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Sample records for combining dna pooling

  1. Using DNA pools for genotyping trios.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Kenneth B; Abel, Kenneth J; Braun, Andreas; Halperin, Eran

    2006-01-01

    The genotyping of mother-father-child trios is a very useful tool in disease association studies, as trios eliminate population stratification effects and increase the accuracy of haplotype inference. Unfortunately, the use of trios for association studies may reduce power, since it requires the genotyping of three individuals where only four independent haplotypes are involved. We describe here a method for genotyping a trio using two DNA pools, thus reducing the cost of genotyping trios to that of genotyping two individuals. Furthermore, we present extensions to the method that exploit the linkage disequilibrium structure to compensate for missing data and genotyping errors. We evaluated our method on trios from CEPH pedigree 66 of the Coriell Institute. We demonstrate that the error rates in the genotype calls of the proposed protocol are comparable to those of standard genotyping techniques, although the cost is reduced considerably. The approach described is generic and it can be applied to any genotyping platform that achieves a reasonable precision of allele frequency estimates from pools of two individuals. Using this approach, future trio-based association studies may be able to increase the sample size by 50% for the same cost and thereby increase the power to detect associations.

  2. Combination fence and solar heater for swimming pools

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, D.L.

    1981-07-28

    A combination fence and solar heater for swimming pools comprises a fence shaped for extending about the periphery of the pool to restrict ingress and egress therefrom. A tubular heat exchanger is formed in at least one section of the fence, includes an exterior surface adapted to absorb solar energy, and communicates with the water in the swimming pool. The number of heat exchanger fence sections can be varied in accordance with the climate in which the pool is located. A pump flows the water in the swimming pool through the heat exchanger fence sections during daylight hours, thereby simultaneously heating the water in the pool, and providing an attractive and protective safety barrier about the swimming pool.

  3. vipR: variant identification in pooled DNA using R

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Andre; Weber, Peter; Quast, Carina; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput-sequencing (HTS) technologies are the method of choice for screening the human genome for rare sequence variants causing susceptibility to complex diseases. Unfortunately, preparation of samples for a large number of individuals is still very cost- and labor intensive. Thus, recently, screens for rare sequence variants were carried out in samples of pooled DNA, in which equimolar amounts of DNA from multiple individuals are mixed prior to sequencing with HTS. The resulting sequence data, however, poses a bioinformatics challenge: the discrimination of sequencing errors from real sequence variants present at a low frequency in the DNA pool. Results: Our method vipR uses data from multiple DNA pools in order to compensate for differences in sequencing error rates along the sequenced region. More precisely, instead of aiming at discriminating sequence variants from sequencing errors, vipR identifies sequence positions that exhibit significantly different minor allele frequencies in at least two DNA pools using the Skellam distribution. The performance of vipR was compared with three other models on data from a targeted resequencing study of the TMEM132D locus in 600 individuals distributed over four DNA pools. Performance of the methods was computed on SNPs that were also genotyped individually using a MALDI-TOF technique. On a set of 82 sequence variants, vipR achieved an average sensitivity of 0.80 at an average specificity of 0.92, thus outperforming the reference methods by at least 0.17 in specificity at comparable sensitivity. Availability: The code of vipR is freely available via: http://sourceforge.net/projects/htsvipr/ Contact: altmann@mpipsykl.mpg.de PMID:21685105

  4. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism. PMID:16277552

  5. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  6. Genetic linkage analysis using pooled DNA and infrared detection of tailed STRP primer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetting, William S.; Wildenberg, Scott C.; King, Richard A.

    1996-04-01

    The mapping of a disease locus to a specific chromosomal region is an important step in the eventual isolation and analysis of a disease causing gene. Conventional mapping methods analyze large multiplex families and/or smaller nuclear families to find linkage between the disease and a chromosome marker that maps to a known chromosomal region. This analysis is time consuming and tedious, typically requiring the determination of 30,000 genotypes or more. For appropriate populations, we have instead utilized pooled DNA samples for gene mapping which greatly reduces the amount of time necessary for an initial chromosomal screen. This technique assumes a common founder for the disease locus of interest and searches for a region of a chromosome shared between affected individuals. Our analysis involves the PCR amplification of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRP) to detect these shared regions. In order to reduce the cost of genotyping, we have designed unlabeled tailed PCR primers which, when combined with a labeled universal primer, provides for an alternative to synthesizing custom labeled primers. The STRP pattern is visualized with an infrared fluorescence based automated DNA sequencer and the patterns quantitated by densitometric analysis of the allele pattern. Differences in the distribution of alleles between pools of affected and unaffected individuals, including a reduction in the number of alleles in the affected pool, indicate the sharing of a region of a chromosome. We have found this method effective for markers 10 - 15 cM away from the disease locus for a recessive genetic disease.

  7. Estimating the effect of SNP genotype on quantitative traits from pooled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies to detect associations between DNA markers and traits of interest in humans and livestock benefit from increasing the number of individuals genotyped. Performing association studies on pooled DNA samples can provide greater power for a given cost. For quantitative traits, the effect of an SNP is measured in the units of the trait and here we propose and demonstrate a method to estimate SNP effects on quantitative traits from pooled DNA data. Methods To obtain estimates of SNP effects from pooled DNA samples, we used logistic regression of estimated allele frequencies in pools on phenotype. The method was tested on a simulated dataset, and a beef cattle dataset using a model that included principal components from a genomic correlation matrix derived from the allele frequencies estimated from the pooled samples. The performance of the obtained estimates was evaluated by comparison with estimates obtained using regression of phenotype on genotype from individual samples of DNA. Results For the simulated data, the estimates of SNP effects from pooled DNA are similar but asymptotically different to those from individual DNA data. Error in estimating allele frequencies had a large effect on the accuracy of estimated SNP effects. For the beef cattle dataset, the principal components of the genomic correlation matrix from pooled DNA were consistent with known breed groups, and could be used to account for population stratification. Correctly modeling the contemporary group structure was essential to achieve estimates similar to those from individual DNA data, and pooling DNA from individuals within groups was superior to pooling DNA across groups. For a fixed number of assays, pooled DNA samples produced results that were more correlated with results from individual genotyping data than were results from one random individual assayed from each pool. Conclusions Use of logistic regression of allele frequency on phenotype makes it possible to estimate SNP

  8. Interval mapping of quantitative trait loci with selective DNA pooling data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Koehler, Kenneth J; Dekkers, Jack CM

    2007-01-01

    Selective DNA pooling is an efficient method to identify chromosomal regions that harbor quantitative trait loci (QTL) by comparing marker allele frequencies in pooled DNA from phenotypically extreme individuals. Currently used single marker analysis methods can detect linkage of markers to a QTL but do not provide separate estimates of QTL position and effect, nor do they utilize the joint information from multiple markers. In this study, two interval mapping methods for analysis of selective DNA pooling data were developed and evaluated. One was based on least squares regression (LS-pool) and the other on approximate maximum likelihood (ML-pool). Both methods simultaneously utilize information from multiple markers and multiple families and can be applied to different family structures (half-sib, F2 cross and backcross). The results from these two interval mapping methods were compared with results from single marker analysis by simulation. The results indicate that both LS-pool and ML-pool provided greater power to detect the QTL than single marker analysis. They also provide separate estimates of QTL location and effect. With large family sizes, both LS-pool and ML-pool provided similar power and estimates of QTL location and effect as selective genotyping. With small family sizes, however, the LS-pool method resulted in severely biased estimates of QTL location for distal QTL but this bias was reduced with the ML-pool. PMID:18053576

  9. Selective DNA Pooling for Determination of Linkage between a Molecular Marker and a Quantitative Trait Locus

    PubMed Central

    Darvasi, A.; Soller, M.

    1994-01-01

    Selective genotyping is a method to reduce costs in marker-quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage determination by genotyping only those individuals with extreme, and hence most informative, quantitative trait values. The DNA pooling strategy (termed: ``selective DNA pooling'') takes this one step further by pooling DNA from the selected individuals at each of the two phenotypic extremes, and basing the test for linkage on marker allele frequencies as estimated from the pooled samples only. This can reduce genotyping costs of marker-QTL linkage determination by up to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical analysis of selective DNA pooling shows that for experiments involving backcross, F(2) and half-sib designs, the power of selective DNA pooling for detecting genes with large effect, can be the same as that obtained by individual selective genotyping. Power for detecting genes with small effect, however, was found to decrease strongly with increase in the technical error of estimating allele frequencies in the pooled samples. The effect of technical error, however, can be markedly reduced by replication of technical procedures. It is also shown that a proportion selected of 0.1 at each tail will be appropriate for a wide range of experimental conditions. PMID:7896115

  10. DNA--a molecule in search of additional functions: recipient of pool wave emissions? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Almost the entire nucleotide sequence of human DNA is functionally unaccounted for, although large parts of the human genome are transcribed. The genes, as defined by current molecular biology, comprise about 1.5-2% of the DNA molecule. It is proposed that DNA encodes additional, hitherto unrecognized functions. In this discussion, the total information inside and outside the universe we live in is termed the pool or the sum total, known or unknown, of all laws, matter, energy, concepts and events. In a hypothetical model, a Gedankenexperiment, it is suggested that the total of all information emits pool waves of an unknown physical nature. They could be related to black energy or have completely different qualities. The designation pool waves should not imply any similarity to electromagnetism. Further, DNA is suggested to have the capability of interacting with the pool waves and thus permit humans - to some partly genetically determined and yet very limited extent - to perceive information from the pool. Pool emissions might be one of the forces that have been instrumental in and are still driving evolution from simple oligonucleotides to DNA with ever more complex recipient capacities. It will be a major challenge for researchers in the field to unravel these and less hypothetical undetected coding principles in DNA. It is uncertain whether the current trend to search the available DNA sequences with ever more refined computer technology on the basis of our present understanding of biology will detect unknown coding systems. For molecular medicine, research into the genetics of the most common human diseases could profit from the elucidation of presently still ephemeral codes in human DNA. Young scientists with a proven record of original research deserve support for the pursuit of unconventional ideas. This concept of granting priorities will be of the utmost importance in advancing the field beyond current concepts in molecular biology.

  11. Pneumocystis jirovecii multilocus genotyping in pooled DNA samples: a new approach for clinical and epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Gaspar, J; de Sousa, B; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Matos, O

    2012-06-01

    Specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are recognized as important DNA sequence variations influencing the pathogenesis of Pneumocystis jirovecii and the clinical outcome of Pneumocystis pneumonia, which is a major worldwide cause of illness among immunocompromised patients. Genotyping platforms for pooled DNA samples are promising methodologies for genetic characterization of infectious organisms. We have developed a new typing strategy for P. jirovecii, which consisted of DNA pools prepared according to clinical data (HIV diagnosis, microscopic and molecular detection of P. jirovecii, parasite burden, clinical diagnosis and follow-up of infection) from individual samples using quantitative real-time PCR followed by multiplex-PCR/single base extension (MPCR/SBE). The frequencies of multiple P. jirovecii SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215 and SOD110) encoded at three distinct loci, the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA) and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) loci, were estimated in seven DNA pooled samples, representing a total of 100 individual samples. The studied SNPs were confirmed to be associated with distinct clinical parameters of infection such as parasite burden and follow-up. The MPCR/SBE-DNA pooling methodology, described in the present study, was demonstrated to be a useful high-throughput procedure for large-scale P. jirovecii SNPs screening and a powerful tool for evaluation of clinically relevant SNPs potentially related to parasite burden, clinical diagnosis and follow-up of P. jirovecii infection. In further studies, the candidate SNPs mt85, SOD215 and SOD110 may be used as molecular markers in association with MPCR/SBE-DNA pooling to generate useful information for understanding the patterns and causes of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Replication Defects Disturb Cellular dNTP Pools and Remodel One-Carbon Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nikkanen, Joni; Forsström, Saara; Euro, Liliya; Paetau, Ilse; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Wang, Liya; Chilov, Dmitri; Viinamäki, Jenni; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Päivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Ahola, Sofia; Buzkova, Jana; Terzioglu, Mügen; Khan, Nahid A; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Paetau, Anders; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Sajantila, Antti; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna; Nomura, Daniel K; Battersby, Brendan J; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-04-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction affects cellular energy metabolism, but less is known about the consequences for cytoplasmic biosynthetic reactions. We report that mtDNA replication disorders caused by TWINKLE mutations-mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA)-remodel cellular dNTP pools in mice. MM muscle shows tissue-specific induction of the mitochondrial folate cycle, purine metabolism, and imbalanced and increased dNTP pools, consistent with progressive mtDNA mutagenesis. IOSCA-TWINKLE is predicted to hydrolyze dNTPs, consistent with low dNTP pools and mtDNA depletion in the disease. MM muscle also modifies the cytoplasmic one-carbon cycle, transsulfuration, and methylation, as well as increases glucose uptake and its utilization for de novo serine and glutathione biosynthesis. Our evidence indicates that the mitochondrial replication machinery communicates with cytoplasmic dNTP pools and that upregulation of glutathione synthesis through glucose-driven de novo serine biosynthesis contributes to the metabolic stress response. These results are important for disorders with primary or secondary mtDNA instability and offer targets for metabolic therapy. PMID:26924217

  13. A pooling-based approach to mapping genetic variants associated with DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Kaplow, Irene M; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; McEwen, Lisa M; Kobor, Michael S; Fraser, Hunter B

    2015-06-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a key role in gene regulation. Previous studies have investigated its genetic basis by mapping genetic variants that are associated with DNA methylation at specific sites, but these have been limited to microarrays that cover <2% of the genome and cannot account for allele-specific methylation (ASM). Other studies have performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on a few individuals, but these lack statistical power to identify variants associated with DNA methylation. We present a novel approach in which bisulfite-treated DNA from many individuals is sequenced together in a single pool, resulting in a truly genome-wide map of DNA methylation. Compared to methods that do not account for ASM, our approach increases statistical power to detect associations while sharply reducing cost, effort, and experimental variability. As a proof of concept, we generated deep sequencing data from a pool of 60 human cell lines; we evaluated almost twice as many CpGs as the largest microarray studies and identified more than 2000 genetic variants associated with DNA methylation. We found that these variants are highly enriched for associations with chromatin accessibility and CTCF binding but are less likely to be associated with traits indirectly linked to DNA, such as gene expression and disease phenotypes. In summary, our approach allows genome-wide mapping of genetic variants associated with DNA methylation in any tissue of any species, without the need for individual-level genotype or methylation data.

  14. Scalable gene synthesis by selective amplification of DNA pools from high-fidelity microchips.

    PubMed

    Kosuri, Sriram; Eroshenko, Nikolai; Leproust, Emily M; Super, Michael; Way, Jeffrey; Li, Jin Billy; Church, George M

    2010-12-01

    Development of cheap, high-throughput and reliable gene synthesis methods will broadly stimulate progress in biology and biotechnology. Currently, the reliance on column-synthesized oligonucleotides as a source of DNA limits further cost reductions in gene synthesis. Oligonucleotides from DNA microchips can reduce costs by at least an order of magnitude, yet efforts to scale their use have been largely unsuccessful owing to the high error rates and complexity of the oligonucleotide mixtures. Here we use high-fidelity DNA microchips, selective oligonucleotide pool amplification, optimized gene assembly protocols and enzymatic error correction to develop a method for highly parallel gene synthesis. We tested our approach by assembling 47 genes, including 42 challenging therapeutic antibody sequences, encoding a total of ∼35 kilobase pairs of DNA. These assemblies were performed from a complex background containing 13,000 oligonucleotides encoding ∼2.5 megabases of DNA, which is at least 50 times larger than in previously published attempts.

  15. Pyrimidine Pool Disequilibrium Induced by a Cytidine Deaminase Deficiency Inhibits PARP-1 Activity, Leading to the Under Replication of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gemble, Simon; Ahuja, Akshay; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Dairou, Julien; Biard, Denis S. F.; Lambert, Sarah; Lopes, Massimo; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2015-01-01

    Genome stability is jeopardized by imbalances of the dNTP pool; such imbalances affect the rate of fork progression. For example, cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency leads to an excess of dCTP, slowing the replication fork. We describe here a novel mechanism by which pyrimidine pool disequilibrium compromises the completion of replication and chromosome segregation: the intracellular accumulation of dCTP inhibits PARP-1 activity. CDA deficiency results in incomplete DNA replication when cells enter mitosis, leading to the formation of ultrafine anaphase bridges between sister-chromatids at “difficult-to-replicate” sites such as centromeres and fragile sites. Using molecular combing, electron microscopy and a sensitive assay involving cell imaging to quantify steady-state PAR levels, we found that DNA replication was unsuccessful due to the partial inhibition of basal PARP-1 activity, rather than slower fork speed. The stimulation of PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells restores replication and, thus, chromosome segregation. Moreover, increasing intracellular dCTP levels generates under-replication-induced sister-chromatid bridges as efficiently as PARP-1 knockdown. These results have direct implications for Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare genetic disease combining susceptibility to cancer and genomic instability. BS results from mutation of the BLM gene, encoding BLM, a RecQ 3’-5’ DNA helicase, a deficiency of which leads to CDA downregulation. BS cells thus have a CDA defect, resulting in a high frequency of ultrafine anaphase bridges due entirely to dCTP-dependent PARP-1 inhibition and independent of BLM status. Our study describes previously unknown pathological consequences of the distortion of dNTP pools and reveals an unexpected role for PARP-1 in preventing DNA under-replication and chromosome segregation defects. PMID:26181065

  16. Pooled-DNA Sequencing for Elucidating New Genomic Risk Factors, Rare Variants Underlying Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sheng Chih; Benitez, Bruno A; Deming, Yuetiva; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for complex disorders usually identify common variants with a relatively small effect size that only explain a small proportion of phenotypic heritability. Several studies have suggested that a significant fraction of heritability may be explained by low-frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) of 1-5 %) and rare-variants that are not contained in the commercial GWAS genotyping arrays (Schork et al., Curr Opin Genet Dev 19:212, 2009). Rare variants can also have relatively large effects on risk for developing human diseases or disease phenotype (Cruchaga et al., PLoS One 7:e31039, 2012). However, it is necessary to perform next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies in a large population (>4,000 samples) to detect a significant rare-variant association. Several NGS methods, such as custom capture sequencing and amplicon-based sequencing, are designed to screen a small proportion of the genome, but most of these methods are limited in the number of samples that can be multiplexed (i.e. most sequencing kits only provide 96 distinct index). Additionally, the sequencing library preparation for 4,000 samples remains expensive and thus conducting NGS studies with the aforementioned methods are not feasible for most research laboratories.The need for low-cost large scale rare-variant detection makes pooled-DNA sequencing an ideally efficient and cost-effective technique to identify rare variants in target regions by sequencing hundreds to thousands of samples. Our recent work has demonstrated that pooled-DNA sequencing can accurately detect rare variants in targeted regions in multiple DNA samples with high sensitivity and specificity (Jin et al., Alzheimers Res Ther 4:34, 2012). In these studies we used a well-established pooled-DNA sequencing approach and a computational package, SPLINTER (short indel prediction by large deviation inference and nonlinear true frequency estimation by recursion) (Vallania et al., Genome Res

  17. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  18. Genome-wide Association Study for Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; deFazio, Anna; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergotes, Ignace; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Carney, Michael E.; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Leminen, Arto; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Le, Nhu; Cook, Linda; Earp, Madalene; Kelemen, Linda; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Alexandra; Gayther, Simon A.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four low-penetrance ovarian cancer susceptibility loci. We hypothesized that further moderate or low penetrance variants exist among the subset of SNPs not well tagged by the genotyping arrays used in the previous studies which would account for some of the remaining risk. We therefore conducted a time- and cost-effective stage 1 GWAS on 342 invasive serous cases and 643 controls genotyped on pooled DNA using the high density Illumina 1M-Duo array. We followed up 20 of the most significantly associated SNPs, which are not well tagged by the lower density arrays used by the published GWAS, and genotyping them on individual DNA. Most of the top 20 SNPs were clearly validated by individually genotyping the samples used in the pools. However, none of the 20 SNPs replicated when tested for association in a much larger stage 2 set of 4,651 cases and 6,966 controls from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Given that most of the top 20 SNPs from pooling were validated in the same samples by individual genotyping, the lack of replication is likely to be due to the relatively small sample size in our stage 1 GWAS rather than due to problems with the pooling approach. We conclude that there are unlikely to be any moderate or large effects on ovarian cancer risk untagged by the less dense arrays. However our study lacked power to make clear statements on the existence of hitherto untagged small effect variants. PMID:22794196

  19. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    PubMed Central

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  20. Detection of obesity QTLs on mouse chromosomes 1 and 7 by selective DNA pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.A.; Phillips, S.J.

