP-142). The sensitivity of nested 18S rRNA and cytochrome b PCR assays and the impact of doubling filter paper material for PCR sensitivity were determined. The distribution of cell material and antibodies throughout filter paper blood spots were examined using luminescent and fluorescent reporter assays. Antibody levels measured after the combined antibody/DNA extraction technique were strongly correlated to those measured after standard antibody elution (p < 0.0001). Antibody levels for both AMA-1 and MSP-142 were generally slightly lower (11.3-21.4%) but age-seroprevalence patterns were indistinguishable. The proportion of parasite positive samples ranged from 12.9% to 19.2% in the different PCR assays. Despite strong agreement between outcomes of different PCR assays, none of the assays detected all parasite-positive individuals. For all assays doubling filter paper material for DNA extraction increased sensitivity. The concentration of cell and antibody material was not homogenously distributed throughout

  15. Combined DNA extraction and antibody elution from filter papers for the assessment of malaria transmission intensity in epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informing and evaluating malaria control efforts relies on knowledge of local transmission dynamics. Serological and molecular tools have demonstrated great sensitivity to quantify transmission intensity in low endemic settings where the sensitivity of traditional methods is limited. Filter paper blood spots are commonly used a source of both DNA and antibodies. To enhance the operational practicability of malaria surveys, a method is presented for combined DNA extraction and antibody elution. Methods Filter paper blood spots were collected as part of a large cross-sectional survey in the Kenyan highlands. DNA was extracted using a saponin/chelex method. The eluate of the first wash during the DNA extraction process was used for antibody detection and compared with previously validated antibody elution procedures. Antibody elution efficiency was assessed by total IgG ELISA for malaria antigens apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and merozoite-surface protein-1 (MSP-142). The sensitivity of nested 18S rRNA and cytochrome b PCR assays and the impact of doubling filter paper material for PCR sensitivity were determined. The distribution of cell material and antibodies throughout filter paper blood spots were examined using luminescent and fluorescent reporter assays. Results Antibody levels measured after the combined antibody/DNA extraction technique were strongly correlated to those measured after standard antibody elution (p < 0.0001). Antibody levels for both AMA-1 and MSP-142 were generally slightly lower (11.3-21.4%) but age-seroprevalence patterns were indistinguishable. The proportion of parasite positive samples ranged from 12.9% to 19.2% in the different PCR assays. Despite strong agreement between outcomes of different PCR assays, none of the assays detected all parasite-positive individuals. For all assays doubling filter paper material for DNA extraction increased sensitivity. The concentration of cell and antibody material was not

  16. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi's individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  17. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi’s individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  18. Laser microbeam - kinetic studies combined with molecule - structures reveal mechanisms of DNA repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberg, B.; Greulich, K. O.

    2011-10-01

    Kinetic studies on double strand DNA damages induced by a laser microbeam have allowed a precise definition of the temporal order of recruitment of repair molecules. The order is KU70 / KU80 - XRCC4 --NBS1 -- RAD51. These kinetic studies are now complemented by studies on molecular structures of the repair proteins, using the program YASARA which does not only give molecular structures but also physicochemical details on forces involved in binding processes. It turns out that the earliest of these repair proteins, the KU70 / KU80 heterodimer, has a hole with high DNA affinity. The next molecule, XRCC4, has a body with two arms, the latter with extremely high DNA affinity at their ends and a binding site for Ligase 4. Together with the laser microbeam results this provides a detailed view on the early steps of DNA double strand break repair. The sequence of DNA repair events is presented as a movie.

  19. The combination of sequence-specific and nonspecific DNA-binding modes of transcription factor SATB1.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Yamasaki, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    Transcription factor SATB1 (special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1) contains multiple DNA-binding domains (DBDs), i.e. two CUT-domain repeats (CUTr1 and CUTr2 from the N-terminus) and a homeodomain, and binds to the matrix attachment region (MAR) of DNA. Although CUTr1 and the homeodomain, but not CUTr2, are known to contribute to DNA binding, different research groups have not reached a consensus on which DBD is responsible for recognition of the target sequence in MAR, 5'-TAATA-3'. Here, we used isothermal titration calorimetry to demonstrate that CUTr1 has binding specificity to this motif, whereas the homeodomain shows affinity for a variety of DNAs without specificity. In line with nonspecific DNA-binding properties of the homeodomain, a mutation of the invariant Asn at position 51 of the homeodomain (typically in contact with the A base in a sequence-specific binding mode) did not affect the binding affinity significantly. The NMR analyses and computational modeling of the homeodomain, however, revealed the tertiary structure and DNA-binding mode that are typical of homeodomains capable of sequence-specific binding. We believe that the lack of highly conserved basic residues in the helix relevant to the base recognition loosens its fitting into the DNA groove and impairs the specific binding. The two DBDs, when fused in tandem, showed strong binding to DNA containing the 5'-TAATA-3' motif with an affinity constant >10(8) M(-1) and retained nonspecific binding activity. The combination of the sequence-specific and nonspecific DNA-binding modes of SATB1 should be advantageous in a search for target loci during transcriptional regulation. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Combining ligation reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis to obtain reliable long DNA probes.

    PubMed

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Mondello, Monica; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-05-01

    New DNA amplification methods are continuously developed for sensitive detection and quantification of specific DNA target sequences for, e.g. clinical, environmental or food applications. These new applications often require the use of long DNA oligonucleotides as probes for target sequences hybridization. Depending on the molecular technique, the length of DNA probes ranges from 40 to 450 nucleotides, solid-phase chemical synthesis being the strategy generally used for their production. However, the fidelity of chemical synthesis of DNA decreases for larger DNA probes. Defects in the oligonucleotide sequence result in the loss of hybridization efficiency, affecting the sensitivity and selectivity of the amplification method. In this work, an enzymatic procedure has been developed as an alternative to solid-phase chemical synthesis for the production of long oligonucleotides. The enzymatic procedure for probe production was based on ligation of short DNA sequences. Long DNA probes were obtained from smaller oligonucleotides together with a short sequence that acts as bridge stabilizing the molecular complex for DNA ligation. The ligation reactions were monitored by capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF) using a bare fused-silica capillary. The capillary gel electrophoresis-LIF method demonstrated to be very useful and informative for the characterization of the ligation reaction, providing important information about the nature of some impurities, as well as for the fine optimization of the ligation conditions (i.e. ligation cycles, oligonucleotide and enzyme concentration). As a result, the yield and quality of the ligation product were highly improved. The in-lab prepared DNA probes were used in a novel multiplex ligation-dependent genome amplification (MLGA) method for the detection of genetically modified maize in samples. The great possibilities of the whole approach were demonstrated by the specific and sensitive

  1. GWAS study using DNA pooling strategy identifies association of variant rs4910623 in OR52B4 gene with anti-VEGF treatment response in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Moeen; Lorés-Motta, Laura; Richardson, Andrea J.; Lu, Yi; Montgomery, Grant; Omar, Amer; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Chen, John; Muether, Philipp; Altay, Lebriz; Schick, Tina; Fauser, Sascha; Smailhodzic, Dzenita; van Asten, Freekje; de Jong, Eiko K.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; MacGregor, Stuart; Guymer, Robyn H.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Baird, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    Pooled DNA based GWAS to determine genetic association of SNPs with visual acuity (VA) outcome in anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treated neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) patients. We performed pooled DNA based GWAS on 285 anti-VEGF treated nAMD patients using high density Illumina 4.3 M array. Primary outcome was change in VA in Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters after 6 months of anti-VEGF treatment (patients who lost ≥5 ETDRS letters classified as non-responders and all remaining classified as responders). GWAS analysis identified 44 SNPs of interest: 37 with strong evidence of association (p < 9 × 10−8), 2 in drug resistance genes (p < 5 × 10−6) and 5 nonsynonymous changes (p < 1 × 10−4). In the validation phase, individual genotyping of 44 variants showed three SNPs (rs4910623 p = 5.6 × 10−5, rs323085 p = 6.5 × 10−4 and rs10198937 p = 1.30 × 10−3) remained associated with VA response at 6 months. SNP rs4910623 also associated with treatment response at 3 months (p = 1.5 × 10−3). Replication of these three SNPs in 376 patients revealed association of rs4910623 with poor VA response after 3 and 6 months of treatment (p = 2.4 × 10−3 and p = 3.5 × 10−2, respectively). Meta-analysis of both cohorts (673 samples) confirmed association of rs4910623 with poor VA response after 3 months (p = 1.2 × 10−5) and 6 months (p = 9.3 × 10−6) of treatment in nAMD patients. PMID:27892514

  2. Detection and risk assessment of adenoviruses in swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, J; Ehlers, M M; Grabow, W O K

    2005-01-01

    The role of swimming pool water as a source of human adenovirus (HAd) infection has previously been demonstrated. In this study, the risk of infection of HAds detected in a survey of swimming pool water from two indoor and one outdoor swimming pools over a period of 1 year was assessed. The HAds were concentrated from 1 l grab samples of swimming pool water using a silicon dioxide-based method. The extracted HAd DNA was amplified by means of a nested PCR method. Adenoviruses were detected in four of 26 samples (15.4%) from the indoor swimming pool A, eight of 38 samples (21.1%) from the indoor swimming pool B and three of 28 samples (10.7%) from the outdoor swimming pool C. Application of these results in an exponential risk assessment model indicated a daily risk of infection of 2.61 x 10(-3) for swimming pool A, 3.69 x 10(-3) for swimming pool B and 1.92 x 10(-3) for swimming pool C assuming a daily consumption of 30 ml of swimming pool water. No acceptable (tolerable) risk of infection has yet been recommended for swimming pool water. However, the quality of swimming pool water is generally expected to be similar to that of drinking water. One infection per 10 000 consumers per year has been recommended for drinking water. The risk of HAd infections calculated for the swimming pool water under investigation exceeded this acceptable risk. The finding that swimming pool water which conforms to generally accepted specifications for treatment, disinfection and indicator organisms constituted a risk of HAd infection, has implications for the swimming pool industry. The formulation of acceptable (tolerable) risks of infection for swimming pool water may be essential. Specifications will, therefore, have to be formulated to ensure that swimming pool water conforms to the acceptable risk of infection.

  3. Generalizing Pooling Functions in CNNs: Mixed, Gated, and Tree.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Yu; Gallagher, Patrick; Tu, Zhuowen

    2017-05-12

    In this paper, we seek to improve deep neural networks by generalizing the pooling operations that play a central role in the current architectures. We pursue a careful exploration of approaches to allow pooling to learn and to adapt to complex and variable patterns. The two primary directions lie in: (1) learning a pooling function via (two strategies of) combining of max and average pooling, and (2) learning a pooling function in the form of a tree-structured fusion of pooling filters that are themselves learned. In our experiments every generalized pooling operation we explore improves performance when used in place of average or max pooling. We experimentally demonstrate that the proposed pooling operations provide a boost in invariance properties relative to conventional pooling and set the state of the art on several widely adopted benchmark datasets. These benefits come with only a light increase in computational overhead during training (ranging from additional 5% to 15% in time complexity) and a very modest increase in the number of model parameters (e.g. additional 1, 9, and 27 parameters for mixed, gated, and 2-level tree pooling operators, respectively). To gain more insights about our proposed pooling methods, we also visualize the learned pooling masks and the embeddings of the internal feature responses for different pooling operations. Our proposed pooling operations are easy to implement and can be applied within various deep neural network architectures.

  4. Genetic variants in combination with early partial improvement as a clinical utility predictor of treatment outcome in major depressive disorder: the result of two pooled RCTs.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Serretti, A; Nonen, S; Takekita, Y; Wakeno, M; Azuma, J; Kinoshita, T

    2015-02-24

    Pharmacogenetics may allow for a personalized treatment, but a combination with clinical variables may further enhance prediction. In particular, in the present paper, we investigated early partial improvement (EPI) defined as 20% or more improvement by rating scales 2  weeks after treatment, in combination with selected gene variants as a predictor of treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Two randomized controlled trials with 168 Japanese depressed patients were used. A stepwise multiple linear regression model with HAM-D score change at week 6 as the dependent variable and genotypes, EPI, baseline HAM-D score, age and sex as independent variables was performed in paroxetine, fluvoxamine and milnacipran, respectively, to estimate the prediction of HAM-D change at week 6. In the paroxetine sample, only EPI (P<0.001) was significantly associated with HAM-D change (n=81, R(2)=0.25, P<0.001). In the fluvoxamine sample, 5-HTTLPR La/Lg, S (P=0.029), FGF2 rs1449683C/T (P=0.013) and EPI (P=0.003) were associated with HAM-D change (n=42, R(2)=0.43, P<0.001). In the milnacipran sample, HTR-1A-1019C/G (P=0.001), ADRA2A-1297C/G (P=0.028) and EPI (P<0.001) were associated with outcome (n=45, R(2)=0.71, P<0.001). EPI in combination with genetic variants could be a useful predictor of treatment outcome and could strengthen the practical use of pharmacogenetic data in clinical practice.

  5. Combined spectroscopic and molecular docking approach to probing binding interactions between lovastatin and calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-B; Chen, J; Wang, J; Zhu, Y-Y; Shi, J-H

    2015-11-01

    The binding interaction of lovastatin with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was studied using UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), viscosity measurement and molecular docking methods. The experimental results showed that there was an obvious binding interaction of lovastatin with ct-DNA and the binding constant (Kb ) was 5.60 × 10(3) M(-1) at 298 K. In the binding process of lovastatin with ct-DNA, the enthalpy change (ΔH(0)) and entropy change (ΔS(0)) were -24.9 kJ/mol and -12.0 J/mol/K, respectively, indicating that the main binding interaction forces were van der Waal's force and hydrogen bonding. The molecular docking results suggested that lovastatin preferred to bind on the minor groove of different B-DNA fragments and the conformation change of lovastatin in the lovastatin-DNA complex was obviously observed, implying that the flexibility of lovastatin molecule plays an important role in the formation of the stable lovastatin-ct-DNA complex. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Personal identification of cold case remains through combined contribution from anthropological, mtDNA, and bomb-pulse dating analyses.

    PubMed

    Speller, Camilla F; Spalding, Kirsty L; Buchholz, Bruce A; Hildebrand, Dean; Moore, Jason; Mathewes, Rolf; Skinner, Mark F; Yang, Dongya Y

    2012-09-01

    In 1968, a child's cranium was recovered from the banks of a northern Canadian river and held in a trust until the "cold case" was reopened in 2005. The cranium underwent reanalysis at the Centre for Forensic Research, Simon Fraser University, using recently developed anthropological analysis, "bomb-pulse" radiocarbon analysis, and forensic DNA techniques. Craniometrics, skeletal ossification, and dental formation indicated an age-at-death of 4.4 ± 1 year. Radiocarbon analysis of enamel from two teeth indicated a year of birth between 1958 and 1962. Forensic DNA analysis indicated the child was a male, and the obtained mitochondrial profile matched a living maternal relative to the presumed missing child. These multidisciplinary analyses resulted in a legal identification 41 years after the discovery of the remains, highlighting the enormous potential of combining radiocarbon analysis with anthropological and mtDNA analyses in producing confident personal identifications for forensic cold cases dating to within the last 60 years.

  7. Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Human Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination Generates a Stable Pool of Protective Long-Lived CD8+ T Effector Memory Cells Specific for a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; de Alencar, Bruna C.; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie C.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Araújo, Adriano F.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we described a heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective human recombinant adenovirus type 5 as a powerful strategy to elicit long-lived CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against experimental systemic infection of mice with a human intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present study, we further characterized the protective long-lived CD8+ T cells. We compared several functional and phenotypic aspects of specific CD8+ T cells present 14 or 98 days after the last immunizing dose and found the following: (i) the numbers of specific cells were similar, as determined by multimer staining or by determining the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay; (ii) these cells were equally cytotoxic in vivo; (iii) following in vitro stimulation, a slight decline in the frequency of multifunctional cells (CD107a+ IFN-γ+ or CD107a+ IFN-γ+ tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-α+]) was paralleled by a significant increase of CD107a singly positive cells after 98 days; (iv) the expression of several surface markers was identical, except for the reexpression of CD127 after 98 days; (v) the use of genetically deficient mice revealed a role for interleukin-12 (IL-12)/IL-23, but not IFN-γ, in the maintenance of these memory cells; and (vi) subsequent immunizations with an unrelated virus or a plasmid vaccine or the depletion of CD4+ T cells did not significantly erode the number or function of these CD8+ T cells during the 15-week period. From these results, we concluded that heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination generated a stable pool of functional protective long-lived CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype. PMID:21357719

  8. Combined first pass and gated blood pool radionuclide studies in the hemodynamic-cardiac evaluation of patients with low cardiac output

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Mansour, P.; Fouad, F.M.; Sheeler, L.R.; Bravo, E.L.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is frequently used in the evaluation of cardiac function but low CO does not necessarily reflect heart failure. Similarly, low ejection fraction (EF) can be present in compensated heart diseases. In order to evaluate cardiac performance in relation to systematic hemodynamics, the authors used a multifactorial approach for the determination of CO, EF, pulmonary mean transit time (MTT), ratio of cardiopulmonary volume over total blood volume (CPV/TBV as an index of venous tone) all obtained from a single injection of 99m Tc-HSA. Four different conditions associated with low CO (less than or equal to 2.1 L/min/m/sup 2/) were evaluated. The combined use of CO, EF, MTT and CPV/TBV allowed a better understanding of the myocardial and peripheral circulatory factors associated with low CO states. This is helpful in the selection and follow-up of appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  9. Quantification of DNA synthesis in multicellular organisms by a combined DAPI and BrdU technique.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Kunz, Werner; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2002-12-01

    The development of a novel method to detect and quantify mitotic activity in multicellular organisms is reported. The method is based on the combinatorial use of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) as a dye for the specific staining of DNA and the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) as a marker for DNA synthesis. It is shown that on nitrocellulose filters, the amount of DNA can be determined by DAPI as a prerequisite for the subsequent quantification of mitotic activity by BrdU. As a model system to prove the applicability of this technique, the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni has been used. It is demonstrated that the DNA synthesis rate is higher in adult female schistosomes than in adult males. Furthermore, dimethyl sulfoxide, a widely used solvent for many mitogens and inhibitors of mitosis, has no influence on mitotic activity in adult schistosomes.

  10. Radiolaria divided into Polycystina and Spasmaria in combined 18S and 28S rDNA phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Krabberød, Anders K; Bråte, Jon; Dolven, Jane K; Ose, Randi F; Klaveness, Dag; Kristensen, Tom; Bjørklund, Kjell R; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Radiolarians are marine planktonic protists that belong to the eukaryote supergroup Rhizaria together with Foraminifera and Cercozoa. Radiolaria has traditionally been divided into four main groups based on morphological characters; i.e. Polycystina, Acantharia, Nassellaria and Phaeodaria. But recent 18S rDNA phylogenies have shown that Phaeodaria belongs within Cerocozoa, and that the previously heliozoan group Taxopodida should be included in Radiolaria. 18S rDNA phylogenies have not yet resolved the sister relationship between the main Radiolaria groups, but nevertheless suggests that Spumellaria, and thereby also Polycystina, are polyphyletic. Very few sequences other than 18S rDNA have so far been generated from radiolarian cells, mostly due to the fact that Radiolaria has been impossible to cultivate and single cell PCR has been hampered by low success rate. Here we have therefore investigated the mutual evolutionary relationship of the main radiolarian groups by using the novel approach of combining single cell whole genome amplification with targeted PCR amplification of the 18S and 28S rDNA genes. Combined 18S and 28S phylogeny of sequences obtained from single cells shows that Radiolaria is divided into two main lineages: Polycystina (Spumellaria+Nassellaria) and Spasmaria (Acantharia+Taxopodida). Further we show with high support that Foraminifera groups within Radiolaria supporting the Retaria hypothesis.

  11. Radiolaria Divided into Polycystina and Spasmaria in Combined 18S and 28S rDNA Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Dolven, Jane K.; Ose, Randi F.; Klaveness, Dag; Kristensen, Tom; Bjørklund, Kjell R.; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Radiolarians are marine planktonic protists that belong to the eukaryote supergroup Rhizaria together with Foraminifera and Cercozoa. Radiolaria has traditionally been divided into four main groups based on morphological characters; i.e. Polycystina, Acantharia, Nassellaria and Phaeodaria. But recent 18S rDNA phylogenies have shown that Phaeodaria belongs within Cerocozoa, and that the previously heliozoan group Taxopodida should be included in Radiolaria. 18S rDNA phylogenies have not yet resolved the sister relationship between the main Radiolaria groups, but nevertheless suggests that Spumellaria, and thereby also Polycystina, are polyphyletic. Very few sequences other than 18S rDNA have so far been generated from radiolarian cells, mostly due to the fact that Radiolaria has been impossible to cultivate and single cell PCR has been hampered by low success rate. Here we have therefore investigated the mutual evolutionary relationship of the main radiolarian groups by using the novel approach of combining single cell whole genome amplification with targeted PCR amplification of the 18S and 28S rDNA genes. Combined 18S and 28S phylogeny of sequences obtained from single cells shows that Radiolaria is divided into two main lineages: Polycystina (Spumellaria+Nassellaria) and Spasmaria (Acantharia+Taxopodida). Further we show with high support that Foraminifera groups within Radiolaria supporting the Retaria hypothesis. PMID:21853146

  12. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates. 120.611 Section 120.611 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As...

  13. MALS: an efficient strategy for multiple site-directed mutagenesis employing a combination of DNA amplification, ligation and suppression PCR

    PubMed Central

    Fushan, Alexey A; Drayna, Dennis T

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple approaches for the site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) have been developed. However, only several of them are designed for simultaneous introduction of multiple nucleotide alterations, and these are time consuming. In addition, many of the existing multiple SDM methods have technical limitations associated with type and number of mutations that can be introduced, or are technically demanding and require special chemical reagents. Results In this study we developed a quick and efficient strategy for introduction of multiple complex mutations in a target DNA without intermediate subcloning by using a combination of connecting SDM and suppression PCR. The procedure consists of sequential rounds, with each individual round including PCR amplification of target DNA with two non-overlapping pairs of oligonucleotides. The desired mutation is incorporated at the 5' end of one or both internal oligonucleotides. DNA fragments obtained during amplification are mixed and ligated. The resulting DNA mixture is amplified with external oligonucleotides that act as suppression adapters. Suppression PCR limits amplification to DNA molecules representing full length target DNA, while amplification of other types of molecules formed during ligation is suppressed. To create additional mutations, an aliquot of the ligation mixture is then used directly for the next round of mutagenesis employing internal oligonucleotides specific for another region of target DNA. Conclusion A wide variety of complex multiple mutations can be generated in a short period of time. The procedure is rapid, highly efficient and does not require special chemical reagents. Thus, MALS represents a powerful alternative to the existing methods for multiple SDM. PMID:19778447

  14. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e.

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4- [4-(N-methyl)styrene] -benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2.

  15. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e

    2016-03-05

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Dang, Phat M; Chen, Charles Y

    2013-02-01

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA isolation from plant seeds is a prerequisite for many seed specific gene expression studies and DNA is necessary in marker-assisted selection and other genetic studies. We describe a modified method to isolate both RNA and DNA from the same seed tissue and have been successful with several oil seeds including peanut, soybean, sunflower, canola, and oil radish. An additional LiCl precipitation step was added to isolate both RNA and DNA from the same seed tissues. High quality nucleic acids were observed based on A(260)/A(280) and A(260)/A(230) ratios above 2.0 and distinct bands on gel-electrophoresis. RNA was shown to be suitable for reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction based on actin or 60S ribosomal primer amplification and DNA was shown to have a single band on gel-electrophoresis analysis. This result shows that RNA and DNA isolated using this method can be appropriate for molecular studies in peanut and other oil containing seeds.

  17. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  18. Pooled Genome-Wide Analysis to Identify Novel Risk Loci for Pediatric Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Giampaolo; Astolfi, Annalisa; Remondini, Daniel; Cipriani, Francesca; Formica, Serena; Dondi, Arianna; Pession, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies of pooled DNA samples were shown to be a valuable tool to identify candidate SNPs associated to a phenotype. No such study was up to now applied to childhood allergic asthma, even if the very high complexity of asthma genetics is an appropriate field to explore the potential of pooled GWAS approach. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a pooled GWAS and individual genotyping in 269 children with allergic respiratory diseases comparing allergic children with and without asthma. We used a modular approach to identify the most significant loci associated with asthma by combining silhouette statistics and physical distance method with cluster-adapted thresholding. We found 97% concordance between pooled GWAS and individual genotyping, with 36 out of 37 top-scoring SNPs significant at individual genotyping level. The most significant SNP is located inside the coding sequence of C5, an already identified asthma susceptibility gene, while the other loci regulate functions that are relevant to bronchial physiopathology, as immune- or inflammation-mediated mechanisms and airway smooth muscle contraction. Integration with gene expression data showed that almost half of the putative susceptibility genes are differentially expressed in experimental asthma mouse models. Conclusion/Significance Combined silhouette statistics and cluster-adapted physical distance threshold analysis of pooled GWAS data is an efficient method to identify candidate SNP associated to asthma development in an allergic pediatric population. PMID:21359210

  19. [Gene pool differentiation between Altaic and trotting horse breeds inferred from ISSR-PCR marker data].

    PubMed

    Feofilov, A V; Bardukov, N V; Glazko, V I

    2011-09-01

    Using ISSR-PCR marker data, comparative analysis of the gene pools of Altaic and trotting horse breeds was carried out. Horse groups of different origin demonstrated differences in amplification spectra of DNA fragments flanked by inverted repeats of four microsatellites. Combinations of certain DNA fragments present in these profiles reproducibly distinguished genomes of the Altaic breed from the trotting breeds. Genetic differentiation between some trotting breeds, based on Nei genetic distance values, was found to be comparable to that between the groups of horses of Altaic breed from two different farms.

  20. Evaluation of blood pressure reduction response and responder characteristics to fixed-dose combination treatment of amlodipine and losartan: a post hoc analysis of pooled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Unniachan, Sreevalsa; Wu, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Hanson, Mary E; Fujita, Kenji P

    2014-09-01

    Data from four clinical trials compared reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among patients treated with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs 5/100 mg and amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg and 10 mg. Response rate was assessed as reduction in SBP or DBP (>20/10 mm Hg) and proportion of patients achieving SBP <140 mm Hg or DBP <90 mm Hg. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on baseline SBP and DBP. Mean SBP and DBP were reduced in amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg (n=182) and amlodipine/losartan 5/100 mg (n=95) users across all baseline quartiles. Patients using amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg had significantly greater SBP and DBP reductions vs amlodipine 5 mg (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). Amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg users had significantly greater SBP reduction vs amlodipine 10 mg (SBP P=.02; DBP P=not significant). The odds of responding to therapy were significantly greater with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg (odds ratio, 5.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-25.5) and were similar vs amlodipine 10 mg (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.017-9.51). These results support the use of combination therapy early in the treatment of hypertension.

  1. Combined walking exercise and alkali therapy in patients with CKD4-5 regulates intramuscular free amino acid pools and ubiquitin E3 ligase expression.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma L; Kosmadakis, George C; Smith, Alice C; Viana, Joao L; Brown, Jeremy R; Molyneux, Karen; Pawluczyk, Izabella Z A; Mulheran, Michael; Bishop, Nicolette C; Shirreffs, Susan; Maughan, Ronald J; Owen, Paul J; John, Stephen G; McIntyre, Christopher W; Feehally, John; Bevington, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Muscle-wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) arises from several factors including sedentary behaviour and metabolic acidosis. Exercise is potentially beneficial but might worsen acidosis through exercise-induced lactic acidosis. We studied the chronic effects of exercise in CKD stage 4-5 patients (brisk walking, 30 min, 5 times/week), and non-exercising controls; each group receiving standard oral bicarbonate (STD), or additional bicarbonate (XS) (Total n = 26; Exercising + STD n = 9; Exercising +XS n = 6; Control + STD n = 8; Control + XS n = 3). Blood and vastus lateralis biopsies were drawn at baseline and 6 months. The rise in blood lactate in submaximal treadmill tests was suppressed in the Exercising + XS group. After 6 months, intramuscular free amino acids (including the branched chain amino acids) in the Exercising + STD group showed a striking chronic depletion. This did not occur in the Exercising + XS group. The effect in Exercising + XS patients was accompanied by reduced transcription of ubiquitin E3-ligase MuRF1 which activates proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Other anabolic indicators (Akt activation and suppression of the 14 kDa actin catabolic marker) were unaffected in Exercising + XS patients. Possibly because of this, overall suppression of myofibrillar proteolysis (3-methylhistidine output) was not observed. It is suggested that alkali effects in exercisers arose by countering exercise-induced acidosis. Whether further anabolic effects are attainable on combining alkali with enhanced exercise (e.g. resistance exercise) merits further investigation.

  2. A Fosmid Pool-Based Next Generation Sequencing Approach to Haplotype-Resolve Whole Genomes.

    PubMed

    Suk, Eun-Kyung; Schulz, Sabrina; Mentrup, Birgit; Huebsch, Thomas; Duitama, Jorge; Hoehe, Margret R

    2017-01-01

    Haplotype resolution of human genomes is essential to describe and interpret genetic variation and its impact on biology and disease. Our approach to haplotyping relies on converting genomic DNA into a fosmid library, which represents the entire diploid genome as a collection of haploid DNA clones of ~40 kb in size. These can be partitioned into pools such that the probability that the same pool contains both parental haplotypes is reduced to ~1 %. This is the key principle of this method, allowing entire pools of fosmids to be massively parallel sequenced, yielding haploid sequence output. Here, we present a detailed protocol for fosmid pool-based next generation sequencing to haplotype-resolve whole genomes including the following steps: (1) generation of high molecular weight DNA fragments of ~40 kb in size from genomic DNA; (2) fosmid cloning and partitioning into 96-well plates; (3) barcoded sequencing library preparation from fosmid pools for next generation sequencing; and (4) computational analysis of fosmid sequences and assembly into contiguous haploid sequences.This method can be used in combination with, but also without, whole genome shotgun sequencing to extensively resolve heterozygous SNPs and structural variants within genomic regions, resulting in haploid contigs of several hundred kb up to several Mb. This method has a broad range of applications including population and ancestry genetics, the clinical interpretation of mutations in personal genomes, the analysis of cancer genomes and highly complex disease gene regions such as MHC. Moreover, haplotype-resolved genome sequencing allows description and interpretation of the diploid nature of genome biology, for example through the analysis of haploid gene forms and allele-specific phenomena. Application of this method has enabled the production of most of the molecular haplotype-resolved genomes reported to date.

  3. Pool spacing in forest channels

    Treesearch

    David R. Montgomery; John M. Buffington; Richard D. Smith; Kevin M. Schmidt; George Pess

    1995-01-01

    Field surveys of stream channels in forested mountain drainage basins in southeast Alaska and Washington reveal that pool spacing depends on large woody debris (LWD) loading and channel type, slope, and width. Mean pool spacing in pool-riffle, plane-bed, and forced pool-riffle channels systematically decreases from greater than 13 channel widths per pool to less than 1...

  4. A novel AT-rich DNA binding protein that combines an HMG I-like DNA binding domain with a putative transcription domain.

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, G; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    There is growing evidence that AT-rich promoter elements play a role in transcription of plant genes. For the promoter of the nuclear gene for chloroplast glutamine synthetase from pea (GS2), the deletion of a 33-bp AT-rich sequence (box 1 native) from the 5' end of a GS2 promoter-beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion resulted in a 10-fold reduction in GUS activity. The box 1 native element was used in gel shift analysis and two distinct complexes were detected. One complex is related to the low-mobility complex reported previously for AT-rich elements from several other plant promoters. A multimer of the box 1 sequence was used to isolate a cDNA encoding an AT-rich DNA binding protein (ATBP-1). ATBP-1 is not a high-mobility group protein, but it is a novel protein that combines a high-mobility group I/Y-like DNA binding domain with a glutamine-rich putative transcriptional domain. PMID:7907505

  5. Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating area. Non-original spa pool is partially visible on right. - Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. Combined RNA/DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries.

    PubMed

    Shpiz, Sergey; Lavrov, Sergey; Kalmykova, Alla

    2014-01-01

    DNA FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) analysis reveals the chromosomal location of the gene of interest. RNA in situ hybridization is used to examine the amounts and cell location of transcripts. This method is commonly used to describe the localization of processed transcripts in different tissues or cell lines. Gene activation studies are often aimed at determining the mechanism of this activation (transcriptional or posttranscriptional). Elucidation of the mechanism of piRNA-mediated silencing of genomic repeats is at the cutting edge of small RNA research. The RNA/DNA FISH technique is a powerful method for assessing transcriptional changes at any particular genomic locus. Colocalization of the RNA and DNA FISH signals allows a determination of the accumulation of nascent transcripts at the transcribed genomic locus. This would be suggest that this gene is activated at the transcriptional (or co-transcriptional) level. Moreover, this method allows for the identification of transcriptional derepression of a distinct copy (copies) among a genomic repeat family. Here, a RNA/DNA FISH protocol is presented for the simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA in situ on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries using tyramide signal amplification. With subsequent immunostaining of chromatin components, this protocol can be easily extended for studying the interdependence between chromatin changes at genomic loci and their transcriptional activity.

  7. Combining SSH and cDNA microarrays for rapid identification of differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, G P; Ross, D T; Kuang, W W; Brown, P O; Weigel, R J

    1999-03-15

    Comparing patterns of gene expression in cell lines and tissues has important applications in a variety of biological systems. In this study we have examined whether the emerging technology of cDNA microarrays will allow a high throughput analysis of expression of cDNA clones generated by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). A set of cDNA clones including 332 SSH inserts amplified by PCR was arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with fluorescent labeled probes prepared from RNA from ER-positive (MCF7 and T47D) and ER-negative (MDA-MB-231 and HBL-100) breast cancer cell lines. Ten clones were identified that were over-expressed by at least a factor of five in the ER-positive cell lines. Northern blot analysis confirmed over-expression of these 10 cDNAs. Sequence analysis identified four of these clones as cytokeratin 19, GATA-3, CD24 and glutathione-S-transferase mu-3. Of the remaining six cDNA clones, four clones matched EST sequences from two different genes and two clones were novel sequences. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence confirmed that CD24 protein was over-expressed in the ER-positive cell lines. We conclude that SSH and microarray technology can be successfully applied to identify differentially expressed genes. This approach allowed the identification of differentially expressed genes without the need to obtain previously cloned cDNAs.

  8. Different combinations of atomic interactions predict protein‐small molecule and protein‐DNA/RNA affinities with similar accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interactions between proteins and other molecules play essential roles in all biological processes. Although it is widely held that a protein's ligand specificity is determined primarily by its three‐dimensional structure, the general principles by which structure determines ligand binding remain poorly understood. Here we use statistical analyses of a large number of protein−ligand complexes with associated binding‐affinity measurements to quantitatively characterize how combinations of atomic interactions contribute to ligand affinity. We find that there are significant differences in how atomic interactions determine ligand affinity for proteins that bind small chemical ligands, those that bind DNA/RNA and those that interact with other proteins. Although protein‐small molecule and protein‐DNA/RNA binding affinities can be accurately predicted from structural data, models predicting one type of interaction perform poorly on the others. Additionally, the particular combinations of atomic interactions required to predict binding affinity differed between small‐molecule and DNA/RNA data sets, consistent with the conclusion that the structural bases determining ligand affinity differ among interaction types. In contrast to what we observed for small‐molecule and DNA/RNA interactions, no statistical models were capable of predicting protein−protein affinity with >60% correlation. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of protein‐DNA/RNA binding prediction as a possible tool for high‐throughput virtual screening to guide laboratory investigations, suggesting that quantitative characterization of diverse molecular interactions may have practical applications as well as fundamentally advancing our understanding of how molecular structure translates into function. Proteins 2015; 83:2100–2114. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26370248

  9. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  10. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  11. Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer After Selective Bladder-Preserving Combined-Modality Therapy: A Pooled Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocols 8802, 8903, 9506, 9706, 9906, and 0233

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Raymond H.; Hunt, Daniel; Shipley, William U.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Tester, William J.; Hagan, Michael P.; Kaufman, Donald S.; Heney, Niall M.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Multiple prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols have evaluated bladder-preserving combined-modality therapy (CMT) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), reserving cystectomy for salvage treatment. We performed a pooled analysis of long-term outcomes in patients with MIBC enrolled across multiple studies. Patients and Methods Four hundred sixty-eight patients with MIBC were enrolled onto six RTOG bladder-preservation studies, including five phase II studies (RTOG 8802, 9506, 9706, 9906, and 0233) and one phase III study (RTOG 8903). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and disease-specific survival (DSS), muscle-invasive and non–muscle-invasive local failure (LF), and distant metastasis (DM) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. Results The median age of patients was 66 years (range, 34 to 93 years), and clinical T stage was T2 in 61%, T3 in 35%, and T4a in 4% of patients. Complete response to CMT was documented in 69% of patients. With a median follow-up of 4.3 years among all patients and 7.8 years among survivors (n = 205), the 5- and 10-year OS rates were 57% and 36%, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year DSS rates were 71% and 65%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year estimates of muscle-invasive LF, non–muscle-invasive LF, and DM were 13% and 14%, 31% and 36%, and 31% and 35%, respectively. Conclusion This pooled analysis of multicenter, prospective RTOG bladder-preserving CMT protocols demonstrates long-term DSS comparable to modern immediate cystectomy studies, for patients with similarly staged MIBC. Given the low incidence of late recurrences with long-term follow-up, CMT can be considered as an alternative to radical cystectomy, especially in elderly patients not well suited for surgery. PMID:25366678

  12. Long-term evaluation of combined prolonged-release oxycodone and naloxone in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic pain: pooled analysis of extension phases of two Phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Blagden, M; Hafer, J; Duerr, H; Hopp, M; Bosse, B

    2014-01-01

    Background While opioids provide effective analgesia, opioid-induced constipation (OIC) can severely impact quality of life and treatment compliance. This pooled analysis evaluated the maintenance of efficacy and safety during long-term treatment with combined oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets (OXN PR) in adults with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Methods Patients (N = 474) received open-label OXN PR during 52-week extension phases of two studies, having completed 12-week, double-blind, randomized treatment with oxycodone prolonged-release tablets (Oxy PR) or OXN PR. Analgesia and bowel function were assessed at each study visit using ‘Average pain over last 24 h scale and Bowel Function Index (BFI), respectively. Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication was assessed at study end only. Key Results Improvement in bowel function was particularly marked in patients who switched from Oxy PR in the double-blind phase to OXN PR during the extension phase, resulting in a clinically meaningful reduction (≥12 points) in BFI score: at the start of the extension phases, mean (SD) BFI score was 44.3 (28.13), and was 29.8 (26.36) for patients who had received OXN PR in the double-blind phase. One week later, BFI scores were similar for the two groups (26.5 [24.40] and 27.5 [25.60], respectively), as was observed throughout the following months. Fewer than 10% of patients received laxatives regularly. Mean 24-h pain scores were low and stable throughout the extension phases. No unexpected adverse events were observed. Conclusions & Inferences Pooled data demonstrate OXN PR is an effective long-term therapy for patients with chronic non-cancer pain, and can address symptoms of OIC. No new safety issues were observed which were attributable to the long-term administration of OXN PR. PMID:25346155

  13. Quality measure attainment with dapagliflozin plus metformin extended-release as initial combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: a post hoc pooled analysis of two clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Kelly F; Katz, Arie; Sheehan, John J

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of quality measures attempts to improve safety and health outcomes and to reduce costs. In two Phase III trials in treatment-naive patients with type 2 diabetes, dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d as initial combination therapy with metformin extended-release (XR) significantly reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C) from baseline to 24 weeks and allowed higher proportions of patients to achieve A1C <7% vs dapagliflozin or metformin monotherapy. Objective A pooled analysis of data from these two studies assessed the effect of dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d plus metformin XR (combination therapy) compared with placebo plus metformin XR (metformin monotherapy) on diabetes quality measures. Quality measures include laboratory measures of A1C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as well as vital status measures of blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI). The proportion of patients achieving A1C, BP, and LDL-C individual and composite measures was assessed, as was the proportion with baseline BMI ≥25 kg/m2 who lost ≥4.5 kg. Subgroup analyses by baseline BMI were also performed. Results A total of 194 and 211 patients were treated with dapagliflozin 5- or 10-mg/d combination therapy, respectively, and 409 with metformin monotherapy. Significantly higher proportions of patients achieved A1C ≤6.5%, <7%, or <8% with combination therapy vs metformin monotherapy (P<0.02). Significantly higher proportions of patients achieved BP <140/90 mmHg (P<0.02 for each dapagliflozin dose) and BP <130/80 mmHg (P<0.02 with dapagliflozin 5 mg/d only) with combination therapy vs metformin monotherapy. Similar proportions (29%–33%) of patients had LDL-C <100 mg/dL across treatment groups. A higher proportion of patients with baseline BMI ≥25 kg/m2 lost ≥4.5 kg with combination therapy. Combination therapy had a more robust effect on patients with higher baseline BMI. Conclusion Initial combination therapy with dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d and metformin improved

  14. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  15. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  16. Storage Pool Deficiencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... group of disorders caused by problems with platelet granules. Granules are little sacs inside the platelet in which ... function are stored. There are two types of granules: alpha granules and dense granules. Some storage pool ...

  17. Swimming Pool Chemistry Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Jennifer

    1994-01-01

    Outlines a strategy for the teaching of equilibrium in a poolside atmosphere. Illustrates the practical application of knowledge about equilibrium as demonstrated by pool staff as they satisfy the needs of both the swimmers and local health inspectors. (DDR)

  18. Pools for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  19. Swimming Pool Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... closing/self-latching Window guards Pool alarms Swimming Lessons - Where We Stand Children need to learn to ... Some factors you may consider before starting swimming lessons for younger children include: Frequency of exposure to ...

  20. Pools for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  1. Plasmid DNA production combining antibiotic-free selection, inducible high yield fermentation, and novel autolytic purification.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P; Luke, Jeremy M; Vincent, Justin M; Williams, James A

    2009-10-15

    DNA vaccines and gene medicines, derived from bacterial plasmids, are emerging as an important new class of pharmaceuticals. However, the challenges of performing cell lysis processes for plasmid DNA purification at an industrial scale are well known. To address downstream purification challenges, we have developed autolytic Escherichia coli host strains that express endolysin (phage lambdaR) in the cytoplasm. Expression of the endolysin is induced during fermentation by a heat inducible promoter. The endolysin remains in the cytoplasm, where it is separated from its peptidoglycan substrate in the cell wall; hence the cells remain alive and intact and can be harvested by the usual methods. The plasmid DNA is then recovered by autolytic extraction under slightly acidic, low salt buffer conditions and treatment with a low concentration of non-ionic detergent. Under these conditions the E. coli genomic DNA remains associated with the insoluble cell debris and is removed by a solid-liquid separation. Here, we report fermentation, lysis methods, and plasmid purification using autolytic hosts.

  2. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA...

  3. Proposed Strategy for Selection Against Recessive Genetic Defects Through a Combination of Inbreeding and DNA Markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recessive genetic defects are currently on the minds of many cattle breeders. The relatively rapid development of diagnostic DNA tests for recessive defects appears to be a major recent technological advancement. However, the attitude of breeders and breed associations toward recessive defects seems...

  4. Immune responses induced by DNA vaccines bearing Spike gene of PEDV combined with porcine IL-18

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is the causative agent of porcine epidemic diarrhea, a highly contagious enteric disease of swine. The Spike (S) protein is one of the main structural proteins of PEDV capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies in vivo. Herein, we generated three distinct DNA ...

  5. Evolutionary Covariance Combined with Molecular Dynamics Predicts a Framework for Allostery in the MutS DNA Mismatch Repair Protein

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is an essential, evolutionarily conserved pathway that maintains genome stability by correcting base-pairing errors in DNA. Here we examine the sequence and structure of MutS MMR protein to decipher the amino acid framework underlying its two key activities—recognizing mismatches in DNA and using ATP to initiate repair. Statistical coupling analysis (SCA) identified a network (sector) of coevolved amino acids in the MutS protein family. The potential functional significance of this SCA sector was assessed by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for alanine mutants of the top 5% of 160 residues in the distribution, and control nonsector residues. The effects on three independent metrics were monitored: (i) MutS domain conformational dynamics, (ii) hydrogen bonding between MutS and DNA/ATP, and (iii) relative ATP binding free energy. Each measure revealed that sector residues contribute more substantively to MutS structure–function than nonsector residues. Notably, sector mutations disrupted MutS contacts with DNA and/or ATP from a distance via contiguous pathways and correlated motions, supporting the idea that SCA can identify amino acid networks underlying allosteric communication. The combined SCA/MD approach yielded novel, experimentally testable hypotheses for unknown roles of many residues distributed across MutS, including some implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. PMID:28135092

  6. Combined effect of Cd and Pb spiked field soils on bioaccumulation, DNA damage, and peroxidase activities in Trifolium repens.

    PubMed

    Lanier, C; Bernard, F; Dumez, S; Leclercq, J; Lemière, S; Vandenbulcke, F; Nesslany, F; Platel, A; Devred, I; Cuny, D; Deram, A

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the combined effects of Cd and Pb on accumulation and genotoxic potential in white clover (Trifolium repens). For this purpose, T. repens was exposed to contaminated soils (2.5-20 mg kg(-1) cadmium (Cd), 250-2000 mg kg(-1) lead (Pb) and a mixture of these two heavy metals) for 3, 10 and 56 days. The resulting bioaccumulation of Cd and Pb, DNA damage (comet assay) and peroxidase activities (APOX and GPOX) were determined. The exposure time is a determinant factor in experiments designed to measure the influence of heavy metal contamination. The accumulation of Cd or Pb resulting from exposure to the two-metal mixture does not appear to depend significantly on whether the white clover is exposed to soil containing one heavy metal or both. However, when T. repens is exposed to a Cd/Pb mixture, the percentage of DNA damage is lower than when the plant is exposed to monometallic Cd. DNA damage is close to that observed in the case of monometallic Pb exposure. Peroxidase activity cannot be associated with DNA damage under these experimental conditions.

  7. Combined analysis of DNA methylome and transcriptome reveal novel candidate genes with susceptibility to bovine Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minyan; He, Yanghua; Zhou, Huangkai; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xizhi; Yu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical mastitis is a widely spread disease of lactating cows. Its major pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In this study, we performed genome-wide integrative analysis of DNA methylation and transcriptional expression to identify candidate genes and pathways relevant to bovine S. aureus subclinical mastitis. The genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in cows with S. aureus subclinical mastitis (SA group) and healthy controls (CK) were generated by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with microarrays. We identified 1078 differentially methylated genes in SA cows compared with the controls. By integrating DNA methylation and transcriptome data, 58 differentially methylated genes were shared with differently expressed genes, in which 20.7% distinctly hypermethylated genes showed down-regulated expression in SA versus CK, whereas 14.3% dramatically hypomethylated genes showed up-regulated expression. Integrated pathway analysis suggested that these genes were related to inflammation, ErbB signalling pathway and mismatch repair. Further functional analysis revealed that three genes, NRG1, MST1 and NAT9, were strongly correlated with the progression of S. aureus subclinical mastitis and could be used as powerful biomarkers for the improvement of bovine mastitis resistance. Our studies lay the groundwork for epigenetic modification and mechanistic studies on susceptibility of bovine mastitis. PMID:27411928

  8. DNA damage persistence as determinant of tumor sensitivity to the combination of Topo I inhibitors and telomere-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Biroccio, Annamaria; Porru, Manuela; Rizzo, Angela; Salvati, Erica; D'Angelo, Carmen; Orlandi, Augusto; Passeri, Daniela; Franceschin, Marco; Stevens, Malcolm F G; Gilson, Eric; Beretta, Giovanni; Zupi, Gabriella; Pisano, Claudio; Zunino, Franco; Leonetti, Carlo

    2011-04-15

    We previously reported that the G-quadruplex (G4) ligand RHPS4 potentiates the antitumor activity of camptothecins both in vitro and in tumor xenografts. The present study aims at investigating the mechanisms involved in this specific drug interaction. Combination index test was used to evaluate the interaction between G4 ligands and standard or novel Topo I inhibitors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to study the presence at telomeres of various types of topisomerase, while immunolabeling experiments were performed to measure the activation of DNA damage both in vitro and in tumor xenografts. We report that integration of the Topo I inhibitor SN-38, but not the Topo II poison doxorubicin with telomere-based therapy is strongly effective and the sequence of drug administration is critical in determining the synergistic interaction, impairing the cell ability to recover from drug-induced cytotoxicity. The synergistic effect of this combination was also observed by using novel camptothecins and, more interestingly, mice treated with ST1481/RHPS4 combination showed an inhibition and delay of tumor growth as well as an increased survival. The study of the mechanism(s) revealed that treatment with G4 ligands increased Topo I at the telomeres and the functional relevance of this observation was directly assessed by showing that standard and novel camptothecins stabilized DNA damage both in vitro and in xenografts. Our results demonstrate an outstanding efficacy of Topo I inhibitors/G4 ligands combination, which likely reflects an enhanced and persistent activation of DNA damage response as a critical determinant of the therapeutic improvement. ©2011 AACR.

  9. A novel combination immunotherapy for cancer by IL-13Rα2-targeted DNA vaccine and immunotoxin in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hideyuki; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2011-11-15

    Optimum efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines may require combinations that generate effective antitumor immune responses, as well as overcome immune evasion and tolerance mechanisms mediated by progressing tumor. Previous studies showed that IL-13Rα2, a unique tumor-associated Ag, is a promising target for cancer immunotherapy. A targeted cytotoxin composed of IL-13 and mutated Pseudomonas exotoxin induced specific killing of IL-13Rα2(+) tumor cells. When combined with IL-13Rα2 DNA cancer vaccine, surprisingly, it mediated synergistic antitumor effects on tumor growth and metastasis in established murine breast carcinoma and sarcoma tumor models. The mechanism of synergistic activity involved direct killing of tumor cells and cell-mediated immune responses, as well as elimination of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, consequently, regulatory T cells. These novel results provide a strong rationale for combining immunotoxins with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer.

  10. Synthesis of highly modified DNA by a combination of PCR with alkyne-bearing triphosphates and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gierlich, Johannes; Gutsmiedl, Katrin; Gramlich, Philipp M E; Schmidt, Alexandra; Burley, Glenn A; Carell, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We report the combination of "click chemistry" with PCR by using alkyne-modified triphosphates for efficient and homogeneous labeling of DNA. A series of modified PCR products of different lengths (300, 900, and 2000 base pairs) were prepared by using a variety of alkyne- and azide-containing triphosphates and different polymerases. After intensive screening of real-time PCR methods, protocols were developed that allow the amplification of genes by using these modified triphosphates with similar efficiency to that of standard PCR. The click reaction on the highly modified PCR fragments provided conversion rates above 90 % and resulted in the functionalization of hundreds of alkynes on large DNA fragments with superb selectivity and efficiency.

  11. Structure elucidation of DNA interstrand cross-link by a combination of nuclease P1 digestion with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuesong; Wang, Yinsheng

    2003-11-15

    DNA interstrand cross-link reagents are among the most powerful agents for cancer treatment. Here we report a combined nuclease P1 digestion/mass spectrometry method for the structure elucidation of duplex oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing an interstrand cross-link. Our results demonstrate that nuclease P1 digestion of a double-stranded ODN containing an interstrand cross-link (ICL) of 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen or mitomycin C gives a tetranucleotide bearing the cross-linked nucleobase moiety. Product ion spectra of the deprotonated ions of the tetranucleotides provide information about the structure of the cross-link. Furthermore, product-ion spectra of tetranucleotides containing two orientation isomers of mitomycin C interstrand cross-link are distinctive. We believe that the method described in this paper can be generally applicable for investigating the structures of other DNA ICLs.

  12. Global eukaryote phylogeny: Combined small- and large-subunit ribosomal DNA trees support monophyly of Rhizaria, Retaria and Excavata.

    PubMed

    Moreira, David; von der Heyden, Sophie; Bass, David; López-García, Purificación; Chao, Ema; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Resolution of the phylogenetic relationships among the major eukaryotic groups is one of the most important problems in evolutionary biology that is still only partially solved. This task was initially addressed using a single marker, the small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), although in recent years it has been shown that it does not contain enough phylogenetic information to robustly resolve global eukaryotic phylogeny. This has prompted the use of multi-gene analyses, especially in the form of long concatenations of numerous conserved protein sequences. However, this approach is severely limited by the small number of taxa for which such a large number of protein sequences is available today. We have explored the alternative approach of using only two markers but a large taxonomic sampling, by analysing a combination of SSU and large-subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences. This strategy allows also the incorporation of sequences from non-cultivated protists, e.g., Radiozoa (=radiolaria minus Phaeodarea). We provide the first LSU rRNA sequences for Heliozoa, Apusozoa (both Apusomonadida and Ancyromonadida), Cercozoa and Radiozoa. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses for 91 eukaryotic combined SSU+LSU sequences yielded much stronger support than hitherto for the supergroup Rhizaria (Cercozoa plus Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and several well-recognised groups and also for other problematic clades, such as the Retaria (Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and, with more moderate support, the Excavata. Within opisthokonts, the combined tree strongly confirms that the filose amoebae Nuclearia are sisters to Fungi whereas other Choanozoa are sisters to animals. The position of some bikont taxa, notably Heliozoa and Apusozoa, remains unresolved. However, our combined trees suggest a more deeply diverging position for Ancyromonas, and perhaps also Apusomonas, than for other bikonts, suggesting that apusozoan zooflagellates may be central for understanding the early evolution of

  13. Pool-riffle Maintenance in Mountain Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Pool-riffles are maintained through a combination of at least several mechanisms that operate and interact over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Velocity or shear reversal is subsumed within several of these mechanisms, however a growing body of work suggests that (1) flow convergence into pools, (2) structuring of riffle crest sediments, and (3) local feedbacks between flood stage bedform evolution and hydrodynamics may be disproportionately important. We additionally propose that temporal and spatial patterns of sediment sorting across pool-riffles may also provide some level of bedform maintenance. A comprehensive understanding of these maintenance mechanisms is needed. We will report results of several flume experiments for autogenic pool-riffles. The experiments examined pool-riffle maintenance processes under variable flood and sediment supply conditions. A focus of our work is to characterize spatial and temporal patterns of pool-riffle sediment sorting, and to examine this in relation to temporal patterns of bedform evolution. The experiments represent a 5:1 scale-model of a prototype reach of a pool-riffle stream located within the University of British Columbia Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, Maple Ridge, BC.