    1996-06-15

    The inheritance of obesity has been analyzed in an intercross between the lean 129/Sv mouse strain and the obesity-prone EL/Suz mouse strain. The weights of three major fat pads were determined on 4-month-old mice, and the sum of these weights, divided by body weight, was used as an adiposity index. The strategy of selective DNA pooling was used as a primary screen to identify putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting adiposity index. DNA pools representing the leanest 15% and fattest 15% of the F2 progeny were compared for differential allelic enrichment using widely dispersed microsatellite variants. To evaluate putative QTLs, individual genotyping and interval mapping were employed to estimate QTL effects and assess statistical significance. One QTL affecting adiposity index, which accounted for 12.3% of phenotypic variance in gender-merged data, was mapped to the central region of Chromosome (Chr) 7. The QTL allele inherited from EL conferred increased adiposity. A second QTL that accounts for 6.3% of phenotypic variance was identified on Chr 1 near D1Mitt211. At both QTLs, the data are consistent with dominant inheritance of the allele contributing to obesity. The possible relationships between these QTLs and previously described obesity QYLs, major obesity mutations, and candidate genes are discussed. 42 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Cost-effective genome-wide estimation of allele frequencies from pooled DNA in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New sequencing technologies have tremendously increased the number of known molecular markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) in a variety of species. Concurrently, improvements to genotyping technology have now made it possible to efficiently genotype large numbers of genome-wide distributed SNPs enabling genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, genotyping significant numbers of individuals with large number of SNPs remains prohibitively expensive for many research groups. A possible solution to this problem is to determine allele frequencies from pooled DNA samples, such ‘allelotyping’ has been presented as a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping and has become popular in human GWAS. In this article we have tested the effectiveness of DNA pooling to obtain accurate allele frequency estimates for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) populations using an Illumina SNP-chip. Results In total, 56 Atlantic salmon DNA pools from 14 populations were analyzed on an Atlantic salmon SNP-chip containing probes for 5568 SNP markers, 3928 of which were bi-allelic. We developed an efficient quality control filter which enables exclusion of loci showing high error rate and minor allele frequency (MAF) close to zero. After applying multiple quality control filters we obtained allele frequency estimates for 3631 bi-allelic loci. We observed high concordance (r > 0.99) between allele frequency estimates derived from individual genotyping and DNA pools. Our results also indicate that even relatively small DNA pools (35 individuals) can provide accurate allele frequency estimates for a given sample. Conclusions Despite of higher level of variation associated with array replicates compared to pool construction, we suggest that both sources of variation should be taken into account. This study demonstrates that DNA pooling allows fast and high-throughput determination of allele frequencies in Atlantic salmon enabling cost

  2. Investigation of rare and low-frequency variants using high-throughput sequencing with pooled DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingwen; Skoog, Tiina; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Kaartokallio, Tea; Laivuori, Hannele; Grauers, Anna; Gerdhem, Paul; Hytönen, Marjo; Lohi, Hannes; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing using pooled DNA samples can facilitate genome-wide studies on rare and low-frequency variants in a large population. Some major questions concerning the pooling sequencing strategy are whether rare and low-frequency variants can be detected reliably, and whether estimated minor allele frequencies (MAFs) can represent the actual values obtained from individually genotyped samples. In this study, we evaluated MAF estimates using three variant detection tools with two sets of pooled whole exome sequencing (WES) and one set of pooled whole genome sequencing (WGS) data. Both GATK and Freebayes displayed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy when detecting rare or low-frequency variants. For the WGS study, 56% of the low-frequency variants in Illumina array have identical MAFs and 26% have one allele difference between sequencing and individual genotyping data. The MAF estimates from WGS correlated well (r = 0.94) with those from Illumina arrays. The MAFs from the pooled WES data also showed high concordance (r = 0.88) with those from the individual genotyping data. In conclusion, the MAFs estimated from pooled DNA sequencing data reflect the MAFs in individually genotyped samples well. The pooling strategy can thus be a rapid and cost-effective approach for the initial screening in large-scale association studies. PMID:27633116

  3. Investigation of rare and low-frequency variants using high-throughput sequencing with pooled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Skoog, Tiina; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Kaartokallio, Tea; Laivuori, Hannele; Grauers, Anna; Gerdhem, Paul; Hytönen, Marjo; Lohi, Hannes; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing using pooled DNA samples can facilitate genome-wide studies on rare and low-frequency variants in a large population. Some major questions concerning the pooling sequencing strategy are whether rare and low-frequency variants can be detected reliably, and whether estimated minor allele frequencies (MAFs) can represent the actual values obtained from individually genotyped samples. In this study, we evaluated MAF estimates using three variant detection tools with two sets of pooled whole exome sequencing (WES) and one set of pooled whole genome sequencing (WGS) data. Both GATK and Freebayes displayed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy when detecting rare or low-frequency variants. For the WGS study, 56% of the low-frequency variants in Illumina array have identical MAFs and 26% have one allele difference between sequencing and individual genotyping data. The MAF estimates from WGS correlated well (r = 0.94) with those from Illumina arrays. The MAFs from the pooled WES data also showed high concordance (r = 0.88) with those from the individual genotyping data. In conclusion, the MAFs estimated from pooled DNA sequencing data reflect the MAFs in individually genotyped samples well. The pooling strategy can thus be a rapid and cost-effective approach for the initial screening in large-scale association studies. PMID:27633116

  4. Tracing European Founder Lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent; Hickey, Eileen; Vega, Emilce; Sykes, Bryan; Guida, Valentina; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; Cruciani, Fulvio; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Thomas, Mark; Rychkov, Serge; Rychkov, Oksana; Rychkov, Yuri; Gölge, Mukaddes; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Hill, Emmeline; Bradley, Dan; Romano, Valentino; Calì, Francesco; Vona, Giuseppe; Demaine, Andrew; Papiha, Surinder; Triantaphyllidis, Costas; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Hatina, Jiři; Belledi, Michele; Di Rienzo, Anna; Oppenheim, Ariella; Nørby, Søren; Al-Zaheri, Nadia; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Scozzari, Rosaria; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2,804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans. PMID:11032788

  5. Admixture Aberration Analysis: Application to Mapping in Admixed Population Using Pooled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Geiger, Dan

    Admixture mapping is a gene mapping approach used for the identification of genomic regions harboring disease susceptibility genes in the case of recently admixed populations such as African Americans. We present a novel method for admixture mapping, called admixture aberration analysis (AAA), that uses a DNA pool of affected admixed individuals. We demonstrate through simulations that AAA is a powerful and economical mapping method under a range of scenarios, capturing complex human diseases such as hypertension and end stage kidney disease. The method has a low false-positive rate and is robust to deviation from model assumptions. Finally, we apply AAA on 600 prostate cancer-affected African Americans, replicating a known risk locus. Simulation results indicate that the method can yield over 96% reduction in genotyping. Our method is implemented as a Java program called AAAmap and is freely available.

  6. Colon cancer-associated mutator DNA polymerase δ variant causes expansion of dNTP pools increasing its own infidelity.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Tony M; Sharma, Sushma; Chabes, Andrei; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2015-05-12

    Defects in DNA polymerases δ (Polδ) and ε (Polε) cause hereditary colorectal cancer and have been implicated in the etiology of some sporadic colorectal and endometrial tumors. We previously reported that the yeast pol3-R696W allele mimicking a human cancer-associated variant, POLD1-R689W, causes a catastrophic increase in spontaneous mutagenesis. Here, we describe the mechanism of this extraordinary mutator effect. We found that the mutation rate increased synergistically when the R696W mutation was combined with defects in Polδ proofreading or mismatch repair, indicating that pathways correcting DNA replication errors are not compromised in pol3-R696W mutants. DNA synthesis by purified Polδ-R696W was error-prone, but not to the extent that could account for the unprecedented mutator phenotype of pol3-R696W strains. In a search for cellular factors that augment the mutagenic potential of Polδ-R696W, we discovered that pol3-R696W causes S-phase checkpoint-dependent elevation of dNTP pools. Abrogating this elevation by strategic mutations in dNTP metabolism genes eliminated the mutator effect of pol3-R696W, whereas restoration of high intracellular dNTP levels restored the mutator phenotype. Further, the use of dNTP concentrations present in pol3-R696W cells for in vitro DNA synthesis greatly decreased the fidelity of Polδ-R696W and produced a mutation spectrum strikingly similar to the spectrum observed in vivo. The results support a model in which (i) faulty synthesis by Polδ-R696W leads to a checkpoint-dependent increase in dNTP levels and (ii) this increase mediates the hypermutator effect of Polδ-R696W by facilitating the extension of mismatched primer termini it creates and by promoting further errors that continue to fuel the mutagenic pathway.

  7. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952) of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612) were intronic and 9% (n = 464) were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS). Significant (P < 0.01) mean allele frequency differentials between the low and high fertility groups were observed for 720 SNPs (58 NSS). Allele frequencies for 43 of the SNPs were also determined by genotyping the 150 individual animals (Sequenom® MassARRAY). No significant differences (P > 0.1) were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total). Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post

  8. Combined gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy for detection of cardiac lymphoproliferative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Rapoport, F.; Boucher, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    Two cases are reported in which combined radionuclide imaging using gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy aided in evaluating lymphomatous involvement of the heart and distinguishing tumor involvement from other cardiac disorders.

  9. Effective High-Throughput Blood Pooling Strategy before DNA Extraction for Detection of Malaria in Low-Transmission Settings

    PubMed Central

    Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Shein, Thinzer; Han, Soe Soe; Zaw, Ni Ni; Han, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Muh, Fauzi; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Sang-Eun; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Chang, Chulhun L.; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    In the era of (pre) elimination setting, the prevalence of malaria has been decreasing in most of the previously endemic areas. Therefore, effective cost- and time-saving validated pooling strategy is needed for detection of malaria in low transmission settings. In this study, optimal pooling numbers and lowest detection limit were assessed using known density samples prepared systematically, followed by genomic DNA extraction and nested PCR. Pooling strategy that composed of 10 samples in 1 pool, 20 µl in 1 sample, was optimal, and the parasite density as low as 2 p/µl for both falciparum and vivax infection was enough for detection of malaria. This pooling method showed effectiveness for handling of a huge number of samples in low transmission settings (<9% positive rate). The results indicated that pooling of the blood samples before DNA extraction followed by usual nested PCR is useful and effective for detection of malaria in screening of hidden cases in low-transmission settings. PMID:27417078

  10. dNTP pool levels modulate mutator phenotypes of error-prone DNA polymerase ε variants

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lindsey N.; Marjavaara, Lisette; Knowels, Gary M.; Schultz, Eric M.; Fox, Edward J.; Chabes, Andrei; Herr, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutator phenotypes create genetic diversity that fuels tumor evolution. DNA polymerase (Pol) ε mediates leading strand DNA replication. Proofreading defects in this enzyme drive a number of human malignancies. Here, using budding yeast, we show that mutator variants of Pol ε depend on damage uninducible (Dun)1, an S-phase checkpoint kinase that maintains dNTP levels during a normal cell cycle and up-regulates dNTP synthesis upon checkpoint activation. Deletion of DUN1 (dun1Δ) suppresses the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 (encoding Pol ε proofreading deficiency) and is synthetically lethal with pol2-M644G (encoding altered Pol ε base selectivity). Although pol2-4 cells cycle normally, pol2-M644G cells progress slowly through S-phase. The pol2-M644G cells tolerate deletions of mediator of the replication checkpoint (MRC) 1 (mrc1Δ) and radiation sensitive (Rad) 9 (rad9Δ), which encode mediators of checkpoint responses to replication stress and DNA damage, respectively. The pol2-M644G mutator phenotype is partially suppressed by mrc1Δ but not rad9Δ; neither deletion suppresses the pol2-4 mutator phenotype. Thus, checkpoint activation augments the Dun1 effect on replication fidelity but is not required for it. Deletions of genes encoding key Dun1 targets that negatively regulate dNTP synthesis, suppress the dun1Δ pol2-M644G synthetic lethality and restore the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 in dun1Δ cells. DUN1 pol2-M644G cells have constitutively high dNTP levels, consistent with checkpoint activation. In contrast, pol2-4 and POL2 cells have similar dNTP levels, which decline in the absence of Dun1 and rise in the absence of the negative regulators of dNTP synthesis. Thus, dNTP pool levels correlate with Pol ε mutator severity, suggesting that treatments targeting dNTP pools could modulate mutator phenotypes for therapy. PMID:25827226

  11. dNTP pool levels modulate mutator phenotypes of error-prone DNA polymerase ε variants.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsey N; Marjavaara, Lisette; Knowels, Gary M; Schultz, Eric M; Fox, Edward J; Chabes, Andrei; Herr, Alan J

    2015-05-12

    Mutator phenotypes create genetic diversity that fuels tumor evolution. DNA polymerase (Pol) ε mediates leading strand DNA replication. Proofreading defects in this enzyme drive a number of human malignancies. Here, using budding yeast, we show that mutator variants of Pol ε depend on damage uninducible (Dun)1, an S-phase checkpoint kinase that maintains dNTP levels during a normal cell cycle and up-regulates dNTP synthesis upon checkpoint activation. Deletion of DUN1 (dun1Δ) suppresses the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 (encoding Pol ε proofreading deficiency) and is synthetically lethal with pol2-M644G (encoding altered Pol ε base selectivity). Although pol2-4 cells cycle normally, pol2-M644G cells progress slowly through S-phase. The pol2-M644G cells tolerate deletions of mediator of the replication checkpoint (MRC) 1 (mrc1Δ) and radiation sensitive (Rad) 9 (rad9Δ), which encode mediators of checkpoint responses to replication stress and DNA damage, respectively. The pol2-M644G mutator phenotype is partially suppressed by mrc1Δ but not rad9Δ; neither deletion suppresses the pol2-4 mutator phenotype. Thus, checkpoint activation augments the Dun1 effect on replication fidelity but is not required for it. Deletions of genes encoding key Dun1 targets that negatively regulate dNTP synthesis, suppress the dun1Δ pol2-M644G synthetic lethality and restore the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 in dun1Δ cells. DUN1 pol2-M644G cells have constitutively high dNTP levels, consistent with checkpoint activation. In contrast, pol2-4 and POL2 cells have similar dNTP levels, which decline in the absence of Dun1 and rise in the absence of the negative regulators of dNTP synthesis. Thus, dNTP pool levels correlate with Pol ε mutator severity, suggesting that treatments targeting dNTP pools could modulate mutator phenotypes for therapy.

  12. Combining of different data pools for calculating a reliable POD for real defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzler, Daniel E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Müller, Christina E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-31

    Real defects are essential for the evaluation of the reliability of non destructive testing (NDT) methods, especially in relation to the integrity of components. But in most of the cases the amount of available real defects is not sufficient to evaluate the system. Model-assisted and transfer functions are one way to handle that challenge. This study is focused on a combination of different data pools to create a sufficient amount of data for the reliability estimation. A widespread approach for calculating the Probability of Detection (POD) was used on a radiographic testing (RT) method. The highest contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of each indication is usually selected as the signal in the 'â vs. a' (signal-response) approach for RT. By combining real and artificial defects (flat bottom holes, side drill holes, flat bottom squares, notches, etc) in RT the highest signals are close to each other, but the process of creating and evaluating real defects is much more complex. The solution is seen in the combination of real and artificial data using a weighted least square approach. The weights for real or artificial data were based on the importance, the value and the different detection behavior of the different data. For comparison, the alternative combination through the Bayesian Updating was also applied. As verification, a data pool with a large amount of real data was available. In an advanced approach for evaluating the digital RT data, the size of the indication (perpendicular to the X-ray beam) was introduced as additional information. The signal now consists of the CNR and the area of the indication. The detectability is changing depending on the area of the indication, a fact that was ignored in the previous POD calculations for RT. This points out that a weighted least square approach to pool the data might no longer be adequate. The Bayesian Updating of the estimated parameters of the relationship between the signal field (the area of the indication) and

  13. Combining of different data pools for calculating a reliable POD for real defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, Daniel; Müller, Christina; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-01

    Real defects are essential for the evaluation of the reliability of non destructive testing (NDT) methods, especially in relation to the integrity of components. But in most of the cases the amount of available real defects is not sufficient to evaluate the system. Model-assisted and transfer functions are one way to handle that challenge. This study is focused on a combination of different data pools to create a sufficient amount of data for the reliability estimation. A widespread approach for calculating the Probability of Detection (POD) was used on a radiographic testing (RT) method. The highest contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of each indication is usually selected as the signal in the "â vs. a" (signal-response) approach for RT. By combining real and artificial defects (flat bottom holes, side drill holes, flat bottom squares, notches, etc) in RT the highest signals are close to each other, but the process of creating and evaluating real defects is much more complex. The solution is seen in the combination of real and artificial data using a weighted least square approach. The weights for real or artificial data were based on the importance, the value and the different detection behavior of the different data. For comparison, the alternative combination through the Bayesian Updating was also applied. As verification, a data pool with a large amount of real data was available. In an advanced approach for evaluating the digital RT data, the size of the indication (perpendicular to the X-ray beam) was introduced as additional information. The signal now consists of the CNR and the area of the indication. The detectability is changing depending on the area of the indication, a fact that was ignored in the previous POD calculations for RT. This points out that a weighted least square approach to pool the data might no longer be adequate. The Bayesian Updating of the estimated parameters of the relationship between the signal field (the area of the indication) and

  14. Disinfection of herbal spa pool using combined chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in public spa pools poses a serious threat to human health. The problem is particularly acute in herbal spas, in which the herbs and microorganisms may interact and produce undesirable consequences. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effectiveness of a combined disinfectant containing chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in improving the water quality of a public herbal spa in Taiwan. Water samples were collected from the spa pool and laboratory tests were then performed to measure the variation over time of the microorganism content (total CFU and total coliforms) and residual disinfectant content given a single disinfection mode (SDM) with disinfectant concentrations of 5.2 × 10, 6.29 × 10, 7.4 × 10, and 11.4 × 10(-5) N, respectively. Utilizing the experience gained from the laboratory tests, a further series of on-site investigations was performed using three different disinfection modes, namely SDM, 3DM (once every 3 h disinfection mode), and 2DM (once every 2 h disinfection mode). The laboratory results showed that for all four disinfectant concentrations, the CFU concentration reduced for the first 6 h following SDM treatment, but then increased. Moreover, the ANOVA results showed that the sample treated with the highest disinfectant concentration (11.4 × 10(-5) N) exhibited the lowest rate of increase in the CFU concentration. In addition, the on-site test results showed that 3DM and 2DM treatments with disinfectant concentrations in excess of 9.3 × 10 and 5.5 × 10(-5) N, respectively, provided an effective reduction in the total CFU concentration. In conclusion, the experimental results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for spa businesses seeking to improve the water quality of their spa pools.

  15. Disinfection of herbal spa pool using combined chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in public spa pools poses a serious threat to human health. The problem is particularly acute in herbal spas, in which the herbs and microorganisms may interact and produce undesirable consequences. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effectiveness of a combined disinfectant containing chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in improving the water quality of a public herbal spa in Taiwan. Water samples were collected from the spa pool and laboratory tests were then performed to measure the variation over time of the microorganism content (total CFU and total coliforms) and residual disinfectant content given a single disinfection mode (SDM) with disinfectant concentrations of 5.2 × 10, 6.29 × 10, 7.4 × 10, and 11.4 × 10(-5) N, respectively. Utilizing the experience gained from the laboratory tests, a further series of on-site investigations was performed using three different disinfection modes, namely SDM, 3DM (once every 3 h disinfection mode), and 2DM (once every 2 h disinfection mode). The laboratory results showed that for all four disinfectant concentrations, the CFU concentration reduced for the first 6 h following SDM treatment, but then increased. Moreover, the ANOVA results showed that the sample treated with the highest disinfectant concentration (11.4 × 10(-5) N) exhibited the lowest rate of increase in the CFU concentration. In addition, the on-site test results showed that 3DM and 2DM treatments with disinfectant concentrations in excess of 9.3 × 10 and 5.5 × 10(-5) N, respectively, provided an effective reduction in the total CFU concentration. In conclusion, the experimental results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for spa businesses seeking to improve the water quality of their spa pools. PMID:25632897

  16. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals.

  17. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  18. Clines of nuclear DNA markers suggest a largely neolithic ancestry of the European gene pool.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, L; Destro-Bisol, G; Bertorelle, G; Pascali, V; Barbujani, G

    1998-07-21

    Comparisons between archaeological findings and allele frequencies at protein loci suggest that most genes of current Europeans descend from populations that have been expanding in Europe in the last 10, 000 years, in the Neolithic period. Recent mitochondrial data have been interpreted as indicating a much older, Paleolithic ancestry. In a spatial autocorrelation study at seven hypervariable loci in Europe (four microsatellites, two larger, tandem-repeat loci, and a sequence polymorphism) broad clinal patterns of DNA variation were recognized. The observed clines closely match those described at the protein level, in agreement with a possible Near Eastern origin for the ancestral population. Separation times between populations were estimated on the basis of a stepwise mutation model. Even assuming low mutation rates and long generation times, we found no evidence for population splits older than 10,000 years, with the predictable exception of Saami (Lapps). The simplest interpretation of these results is that the current nuclear gene pool largely reflects the westward and northward expansion of a Neolithic group. This conclusion is now supported by purely genetic evidence on the levels and patterns of microsatellite diversity, rather than by correlations of biological and nonbiological data. We argue that many mitochondrial lineages whose origin has been traced back to the Paleolithic period probably reached Europe at a later time.

  19. Effect of a dCTP:dTTP pool imbalance on DNA replication fidelity in Friend murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hyland, P L; Keegan, A L; Curran, M D; Middleton, D; McKenna, P G; Barnett, Y A

    2000-01-01

    Nucleotide pool imbalances have been reported to affect the fidelity of DNA replication and repair in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We have reported previously that the mutagen-hypersensitive thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient Friend erythroleukemia (FEL) cells (subclones 707BUF and 707BUE), have a more than sixfold increase in the dCTP:dTTP pool ratio when compared to that of wild-type, TK-positive (TK(+)) clone 707 cells. In this study we present the results of an investigation of the effect of the dCTP:dTTP pool imbalance on the accuracy of DNA replication within 707BUF cells. We examined the spontaneous mutation spectra occurring at the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) locus within clone 707 (TK(+)) and 707BUF (TK(-)) FEL cells. Mutations recovered at the aprt locus in FEL cells comprised: base substitutions (43:73), frameshifts (14:13.5), and deletions (43:13.5) [clone 707 (TK(+)):707BUF (TK(-)), respectively, expressed as percentages]. A comparison of the mutation spectra obtained for the two cell lines did not reveal any significant increase in misincorporation of dCTP, the nucleotide in excess, in 707BUF (TK(-)) cells, during DNA replication synthesis. These data suggest that the dCTP:dTTP pool imbalance does not alter the fidelity of DNA replication synthesis in 707BUF (TK(-)) FEL cells. Rather, the predominance of GC --> AT transitions (53%) in the 707BUF (TK(-)) spectrum may reflect a reduced efficiency of repair by uracil DNA glycosylase of uracil residues within these cells.

  20. Colon cancer-associated mutator DNA polymerase δ variant causes expansion of dNTP pools increasing its own infidelity

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Tony M.; Sharma, Sushma; Chabes, Andrei; Shcherbakova, Polina V.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in DNA polymerases δ (Polδ) and ε (Polε) cause hereditary colorectal cancer and have been implicated in the etiology of some sporadic colorectal and endometrial tumors. We previously reported that the yeast pol3-R696W allele mimicking a human cancer-associated variant, POLD1-R689W, causes a catastrophic increase in spontaneous mutagenesis. Here, we describe the mechanism of this extraordinary mutator effect. We found that the mutation rate increased synergistically when the R696W mutation was combined with defects in Polδ proofreading or mismatch repair, indicating that pathways correcting DNA replication errors are not compromised in pol3-R696W mutants. DNA synthesis by purified Polδ-R696W was error-prone, but not to the extent that could account for the unprecedented mutator phenotype of pol3-R696W strains. In a search for cellular factors that augment the mutagenic potential of Polδ-R696W, we discovered that pol3-R696W causes S-phase checkpoint-dependent elevation of dNTP pools. Abrogating this elevation by strategic mutations in dNTP metabolism genes eliminated the mutator effect of pol3-R696W, whereas restoration of high intracellular dNTP levels restored the mutator phenotype. Further, the use of dNTP concentrations present in pol3-R696W cells for in vitro DNA synthesis greatly decreased the fidelity of Polδ-R696W and produced a mutation spectrum strikingly similar to the spectrum observed in vivo. The results support a model in which (i) faulty synthesis by Polδ-R696W leads to a checkpoint-dependent increase in dNTP levels and (ii) this increase mediates the hypermutator effect of Polδ-R696W by facilitating the extension of mismatched primer termini it creates and by promoting further errors that continue to fuel the mutagenic pathway. PMID:25827231

  1. Reduced Representation Libraries from DNA Pools Analysed with Next Generation Semiconductor Based-Sequencing to Identify SNPs in Extreme and Divergent Pigs for Back Fat Thickness.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Samuele; Bertolini, Francesca; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that could be associated with back fat thickness (BFT) in pigs. To achieve this goal, we evaluated the potential and limits of an experimental design that combined several methodologies. DNA samples from two groups of Italian Large White pigs with divergent estimating breeding value (EBV) for BFT were separately pooled and sequenced, after preparation of reduced representation libraries (RRLs), on the Ion Torrent technology. Taking advantage from SNAPE for SNPs calling in sequenced DNA pools, 39,165 SNPs were identified; 1/4 of them were novel variants not reported in dbSNP. Combining sequencing data with Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip genotyping results on the same animals, 661 genomic positions overlapped with a good approximation of minor allele frequency estimation. A total of 54 SNPs showing enriched alleles in one or in the other RRLs might be potential markers associated with BFT. Some of these SNPs were close to genes involved in obesity related phenotypes. PMID:25821781

  2. Reduced Representation Libraries from DNA Pools Analysed with Next Generation Semiconductor Based-Sequencing to Identify SNPs in Extreme and Divergent Pigs for Back Fat Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Bovo, Samuele; Bertolini, Francesca; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that could be associated with back fat thickness (BFT) in pigs. To achieve this goal, we evaluated the potential and limits of an experimental design that combined several methodologies. DNA samples from two groups of Italian Large White pigs with divergent estimating breeding value (EBV) for BFT were separately pooled and sequenced, after preparation of reduced representation libraries (RRLs), on the Ion Torrent technology. Taking advantage from SNAPE for SNPs calling in sequenced DNA pools, 39,165 SNPs were identified; 1/4 of them were novel variants not reported in dbSNP. Combining sequencing data with Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip genotyping results on the same animals, 661 genomic positions overlapped with a good approximation of minor allele frequency estimation. A total of 54 SNPs showing enriched alleles in one or in the other RRLs might be potential markers associated with BFT. Some of these SNPs were close to genes involved in obesity related phenotypes. PMID:25821781

  3. Singular and combined effects of blowdown, salvage logging, and wildfire on forest floor and soil mercury pools.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Carl P J; Kolka, Randall K; Fraver, Shawn

    2012-08-01

    A number of factors influence the amount of mercury (Hg) in forest floors and soils, including deposition, volatile emission, leaching, and disturbances such as fire. Currently the impact on soil Hg pools from other widespread forest disturbances such as blowdown and management practices like salvage logging are unknown. Moreover, ecological and biogeochemical responses to disturbances are generally investigated within a single-disturbance context, with little currently known about the impact of multiple disturbances occurring in rapid succession. In this study we capitalize on a combination of blowdown, salvage logging and fire events in the sub-boreal region of northern Minnesota to assess both the singular and combined effects of these disturbances on forest floor and soil total Hg concentrations and pools. Although none of the disturbance combinations affected Hg in mineral soil, we did observe significant effects on both Hg concentrations and pools in the forest floor. Blowdown increased the mean Hg pool in the forest floor by 0.76 mg Hg m(-2) (223%). Salvage logging following blowdown created conditions leading to a significantly more severe forest floor burn during wildfire, which significantly enhanced Hg emission. This sequence of combined events resulted in a mean loss of approximately 0.42 mg Hg m(-2) (68% of pool) from the forest floor, after conservatively accounting for potential losses via enhanced soil leaching and volatile emissions between the disturbance and sampling dates. Fire alone or blowdown followed by fire did not significantly affect the total Hg concentrations or pools in the forest floor. Overall, unexpected consequences for soil Hg accumulation and by extension, atmospheric Hg emission and risk to aquatic biota, may result when combined impacts are considered in addition to singular forest floor and soil disturbances. PMID:22747193

  4. Singular and combined effects of blowdown, salvage logging, and wildfire on forest floor and soil mercury pools.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Carl P J; Kolka, Randall K; Fraver, Shawn

    2012-08-01

    A number of factors influence the amount of mercury (Hg) in forest floors and soils, including deposition, volatile emission, leaching, and disturbances such as fire. Currently the impact on soil Hg pools from other widespread forest disturbances such as blowdown and management practices like salvage logging are unknown. Moreover, ecological and biogeochemical responses to disturbances are generally investigated within a single-disturbance context, with little currently known about the impact of multiple disturbances occurring in rapid succession. In this study we capitalize on a combination of blowdown, salvage logging and fire events in the sub-boreal region of northern Minnesota to assess both the singular and combined effects of these disturbances on forest floor and soil total Hg concentrations and pools. Although none of the disturbance combinations affected Hg in mineral soil, we did observe significant effects on both Hg concentrations and pools in the forest floor. Blowdown increased the mean Hg pool in the forest floor by 0.76 mg Hg m(-2) (223%). Salvage logging following blowdown created conditions leading to a significantly more severe forest floor burn during wildfire, which significantly enhanced Hg emission. This sequence of combined events resulted in a mean loss of approximately 0.42 mg Hg m(-2) (68% of pool) from the forest floor, after conservatively accounting for potential losses via enhanced soil leaching and volatile emissions between the disturbance and sampling dates. Fire alone or blowdown followed by fire did not significantly affect the total Hg concentrations or pools in the forest floor. Overall, unexpected consequences for soil Hg accumulation and by extension, atmospheric Hg emission and risk to aquatic biota, may result when combined impacts are considered in addition to singular forest floor and soil disturbances.

  5. A mass spectrometry-based approach for identifying novel DNA polymerase substrates from a pool of dNTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kincaid, Kristi; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    There has been a long-standing interest in the discovery of unnatural nucleotides that can be incorporated into DNA by polymerases. However, it is difficult to predict which nucleotide analogs will prove to have biological relevance. Therefore, we have developed a new screening method to identify novel substrates for DNA polymerases. This technique uses the polymerase itself to select a dNTP from a pool of potential substrates via incorporation onto a short oligonucleotide. The unnatural nucleotide(s) is then identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry. By using a DNA polymerase as a selection tool, only the biologically relevant members of a small nucleotide library can be quickly determined. We have demonstrated that this method can be used to discover unnatural base pairs in DNA with a detection threshold of ≤10% incorporation. PMID:16945949

  6. DNA Profiling of Convicted Offender Samples for the Combined DNA Index System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    The cornerstone of forensic chemistry is that a perpetrator inevitably leaves trace evidence at a crime scene. One important type of evidence is DNA, which has been instrumental in both the implication and exoneration of thousands of suspects in a wide range of crimes. The Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a network of DNA databases, provides…

  7. Determining microsatellite genotyping reliability and mutation detection ability: an approach using small-pool PCR from sperm DNA.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Anna J; Sarre, Stephen D; Fitzsimmons, Nancy N; Aitken, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite genotyping from trace DNA is now common in fields as diverse as medicine, forensics and wildlife genetics. Conversely, small-pool PCR (SP-PCR) has been used to investigate microsatellite mutation mechanisms in human DNA, but has had only limited application to non-human species. Trace DNA and SP-PCR studies share many challenges, including problems associated with allelic drop-out, false alleles and other PCR artefacts, and the need to reliably identify genuine alleles and/or mutations. We provide a framework for the validation of such studies without a multiple tube approach and demonstrate the utility of that approach with an analysis of microsatellite mutations in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). Specifically, we amplified three autosomal microsatellites from somatic DNA to characterise efficiency and reliability of PCR from low-template DNA. Reconstruction experiments determined our ability to discriminate mutations from parental alleles. We then developed rules to guide data interpretation. We estimated mutation rates in sperm DNA to range from 1.5 × 10(-2) to 2.2 × 10(-3) mutations per locus per generation. Large multi-step mutations were observed, providing evidence for complex mutation processes at microsatellites and potentially violating key assumptions in the stepwise mutation model. Our data demonstrate the necessity of actively searching for large mutation events when investigating microsatellite evolution and highlight the need for a thorough understanding of microsatellite amplification characteristics before embarking on SP-PCR or trace DNA studies.

  8. SNP discovery using Paired-End RAD-tag sequencing on pooled genomic DNA of Sisymbrium austriacum (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Vandepitte, K; Honnay, O; Mergeay, J; Breyne, P; Roldán-Ruiz, I; De Meyer, T

    2013-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs are rapidly replacing anonymous markers in population genomic studies, but their use in non model organisms is hampered by the scarcity of cost-effective approaches to uncover genome-wide variation in a comprehensive subset of individuals. The screening of one or only a few individuals induces ascertainment bias. To discover SNPs for a population genomic study of the Pyrenean rocket (Sisymbrium austriacum subsp. chrysanthum), we undertook a pooled RAD-PE (Restriction site Associated DNA Paired-End sequencing) approach. RAD tags were generated from the PstI-digested pooled genomic DNA of 12 individuals sampled across the species distribution range and paired-end sequenced using Illumina technology to produce ~24.5 Mb of sequences, covering ~7% of the specie's genome. Sequences were assembled into ~76 000 contigs with a mean length of 323 bp (N(50)  = 357 bp, sequencing depth = 24x). In all, >15 000 SNPs were called, of which 47% were annotated in putative genic regions based on homology with the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Gene ontology (GO) slim categorization demonstrated that the identified SNPs covered extant genic variation well. The validation of 300 SNPs on a larger set of individuals using a KASPar assay underpinned the utility of pooled RAD-PE as an inexpensive genome-wide SNP discovery technique (success rate: 87%). In addition to SNPs, we discovered >600 putative SSR markers.

  9. Two Distinct Cdc2 Pools Regulate Cell Cycle Progression and the DNA Damage Response in the Fission Yeast S.pombe.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Thomas; Hilditch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The activity of Cdc2 (CDK1) kinase, which coordinates cell cycle progression and DNA break repair, is blocked upon its phosphorylation at tyrosine 15 (Y15) by Wee1 kinase in the presence of DNA damage. How Cdc2 can support DNA repair whilst being inactivated by the DNA damage checkpoint remains to be explained. Human CDK1 is phosphorylated by Myt1 kinase at threonine 14 (T14) close to its ATP binding site before being modified at threonine 161 (T167Sp) in its T-loop by the CDK-activating kinase (CAK). While modification of T161 promotes association with the cyclin partner, phosphorylation of T14 inhibits the CDK1-cyclin complex. This inhibition is further enforced by the modification of Y15 by Wee1 in the presence of DNA lesions. In S.pombe, the dominant inhibition of Cdc2 is provided by the phosphorylation of Y15 and only a small amount of Cdc2 is modified at T14 when cells are in S phase. Unlike human cells, both inhibitory modifications are executed by Wee1. Using the novel IEFPT technology, which combines isoelectric focusing (IEF) with Phos-tag SDS electrophoresis (PT), we report here that S.pombe Cdc2 kinase exists in seven forms. While five forms are phosphorylated, two species are not. Four phospho-forms associate with cyclin B (Cdc13) of which only two are modified at Y15 by Wee1. Interestingly, only one Y15-modified species carries also the T14 modification. The fifth phospho-form has a low affinity for cyclin B and is neither Y15 nor T14 modified. The two unphosphorylated forms may contribute directly to the DNA damage response as only they associate with the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Chk1. Interestingly, cyclin B is also present in the unphosphorylated pool. We also show that the G146D mutation in Cdc2.1w, which renders Cdc2 insensitive to Wee1 inhibition, is aberrantly modified in a Wee1-dependent manner. In conclusion, our work adds support to the idea that two distinct Cdc2 pools regulate cell cycle progression and the response to DNA damage.

  10. Two Distinct Cdc2 Pools Regulate Cell Cycle Progression and the DNA Damage Response in the Fission Yeast S.pombe.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Thomas; Hilditch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The activity of Cdc2 (CDK1) kinase, which coordinates cell cycle progression and DNA break repair, is blocked upon its phosphorylation at tyrosine 15 (Y15) by Wee1 kinase in the presence of DNA damage. How Cdc2 can support DNA repair whilst being inactivated by the DNA damage checkpoint remains to be explained. Human CDK1 is phosphorylated by Myt1 kinase at threonine 14 (T14) close to its ATP binding site before being modified at threonine 161 (T167Sp) in its T-loop by the CDK-activating kinase (CAK). While modification of T161 promotes association with the cyclin partner, phosphorylation of T14 inhibits the CDK1-cyclin complex. This inhibition is further enforced by the modification of Y15 by Wee1 in the presence of DNA lesions. In S.pombe, the dominant inhibition of Cdc2 is provided by the phosphorylation of Y15 and only a small amount of Cdc2 is modified at T14 when cells are in S phase. Unlike human cells, both inhibitory modifications are executed by Wee1. Using the novel IEFPT technology, which combines isoelectric focusing (IEF) with Phos-tag SDS electrophoresis (PT), we report here that S.pombe Cdc2 kinase exists in seven forms. While five forms are phosphorylated, two species are not. Four phospho-forms associate with cyclin B (Cdc13) of which only two are modified at Y15 by Wee1. Interestingly, only one Y15-modified species carries also the T14 modification. The fifth phospho-form has a low affinity for cyclin B and is neither Y15 nor T14 modified. The two unphosphorylated forms may contribute directly to the DNA damage response as only they associate with the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Chk1. Interestingly, cyclin B is also present in the unphosphorylated pool. We also show that the G146D mutation in Cdc2.1w, which renders Cdc2 insensitive to Wee1 inhibition, is aberrantly modified in a Wee1-dependent manner. In conclusion, our work adds support to the idea that two distinct Cdc2 pools regulate cell cycle progression and the response to DNA damage. PMID

  11. The blue man: burn from muriatic acid combined with chlorinated paint in an adult pool construction worker.

    PubMed

    O'Cleireachain, Marc R; Macias, Luis H; Richey, Karen J; Pressman, Melissa A; Shirah, Gina R; Caruso, Daniel M; Foster, Kevin N; Matthews, Marc R

    2014-01-01

    Muriatic acid (hydrochloric acid), a common cleaning and resurfacing agent for concrete pools, can cause significant burn injuries. When coating a pool with chlorinated rubber-based paint, the pool surface is initially cleansed using 31.45% muriatic acid. Here we report a 50-year-old Hispanic male pool worker who, during the process of a pool resurfacing, experienced significant contact exposure to a combination of muriatic acid and blue chlorinated rubber-based paint. Confounding the clinical situation was the inability to efficiently remove the chemical secondary to the rubber-based nature of the paint. Additionally, vigorous attempts were made to remove the rubber paint using a variety of agents, including bacitracin, chlorhexidine soap, GOOP adhesive, and Johnson's baby oil. Resultant injuries were devastating fourth-degree burns requiring an immediate operative excision and amputation. Despite aggressive operative intervention and resuscitation, he continued to have severe metabolic derangements and ultimately succumbed to his injuries. We present our attempts at debridement and the system in place to manage patients with complex chemical burns.

  12. Thymidine kinase 2 (H126N) knockin mice show the essential role of balanced deoxynucleotide pools for mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Hasan O.; Dorado, Beatriz; López, Luis C.; García-Cazorla, Ángeles; Vilà, Maya R.; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Dauer, William T.; Bonilla, Eduardo; Tanji, Kurenai; Hirano, Michio

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (MDS), an autosomal recessive condition, is characterized by variable organ involvement with decreased mtDNA copy number and activities of respiratory chain enzymes in affected tissues. MtDNA depletion has been associated with mutations in nine autosomal genes, including thymidine kinase (TK2), which encodes a ubiquitous mitochondrial protein. To study the pathogenesis of TK2-deficiency, we generated mice harboring an H126N Tk2 mutation. Homozygous Tk2 mutant (Tk2−/−) mice developed rapidly progressive weakness after age 10 days and died between ages 2 and 3 weeks. Tk2−/− animals showed Tk2 deficiency, unbalanced dNTP pools, mtDNA depletion and defects of respiratory chain enzymes containing mtDNA-encoded subunits that were most prominent in the central nervous system. Histopathology revealed an encephalomyelopathy with prominent vacuolar changes in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. The H126N TK2 mouse is the first knock-in animal model of human MDS and demonstrates that the severity of TK2 deficiency in tissues may determine the organ-specific phenotype. PMID:18467430

  13. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  14. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  15. A pool of peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin inhibits tumor cell growth by causing defective DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously reported that a pool of low molecular weight peptides can be extracted by alkali treatment of DNA preparations obtained from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells after intensive deproteinization. This class of peptides, isolated from wheat bud chromatin, induces growth inhibition, DNA damage, G2 checkpoint activation and apoptosis in HeLa cells. In this work we studied their mechanism of action by investigating their ability to interfere with DNA synthesis. Methods BrdUrd comet assays were used to detect DNA replication defects during S phase. DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and DNA damage response pathway activation were assessed using 3H-thymidine incorporation, DNA flow cytometry and Western blotting, respectively. Results BrdUrd labelling close to DNA strand discontinuities (comet tails) detects the number of active replicons. This number was significantly higher in treated cells (compared to controls) from entry until mid S phase, but markedly lower in late S phase, indicating the occurrence of defective DNA synthesis. In mid S phase the treated cells showed less 3H-thymidine incorporation with respect to the controls, which supports an early arrest of DNA synthesis. DNA damage response activation was also shown in both p53-defective HeLa cells and p53-proficient U2OS cells by the detection of the phosphorylated form of H2AX after peptide treatment. These events were accompanied in both cell lines by an increase in p21 levels and, in U2OS cells, of phospho-p53 (Ser15) levels. At 24 h of recovery after peptide treatment the cell cycle phase distribution was similar to that seen in controls and CDK1 kinase accumulation was not detected. Conclusion The data reported here show that the antiproliferative effect exhibited by these chromatin peptides results from their ability to induce genomic stress during DNA synthesis. This effect seems to be S-phase specific since surviving cells are able to progress through their

  16. Cost-effective pooling of DNA from nasopharyngeal swab samples for large-scale detection of bacteria by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Edouard, Sophie; Prudent, Elsa; Gautret, Philippe; Memish, Ziad A; Raoult, Didier

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the potential of pooling DNA from nasopharyngeal specimens to reduce the cost of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) for bacterial detection. Lyophilization is required to reconcentrate DNA. This strategy yields a high specificity (86%) and a high sensitivity (96%). We estimate that compared to individual testing, 37% fewer RT-PCR tests are needed.

  17. Whole genome semiconductor based sequencing of farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Mediterranean genetic stocks using a DNA pooling approach.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Francesca; Geraci, Claudia; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Sardina, Maria Teresa; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is an important marine species for commercial and sport fisheries and aquaculture production. Recently, the European sea bass genome has been sequenced and assembled. This resource can open new opportunities to evaluate and monitor variability and identify variants that could contribute to the adaptation to farming conditions. In this work, two DNA pools constructed from cultivated European sea bass were sequenced using a next generation semiconductor sequencing approach based on Ion Proton sequencer. Using the first draft version of the D. labrax genome as reference, sequenced reads obtained a total of about 1.6 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), spread all over the chromosomes. Transition/transversion (Ti/Tv) was equal to 1.28, comparable to what was already reported in Salmon species. A pilot homozygosity analysis across the D. labrax genome using DNA pool sequence datasets indicated that this approach can identify chromosome regions with putative signatures of selection, including genes involved in ion transport and chloride channel functions, amino acid metabolism and circadian clock and related neurological systems. This is the first study that reported genome wide polymorphisms in a fish species obtained with the Ion Proton sequencer. Moreover, this study provided a methodological approach for selective sweep analysis in this species. PMID:27020381

  18. Uniparental genetic heritage of belarusians: encounter of rare middle eastern matrilineages with a central European mitochondrial DNA pool.

    PubMed

    Kushniarevich, Alena; Sivitskaya, Larysa; Danilenko, Nina; Novogrodskii, Tadeush; Tsybovsky, Iosif; Kiseleva, Anna; Kotova, Svetlana; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Metspalu, Ene; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Reidla, Maere; Rootsi, Siiri; Parik, Jüri; Reisberg, Tuuli; Achilli, Alessandro; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Gandini, Francesca; Olivieri, Anna; Behar, Doron M; Torroni, Antonio; Davydenko, Oleg; Villems, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Ethnic Belarusians make up more than 80% of the nine and half million people inhabiting the Republic of Belarus. Belarusians together with Ukrainians and Russians represent the East Slavic linguistic group, largest both in numbers and territory, inhabiting East Europe alongside Baltic-, Finno-Permic- and Turkic-speaking people. Till date, only a limited number of low resolution genetic studies have been performed on this population. Therefore, with the phylogeographic analysis of 565 Y-chromosomes and 267 mitochondrial DNAs from six well covered geographic sub-regions of Belarus we strove to complement the existing genetic profile of eastern Europeans. Our results reveal that around 80% of the paternal Belarusian gene pool is composed of R1a, I2a and N1c Y-chromosome haplogroups - a profile which is very similar to the two other eastern European populations - Ukrainians and Russians. The maternal Belarusian gene pool encompasses a full range of West Eurasian haplogroups and agrees well with the genetic structure of central-east European populations. Our data attest that latitudinal gradients characterize the variation of the uniparentally transmitted gene pools of modern Belarusians. In particular, the Y-chromosome reflects movements of people in central-east Europe, starting probably as early as the beginning of the Holocene. Furthermore, the matrilineal legacy of Belarusians retains two rare mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, N1a3 and N3, whose phylogeographies were explored in detail after de novo sequencing of 20 and 13 complete mitogenomes, respectively, from all over Eurasia. Our phylogeographic analyses reveal that two mitochondrial DNA lineages, N3 and N1a3, both of Middle Eastern origin, might mark distinct events of matrilineal gene flow to Europe: during the mid-Holocene period and around the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, respectively. PMID:23785503

  19. Uniparental Genetic Heritage of Belarusians: Encounter of Rare Middle Eastern Matrilineages with a Central European Mitochondrial DNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Kushniarevich, Alena; Sivitskaya, Larysa; Danilenko, Nina; Novogrodskii, Tadeush; Tsybovsky, Iosif; Kiseleva, Anna; Kotova, Svetlana; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Metspalu, Ene; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Reidla, Maere; Rootsi, Siiri; Parik, Jüri; Reisberg, Tuuli; Achilli, Alessandro; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Gandini, Francesca; Olivieri, Anna; Behar, Doron M.; Torroni, Antonio; Davydenko, Oleg; Villems, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Ethnic Belarusians make up more than 80% of the nine and half million people inhabiting the Republic of Belarus. Belarusians together with Ukrainians and Russians represent the East Slavic linguistic group, largest both in numbers and territory, inhabiting East Europe alongside Baltic-, Finno-Permic- and Turkic-speaking people. Till date, only a limited number of low resolution genetic studies have been performed on this population. Therefore, with the phylogeographic analysis of 565 Y-chromosomes and 267 mitochondrial DNAs from six well covered geographic sub-regions of Belarus we strove to complement the existing genetic profile of eastern Europeans. Our results reveal that around 80% of the paternal Belarusian gene pool is composed of R1a, I2a and N1c Y-chromosome haplogroups – a profile which is very similar to the two other eastern European populations – Ukrainians and Russians. The maternal Belarusian gene pool encompasses a full range of West Eurasian haplogroups and agrees well with the genetic structure of central-east European populations. Our data attest that latitudinal gradients characterize the variation of the uniparentally transmitted gene pools of modern Belarusians. In particular, the Y-chromosome reflects movements of people in central-east Europe, starting probably as early as the beginning of the Holocene. Furthermore, the matrilineal legacy of Belarusians retains two rare mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, N1a3 and N3, whose phylogeographies were explored in detail after de novo sequencing of 20 and 13 complete mitogenomes, respectively, from all over Eurasia. Our phylogeographic analyses reveal that two mitochondrial DNA lineages, N3 and N1a3, both of Middle Eastern origin, might mark distinct events of matrilineal gene flow to Europe: during the mid-Holocene period and around the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, respectively. PMID:23785503

  20. Exome sequencing in pooled DNA samples to identify maternal pre-eclampsia risk variants.

    PubMed

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Wang, Jingwen; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Gerdhem, Paul; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy disorder that is a major cause for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Variants predisposing to pre-eclampsia might be under negative evolutionary selection that is likely to keep their population frequencies low. We exome sequenced samples from a hundred Finnish pre-eclamptic women in pools of ten to screen for low-frequency, large-effect risk variants for pre-eclampsia. After filtering and additional genotyping steps, we selected 28 low-frequency missense, nonsense and splice site variants that were enriched in the pre-eclampsia pools compared to reference data, and genotyped the variants in 1353 pre-eclamptic and 699 non-pre-eclamptic women to test the association of them with pre-eclampsia and quantitative traits relevant for the disease. Genotypes from the SISu project (n = 6118 exome sequenced Finnish samples) were included in the binary trait association analysis as a population reference to increase statistical power. In these analyses, none of the variants tested reached genome-wide significance. In conclusion, the genetic risk for pre-eclampsia is likely complex even in a population isolate like Finland, and larger sample sizes will be necessary to detect risk variants. PMID:27384325

  1. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA and lung cancer: a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Cawthon, Richard M; Purdue, Mark P; Hu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Huang, Wen-Yi; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Ji, Bu-Tian; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hosgood, H Dean; Bassig, Bryan A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Min, Shen; Chow, Wong-Ho; Berndt, Sonja I; Kim, Christopher; Lim, Unhee; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Chanock, Stephen; Zheng, Wei; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the relationship between telomere length and lung cancer in a pooled analysis from three prospective cohort studies: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, conducted among men and women in the United States, and previously published data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial conducted among male smokers in Finland, and the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), which is comprised primarily of never-smokers. The pooled population included 847 cases and 847 controls matched by study, age, and sex. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by a monochrome multiplex qPCR assay. We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between telomere length and lung cancer risk, adjusted for age and pack-years of smoking. Longer telomere length was associated with increased lung cancer risk in the pooled analysis [OR (95% CI) by quartile: 1.00; 1.24 (0.90-1.71); 1.27 (0.91-1.78); and 1.86 (1.33-2.62); P trend = 0.000022]. Findings were consistent across the three cohorts and strongest for subjects with very long telomere length, i.e., lung cancer risks for telomere length [OR (95% CI)] in the upper half of the fourth quartile were 2.41 (1.28-4.52), 2.16 (1.11-4.23), and 3.02(1.39-6.58) for the PLCO trial, the ATBC trial, and the SWHS, respectively. In addition, the association persisted among cases diagnosed more than 6 years after blood collection and was particularly evident for female adenocarcinoma cases. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA may be a biomarker of future increased risk of lung cancer in diverse populations.