  14. Microbial life in Champagne Pool, a geothermal spring in Waiotapu, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Adrian; Morgan, Hugh W; McDonald, Ian R; Daughney, Christopher J

    2007-07-01

    Surveys of Champagne Pool, one of New Zealand's largest terrestrial hot springs and rich in arsenic ions and compounds, have been restricted to geological and geochemical descriptions, and a few microbiological studies applying culture-independent methods. In the current investigation, a combination of culture and culture-independent approaches were chosen to determine microbial density and diversity in Champagne Pool. Recovered total DNA and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) content of spring water revealed relatively low values compared to other geothermal springs within New Zealand and are in good agreement with low cell numbers of 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(6) cells/ml obtained for Champagne Pool water samples by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA (small-subunit ribosomal nucleic acid) gene clone library analyses of environmental DNA indicated the abundance of Sulfurihydrogenibium, Sulfolobus, and Thermofilum-like populations in Champagne Pool. From these results, media were selected to target the enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing and sulfur-dependent microorganisms. Three isolates were successfully obtained having 16S rRNA gene sequences with similarities of approximately 98% to Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, 94% to Sulfurihydrogenibium azorense, and 99% to Thermococcus waiotapuensis, respectively.

  15. Combined administration of naked DNA vectors encoding VEGF and bFGF enhances tissue perfusion and arteriogenesis in ischemic hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Sun; Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Koung Li; Jang, Hyung-Suk; Shin, In-Soon; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Suh, Wonhee; Byun, Jonghoe; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2007-09-07

    Few studies have examined in detail the combined effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene delivery on collateral development. Here, we evaluated the potential synergism of naked DNA vectors encoding VEGF and bFGF using a skeletal-muscle based ex vivo angiogenesis assay and compared tissue perfusion and limb loss in a murine model of hindlimb ischemia. In the ex vivo angiogenesis assay, the VEGF+bFGF combination group had a larger capillary sprouting area than those of the LacZ, VEGF, and bFGF groups. Consistent with these results, regional blood flow recovery on day 14 was also highest in the VEGF+bFGF combination group, followed by the bFGF, VEGF, and LacZ groups. The limb loss frequency was 0% in the combination group, whereas the limb loss frequencies of the other groups were 7-29%. The ischemic muscles of the combination group revealed evidence of increased angiogenesis and arteriogenesis and the upregulated expression of genes that may be associated with arteriogenesis, such as those for cardiac ankyrin repeat protein, early growth response factor-1, and transforming growth factor-beta1. Our study has implications for the development of a combined gene therapy for the vascular occlusive diseases.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  17. Combined microfluidic-optical DNA analysis with single-base-pair sizing capability

    PubMed Central

    Pollnau, Markus; Hammer, Manfred; Dongre, Chaitanya; Hoekstra, Hugo J. W. M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by microchip capillary electrophoresis (CE) enables cheap, high-speed analysis of low reagent volumes. One of its potential applications is the identification of genomic deletions or insertions associated with genetic illnesses. Detecting single base-pair insertions or deletions from DNA fragments in the diagnostically relevant size range of 150−1000 base-pairs requires a variance of σ2 < 10−3. In a microfluidic chip post-processed by femtosecond-laser writing of an optical waveguide we CE-separated 12 blue-labeled and 23 red-labeled DNA fragments in size. Each set was excited by either of two lasers power-modulated at different frequencies, their fluorescence detected by a photomultiplier, and blue and red signals distinguished by Fourier analysis. We tested different calibration strategies. Choice of the fluorescent label as well as the applied fit function strongly influence the obtained variance, whereas fluctuations between two consecutive experiments are less detrimental in a laboratory environment. We demonstrate a variance of σ2 ≈4 × 10−4, lower than required for the detection of single base-pair insertion or deletion in an optofluidic chip. PMID:28018736

  18. Complete sequence of human mitochondrial DNA obtained by combining multiple displacement amplification and next-generation sequencing on a single oocyte.

    PubMed

    Ancora, Massimo; Orsini, Massimiliano; Colosimo, Alessia; Marcacci, Maurilia; Russo, Valentina; De Santo, Maria; D'Aurora, Marco; Stuppia, Liborio; Barboni, Barbara; Cammà, Cesare; Gatta, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) plays a key role in the development of a competent oocyte. In this study, the complete mtDNA sequence obtained for the first time by multiple displacement amplification approach in combination with next-generation sequencing from a single human oocyte is reported (GenBank accession no. KT364276). The analysis of oocyte mitochondrial mutations could provide a better understanding of the genetic variants correlated with the oocyte quality.

  19. [Genetic polymorphisms of 9 non-combined of DNA index system short tandem repeat loci in Guangdong Han population].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-xiang; Xue, Tian-yu; Li, Hai-xia; Sun, Hong-yu; Cheng, Jian-ding

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the genetic polymorphisms and their forensic application of 9 non-combined of DNA index system (CODIS) short tandem repeat(STR) loci in Guangdong Han population. DNA samples from 500 unrelated individuals were extracted and amplified with fluorescence labeled multiplex PCR system. PCR products were separated and genotyped with capillary electrophoresis. One hundred and fifteen alleles and 160 genotypes were observed in the 9 STR loci, respectively. The heterozygosity was 0.824-0.884, the discrimination power (DP) was 0.925-0.969 and the polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.77-0.86, respectively. The distribution met the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05). The total discrimination power was 1.00 x 10(-13), the combined probability of exclusion for trio-paternity testing was 0.999989488. The combined probability of exclusion for duo-paternity testing was 0.873436. The 9 STR loci are powerful and reliable for personal identification and paternity testing. They can be used as supplementary loci in fatherless (motherless) testing or cases with mutation events.

  20. Consequences of combining siRNA-mediated DNA methyltransferase 1 depletion with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in human leukemic KG1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Vispé, Stéphane; Deroide, Arthur; Davoine, Emeline; Desjobert, Cécile; Lestienne, Fabrice; Fournier, Lucie; Novosad, Natacha; Bréand, Sophie; Besse, Jérôme; Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg; De Vries, Luc; Cussac, Didier; Riond, Joëlle; Arimondo, Paola B.

    2015-01-01

    5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine are clinically used to treat patients with blood neoplasia. Their antileukemic property is mediated by the trapping and the subsequent degradation of a family of proteins, the DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B) leading to DNA demethylation, tumor suppressor gene re-expression and DNA damage. Here we studied the respective role of each DNMT in the human leukemia KG1 cell line using a RNA interference approach. In addition we addressed the role of DNA damage formation in DNA demethylation by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Our data show that DNMT1 is the main DNMT involved in DNA methylation maintenance in KG1 cells and in mediating DNA damage formation upon exposure to 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Moreover, KG1 cells express the DNMT1 protein at a level above the one required to ensure DNA methylation maintenance, and we identified a threshold for DNMT1 depletion that needs to be exceeded to achieve DNA demethylation. Most interestingly, by combining DNMT1 siRNA and treatment with low dose of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, it is possible to uncouple DNA damage formation from DNA demethylation. This work strongly suggests that a direct pharmacological inhibition of DNMT1, unlike the use of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, should lead to tumor suppressor gene hypomethylation and re-expression without inducing major DNA damage in leukemia. PMID:25948775

  1. A two-dimensional pooling strategy for rare variant detection on next-generation sequencing platforms.

    PubMed

    Zuzarte, Philip C; Denroche, Robert E; Fehringer, Gordon; Katzov-Eckert, Hagit; Hung, Rayjean J; McPherson, John D

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for pooling and sequencing DNA from a large number of individual samples while preserving information regarding sample identity. DNA from 576 individuals was arranged into four 12 row by 12 column matrices and then pooled by row and by column resulting in 96 total pools with 12 individuals in each pool. Pooling of DNA was carried out in a two-dimensional fashion, such that DNA from each individual is present in exactly one row pool and exactly one column pool. By considering the variants observed in the rows and columns of a matrix we are able to trace rare variants back to the specific individuals that carry them. The pooled DNA samples were enriched over a 250 kb region previously identified by GWAS to significantly predispose individuals to lung cancer. All 96 pools (12 row and 12 column pools from 4 matrices) were barcoded and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument with an average depth of coverage greater than 4,000×. Verification based on Ion PGM sequencing confirmed the presence of 91.4% of confidently classified SNVs assayed. In this way, each individual sample is sequenced in multiple pools providing more accurate variant calling than a single pool or a multiplexed approach. This provides a powerful method for rare variant detection in regions of interest at a reduced cost to the researcher.

  2. Vernal Pool Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nancy; Colburn, Betsy

    This curriculum guide accompanies Certified: A Citizen's Step-by-Step Guide to Protecting Vernal Pools which is designed to train volunteers in the process of identifying vernal pool habitat so that as many of these pools as possible can be certified by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program. Vernal pools are a kind of…

  3. Vernal Pool Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nancy; Colburn, Betsy

    This curriculum guide accompanies Certified: A Citizen's Step-by-Step Guide to Protecting Vernal Pools which is designed to train volunteers in the process of identifying vernal pool habitat so that as many of these pools as possible can be certified by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program. Vernal pools are a kind of…

  4. Combination of cascade chemical reactions with graphene-DNA interaction to develop new strategy for biosensor fabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Sun, Liya; Chen, Yangyang; Ye, Zonghuang; Shen, Zhongming; Li, Genxi

    2013-09-15

    Graphene, a single atom thick and two dimensional carbon nano-material, has been proven to possess many unique properties, one of which is the recent discovery that it can interact with single-stranded DNA through noncovalent π-π stacking. In this work, we demonstrate that a new strategy to fabricate many kinds of biosensors can be developed by combining this property with cascade chemical reactions. Taking the fabrication of glucose sensor as an example, while the detection target, glucose, may regulate the graphene-DNA interaction through three cascade chemical reactions, electrochemical techniques are employed to detect the target-regulated graphene-DNA interaction. Experimental results show that in a range from 5μM to 20mM, the glucose concentration is in a natural logarithm with the logarithm of the amperometric response, suggesting a best detection limit and detection range. The proposed biosensor also shows favorable selectivity, and it has the advantage of no need for labeling. What is more, by controlling the cascade chemical reactions, detection of a variety of other targets may be achieved, thus the strategy proposed in this work may have a wide application potential in the future.

  5. Assessing combined methylation-sensitive high resolution melting and pyrosequencing for the analysis of heterogeneous DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous DNA methylation leads to difficulties in accurate detection and quantification of methylation. Methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) is unique among regularly used methods for DNA methylation analysis in that heterogeneous methylation can be readily identified, although not quantified, by inspection of the melting curves. Bisulfite pyrosequencing has been used to estimate the level of heterogeneous methylation by quantifying methylation levels present at individual CpG dinucleotides. Sequentially combining the two methodologies using MS-HRM to screen the amplification products prior to bisulfite pyrosequencing would be advantageous. This would not only replace the quality control step using agarose gel analysis prior to the pyrosequencing step but would also provide important qualitative information in its own right. We chose to analyze DAPK1 as it is an important tumor suppressor gene frequently heterogeneously methylated in a number of malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A region of the DAPK1 promoter was analyzed in ten CLL samples by MS-HRM. By using a biotinylated primer, bisulfite pyrosequencing could be used to directly analyze the samples. MS-HRM revealed the presence of various extents of heterogeneous DAPK1 methylation in all CLL samples. Further analysis of the biotinylated MS-HRM products by bisulfite pyrosequencing provided quantitative information for each CpG dinucleotide analyzed, and confirmed the presence of heterogeneous DNA methylation. Whereas each method could be used individually, MS-HRM and bisulfite pyrosequencing provided complementary information for the assessment of heterogeneous methylation. PMID:21364322

  6. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization using Au/Fe3O4 magnetic composites combined with silver enhancement.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Hui; Li, Jin-Yi; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    A novel method is described for the highly effective amplifying electrochemical response of DNA based on oligonucleotides functionalized with Au/Fe(3)O(4) nanocomposites by the aid of silver (Ag) enhancement. Via electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly, the prepared Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles form nano-clusters coated with a bilayer composed of polystyrene sulfonate sodium salt (PSS) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), which are in favor of adsorbing lots of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the surface. The application of magnetic Fe(3)O(4) made the procedures much more simple, convenient and feasible. The resulting composites were then used as labels via the Au-S bond for the DNA hybridization, followed by catalytic deposition of silver on the gold tags. Such an assay is then combined with a sensitive anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) measurement of multiple silver nanoparticle tracers. A 27-mer sequence DNA target is detected at a glassy carbon (GC) electrode with a detection limit down to ca. 100 aM, which is 800 times lower than that obtained using gold nanoparticles only as labels in the control experiments. This Fe(3)O(4)/PSS/PDDA/Au composite offers a great promising future for the ultrasensitive detection of other biorecognition events.

  7. A Combination of Guanidyl and Phenyl Groups on a Dendrimer Enables Efficient siRNA and DNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Hui; Lv, Jia; Cheng, Yiyun

    2017-08-14

    Gene therapy has received considerable attention due to its great potential in the treatment of various diseases; however, the design of efficient and biocompatible carriers for the delivery of siRNA as well as DNA still remains a major challenge. In this study, we developed an efficient carrier for gene delivery by modification of a compound containing both guanidyl and phenyl groups on the surface of a cationic dendrimer. The guanidyl group on the dendrimer facilitates nucleic acid condensation via specific guanidinium-phosphate interactions, whereas the phenyl group on the polymer is critical for efficient endosomal escape. The combination of guanidyl and phenyl shows a synergistic effect in facilitated endocytosis. The designed material is much more efficient in siRNA and DNA delivery than control materials such as dendrimers engineered with a guanidyl or phenyl group only, as well as intact dendrimers, and shows comparable efficacy to commercial transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000. In addition, the material and its complex with nucleic acid show minimal toxicity on the transfected cells. This study provides a new strategy to develop multifunctional polymers for efficient siRNA and DNA delivery.

  8. Combining Genes from Multiple Phages for Improved Cell Lysis and DNA Transfer from Escherichia coli to Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Wong, Christine; Ajioka, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer genetic circuits between the key synthetic biology chassis, such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, constitutes one of the major hurdles of the rational genome engineering. Using lambda Red recombineering we integrated the thermosensitive lambda repressor and the lysis genes of several bacteriophages into the E. coli chromosome. The lysis of the engineered autolytic cells is inducible by a simple temperature shift. We improved the lysis efficiency by introducing different combinations of lysis genes from bacteriophages lambda, ΦX174 and MS2 under the control of the thermosensitive lambda repressor into the E. coli chromosome. We tested the engineered autolytic cells by transferring plasmid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-borne genetic circuits from E. coli to B. subtilis. Our engineered system combines benefits of the two main synthetic biology chassis, E. coli and B. subtilis, and allows reliable and efficient transfer of DNA edited in E. coli into B. subtilis. PMID:27798678

  9. Exploring the Genetic Etiology of Trust in Adolescents: Combined Twin and DNA Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Robyn E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Mottershaw, Abigail L.; Wang, R. Adele H.; Haworth, Claire M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral traits generally show moderate to strong genetic influence, with heritability estimates of around 50%. Some recent research has suggested that trust may be an exception because it is more strongly influenced by social interactions. In a sample of over 7,000 adolescent twins from the United Kingdom’s Twins Early Development Study, we found broad sense heritability estimates of 57% for generalized trust and 51% for trust in friends. Genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML) estimates in the same sample indicate that 21% of the narrow sense genetic variance can be explained by common single nucleotide polymorphisms for generalized trust and 43% for trust in friends. As expected, this implies a large amount of unexplained heritability, although power is low for estimating DNA-based heritability. The missing heritability may be accounted for by interactions between DNA and the social environment during development or via gene–environment correlations with rare variants. How these genes and environments correlate seem especially important for the development of trust. PMID:27852354

  10. Analysis of first-trimester combined test results in preparation for a cell-free fetal DNA era.

    PubMed

    Kose, Semir; Cımrın, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nuri; Aksel, Ozge; Keskinoglu, Pembe; Bora, Elcin; Cankaya, Tufan; Altunyurt, Sabahattin

    2016-11-01

    To survey experience with the first-trimester combined test (FCT) for trisomy 21 (T21) in different risk score groups to determine the most useful clinical application of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) screening. In a retrospective study, the records of FCT results obtained at a center in Turkey between January 2009 and January 2014 were reviewed. The FCT results and rates of uptake of invasive diagnostic testing were compared among different risk score groups. FCT results were available for 4804 pregnancies; 276 (5.7%) had IDT results. Ten (72.7%) of 11 cases of T21 had a risk score of 1:300 or more. The IDT uptake rates were 54.5%, 51.9%, and 47.4% at risk scores of 1:100 or more, 1:200 or more, and 1:300 or more, respectively. In the group at intermediate risk (1:1001-1:3000), no pregnancy had an FCT result of both low pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and high free β-human chorionic gonadotropin, but 30 (3.9%) of 766 pregnancies had both advanced maternal age and high β-human chorionic gonadotropin. cffDNA screening should be used to optimize IDT uptake in pregnancies with a risk score of 1:101-1:1000. The selective power of the FCT diminishes beyond the 1:1001 score and cffDNA screening cannot yet be recommended routinely. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Byard, Roger W.; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines. PMID:26658160

  12. Combining Human and Rat Sequences in Her-2 DNA Vaccines Blunts Immune Tolerance and Drives Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Jennifer B.; Quaglino, Elena; Radkevich-Brown, Olga; Jones, Richard F.; Piechocki, Marie P.; Reyes, Joyce D.; Weise, Amy; Amici, Augusto; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Immune tolerance to tumor-associated self-antigens poses a major challenge in the ability to mount an effective cancer vaccine response. To overcome immune tolerance to HER-2, we formulated DNA vaccines that express both human HER-2 and heterologous rat Neu sequences in separate plasmids or as single hybrid constructs that encode HER-2/Neu fusion proteins. Candidate vaccines were tested in Her-2 transgenic (Tg) mice of BALB/c (BALB), BALB/c × C57BL/6 F1 (F1), or C57BL/6 (B6) background, which exhibit decreasing immune responsiveness to HER-2. Analysis of various cocktails or hybrid vaccines defined a requirement for particular combination of HER/2/Neu sequences to effectively prime immune effector cells in HER-2 Tg mice. In B6 HER-2 Tg mice, rejection of HER-2–positive tumors protected mice from HER-2–negative tumors, providing evidence of epitope spreading. Our findings show that a strategy of combining heterologous antigen with self-antigens could produce a potent DNA vaccine that may be applicable to other tumor-associated antigens. PMID:20048073

  13. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Megan L; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C; White, Nicole E; Byard, Roger W; Bellgard, Matthew I; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J N; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F; Bunce, Michael

    2015-12-10

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines.

  14. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Byard, Roger W.; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines.

  15. NEW APPROACHES: Pool table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Malcolm

    1998-05-01

    This article explains a novel way of demonstrating the principle of conservation of energy. This can be difficult to demonstrate in the laboratory, but if students have been convinced of the conservation of momentum, two-dimensional collisions on a pool table may be used.

  16. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, H. Carter

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  17. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, H. Carter

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  18. Swimming Pools for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilson, Donald W.; Nixon, John E.

    The increasing interest in swimming instruction and recreation for elementary and secondary school children has resulted in the development of this guide for swimming pool use, design, and construction. Introductory material discussed the need for swimming in the educational program and the organization of swimming programs in the school. Design…

  19. Getting Pool Light Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Scot

    1998-01-01

    Examines the use of lighting, both artificial and natural, that can enhance the aesthetic quality and functionality of areas with indoor swimming pools. Discusses glare and shadow-reduction measures that aid competitive events, including lighting above and below water levels, and highlights lighting issues during televised events. Descriptions of…

  20. The Future of Pooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  1. The Future of Pooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  2. Simul-seq: combined DNA and RNA sequencing for whole-genome and transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Jason A; Spacek, Damek V; Pai, Reetesh K; Snyder, Michael P

    2016-11-01

    Paired DNA and RNA profiling is increasingly employed in genomics research to uncover molecular mechanisms of disease and to explore personal genotype and phenotype correlations. Here, we introduce Simul-seq, a technique for the production of high-quality whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing libraries from small quantities of cells or tissues. We apply the method to laser-capture-microdissected esophageal adenocarcinoma tissue, revealing a highly aneuploid tumor genome with extensive blocks of increased homozygosity and corresponding increases in allele-specific expression. Among this widespread allele-specific expression, we identify germline polymorphisms that are associated with response to cancer therapies. We further leverage this integrative data to uncover expressed mutations in several known cancer genes as well as a recurrent mutation in the motor domain of KIF3B that significantly affects kinesin-microtubule interactions. Simul-seq provides a new streamlined approach for generating comprehensive genome and transcriptome profiles from limited quantities of clinically relevant samples.

  3. Delivery and processing of exogenous double-stranded DNA in mouse CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and their cell cycle changes upon combined treatment with cyclophosphamide and double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Dolgova, Evgenia V; Efremov, Yaroslav R; Orishchenko, Konstantin E; Andrushkevich, Oleg M; Alyamkina, Ekaterina A; Proskurina, Anastasia S; Bayborodin, Sergey I; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Popova, Nelly A; Chernykh, Elena R; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Taranov, Oleg S; Omigov, Vladimir V; Minkevich, Alexandra M; Rogachev, Vladimir A; Bogachev, Sergey S; Shurdov, Mikhail A

    2013-10-10

    We previously reported that fragments of exogenous double-stranded DNA can be internalized by mouse bone marrow cells without any transfection. Our present analysis shows that only 2% of bone marrow cells take up the fragments of extracellular exogenous DNA. Of these, ~45% of the cells correspond to CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Taking into account that CD34+ stem cells constituted 2.5% of the total cell population in the bone marrow samples analyzed, these data indicate that as much as 40% of CD34+ cells readily internalize fragments of extracellular exogenous DNA. This suggests that internalization of fragmented dsDNA is a general feature of poorly differentiated cells, in particular CD34+ bone marrow cells. When linearized plasmid DNA was used as a source of exogenous DNA, we observed that exonucleolytic processing and ligation of double-stranded DNA termini occurred in the bone marrow cells that had this DNA internalized. We also recovered "hybrid" plasmids that encompass kanamycin-resistance gene from the exogenous plasmid DNA and the fragments of plasmids from host enterobacteria, which is suggestive of recombination events taking place upon DNA internalization. CD34+ cells make up the distinctive bone marrow cell population that internalizes extracellular DNA. Cell cycle analysis of CD34+ cells treated with cyclophosphamide only or in combination with dsDNA, suggests that these cells have distinct biologic responses to these treatments. Namely, whereas upon cyclophosphamide treatment bone marrow stem cells become arrested at S-G2 phases, combined cyclophosphamide+dsDNA treatment leads to cell cycle progression without any delay. This indicates that when the genome is undergoing repair of interstrand crosslinks, injection of fragmented exogenous dsDNA results in immediate reconstitution of genome integrity. We observe that cyclophosphamide-only or a combined cyclophosphamide+dsDNA treatment of cells lead to two distinct waves of apoptosis in CD34

  4. Circular Dichroism of DNA G-Quadruplexes: Combining Modeling and Spectroscopy To Unravel Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Gattuso, Hugo; Spinello, Angelo; Terenzi, Alessio; Assfeld, Xavier; Barone, Giampaolo; Monari, Antonio

    2016-03-31

    We report on the comparison between the computational and experimental determination of electronic circular dichroism spectra of different guanine quadruplexes obtained from human telomeric sequences. In particular the difference between parallel, antiparallel, and hybrid structures is evidenced, as well as the induction of transitions between the polymorphs depending on the solution environment. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations (MD) are used to probe the conformational space of the different quadruplexes, and subsequently state-of-the-art hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques coupled with excitonic semiempirical Hamiltonian are used to simulate the macromolecular induced circular dichroism. The coupling of spectroscopy and molecular simulation allows an efficient one-to-one mapping between structures and optical properties, offering a way to disentangle the rich, yet complicated, quantity of information embedded in circular dichroism spectra. We show that our methodology is robust and efficient and allows us to take into account subtle conformational changes. As such, it could be used as an efficient tool to investigate structural modification upon DNA/drug interactions.

  5. The energetic basis of the DNA double helix: a combined microcalorimetric approach

    PubMed Central

    Vaitiekunas, Paulius; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Privalov, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Microcalorimetric studies of DNA duplexes and their component single strands showed that association enthalpies of unfolded complementary strands into completely folded duplexes increase linearly with temperature and do not depend on salt concentration, i.e. duplex formation results in a constant heat capacity decrement, identical for CG and AT pairs. Although duplex thermostability increases with CG content, the enthalpic and entropic contributions of an AT pair to duplex formation exceed that of a CG pair when compared at the same temperature. The reduced contribution of AT pairs to duplex stabilization comes not from their lower enthalpy, as previously supposed, but from their larger entropy contribution. This larger enthalpy and particularly the greater entropy results from water fixed by the AT pair in the minor groove. As the increased entropy of an AT pair exceeds that of melting ice, the water molecule fixed by this pair must affect those of its neighbors. Water in the minor groove is, thus, orchestrated by the arrangement of AT groups, i.e. is context dependent. In contrast, water hydrating exposed nonpolar surfaces of bases is responsible for the heat capacity increment on dissociation and, therefore, for the temperature dependence of all thermodynamic characteristics of the double helix. PMID:26304541

  6. The energetic basis of the DNA double helix: a combined microcalorimetric approach.

    PubMed

    Vaitiekunas, Paulius; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Privalov, Peter L

    2015-09-30

    Microcalorimetric studies of DNA duplexes and their component single strands showed that association enthalpies of unfolded complementary strands into completely folded duplexes increase linearly with temperature and do not depend on salt concentration, i.e. duplex formation results in a constant heat capacity decrement, identical for CG and AT pairs. Although duplex thermostability increases with CG content, the enthalpic and entropic contributions of an AT pair to duplex formation exceed that of a CG pair when compared at the same temperature. The reduced contribution of AT pairs to duplex stabilization comes not from their lower enthalpy, as previously supposed, but from their larger entropy contribution. This larger enthalpy and particularly the greater entropy results from water fixed by the AT pair in the minor groove. As the increased entropy of an AT pair exceeds that of melting ice, the water molecule fixed by this pair must affect those of its neighbors. Water in the minor groove is, thus, orchestrated by the arrangement of AT groups, i.e. is context dependent. In contrast, water hydrating exposed nonpolar surfaces of bases is responsible for the heat capacity increment on dissociation and, therefore, for the temperature dependence of all thermodynamic characteristics of the double helix. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Classification of breast cancer subtypes by combining gene expression and DNA methylation data.