  2. Combining Microarray and Genomic Data to Predict DNA Binding Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Linyong; Mackenzie, Ronald C.; Roh, J. H.; Eraso, Jesus M.; Kaplan, Samuel; Resat, Haluk

    2005-10-01

    The ability to detect regulatory elements within genome sequences is important in understanding how gene expression is controlled in biological systems. In this work, we combine microarray data analysis with genome sequence analysis to predict DNA sequences in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides that bind the regulators PrrA, PpsR and FnrL. These predictions were made by using hierarchical clustering to detect genes that share similar expression patterns. The DNA sequences upstream of these genes were then searched for possible transcription factor recognition motifs that may be involved in their co-regulation. The approach used promises to be widely applicable for the prediction of cis-acting DNA binding elements. Using this method we were independently able to detect and extend the previously described consensus sequences that have been suggested to bind FnrL and PpsR. In addition we have predicted sequences that may be recognized by the global regulator PrrA. Our results support the earlier suggestions that the DNA binding sequence of PrrA may have a variable sized gap between its conserved block elements. Using the predicted DNA binding sequences, we have performed a whole genome scale analysis to determine the relative importance of the interplay between these three regulators PpsR, FnrL and PrrA. Results of this analysis showed that, compared to the regulation by PpsR and FnrL, a much larger number of genes are candidates to be regulated by PrrA. Our study demonstrates by example that integration of multiple data types can be a powerful approach for inferring transcriptional regulatory patterns in microbial systems, and it allowed us to detect the photosynthesis related regulatory patterns in R. sphaeroides.

  3. Detection of Onchocerca volvulus in Latin American black flies for pool screening PCR using high-throughput automated DNA isolation for transmission surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Gopal, Hemavathi; Adeleke, Monsuru Adebayo; De Luna-Santillana, Erick Jesús; Gurrola-Reyes, J Natividad; Guo, Xianwu

    2013-11-01

    The posttreatment entomological surveillance (ES) of onchocerciasis in Latin America requires quite large numbers of flies to be examined for parasite infection to prove that the control strategies have worked and that the infection is on the path of elimination. Here, we report a high-throughput automated DNA isolation of Onchocerca volvulus for PCR using a major Latin American black fly vector of onchocerciasis. The sensitivity and relative effectiveness of silica-coated paramagnetic beads was evaluated in comparison with phenol chloroform (PC) method which is known as the gold standard of DNA extraction for ES in Latin America. The automated method was optimized in the laboratory and validated in the field to detect parasite DNA in Simulium ochraceum sensu lato flies in comparison with PC. The optimization of the automated method showed that it is sensitive to detect O. volvulus with a pool size of 100 flies as compared with PC which utilizes 50 flies pool size. The validation of the automated method in comparison with PC in an endemic community showed that 5/67 and 3/134 heads pools were positive for the two methods, respectively. There was no statistical variation (P < 0.05) in the estimation of transmission indices generated by automated method when compared with PC method. The fact that the automated method is sensitive to pool size up to 100 confers advantage over PC method and can, therefore, be employed in large-scale ES of onchocerciasis transmission in endemic areas of Latin America. PMID:24030195

  4. Pooled genomic indexing of rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Harris, Ronald A.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Ken J.; Hodgson, Anne; Cree, Andrew; Dai, Weilie; Csuros, Miklos; Zhu, Baoli; de Jong, Pieter J.; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Pooled genomic indexing (PGI) is a method for mapping collections of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones between species by using a combination of clone pooling and DNA sequencing. PGI has been used to map a total of 3858 BAC clones covering ∼24% of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) genome onto 4178 homologous loci in the human genome. A number of intrachromosomal rearrangements were detected by mapping multiple segments within the individual rhesus BACs onto multiple disjoined loci in the human genome. Transversal pooling designs involving shuffled BAC arrays were employed for robust mapping even with modest DNA sequence read coverage. A further innovation, short-tag pooled genomic indexing (ST-PGI), was also introduced to further improve the economy of mapping by sequencing multiple, short, mapable tags within a single sequencing reaction. PMID:15687293

  5. Identification of resistance to new virulent races of rust in sunflowers and validation of DNA markers in the gene pool.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lili; Gulya, Tom; Seiler, Gerald J; Hulke, Brent S; Vick, Brady A

    2011-02-01

    Sunflower rust, caused by Puccinia helianthi, is a prevalent disease in many countries throughout the world. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Agricultural Research Service, Sunflower Research Unit has released rust resistant breeding materials for several decades. However, constantly coevolving rust populations have formed new virulent races to which current hybrids have little resistance. The objectives of this study were to identify resistance to race 336, the predominant race in North America, and to race 777, the most virulent race currently known, and to validate molecular markers known to be linked to rust resistance genes in the sunflower gene pool. A total of 104 entries, including 66 released USDA inbred lines, 14 USDA interspecific germplasm lines, and 24 foreign germplasms, all developed specifically for rust resistance, were tested for their reaction to races 336 and 777. Only 13 of the 104 entries tested were resistant to both races, whereas another six were resistant only to race 336. The interspecific germplasm line, Rf ANN-1742, was resistant to both races and was identified as a new rust resistance source. A selection of 24 lines including 19 lines resistant to races 777 and/or 336 was screened with DNA markers linked to rust resistance genes R(1), R(2), R(4u), and R(5). The results indicated that the existing resistant lines are diverse in rust resistance genes. Durable genetic resistance through gene pyramiding will be effective for the control of rust.

  6. Mutation analysis with random DNA identifiers (MARDI) catalogs Pig-a mutations in heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Revollo, Javier R; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Pearce, Mason G; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N

    2016-03-01

    Identification of mutations induced by xenotoxins is a common task in the field of genetic toxicology. Mutations are often detected by clonally expanding potential mutant cells and genotyping each viable clone by Sanger sequencing. Such a "clone-by-clone" approach requires significant time and effort, and sometimes is even impossible to implement. Alternative techniques for efficient mutation identification would greatly benefit both basic and regulatory genetic toxicology research. Here, we report the development of Mutation Analysis with Random DNA Identifiers (MARDI), a novel high-fidelity Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach that circumvents clonal expansion and directly catalogs mutations in pools of mutant cells. MARDI uses oligonucleotides carrying Random DNA Identifiers (RDIs) to tag progenitor DNA molecules before PCR amplification, enabling clustering of descendant DNA molecules and eliminating NGS- and PCR-induced sequencing artifacts. When applied to the Pig-a cDNA analysis of heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats, MARDI detected nearly all Pig-a mutations that were previously identified by conventional clone-by-clone analysis and discovered many additional ones consistent with DMBA exposure: mostly A to T transversions, with the mutated A located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. PMID:26683280

  7. Identifying DNA Binding Motifs by Combining Data from Different Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Linyong; Resat, Haluk; Nagib Callaos; Katsuhisa Horimoto; Jake Chen; Amy Sze Chan

    2004-07-19

    A transcription factor regulates the expression of its target genes by binding to their operator regions. It functions by affecting the interactions between RNA polymerases and the gene's promoter. Many transcription factors bind to their targets by recognizing a specific DNA sequence pattern, which is referred to as a consensus sequence or a motif. Since it would remove the possible biases, combining biological data from different sources can be expected to improve the quality of the information extracted from the biological data. We analyzed the microarray gene expression data and the organism's genome sequence jointly to determine the transcription factor recognition sequences with more accuracy. Utilizing such a data integration approach, we have investigated the regulation of the photosynthesis genes of the purple non-sulphur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The photosynthesis genes in this organism are tightly regulated as a function of environmental growth conditions by three major regulatory systems, PrrB/PrrA, AppA/PpsR and FnrL. In this study, we have detected a previously undefined PrrA consensus sequence, improved the previously known DNA-binding motif of PpsR, and confirmed the consensus sequence of the global regulator FnrL.

  8. Genome-wide Association Study of Subtype-Specific Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Alleles Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Swenerton, Kenneth D.; Chenevix–Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia–Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Flanagan, James M.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks–Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS (56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC), selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging 6 loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P<0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR=1.17, P=0.029, n=1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P=0.014, n=2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR=0.86, P=0.0043, n=892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR=0.84, P=0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P<0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  9. The essentiality of folate for the maintenance of deoxynucleotide precursor pools, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle progression in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    James, S J; Miller, B J; Cross, D R; McGarrity, L J; Morris, S M

    1993-01-01

    The fidelity and progression of DNA synthesis is critically dependent on the correct balance and availability of the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) precursors for the polymerases involved in DNA replication and repair. Because folate-derived one-carbon groups are essential for the de novo synthesis of both purines and pyrimidines, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of folate deprivation on deoxynucleotide pool levels and cell cycle progression. Primary cultures of phytohemagglutin (PHA)-stimulated splenocytes were used as the cellular model. T-cells and macrophages were purified from spleen cell suspensions obtained from F344 rats and recombined in culture. The cells were harvested after a 66-hr incubation with PHA and analyzed for nucleotide levels by reverse-phase HPLC with diode array detection. The proportion of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle was determined by bivariate flow cytometric measurement of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and DNA content (propidium iodide staining). PHA-stimulated T-cells cultured in medium lacking folate and methionine manifested significant decreases in the deoxynucleotides dCTP, dTMP, dGTP, and dATP relative to cells cultured in complete medium. The reduction in dNTP pools was associated with a decrease in the corresponding ribonucleotide pools. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a 2-fold increase in S and G2/mitosis (G2/M) DNA content in PHA-stimulated cells cultured in the medium lacking folate and methionine, which suggests a delay in cell cycle progression. These alterations in DNA content were accompanied by a 5-fold decrease in BrdU incorporation relative to PHA-stimulated cells cultured in complete medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8013406

  10. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M; Swenerton, Kenneth D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Thompson, Pamela J; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H; Flanagan, James M; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  11. Measuring intermolecular rupture forces with a combined TIRF-optical trap microscope and DNA curtains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Yil; Wang, Feng; Fazio, Teresa; Wind, Shalom; Greene, Eric C

    2012-10-01

    We report a new approach to probing DNA-protein interactions by combining optical tweezers with a high-throughput DNA curtains technique. Here we determine the forces required to remove the individual lipid-anchored DNA molecules from the bilayer. We demonstrate that DNA anchored to the bilayer through a single biotin-streptavidin linkage withstands ∼20pN before being pulled free from the bilayer, whereas molecules anchored to the bilayer through multiple attachment points can withstand ⩾65pN; access to this higher force regime is sufficient to probe the responses of protein-DNA interactions to force changes. As a proof-of-principle, we concurrently visualized DNA-bound fluorescently-tagged RNA polymerase while simultaneously stretching the DNA molecules. This work presents a step towards a powerful experimental platform that will enable concurrent visualization of DNA curtains while applying defined forces through optical tweezers.

  12. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a new repetitive DNA family recently amplified in the Mesoamerican gene pool of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago; dos Santos, Karla G B; Fonsêca, Artur; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is one of the most important crop plants. About 50% of its genome is composed of repetitive sequences, but only a little fraction was isolated and characterized so far. In this paper, a new repetitive DNA family from the species, named PvMeso, was isolated and characterized in both gene pools of P. vulgaris (Andean and Mesoamerican) and related species. Two fragments, 1.7 and 2.3 kb long, were cloned from BAC 255F18, which has previously shown a repetitive pattern. The subclone PvMeso-31 showed a terminal block in chromosome 7. This subclone contains a 1,705 bp long, AT-rich repeat with small internal repeats and shares a 1.2 kb region with PvMeso-47, derived from the 2.3 kb fragment. The presence of this repetitive block was restricted to Mesoamerican accessions of the common bean. In P. acutifolius, P. leptostachyus and Andean P. vulgaris, only a faint, 2.3 kb fragment was visualized in Southern experiments. Moreover, in Mesoamerican accessions, two other fragments (1.7 kb and 3.4 kb) were strongly labelled as well. Taken together, our results indicate that PvMeso is a recently emerged, repeat family initially duplicated in chromosome 11, on ancestral Mesoamerican accession, and later amplified in chromosome 7, after the split of the two major gene pools of the common bean.

  14. High-density SNP screen of sodium channel genes by haplotype tagging and DNA pooling for association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Makoff, Andrew; Lai, Teck; Barratt, Catherine; Valentin, Antonio; Moran, Nick; Asherson, Philip; Nashef, Lina

    2010-04-01

    We have investigated seven voltage-gated sodium channel genes for association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Probands and control DNA were grouped into pools and used to screen 85 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), mostly HapMap SNPs tagging the common variation in these genes. Twelve SNPs exhibiting an allele frequency difference between pools were genotyped individually in our sample of 232 probands, 313 controls, and 95 parent-proband trios. Two SNPs, in SCN1A and SCN8A, were associated by allele and genotype at nominal level of significance, but were not significant after Bonferroni correction. Two SCN2A SNPs (rs3943809 and rs16850331) were associated by case-control with a subgroup with IGE and history of febrile seizures and also by transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) in parent-proband trios. Both SNPs are part of a linkage disequilibrium (LD) cluster of 38 SNPs, but none are obvious functional variants. The association of rs3943809 with the febrile seizure subgroup (p = 0.0004) remains significant after the conservative Bonferroni correction for multiple testing.

  15. The allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay, a new real-time PCR method for fine quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Billard, A; Laval, V; Fillinger, S; Leroux, P; Lachaise, H; Beffa, R; Debieu, D

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of fungicide resistance within populations of plant pathogens must be monitored to develop management strategies. Such monitoring often is based on microbiological tests, such as microtiter plate assays. Molecular monitoring methods can be considered if the mutations responsible for resistance have been identified. Allele-specific real-time PCR approaches, such as amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR and mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, are, despite their moderate efficacy, among the most precise methods for refining SNP quantification. We describe here a new real-time PCR method, the allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay (ASPPAA PCR). This method makes use of mixtures of allele-specific minor groove binder (MGB) TaqMan probes and allele-specific primers for the fine quantification of SNPs from a pool of DNA extracted from a mixture of conidia. It was developed for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is responsible for resistance to the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide fenhexamid, resulting in the replacement of the phenylalanine residue (encoded by the TTC codon) in position 412 of the enzymatic target (3-ketoreductase) by a serine (TCC), valine (GTC), or isoleucine (ATC) residue. The levels of nonspecific amplification with the ASPPAA PCR were reduced at least four times below the level of currently available allele-specific real-time PCR approaches due to strong allele specificity in amplification cycles, including two allele selectors. This new method can be used to quantify a complex quadriallelic SNP in a DNA pool with a false discovery rate of less than 1%.

  16. Combining qualitative and quantitative imaging evaluation for the assessment of genomic DNA integrity: The SPIDIA experience.

    PubMed

    Ciniselli, Chiara Maura; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Pazzagli, Mario; Hartmann, Christina C; Ibrahim-Gawel, Hady; Verderio, Paolo

    2015-06-15

    In this note, we present an ad hoc procedure that combines qualitative (visual evaluation) and quantitative (ImageJ software) evaluations of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) images to assess the genomic DNA (gDNA) integrity of analyzed samples. This procedure could be suitable for the analysis of a large number of images by taking into consideration both the expertise of researchers and the objectiveness of the software. We applied this procedure on the first SPIDIA DNA External Quality Assessment (EQA) samples. Results show that the classification obtained by this ad hoc procedure allows a more accurate evaluation of gDNA integrity with respect to a single approach.

  17. Arsenic-Induced Antioxidant Depletion, Oxidative DNA Breakage, and Tissue Damages are Prevented by the Combined Action of Folate and Vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a grade I human carcinogen. It acts by disrupting one-carbon (1C) metabolism and cellular methyl (-CH3) pool. The -CH3 group helps in arsenic disposition and detoxification of the biological systems. Vitamin B12 and folate, the key promoters of 1C metabolism were tested recently (daily 0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w. of rat for 28 days) to evaluate their combined efficacy in the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakage and tissue damages. The selected tissues like intestine (first-pass site), liver (major xenobiotic metabolizer) and lung (major arsenic accumulator) were collected from arsenic-ingested (0.6 ppm/same schedule) female rats. The hemo-toxicity and liver and kidney functions were monitored. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed humans can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the supplementation of physiological/therapeutic dose of vitamin B12 and folate protected the rodents significantly from arsenic-induced DNA damage (DNA fragmentation and comet assay) and hepatic and renal tissue degeneration (histo-architecture, HE staining). The level of arsenic-induced free-radical products (TBARS and conjugated diene) was significantly declined by the restored actions of several antioxidants viz. urate, thiol, catalase, xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the tissues of vitamin-supplemented group. The alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, urea and creatinine (hepatic and kidney toxicity marker), and lactate dehydrogenase (tissue degeneration marker) were significantly impaired in the arsenic-fed group. But a significant protection was evident in the vitamin-supplemented group. In conclusion, the combined action of folate and B12 results in the restitution in the 1C metabolic pathway and cellular methyl pool. The cumulative outcome from the enhanced arsenic methylation and antioxidative capacity was protective against arsenic induced mutagenic DNA breakages and tissue damages.

  18. Arsenic-Induced Antioxidant Depletion, Oxidative DNA Breakage, and Tissue Damages are Prevented by the Combined Action of Folate and Vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a grade I human carcinogen. It acts by disrupting one-carbon (1C) metabolism and cellular methyl (-CH3) pool. The -CH3 group helps in arsenic disposition and detoxification of the biological systems. Vitamin B12 and folate, the key promoters of 1C metabolism were tested recently (daily 0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w. of rat for 28 days) to evaluate their combined efficacy in the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakage and tissue damages. The selected tissues like intestine (first-pass site), liver (major xenobiotic metabolizer) and lung (major arsenic accumulator) were collected from arsenic-ingested (0.6 ppm/same schedule) female rats. The hemo-toxicity and liver and kidney functions were monitored. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed humans can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the supplementation of physiological/therapeutic dose of vitamin B12 and folate protected the rodents significantly from arsenic-induced DNA damage (DNA fragmentation and comet assay) and hepatic and renal tissue degeneration (histo-architecture, HE staining). The level of arsenic-induced free-radical products (TBARS and conjugated diene) was significantly declined by the restored actions of several antioxidants viz. urate, thiol, catalase, xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the tissues of vitamin-supplemented group. The alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, urea and creatinine (hepatic and kidney toxicity marker), and lactate dehydrogenase (tissue degeneration marker) were significantly impaired in the arsenic-fed group. But a significant protection was evident in the vitamin-supplemented group. In conclusion, the combined action of folate and B12 results in the restitution in the 1C metabolic pathway and cellular methyl pool. The cumulative outcome from the enhanced arsenic methylation and antioxidative capacity was protective against arsenic induced mutagenic DNA breakages and tissue damages. PMID

  19. Enhancement of anti-proliferative activities of Metformin, when combined with Celecoxib, without increasing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Asad; Ashraf, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Attiq, Ali; Ali, Sarwat

    2016-07-01

    Pathophysiological changes in diabetes like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia predispose cells to malignant transformation and damage DNA repair mechanism. This study was designed to explore the potential synergistic toxic effects of anti-diabetic drug (Metformin), and an analgesic drug (Celecoxib) at cellular level. MTT assay run on Vero cell line revealed that the combinations of Metformin and Celecoxib augment the anti-proliferative effects, whereas Single cell gel electrophoresis spotlighted that Metformin produce non-significant DNA damage with the threshold concentration of 400μg/ml in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (lymphocytes and monocytes), while Celecoxib produced significant (P<0.05) DNA damage (class III comets) above the concentration of 75μg/ml, however the DNA damage or DNA tail protrusions by combinations of both drugs were less than what was observed with Celecoxib alone. Metformin or Celecoxib did not appear mutagenic against any mutant strains (TA 100 and TA 98) but their combination exhibited slight mutagenicity at much higher concentration. The results obtained at concentrations higher than the therapeutic level of drugs and reflect that Metformin in combination with Celecoxib synergistically inhibits the cell proliferation in a concentration dependent pattern. Since, this increase in cytotoxicity did not confer an increase in DNA damage; this combination could be adopted to inhibit the growth of malignant cell without producing any genotoxic or mutagenic effects at cellular level. PMID:27327526

  20. Graphene quantums dots combined with endonuclease cleavage and bidentate chelation for highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent DNA biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jing; Liu, Shanshan; Tu, Wenwen; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-01-20

    A novel strategy for highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection of DNA was proposed based on site-specific cleavage of BamHI endonuclease combined with the excellent ECL activity of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and bidentate chelation of the dithiocarbamate DNA (DTC-DNA) probe assembly. The difference between photoluminescence and ECL spectral peaks suggested that a negligible defect existed on the GQDs surface for generation of an ECL signal. The formed DTC-DNA was directly attached to the gold surface by bidentate anchoring (S-Au-S bonds), which conferred a strong affinity between the ligands and the gold surface, increasing the robustness of DNA immobilization on the gold surface. BamHI endonuclease site-specifically recognized and cleaved the duplex symmetrical sequence, which made the double-stranded DNA fragments and GQDs break off from the electrode surface, inducing a decrease of the ECL signal. Using hepatitis C virus-1b genotype complementary DNA (HCV-1b cDNA) as a model, a novel signal-off ECL DNA biosensor was developed based on variation of the ECL intensity before and after digestion of the DNA hybrid. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the successful fabrication of the ECL DNA biosensor. This ECL biosensor for HCV-1b cDNA determination exhibited a linear range from 5 fM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.45 fM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and showed satisfactory selectivity and good stability, which validated the feasibility of the designed strategy. The proposed strategy may be conveniently combined with other specific biological recognition events for expansion of the biosensing application, especially in clinical diagnoses. PMID:25523862

  1. Deep Sequencing of the Nicastrin Gene in Pooled DNA, the Identification of Genetic Variants That Affect Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lupton, Michelle K.; Proitsi, Petroula; Danillidou, Makrina; Tsolaki, Magda; Hamilton, Gillian; Wroe, Richard; Pritchard, Megan; Lord, Kathryn; Martin, Belinda M.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Harold, Denise; Hollingworth, Paul; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Nicastrin is an obligatory component of the γ-secretase; the enzyme complex that leads to the production of Aβ fragments critically central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Analyses of the effects of common variation in this gene on risk for late onset AD have been inconclusive. We investigated the effect of rare variation in the coding regions of the Nicastrin gene in a cohort of AD patients and matched controls using an innovative pooling approach and next generation sequencing. Five SNPs were identified and validated by individual genotyping from 311 cases and 360 controls. Association analysis identified a non-synonymous rare SNP (N417Y) with a statistically higher frequency in cases compared to controls in the Greek population (OR 3.994, CI 1.105–14.439, p = 0.035). This finding warrants further investigation in a larger cohort and adds weight to the hypothesis that rare variation explains some of genetic heritability still to be identified in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21364883

  2. Triggered polycatenated DNA scaffolds for DNA sensors and aptasensors by a combination of rolling circle amplification and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Li, Li; Zhang, Shusheng

    2010-11-15

    The concept of triggered polycatenated DNA scaffolds has been elegantly introduced into ultrasensitive biosensing applications by a combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA) and DNAzyme amplification. As compared to traditional methods in which one target could only initiate the formation of one circular template for RCA reaction, in the present study two species of linear single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) monomers are self-assembled into mechanically interlocked polycatenated nanostructures on capture probe-tagged magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) only upon the introduction of one base mutant DNA sequence as initiator for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis. The resultant topologically polycatenated DNA ladder is further available for RCA process by using the serially ligated circular DNA as template for the synthesis of hemin/G-quadruplex HRP-mimicking DNAzyme chains, which act as biocatalytic labels for the luminol-H(2)O(2) chemiluminescence (CL) system. Notably, the problem of high background induced by excess hemin itself is circumvented by immobilizing the biotinylated RCA products on streptavidin-modified MNPs via biotin-streptavidin interaction. Similarly, a universal strategy is contrived by substitutedly employing aptamer as initiator for the construction of polycatenated DNA scaffolds to accomplish ultrasensitive detection of proteins based on structure-switching of aptamer upon target binding, which is demonstrated by using thrombin as a model analyte in this study. Overall, with two successive amplification steps and one magnetic separation procedure, this flexible biosensing system exhibits not only high sensitivity and specificity with the detection limits of SNPs and thrombin as low as 71 aM and 6.6 pM, respectively, but also excellent performance in real human serum assay with no PCR preamplification for SNPs assay. Given the unique and attractive characteristics, this study illustrates the potential of DNA nanotechnology in bioanalytical

  3. Evaluation of large-scale genetic structure in complex demographic and historical scenarios: the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome pools of the Iberian Atlantic façade.

    PubMed

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Roca, Agustín; García-Vazquez, Eva; López, Belén

    2014-04-01

    Genetic structural patterns of human populations are usually a combination of long-term evolutionary forces and short-term social, cultural, and demographic processes. Recently, using mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome loci, various studies in northern Spain have found evidence that the geographical distribution of Iron Age tribal peoples might have influenced current patterns of genetic structuring in several autochthonous populations. Using the wealth of data that are currently available from the whole territory of the Iberian Peninsula, we have evaluated its genetic structuring in the spatial scale of the Atlantic façade. Hierarchical tree modeling procedures, combined with a classic analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), were used to model known sociocultural divisions from the third century BCE to the eighth century CE, contrasting them with uniparental marker data. Our results show that, while mountainous and abrupt areas of the Iberian North bear the signals of long-term isolation in their maternal and paternal gene pools, the makeup of the Atlantic façade as a whole can be related to tribal population groups that predate the Roman conquest of the Peninsula. The maintenance through time of such a structure can be related to the numerous geographic barriers of the Iberian mainland, which have historically conditioned its settlement patterns and the occurrence of genetic drift processes. PMID:24375152

  4. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  5. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability

    PubMed Central

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H.; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  6. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    SciTech Connect

    Barends, Thomas R. M.; Brosi, Richard W. W.; Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten; Seidel, Ralf; Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine; Bittl, Robert; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal part of T. thermophilus DnaJ unexpectedly showed an ordered GF domain and guided the design of a construct enabling the first structure determination of a complete DnaJ cochaperone molecule. By combining the crystal structures with spin-labelling EPR and cross-linking in solution, a dynamic view of this flexible molecule was developed. Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ.

  7. Low-density lipoprotein peptide-combined DNA nanocomplex as an efficient anticancer drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Tao, Jun; Hua, Haiying; Sun, Pengchao; Zhao, Yongxing

    2015-08-01

    DNA is a type of potential biomaterials for drug delivery due to its nanoscale geometry, loading capacity of therapeutics, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Unfortunately, DNA is easily degraded by DNases in the body circulation and has low intracellular uptake. In the present study, we selected three cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor targeted peptide (RLT), to modify DNA and improve the issues. A potent anti-tumor anthracycline-doxorubicin (DOX) was intercalated into DNA non-covalently and the DOX/DNA was then combined with PEI, CTAB, and RLT, respectively. Compact nanocomplexes were formed by electrostatic interaction and could potentially protect DNA from DNases. More importantly, RLT had the potential to enhance intracellular uptake by LDL receptor mediated endocytosis. In a series of in vitro experiments, RLT complexed DNA enhanced intracellular delivery of DOX, increased tumor cell death and intracellular ROS production, and reduced intracellular elimination of DOX. All results suggested that the easily prepared and targeted RLT/DNA nanocomplexes had great potential to be developed into a formulation for doxorubicin with enhanced anti-tumor activity.

  8. A whole genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting milk protein percentage in Israeli-Holstein cattle, by means of selective milk DNA pooling in a daughter design, using an adjusted false discovery rate criterion.

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, M O; Lipkin, E; Khutoreskaya, G; Tchourzyna, E; Soller, M; Friedmann, A

    2001-01-01

    Selective DNA pooling was employed in a daughter design to screen all bovine autosomes for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting estimated breeding value for milk protein percentage (EBVP%). Milk pools prepared from high and low daughters of each of seven sires were genotyped for 138 dinucleotide microsatellites. Shadow-corrected estimates of sire allele frequencies were compared between high and low pools. An adjusted false discovery rate (FDR) method was employed to calculate experimentwise significance levels and empirical power. Significant associations with milk protein percentage were found for 61 of the markers (adjusted FDR = 0.10; estimated power, 0.68). The significant markers appear to be linked to 19--28 QTL. Mean allele substitution effects of the putative QTL averaged 0.016 (0.009--0.028) in units of the within-sire family standard deviation of EBVP% and summed to 0.460 EBVP%. Overall QTL heterozygosity was 0.40. The identified QTL appear to account for all of the variation in EBVP% in the population. Through use of selective DNA pooling, 4400 pool data points provided the statistical power of 600,000 individual data points. PMID:11290723

  9. Female gene pools of Berber and Arab neighboring communities in central Tunisia: microstructure of mtDNA variation in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Cherni, Lotfi; Loueslati, Besma Yaacoubi; Pereira, Luísa; Ennafaâ, Hajer; Amorim, António; El Gaaied, Amel Ben Ammar

    2005-02-01

    North African populations are considered genetically closer to Eurasians than to sub-Saharans. However, they display a considerably high mtDNA heterogeneity among them, namely in the frequencies of the U6, East African, and sub-Saharan haplogroups. In this study, we describe and compare the female gene pools of two neighboring Tunisian populations, Kesra (Berber) and Zriba (non-Berber), which have contrasting historical backgrounds. Both populations presented lower diversity values than those observed for other North African populations, and they were the only populations not showing significant negative Fu's F(S) values. Kesra displayed a much higher proportion of typical sub-Saharan haplotypes (49%, including 4.2% of M1 haplogroup) than Zriba (8%). With respect to U6 sequences, frequencies were low (2% in Kesra and 8% in Zriba), and all belonged to the subhaplogroup U6a. An analysis of these data in the context of North Africa reveals that the emerging picture is complex, because Zriba would match the profile of a Berber Moroccan population, whereas Kesra, which shows twice the frequency of sub-Saharan lineages normally observed in northern coastal populations, would match a western Saharan population except for the low U6 frequency. The North African patchy mtDNA landscape has no parallel in other regions of the world and increasing the number of sampled populations has not been accompanied by any substantial increase in our understanding of its phylogeography. Available data up to now rely on sampling small, scattered populations, although they are carefully characterized in terms of their ethnic, linguistic, and historical backgrounds. It is therefore doubtful that this picture truly represents the complex historical demography of the region rather than being just the result of the type of samplings performed so far.

  10. Fluorometric identification of 5-methylcytosine modification in DNA: combination of photosensitized oxidation and invasive cleavage.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hisatsugu; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2008-01-01

    An efficient fluorometric detection system of DNA methylation has been developed by a combination of a photooxidative DNA cleavage reaction with 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) chromophore and an invasive cleavage reaction with human Flap endonuclease-1. Enzymatic treatment of a mixture of photochemically fragmented target oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) at 5-methylcytosine mC) and hairpin-like probe oligomer possessing a fluorophore (F) and a quencher (D) resulted in a dramatic enhancement of fluorescence. In contrast, fluorescence emission for the ODN containing cytosine but not mC at the target sequence was extremely weak. In addition, by monitoring the fluorescence change, this system allows for the detection of mC in DNA at subfemtomole amounts. This system would provide a highly sensitive protocol for determining the methylation status in DNA by fluorescence emission.

  11. STED nanoscopy combined with optical tweezers reveals protein dynamics on densely covered DNA (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Iddo; Sitters, Gerrit; Broekmans, Onno D.; Farge, Géraldine; Menges, Carolin; Wende, Wolfgang; Hell, Stefan W.; Peterman, Erwin J.; Wuite, Gijs J.

    2014-09-01

    Dense coverage of DNA by proteins is a ubiquitous feature of cellular processes such as DNA organization, replication and repair. We present a single-molecule approach capable of visualizing individual DNA-binding proteins on densely covered DNA and in the presence of high protein concentrations. Our approach combines optical tweezers with multicolor confocal and stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy. Proteins on DNA are visualized at a resolution of 50 nm, a sixfold resolution improvement over that of confocal microscopy. High temporal resolution (<50 ms) is ensured by fast one-dimensional beam scanning. Individual trajectories of proteins translocating on DNA can thus be distinguished and tracked with high precision. We demonstrate our multimodal approach by visualizing the assembly of dense nucleoprotein filaments with unprecedented spatial resolution in real time. Experimental access to the force-dependent kinetics and motility of DNA-associating proteins at biologically relevant protein densities is essential for linking idealized in vitro experiments with the in vivo situation.

  12. Combined activation of methyl paraben by light irradiation and esterase metabolism toward oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Matsunami, Shinpei; Ueda, Koji; Kojima, Nakao

    2008-08-01

    Methyl paraben (MP) is often used as a preservative in foods, drugs, and cosmetics because of its high reliability in safety based on the rapid excretion and nonaccumulation following administration. Light irradiation sometimes produces unexpected activity from chemicals such as MP; furthermore, there is ample opportunity for MP to be exposed to sunlight. Here, we investigated whether MP shows DNA damage after sunlight irradiation. Two major photoproducts, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA) and 3-hydroxy methyl paraben (MP-3OH), were detected after sunlight irradiation to an aqueous MP solution. Both photoproducts were inactive in the in vitro DNA damage assay that measures oxidized guanine formed in calf thymus DNA in the presence of divalent copper ion, a known mediator of oxidative DNA damage. Simulated MP metabolism using dermal tissues after light irradiation produced these two photoproducts, which reacted with a microsomal fraction (S9) of the skin. A metabolite from MP-3OH, not PHBA, caused distinct DNA damage in the in vitro assay. This active metabolite was identified as protocatechuic acid, a hydrolyzed MP-3OH product. In addition, NADH, a cellular reductant, enhanced DNA damage by approximately five times. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species generated by the redox cycle via metal ion and catechol autoxidation are participating in oxidative DNA damage. This study reveals that MP might cause skin damage involving carcinogenesis through the combined activation of sunlight irradiation and skin esterases.

  13. [Combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA; a model with nearest interactions].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the earlier developed combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA, a model with all nearest interactions between nucleobases is proposed. It is shown that the transfer rates for various types of nucleotide sequences calculated within this model are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Synergistic antitumor efficacy of combined DNA vaccines targeting tumor cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Lin; Du, Zhiyan; Gao, Jiangping; Yu, Jiyun

    2015-09-18

    To further enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA vaccine, we proposed a synergistic strategy that targeted tumor cells and angiogenesis simultaneously. In this study, a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon DNA vaccine expressing 1-4 domains of murine VEGFR2 and IL12 was constructed, and was named pSVK-VEGFR2-GFc-IL12 (CAVE). The expression of VEGFR2 antigen and IL12 adjuvant molecule in 293T cells in vitro were verified by western blot and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Then CAVE was co-immunized with CAVA, a SFV replicon DNA vaccine targeting survivin and β-hCG antigens constructed previously. The antitumor efficacy of our combined replicon vaccines was evaluated in mice model and the possible mechanism was further investigated. The combined vaccines could elicit efficient humoral and cellular immune responses against survivin, β-hCG and VEGFR2 simultaneously. Compared with CAVE or CAVA vaccine alone, the combined vaccines inhibited the tumor growth and improved the survival rate in B16 melanoma mice model more effectively. Furthermore, the intratumoral microvessel density was lowest in combined vaccines group than CAVE or CAVA alone group. Therefore, this synergistic strategy of DNA vaccines for tumor treatment results in an increased antitumor efficacy, and may be more suitable for translation to future research and clinic. PMID:26253468

  15. Functional Flow Patterns and Static Blood Pooling in Tumors Revealed by Combined Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Yin, Melissa; Adam, Dan; Foster, F Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in tumor perfusion and microenvironment have been shown to be associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, raising the need for noninvasive methods of tracking these changes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging serve as promising candidates-one has the ability to measure tissue perfusion, whereas the other can be used to monitor tissue oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the different functional parameters measured with DCEUS and PA imaging, using two morphologically different hind-limb tumor models and drug-induced alterations in an orthotopic breast tumor model. Imaging results showed some correlation between perfusion and oxygen saturation maps and the ability to sensitively monitor antivascular treatment. In addition, DCEUS measurements revealed different vascular densities in the core of specific tumors compared with their rims. Noncorrelated perfusion and hemoglobin concentration measurements facilitated discrimination between blood lakes and necrotic areas. Taken together, our results illustrate the utility of a combined contrast-enhanced ultrasound method with photoacoustic imaging to visualize blood flow patterns in tumors. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4320-31. ©2016 AACR.

  16. The Updated Phylogenies of the Phasianidae Based on Combined Data of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yong-Yi; Dai, Kun; Cao, Xue; Murphy, Robert W.; Shen, Xue-Juan; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of species in the Phasianidae, Order Galliformes, are the object of intensive study. However, convergent morphological evolution and rapid species radiation result in much ambiguity in the group. Further, matrilineal (mtDNA) genealogies conflict with trees based on nuclear DNA retrotransposable elements. Herein, we analyze 39 nearly complete mitochondrial genomes (three new) and up to seven nuclear DNA segments. We combine these multiple unlinked, more informative genetic markers to infer historical relationships of the major groups of phasianids. The nuclear DNA tree is largely congruent with the tree derived from mt genomes. However, branching orders of mt/nuclear trees largely conflict with those based on retrotransposons. For example, Gallus/Bambusicola/Francolinus forms the sister-group of Coturnix/Alectoris in the nuclear/mtDNA trees, yet the tree based on retrotransposable elements roots the former at the base of the tree and not with the latter. Further, while peafowls cluster with Gallus/Coturnix in the mt tree, they root at the base of the phasianids following Gallus in the tree based on retrotransposable elements. The conflicting branch orders in nuclear/mtDNA and retrotransposons-based trees in our study reveal the complex topology of the Phasianidae. PMID:24748132

  17. A DNA-based system for selecting and displaying the combined result of two input variables

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huajie; Wang, Jianbang; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Gothelf, Kurt V.

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based technologies for biosensing or bio-regulation produce huge amounts of rich high-dimensional information. There is a consequent need for flexible means to combine diverse pieces of such information to form useful derivative outputs, and to display those immediately. Here we demonstrate this capability in a DNA-based system that takes two input numbers, represented in DNA strands, and returns the result of their multiplication, writing this as a number in a display. Unlike a conventional calculator, this system operates by selecting the result from a library of solutions rather than through logic operations. The multiplicative example demonstrated here illustrates a much more general capability—to generate a unique output for any distinct pair of DNA inputs. The system thereby functions as a lookup table and could be a key component in future, more powerful data-processing systems for diagnostics and sensing. PMID:26646059

  18. Dual Targeting Biomimetic Liposomes for Paclitaxel/DNA Combination Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xia; Fang, Gui-Qing; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs with nucleic acid has shown great promise in cancer therapy. In the present study, paclitaxel (PTX) and DNA were co-loaded in the hyaluronic acid (HA) and folate (FA)-modified liposomes (HA/FA/PPD), to obtain the dual targeting biomimetic nanovector. The prepared HA/FA/PPD exhibited nanosized structure and narrow size distributions (247.4 ± 4.2 nm) with appropriate negative charge of −25.40 ± 2.7 mV. HA/FA/PD (PTX free HA/FA/PPD) showed almost no toxicity on murine malignant melanoma cell line (B16) and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) (higher than 80% cell viability), demonstrating the safety of the blank nanovector. In comparison with the FA-modified PTX/DNA co-loaded liposomes (FA/PPD), HA/FA/PPD showed significant superiority in protecting the nanoparticles from aggregation in the presence of plasma and degradation by DNase I. Moreover, HA/FA/PPD could also significantly improve the transfection efficiency and cellular internalization rates on B16 cells comparing to that of FA/PPD (p < 0.05) and PPD (p < 0.01), demonstrating the great advantages of dual targeting properties. Furthermore, fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry results showed that PTX and DNA could be effectively co-delivered into the same tumor cell via HA/FA/PPD, contributing to PTX/DNA combination cancer treatment. In conclusion, the obtained HA/FA/PPD in the study could effectively target tumor cells, enhance transfection efficiency and subsequently achieve the co-delivery of PTX and DNA, displaying great potential for optimal combination therapy. PMID:25177862

  19. Nanoparticles and DNA - a powerful and growing functional combination in bionanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-04-01

    Functionally integrating DNA and other nucleic acids with nanoparticles in all their different physicochemical forms has produced a rich variety of composite nanomaterials which, in many cases, display unique or augmented properties due to the synergistic activity of both components. These capabilities, in turn, are attracting greater attention from various research communities in search of new nanoscale tools for diverse applications that include (bio)sensing, labeling, targeted imaging, cellular delivery, diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics, bioelectronics, and biocomputing to name just a few amongst many others. Here, we review this vibrant and growing research area from the perspective of the materials themselves and their unique capabilities. Inorganic nanocrystals such as quantum dots or those made from gold or other (noble) metals along with metal oxides and carbon allotropes are desired as participants in these hybrid materials since they can provide distinctive optical, physical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties. Beyond this, synthetic polymer-based and proteinaceous or viral nanoparticulate materials are also useful in the same role since they can provide a predefined and biocompatible cargo-carrying and targeting capability. The DNA component typically provides sequence-based addressability for probes along with, more recently, unique architectural properties that directly originate from the burgeoning structural DNA field. Additionally, DNA aptamers can also provide specific recognition capabilities against many diverse non-nucleic acid targets across a range of size scales from ions to full protein and cells. In addition to appending DNA to inorganic or polymeric nanoparticles, purely DNA-based nanoparticles have recently surfaced as an excellent assembly platform and have started finding application in areas like sensing, imaging and immunotherapy. We focus on selected and representative nanoparticle-DNA materials and highlight their

  20. Fabrication of a microarray using a combination of the large circular sense and antisense DNA.

    PubMed

    Doh, Kyung-Oh; Lee, Yun-Han; Han, Kil-Hwan; Uhm, Seok-Yong; Kim, Jong-Pil; Bae, Yun-Ui; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Moon, Ik-Jae; Park, Jong-Gu

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, single-stranded large circular (LC)-sense molecules were utilized as probes for DNA microarrays and showed stronger binding signals than those of PCR-amplified cDNA probes. A microarray experiment using 284 LC-sense DNA probes found 6 upregulated and 7 downregulated genes in A549 cells as compared to WI38VA13 cells. Repeated experiments showed largely consistent results, and microarray data strongly correlated with data acquired from quantitative real-time RT-PCR. A large array comprising 5,079 LC-sense DNA was prepared, and analysis of the mean differential expression from dye-swap experiments revealed 332 upregulated and 509 downregulated genes in A549 cells compared to WI38VA13 cells. Subsequent functional analysis using an LC-antisense library of overexpressed genes identified 28 genes involved in A549 cell growth. These experiments demonstrated the proper features of LC-sense molecules as probe DNA for microarray and the potential utility of the combination of LC-sense and -antisense libraries for an effective functional validation of genes.