    PubMed

    List, Markus; Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben A; Mollenhauer, Jan; Baumbach, Jan; Batra, Richa

    2014-06-13

    Selecting the most promising treatment strategy for breast cancer crucially depends on determining the correct subtype. In recent years, gene expression profiling has been investigated as an alternative to histochemical methods. Since databases like TCGA provide easy and unrestricted access to gene expression data for hundreds of patients, the challenge is to extract a minimal optimal set of genes with good prognostic properties from a large bulk of genes making a moderate contribution to classification. Several studies have successfully applied machine learning algorithms to solve this so-called gene selection problem. However, more diverse data from other OMICS technologies are available, including methylation. We hypothesize that combining methylation and gene expression data could already lead to a largely improved classification model, since the resulting model will reflect differences not only on the transcriptomic, but also on an epigenetic level. We compared so-called random forest derived classification models based on gene expression and methylation data alone, to a model based on the combined features and to a model based on the gold standard PAM50. We obtained bootstrap errors of 10-20% and classification error of 1-50%, depending on breast cancer subtype and model. The gene expression model was clearly superior to the methylation model, which was also reflected in the combined model, which mainly selected features from gene expression data. However, the methylation model was able to identify unique features not considered as relevant by the gene expression model, which might provide deeper insights into breast cancer subtype differentiation on an epigenetic level.

  8. Combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences resolve the interrelations of the major Australasian marsupial radiations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J; McLenachan, Patricia A; Down, Christin; Gibb, Gillian C; Penny, David

    2006-02-01

    Australasian marsupials include three major radiations, the insectivorous/carnivorous Dasyuromorphia, the omnivorous bandicoots (Peramelemorphia), and the largely herbivorous diprotodontians. Morphologists have generally considered the bandicoots and diprotodontians to be closely related, most prominently because they are both syndactylous (with the 2nd and 3rd pedal digits being fused). Molecular studies have been unable to confirm or reject this Syndactyla hypothesis. Here we present new mitochondrial (mt) genomes from a spiny bandicoot (Echymipera rufescens) and two dasyurids, a fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) and a northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus). By comparing trees derived from pairwise base-frequency differences between taxa with standard (absolute, uncorrected) distance trees, we infer that composition bias among mt protein-coding and RNA sequences is sufficient to mislead tree reconstruction. This can explain incongruence between trees obtained from mt and nuclear data sets. However, after excluding major sources of compositional heterogeneity, both the "reduced-bias" mt and nuclear data sets clearly favor a bandicoot plus dasyuromorphian association, as well as a grouping of kangaroos and possums (Phalangeriformes) among diprotodontians. Notably, alternatives to these groupings could only be confidently rejected by combining the mt and nuclear data. Elsewhere on the tree, Dromiciops appears to be sister to the monophyletic Australasian marsupials, whereas the placement of the marsupial mole (Notoryctes) remains problematic. More generally, we contend that it is desirable to combine mt genome and nuclear sequences for inferring vertebrate phylogeny, but as separately modeled process partitions. This strategy depends on detecting and excluding (or accounting for) major sources of non-historical signal, such as from compositional non-stationarity. [Base composition; combined data; marsupial; mitochondrial genome; phylogeny.].

  9. Allergic to Pool Water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To identify the allergy problem of a 36-year old swimming instructor, who experiences heavy itching and rashes whenever she comes in contact with pool water. Patch tests were performed with European standard series and materials from the work floor. A positive patch test to aluminum chloride and flocculant was observed. Occupational dermatitis is, based on a contact allergy to aluminum chloride in the flocculant. PMID:22993713

  10. Improved therapeutic effectiveness by combining recombinant p14(ARF) with antisense complementary DNA of EGFR in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Du, JinTao; Xian, Junming; Liu, Yafeng; Liu, Shixi; Lin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p14(ARF) and proto-oncogene epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) play important roles in the development of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). This study was aimed to determine whether combining recombinant p14(ARF) with antisense complementary DNA of EGFR could improve the therapeutic effectiveness in LSCC. After human larynx cancer cells (Hep-2) were infected with recombinant adenoviruses (Ad-p14(ARF) and Ad-antisense EGFR) together or alone in vitro, the proliferation and cell cycle distribution of Hep-2 cells were detected by MTT assay and flow cytometer analysis, respectively. Furthermore, the antitumor effects of recombinant adenoviruses together or alone on Hep-2 xenografts were examined in vivo. The levels of p14(ARF) and EGFR expressed in Hep-2 cells and xenografts were determined by western blot assay. Ad-p14(ARF) combining with Ad-antisense EGFR markedly inhibited the Hep-2 proliferation compared with alone (P=0.001, P=0.002 respectively). Combination of Ad-p14(ARF) and Ad-antisense EGFR led to the proportion of Hep-2 cells in G0/G1 phases increased by up to 86.9%. The down-expression of EGFR protein and overexpression of p14(ARF) protein were observed in vitro and in vivo, and this effect was preserved when Ad-p14(ARF) was combined with Ad-antisense EGFR. Besides, Ad-p14(ARF) plus Ad-antisense EGFR significantly (P<0.05) increased the antitumor activity against Hep-2 tumor xenografts comparing with Ad-p14(ARF) or Ad-antisense EGFR alone. Combination Ad-p14(ARF) with Ad-antisense EGFR significantly increased the antitumor responses in LSCC. An effectively potential gene therapy to prevent proliferation of LSCC was provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cations Form Sequence Selective Motifs within DNA Grooves via a Combination of Cation-Pi and Ion-Dipole/Hydrogen Bond Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela; Dunlap, Tori; Dourlain, Elizabeth; Grant, Bryce; McFail-Isom, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The fine conformational subtleties of DNA structure modulate many fundamental cellular processes including gene activation/repression, cellular division, and DNA repair. Most of these cellular processes rely on the conformational heterogeneity of specific DNA sequences. Factors including those structural characteristics inherent in the particular base sequence as well as those induced through interaction with solvent components combine to produce fine DNA structural variation including helical flexibility and conformation. Cation-pi interactions between solvent cations or their first hydration shell waters and the faces of DNA bases form sequence selectively and contribute to DNA structural heterogeneity. In this paper, we detect and characterize the binding patterns found in cation-pi interactions between solvent cations and DNA bases in a set of high resolution x-ray crystal structures. Specifically, we found that monovalent cations (Tl+) and the polarized first hydration shell waters of divalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+) form cation-pi interactions with DNA bases stabilizing unstacked conformations. When these cation-pi interactions are combined with electrostatic interactions a pattern of specific binding motifs is formed within the grooves. PMID:23940752

  12. Neotomine-peromyscine rodent systematics based on combined analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Serena A; Carroll, Darin S; Edwards, Cody W; Kilpatrick, C William; Bradley, Robert D

    2006-07-01

    Recently, sequences from two nuclear genes (exon 6 of the dentin matrix protein 1 gene and intron 7 of the beta-fibrinogen gene) and one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b gene) were used independently in an attempt to resolve phylogenetic relationships within the neotomine-peromyscine complex. Although these studies provided testable hypotheses regarding this group of rodents, the affinities of certain tribes and genera remain uncertain. To elucidate these relationships, the three data partitions were tested for heterogeneity and then concatenated according to conditional data combination and total evidence approaches. Support was found for five clades, four of which correspond to well recognized tribes (the Neotomini, Peromyscini=Reithrodontomyini, Baiomyini, and Tylomyini). Recommendations are made regarding the recognition of Ochrotomys as a tribe of its own, the Ochrotomyini, paralleling other recent findings. The Peromyscini, Baiomyini, and Ochrotomyini are unresolved in relation to each other, but as a whole are sister to the Neotomini. The Tylomyini is basal to all clades. It appears that combined data from the nuclear and mitochondrial genes (analyzing all three partitions simultaneously) resulted in the best phylogenetic hypothesis regarding the complex.

  13. Characterizing convective cold pools: Characterizing Convective Cold Pools

    DOE PAGES

    Drager, Aryeh J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2017-05-09

    Cold pools produced by convective storms play an important role in Earth's climate system. However, a common framework does not exist for objectively identifying convective cold pools in observations and models. The present study investigates convective cold pools within a simulation of tropical continental convection that uses a cloud-resolving model with a coupled land-surface model. Multiple variables are assessed for their potential in identifying convective cold pool boundaries, and a novel technique is developed and tested for identifying and tracking cold pools in numerical model simulations. This algorithm is based on surface rainfall rates and radial gradients in the densitymore » potential temperature field. The algorithm successfully identifies near-surface cold pool boundaries and is able to distinguish between connected cold pools. Once cold pools have been identified and tracked, composites of cold pool evolution are then constructed, and average cold pool properties are investigated. Wet patches are found to develop within the centers of cold pools where the ground has been soaked with rainwater. These wet patches help to maintain cool surface temperatures and reduce cold pool dissipation, which has implications for the development of subsequent convection.« less

  14. The Combination of DNA Ploidy Status and PTEN/6q15 Deletions Provides Strong and Independent Prognostic Information in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lennartz, Maximilian; Minner, Sarah; Brasch, Sophie; Wittmann, Hilko; Paterna, Leonard; Angermeier, Katja; Öztürk, Eray; Shihada, Rami; Ruge, Mingu; Kluth, Martina; Koop, Christina; Wilczak, Waldemar; Krech, Till; Lebok, Patrick; Wittmer, Corinna; Heinzer, Hans; Steuber, Thomas; Adam, Meike; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Haese, Alexander; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant DNA content has been discussed as a potential prognostic feature in prostate cancer. We analyzed the clinical significance of DNA ploidy in combination with prognostic relevant deletions of PTEN and 6q15 in 3,845 prostate cancers. The DNA status was diploid in 67.8%, tetraploid in 25.6%, and aneuploid in 6.8% of tumors, and deletions of PTEN and 6q15 occurred in 17.8% and 20.3% of tumors. Abnormal DNA content and deletions were linked to high Gleason score, advanced tumor stage, and positive nodal stage (P < 0.0001 each). The risk of PSA recurrence increased from diploid to tetraploid and from tetraploid to aneuploid DNA status (P < 0.0001 each). However, 40% of patients with Gleason score ≥4+4 and 55% of patients with PSA recurrence had diploid cancers. This fraction decreased to 21% (Gleason ≥4+4) and 29% (PSA recurrence) if PTEN and/or 6q deletion data were added to ploidy data to identify cancers with an aberrant DNA status. The significance of combining both deletions and ploidy was further demonstrated in a combined recurrence analysis. Presence of deletions increased the risk of PSA recurrence in diploid (P < 0.0001), tetraploid (P < 0.0001), and aneuploid cancers (P = 0.0049), and the combination of ploidy data and deletions provided clinically relevant information beyond the CAPRA-S nomogram. Multivariate modeling including preoperatively and postoperatively available parameters identified the "combined DNA status" as a strong independent predictor of poor patient outcome. The combinatorial DNA content analysis involving general (ploidy) and specific events (deletions) has the potential for clinical utility in prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2802-11. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines.

  16. FluoMEP: a new genotyping method combining the advantages of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Liew, Woei Chang; Chuah, Aaron; Lim, Zijie; Lin, Qifeng; Orban, Laszlo

    2007-02-01

    PCR-based identification of differences between two unknown genomes often requires complex manipulation of the templates prior to amplification and/or gel electrophoretic separation of a large number of samples with manual methods. Here, we describe a new genotyping method, called fluorescent motif enhanced polymorphism (fluoMEP). The fluoMEP method is based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay, but combines the advantages of the large collection of unlabelled 10mer primers (ca. 5000) from commercial sources and the power of the automated CE devices used for the detection of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) patterns. The link between these two components is provided by a fluorescently labeled "common primer" that is used in a two-primer PCR together with an unlabeled RAPD primer. By using the same "common primer" and a series of RAPD primers, DNA templates can be screened quickly and effectively for polymorphisms. Our manuscript describes the optimization of the method and its characterization on different templates. We demonstrate by using several different approaches that the addition of the "common primer" to the PCR changes the profile of amplified fragments, allowing for screening various parts of the genome with the same set of unlabeled primers. We also present an in silico analysis of the genomic localization of fragments amplified by a RAPD primer with two different "common primers" and alone.

  17. In vitro detection of DNA damage in human leukocytes induced by combined effect of resin composites and adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Marovic, Danijela; Tadin, Antonija; Mladinic, Marin; Juric-Kacunic, Danijela; Galic, Nada

    2014-02-01

    To simultaneously evaluate the genotoxicity of dental composites and adhesive systems in vitro using a cytogenetic assay, with respect to the influence of composite shade. Genotoxicity assessment was carried out in human peripheral blood leukocytes using the comet assay. Three resin composite materials, two microhybrids and one nano-hybrid, in shade A1 and A3.5 were used with manufacturer-recommended four adhesive systems. Cultures were treated for 48 hours with samples after elusion for 1 hour, 1 day, 7 days or 30 days, in two different concentrations (4.16 mg/mL, 8.33 mg/mL). Kruskall-Wallis test was used for the statistical analysis (alpha = 0.05). For combinations of micro-hybrid composite (A3.5) with two self-etch adhesives (16.1 +/- 5.50 and 16.2 +/- 9.52) after exposure to samples eluted for 1 day, the incidence of primary DNA damage was significantly higher than for the corresponding negative control (14.7 +/- 2.85). Genotoxicity was also higher after treatment with samples eluted for 1 hour (15.3 +/- 4.70) and 1 day (15.3 +/- 9.10), comprised of nano-hybrid composite (A1) with self-etch adhesive in relation to the control (13.1 +/- 1.70). There was no clear trend of increased DNA damage in material combinations with darker shades of composites. Material composition and higher material concentrations showed greater influence on the genotoxicity.

  18. Combination reactions of superoxide with 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine radicals in DNA: kinetics and end products.

    PubMed

    Misiaszek, Richard; Uvaydov, Yuriy; Crean, Conor; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2005-02-25

    One of the major biomarkers of oxidative stress and oxidative damage of cellular DNA is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua), which is more easily oxidized than guanine to diverse oxidative products. In this work, we have investigated further oxidative transformations of 8-oxoGua in single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides to the dehydroguanidinohydantoin, oxaluric acid, and diastereomeric spiroiminodihydantoin lesions. The relative distributions of these end products were explored by a combined kinetic laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approach and are shown to depend markedly on the presence of superoxide radical anions. The 8-oxaGua radicals were produced by one-electron oxidation of 8-oxoGua by 2-aminopurine radicals generated by the two-photon ionization of 2-aminopurine residues site specifically positioned in 5'-d(CC[2-aminopurine]TC[8-oxoGua]CTACC). The hydrated electrons also formed in the photoionization process were trapped by dissolved molecular oxygen thus producing superoxide. A combination reaction between the 8-oxoGua and superoxide radicals occurs with the rate constant of (1.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(8) m(-1) s(-1) and (1.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(8) m(-1) s(-1) in single- and double-stranded DNA, respectively. The major end products of this reaction are the dehydroguanidinohydantoin lesions that slowly hydrolyze to oxaluric acid residues. In the presence of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, an enzyme that induces the rapid catalytic dismutation of superoxide to the less reactive H(2)O(2) and O(2), the yields of the dehydroguanidinohydantion lesions become negligible. Under these conditions, the 8-oxoGua radicals do not exhibit any observable reactivities with oxygen (k < 10(2) m(-1) s(-1)), decay on the time interval of several seconds, and the major reaction products are the spiroiminodihydantoin lesions. The possible biological implications of the 8-oxoGua oxidation are discussed.

  19. Combined TLR7/8 and TLR9 Ligands Potentiate the Activity of a Schistosoma japonicum DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefeng; Dong, Liyang; Ni, Hongchang; Zhou, Sha; Xu, Zhipeng; Hoellwarth, Jason Shih; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhang, Rongbo; Chen, Qiaoyun; Liu, Feng; Wang, Jun; Su, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands have been explored as vaccine adjuvants for tumor and virus immunotherapy, but few TLR ligands affecting schistosoma vaccines have been characterized. Previously, we developed a partially protective DNA vaccine encoding the 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum (pVAX1-Sj26GST). Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we evaluated a TLR7/8 ligand (R848) and a TLR9 ligand (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, or CpG) as adjuvants for pVAX1-Sj26GST and assessed their effects on the immune system and protection against S. japonicum. We show that combining CpG and R848 with pVAX1-Sj26GST immunization significantly increases splenocyte proliferation and IgG and IgG2a levels, decreases CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) frequency in vivo, and enhances protection against S. japonicum. CpG and R848 inhibited Treg-mediated immunosuppression, upregulated the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-2, and IL-6, and decreased Foxp3 expression in vitro, which may contribute to prevent Treg suppression and conversion during vaccination and allow expansion of antigen-specific T cells against pathogens. Conclusions Our data shows that selective TLR ligands can increase the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines against schistosomiasis, potentially through combined antagonism of Treg-mediated immunosuppression and conversion. PMID:23593527

  20. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  1. Combining paternally and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA for analysis of population structure in mussels.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Robert A

    2004-06-01

    Sequence divergence for a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene was compared to identify the advantages in using mitochondrial genes that descend separately through the female and male lineages to examine population structure. The test compared divergence among four local species of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) and was extended to multiple populations of one species, Pyganodon grandis. For the same gene, the male-inherited sequences diverged at a faster rate, producing longer branch lengths in the phylogenies. Of particular use were sequences extracted from P. grandis populations from the southern region of the Lake Erie watershed (Ohio, USA); five male-inherited haplotypes were found. Only one change was observed in the female-inherited form in this region. Therefore, more rapid evolution has occurred in the male form of the gene, and this form provided stronger evidence of geographical isolation among populations. A combination of analyses on haplotypes derived through males and females creates complementary opportunities to identify evolutionary relationships caused by drift and migration in mussels.

  2. A Multikinase and DNA-PK Inhibitor Combination Immunomodulates Melanomas, Suppresses Tumor Progression, and Enhances Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alexander K; Khan, Asra Y; Worgo, Christina E; Wang, Lucy L; Liang, Yuanyuan; Davila, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Combination therapies have the potential to improve outcomes in melanoma patients but have not yet been clinically efficacious. Here, we used high-throughput flow cytometry-based screening to identify and characterize candidate therapies that might synergize with and augment T-cell immunotherapy efficacy. Two lead therapies, regorafenib (Reg) and NU7441, were selected based on their ability to alter a variety of immunomodulatory proteins, including CD55, CD73, CD155, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), and HLA class I in a heterogeneous panel of melanomas. The therapies also upregulated several melanoma antigens, inhibited proliferation, and perturbed activation of oncogenic signaling pathways in melanomas. T cells treated with the therapies proliferated normally and exhibited a favorably altered phenotype, including increased CD25, CD28, inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS), and reduced expression of coinhibitory receptors. Cytokine production was also increased in treated T cells. When administered in mice, REg suppressed melanoma progression in a CD8(+) T cell-dependent manner when used alone and with various immunotherapies. Additionally, Reg altered the number, phenotype, and function of various T-cell subsets in the tumor microenvironment. These studies reveal that Reg and NU7441 influence the immunobiology of both tumor cells and T cells and enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(9); 790-803. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Anti-dsDNA antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: A combination of two quantitative methods and the ANA pattern is the most efficient strategy of detection.

    PubMed

    Almeida González, Delia; Roces Varela, Alfredo; Marcelino Rodríguez, Itahisa; González Vera, Alexander; Delgado Sánchez, Mónica; Aznar Esquivel, Antonio; Casañas Rodríguez, Carlos; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Several methods have been used to measure anti-double-stranded DNA auto-antibody (anti-dsDNA). Our aim was to determine the most efficient strategy to test anti-dsDNA in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, anti-dsDNA and anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) tests were requested for 644 patients. Anti-dsDNA was tested by RIA, ELISA and CLIA in all patients. The results indicated that 78 patients had a positive anti-dsDNA test according to at least one of the methods. After a 3-year follow-up period only 26 patients were diagnosed with SLE. We evaluated each method and combination of methods. Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) increased with the number of assay methods used (p=0.002 for trend), and PPV was 100% in patients whose results were positive by all three anti-dsDNA assay methods. The proportion of anti-dsDNA-positive patients who had SLE was highest (82%; p b 0.001) among those with a homogeneous pattern of ANA staining, followed by those with a speckled pattern. In ANA positive patients, when only RIA was considered, 59% of anti-dsDNA-positive patients had SLE, but when RIA and CLIA were both considered, all patients with positive results on both tests had SLE. The combination of RIA+CLIA in patients with homogeneous and speckled ANA staining showed a similar cost and higher sensitivity than RIA alone in ANA positive patients (p b 0.001). We conclude that the most efficient strategy was to combine simultaneously two quantitative and sensitive methods but only in patients with a homogeneous or speckled pattern of ANA staining. This approach maximized specificity and PPV, and reduced costs.

  4. Treatment of metastatic breast cancer by combination of chemotherapy and photothermal ablation using doxorubicin-loaded DNA wrapped gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dangge; Xu, Zhiai; Yu, Haijun; Chen, Xianzhi; Feng, Bing; Cui, Zhirui; Lin, Bin; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Chen, Chunying; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Wen; Li, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Despite the exciting advances in cancer therapy over past decades, tumor metastasis remains the dominate reason for cancer-related mortality. In present work, DNA-wrapped gold nanorods with doxorubicin (DOX)-loading (GNR@DOX) were developed for treatment of metastatic breast cancer via a combination of chemotherapy and photothermal ablation. The GNR@DOX nanoparticles induced significant temperature elevation and DOX release upon irradiation with near infrared (NIR) light as shown in the test tube studies. It was found that GNR@DOX nanoparticles in combination with laser irradiation caused higher cytotoxicity than free DOX in 4T1 breast cancer cells. Animal experiment with an orthotropic 4T1 mammary tumor model demonstrated that GNR@DOX nanoplatform significantly reduced the growth of primary tumors and suppressed their lung metastasis. The Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining assays confirmed that the tumor growth inhibition and metastasis prevention of GNR@DOX nanoparticles were attributed to their abilities to induce cellular apoptosis/necrosis and ablate intratumoral blood vessels. All these results suggested a considerable potential of GNR@DOX nanoplatform for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  5. How to link soil C pools with CO2 fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Y.

    2011-06-01

    soil after the input, the discordance of MRT of C in pools and of C released in CO2 was demonstrated. This discordance of MRT between pools and fluxes shows that the use of MRT of pools alone underestimates the fluxes at least for two times. The future challenges include combining two or more promising approaches to elucidate more than two C sources for CO2 fluxes, and linking scientific communities investigating the pools with those investigating the fluxes.

  6. Highly sensitive faecal DNA testing of TWIST1 methylation in combination with faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin is a promising marker for detection of colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Yutaka; Zhang, Yibo; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Takami, Taro; Higaki, Shingo; Shindo, Yoshitaro; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Hazama, Shoichi; Oka, Masaaki; Nagano, Hiroaki; Sakaida, Isao; Yamasaki, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Background As TWIST1 methylation is specific to colorectal neoplasia, detection of TWIST1 methylation from faeces samples might be useful for colorectal neoplasia screening. However, because the content of human DNA in faeces is very small, it is very difficult to detect TWIST1 methylation by conventional bisulphite-based methylation assays. Therefore, we developed a new methylation assay without bisulphite treatment, the combined restriction digital PCR assay, and evaluated its sensitivity and specificity in combination with and without the faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin for colorectal neoplasia detection from faeces samples. Methods For the combined restriction digital PCR assay, DNA was treated with three methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes and an exonuclease, followed by measurement of TWIST1 methylation level by droplet digital PCR. Faecal DNA testing and faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin were performed on 109 patients with colorectal neoplasia and 10 control individuals. Results Basic performance testing showed that the combined restriction digital PCR assay enabled detection of 0.14% of the TWIST1 methylation level for the lymphocyte DNA. The combined restriction digital PCR assay from faeces samples had a sensitivity of 22.2% (95% confidence interval, 2.8-60.0%) for non-advanced adenoma, 47.1% (95% confidence interval, 23.0-72.2%) for advanced adenoma, and 33.7% (95% confidence interval, 23.7-45.0%) for colorectal cancer, and a specificity of 100.0%. Combination of faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin and faecal combined restriction digital PCR assay increased sensitivity to 82.4% (95% confidence interval, 56.6-96.2%) for the detection of advanced adenoma. Conclusions We developed the combined restriction digital PCR assay, a possible highly sensitive methylation assay. Combination of faecal combined restriction digital PCR assay with faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin may provide an alternative screening strategy

  7. Determining the Architecture of a Protein-DNA Complex by Combining FeBABE Cleavage Analyses, 3-D Printed Structures, and the ICM Molsoft Program.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Knipling, Leslie; Hinton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Determining the structure of a protein-DNA complex can be difficult, particularly if the protein does not bind tightly to the DNA, if there are no homologous proteins from which the DNA binding can be inferred, and/or if only portions of the protein can be crystallized. If the protein comprises just a part of a large multi-subunit complex, other complications can arise such as the complex being too large for NMR studies, or it is not possible to obtain the amounts of protein and nucleic acids needed for crystallographic analyses. Here, we describe a technique we used to map the position of an activator protein relative to the DNA within a large transcription complex. We determined the position of the activator on the DNA from data generated using activator proteins that had been conjugated at specific residues with the chemical cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). These analyses were combined with 3-D models of the available structures of portions of the activator protein and B-form DNA to obtain a 3-D picture of the protein relative to the DNA. Finally, the Molsoft program was used to refine the position, revealing the architecture of the protein-DNA within the transcription complex.

  8. Ultra-low Doping on Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides using DNA Nanostructure Doped by a Combination of Lanthanide and Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Hyung-Youl; Shim, Jaewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jeon, Jaeho; Lee, Sungjoo; Roh, Yonghan; Park, Sung Ha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we propose a novel DNA-based doping method on MoS2 and WSe2 films, which enables ultra-low n- and p-doping control and allows for proper adjustments in device performance. This is achieved by selecting and/or combining different types of divalent metal and trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions on DNA nanostructures, using the newly proposed concept of Co-DNA (DNA functionalized by both divalent metal and trivalent Ln ions). The available n-doping range on the MoS2 by Ln-DNA is between 6 × 109 and 2.6 × 1010 cm−2. The p-doping change on WSe2 by Ln-DNA is adjusted between −1.0 × 1010 and −2.4 × 1010 cm−2. In Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA doping, a light p-doping is observed on MoS2 and WSe2 (~1010 cm−2). However, in the devices doped by Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA, a light n-doping (~1010 cm−2) occurs. A significant increase in on-current is also observed on the MoS2 and WSe2 devices, which are, respectively, doped by Tb3+- and Gd3+-Co-DNA, due to the reduction of effective barrier heights by the doping. In terms of optoelectronic device performance, the Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA (n-doping) and the Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA (p-doping) improve the MoS2 and WSe2 photodetectors, respectively. We also show an excellent absorbing property by Tb3+ ions on the TMD photodetectors. PMID:26838524

  9. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  10. Combinatorial Pooling Enables Selective Sequencing of the Barley Gene Space

    PubMed Central

    Lonardi, Stefano; Duma, Denisa; Alpert, Matthew; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco; Bhat, Prasanna R.; Wu, Yonghui; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Alsaihati, Burair; Ma, Yaqin; Wanamaker, Steve; Resnik, Josh; Bozdag, Serdar; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Close, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    For the vast majority of species – including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution) so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding. PMID:23592960

  11. Changes in the response of MCF-7 cells to ionizing radiation after the combination of ATM and DNA-PK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ćmielová, Jana; Havelek, Radim; Vávrová, Jiřina; Řezáčová, Martina

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the role of ATM (KU55933) and DNA-PK (NU7441) inhibitors in the repair of double-strand breaks and downstream signaling of DNA damage introduced by ionizing radiation. The irradiation of MCF-7 cells alone increased the proportion of cells in the G1 phase in comparison with mock-treated cells. After ATM inhibitor pretreatment, the cells were more accumulated in the G2 phase, whereas DNA-PK inhibitor application increased the percentage of cells in the G1 phase. ATM and DNA-PK inhibitor application alone increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to ionizing radiation; however, combining both inhibitors together resulted in a further enhancement of cell death. Unexpectedly, combining both inhibitors decreased the percentage of senescent cells and increased G2 cell cycle arrest 3 days after treatment. After irradiation, the p21 protein was increased and Chk1 and Chk2 were activated. These proteins were not increased in cells pretreated with the ATM inhibitor prior to ionizing radiation exposure, albeit DNA-PK inhibitor application did not affect the amount of proteins detected. Formation of γH2AX was found to be ATM and DNA-PK dependent, application of the ATM inhibitor suppressed incidence of γH2AX, whereas DNA-PK caused persistence of γH2AX. Our results suggest that the further investigation of the ATM inhibitor in combination with the DNA-PK inhibitor as sensitizers preventing cell senescence and promoting cell death in breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells is warranted.

  12. Combining morphology, DNA sequences, and morphometrics: revising closely related species in the orb-weaving spider genus Araniella (Araneae, Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Spasojevic, Tamara; Kropf, Christian; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lasut, Liana

    2016-05-17

    The integration of independent data sets could solve problems in both traditional and DNA-based taxonomy. The aim of this study is to investigate the power of CO1 sequences and of morphometrics to distinguish closely related species in the spider genus Araniella. We put special emphasis on the species pair A. cucurbitina (Clerck, 1757) and A. opisthographa (Kulczyński, 1905) since the females are morphologically difficult to distinguish and often misidentified. A total of 216 sequences of eight Araniella species from seven European countries, North America and Asia were included in the molecular analysis. The results from both maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic inference indicate successful separation of six out of eight Araniella species, including A. cucurbitina and A. opisthographa. For the same six species, we detect no overlap of intra- and interspecific genetic divergence, leading to successful species identification with a threshold approach. In addition, morphometric analysis of the epigyna of A. cucurbitina and A. opisthographa supports species separation by two best explanatory ratios: receptaculum length and distance between receptaculum and copulatory duct. Although a small overlap in the ratios exists, the species identification rate increases when combining morphometric and molecular data, which demonstrates the efficiency of integrative approaches for distinguishing closely related species. However, none of the molecular approaches was able to separate closely related A. alpica (L. Koch, 1869) and A. inconspicua (Simon, 1874) due to shared CO1 haplotypes. Considering the clear morphological separation of the males and different habitat preferences, incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization could have led to identical CO1 sequences. Therefore, DNA-barcoding must be thoroughly tested even within small homogenous genera of spiders.

  13. Sampling and Pooling Methods for Capturing Herd Level Antibiotic Resistance in Swine Feces using qPCR and CFU Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mellerup, Anders; Ståhl, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to define the sampling level and method combination that captures antibiotic resistance at pig herd level utilizing qPCR antibiotic resistance gene quantification and culture-based quantification of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria. Fourteen qPCR assays for commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were developed, and used to quantify antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA from swine fecal samples that were obtained using different sampling and pooling methods. In parallel, the number of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria was determined in the same swine fecal samples. The results showed that the qPCR assays were capable of detecting differences in antibiotic resistance levels in individual animals that the coliform bacteria colony forming units (CFU) could not. Also, the qPCR assays more accurately quantified antibiotic resistance genes when comparing individual sampling and pooling methods. qPCR on pooled samples was found to be a good representative for the general resistance level in a pig herd compared to the coliform CFU counts. It had significantly reduced relative standard deviations compared to coliform CFU counts in the same samples, and therefore differences in antibiotic resistance levels between samples were more readily detected. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe sampling and pooling methods for qPCR quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA extracted from swine feces. PMID:26114765

  14. Sampling and Pooling Methods for Capturing Herd Level Antibiotic Resistance in Swine Feces using qPCR and CFU Approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gunilla Veslemøy; Mellerup, Anders; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Ståhl, Marie; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Angen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to define the sampling level and method combination that captures antibiotic resistance at pig herd level utilizing qPCR antibiotic resistance gene quantification and culture-based quantification of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria. Fourteen qPCR assays for commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were developed, and used to quantify antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA from swine fecal samples that were obtained using different sampling and pooling methods. In parallel, the number of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria was determined in the same swine fecal samples. The results showed that the qPCR assays were capable of detecting differences in antibiotic resistance levels in individual animals that the coliform bacteria colony forming units (CFU) could not. Also, the qPCR assays more accurately quantified antibiotic resistance genes when comparing individual sampling and pooling methods. qPCR on pooled samples was found to be a good representative for the general resistance level in a pig herd compared to the coliform CFU counts. It had significantly reduced relative standard deviations compared to coliform CFU counts in the same samples, and therefore differences in antibiotic resistance levels between samples were more readily detected. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe sampling and pooling methods for qPCR quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA extracted from swine feces.

  15. Evidence of Subclinical mtDNA Alterations in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Compared to HIV-Negative Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah M; Wagner, Emily C; Maan, Evelyn J; Chaworth-Musters, Tessa; Gadawski, Izabelle; van Schalkwyk, Julie E; Forbes, John C; Burdge, David R; Albert, Arianne Y K; Lohn, Zoe; Côté, Hélène C F

    2015-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can effectively prevent vertical transmission of HIV but there is potential risk of adverse maternal, foetal or infant effects. Specifically, the effect of cART use during pregnancy on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in HIV-positive (HIV+) women is unclear. We sought to characterize subclinical alterations in peripheral blood mtDNA levels in cART-treated HIV+ women during pregnancy and the postpartum period. This prospective longitudinal observational cohort study enrolled both HIV+ and HIV-negative (HIV-) pregnant women. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at three time points in pregnancy (13-<23 weeks, 23-<30 weeks, 30-40 weeks), and at delivery and six weeks post-partum in HIV+ women. Peripheral blood mtDNA to nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio was measured by qPCR. Over a four year period, 63 HIV+ and 42 HIV- women were enrolled. HIV+ women showed significantly lower mtDNA/nDNA ratios compared to HIV- women during pregnancy (p = 0.003), after controlling for platelet count and repeated measurements using a multivariable mixed-effects model. Ethnicity, gestational age (GA) and substance use were also significantly associated with mtDNA/nDNA ratio (p≤0.02). Among HIV+ women, higher CD4 nadir was associated with higher mtDNA/nDNA ratios (p<0.0001), and these ratio were significantly lower during pregnancy compared to the postpartum period (p<0.0001). In the context of this study, it was not possible to distinguish between mtDNA effects related to HIV infection versus cART therapy. Nevertheless, while mtDNA levels were relatively stable over time in both groups during pregnancy, they were significantly lower in HIV+ women compared to HIV- women. Although no immediate clinical impact was observed on maternal or infant health, lower maternal mtDNA levels may exert long-term effects on women and children and remain a concern. Improved knowledge of such subclinical alterations is another step toward optimizing the safety

  16. Evidence of Subclinical mtDNA Alterations in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Compared to HIV-Negative Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Money, Deborah M.; Wagner, Emily C.; Maan, Evelyn J.; Chaworth-Musters, Tessa; Gadawski, Izabelle; van Schalkwyk, Julie E.; Forbes, John C.; Burdge, David R.; Albert, Arianne Y. K.; Lohn, Zoe; Côté, Hélène C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can effectively prevent vertical transmission of HIV but there is potential risk of adverse maternal, foetal or infant effects. Specifically, the effect of cART use during pregnancy on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in HIV-positive (HIV+) women is unclear. We sought to characterize subclinical alterations in peripheral blood mtDNA levels in cART-treated HIV+ women during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Methods This prospective longitudinal observational cohort study enrolled both HIV+ and HIV-negative (HIV-) pregnant women. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at three time points in pregnancy (13-<23 weeks, 23-<30 weeks, 30–40 weeks), and at delivery and six weeks post-partum in HIV+ women. Peripheral blood mtDNA to nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio was measured by qPCR. Results Over a four year period, 63 HIV+ and 42 HIV- women were enrolled. HIV+ women showed significantly lower mtDNA/nDNA ratios compared to HIV- women during pregnancy (p = 0.003), after controlling for platelet count and repeated measurements using a multivariable mixed-effects model. Ethnicity, gestational age (GA) and substance use were also significantly associated with mtDNA/nDNA ratio (p≤0.02). Among HIV+ women, higher CD4 nadir was associated with higher mtDNA/nDNA ratios (p<0.0001), and these ratio were significantly lower during pregnancy compared to the postpartum period (p<0.0001). Conclusions In the context of this study, it was not possible to distinguish between mtDNA effects related to HIV infection versus cART therapy. Nevertheless, while mtDNA levels were relatively stable over time in both groups during pregnancy, they were significantly lower in HIV+ women compared to HIV- women. Although no immediate clinical impact was observed on maternal or infant health, lower maternal mtDNA levels may exert long-term effects on women and children and remain a concern. Improved knowledge of such subclinical alterations is

  17. Combined immunization using DNA-Sm14 and DNA-Hsp65 increases CD8+ memory T cells, reduces chronic pathology and decreases egg viability during Schistosoma mansoni infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most important neglected diseases found in developing countries and affects 249 million people worldwide. The development of an efficient vaccination strategy is essential for the control of this disease. Previous work showed partial protection induced by DNA-Sm14 against Schistosoma mansoni infection, whereas DNA-Hsp65 showed immunostimulatory properties against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer and antifibrotic properties in an egg-induced granuloma model. Methods C57BL/6 mice received 4 doses of DNA-Sm14 (100 μg/dose) and DNA-Hsp65 (100 μg/dose), simultaneously administrated, or DNA-Sm14 alone, once a week, during four weeks. Three groups were included: 1- Control (no immunization); 2- DNA-Sm14; 3- DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65. Two weeks following last immunization, animals were challenged subcutaneously with 30 cercariae. Fifteen, 48 and 69 days after infection splenocytes were collected to evaluate the number of CD8+ memory T cells (CD44highCD62low) using flow cytometry. Forty-eight days after challenge adult worms were collected by portal veins perfusion and intestines were collected to analyze the intestinal egg viability. Histological, immunohistochemical and soluble quantification of collagen and α-SMA accumulation were performed on the liver. Results In the current work, we tested a new vaccination strategy using DNA-Sm14 with DNA-Hsp65 to potentiate the protection against schistosomiasis. Combined vaccination increased the number of CD8+ memory T cells and decreased egg viability on the intestinal wall of infected mice. In addition, simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 reduced collagen and α-SMA accumulation during the chronic phase of granuloma formation. Conclusion Simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 showed an immunostimulatory potential and antifibrotic property that is associated with the reduction of tissue damage on Schistosoma mansoni experimental infection. PMID

  18. Gene expression profiling of osteoclast differentiation by combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rho, Jaerang; Altmann, Curtis R; Socci, Nicholas D; Merkov, Lubomir; Kim, Nacksung; So, Hongseob; Lee, Okbok; Takami, Masamichi; Brivanlou, Ali H; Choi, Yongwon

    2002-08-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balanced action of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Multinucleated, mature osteoclasts develop from hematopoietic stem cells via the monocyte-macrophage lineage, which also give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells. Despite their distinct physiologic roles in bone and the immune system, these cell types share many molecular and biochemical features. To provide insights into how osteoclasts differentiate and function to control bone metabolism, we employed a systematic approach to profile patterns of osteoclast-specific gene expression by combining suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis. Here we examined how gene expression profiles of mature osteoclast differ from macrophage or dendritic cells, how gene expression profiles change during osteoclast differentiation, and how Mitf, a transcription factor critical for osteoclast maturation, affects the gene expression profile. This approach revealed a set of genes coordinately regulated for osteoclast function, some of which have previously been implicated in several bone diseases in humans.

  19. High efficiency gene transfer using chitosan/DNA nanoparticles with specific combinations of molecular weight and degree of deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Lavertu, Marc; Méthot, Stephane; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Buschmann, Michael D

    2006-09-01

    Chitosan is a biodegradable natural polysaccharide that has shown potential for gene delivery, although the ideal molecular weight (MW) and degree of deacetylation (DDA) for this application have not been elucidated. To examine the influence of these parameters on gene transfer, we produced chitosans with different DDAs (98%, 92%, 80% and 72%) and depolymerized them with nitrous acid to obtain different MWs (150, 80, 40 and 10 kDa). We produced 64 formulations of chitosan/pDNA complexes (16 chitosans, 2 amine-to-phosphate (N:P) ratios of 5:1 and 10:1 and 2 transfection media pH of 6.5 and 7.1), characterized them for size and surface charge, and tested them for gene transfection in HEK 293 cells in vitro. Several formulations produced high levels of transgene expression while two conditions, 92-10-5 and 80-10-10 [DDA-MW-N:P ratio] at pH 6.5, showed equivalence to our best positive control. The results also revealed an important coupling between DDA and MW of chitosan in determining transgene expression. Maximum expression was obtained with a certain combination of DDA and MW that depended on N:P ratio and the pH, but similar expression levels could be achieved by simultaneously lowering MW and increasing DDA or lowering DDA and increasing MW, suggesting a predominant role of particle stability, through co-operative electrostatic binding, in determining transfection efficiency.

  20. Gold Nanorods, DNA Origami, and Porous Silicon Nanoparticle-functionalized Biocompatible Double Emulsion for Versatile Targeted Therapeutics and Antibody Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Feng; Zhang, Hongbo; Qu, Xiangmeng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Dong; Ding, Ruihua; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Hélder A; Hai, Mingtan

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanorods, DNA origami, and porous silicon nanoparticle-functionalized biocompatible double emulsion are developed for versatile molecular targeted therapeutics and antibody combination therapy. This advanced photothermal responsive all-in-one biocompatible platform can be easily formed with great therapeutics loading capacity for different cancer treatments with synergism and multidrug resistance inhibition, which has great potential in advancing biomedical applications.

  1. Activity of levofloxacin alone and in combination with a DnaK inhibitor against gram-negative rods, including levofloxacin-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-02-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of > or =4 microg/ml).

  2. Efficacy, tolerability, and safety of an oral enzyme combination vs diclofenac in osteoarthritis of the knee: results of an individual patient-level pooled reanalysis of data from six randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Ueberall, Michael A; Mueller-Schwefe, Gerhard HH; Wigand, Rainer; Essner, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare efficacy, safety, and tolerability of an oral enzyme combination (OEC) containing proteolytic enzymes and bioflavonoid vs diclofenac (DIC), a nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Materials and methods This was an individual patient-level pooled reanalysis of patient-reported data from prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group studies in adult patients with moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis of the knee treated for at least 3 weeks with OEC or DIC. Appropriate trials were identified with a systemic literature and database search. Data were extracted from the original case-report forms and reanalyzed by a blinded evaluation committee. The primary end point was the improvement of the Lequesne algofunctional index (LAFI) score at study end vs baseline. Secondary end points addressed LAFI response rates, treatment-related pain-intensity changes, adverse events, and laboratory parameters. Results Six trials were identified that enrolled in total 774 patients, of whom 759 had post-baseline data for safety analysis, 697 (n=348/349 with OEC/DIC) for intent to treat, 524 for per protocol efficacy analysis, and 500 for laboratory evaluation. LAFI scores – the primary efficacy end point – decreased comparably with both treatments and improved with both treatments significantly vs baseline (OEC 12.6±2.4 to 9.1±3.9, DIC 12.7±2.4 to 9.1±4.2, effect size 0.9/0.88; P<0.001 for each). In parallel, movement-related 11-point numeric rating-scale pain intensity improved significantly (P<0.001) and comparably with both treatments from baseline (6.4±1.9/6.6±1.8) to study end (3.8±2.7/3.9±2.5). Overall, 55/81 OEC/DIC patients of the safety-analysis population (14.7%/21.1%, P=0.022) reported 90/133 treatment-emergent adverse events, followed by premature treatment discontinuations in 22/39 patients (5.9%/10.2%, P=0.030). Changes in laboratory parameters were significantly less with OEC

  3. Morphology of drying blood pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Nick; Smith, Fiona; Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David; D-Blood project Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Often blood pools are found on crime scenes providing information concerning the events and sequence of events that took place on the scene. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the drying dynamics of blood pools. This study focuses on the drying process of blood pools to determine what relevant information can be obtained for the forensic application. We recorded the drying process of blood pools with a camera and measured the weight. We found that the drying process can be separated into five different: coagulation, gelation, rim desiccation, centre desiccation, and final desiccation. Moreover, we found that the weight of the blood pool diminishes similarly and in a reproducible way for blood pools created in various conditions. In addition, we verify that the size of the blood pools is directly related to its volume and the wettability of the surface. Our study clearly shows that blood pools dry in a reproducible fashion. This preliminary work highlights the difficult task that represents blood pool analysis in forensic investigations, and how internal and external parameters influence its dynamics. We conclude that understanding the drying process dynamics would be advancement in timeline reconstitution of events. ANR funded project: D-Blood Project.

  4. Using minimum DNA marker loci for accurate population classification in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using few DNA markers to classify genetic background of a germplasm pool will help breeders make a quick decision while saving time and resources. WHICHLOCI is a computer program that selects the best combination of loci for population assignment through empiric analysis of molecular marker data. Th...

  5. 1. OVERVIEW OF POOLE POWERHOUSE COMPLEX SETTING. POOLE POWERHOUSE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW OF POOLE POWERHOUSE COMPLEX SETTING. POOLE POWERHOUSE AND TRIPLEX COTTAGE ARE VISIBLE AT PHOTO CENTER IN SMALL CLEARING AMONG TREES IN LEE VINING CREEK VALLEY. VIEW TO SOUTH EAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  6. On-line study of flavonoids of Trollius chinensis Bunge binding to DNA with ethidium bromide using a novel combination of chromatographic, mass spectrometric and fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiling; Wang, Hong; Ren, Biao; Zhang, Baobao; Hashi, Yuki; Chen, Shizhong

    2013-03-22

    The study of the interaction between drugs and DNA is an important way to understand the role of drug molecules. A novel online analytical method for this purpose combining high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization-ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n)) and DNA-ethidium bromide detection with a fluorescence detector (DNA-EB-FLD) was firstly developed, which could rapidly identify the chemical constituents and obtain the profile related to DNA binding activity. This method has been applied for a precise or probable identification of the chemical constituents by ultraviolet (UV) absorption and MS(n) data analysis, while the DNA binding profile has been characterized by directly measuring the fluorescence intensity of compound-DNA-EB. Using this method, Trollius chinensis Bunge was studied and 18 constituents were identified by MS(n) data; six of them (4'-methoxy-2″-O-(2‴-methylbutyryl)vitexin,2″-O-(3‴-methoxycaffeoyl)vitexin) and 4'-methoxy-2″-O-(2‴-methylbutyryl)orientin,acacetin-7-O-rutinoside,quercetin-3-O-xylosylglucoside,quercetin-3-O-arabinosylglucoside) were identified for the first time in T. chinensis Bunge, and 16 constituents accounted for its activity of binding to DNA. The established (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n) DNA-EB-FLD) system has proved to offer a useful strategy for correlating the chemical profile with the binding to DNA activities of the components without their isolation and purification, and may be used for multicomponent analysis of active substances in other herbs.

  7. High-density DNA functionalization by a combination of Cu-catalyzed and cu-free click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutsmiedl, Katrin; Fazio, Danila; Carell, Thomas

    2010-06-18

    We report the regioselective Cu-free click modification of styrene functionalized DNA with nitrile oxides. A series of modified oligodeoxynucleotides (nine base pairs) was prepared with increasing styrene density. 1,3-Dipolar cycloaddition with nitrile oxides allows the high density functionalization of the styrene modified DNA directly on the DNA solid support and in solution. This click reaction proceeds smoothly even directly in the DNA synthesizer and gives exclusively 3,5-disubstituted isoxazolines. Additionally, PCR products (300 and 900 base pairs) were synthesized with a styrene triphosphate and KOD XL polymerase. The click reaction on the highly modified PCR fragments allows functionalization of hundreds of styrene units on these large DNA fragments simultaneously. Even sequential Cu-free and Cu-catalyzed click reaction of PCR amplicons containing styrene and alkyne carrying nucleobases was achieved. This new approach towards high-density functionalization of DNA is simple, modular, and efficient.

  8. In-silico screening for DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitors: Combined homology modeling, docking, molecular dynamic study followed by biological investigation.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, Hamadeh; Saleh, Ekram; El-Awady, Raafat

    2016-10-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a key enzyme in non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. The targeted inhibition of such enzyme would furnish a valuable option for cancer treatment. In this study we report the development of validation of enzyme homology model, and the subsequent use of this model to perform docking-based virtual screening against a database of FDA-approved drugs. The nominated highest ranking hits (Praziquantel and Dutasteride) were subjected to biological investigation. Additionally, molecular dynamic study was carried-out for binding mode exploration. Results of the biological evaluation revealed that both compounds inhibit the DNA-PK enzymatic activity at relatively high concentration levels with an IC50 of 17.3μM for praziquantel and >20μM for dutasteride. Furthermore, both agents enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of doxorubicin and cisplatin on breast cancer (MCF7) and lung cancer (A549) cell lines. This result indicates that these two hits are good candidate as DNA-PK inhibitors and worth further structural modifications to enhance their enzyme inhibitory effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A combined DFT/Green’s function study on electrical conductivity through DNA duplex between Au electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Sengoku, Yasuo; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2009-06-01

    Electrical conducting properties of DNA duplexes sandwiched between Au electrodes have been investigated by use of first-principles molecular simulation based on DFT and Green's function to elucidate the origin of their base sequence dependence. The theoretically simulated effects of DNA base sequence on the electrical conducting properties are in qualitative agreement with experiment. The HOMOs localized on Guanine bases have the major contribution to the electrical conductivity through DNA duplexes.

  10. Novel strategy combining SYBR Green I with carbon nanotubes for highly sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium DNA.

    PubMed

    Mao, Pingdao; Ning, Yi; Li, Wenkai; Peng, Zhihui; Chen, Yongzhe; Deng, Le

    2014-01-10

    A simple, selective, sensitive and label-free fluorescent method for detecting trpS-harboring Salmonella typhimurium was developed in this study. This assay used the non-covalent interaction of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes with SWNTs, since SWNTs can quench fluorescence. Fluorescence recovery (78% with 1.8 nM target DNA) was detected in the presence of target DNA as ssDNA probes detached from SWNTs hybridized with target DNA, and the resulting double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) intercalated with SYBR Green I (SG) dyes. The increasing fluorescence intensity reached 4.54-fold. In contrast, mismatched oligonucleotides (1- or 3-nt difference to the target DNA) did not contribute to significant fluorescent recovery, which demonstrated the specificity of the assay. The increasing fluorescence intensity increased 3.15-fold when purified PCR products containing complementary sequences of trpS gene were detected. These results confirmed the ability to use this assay for detecting real samples.

  11. Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient breast cancer by ATM or DNA-PKcs blockade either alone or in combination with cisplatin for personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Albarakati, Nada; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Doherty, Rachel; Russell, Roslin; Agarwal, Devika; Moseley, Paul; Perry, Christina; Arora, Arvind; Alsubhi, Nouf; Seedhouse, Claire; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, a key factor in homologous recombination (HR) repair may also regulate base excision repair (BER). Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient cells by blockade of ATM and DNA-PKcs could be a promising strategy in breast cancer. We investigated BRCA1, XRCC1 and pol β protein expression in two cohorts (n = 1602 sporadic and n = 50 germ-line BRCA1 mutated) and mRNA expression in two cohorts (n = 1952 and n = 249). Artificial neural network analysis for BRCA1-DNA repair interacting genes was conducted in 249 tumours. Pre-clinically, BRCA1 proficient and deficient cells were DNA repair expression profiled and evaluated for synthetic lethality using ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitors either alone or in combination with cisplatin. In human tumours, BRCA1 negativity was strongly associated with low XRCC1, and low pol β at mRNA and protein levels (p < 0.0001). In patients with BRCA1 negative tumours, low XRCC1 or low pol β expression was significantly associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis compared to high XRCC1 or high pol β expressing BRCA1 negative tumours (ps < 0.05). Pre-clinically, BRCA1 negative cancer cells exhibit low mRNA and low protein expression of XRCC1 and pol β. BRCA1-BER deficient cells were sensitive to ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitor treatment either alone or in combination with cisplatin and synthetic lethality was evidenced by DNA double strand breaks accumulation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We conclude that XRCC1 and pol β expression status in BRCA1 negative tumours may have prognostic significance. BRCA1-BER deficient cells could be targeted by ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors for personalized therapy. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA damage and inhibition of akt pathway in mcf-7 cells and ehrlich tumor in mice treated with 1,4-naphthoquinones in combination with ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Ourique, Fabiana; Kviecinski, Maicon R; Felipe, Karina B; Correia, João Francisco Gomes; Farias, Mirelle S; Castro, Luiza S E P W; Grinevicius, Valdelúcia M A S; Valderrama, Jaime; Rios, David; Benites, Julio; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enhance the understanding of the antitumor mechanism of 1,4-naphthoquinones and ascorbate. Juglone, phenylaminonaphthoquinone-7, and 9 (Q7/Q9) were evaluated for effects on CT-DNA and DNA of cancer cells. Evaluations in MCF-7 cells are DNA damage, ROS levels, viability, and proliferation. Proteins from MCF-7 lysates were immunoblotted for verifying PARP integrity, γH2AX, and pAkt. Antitumor activity was measured in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice. The same markers of molecular toxicity were assessed in vivo. The naphthoquinones intercalate into CT-DNA and caused oxidative cleavage, which is increased in the presence of ascorbate. Treatments caused DNA damage and reduced viability and proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Effects were potentiated by ascorbate. No PARP cleavage was observed. Naphthoquinones, combined with ascorbate, caused phosphorylation of H2AX and inhibited pAkt. ROS were enhanced in MCF-7 cells, particularly by the juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate. Ehrlich carcinoma was inhibited by juglone, Q7, or Q9, but the potentiating effect of ascorbate was reproduced in vivo only in the cases of juglone and Q7, which caused up to 60% inhibition of tumor and the largest extension of survival. Juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate caused enhanced ROS and DNA damage and inhibited pAkt also in Ehrlich carcinoma cells.