  1. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  2. A platform for combined DNA and protein microarrays based on total internal reflection fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax.

  3. A Platform for Combined DNA and Protein Microarrays Based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax. PMID:22438738

  4. Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B.; Chaplin, M.

    1993-10-06

    This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.

  5. Molecular recognition of DNA-protein complexes: a straightforward method combining scanning force and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Humberto; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2010-06-01

    Combining scanning force and fluorescent microscopy allows simultaneous identification of labeled biomolecules and analysis of their nanometer level architectural arrangement. Fluorescent polystyrene nano-spheres were used as reliable objects for alignment of optical and topographic images. This allowed the precise localization of different fluorescence particles within complex molecular assemblies whose structure was mapped in nanometer detail topography. Our experiments reveal the versatility of this method for analysis of proteins and protein-DNA complexes.

  6. Augmentation of French grunt diet description using combined visual and DNA-based analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hargrove, John S.; Parkyn, Daryl C.; Murie, Debra J.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Austin, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Trophic linkages within a coral-reef ecosystem may be difficult to discern in fish species that reside on, but do not forage on, coral reefs. Furthermore, dietary analysis of fish can be difficult in situations where prey is thoroughly macerated, resulting in many visually unrecognisable food items. The present study examined whether the inclusion of a DNA-based method could improve the identification of prey consumed by French grunt, Haemulon flavolineatum, a reef fish that possesses pharyngeal teeth and forages on soft-bodied prey items. Visual analysis indicated that crustaceans were most abundant numerically (38.9%), followed by sipunculans (31.0%) and polychaete worms (5.2%), with a substantial number of unidentified prey (12.7%). For the subset of prey with both visual and molecular data, there was a marked reduction in the number of unidentified sipunculans (visual – 31.1%, combined &ndash 4.4%), unidentified crustaceans (visual &ndash 15.6%, combined &ndash 6.7%), and unidentified taxa (visual &ndash 11.1%, combined &ndash 0.0%). Utilising results from both methodologies resulted in an increased number of prey placed at the family level (visual &ndash 6, combined &ndash 33) and species level (visual &ndash 0, combined &ndash 4). Although more costly than visual analysis alone, our study demonstrated the feasibility of DNA-based identification of visually unidentifiable prey in the stomach contents of fish.

  7. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  8. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  9. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  11. Protection of pigs against Taenia solium cysticercosis using recombinant antigen or in combination with DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying-Jun; Sun, Shu-Han; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhu-Huan; Wang, Kai-Yu; Huang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Qing-Min; Wu, Dan; Zhu, Wei-Jia

    2004-09-28

    In the present study, we investigated the duration of protection afforded to pigs immunized in two different prime-boost regimens: one is homologus priming and boosting with a protein vaccine, and the other is priming with a DNA vaccine and boosting with the protein vaccine. Groups of pigs that received the same vaccination regimen were then challenged with Taenia solium eggs at 6, 12 or 20 weeks post-immunization (wpi), respectively. The results showed that all vaccinated pigs challenged at 6 or 12 wpi showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in the development of cysts. When challenged at 20 wpi, pigs primed with the DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-cC1) followed by two boosters of the protein vaccine (GST-cC1) showed significant (P < 0.05) protection against the challenge of T. solium eggs, whereas pigs receiving three injections of the protein vaccine showed no significant protection compared to non-vaccinated controls (P > 0.05). Antibody isotype assays showed that DNA prime-protein boost regimen induced a predominantly IgG2 response, compared to an IgG1 biased response for the protein prime-protein boost regimen. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from the DNA prime-protein boost group proliferated strongly in response to GST-cC1 protein, and this responsiveness persisted until 20 wpi. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of a prime-boost strategy combining DNA and protein vaccines may be better than protein alone for the longevity of protection against the challenge of T. solium eggs.

  12. Novel DNA Topoisomerase IIα Inhibitors from Combined Ligand- and Structure-Based Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Drwal, Malgorzata N.; Marinello, Jessica; Manzo, Stefano G.; Wakelin, Laurence P. G.; Capranico, Giovanni; Griffith, Renate

    2014-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes responsible for the relaxation of DNA torsional strain, as well as for the untangling of DNA duplexes after replication, and are important cancer drug targets. One class of topoisomerase inhibitors, “poisons”, binds to the transient enzyme-DNA complex which occurs during the mechanism of action, and inhibits the religation of DNA. This ultimately leads to the accumulation of DNA double strand breaks and cell death. Different types of topoisomerases occur in human cells and several poisons of topoisomerase I and II are widely used clinically. However, their use is compromised by a variety of side effects. Recent studies confirm that the inhibition of the α-isoform of topoisomerase II is responsible for the cytotoxic effect, whereas the inhibition of the β-isoform leads to development of adverse drug reactions. Thus, the discovery of agents selective for topoisomerase IIα is an important strategy for the development of topoisomerase II poisons with improved clinical profiles. Here, we present a computer-aided drug design study leading to the identification of structurally novel topoisomerase IIα poisons. The study combines ligand- and structure-based drug design methods including pharmacophore models, homology modelling, docking, and virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute compound database. From the 8 compounds identified from the computational work, 6 were tested for their capacity to poison topoisomerase II in vitro: 4 showed selective inhibitory activity for the α- over the β-isoform and 3 of these exhibited cytotoxic activity. Thus, our study confirms the applicability of computer-aided methods for the discovery of novel topoisomerase II poisons, and presents compounds which could be investigated further as selective topoisomerase IIα inhibitors. PMID:25489853

  13. Combining allele frequency uncertainty and population substructure corrections in forensic DNA calculations.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In forensic DNA calculations of relatedness of individuals and in DNA mixture analyses, at least two sources of uncertainty are present concerning the allele frequencies used for evaluating genotype probabilities when evaluating likelihoods. They are: (i) imprecision in the estimates of the allele frequencies in the population by using an inevitably finite database of DNA profiles to estimate them; and (ii) the existence of population substructure. Green and Mortera [6] showed that these effects may be taken into account individually using a common Dirichlet model within a Bayesian network formulation, but that when taken in combination this is not the case; however they suggested an approximation that could be used. Here we develop a slightly different approximation that is shown to be exact in the case of a single individual. We demonstrate the numerical closeness of the approximation using a published database of allele counts, and illustrate the effect of incorporating the approximation into calculations of a recently published statistical model of DNA mixtures. PMID:27231804

  14. Combined sequencing of mRNA and DNA from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mertes, Florian; Kuhl, Heiner; Wruck, Wasco; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2016-06-01

    Combined transcriptome and whole genome sequencing of the same ultra-low input sample down to single cells is a rapidly evolving approach for the analysis of rare cells. Besides stem cells, rare cells originating from tissues like tumor or biopsies, circulating tumor cells and cells from early embryonic development are under investigation. Herein we describe a universal method applicable for the analysis of minute amounts of sample material (150 to 200 cells) derived from sub-colony structures from human embryonic stem cells. The protocol comprises the combined isolation and separate amplification of poly(A) mRNA and whole genome DNA followed by next generation sequencing. Here we present a detailed description of the method developed and an overview of the results obtained for RNA and whole genome sequencing of human embryonic stem cells, sequencing data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE69471. PMID:27275414

  15. Combined sequencing of mRNA and DNA from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mertes, Florian; Kuhl, Heiner; Wruck, Wasco; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2016-06-01

    Combined transcriptome and whole genome sequencing of the same ultra-low input sample down to single cells is a rapidly evolving approach for the analysis of rare cells. Besides stem cells, rare cells originating from tissues like tumor or biopsies, circulating tumor cells and cells from early embryonic development are under investigation. Herein we describe a universal method applicable for the analysis of minute amounts of sample material (150 to 200 cells) derived from sub-colony structures from human embryonic stem cells. The protocol comprises the combined isolation and separate amplification of poly(A) mRNA and whole genome DNA followed by next generation sequencing. Here we present a detailed description of the method developed and an overview of the results obtained for RNA and whole genome sequencing of human embryonic stem cells, sequencing data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE69471.

  16. Determination of DNA adducts by combining acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chromatographic analysis of the carcinogen-modified nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elvis M K; Deng, Kailin; Wong, Tin-Yan; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used method of analyzing carcinogen-induced DNA adducts involves the hydrolysis of carcinogen-modified DNA samples by using a mixture of enzymes, followed by (32)P-postlabeling or liquid chromatography (LC)-based analyses of carcinogen-modified mononucleotides/nucleosides. In the present study, we report the development and application of a new approach to DNA adduct analysis by combining the H(+)/heat-catalyzed release of carcinogen-modified nucleobases and the use of LC-based methods to analyze DNA adducts. Results showed that heating the carcinogen-modified DNA samples at 70 °C for an extended period of 4 to 6 h in the presence of 0.05% HCl can efficiently induce DNA depurination, releasing the intact carcinogen-modified nucleobases for LC analyses. After optimizing the hydrolysis conditions, DNA samples with C8- and N (2) -modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, as well as N (6) -modified 2'-deoxyadenosine, were synthesized by reacting DNA with 1-nitropyrene, acetaldehyde, and aristolochic acids, respectively. These samples were then hydrolyzed, and the released nucleobase adducts were analyzed using LC-based analytical methods. Analysis results demonstrated a dose-dependent release of target DNA adducts from carcinogen-modified DNA samples, indicating that the developed H(+)/heat-catalyzed hydrolysis method was quantitative. Comparative studies with enzymatic digestion method on carcinogen-modified DNA samples revealed that the two hydrolysis methods did not yield systematically different results.

  17. Combining natural and man-made DNA tracers to advance understanding of hydrologic flow pathway evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Walter, M. T.; Lyon, S. W.; Rosqvist, G. N.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying and characterizing the sources, pathways and residence times of water and associated constituents is critical to developing improved understanding of watershed-stream connections and hydrological/ecological/biogeochemical models. To date the most robust information is obtained from integrated studies that combine natural tracers (e.g. isotopes, geochemical tracers) with controlled chemical tracer (e.g., bromide, dyes) or colloidal tracer (e.g., carboxilated microspheres, tagged clay particles, microorganisms) applications. In the presented study we explore how understanding of sources and flow pathways of water derived from natural tracer studies can be improved and expanded in space and time by simultaneously introducing man-made, synthetic DNA-based microtracers. The microtracer used were composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated. Tracer experiments using both natural tracers and the DNA-based microtracers were conducted in the sub-arctic, glacierized Tarfala (21.7 km2) catchment in northern Sweden. Isotopic hydrograph separations revealed that even though storm runoff was dominated by pre-event water the event water (i.e. rainfall) contributions to streamflow increased throughout the summer season as glacial snow cover decreased. This suggests that glaciers are a major source of the rainwater fraction in streamflow. Simultaneous injections of ten unique DNA-based microtracers confirmed this hypothesis and revealed that the transit time of water traveling from the glacier surface to the stream decreased fourfold over the summer season leading to instantaneous rainwater contributions during storm events. These results highlight that integrating simultaneous tracer injections (injecting tracers at multiple places at one time) with traditional tracer methods (sampling multiple times at one place) rather than using either approach in isolation can

  18. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. PMID:27369379

  19. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-09-30

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. PMID:27369379

  20. Swimming Pool Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... insist that the following rules are followed: Keep toys away from the pool when the pool is ... after each use. No tricycles or other riding toys at poolside. No electrical appliances near the pool. ...

  1. THE OUTDOOR POOL

    PubMed Central

    Craster, Charles V.

    1919-01-01

    That almost any bit of water will serve for a wading pool seems to be the idea in practice. Dr. Craster has tested such pools and finds that they need to be as well constructed as bathing pools and as well cared for. Chlorination is necessary when they can not otherwise be controlled. ImagesPOOL I.POOL II.POOL III.p826-a PMID:18010192

  2. LinguisticBelief and PoolEvidence

    SciTech Connect

    DARBY, JOHN

    2008-03-11

    LinguisticBelief allows the creation and analysis of combinations of linguistic variables with epistemic uncertainty for decision making. The model is solved using approximate reasoning to implement the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for combinations of variables expressed as purely linguistic fuzzy sets. PoolEvidence pools evidence for linguistic variables from many experts for input into LinguisticBelief.

  3. DNA bases assembled on the Au(110)/electrolyte interface: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Princia; Nazmutdinov, Renat R; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-02-19

    Among the low-index single-crystal gold surfaces, the Au(110) surface is the most active toward molecular adsorption and the one with fewest electrochemical adsorption data reported. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemically controlled scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been employed in the present study to address the adsorption of the four nucleobases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T), on the Au(110)-electrode surface. Au(110) undergoes reconstruction to the (1 × 3) surface in electrochemical environment, accompanied by a pair of strong voltammetry peaks in the double-layer region in acid solutions. Adsorption of the DNA bases gives featureless voltammograms with lower double-layer capacitance, suggesting that all the bases are chemisorbed on the Au(110) surface. Further investigation of the surface structures of the adlayers of the four DNA bases by EC-STM disclosed lifting of the Au(110) reconstruction, specific molecular packing in dense monolayers, and pH dependence of the A and G adsorption. DFT computations based on a cluster model for the Au(110) surface were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and geometry of the DNA bases in different adsorbate orientations. The optimized geometry is further used to compute models for STM images which are compared with the recorded STM images. This has provided insight into the physical nature of the adsorption. The specific orientations of A, C, G, and T on Au(110) and the nature of the physical adsorbate/surface interaction based on the combination of the experimental and theoretical studies are proposed, and differences from nucleobase adsorption on Au(111)- and Au(100)-electrode surfaces are discussed.

  4. DNA bases assembled on the Au(110)/electrolyte interface: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Princia; Nazmutdinov, Renat R; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-02-19

    Among the low-index single-crystal gold surfaces, the Au(110) surface is the most active toward molecular adsorption and the one with fewest electrochemical adsorption data reported. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemically controlled scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been employed in the present study to address the adsorption of the four nucleobases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T), on the Au(110)-electrode surface. Au(110) undergoes reconstruction to the (1 × 3) surface in electrochemical environment, accompanied by a pair of strong voltammetry peaks in the double-layer region in acid solutions. Adsorption of the DNA bases gives featureless voltammograms with lower double-layer capacitance, suggesting that all the bases are chemisorbed on the Au(110) surface. Further investigation of the surface structures of the adlayers of the four DNA bases by EC-STM disclosed lifting of the Au(110) reconstruction, specific molecular packing in dense monolayers, and pH dependence of the A and G adsorption. DFT computations based on a cluster model for the Au(110) surface were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and geometry of the DNA bases in different adsorbate orientations. The optimized geometry is further used to compute models for STM images which are compared with the recorded STM images. This has provided insight into the physical nature of the adsorption. The specific orientations of A, C, G, and T on Au(110) and the nature of the physical adsorbate/surface interaction based on the combination of the experimental and theoretical studies are proposed, and differences from nucleobase adsorption on Au(111)- and Au(100)-electrode surfaces are discussed. PMID:25611676

  5. Radiation damage to a DNA-binding protein. Combined circular dichroism and molecular dynamics simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazier, S; Villette, S; Goffinont, S; Renouard, S; Maurizot, J C; Genest, D; Spotheim-Maurizot, M

    2008-11-01

    The E. coli lactose operon, the paradigm of gene expression regulation systems, is the best model for studying the effect of radiation on such systems. The operon function requires the binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have previously shown that upon irradiation the repressor loses its operator binding ability. The main radiation-induced lesions of the headpiece have been identified by mass spectrometry. All tyrosine residues are oxidized into 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). In the present study we report a detailed characterization of the headpiece radiation-induced modification. An original approach combining circular dichroism measurements and the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation of headpieces bearing DOPA-s instead of tyrosines has been applied. The CD measurements reveal an irreversible modification of the headpiece structure and stability. The molecular dynamics simulation shows a loss of stability shown by an increase in internal dynamics and allows the estimation of the modifications due to tyrosine oxidation for each structural element of the protein. The changes in headpiece structure and stability can explain at least in part the radiation-induced loss of binding ability of the repressor to the operator. This conclusion should hold for all proteins containing radiosensitive amino acids in their DNA-binding site. PMID:18959464

  6. Combining atomic force and fluorescence microscopy for analysis of quantum-dot labeled protein-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Kim, Soohong; Weiss, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy are widely used for the study of protein-DNA interactions. While AFM excels in its ability to elucidate structural detail and spatial arrangement, it lacks the ability to distinguish between similarly sized objects in a complex system. This information is readily accessible to optical imaging techniques via site-specific fluorescent labels, which enable the direct detection and identification of multiple components simultaneously. Here, we show how the utilization of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), serving as contrast agents for both AFM topography and fluorescence imaging, facilitates the combination of both imaging techniques, and with the addition of a flow based DNA extension method for sample deposition, results in a powerful tool for the study of protein-DNA complexes. We demonstrate the inherent advantages of this novel combination of techniques by imaging individual RNA polymerases (RNAP) on T7 genomic DNA.

  7. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    PubMed

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  8. Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction combined with gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of N-nitrosamines in swimming pool water samples.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ssu-Chieh; Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Chen, Hsin-Chang; Wang, Yu-Chen; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-02-01

    A simple sample pretreatment technique, dispersive micro-solid phase extraction, was applied for the extraction of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other four N-nitrosamines (NAs) from samples of swimming pool water. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were systematically investigated. The best extraction conditions involved immersing 75 mg of carbon molecular sieve, Carboxen™ 1003 (as an adsorbent), in a 50-mL water sample (pH 7.0) containing 5% sodium chloride in a sample tube. After 20 min of extraction by vigorous shaking, the adsorbent was collected on a filter and the NAs desorbed by treatment with 150 μL of dichloromethane. A 10-μL aliquot was then directly determined by large-volume injection gas chromatography with chemical ionization mass spectrometry using the selected ion storage mode. The limits of quantitation were <0.9 ng/L. The precision for these analytes, as indicated by relative standard deviations, were <8% for both intra- and inter-day analyses. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 62% and 109%. A preliminary analysis of swimming pool water samples revealed that NDMA was present in the highest concentration, in the range from n.d. to 100 ng/L. PMID:22222914

  9. Ni exposure impacts the pool of free Fe and modifies DNA supercoiling via metal-induced oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Gault, Manon; Effantin, Géraldine; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2016-08-01

    The biology of nickel has been widely studied in mammals because of its carcinogenic properties, whereas few studies have been performed in microorganisms. In the present work, changes accompanying stress caused by nickel were evaluated at the cellular level using RNA-Seq in Escherichia coli K-12. Interestingly, a very large number of genes were found to be deregulated by Ni stress. Iron and oxidative stress homeostasis maintenance were among the most highly enriched functional categories, and genes involved in periplasmic copper efflux were among the most highly upregulated. These results suggest that the deregulation of Fe and Cu homeostatic genes is caused by a release of free Cu and Fe ions in the cell which in turn activate the Cu and Fe homeostatic systems. The content of Cu was not significantly affected upon the addition of Ni to the growth medium, nor were the Cus and CopA Cu-efflux systems important for the survival of bacteria under Ni stress In contrast the addition of Ni slightly decreased the amount of cellular Fe and activated the transcription of Fur regulated genes in a Fur-dependent manner. Cu or Fe imbalance together with oxidative stress might affect the structure of DNA. Further experiments revealed that Ni alters the state of DNA folding by causing a relaxed conformation, a phenomenon that is reversible by addition of the antioxidant Tiron or the Fe chelator Dip. The Tiron-reversible DNA relaxation was also observed for Fe and to a lesser extent with Cu but not with Co. DNA supercoiling is well recognized as an integral aspect of gene regulation. Moreover our results show that Ni modifies the expression of several nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs), important agents of DNA topology and global gene regulation. This is the first report describing the impact of metal-induced oxidative on global regulatory networks.

  10. Ni exposure impacts the pool of free Fe and modifies DNA supercoiling via metal-induced oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Gault, Manon; Effantin, Géraldine; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2016-08-01

    The biology of nickel has been widely studied in mammals because of its carcinogenic properties, whereas few studies have been performed in microorganisms. In the present work, changes accompanying stress caused by nickel were evaluated at the cellular level using RNA-Seq in Escherichia coli K-12. Interestingly, a very large number of genes were found to be deregulated by Ni stress. Iron and oxidative stress homeostasis maintenance were among the most highly enriched functional categories, and genes involved in periplasmic copper efflux were among the most highly upregulated. These results suggest that the deregulation of Fe and Cu homeostatic genes is caused by a release of free Cu and Fe ions in the cell which in turn activate the Cu and Fe homeostatic systems. The content of Cu was not significantly affected upon the addition of Ni to the growth medium, nor were the Cus and CopA Cu-efflux systems important for the survival of bacteria under Ni stress In contrast the addition of Ni slightly decreased the amount of cellular Fe and activated the transcription of Fur regulated genes in a Fur-dependent manner. Cu or Fe imbalance together with oxidative stress might affect the structure of DNA. Further experiments revealed that Ni alters the state of DNA folding by causing a relaxed conformation, a phenomenon that is reversible by addition of the antioxidant Tiron or the Fe chelator Dip. The Tiron-reversible DNA relaxation was also observed for Fe and to a lesser extent with Cu but not with Co. DNA supercoiling is well recognized as an integral aspect of gene regulation. Moreover our results show that Ni modifies the expression of several nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs), important agents of DNA topology and global gene regulation. This is the first report describing the impact of metal-induced oxidative on global regulatory networks. PMID:27375130

  11. Combined analysis of DNA methylation and cell cycle in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Desjobert, Cécile; El Maï, Mounir; Gérard-Hirne, Tom; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Carrier, Arnaud; Pottier, Cyrielle; Arimondo, Paola B; Riond, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a chemical modification of DNA involved in the regulation of gene expression by controlling the access to the DNA sequence. It is the most stable epigenetic mark and is widely studied for its role in major biological processes. Aberrant DNA methylation is observed in various pathologies, such as cancer. Therefore, there is a great interest in analyzing subtle changes in DNA methylation induced by biological processes or upon drug treatments. Here, we developed an improved methodology based on flow cytometry to measure variations of DNA methylation level in melanoma and leukemia cells. The accuracy of DNA methylation quantification was validated with LC-ESI mass spectrometry analysis. The new protocol was used to detect small variations of cytosine methylation occurring in individual cells during their cell cycle and those induced by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AzadC). Kinetic experiments confirmed that inheritance of DNA methylation occurs efficiently in S phase and revealed a short delay between DNA replication and completion of cytosine methylation. In addition, this study suggests that the uncoupling of 5AzadC effects on DNA demethylation and cell proliferation might be related to the duration of the DNA replication phase. PMID:25531272

  12. Chromosomal and DNA ploidy characterization of salivary gland neoplasms by combined FISH and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, A K; Dinh, M; Tucker, S L; Gillenwater, A; Luna, M A; Batsakis, J G

    1997-08-01

    Concurrent DNA ploidy by flow cytometry and interphase FISH analysis of chromosomes 6 through 12, 17, 18, X, and Y were prospectively performed on 22 salivary gland neoplasms (four benign and 18 malignant) to investigate the diagnostic and biological implications of their alterations in these neoplasms. Our results show that benign neoplasms lack DNA aneuploidy and numerical chromosomal abnormalities. Low-grade malignant neoplasms, except for two lesions, manifested small chromosomal gains and losses and were generally DNA diploid or near-diploid aneuploid, whereas all high-grade tumors showed marked polysomy and were DNA aneuploid. Marked intratumoral and intertumoral chromosomal heterogeneity also were noted in and between individual tumors. Although polysomy was the main finding in DNA aneuploid lesions, monosomy was more noted in DNA diploid neoplasms and was restricted to chromosomes 8, 11, and 17. Significant correlation between the DNA index, chromosomal aneusomy, histological grade, and tumor stage was noted. Our study indicates that (1) benign salivary gland neoplasms lack gross DNA content and numerical chromosomal abnormalities, (2) clonal chromosomal alterations are manifested in most DNA diploid and all DNA aneuploid malignant tumors, (3) chromosomal gain is the most common alteration; chromosomal loss is less frequent and restricted to certain chromosomes, and (4) DNA aneuploidy and chromosomal aneusomy characterize tumors with aggressive features.