  13. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth using a combination of NK4 plasmid DNA-PEG engrafted cationized dextran complex and ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, H; Kushibiki, T; Matsumoto, K; Nakamura, T; Tabata, Y

    2006-05-01

    This investigation aims to determine experimentally whether or not ultrasound (US) irradiation is effective in enhancing the in vivo gene expression of NK4 plasmid DNA and suppressing tumor growth. NK4, composed of the NH2-terminal hairpin and subsequent four-kringle domains of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), acts as an HGF-antagonist and angiogenesis inhibitor. Dextran was cationized by introducing spermine to the hydroxyl groups to allow for polyionic complexation with NK4 plasmid DNA. The cationized dextran was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules giving PEG engrafted cationized dextran. Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed when PEG engrafted cationized dextran-NK4 plasmid DNA complexes were intravenously injected into mice carrying a subcutaneous Lewis lung carcinoma tumor mass with subsequent US irradiation when compared with the cationized dextran-NK4 plasmid DNA complex and naked NK4 plasmid DNA with or without US irradiation. We conclude that complexation with PEG-engrafted cationized dextran in combination with US irradiation is a promising way to target the NK4 plasmid DNA to the tumor for gene expression.

  14. DNA Damage and Inhibition of Akt Pathway in MCF-7 Cells and Ehrlich Tumor in Mice Treated with 1,4-Naphthoquinones in Combination with Ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Ourique, Fabiana; Kviecinski, Maicon R.; Felipe, Karina B.; Correia, João Francisco Gomes; Farias, Mirelle S.; Castro, Luiza S. E. P. W.; Grinevicius, Valdelúcia M. A. S.; Valderrama, Jaime; Rios, David; Benites, Julio; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enhance the understanding of the antitumor mechanism of 1,4-naphthoquinones and ascorbate. Juglone, phenylaminonaphthoquinone-7, and 9 (Q7/Q9) were evaluated for effects on CT-DNA and DNA of cancer cells. Evaluations in MCF-7 cells are DNA damage, ROS levels, viability, and proliferation. Proteins from MCF-7 lysates were immunoblotted for verifying PARP integrity, γH2AX, and pAkt. Antitumor activity was measured in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice. The same markers of molecular toxicity were assessed in vivo. The naphthoquinones intercalate into CT-DNA and caused oxidative cleavage, which is increased in the presence of ascorbate. Treatments caused DNA damage and reduced viability and proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Effects were potentiated by ascorbate. No PARP cleavage was observed. Naphthoquinones, combined with ascorbate, caused phosphorylation of H2AX and inhibited pAkt. ROS were enhanced in MCF-7 cells, particularly by the juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate. Ehrlich carcinoma was inhibited by juglone, Q7, or Q9, but the potentiating effect of ascorbate was reproduced in vivo only in the cases of juglone and Q7, which caused up to 60% inhibition of tumor and the largest extension of survival. Juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate caused enhanced ROS and DNA damage and inhibited pAkt also in Ehrlich carcinoma cells. PMID:25793019

  15. Combined exposure to nano-silica and lead induced potentiation of oxidative stress and DNA damage in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Feng; Yuan, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li-Zhong; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yi-Mei; Peng, Shuang-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidence has confirmed that exposure to ambient particulate matters (PM) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Ambient PM is a complex mixture of particles and air pollutants. Harmful effects of PM are specifically associated with ultrafine particles (UFPs) that can adsorb high concentrations of toxic air pollutants and are easily inhaled into the lungs. However, combined effects of UFPs and air pollutants on human health remain unclear. In the present study, we elucidated the combined toxicity of silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO2), a typical UFP, and lead acetate (Pb), a typical air pollutant. Lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were exposed to nano-SiO2 and Pb alone or their combination, and their combined toxicity was investigated by focusing on cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage. Factorial analyses were performed to determine the potential interactions between nano-SiO2 and Pb. Our results showed that exposure of A549 cells to a modest cytotoxic concentration of Pb alone induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by elevated reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation, and reduced glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. In addition, exposure of A549 cells to Pb alone induced DNA damage, as evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Exposure of A549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentration of nano-SiO2 did not induce cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, exposure to the combination of nano-SiO2 and Pb potentiated oxidative stress and DNA damage in A549 cells. Factorial analyses indicated that the potentiation of combined toxicity of nano-SiO2 and Pb was induced by additive or synergistic interactions.

  16. Tidal Pools--Miniature Oceans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Linda Perry

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the biological activity in tidal pools is provided. The importance of environmental factors such as oxygen supply, temperature, salinity, and light is detailed. Plants and animals that might be found in a tidal pool are identified and described. (BT)

  17. Tidal Pools--Miniature Oceans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Linda Perry

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the biological activity in tidal pools is provided. The importance of environmental factors such as oxygen supply, temperature, salinity, and light is detailed. Plants and animals that might be found in a tidal pool are identified and described. (BT)

  18. Synaptic Vesicle Pools: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or “pools”. We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are “fixed”. Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  19. How to link soil C pools with CO2 fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Y.

    2011-02-01

    include combining two or more promising approaches to elucidate more than two C sources for CO2 fluxes, and linking scientific communities investigating the pools with those investigating the fluxes.

  20. Vaccination with toxofilin DNA in combination with an alum-monophosphoryl lipid A mixed adjuvant induces significant protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengxia; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Aihua; Lv, Gang; Guo, Jingjing; Zhou, Jian; Han, Yali; Zhou, Huaiyu; Hao, Zhen; Cong, Hua

    2017-01-05

    A widely prevalent disease, toxoplasmosis poses serious health threats to both humans and animals; therefore, development of an ideal DNA vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii is needed eagerly. The purpose of the present study is to assess the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the T. gondii toxofilin gene (pEGFP-toxofilin). In addition, toxofilin DNA vaccine combined with the individual adjuvants, alum or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), or a mixture of alum-MPLA adjuvant were screened for their ability to enhance antibody responses. Using bioinformatics, we analyzed the gene and amino acid sequences of the toxofilin protein, recognizing and identifying several potential linear B and T helper (Th)-1 cell epitopes. BALB/c mice were immunized three times with either toxofilin DNA vaccine alone or in combination with the adjuvants such as alum, MPLA or an alum-MPLA mixture. The systemic immune response was evaluated by cytokine, the percentage of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T cells and specific antibody measurement. Two weeks after the last immunization, protective efficacy was evaluated by challenging intraperitoneally with 1 × 10(4) tachyzoites of T. gondii or intragastrically with 20 cysts of T. gondii PRU strain. All experimentally immunized mice developed strong humoral and cellular immune responses compared with the control groups. Moreover, by comparison with the non-adjuvant toxofilin DNA vaccine group, adding alum adjuvant to toxofilin DNA vaccine resulted in an increase in humoral response and a skewed Th2 response. However, the MPLA adjuvant with toxofilin DNA vaccine induced significantly enhanced humoral and Th1-biased immune responses. Importantly, the co-administration of alum-MPLA adjuvant in combination with the toxofilin DNA vaccine shifted the Th2 immune response to a Th1 response compared with the alum-toxofilin group, and elicited the strongest humoral and Th1 responses among all the groups. At the same time, a longer survival time and less

  1. Field and pore size dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of DNA: a combination of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and electric birefringence measurements.

    PubMed

    Tinland, B; Pernodet, N; Weill, G

    1996-06-01

    By combining an electrophoretic cell with a setup of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) we can measure the electrophoretic mobility mu of double-stranded lambda DNA in agarose gel as a function of electric field E and gel concentration C. Mobility varies linearly with the field in agreement with the biased reptation model with fluctuations. The slopes are analyzed in term of orientation and compared with birefringence results. The mobility extrapolated at zero field follows the prediction of the reptation theory; we deduced the variation of the pore size with the agarose concentration. With a special use of our setup, we measure directly the free-mobility mu 0 of the DNA.

  2. Strand breakage by decay of DNA-bound (124)I provides a basis for combined PET imaging and Auger endoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Clark, George R; Pytel, Patrycja D; Leung, Brenda; Skene, Colin; Andrau, Laura; White, Jonathan M; Karagiannis, Tom; Cullinane, Carleen; Lee, Boon Q; Stuchbery, Andrew; Kibedi, Tibor; Hicks, Rodney J; Martin, Roger F

    2016-11-01

    Purpose DNA ligands labelled with (125)I induce cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), suggesting a potential for Auger endoradiotherapy. Since the 60-day half-life of (125)I is suboptimal for therapy, we have investigated another Auger-emitter (124)I, with shorter half-life (4.18 days), and the additional feature of positron-emission, enabling positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the two radionuclides on the basis of DNA DSB per decay. Materials and methods Using a (124)I- (or (125)I)-labelled minor groove binding DNA ligand, we investigated DNA breakage using the plasmid DNA assay. Biodistribution of the conjugate of the labelled ligand with transferrin was investigated in nude mice bearing a K562 human lymphoma xenograft. Results The probability of DSB per decay was 0.58 and 0.85 for (124)I and (125)I, respectively, confirming the therapeutic potential of the former. The crystal structure of the ligand DNA complex shows the iodine atom deep within the minor groove, consistent with the high efficiency of induced damage. Biodistribution studies, including PET imaging, showed distinctive results for the conjugate, compared to the free ligand and transferrin, consistent with receptor-mediated delivery of the ligand. Conclusions Conjugation of (124)I-labelled DNA ligands to tumor targeting peptides provides a feasible strategy for Auger endoradiotherapy, with the advantage of monitoring tumor targeting by PET imaging.

  3. Microwave-assisted digestion combined with silica-based spin column for DNA isolation from human bones.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir-Kaynak, Elif; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-10-01

    A protocol for the extraction of DNA from ancient skeletal material was developed. Bone specimen samples (powder or slice), buffer, pretreatment, and extraction methodologies were compared to investigate the best conditions yielding the highest concentration of DNA. The degree of extract contamination by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors was compared as well. Pretreatment was carried out using agitation in an incubator shaker and microwave digestion. Subsequently, DNA from bones was isolated by the classical organic phenol-chloroform extraction and silica-based spin columns. Decalcification buffer for total demineralization was required as well as lysis buffer for cell lysis to obtain DNA, whereas microwave-assisted digestion proved to be very rapid, with an incubation time of 2min instead of 24h at an incubator shaker without using lysis buffer. The correction of isolated DNA was detected using real-time PCR with melt curve analysis, which was 82.8±0.2°C for highly repetitive α-satellite gene region specific for human chromosome 17 (locus D17Z1). Consequently, microwave-based DNA digestion followed by silica column yielded a high-purity DNA with a concentration of 19.40ng/μl and proved to be a superior alternative to the phenol-chloroform method, presenting an environmentally friendly and efficient technique for DNA extraction.

  4. Combined Interactions of Plant Homeodomain and Chromodomain Regulate NuA4 Activity at DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen-Pin; Hsu, Sen-Huei; Chia, Li-Chiao; Lin, Jui-Yang; Chang, Song-Bin; Jiang, Zong-da; Lin, Yi-Ju; Shih, Min-Yu; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Mau-Sun; Yang, Wen-Bin; Hung, Jan-Jong; Hung, Po-Cheng; Wu, Wei-Sheng; Myung, Kyungjae; Liaw, Hungjiun

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent one of the most threatening lesions to the integrity of genomes. In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, NuA4, a histone acetylation complex, is recruited to DSBs, wherein it acetylates histones H2A and H4, presumably relaxing the chromatin and allowing access to repair proteins. Two subunits of NuA4, Yng2 and Eaf3, can interact in vitro with methylated H3K4 and H3K36 via their plant homeodomain (PHD) and chromodomain. However, the roles of the two domains and how they interact in a combinatorial fashion are still poorly characterized. In this study, we generated mutations in the PHD and chromodomain that disrupt their interaction with methylated H3K4 and H3K36. We demonstrate that the combined mutations in both the PHD and chromodomain impair the NuA4 recruitment, reduce H4K12 acetylation at the DSB site, and confer sensitivity to bleomycin that induces DSBs. In addition, the double mutant cells are defective in DSB repair as judged by Southern blot and exhibit prolonged activation of phospho-S129 of H2A. Cells harboring the H3K4R, H3K4R, K36R, or set1Δ set2Δ mutant that disrupts H3K4 and H3K36 methylation also show very similar phenotypes to the PHD and chromodomain double mutant. Our results suggest that multivalent interactions between the PHD, chromodomain, and methylated H3K4 and H3K36 act in a combinatorial manner to recruit NuA4 and regulate the NuA4 activity at the DSB site. PMID:26564157

  5. DNA methylation of leptin and adiponectin promoters in children is reduced by the combined presence of obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    García-Cardona, M C; Huang, F; García-Vivas, J M; López-Camarillo, C; Del Río Navarro, B E; Navarro Olivos, E; Hong-Chong, E; Bolaños-Jiménez, F; Marchat, L A

    2014-11-01

    Epigenetic alterations have been suggested to be associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders. Here we examined the correlation between obesity and insulin resistance with the methylation frequency of the leptin (LEP) and adiponectin (ADIPOQ) promoters in obese adolescents with the aim to identify epigenetic markers that might be used as tools to predict and follow up the physiological alterations associated with the development of the metabolic syndrome. One hundred and six adolescents were recruited and classified according to body mass index and homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance index. The circulating concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and of several metabolic markers of obesity and insulin resistance were determined by standard methods. The methylation frequency of the LEP and ADIPOQ promoters was determined by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR) in DNA obtained from peripheral blood samples. Obese adolescents without insulin resistance showed higher and lower circulating levels of, respectively, leptin and adiponectin along with increased plasmatic concentrations of insulin and triglycerides. They also exhibited the same methylation frequency than lean subjects of the CpG sites located at -51 and -31 nt relative to the transcription start site of the LEP gene. However, the methylation frequency of these nucleotides dropped markedly in obese adolescents with insulin resistance. We found the same inverse relationship between the combined presence of obesity and insulin resistance and the methylation frequency of the CpG site located at -283 nt relative to the start site of the ADIPOQ promoter. These observations sustain the hypothesis that epigenetic modifications might underpin the development of obesity and related metabolic disorders. They also validate the use of blood leukocytes and MS-PCR as a reliable and affordable methodology for the identification of epigenetic modifications that could be used as molecular markers to

  6. Staphylococci in swimming pool water

    PubMed Central

    Crone, P. B.; Tee, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    During a period of five years 1192 water samples from swimming pools were examined for staphylococci and 338 for coliform organisms only. Eighty-nine different pools were sampled. Numbers of staphylococci, estimated by the membrane filtration technique did not bear any significant relation to either bathing load or concentration of free chlorine. Wide variation in the staphylococcal count was observed when different parts of a pool were sampled on the same occasion. The only practicable standard for pool samples in relation to staphylococci would appear to be that these organisms should be absent from 100 ml. water when the pool has been out of use during at least ten hours before sampling if filtration and chlorination are adequate. PMID:4608265

  7. Efficacy and safety of combined prolonged-release oxycodone and naloxone in the management of moderate/severe chronic non-malignant pain: results of a prospectively designed pooled analysis of two randomised, double-blind clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two randomised 12-week, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter studies comparing oxycodone PR/naloxone PR and oxycodone PR alone on symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in patients with moderate/severe non-malignant pain have been conducted. Methods These studies were prospectively designed to be pooled and the primary outcome measure of the pooled data analysis was to demonstrate non-inferiority in 12-week analgesic efficacy of oxycodone PR/naloxone PR versus oxycodone PR alone. Patients with opioid-induced constipation were switched to oxycodone PR and then randomised to fixed doses of oxycodone PR/naloxone PR (n = 292) or oxycodone PR (n = 295) for 12 weeks (20-80 mg/day). Results No statistically significant differences in analgesic efficacy were observed for the two treatments (p = 0.3197; non-inferiority p < 0.0001; 95% CI -0.07, 0.23) and there was no statistically significant difference in frequency of analgesic rescue medication use. Improvements in Bowel Function Index score were observed for oxycodone PR/naloxone PR by Week 1 and at every subsequent time point (-15.1; p < 0.0001; 95% CI -17.3, -13.0). AE incidence was similar for both groups (61.0% and 57.3% of patients with oxycodone PR/naloxone PR and oxycodone PR alone, respectively). Conclusions Results of this pooled analysis confirm that oxycodone PR/naloxone PR provides effective analgesia and suggest that oxycodone PR/naloxone PR improves bowel function without compromising analgesic efficacy. Trial registration numbers ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00412100 and NCT00412152 PMID:20920236

  8. Efficient isolation of sperm with high DNA integrity and stable chromatin packaging by a combination of density-gradient centrifugation and magnetic-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Su-Jin; Kim, Seok-Gi; Kim, Youn-Young; Park, Ji-Young; Yoo, Chang-Seok; Park, Il-Hae; Sun, Hong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Kyeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was carried out to investigate the correlations of the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) with semen parameters and apoptosis, and to investigate the effects of density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) on reducing the proportion of sperm with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency. Methods Semen analysis and a sperm DNA fragmentation assay were performed to assess the correlations between semen parameters and the DFI in 458 semen samples. Sperm with progressive motility or non-apoptosis were isolated by DGC or MACS, respectively, in 29 normozoospermic semen samples. The effects of DGC or MACS alone and of DGC and MACS combined on reducing the amount of sperm in the sample with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency were investigated. Results The sperm DFI showed a significant correlation (r=–0.347, p<0.001) with sperm motility and morphology (r=–0.114, p<0.05) but not with other semen parameters. The DFI (11.5%±2.0%) of semen samples was significantly reduced by DGC (8.1%±4.1%) or MACS alone (7.4%±3.9%) (p<0.05). The DFI was significantly further reduced by a combination of DGC and MACS (4.1%±1.3%, p<0.05). Moreover, the combination of DGC and MACS (1.6%±1.1%, p<0.05) significantly reduced the protamine deficiency rate of semen samples compared to DGC (4.4%±3.2%) or MACS alone (3.4%±2.2%). Conclusion The combination of DGC and MACS may be an effective method to isolate high-quality sperm with progressive motility, non-apoptosis, high DNA integrity, and low protamine deficiency in clinical use. PMID:28090458

  9. Efficient isolation of sperm with high DNA integrity and stable chromatin packaging by a combination of density-gradient centrifugation and magnetic-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Chi, Hee-Jun; Kwak, Su-Jin; Kim, Seok-Gi; Kim, Youn-Young; Park, Ji-Young; Yoo, Chang-Seok; Park, Il-Hae; Sun, Hong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Kyeong-Ho

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the correlations of the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) with semen parameters and apoptosis, and to investigate the effects of density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) on reducing the proportion of sperm with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency. Semen analysis and a sperm DNA fragmentation assay were performed to assess the correlations between semen parameters and the DFI in 458 semen samples. Sperm with progressive motility or non-apoptosis were isolated by DGC or MACS, respectively, in 29 normozoospermic semen samples. The effects of DGC or MACS alone and of DGC and MACS combined on reducing the amount of sperm in the sample with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency were investigated. The sperm DFI showed a significant correlation (r=-0.347, p<0.001) with sperm motility and morphology (r=-0.114, p<0.05) but not with other semen parameters. The DFI (11.5%±2.0%) of semen samples was significantly reduced by DGC (8.1%±4.1%) or MACS alone (7.4%±3.9%) (p<0.05). The DFI was significantly further reduced by a combination of DGC and MACS (4.1%±1.3%, p<0.05). Moreover, the combination of DGC and MACS (1.6%±1.1%, p<0.05) significantly reduced the protamine deficiency rate of semen samples compared to DGC (4.4%±3.2%) or MACS alone (3.4%±2.2%). The combination of DGC and MACS may be an effective method to isolate high-quality sperm with progressive motility, non-apoptosis, high DNA integrity, and low protamine deficiency in clinical use.

  10. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling

    PubMed Central

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C 14N - recombinant ion and the use of the 13C: 12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  11. Chlorate as an inorganic disinfection by product in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Erdinger, L; Kirsch, F; Sonntag, H G

    1999-06-01

    Chlorate and chlorite concentrations were determined in water samples taken from 33 swimming pools. In the pools under investigation, disinfection of the water is carried out either by gaseous chlorine (n = 14) or hypochlorite solution in conjunction with flocculation and sand filtration. A number of the pools also use ozone treatment to augment the disinfection process. Chlorite was not detectable in any of the samples (detection limit 1 mg/l). High concentrations of chlorate were detected in samples from a number of the pools; in one case as high as 40 mg/l. Higher chlorate concentrations were found to be associated with those pools using hypochlorite solution as a disinfecting agent. In contrast, relatively low chlorate concentrations were found in pools treated with gaseous chlorine. In order to elucidate any relationship between the chlorate content of pool water and that of the respective hypochlorite stock solution, chlorate and bromate concentrations were determined in the hypochlorite stock solutions of nine pools. Bromate concentration in the stock solutions were not found to exceed 1.2 g/l, chlorate was measured in concentrations of up to 44.5 g/l. The additional use of ozone as part of the water purification process appears to have no significant influence on chlorate concentration. Chlorate has no bactericidal properties and does not interfere with the measurement of certain parameters relevant to hygiene in swimming pools such as free and combined chlorine, pH or redox potential. At present, the effects of high chlorate concentrations in swimming pool water are unclear. Our initial investigations indicate that chlorate has no cytotoxic (Neutral-Red assay) or irritating properties (HET-CAM assay). However, both chlorate and chlorite are known to interfere with the haematopoetic system. In Germany, the MCL for chlorite in drinking water is 0.2 mg/l. It is therefore strongly recommended that measures should be taken to reduce chlorate concentrations in

  12. Pooled Screening for Synergistic Interactions Subject to Blocking and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kyle; Precup, Doina; Perkins, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The complex molecular networks in the cell can give rise to surprising interactions: gene deletions that are synthetically lethal, gene overexpressions that promote stemness or differentiation, synergistic drug interactions that heighten potency. Yet, the number of actual interactions is dwarfed by the number of potential interactions, and discovering them remains a major problem. Pooled screening, in which multiple factors are simultaneously tested for possible interactions, has the potential to increase the efficiency of searching for interactions among a large set of factors. However, pooling also carries with it the risk of masking genuine interactions due to antagonistic influence from other factors in the pool. Here, we explore several theoretical models of pooled screening, allowing for synergy and antagonism between factors, noisy measurements, and other forms of uncertainty. We investigate randomized sequential designs, deriving formulae for the expected number of tests that need to be performed to discover a synergistic interaction, and the optimal size of pools to test. We find that even in the presence of significant antagonistic interactions and testing noise, randomized pooled designs can significantly outperform exhaustive testing of all possible combinations. We also find that testing noise does not affect optimal pool size, and that mitigating noise by a selective approach to retesting outperforms naive replication of all tests. Finally, we show that a Bayesian approach can be used to handle uncertainty in problem parameters, such as the extent of synergistic and antagonistic interactions, resulting in schedules for adapting pool size during the course of testing. PMID:24454940

  13. Screening insertion libraries for mutations in many genes simultaneously using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Ramamurthy; Fedoroff, Nina

    2001-01-01

    We describe a method to screen pools of DNA from multiple transposon lines for insertions in many genes simultaneously. We use thermal asymmetric interlaced–PCR, a hemispecific PCR amplification protocol that combines nested, insertion-specific primers with degenerate primers, to amplify DNA flanking the transposons. In reconstruction experiments with previously characterized Arabidopsis lines carrying insertions of the maize Dissociation (Ds) transposon, we show that fluorescently labeled, transposon-flanking fragments overlapping ORFs hybridize to cognate expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on a DNA microarray. We further show that insertions can be detected in DNA pools from as many as 100 plants representing different transposon lines and that all of the tested, transposon-disrupted genes whose flanking fragments can be amplified individually also can be detected when amplified from the pool. The ability of a transposon-flanking fragment to hybridize declines rapidly with decreasing homology to the spotted DNA fragment, so that only ESTs with >90% homology to the transposon-disrupted gene exhibit significant cross-hybridization. Because thermal asymmetric interlaced–PCR fragments tend to be short, use of the present method favors recovery of insertions in and near genes. We apply the technique to screening pools of new Ds lines using cDNA microarrays containing ESTs for ≈1,000 stress-induced and -repressed Arabidopsis genes. PMID:11416215

  14. Clinical implementation of routine screening for fetal trisomies in the UK NHS: cell-free DNA test contingent on results from first-trimester combined test.

    PubMed

    Gil, M M; Revello, R; Poon, L C; Akolekar, R; Nicolaides, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) analysis of maternal blood for detection of trisomies 21, 18 and 13 is superior to other methods of screening but is expensive. One strategy to maximize performance at reduced cost is to offer cfDNA testing contingent on the results of the first-trimester combined test that is used currently. The objectives of this study were to report the feasibility of implementing such screening, to examine the factors affecting patient decisions concerning their options for screening and decisions on the management of affected pregnancies and to report the prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomies and outcome of affected pregnancies following the introduction of contingent screening. We examined routine clinical implementation of contingent screening in 11,692 singleton pregnancies in two National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the UK. Women with a risk ≥ 1 in 100 (high-risk group) were offered options of invasive testing, cfDNA testing or no further testing, and those with a risk between 1 in 101 and 1 in 2500 (intermediate-risk group) were offered cfDNA testing or no further testing. The trisomic status of the pregnancies was determined by prenatal or postnatal karyotyping or by examination of the neonates. In the study population of 11,692 pregnancies, there were 47 cases of trisomy 21 and 28 of trisomies 18 or 13. Screening with the combined test followed by invasive testing for all patients in the high-risk group potentially could have detected 87% of trisomy 21 and 93% of trisomies 18 or 13, at a false-positive rate of 3.4%; the respective values for cfDNA testing in the high- and intermediate-risk groups were 98%, 82% and 0.25%. However, in the high-risk group, 38% of women chose invasive testing and 60% chose cfDNA testing; in the intermediate-risk group 92% opted for cfDNA testing. A prenatal diagnosis was made in 43 (91.5%) pregnancies with trisomy 21 and all pregnancies with trisomies 18 or 13. In many affected pregnancies the parents chose

  15. Rank Pooling for Action Recognition.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Basura; Gavves, Efstratios; Oramas M, Jose Oramas; Ghodrati, Amir; Tuytelaars, Tinne

    2017-04-01

    We propose a function-based temporal pooling method that captures the latent structure of the video sequence data - e.g., how frame-level features evolve over time in a video. We show how the parameters of a function that has been fit to the video data can serve as a robust new video representation. As a specific example, we learn a pooling function via ranking machines. By learning to rank the frame-level features of a video in chronological order, we obtain a new representation that captures the video-wide temporal dynamics of a video, suitable for action recognition. Other than ranking functions, we explore different parametric models that could also explain the temporal changes in videos. The proposed functional pooling methods, and rank pooling in particular, is easy to interpret and implement, fast to compute and effective in recognizing a wide variety of actions. We evaluate our method on various benchmarks for generic action, fine-grained action and gesture recognition. Results show that rank pooling brings an absolute improvement of 7-10 average pooling baseline. At the same time, rank pooling is compatible with and complementary to several appearance and local motion based methods and features, such as improved trajectories and deep learning features.