  13. Combined shared and distributed memory ab-initio computations of molecular-hydrogen systems in the correlated state: Process pool solution and two-level parallelism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biborski, Andrzej; Kądzielawa, Andrzej P.; Spałek, Józef

    2015-12-01

    An efficient computational scheme devised for investigations of ground state properties of the electronically correlated systems is presented. As an example, (H2)n chain is considered with the long-range electron-electron interactions taken into account. The implemented procedure covers: (i) single-particle Wannier wave-function basis construction in the correlated state, (ii) microscopic parameters calculation, and (iii) ground state energy optimization. The optimization loop is based on highly effective process-pool solution - specific root-workers approach. The hierarchical, two-level parallelism was applied: both shared (by use of Open Multi-Processing) and distributed (by use of Message Passing Interface) memory models were utilized. We discuss in detail the feature that such approach results in a substantial increase of the calculation speed reaching factor of 300 for the fully parallelized solution. The scheme elaborated in detail reflects the situation in which the most demanding task is the single-particle basis optimization.

  14. Safety and Tolerability of the Direct Renin Inhibitor Aliskiren in Combination with Angiotensin Receptor Blockers and Thiazide Diuretics: A Pooled Analysis of Clinical Experience of 12,942 Patients

    PubMed Central

    White, William B.; Bresalier, Robert; Kaplan, Allen P.; Palmer, Biff F.; Riddell, Robert H.; Lesogor, Anastasia; Chang, William; Keefe, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    Combinations of the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or diuretics are effective therapeutic regimens for the treatment of hypertension. A large database of safety information has become available during the past several years with aliskiren in combination trials. Data were pooled from nine short-term (8-week) and four longer-term (26–52-week) randomized, controlled trials of aliskiren in patients with hypertension. Adverse event (AE) rates were assessed for aliskiren combination therapy compared to component monotherapies. In short-term studies, overall AE rates were similar for those receiving aliskiren/valsartan or aliskiren/diuretic combinations (32.2–39.8%) and those receiving the component monotherapies (30.0–39.6%). In longer-term studies, AE rates with aliskiren/losartan (55.5%) and aliskiren/diuretic (45.0%) combination therapy were similar to those with losartan (53.9%) and diuretic (48.9%) alone. Angioedema and hyperkalemia occurred in similar proportions of patients on combination therapies versus monotherapy. In conclusion, the safety and tolerability profile of aliskiren in combination with the ARBs valsartan or losartan, or diuretic is similar to aliskiren, ARBs or diuretic alone. PMID:21029339

  15. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  16. A new method of representing DNA sequences which combines ease of visual analysis with machine readability.

    PubMed Central

    Cowin, J E; Jellis, C H; Rickwood, D

    1986-01-01

    A new method of representing DNA sequences has been devised which is termed stave projection. Compared with other formats for showing the base sequences of DNA, this method greatly enhances the ease of visual analysis of the sequences of bases and it is also in a machine readable form. Using this method it is possible to identify and annotate all of the functional features found in DNA sequences. PMID:3003680

  17. Validation of Pooled Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing in Arabidopsis lyrata

    PubMed Central

    Fracassetti, Marco; Griffin, Philippa C.; Willi, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing pooled DNA of multiple individuals from a population instead of sequencing individuals separately has become popular due to its cost-effectiveness and simple wet-lab protocol, although some criticism of this approach remains. Here we validated a protocol for pooled whole-genome re-sequencing (Pool-seq) of Arabidopsis lyrata libraries prepared with low amounts of DNA (1.6 ng per individual). The validation was based on comparing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies obtained by pooling with those obtained by individual-based Genotyping By Sequencing (GBS). Furthermore, we investigated the effect of sample number, sequencing depth per individual and variant caller on population SNP frequency estimates. For Pool-seq data, we compared frequency estimates from two SNP callers, VarScan and Snape; the former employs a frequentist SNP calling approach while the latter uses a Bayesian approach. Results revealed concordance correlation coefficients well above 0.8, confirming that Pool-seq is a valid method for acquiring population-level SNP frequency data. Higher accuracy was achieved by pooling more samples (25 compared to 14) and working with higher sequencing depth (4.1× per individual compared to 1.4× per individual), which increased the concordance correlation coefficient to 0.955. The Bayesian-based SNP caller produced somewhat higher concordance correlation coefficients, particularly at low sequencing depth. We recommend pooling at least 25 individuals combined with sequencing at a depth of 100× to produce satisfactory frequency estimates for common SNPs (minor allele frequency above 0.05). PMID:26461136

  18. The science of pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  19. Biochips for cell biology by combined dip-pen nanolithography and DNA-directed protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Arrabito, Giuseppe; Reisewitz, Stephanie; Dehmelt, Leif; Bastiaens, Philippe I; Pignataro, Bruno; Schroeder, Hendrik; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2013-12-20

    A general methodology for patterning of multiple protein ligands with lateral dimensions below those of single cells is described. It employs dip pen nanolithography (DPN) patterning of DNA oligonucleotides which are then used as capture strands for DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) of oligonucleotide-tagged proteins. This study reports the development and optimization of PEG-based liquid ink, used as carrier for the immobilization of alkylamino-labeled DNA oligomers on chemically activated glass surfaces. The resulting DNA arrays have typical spot sizes of 4-5 μm with a pitch of 12 μm micrometer. It is demonstrated that the arrays can be further functionalized with covalent DNA-streptavidin (DNA-STV) conjugates bearing ligands recognized by cells. To this end, biotinylated epidermal growth factor (EGF) is coupled to the DNA-STV conjugates, the resulting constructs are hybridized with the DNA arrays and the resulting surfaces used for the culturing of MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cells. Owing to the lateral diffusion of transmembrane proteins in the cell's plasma membrane, specific recruitment and concentration of EGF receptor can be induced specifically at the sites where the ligands are bound on the solid substrate. This is a clear demonstration that this method is suitable for precise functional manipulations of subcellular areas within living cells. PMID:23881817

  20. Biochips for cell biology by combined dip-pen nanolithography and DNA-directed protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Arrabito, Giuseppe; Reisewitz, Stephanie; Dehmelt, Leif; Bastiaens, Philippe I; Pignataro, Bruno; Schroeder, Hendrik; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2013-12-20

    A general methodology for patterning of multiple protein ligands with lateral dimensions below those of single cells is described. It employs dip pen nanolithography (DPN) patterning of DNA oligonucleotides which are then used as capture strands for DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) of oligonucleotide-tagged proteins. This study reports the development and optimization of PEG-based liquid ink, used as carrier for the immobilization of alkylamino-labeled DNA oligomers on chemically activated glass surfaces. The resulting DNA arrays have typical spot sizes of 4-5 μm with a pitch of 12 μm micrometer. It is demonstrated that the arrays can be further functionalized with covalent DNA-streptavidin (DNA-STV) conjugates bearing ligands recognized by cells. To this end, biotinylated epidermal growth factor (EGF) is coupled to the DNA-STV conjugates, the resulting constructs are hybridized with the DNA arrays and the resulting surfaces used for the culturing of MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cells. Owing to the lateral diffusion of transmembrane proteins in the cell's plasma membrane, specific recruitment and concentration of EGF receptor can be induced specifically at the sites where the ligands are bound on the solid substrate. This is a clear demonstration that this method is suitable for precise functional manipulations of subcellular areas within living cells.

  1. An economical and combined method for rapid and efficient isolation of fungal DNA.

    PubMed

    Lech, T; Syguła-Cholewinska, J; Szostak-Kot, J

    2014-12-18

    DNA isolation is a crucial step of conducting genetic studies in any organism. However, this process is quite difficult when studying fungi because of the need to damage the fungal cell walls of specific structures. In this study, we developed a method for the rapid and efficient isolation of fungal DNA based on simultaneous mechanical and enzymatic cell wall degradation. There are several typical modifications of the standard phenol-chloroform DNA extraction method. This method can be modified to degrade the fungal cell wall. The first step of the presented DNA extraction included manual homogenization in modified lysis buffer. Next, enzymatic digestion using 2 enzymes was conducted, including lyticase and proteinase K. To carefully select the most favorable conditions, we developed an economical, rapid, and reliable method for fungal DNA extraction that ensures both high efficiency and proper purity, which are essential for further analyses.

  2. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi's individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  3. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi’s individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  4. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi's individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  5. The Molecular Dissection of mtDNA Haplogroup H Confirms That the Franco-Cantabrian Glacial Refuge Was a Major Source for the European Gene Pool

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Magri, Chiara; Battaglia, Vincenza; Olivieri, Anna; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio; Zeviani, Massimo; Briem, Egill; Carelli, Valerio; Moral, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Roostalu, Urmas; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Kivisild, Toomas; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Richards, Martin; Villems, Richard; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Complete sequencing of 62 mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) belonging (or very closely related) to haplogroup H revealed that this mtDNA haplogroup—by far the most common in Europe—is subdivided into numerous subhaplogroups, with at least 15 of them (H1–H15) identifiable by characteristic mutations. All the haplogroup H mtDNAs found in 5,743 subjects from 43 populations were then screened for diagnostic markers of subhaplogroups H1 and H3. This survey showed that both subhaplogroups display frequency peaks, centered in Iberia and surrounding areas, with distributions declining toward the northeast and southeast—a pattern extremely similar to that previously reported for mtDNA haplogroup V. Furthermore, the coalescence ages of H1 and H3 (∼11,000 years) are close to that previously reported for V. These findings have major implications for the origin of Europeans, since they attest that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area was indeed the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe from ∼15,000 years ago. This has also some implications for disease studies. For instance, the high occurrence of H1 and H3 in Iberia led us to re-evaluate the haplogroup distribution in 50 Spanish families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation. The survey revealed that the previously reported excess of H among these families is caused entirely by H3 and is due to a major, probably nonrecent, founder event. PMID:15382008

  6. Personal identification of cold case remains through combined contribution from anthropological, mtDNA, and bomb-pulse dating analyses.

    PubMed

    Speller, Camilla F; Spalding, Kirsty L; Buchholz, Bruce A; Hildebrand, Dean; Moore, Jason; Mathewes, Rolf; Skinner, Mark F; Yang, Dongya Y

    2012-09-01

    In 1968, a child's cranium was recovered from the banks of a northern Canadian river and held in a trust until the "cold case" was reopened in 2005. The cranium underwent reanalysis at the Centre for Forensic Research, Simon Fraser University, using recently developed anthropological analysis, "bomb-pulse" radiocarbon analysis, and forensic DNA techniques. Craniometrics, skeletal ossification, and dental formation indicated an age-at-death of 4.4 ± 1 year. Radiocarbon analysis of enamel from two teeth indicated a year of birth between 1958 and 1962. Forensic DNA analysis indicated the child was a male, and the obtained mitochondrial profile matched a living maternal relative to the presumed missing child. These multidisciplinary analyses resulted in a legal identification 41 years after the discovery of the remains, highlighting the enormous potential of combining radiocarbon analysis with anthropological and mtDNA analyses in producing confident personal identifications for forensic cold cases dating to within the last 60 years.

  7. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  8. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  9. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  10. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  11. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  12. Radiolaria Divided into Polycystina and Spasmaria in Combined 18S and 28S rDNA Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Dolven, Jane K.; Ose, Randi F.; Klaveness, Dag; Kristensen, Tom; Bjørklund, Kjell R.; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Radiolarians are marine planktonic protists that belong to the eukaryote supergroup Rhizaria together with Foraminifera and Cercozoa. Radiolaria has traditionally been divided into four main groups based on morphological characters; i.e. Polycystina, Acantharia, Nassellaria and Phaeodaria. But recent 18S rDNA phylogenies have shown that Phaeodaria belongs within Cerocozoa, and that the previously heliozoan group Taxopodida should be included in Radiolaria. 18S rDNA phylogenies have not yet resolved the sister relationship between the main Radiolaria groups, but nevertheless suggests that Spumellaria, and thereby also Polycystina, are polyphyletic. Very few sequences other than 18S rDNA have so far been generated from radiolarian cells, mostly due to the fact that Radiolaria has been impossible to cultivate and single cell PCR has been hampered by low success rate. Here we have therefore investigated the mutual evolutionary relationship of the main radiolarian groups by using the novel approach of combining single cell whole genome amplification with targeted PCR amplification of the 18S and 28S rDNA genes. Combined 18S and 28S phylogeny of sequences obtained from single cells shows that Radiolaria is divided into two main lineages: Polycystina (Spumellaria+Nassellaria) and Spasmaria (Acantharia+Taxopodida). Further we show with high support that Foraminifera groups within Radiolaria supporting the Retaria hypothesis. PMID:21853146

  13. Radiolaria divided into Polycystina and Spasmaria in combined 18S and 28S rDNA phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Krabberød, Anders K; Bråte, Jon; Dolven, Jane K; Ose, Randi F; Klaveness, Dag; Kristensen, Tom; Bjørklund, Kjell R; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Radiolarians are marine planktonic protists that belong to the eukaryote supergroup Rhizaria together with Foraminifera and Cercozoa. Radiolaria has traditionally been divided into four main groups based on morphological characters; i.e. Polycystina, Acantharia, Nassellaria and Phaeodaria. But recent 18S rDNA phylogenies have shown that Phaeodaria belongs within Cerocozoa, and that the previously heliozoan group Taxopodida should be included in Radiolaria. 18S rDNA phylogenies have not yet resolved the sister relationship between the main Radiolaria groups, but nevertheless suggests that Spumellaria, and thereby also Polycystina, are polyphyletic. Very few sequences other than 18S rDNA have so far been generated from radiolarian cells, mostly due to the fact that Radiolaria has been impossible to cultivate and single cell PCR has been hampered by low success rate. Here we have therefore investigated the mutual evolutionary relationship of the main radiolarian groups by using the novel approach of combining single cell whole genome amplification with targeted PCR amplification of the 18S and 28S rDNA genes. Combined 18S and 28S phylogeny of sequences obtained from single cells shows that Radiolaria is divided into two main lineages: Polycystina (Spumellaria+Nassellaria) and Spasmaria (Acantharia+Taxopodida). Further we show with high support that Foraminifera groups within Radiolaria supporting the Retaria hypothesis.

  14. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e.

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4- [4-(N-methyl)styrene] -benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2.

  15. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    PubMed Central

    Barends, Thomas R. M.; Brosi, Richard W. W.; Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten; Seidel, Ralf; Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine; Bittl, Robert; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ. PMID:23897477

  16. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2.

  17. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Dang, Phat M; Chen, Charles Y

    2013-02-01

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA isolation from plant seeds is a prerequisite for many seed specific gene expression studies and DNA is necessary in marker-assisted selection and other genetic studies. We describe a modified method to isolate both RNA and DNA from the same seed tissue and have been successful with several oil seeds including peanut, soybean, sunflower, canola, and oil radish. An additional LiCl precipitation step was added to isolate both RNA and DNA from the same seed tissues. High quality nucleic acids were observed based on A(260)/A(280) and A(260)/A(230) ratios above 2.0 and distinct bands on gel-electrophoresis. RNA was shown to be suitable for reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction based on actin or 60S ribosomal primer amplification and DNA was shown to have a single band on gel-electrophoresis analysis. This result shows that RNA and DNA isolated using this method can be appropriate for molecular studies in peanut and other oil containing seeds.

  18. Combining RNA-DNA swapping and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for the detection of influenza A nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Morin, Isabelle; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2012-01-15

    The detection of proteinaceous antigens generally relies on traditional immunoassays and, more recently, on immuno-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays and their derivatives, which do not take advantage of the intrinsic function or binding property of a protein. The RNA-binding nucleoprotein has been shown to be an excellent target for the development of various influenza A diagnostics due to its high antigenicity and the presence of large numbers in the virus. It binds nonspecifically to the sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA as well as to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in vitro. We decided to take advantage of this property to develop an ssDNA probe for the detection of nucleoprotein by quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that recombinant influenza A nucleoprotein from avian H5N1 subtype binds strongest to a 74-base-long ssDNA. Two systems, one comprising an antibody-based nucleoprotein capture surface and the other based on direct nucleoprotein adsorption under denaturing conditions, were developed combining the replacement of RNA bound to nucleoprotein by a discrete ssDNA probe and a qPCR for the detection of nucleoprotein in the low picomolar (pM) range.

  19. Combined DNA and lipid analyses of sediments reveal changes in Holocene haptophyte and diatom populations in an Antarctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, Marco J. L.; Muyzer, Gerard; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Schouten, Stefan; Volkman, John K.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2004-06-01

    Preserved ribosomal DNA of planktonic phototrophic algae was recovered from Holocene anoxic sediments of Ace Lake (Antarctica), and the ancient community members were identified based on comparative sequence analysis. The similar concentration profiles of DNA of haptophytes and their traditional lipid biomarkers (alkenones and alkenoates) revealed that fossil rDNA also served as quantitative biomarkers in this environment. The DNA data clearly revealed the presence of six novel phylotypes related to known alkenone and alkenoate-biosynthesizing haptophytes with Isochrysis galbana UIO 102 as their closest relative. The relative abundance of these phylotypes changed as the lake chemistry, particularly salinity, evolved over time. Changes in the alkenone distributions reflect these population changes rather than a physiological response to salinity by a single haptophyte. Using this novel paleo-ecological approach of combining data from lipid biomarkers and preserved DNA, we showed that the post-glacial development of Ace Lake from freshwater basin to marine inlet and the present-day lacustrine saline system caused major qualitative and quantitative changes in the biodiversity of the planktonic populations over time.

  20. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  1. Enhancement of reverse transfection efficiency by combining stimulated DNA surface desorption and electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, Rhiannon; Hook, Andrew; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Transfection cell microarrays (TCMs) are a high-throughput, miniaturised cell-culture system utilising reverse transfection, in which cells are seeded onto a DNA array resulting in localised regions of transfected cells. TCMs are useful for the analysis of gene expression, and can be used to identify genes involved in many cellular processes. This is of significant interest in fields such as tissue engineering, diagnostic screening, and drug testing [1, 2]. Low transfection efficiency has so far limited the application and utility of this technique. Recently, the transfection efficiency of TCMs was improved by an application of a high voltage for a short period of time to the DNA array resulting in the electroporation of cells attached to the surface [3, 4]. Furthermore, application of a low voltage for a longer period of time to the DNA array was shown to improve the transfection efficiency by stimulating the desorption of attached DNA, increasing the concentration of DNA available for cellular uptake [5]. In the present study, the optimisation of the uptake of adsorbed DNA vectors by adherent cells, utilising a voltage bias without compromising cell viability was investigated. This was achieved by depositing negatively charged DNA plasmids onto a positively charged allylamine plasma polymer (ALAPP) layer deposited on highly doped p-type silicon wafers either using a pipettor or a microarray contact printer. Surface-dependant human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 line) cells were cultured onto the DNA vector loaded ALAPP spots and the plasmid transfection events were detected by fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability assays, including fluorescein diacetate (FDA) / Hoechst DNA labelling, were carried out to determine the number of live adherent cells before and after application of a voltage. A protocol was developed to screen for voltage biases and exposure times in order to optimise transfection efficiency and cell viability. Cross-contamination between the microarray

  2. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  3. Combined DNA-RNA Fluorescent In situ Hybridization (FISH) to Study X Chromosome Inactivation in Differentiated Female Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Gribnau, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique which enables the detection of nucleic acids in cells. DNA FISH is often used in cytogenetics and cancer diagnostics, and can detect aberrations of the genome, which often has important clinical implications. RNA FISH can be used to detect RNA molecules in cells and has provided important insights in regulation of gene expression. Combining DNA and RNA FISH within the same cell is technically challenging, as conditions suitable for DNA FISH might be too harsh for fragile, single stranded RNA molecules. We here present an easily applicable protocol which enables the combined, simultaneous detection of Xist RNA and DNA encoded by the X chromosomes. This combined DNA-RNA FISH protocol can likely be applied to other systems where both RNA and DNA need to be detected. PMID:24961515

  4. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  5. Different combinations of atomic interactions predict protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA affinities with similar accuracy.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raquel; Kolazckowski, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between proteins and other molecules play essential roles in all biological processes. Although it is widely held that a protein's ligand specificity is determined primarily by its three-dimensional structure, the general principles by which structure determines ligand binding remain poorly understood. Here we use statistical analyses of a large number of protein-ligand complexes with associated binding-affinity measurements to quantitatively characterize how combinations of atomic interactions contribute to ligand affinity. We find that there are significant differences in how atomic interactions determine ligand affinity for proteins that bind small chemical ligands, those that bind DNA/RNA and those that interact with other proteins. Although protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA binding affinities can be accurately predicted from structural data, models predicting one type of interaction perform poorly on the others. Additionally, the particular combinations of atomic interactions required to predict binding affinity differed between small-molecule and DNA/RNA data sets, consistent with the conclusion that the structural bases determining ligand affinity differ among interaction types. In contrast to what we observed for small-molecule and DNA/RNA interactions, no statistical models were capable of predicting protein-protein affinity with >60% correlation. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of protein-DNA/RNA binding prediction as a possible tool for high-throughput virtual screening to guide laboratory investigations, suggesting that quantitative characterization of diverse molecular interactions may have practical applications as well as fundamentally advancing our understanding of how molecular structure translates into function.