  16. Combination Treatment with Intralesional Cidofovir and Viral-DNA Vaccination Cures Large Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus-Induced Papillomas and Reduces Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Neil D.; Han, Ricai; Cladel, Nancy M.; Pickel, Martin D.

    2001-01-01

    We used the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) New Zealand White rabbit model to test a combination treatment of large established papillomas with intralesional cidofovir and DNA vaccination to cure sites and reduce recurrences. Intralesional 1% (wt/vol) (0.036 M) cidofovir treatment of rabbit papillomas led to elimination, or “cure,” of the papillomas over a 6- to 8-week treatment period (N. D. Christenson, M. D. Pickel, L. R. Budgeon, and J. W. Kreider, Antivir. Res. 48:131–142, 2000). However, recurrences at periods from 1 to 8 weeks after treatment cessation were observed at approximately 50% of cured sites. DNA vaccinations with CRPV E1, E2, E6, and E7 were initiated either after or at the time of intralesional treatments, and the recurrence rates were observed. When DNA vaccinations were started after intralesional cures, recurrence rates were similar to those of vector-vaccinated rabbits. A small proportion of recurrent sites subsequently regressed (4 out of 10, or 40%) in the vaccinated group versus no regression of recurrences in the vector-immunized group (0 out of 19, or 0%), indicating partial effectiveness. In contrast, when DNA vaccinations were conducted during intralesional treatments, a significant reduction of recurrences (from 10 out of 19, or 53%, of sites in vector-immunized rabbits to 3 out of 20, or 15%, of sites in viral-DNA-immunized rabbits) was observed. DNA vaccination without intralesional treatments had a minimal effect on preexisting papillomas. These data indicated that treatment with a combination of antiviral compounds and specific immune stimulation may lead to long-term cures of lesions without the ensuing problem of papilloma recurrence. PMID:11257035

  17. Combination of methylated-DNA precipitation and methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes (COMPARE-MS) for the rapid, sensitive and quantitative detection of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Lin, Xiaohui; Haffner, Michael C; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Nelson, William G

    2006-02-09

    Hypermethylation of CpG island (CGI) sequences is a nearly universal somatic genome alteration in cancer. Rapid and sensitive detection of DNA hypermethylation would aid in cancer diagnosis and risk stratification. We present a novel technique, called COMPARE-MS, that can rapidly and quantitatively detect CGI hypermethylation with high sensitivity and specificity in hundreds of samples simultaneously. To quantitate CGI hypermethylation, COMPARE-MS uses real-time PCR of DNA that was first digested by methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes and then precipitated by methyl-binding domain polypeptides immobilized on a magnetic solid matrix. We show that COMPARE-MS could detect five genome equivalents of methylated CGIs in a 1000- to 10,000-fold excess of unmethylated DNA. COMPARE-MS was used to rapidly quantitate hypermethylation at multiple CGIs in >155 prostate tissues, including benign and malignant prostate specimens, and prostate cell lines. This analysis showed that GSTP1, MDR1 and PTGS2 CGI hypermethylation as determined by COMPARE-MS could differentiate between malignant and benign prostate with sensitivities >95% and specificities approaching 100%. This novel technology could significantly improve our ability to detect CGI hypermethylation.

  18. Pooling techniques for bioassay screening

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.C.; Baum, J.W.; Kaplan, E; Moorthy, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    Pooling techniques commonly are used to increase the throughput of samples used for screening purposes. While the advantages of such techniques are increased analytical efficiency and cost savings, the sensitivity of measurements decreases because it is inversely proportional to the number of samples in the pools. Consequently, uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk which are based on the results of pooled samples increase as the number of samples in the pools increases in all applications. However, sensitivities may not be seriously degraded, for example, in urinalysis, if the samples in the pools are of known time duration, or if the fraction of some attribute of the grab urine samples to that in a 24-hour composite is known (e.g., mass, specific gravity, creatinine, or volume, per 24-h interval). This paper presents square and cube pooling schemes that greatly increase throughput and can considerably reduce analytical costs (on a sample basis). The benefit-cost ratios for 5{times}5 square and 5{times}5{times}5 cube pooling schemes are 2.5 and 8.3, respectively. Three-dimensional and higher arrayed pooling schemes would result in even greater economies; however, significant improvements in analytical sensitivity are required to achieve these advantages. These are various other considerations for designing a pooling scheme, where the number of dimensions and of samples in the optimum array are influenced by: (1) the minimal detectable amount (MDA) of the analytical processes, (2) the screening dose-rate requirements, (3) the maximum masses or volumes of the composite samples that can be analyzed, (4) the information already available from results of composite analysis, and (5) the ability of an analytical system to guard against both false negative and false positive results. Many of these are beyond the scope of this paper but are being evaluated.

  19. Macroalgal communities of intertidal rock pools in the northwest coast of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Rita; Sousa-Pinto, I.; Bárbara, I.; Quintino, V.

    2006-09-01

    Macroalgal communities in littoral rock pools of the Northwest coast of Portugal were studied along 60 km of coastline. Thirty-eight pools were sampled twice between March and August 2003. Rhodophyta were the dominant algue group, whether the pools were located lower or upper on the shore, except in pools located between 2 and 3 meters where Rhodophyta share the dominance with Chlorophyta. Species richness increased from pools located at higher levels on the beach to the ones located lower on the shore. The macroalgal communities' species composition was the major source of variability between rock pools. Each pool presented a unique combination of species, forming particular communities. A reduced number of species with high percent cover are the main factor creating the differences between the pools. Also, clear differences could be found between the species compositions of macroalgal communities located in the pools and in the surrounding emergent substrata. The environmental variables considered in this study (tidal height, maximum pool depth, maximum pool width and maximum pool length), were poorly related to the communities' species composition. The results suggest that each pool is unique regarding its macroalgal community structure and that the environmental factors considered in this study were not of major importance in determining the variability between pools.

  20. 5-Azacytidine combined with 2,4-D improves somatic embryogenesis of Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret by means of changes in global DNA methylation levels.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Hugo P F; Vieira, Leila N; Caprestano, Clarissa A; Steinmacher, Douglas A; Micke, Gustavo A; Spudeit, Daniel A; Pescador, Rosete; Guerra, Miguel P

    2012-12-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic regulatory mechanism of gene expression which can be associated with developmental phases and in vitro morphogenetic competence in plants. The present work evaluated the effects of 5-azacytidine (AzaC) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on Acca sellowiana somatic embryogenesis (SE) and global DNA methylation levels by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). 2,4-D-free treatments revealed no somatic embryo formation in both accessions tested. Treatments supplemented with 2,4-D pulse plus AzaC in the culture medium resulted in increased embryo formation. In AzaC-free treatment, HPLC/MS/MS analysis showed a gradual increase in methylation levels in cultures of both accessions tested during SE induction. Treatment with AzaC and 2,4-D-free resulted in a marked decrease in methylation for both accessions, ranging from 37.6 to 20.8 %. In treatment with 2,4-D and AzaC combined, the 85 accession showed increasing global methylation levels. Otherwise, the 101X458 accession, in the same treatment, showed a decrease between 10 and 20 days, followed by an increase after 30 days (39.5, 36.2 and 41.6 %). These results indicate that 2,4-D pulse combined with AzaC improves SE induction. However, the conversion phase showed that although positively influencing SE induction, AzaC had a dysregulatory effect on the stage of autotrophic plant formation, resulting in significantly lower conversion rates. The results suggest that DNA methylation dramatically influences SE in Acca sellowiana, and global DNA methylation dynamics are related to morphogenetic response. 5-Azacytidine combined with 2,4-D increases the number of Acca sellowiana somatic embryos. Global DNA methylation is directly affected by these compounds.

  1. Quantitative analysis of low-density SNP data for parentage assignment and estimation of family contributions to pooled samples.

    PubMed

    Henshall, John M; Dierens, Leanne; Sellars, Melony J

    2014-09-02

    While much attention has focused on the development of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays, the costs of developing and running low-density assays have fallen dramatically. This makes it feasible to develop and apply SNP assays for agricultural species beyond the major livestock species. Although low-cost low-density assays may not have the accuracy of the high-density assays widely used in human and livestock species, we show that when combined with statistical analysis approaches that use quantitative instead of discrete genotypes, their utility may be improved. The data used in this study are from a 63-SNP marker Sequenom® iPLEX Platinum panel for the Black Tiger shrimp, for which high-density SNP assays are not currently available. For quantitative genotypes that could be estimated, in 5% of cases the most likely genotype for an individual at a SNP had a probability of less than 0.99. Matrix formulations of maximum likelihood equations for parentage assignment were developed for the quantitative genotypes and also for discrete genotypes perturbed by an assumed error term. Assignment rates that were based on maximum likelihood with quantitative genotypes were similar to those based on maximum likelihood with perturbed genotypes but, for more than 50% of cases, the two methods resulted in individuals being assigned to different families. Treating genotypes as quantitative values allows the same analysis framework to be used for pooled samples of DNA from multiple individuals. Resulting correlations between allele frequency estimates from pooled DNA and individual samples were consistently greater than 0.90, and as high as 0.97 for some pools. Estimates of family contributions to the pools based on quantitative genotypes in pooled DNA had a correlation of 0.85 with estimates of contributions from DNA-derived pedigree. Even with low numbers of SNPs of variable quality, parentage testing and family assignment from pooled samples are

  2. Pooled CRISPR screening with single-cell transcriptome readout.

    PubMed

    Datlinger, Paul; Rendeiro, André F; Schmidl, Christian; Krausgruber, Thomas; Traxler, Peter; Klughammer, Johanna; Schuster, Linda C; Kuchler, Amelie; Alpar, Donat; Bock, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    CRISPR-based genetic screens are accelerating biological discovery, but current methods have inherent limitations. Widely used pooled screens are restricted to simple readouts including cell proliferation and sortable marker proteins. Arrayed screens allow for comprehensive molecular readouts such as transcriptome profiling, but at much lower throughput. Here we combine pooled CRISPR screening with single-cell RNA sequencing into a broadly applicable workflow, directly linking guide RNA expression to transcriptome responses in thousands of individual cells. Our method for CRISPR droplet sequencing (CROP-seq) enables pooled CRISPR screens with single-cell transcriptome resolution, which will facilitate high-throughput functional dissection of complex regulatory mechanisms and heterogeneous cell populations.

  3. [Evaluation of immunological efficiency induced by Campylobacter jejuni PEB1 DNA combined with PEB1 protein in mice].

    PubMed

    Liu, Linlin; Lai, Weidong; Hu, Na; Zhang, Weizhe; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Faquan; Gu, Runguo

    2014-06-01

    To explore the improved immunological responses induced by an amino acid ABC transporter, permease protein PEB1 DNA vaccine primer-protein boost immunization method against Campylobacter jejuni. The DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1(-)-PEB1 and protein vaccine were prepared, respectively. The female BALB/c mice were intranasally immunized with the vaccines. PBS and pcDNA3.1(-) were used as controls. The humoral and cellular immunological responses were detected in female BALB/c mice that were challenged by Campylobacter jejuni at 28 days after the final immunization. In the DNA primer-protein boost group at day 56, the stimulation index (SI) of lymphocytes was 2.625±0.275, serum IgG was (2.507±0.124) μg/mL, IL-4 in spleen supernatant was (377.47±14.560) pg/mL, IFN-γ in spleen supernatant was (258.920±13.472) pg/mL, and sIgA in genital tract was (80.351±5.769) ng/mL. All of them were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). The DNA primer-protein boost vaccines induced the strongest levels of protection to BALB/c mice (91.53%). The DNA primer-protein boost immunization could induce significant protective immunity against Campylobacter jejuni challenge. It could significantly enhance both humoral and cellular immunologic responses in BALB/c mice, compared with DNA vaccine or protein vaccine immunization alone.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of aberrant methylation in human breast cancer cells using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells undergo massive alterations to their DNA methylation patterns that result in aberrant gene expression and malignant phenotypes. However, the mechanisms that underlie methylome changes are not well understood nor is the genomic distribution of DNA methylation changes well characterized. Results Here, we performed methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) to obtain whole-genome DNA methylation profiles for eight human breast cancer cell (BCC) lines and for normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). The MeDIP-seq analysis generated non-biased DNA methylation maps by covering almost the entire genome with sufficient depth and resolution. The most prominent feature of the BCC lines compared to HMEC was a massively reduced methylation level particularly in CpG-poor regions. While hypomethylation did not appear to be associated with particular genomic features, hypermethylation preferentially occurred at CpG-rich gene-related regions independently of the distance from transcription start sites. We also investigated methylome alterations during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in MCF7 cells. EMT induction was associated with specific alterations to the methylation patterns of gene-related CpG-rich regions, although overall methylation levels were not significantly altered. Moreover, approximately 40% of the epithelial cell-specific methylation patterns in gene-related regions were altered to those typical of mesenchymal cells, suggesting a cell-type specific regulation of DNA methylation. Conclusions This study provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of the methylome of human mammary cell lines and has produced novel insights into the mechanisms of methylome alteration during tumorigenesis and the interdependence between DNA methylome alterations and morphological changes. PMID:20181289

  5. Correlation of in Situ Oxazolidine Formation with Highly Synergistic Cytotoxicity and DNA Cross-Linking in Cancer Cells from Combinations of Doxorubicin and Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Benjamin L; Mooz, Erin L; Wiener, Laura Elizabeth; Koch, Gary G; Koch, Tad H

    2016-03-10

    Anthracyclines are a class of antitumor compounds that are successful and widely used but suffer from cardiotoxicity and acquired tumor resistance. Formaldehyde interacts with anthracyclines to enhance antitumor efficacy, bypass resistance mechanisms, improve the therapeutic profile, and change the mechanism of action from a topoisomerase II poison to a DNA cross-linker. Contrary to current dogma, we show that both efficient DNA cross-linking and potent synergy in combination with formaldehyde correlate with the anthracycline's ability to form cyclic formaldehyde conjugates as oxazolidine moieties and that the cyclic conjugates are better cross-linking agents and cytotoxins than acyclic conjugates. We also provide evidence that suggests that the oxazolidine forms in situ, since cotreatment with doxorubicin and formaldehyde is highly cytotoxic to dox-resistant tumor cell lines, and that this benefit is absent in combinations of formaldehyde and epirubicin, which cannot form stable oxazolidines. These results have potential clinical implications in the active field of anthracycline prodrug design and development.

  6. Ibuprofen causes photocleavage through ROS generation and intercalates with DNA: a combined biophysical and molecular docking approach.

    PubMed

    Husain, Mohammed Amir; Sarwar, Tarique; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Tabish, Mohammad

    2015-06-07

    Ibuprofen is an important nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug endowed with various pharmacological and biological activities. In the present study, the photochemical properties of ibuprofen were evaluated by assaying the generation of various reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, singlet oxygen and the hydroxyl radical. ROS generated by ibuprofen in the presence of white light causes DNA strand scission as observed by plasmid nicking assay. Ibuprofen induced ROS generation is also capable of causing DNA degradation in lymphocytes as observed by photocomet assay. ROS generation properties of ibuprofen were further strengthened by the formation of carbonyl groups in BSA and TBARS in linoleic acid as observed by carbonyl assay and lipid peroxidation assay respectively. We have also investigated the mode of interaction of ibuprofen with calf thymus DNA through a series of in vitro experiments. UV-visible spectroscopy established the formation of a complex between ibuprofen and Ct DNA. The steady state fluorescence experiments at different temperatures revealed a binding constant of ∼10(4) L mol(-1), which is indicative of intercalative binding between ibuprofen and the DNA helix. Analysis of the various thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS calculated at different temperatures indicated that the hydrogen bonds played a major role in the interaction. The intercalative binding mode is further confirmed by competitive displacement assays, urea denaturation, iodide quenching, viscosity measurements and CD analysis. In silico molecular docking revealed the binding of ibuprofen within the GC base pairs of DNA, confirming the intercalative binding mode.

  7. Anion-exchanged nanosolid support of magnetic nanoparticle in combination with PNA probes for DNA sequence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theppaleak, T.; Rutnakornpituk, M.; Wichai, U.; Vilaivan, T.; Rutnakornpituk, B.

    2013-12-01

    Poly((2-diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (poly(DEAEMA))-grafted magnetite nanoparticle (MNP) with a positively charged surface was used as an anion exchanger for detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences by employing peptide nucleic acid (PNA) as a probe. The cationic MNP with a size ranging between 6 and 10 nm in diameter can electrostatically adsorb DNA with a capacity of 171 nmol nucleotide/g MNP. The electrostatically neutral pyrrolidinyl PNA-bearing prolyl-2-aminocyclopentane carboxylic acid backbone (acpcPNA) can be adsorbed by the cationic MNP only when the sequence of the PNA and DNA is complementary, and the presence of adsorbed PNA could be examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Two DNA sequences, the sequence stimulating Kirsten Rat Sarcoma ( K- ras) gene and the sequence having 5' methylated CpG site, were used in this study. It was found that the particles can be used as nanosolid support to differentiate between complementary and single-base mismatched DNA sequences using both single and two acpcPNA probes. This polymer-grafted MNP might be applicable for use as a magnetically guidable tool for detection of real DNA samples in the future.

  8. SMART amplification combined with cDNA size fractionation in order to obtain large full-length clones

    PubMed Central

    Wellenreuther, Ruth; Schupp, Ingo; Poustka, Annemarie; Wiemann, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Background cDNA libraries are widely used to identify genes and splice variants, and as a physical resource for full-length clones. Conventionally-generated cDNA libraries contain a high percentage of 5'-truncated clones. Current library construction methods that enrich for full-length mRNA are laborious, and involve several enzymatic steps performed on mRNA, which renders them sensitive to RNA degradation. The SMART technique for full-length enrichment is robust but results in limited cDNA insert size of the library. Results We describe a method to construct SMART full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large insert sizes. Sub-libraries were generated from size-fractionated cDNA with an average insert size of up to seven kb. The percentage of full-length clones was calculated for different size ranges from BLAST results of over 12,000 5'ESTs. Conclusions The presented technique is suitable to generate full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large average insert sizes in a straightforward and robust way. The representation of full-coding clones is high also for large cDNAs (70%, 4–10 kb), when high-quality starting mRNA is used. PMID:15198809

  9. SMART amplification combined with cDNA size fractionation in order to obtain large full-length clones.

    PubMed

    Wellenreuther, Ruth; Schupp, Ingo; Poustka, Annemarie; Wiemann, Stefan

    2004-06-15

    cDNA libraries are widely used to identify genes and splice variants, and as a physical resource for full-length clones. Conventionally-generated cDNA libraries contain a high percentage of 5'-truncated clones. Current library construction methods that enrich for full-length mRNA are laborious, and involve several enzymatic steps performed on mRNA, which renders them sensitive to RNA degradation. The SMART technique for full-length enrichment is robust but results in limited cDNA insert size of the library. We describe a method to construct SMART full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large insert sizes. Sub-libraries were generated from size-fractionated cDNA with an average insert size of up to seven kb. The percentage of full-length clones was calculated for different size ranges from BLAST results of over 12,000 5'ESTs. The presented technique is suitable to generate full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large average insert sizes in a straightforward and robust way. The representation of full-coding clones is high also for large cDNAs (70%, 4-10 kb), when high-quality starting mRNA is used.

  10. Multi-spectroscopic methods combined with molecular modeling dissect the interaction mechanisms of ractopamine and calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jun; Wang, Juyuan; Xu, Qifei; Hao, Fang; Liu, Rutao

    2012-07-06

    The toxic interaction of ractopamine (RAC) with calf thymus DNA (ct DNA) was studied in vitro using multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling methods. The hypochromic effect without a noticeable shift in UV-vis absorption indicated that the minor groove binding mode existed in the interaction between RAC and DNA. The fluorescence quenching of RAC was observed with the increasing addition of DNA and was proved to be the static quenching. The binding constant and the binding site sizes were 4.13 × 10(3) and 0.97, respectively. The thermodynamic calculation demonstrated that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals were main acting forces. This result further confirmed the existence of groove binding mode. Afterwards, we found another interaction mode, electrostatic binding mode through the fluorescence polarization, ionic effects and denatured DNA experiments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was then employed to monitor the conformation changes of DNA. Molecular modeling studies illustrated the visual display of the binding mode and the detailed information of the H-bond.

  11. One simple DNA extraction device and its combination with modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid on-field detection of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Yinan; Chen, Lili; Quan, Sheng; Jiang, Shimeng; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-02

    Quickness, simplicity, and effectiveness are the three major criteria for establishing a good molecular diagnosis method in many fields. Herein we report a novel detection system for genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which can be utilized to perform both on-field quick screening and routine laboratory diagnosis. In this system, a newly designed inexpensive DNA extraction device was used in combination with a modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (vLAMP) assay. The main parts of the DNA extraction device included a silica gel membrane filtration column and a modified syringe. The DNA extraction device could be easily operated without using other laboratory instruments, making it applicable to an on-field GMO test. High-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and isothermal amplification could be quickly isolated from plant tissues using this device within 15 min. In the modified vLAMP assay, a microcrystalline wax encapsulated detection bead containing SYBR green fluorescent dye was introduced to avoid dye inhibition and cross-contaminations from post-LAMP operation. The system was successfully applied and validated in screening and identification of GM rice, soybean, and maize samples collected from both field testing and the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) proficiency test program, which demonstrated that it was well-adapted to both on-field testing and/or routine laboratory analysis of GMOs.

  12. Activity of Levofloxacin Alone and in Combination with a DnaK Inhibitor against Gram-Negative Rods, Including Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml). PMID:19015359

  13. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    MedlinePlus

    ... to another if they share a towel or toys. Parents and others often ask if molluscum virus ... it can spread by sharing swimming equipment, pool toys, or towels. Some investigations report that spread of ...

  14. Pooling and Correlated Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Robert J.; Trousdale, James; Josić, Krešimir

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between spike trains can strongly modulate neuronal activity and affect the ability of neurons to encode information. Neurons integrate inputs from thousands of afferents. Similarly, a number of experimental techniques are designed to record pooled cell activity. We review and generalize a number of previous results that show how correlations between cells in a population can be amplified and distorted in signals that reflect their collective activity. The structure of the underlying neuronal response can significantly impact correlations between such pooled signals. Therefore care needs to be taken when interpreting pooled recordings, or modeling networks of cells that receive inputs from large presynaptic populations. We also show that the frequently observed runaway synchrony in feedforward chains is primarily due to the pooling of correlated inputs. PMID:20485451

  15. The Synergistic Effect of Combined Immunization with a DNA Vaccine and Chimeric Yellow Fever/Dengue Virus Leads to Strong Protection against Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Adriana S.; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Archer, Marcia; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E) is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2) and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2). The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:23472186

  16. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Adriana S; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Archer, Marcia; Freire, Marcos S; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M B

    2013-01-01

    The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E) is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2) and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2). The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  17. DNA Polymerases η and ζ Combine to Bypass O(2)-[4-(3-Pyridyl)-4-oxobutyl]thymine, a DNA Adduct Formed from Tobacco Carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Gowda, A S Prakasha; Spratt, Thomas E

    2016-03-21

    4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are important human carcinogens in tobacco products. They are metabolized to produce a variety 4-(3-pyridyl)-4-oxobutyl (POB) DNA adducts including O(2)-[4-(3-pyridyl)-4-oxobut-1-yl]thymidine (O(2)-POB-dT), the most abundant POB adduct in NNK- and NNN-treated rodents. To evaluate the mutagenic properties of O(2)-POB-dT, we measured the rate of insertion of dNTPs opposite and extension past O(2)-POB-dT and O(2)-Me-dT by purified human DNA polymerases η, κ, ι, and yeast polymerase ζ in vitro. Under conditions of polymerase in excess, polymerase η was most effective at the insertion of dNTPs opposite O(2)-alkyl-dTs. The time courses were biphasic suggesting the formation of inactive DNA-polymerase complexes. The kpol parameter was reduced approximately 100-fold in the presence of the adduct for pol η, κ, and ι. Pol η was the most reactive polymerase for the adducts due to a higher burst amplitude. For all three polymerases, the nucleotide preference was dATP > dTTP ≫ dGTP and dCTP. Yeast pol ζ was most effective in bypassing the adducts; the kcat/Km values were reduced only 3-fold in the presence of the adducts. The identity of the nucleotide opposite the O(2)-alkyl-dT did not significantly affect the ability of pol ζ to bypass the adducts. The data support a model in which pol η inserts ATP or dTTP opposite O(2)-POB-dT, and then, pol ζ extends past the adduct.

  18. Taxonomic Confusion Permits the Unchecked Invasion of Vernal Pools in California by Glyceria declinata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chloroplast DNA molecular markers and recently established morphological characters were used to confirm the widespread invasion of California's vernal pools by European low Glyceria (Glyceria declinata). Morphological similarities between low Glyceria and western mannagrass (Glyceria occidentalis)...

  19. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    The thesis work focusses upon two aspects of DNA, the polymer and the molecular code. Our approach was to bring single molecule micromanipulation methods to the study of DNA. It included a home built optical microscope combined with an atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer. This combined approach led to a novel method to graft a single DNA molecule onto a force cantilever using the optical tweezer and local heating. With this method, a force versus extension assay of double stranded DNA was realized. The resolution was about 10 picoN. To improve on this force measurement resolution, a simple light backscattering technique was developed and used to probe the DNA polymer flexibility and its fluctuations. It combined the optical tweezer to trap a DNA tethered bead and the laser backscattering to detect the beads Brownian fluctuations. With this technique the resolution was about 0.1 picoN with a millisecond access time, and the whole entropic part of the DNA force-extension was measured. With this experimental strategy, we measured the polymerization of the protein RecA on an isolated double stranded DNA. We observed the progressive decoration of RecA on the l DNA molecule, which results in the extension of l , due to unwinding of the double helix. The dynamics of polymerization, the resulting change in the DNA entropic elasticity and the role of ATP hydrolysis were the main parts of the study. A simple model for RecA assembly on DNA was proposed. This work presents a first step in the study of genetic recombination. Recently we have started a study of equilibrium binding which utilizes fluorescence polarization methods to probe the polymerization of RecA on single stranded DNA. In addition to the study of material properties of DNA and DNA-RecA, we have developed experiments for which the code of the DNA is central. We studied one aspect of DNA as a molecular code, using different techniques. In particular the programmatic use of template specificity makes

  20. Controls on Filling and Evacuation of Sediment in Waterfall Plunge Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Many waterfalls are characterized by the presence of deep plunge pools that experience periods of sediment fill and evacuation. These cycles of sediment fill are a first order control on the relative magnitude of lateral versus vertical erosion at the base of waterfalls, as vertical incision requires cover-free plunge pools to expose the bedrock floor, while lateral erosion can occur when pools are partially filled and plunge-pool walls are exposed. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model describing sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools, limiting our ability to predict waterfall retreat. To address this knowledge gap, we performed detailed laboratory experiments measuring plunge-pool sediment transport capacity (Qsc_pool) under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. Our experimental plunge-pool sediment transport capacity measurements match well with a mechanistic model we developed which combines existing waterfall jet theory with a modified Rouse profile to predict sediment transport capacity as a function of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration at the plunge-pool lip. Comparing the transport capacity of plunge pools to lower gradient portions of rivers (Qsc_river) shows that, for transport limited conditions, plunge pools fill with sediment under modest water discharges when Qsc_river > Qsc_pool, and empty to bedrock under high discharges when Qsc_pool > Qsc_river. These results are consistent with field observations of sand-filled plunge pools with downstream boulder rims, implying filling and excavation of plunge pools over single-storm timescales. Thus, partial filling of waterfall plunge pools may provide a mechanism to promote lateral undercutting and retreat of waterfalls in homogeneous rock in which plunge-pool vertical incision occurs during brief large floods that expose bedrock, whereas lateral erosion may prevail during smaller events.

  1. Sequence analysis of pooled bacterial samples enables identification of strain variation in group A streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Weldatsadik, Rigbe G.; Wang, Jingwen; Puhakainen, Kai; Jiao, Hong; Jalava, Jari; Räisänen, Kati; Datta, Neeta; Skoog, Tiina; Vuopio, Jaana; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; Kere, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the genomic variation among different strains of a pathogenic microbial species can help in selecting optimal candidates for diagnostic assays and vaccine development. Pooled sequencing (Pool-seq) is a cost effective approach for population level genetic studies that require large numbers of samples such as various strains of a microbe. To test the use of Pool-seq in identifying variation, we pooled DNA of 100 Streptococcus pyogenes strains of different emm types in two pools, each containing 50 strains. We used four variant calling tools (Freebayes, UnifiedGenotyper, SNVer, and SAMtools) and one emm1 strain, SF370, as a reference genome. In total 63719 SNPs and 164 INDELs were identified in the two pools concordantly by at least two of the tools. Majority of the variants (93.4%) from six individually sequenced strains used in the pools could be identified from the two pools and 72.3% and 97.4% of the variants in the pools could be mined from the analysis of the 44 complete Str. pyogenes genomes and 3407 sequence runs deposited in the European Nucleotide Archive respectively. We conclude that DNA sequencing of pooled samples of large numbers of bacterial strains is a robust, rapid and cost-efficient way to discover sequence variation. PMID:28361960

  2. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  3. Formation of the southern Bay of Bengal cold pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Umasankar; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Behara, Ambica

    2016-09-01

    A pool of relatively cooler water, called here as the southern Bay of Bengal cold pool, exists around Sri Lanka and southern tip of India during the summer monsoon. This cold pool is enveloped by the larger Indian Ocean warm pool and is believed to affect the intraseasonal variations of summer monsoon rainfall. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the formation of the cold pool using a combination of both satellite data sets and a general circulation model of the Indian Ocean. Sea surface temperature (SST) within the cold pool, after the steady increase during the February-April period, decreases first during a pre-monsoon spell in April and then with the monsoon onset during May. The onset cooling is stronger (~1.8°C) than the pre-monsoon cooling (~0.8°C) and culminates in the formation of the cold pool. Analysis of the model temperature equation shows that SST decrease during both events is primarily due to a decrease in incoming solar radiation and an increase in latent heat loss. These changes in the net heat flux are brought about by the arrival of cloud bands above the cold pool during both periods. During the pre-monsoon period, a cloud band originates in the western equatorial Indian Ocean and subsequently arrives above the cold pool. Similarly, during the monsoon onset, a band of clouds originating in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean comes over the cold pool region. A lead-lag correlation calculation between daily SST and rainfall anomalies suggest that cooling in SST occurs in response to rainfall events with a lag of 5 days. These sequence of events occur every year with certain amount of interannual variability.

  4. Enhanced Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Delivered with Electroporation via Combined Intramuscular and Intradermal Routes

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Paul F.; Fiserova, Anezka; Klein, Katja; Cope, Alethea; Rogers, Paul; Swales, Julie; Seaman, Michael S.; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is accepted that an effective prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine is likely to have the greatest impact on viral transmission rates. As previous reports have implicated DNA-priming, protein boost regimens to be efficient activators of humoral responses, we sought to optimize this regimen to further augment vaccine immunogenicity. Here we evaluated single versus concurrent intradermal (i.d.) and intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinations as a DNA-priming strategy for their abilities to elicit humoral and cellular responses against a model HIV-1 vaccine antigen, CN54-gp140. To further augment vaccine-elicited T and B cell responses, we enhanced cellular transfection with electroporation and then boosted the DNA-primed responses with homologous protein delivered subcutaneously (s.c.), intranasally (i.n.), i.m., or transcutaneously (t.c.). In mice, the concurrent priming regimen resulted in significantly elevated gamma interferon T cell responses and high-avidity antigen-specific IgG B cell responses, a hallmark of B cell maturation. Protein boosting of the concurrent DNA strategy further enhanced IgG concentrations but had little impact on T cell reactivity. Interestingly protein boosting by the subcutaneous route increased antibody avidity to a greater extent than protein boosting by either the i.m., i.n., or t.c. route, suggesting that this route may be preferential for driving B cell maturation. Using an alternative and larger animal model, the rabbit, we found the concurrent DNA-priming strategy followed by s.c. protein boosting to again be capable of eliciting high-avidity humoral responses and to also be able to neutralize HIV-1 pseudoviruses from diverse clades (clades A, B, and C). Taken together, we show that concurrent multiple-route DNA vaccinations induce strong cellular immunity, in addition to potent and high-avidity humoral immune responses. IMPORTANCE The route of vaccination has profound effects on prevailing immune responses. Due to the insufficient

  5. In-Frame cDNA Library Combined with Protein Complementation Assay Identifies ARL11-Binding Partners

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, Ilkyun; Jung, Yoonsuh; McConkey, David; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5′-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an “in-frame cDNA library.” We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11), cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1). Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5′-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems. PMID:23272234

  6. In-frame cDNA library combined with protein complementation assay identifies ARL11-binding partners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, Ilkyun; Jung, Yoonsuh; McConkey, David; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5'-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an "in-frame cDNA library." We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11), cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1). Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5'-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems.

  7. Immunogenicity of a DNA and Recombinant Protein Vaccine Combining LipL32 and Loa22 for Leptospirosis Using Chitosan as a Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Umthong, Supawadee; Buaklin, Arun; Jacquet, Alain; Sangjun, Noppadol; Kerdkaew, Ruthairat; Patarakul, Kanitha; Palaga, Tanapat

    2015-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira, a genus of which more than 250 serovars have been identified. Commercial bacterin vaccines are limited in that they lack both cross-protection against heterologous serovars and long-term protection. This study investigated in mice the immunogenicity of an anti-leptospirosis vaccine, using the outer membrane proteins LipL32 and Loa22 as antigens. The immunogenicity of this vaccine formulation was compared with those induced by vaccines based on LipL32 or Loa22 alone. A DNA-encapsulated chitosan nanoparticle was used for in vivo DNA delivery. Using a unique DNA plasmid expressing both lipL32 and loa22 for vaccination, higher antibody responses were induced than when combining plasmids harboring each gene separately. Therefore, this formulation was used to test the immunogenicity when administered by a heterologous prime (DNA)-boost (protein) immunization regimen. The specific antibody responses against LipL32 (total IgG and IgG1) and Loa22 (IgG1) were higher in mice receiving two antigens in combination than in those vaccinated with a single antigen alone. Although no significant difference in splenic CD4+ T cell proliferation was observed among all groups of vaccinated mice, splenocytes from mice vaccinated with two antigens exhibited higher interferon-γ and IL-2 production than when using single antigens alone upon in vitro restimulation. Taken together, the immunogenicity induced by LipL32 and Loa22 antigens in a heterologous primeboost immunization regimen using chitosan as a DNA delivery system induces higher immune response, and may be useful for developing a better vaccine for leptospirosis.

  8. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42-44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica.

  9. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42–44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  10. Goji Berry: Quality Assessment and Crop Adaptation of Plants Cultivated in Tuscany (Italy) by Combination of Carotenoid and DNA Analyses.

    PubMed

    Capecchi, Giada; Goti, Emanuele; Nicolai, Elena; Bergonzi, Maria Camilla; Monnanni, Roberto; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2015-06-01

    In this study HPLC analysis for the evaluation of carotenoids and DNA barcoding are reported for three different samples of Lycium cultivated in Tuscany (Italy). These two analytical methods can represent integrative methods for quality control of goji, giving also crucial information on the plant adaptation to different environments. Hence, carotenoids represent the quality markers proposed by the monograph of the European Pharmacopoeia, while DNA barcoding can differentiate between species and populations and is useful for the detection of the homogeneity of the samples.

  11. DNA damage following combination of radiation with the bioreductive drug AQ4N: possible selective toxicity to oxic and hypoxic tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hejmadi, M. V.; McKeown, S. R.; Friery, O. P.; McIntyre, I. A.; Patterson, L. H.; Hirst, D. G.

    1996-01-01

    AQ4N (1,4-bis-([2-(dimethylamino-N- oxide)ethyl]amino)5,8-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione) is a novel bioreductive agent that can be reduced to a stable, DNA-affinic compound, AQ4. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damage induced by AQ4N and radiation. Cells prepared from freshly excised T50/80 murine tumours were shown to have the ability to reduce AQ4N to a DNA-damaging agent; this had disappeared within 24 h of excision. When T50/80 tumours implanted in BDF mice were exposed to radiation in vivo a considerable amount of DNA damage was present in tumours excised immediately. Minimal levels of DNA damage were detectable in tumours excised after 2-5 h. AQ4N given 30 min before radiation had no appreciable influence on this effect and AQ4N alone caused only a small amount of damage. When AQ4N and radiation were combined an increasing number of damaged cells were seen in tumours excised 24-96 h after irradiation. This was interpreted as evidence of the continued presence of AQ4, or AQ4-induced damage, which was formed in cells hypoxic at the time of administration of AQ4N. AQ4, a potent topoisomerase II inhibitor, would be capable of damaging cells recruited into the cell cycle following radiation damage to the well-oxygenated cells of the tumour. The kinetics of the expression of the DNA damage is consistent with this hypothesis and shows that AQ4 has persistent activity in vivo. PMID:8595165

  12. The combined effects of BDE47 and BaP on oxidatively generated DNA damage in L02 cells and the possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    An, Jing; Yin, Lingling; Shang, Yu; Zhong, Yufang; Zhang, Xinyu; Wu, Minghong; Yu, Zhiqiang; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Huang, Yuecheng

    2011-04-03

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) coexist widely in the environment and have generated adverse effects on the environment and human health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined toxic effects of these chemicals and the related mechanism. L02 cells were exposed to BDE47 (5, 10μmol/L) or/and BaP (50μmol/L) in different administration order. The cell growth and survival, DNA strand breaks, oxidative stress index (ROS, SOD, GSH, and MDA), LDH release and the expression level of CYP1 family members were measured. The result showed that BDE47 or/and BaP had no effect on the cell growth and survival under the present conditions. However, compared with the groups treated with BDE47 or BaP alone, the combined-treated groups induced significantly elevated DNA strand breaks, ROS production, and MDA level. Especially, pretreatment with BDE47 followed by BaP led to the strongest effects. Addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) markedly reduced the ROS level and partly suppressed the DNA strand breaks induced by BDE47 or/and BaP. Meanwhile, the combined treatment groups also markedly increased the SOD activity, GSH content, and LDH release level compared with the control group. The real-time PCR results showed that BaP could significantly induce the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, however, the pre-treatment with BDE47 appeared to attenuate the BaP-induced CYP1 expression. All of above findings indicated that BDE47 and BaP had a synergistic effect on oxidatively generated DNA damage in L02 cells via regulation on the oxidative stress response and the expression of CYP1 metabolism enzymes.

  13. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David R.; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP) and a slowly releasable (SRP) pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation, and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles. PMID:21423410

  14. poolHiTS: A Shifted Transversal Design based pooling strategy for high-throughput drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Kainkaryam, Raghunandan M; Woolf, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Background A key goal of drug discovery is to increase the throughput of small molecule screens without sacrificing screening accuracy. High-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery involves testing a large number of compounds in a biological assay to identify active compounds. Normally, molecules from a large compound library are tested individually to identify the activity of each molecule. Usually a small number of compounds are found to be active, however the presence of false positive and negative testing errors suggests that this one-drug one-assay screening strategy can be significantly improved. Pooling designs are testing schemes that test mixtures of compounds in each assay, thereby generating a screen of the whole compound library in fewer tests. By repeatedly testing compounds in different combinations, pooling designs also allow for error-correction. These pooled designs, for specific experiment parameters, can be simply and efficiently created using the Shifted Transversal Design (STD) pooling algorithm. However, drug screening contains a number of key constraints that require specific modifications if this pooling approach is to be useful for practical screen designs. Results In this paper, we introduce a pooling strategy called poolHiTS (Pooled High-Throughput Screening) which is based on the STD algorithm. In poolHiTS, we implement a limit on the number of compounds that can be mixed in a single assay. In addition, we show that the STD-based pooling strategy is limited in the error-correction that it can achieve. Due to the mixing constraint, we show that it is more efficient to split a large library into smaller blocks of compounds, which are then tested using an optimized strategy repeated for each block. We package the optimal block selection algorithm into poolHiTS. The MATLAB codes for the poolHiTS algorithm and the corresponding decoding strategy are also provided. Conclusion We have produced a practical version of STD algorithm for

  15. Incorporating incorporating economic models into seasonal pool conservation planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Robert C.; Bell, Kathleen P.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Loftin, Cyndy

    2012-01-01

    Massachusetts, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Maine have adopted regulatory zones around seasonal (vernal) pools to conserve terrestrial habitat for pool-breeding amphibians. Most amphibians require access to distinct seasonal habitats in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems because of their complex life histories. These habitat requirements make them particularly vulnerable to land uses that destroy habitat or limit connectivity (or permeability) among habitats. Regulatory efforts focusing on breeding pools without consideration of terrestrial habitat needs will not ensure the persistence of pool-breeding amphibians. We used GIS to combine a discrete-choice, parcel-scale economic model of land conversion with a landscape permeability model based on known habitat requirements of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in Maine (USA) to examine permeability among habitat elements for alternative future scenarios. The economic model predicts future landscapes under different subdivision open space and vernal pool regulatory requirements. Our model showed that even “no build” permit zones extending 76 m (250 ft) outward from the pool edge were insufficient to assure permeability among required habitat elements. Furthermore, effectiveness of permit zones may be inconsistent due to interactions with other growth management policies, highlighting the need for local and state planning for the long-term persistence of pool-breeding amphibians in developing landscapes.

  16. 3D finite element simulation of TIG weld pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Asserin, O.; Gounand, S.; Gilles, P.; Bergheau, J. M.; Medale, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a three-dimensional weld pool model for the moving gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, in order to understand the main factors that limit the weld quality and improve the productivity, especially with respect to the welding speed. Simulation is a very powerful tool to help in understanding the physical phenomena in the weld process. A 3D finite element model of heat and fluid flow in weld pool considering free surface of the pool and traveling speed has been developed for the GTAW process. Cast3M software is used to compute all the governing equations. The free surface of the weld pool is calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. The combined effects of surface tension gradient, buoyancy force, arc pressure, arc drag force to drive the fluid flow is included in our model. The deformation of the weld pool surface and the welding speed affect fluid flow, heat flow and thus temperature gradients and molten pool dimensions. Welding trials study is presented to compare our numerical results with macrograph of the molten pool.

  17. Improved single laser measurement of two cellular antigens and DNA-ploidy by the combined use of propidium iodide and TO-PRO-3 iodide.

    PubMed

    Corver, W E; Fleuren, G J; Cornelisse, C J

    1997-08-01

    Recently, Frey (Cytometry 17:310-318, 1994) demonstrated that TO-PRO-3 iodide (TP3) can be excited indirectly by a 488 nm laser line through energy transfer by propidium iodide (PI). In the present study, we investigated whether PI-TP3 energy transfer can help to overcome spectral cross talk problems associated with the combined use of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), R-phycoerythrin (PE), and PI. Mixtures of keratin 8/18 FITC-labeled, keratin 8/18-PE-labeled, and unlabeled MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells were prepared and stained for DNA with PI (100 microM). The effect of adding a range of TP3 concentrations (0.001 to 16 microM) to these mixtures was evaluated. The combined use of PI and TP3 was further evaluated using mixtures of unlabeled and p53 FITC-labeled COV362.cl4 ovarian cancer cells and mixtures of unlabeled and p53 FITC-labeled COV362.cl4 cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), additionally stained for keratin 8/18 (PE). Finally, a human ovarian ascites tumor specimen was triple-stained for keratin 8/18 (PE), vimentin (FITC) and DNA or keratin 8/18 (PE), PCNA (FITC) and DNA. Addition of TP3 allowed complete correction for spectral cross talk of PE/PI into the green fluorescence detector (FL1). Only minimal (FL1 - %FL2) compensation was required at a TP3 concentration of 2.0 microM in the presence of PI (100 microM). The PI spectral cross talk into the orange fluorescence detector (FL2) was reduced by about 50% using the same photomultiplier (PMT) settings. Although addition of TP3 reduced the signal-to-background ratio by about 30%, the advantage gained through full compensation for spectral cross talk resulted in an improved discrimination of p53-positive and -negative subpopulations in a mixture of human PBL and COV362.cl4 cells. Furthermore, vimentin-negative and PCNA-negative cells were better resolved in a human DNA-aneuploid ovarian ascites tumor after staining the DNA with PI/TP3, rather than with PI alone. We conclude that the addition of

  18. Fetal Gene Therapy for Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency by Intrahepatic Plasmid DNA-Micro-Bubble Injection Combined with Hepatic Ultrasound Insonation.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshie; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yuan, Wenji; Kuno, Shuichi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of hepatic transfection of plasmid DNA using micro-bubbles and ultrasound insonation for fetal correction of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency in mice. Twenty-three sparse-fur heterozygous pregnant mice (day 16 of gestation) were divided into three groups: injection of plasmid-DNA micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with ultrasound insonation (Tr, n = 11); control group 1 (C1), injection of plasmid-DNA micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with no insonation (n = 5); and control group 2 (C2), injection of saline-micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with ultrasound insonation (n = 7). Levels of blood ammonia and urinary orotic acid were significantly lower in the Tr group than in the C1 and C2 groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively), whereas OTC activity was not different between groups. Therefore, ultrasound insonation with micro-bubbles enhanced plasmid DNA transfection into fetal mouse liver, leading to one of the therapeutic methods in ammonia metabolism. This might provide more time for OTC-deficient infants until liver transplantation.

  19. ITS2 barcoding DNA region combined with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis of Hyoscyami Semen, the mature seed of Hyoscyamus niger.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Hu, Zhi-Gang; Tu, Yuan; Liu, He-Gang; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Ming-Ming; SHIi, Yu-Hua; Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2016-12-01

    Hyoscyami Semen, the mature dried seed of Hyoscyamus niger L., has long been used as a traditional Chinese medicine to treat human diseases. Hyoscyami Semen is found in local markets in China. In markets, sellers and buyers commonly inadvertently mix the seeds of H. niger with the seeds of related species such as Hygrophila salicifolia (Vahl) Nees, Astragalus complanatus R. Br., Cuscuta australis R. Br., Cuscuta chinensis Lam., and Impatiens balsamina L. because of their similar morphologies or similar names. Thus, developing a reliable method for discriminating H. niger seeds from its adulterants is necessary to reduce confusion and ensure the safe use of Hyoscyami Semen. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of high-resolution melting analysis combined with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) with internal transcribed spacer 2 to discriminate H. niger. Our results show that Bar-HRM successfully identified the adulterants and detected the proportion of H. niger DNA extract within an admixture. In particular, HRM detected H. niger DNA extract in A. complanatus DNA extract at concentrations as low as 1%. In conclusion, the Bar-HRM method developed in the present study for authenticating H. niger is rapid and cost-effective. It can be used in the future to guarantee the purity of Hyoscyami Semen for the clinical use.

  20. Salt-mediated electrostatics in the association of TATA binding proteins to DNA: a combined molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann study.

    PubMed

    Bredenberg, Johan H; Russo, Cristina; Fenley, Marcia O

    2008-06-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a key component of the archaea ternary preinitiation transcription assembly. The archaeon TBP, from the halophile/hyperthermophile organism Pyrococcus woesei, is adapted to high concentrations of salt and high-temperature environments. Although most eukaryotic TBPs are mesophilic and adapted to physiological conditions of temperature and salt, they are very similar to their halophilic counterparts in sequence and fold. However, whereas the binding affinity to DNA of halophilic TBPs increases with increasing salt concentration, the opposite is observed for mesophilic TBPs. We investigated these differences in nonspecific salt-dependent DNA-binding behavior of halophilic and mesophilic TBPs by using a combined molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann approach. Our results are qualitatively in good agreement with experimentally observed salt-dependent DNA-binding for mesophilic and halophilic TBPs, and suggest that the distribution and the total number of charged residues may be the main underlying contributor in the association process. Therefore, the difference in the salt-dependent binding behavior of mesophilic and halophilic TBPs to DNA may be due to the very unique charge and electrostatic potential distribution of these TBPs, which consequently alters the number of repulsive and attractive electrostatic interactions.

  1. Membrane Destruction and DNA Binding of Staphylococcus aureus Cells Induced by Carvacrol and Its Combined Effect with a Pulsed Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Gong, De-Ming; Huang, Yan-Bo

    2016-08-17

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol, CAR) is an antibacterial ingredient that occurs naturally in the leaves of the plant Origanum vulgare. The antimicrobial mechanism of CAR against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 was investigated in the study. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that exposure to CAR at low concentrations induced a marked increase in the level of unbranched fatty acids (from 34.90 ± 1.77% to 62.37 ± 4.26%). Moreover, CAR at higher levels severely damaged the integrity and morphologies of the S. aureus cell membrane. The DNA-binding properties of CAR were also investigated using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and atomic-force microscopy. The results showed that CAR bound to DNA via the minor-groove mode, mildly perturbed the DNA secondary structure, and induced DNA molecules to be aggregated. Furthermore, a combination of CAR with a pulsed-electric field was found to exhibit strong synergistic effects on S. aureus.

  2. Cooperative binding of PhoB(DBD) to its cognate DNA sequence-a combined application of single-molecule and ensemble methods.

    PubMed

    Ritzefeld, Markus; Walhorn, Volker; Kleineberg, Christin; Bieker, Adeline; Kock, Klaus; Herrmann, Christian; Anselmetti, Dario; Sewald, Norbert

    2013-11-19

    A combined approach based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was applied to elucidate the mechanism of protein-DNA complex formation and the impact of protein dimerization of the DNA-binding domain of PhoB (PhoB(DBD)). These insights can be translated to related members of the family of winged helix-turn-helix proteins. One central question was the assembly of the trimeric complex formed by two molecules of PhoB(DBD) and two cognate binding sites of a single oligonucleotide. In addition to the native protein WT-PhoB(DBD), semisynthetic covalently linked dimers with different linker lengths were studied. The ITC, SPR, FRET, and CD results indicate a positive cooperative binding mechanism and a decisive contribution of dimerization on the complex stability. Furthermore, an alanine scan was performed and binding of the corresponding point mutants was analyzed by both techniques to discriminate between different binding types involved in the protein-DNA interaction and to compare the information content of the two methods DFS and SPR. In light of the published crystal structure, four types of contribution to the recognition process of the pho box by the protein PhoB(DBD) could be differentiated and quantified. Consequently, it could be shown that investigating the interactions between DNA and proteins with complementary techniques is necessary to fully understand the corresponding recognition process.

  3. Development of a 24-locus multiplex system to incorporate the core loci in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and the European Standard Set (ESS).

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Shen, Hongying; Tian, Huaizhou; Jin, Ping; Jiang, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    The 24-locus multiplex system allows co-amplification and fluorescent detection of 24 loci (23 STR loci and Amelogenin), including STR loci in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and the ESS (European Standard Set) as well as five additional loci (D2S1338, D6S1043, D19S433, Penta D and Penta E) commonly used in commercial kits. It facilitates data sharing and minimizes adventitious matches within national or between international DNA databases. Additionally, the system can amplify directly from blood and buccal samples spotted on filter paper and swabs and reduce the cycling time to less than one hour and a half. Primers, internal size standard, allelic ladders and matrix standard set were designed and created in-house with a design strategy to work in this multiplex. Developmental validation experiments followed the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) and the Chinese National Standard (GA/T815-2009) guidelines. The system was evaluated by species specificity, sensitivity, stability, precision and accuracy, case-type samples, population, mixture and PCR-based studies. The results demonstrate that the 24-locus multiplex system is a robust and reliable identification assay as required for forensic DNA typing and databasing.

  4. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  5. Differentiation of toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in staphylococcal isolates from prepared and frozen foods by combined arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction and DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Maria G; Jordano, Rafael; Aranda, Emilio; Benito, Maria J; Córdoba, Juan J

    2003-06-01

    In prepared and frozen flamenquín and hake fish fingers Staphylococcus aureus as sanitary hazards have been detected. In the present work, a combined method that includes an arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and a mixed DNA probe hybridisation designed for the enterotoxigenic genes sea, seb, sec, and sed will be assayed to differentiate enterotoxigenic S. aureus from other staphylococcal species isolated during the processing of prepared and frozen foods. From the protocols tested for the AP-PCR, the highest number of amplification bands showing the best resolution was achieved at 30 degrees C annealing and 35 degrees C extension temperatures. Several staphylococci identified by a biochemical test as S. aureus showed in the AP-PCR analysis different banding patterns to the references S. aureus. The isolates, were investigated by slot blot hybridisation for genes encoding A, B, C, and D staphylococcal enterotoxins to determine their enterotoxigenic potential. Several isolates characterised by the AP-PCR analysis as S. aureus hybridised with the DNA probe mixture. The combined AP-PCR and DNA probe hybridisation assayed was able to differentiate toxigenic S. aureus from other staphylococcal species from prepared and frozen foods. This method could be considered as microbial quality assurance in these products.

  6. Combination of 768-well microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis with duplex PCR of X and Y chromosome markers for quality control of epidemiological DNA banks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuwen; Chen, Xiao-he; Day, Ian N M

    2006-08-01

    Large DNA banks for human epidemiological studies have become an increasingly important research tool. The power of genotype-phenotype studies is dependent both on the quality of phenotyping and of genotyping and of correct linking of phenotypes to genotypes. Samples must be tracked through numerous steps between subject or patient and post-genotypic data. Only one phenotype, sex, has a perfect and binary correlation with genotype. In mixed sex studies, it may be advantageous for purposes of quality control to keep sexes mixed during the steps from acquisition to DNA bank, in order to be able to check later for sample swaps. We have designed a duplex PCR combining an amplicon from MAOA marking the X chromosome and an amplicon from DDX3Y marking the Y chromosome. We combined this with a simple economical palmtop sized 768-well microplate compatible electrophoresis system developed in-house for examination of duplex PCR products. We applied this quality control test in the validation of two DNA banks.

  7. Combination of interleukin-12 gene therapy, metronomic cyclophosphamide and DNA cancer vaccination directs all arms of the immune system towards tumor eradication.

    PubMed

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Van Audenho