  6. Different combinations of atomic interactions predict protein‐small molecule and protein‐DNA/RNA affinities with similar accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interactions between proteins and other molecules play essential roles in all biological processes. Although it is widely held that a protein's ligand specificity is determined primarily by its three‐dimensional structure, the general principles by which structure determines ligand binding remain poorly understood. Here we use statistical analyses of a large number of protein−ligand complexes with associated binding‐affinity measurements to quantitatively characterize how combinations of atomic interactions contribute to ligand affinity. We find that there are significant differences in how atomic interactions determine ligand affinity for proteins that bind small chemical ligands, those that bind DNA/RNA and those that interact with other proteins. Although protein‐small molecule and protein‐DNA/RNA binding affinities can be accurately predicted from structural data, models predicting one type of interaction perform poorly on the others. Additionally, the particular combinations of atomic interactions required to predict binding affinity differed between small‐molecule and DNA/RNA data sets, consistent with the conclusion that the structural bases determining ligand affinity differ among interaction types. In contrast to what we observed for small‐molecule and DNA/RNA interactions, no statistical models were capable of predicting protein−protein affinity with >60% correlation. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of protein‐DNA/RNA binding prediction as a possible tool for high‐throughput virtual screening to guide laboratory investigations, suggesting that quantitative characterization of diverse molecular interactions may have practical applications as well as fundamentally advancing our understanding of how molecular structure translates into function. Proteins 2015; 83:2100–2114. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26370248

  7. Genetic variants in combination with early partial improvement as a clinical utility predictor of treatment outcome in major depressive disorder: the result of two pooled RCTs.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Serretti, A; Nonen, S; Takekita, Y; Wakeno, M; Azuma, J; Kinoshita, T

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics may allow for a personalized treatment, but a combination with clinical variables may further enhance prediction. In particular, in the present paper, we investigated early partial improvement (EPI) defined as 20% or more improvement by rating scales 2  weeks after treatment, in combination with selected gene variants as a predictor of treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Two randomized controlled trials with 168 Japanese depressed patients were used. A stepwise multiple linear regression model with HAM-D score change at week 6 as the dependent variable and genotypes, EPI, baseline HAM-D score, age and sex as independent variables was performed in paroxetine, fluvoxamine and milnacipran, respectively, to estimate the prediction of HAM-D change at week 6. In the paroxetine sample, only EPI (P<0.001) was significantly associated with HAM-D change (n=81, R(2)=0.25, P<0.001). In the fluvoxamine sample, 5-HTTLPR La/Lg, S (P=0.029), FGF2 rs1449683C/T (P=0.013) and EPI (P=0.003) were associated with HAM-D change (n=42, R(2)=0.43, P<0.001). In the milnacipran sample, HTR-1A-1019C/G (P=0.001), ADRA2A-1297C/G (P=0.028) and EPI (P<0.001) were associated with outcome (n=45, R(2)=0.71, P<0.001). EPI in combination with genetic variants could be a useful predictor of treatment outcome and could strengthen the practical use of pharmacogenetic data in clinical practice. PMID:25710119

  8. Genetic variants in combination with early partial improvement as a clinical utility predictor of treatment outcome in major depressive disorder: the result of two pooled RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, M; Serretti, A; Nonen, S; Takekita, Y; Wakeno, M; Azuma, J; Kinoshita, T

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics may allow for a personalized treatment, but a combination with clinical variables may further enhance prediction. In particular, in the present paper, we investigated early partial improvement (EPI) defined as 20% or more improvement by rating scales 2  weeks after treatment, in combination with selected gene variants as a predictor of treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Two randomized controlled trials with 168 Japanese depressed patients were used. A stepwise multiple linear regression model with HAM-D score change at week 6 as the dependent variable and genotypes, EPI, baseline HAM-D score, age and sex as independent variables was performed in paroxetine, fluvoxamine and milnacipran, respectively, to estimate the prediction of HAM-D change at week 6. In the paroxetine sample, only EPI (P<0.001) was significantly associated with HAM-D change (n=81, R2=0.25, P<0.001). In the fluvoxamine sample, 5-HTTLPR La/Lg, S (P=0.029), FGF2 rs1449683C/T (P=0.013) and EPI (P=0.003) were associated with HAM-D change (n=42, R2=0.43, P<0.001). In the milnacipran sample, HTR-1A-1019C/G (P=0.001), ADRA2A-1297C/G (P=0.028) and EPI (P<0.001) were associated with outcome (n=45, R2=0.71, P<0.001). EPI in combination with genetic variants could be a useful predictor of treatment outcome and could strengthen the practical use of pharmacogenetic data in clinical practice. PMID:25710119

  9. The combination of gold nanorods and nanoparticles with DNA nanodevices for logic gates construction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongbao; Song, Tingjie; Zheng, Bin; Xiao, Shiyan; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2015-10-23

    In this work, two DNA nanodevices were constructed utilizing a DNA strand displacement reaction. With the assistance of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs), the autonomous reactions can be reflected from the aggregation states of nanoparticles. By sequence design and the two non-overlapping double hump-like UV-vis spectral peaks of AuNPs and AuNRs, two logic gates with multiple inputs and outputs were successfully run with expected outcomes. This method not only shows how to achieve computing with multiple logic calculations but also has great potential for multiple targets detection.

  10. Combination of Gefitinib and DNA Methylation Inhibitor Decitabine Exerts Synergistic Anti-Cancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-jia; Huang, Guo-bin; Li, Bin; Zheng, De-qing; Yu, Xiu-rong; Luo, Xiao-yong

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of human colon cancer, the chemotherapy efficacy against colon cancer is still unsatisfactory. In the present study, effects of concomitant inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and DNA methyltransferase were examined in human colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that decitabine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor) synergized with gefitinib (an EGFR inhibitor) to reduce cell viability and colony formation in SW1116 and LOVO cells. However, the combination of the two compounds displayed minimal toxicity to NCM460 cells, a normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line. The combination was also more effective at inhibiting the AKT/mTOR/S6 kinase pathway. In addition, the combination of decitabine with gefitinib markedly inhibited colon cancer cell migration. Furthermore, gefitinib synergistically enhanced decitabine-induced cytotoxicity was primarily due to apoptosis as shown by Annexin V labeling that was attenuated by z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor. Concomitantly, cell apoptosis resulting from the co-treatment of gefitinib and decitabine was accompanied by induction of BAX, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, along with reduction of Bcl-2 compared to treatment with either drug alone. Interestingly, combined treatment with these two drugs increased the expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1) which play an important role in cell apoptosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion of XAF1 significantly attenuated colon cancer cells apoptosis induced by the combination of the two drugs. Our findings suggested that gefitinib in combination with decitabine exerted enhanced cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells were involved in mitochondrial-mediated pathway and induction of XAF1 expression. In conclusion, based on the observations from our study, we suggested that the combined administration of these two drugs might be considered as a novel therapeutic regimen for treating colon cancer. PMID

  11. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA...

  12. Self-reproduction of supramolecular giant vesicles combined with the amplification of encapsulated DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Kensuke; Tamura, Mieko; Shohda, Koh-Ichiroh; Toyota, Taro; Suzuki, Kentaro; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a protocell from a materials point of view is important in understanding the origin of life. Both self-reproduction of a compartment and self-replication of an informational substance have been studied extensively, but these processes have typically been carried out independently, rather than linked to one another. Here, we demonstrate the amplification of DNA (encapsulated guest) within a self-reproducible cationic giant vesicle (host). With the addition of a vesicular membrane precursor, we observe the growth and spontaneous division of the giant vesicles, accompanied by distribution of the DNA to the daughter giant vesicles. In particular, amplification of the DNA accelerated the division of the giant vesicles. This means that self-replication of an informational substance has been linked to self-reproduction of a compartment through the interplay between polyanionic DNA and the cationic vesicular membrane. Our self-reproducing giant vesicle system therefore represents a step forward in the construction of an advanced model protocell.

  13. Self-reproduction of supramolecular giant vesicles combined with the amplification of encapsulated DNA.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Kensuke; Tamura, Mieko; Shohda, Koh-Ichiroh; Toyota, Taro; Suzuki, Kentaro; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a protocell from a materials point of view is important in understanding the origin of life. Both self-reproduction of a compartment and self-replication of an informational substance have been studied extensively, but these processes have typically been carried out independently, rather than linked to one another. Here, we demonstrate the amplification of DNA (encapsulated guest) within a self-reproducible cationic giant vesicle (host). With the addition of a vesicular membrane precursor, we observe the growth and spontaneous division of the giant vesicles, accompanied by distribution of the DNA to the daughter giant vesicles. In particular, amplification of the DNA accelerated the division of the giant vesicles. This means that self-replication of an informational substance has been linked to self-reproduction of a compartment through the interplay between polyanionic DNA and the cationic vesicular membrane. Our self-reproducing giant vesicle system therefore represents a step forward in the construction of an advanced model protocell. PMID:21941249

  14. Proposed Strategy for Selection Against Recessive Genetic Defects Through a Combination of Inbreeding and DNA Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recessive genetic defects are currently on the minds of many cattle breeders. The relatively rapid development of diagnostic DNA tests for recessive defects appears to be a major recent technological advancement. However, the attitude of breeders and breed associations toward recessive defects seems...

  15. Combined analysis of DNA methylome and transcriptome reveal novel candidate genes with susceptibility to bovine Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minyan; He, Yanghua; Zhou, Huangkai; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xizhi; Yu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical mastitis is a widely spread disease of lactating cows. Its major pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In this study, we performed genome-wide integrative analysis of DNA methylation and transcriptional expression to identify candidate genes and pathways relevant to bovine S. aureus subclinical mastitis. The genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in cows with S. aureus subclinical mastitis (SA group) and healthy controls (CK) were generated by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with microarrays. We identified 1078 differentially methylated genes in SA cows compared with the controls. By integrating DNA methylation and transcriptome data, 58 differentially methylated genes were shared with differently expressed genes, in which 20.7% distinctly hypermethylated genes showed down-regulated expression in SA versus CK, whereas 14.3% dramatically hypomethylated genes showed up-regulated expression. Integrated pathway analysis suggested that these genes were related to inflammation, ErbB signalling pathway and mismatch repair. Further functional analysis revealed that three genes, NRG1, MST1 and NAT9, were strongly correlated with the progression of S. aureus subclinical mastitis and could be used as powerful biomarkers for the improvement of bovine mastitis resistance. Our studies lay the groundwork for epigenetic modification and mechanistic studies on susceptibility of bovine mastitis. PMID:27411928

  16. Combined analysis of DNA methylome and transcriptome reveal novel candidate genes with susceptibility to bovine Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Song, Minyan; He, Yanghua; Zhou, Huangkai; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xizhi; Yu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical mastitis is a widely spread disease of lactating cows. Its major pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In this study, we performed genome-wide integrative analysis of DNA methylation and transcriptional expression to identify candidate genes and pathways relevant to bovine S. aureus subclinical mastitis. The genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in cows with S. aureus subclinical mastitis (SA group) and healthy controls (CK) were generated by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with microarrays. We identified 1078 differentially methylated genes in SA cows compared with the controls. By integrating DNA methylation and transcriptome data, 58 differentially methylated genes were shared with differently expressed genes, in which 20.7% distinctly hypermethylated genes showed down-regulated expression in SA versus CK, whereas 14.3% dramatically hypomethylated genes showed up-regulated expression. Integrated pathway analysis suggested that these genes were related to inflammation, ErbB signalling pathway and mismatch repair. Further functional analysis revealed that three genes, NRG1, MST1 and NAT9, were strongly correlated with the progression of S. aureus subclinical mastitis and could be used as powerful biomarkers for the improvement of bovine mastitis resistance. Our studies lay the groundwork for epigenetic modification and mechanistic studies on susceptibility of bovine mastitis.

  17. Evaluation of blood pressure reduction response and responder characteristics to fixed-dose combination treatment of amlodipine and losartan: a post hoc analysis of pooled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Unniachan, Sreevalsa; Wu, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Hanson, Mary E; Fujita, Kenji P

    2014-09-01

    Data from four clinical trials compared reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among patients treated with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs 5/100 mg and amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg and 10 mg. Response rate was assessed as reduction in SBP or DBP (>20/10 mm Hg) and proportion of patients achieving SBP <140 mm Hg or DBP <90 mm Hg. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on baseline SBP and DBP. Mean SBP and DBP were reduced in amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg (n=182) and amlodipine/losartan 5/100 mg (n=95) users across all baseline quartiles. Patients using amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg had significantly greater SBP and DBP reductions vs amlodipine 5 mg (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). Amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg users had significantly greater SBP reduction vs amlodipine 10 mg (SBP P=.02; DBP P=not significant). The odds of responding to therapy were significantly greater with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg (odds ratio, 5.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-25.5) and were similar vs amlodipine 10 mg (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.017-9.51). These results support the use of combination therapy early in the treatment of hypertension.

  18. Combined walking exercise and alkali therapy in patients with CKD4-5 regulates intramuscular free amino acid pools and ubiquitin E3 ligase expression.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma L; Kosmadakis, George C; Smith, Alice C; Viana, Joao L; Brown, Jeremy R; Molyneux, Karen; Pawluczyk, Izabella Z A; Mulheran, Michael; Bishop, Nicolette C; Shirreffs, Susan; Maughan, Ronald J; Owen, Paul J; John, Stephen G; McIntyre, Christopher W; Feehally, John; Bevington, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Muscle-wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) arises from several factors including sedentary behaviour and metabolic acidosis. Exercise is potentially beneficial but might worsen acidosis through exercise-induced lactic acidosis. We studied the chronic effects of exercise in CKD stage 4-5 patients (brisk walking, 30 min, 5 times/week), and non-exercising controls; each group receiving standard oral bicarbonate (STD), or additional bicarbonate (XS) (Total n = 26; Exercising + STD n = 9; Exercising +XS n = 6; Control + STD n = 8; Control + XS n = 3). Blood and vastus lateralis biopsies were drawn at baseline and 6 months. The rise in blood lactate in submaximal treadmill tests was suppressed in the Exercising + XS group. After 6 months, intramuscular free amino acids (including the branched chain amino acids) in the Exercising + STD group showed a striking chronic depletion. This did not occur in the Exercising + XS group. The effect in Exercising + XS patients was accompanied by reduced transcription of ubiquitin E3-ligase MuRF1 which activates proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Other anabolic indicators (Akt activation and suppression of the 14 kDa actin catabolic marker) were unaffected in Exercising + XS patients. Possibly because of this, overall suppression of myofibrillar proteolysis (3-methylhistidine output) was not observed. It is suggested that alkali effects in exercisers arose by countering exercise-induced acidosis. Whether further anabolic effects are attainable on combining alkali with enhanced exercise (e.g. resistance exercise) merits further investigation. PMID:23591985

  19. Combined immunofluorescence-DNA-fluorescence staining technique for enumeration of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in a population of acidophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Muyzer, G.; De Bruyn, A.; Schmedding, D.J.M.; Bos, P.; Westbroek, P.; Kuenen, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    An antiserum raised against whole cells of Thiobacillus ferroxidans was allowed to react with a variety of acidophilic and nonacidophilic bacteria in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Both experiments demonstrated that the antiserum was specific at the species level. This preparation was used to evaluate the role of T. ferroooxidans in the microbial desulfurization process. Leaching experiments were performed, and the numbers of T. ferrooxidans cells and other bacteria were estimated by using a combined immunofluorescence-DNA-fluorescence staining technique that was adapted for this purpose. Nonsterile coal samples inoculated with T. ferrooxidans yielded high concentrations of soluble iron after 16 days. After this period, however, T. ferrooxidans cells could no longer be detected by the immunofluorescence assay, whereas the DNA-fluorescence staining procedure demonstrated a large number of microorganisms on the coal particles. These results indicate that T. ferrooxidans is removed by competition with different acidophilic microorganisms that were originally present on the coal.

  20. Global eukaryote phylogeny: Combined small- and large-subunit ribosomal DNA trees support monophyly of Rhizaria, Retaria and Excavata.

    PubMed

    Moreira, David; von der Heyden, Sophie; Bass, David; López-García, Purificación; Chao, Ema; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Resolution of the phylogenetic relationships among the major eukaryotic groups is one of the most important problems in evolutionary biology that is still only partially solved. This task was initially addressed using a single marker, the small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), although in recent years it has been shown that it does not contain enough phylogenetic information to robustly resolve global eukaryotic phylogeny. This has prompted the use of multi-gene analyses, especially in the form of long concatenations of numerous conserved protein sequences. However, this approach is severely limited by the small number of taxa for which such a large number of protein sequences is available today. We have explored the alternative approach of using only two markers but a large taxonomic sampling, by analysing a combination of SSU and large-subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences. This strategy allows also the incorporation of sequences from non-cultivated protists, e.g., Radiozoa (=radiolaria minus Phaeodarea). We provide the first LSU rRNA sequences for Heliozoa, Apusozoa (both Apusomonadida and Ancyromonadida), Cercozoa and Radiozoa. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses for 91 eukaryotic combined SSU+LSU sequences yielded much stronger support than hitherto for the supergroup Rhizaria (Cercozoa plus Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and several well-recognised groups and also for other problematic clades, such as the Retaria (Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and, with more moderate support, the Excavata. Within opisthokonts, the combined tree strongly confirms that the filose amoebae Nuclearia are sisters to Fungi whereas other Choanozoa are sisters to animals. The position of some bikont taxa, notably Heliozoa and Apusozoa, remains unresolved. However, our combined trees suggest a more deeply diverging position for Ancyromonas, and perhaps also Apusomonas, than for other bikonts, suggesting that apusozoan zooflagellates may be central for understanding the early evolution of

  1. Ty virus-like particles, DNA vaccines and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara; comparisons and combinations.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, S C; Schneider, J; Plebanski, M; Hannan, C M; Blanchard, T J; Smith, G L; Hill, A V

    1999-03-01

    Three types of vaccine, all expressing the same antigen from Plasmodium berghei, or a CD8+ T cell epitope from that antigen, were compared for their ability to induce CD8+ T cell responses in mice. Higher levels of lysis and numbers of IFN-gamma secreting T cells were primed with Ty virus-like particles and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) than with DNA vaccines, but none of the vaccines were able to protect immunised mice from infectious challenge even after repeated doses. However, when the immune response was primed with one type of vaccine (Ty-VLPs or DNA) and boosted with another (MVA) complete protection against infection was achieved. Protection correlated with very high levels of IFN-gamma secreting T cells and lysis. This method of vaccination uses delivery systems and routes that can be used in humans and could provide a generally applicable regime for the induction of high levels of CD8+ T cells.

  2. Berberine in combination with cisplatin suppresses breast cancer cell growth through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuwan; Jing, Zuolei; Li, Yan; Mao, Weifeng

    2016-07-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from medicinal plants such as Hydrastis canadensis, Berberis aristata and Coptis chinensis. BBR displays a number of beneficial roles in the treatment of various types of cancers, yet the precise mechanisms of its action remain unclear. Cisplatin is an effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent and functions by generating DNA damage, promoting DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis; however, its efficacy is challenged by the resistance of tumor cells in clinical application. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of BBR in combination with cisplatin on human breast cancer cells. MTT assay showed that BBR inhibited breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 52.178±1.593 µM and the IC50 value of cisplatin was 49.541±1.618 µM, while in combination with 26 µM BBR, the IC50 value of cisplatin was 5.759±0.76 µM. BBR sensitized the MCF-7 cells to cisplatin in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After treatment of BBR and cisplatin, the cellular pro-apoptotic capase-3 and cleaved capspase-3 and caspase-9 were upregulated and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated. Importantly, BBR restrained the expression of cellular PCNA, and immunofluoresence analysis of γH2AX showed that BBR increased the DNA damages induced by cisplatin. Taken together, the results demonstrated that BBR sensitized MCF-7 cells to cisplatin through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27177238

  3. Enhanced Performance of Plasmid DNA Polyplexes Stabilized by a Combination of Core Hydrophobicity and Surface PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Elizabeth J.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Werfel, Thomas A.; Guo, Ruijing; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy has high potential for safely promoting tissue restoration and for treating various genetic diseases. One current limitation is that conventional transfection reagents such as polyethylenimine (PEI) form electrostatically stabilized plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes with poor colloidal stability. In this study, a library of poly(ethylene glycol-b-(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate)) [poly(EG-b-(DMAEMA-co-BMA))] polymers were synthesized and screened for improved colloidal stability and nucleic acid transfection following lyophilization. When added to pDNA in the appropriate pH buffer, the DMAEMA moieties initiate formation of electrostatic polyplexes that are internally stabilized by hydrophobic interactions of the core BMA blocks and sterically stabilized against aggregation by a PEG corona. The BMA content was varied from 0% to 60% in the second polymer block in order to optimally tune the balance of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in the polyplex core, and polymers with 40 and 50 mol% BMA achieved the highest transfection efficiency. Diblock copolymers were more stable than PEI in physiologic buffers. Consequently, diblock copolymer polyplexes aggregated more slowly and followed a reaction-limited colloidal aggregation model, while fast aggregation of PEI polyplexes was governed by a diffusion-limited model. Polymers with 40% BMA did not aggregate significantly after lyophilization and produced up to 20-fold higher transfection efficiency than PEI polyplexes both before and after lyophilization. Furthermore, poly(EG-b-(DMAEMA-co-BMA)) polyplexes exhibited pH-dependent membrane disruption in a red blood cell hemolysis assay and endosomal escape as observed by confocal microscopy.Lyophilized polyplexes made with the lead candidate diblock copolymer (40% BMA) also successfully transfected cells in vitro following incorporation into gas-foamed polymeric scaffolds. In summary, the enhanced colloidal stability

  4. Long-term evaluation of combined prolonged-release oxycodone and naloxone in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic pain: pooled analysis of extension phases of two Phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Blagden, M; Hafer, J; Duerr, H; Hopp, M; Bosse, B

    2014-01-01

    Background While opioids provide effective analgesia, opioid-induced constipation (OIC) can severely impact quality of life and treatment compliance. This pooled analysis evaluated the maintenance of efficacy and safety during long-term treatment with combined oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets (OXN PR) in adults with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Methods Patients (N = 474) received open-label OXN PR during 52-week extension phases of two studies, having completed 12-week, double-blind, randomized treatment with oxycodone prolonged-release tablets (Oxy PR) or OXN PR. Analgesia and bowel function were assessed at each study visit using ‘Average pain over last 24 h scale and Bowel Function Index (BFI), respectively. Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication was assessed at study end only. Key Results Improvement in bowel function was particularly marked in patients who switched from Oxy PR in the double-blind phase to OXN PR during the extension phase, resulting in a clinically meaningful reduction (≥12 points) in BFI score: at the start of the extension phases, mean (SD) BFI score was 44.3 (28.13), and was 29.8 (26.36) for patients who had received OXN PR in the double-blind phase. One week later, BFI scores were similar for the two groups (26.5 [24.40] and 27.5 [25.60], respectively), as was observed throughout the following months. Fewer than 10% of patients received laxatives regularly. Mean 24-h pain scores were low and stable throughout the extension phases. No unexpected adverse events were observed. Conclusions & Inferences Pooled data demonstrate OXN PR is an effective long-term therapy for patients with chronic non-cancer pain, and can address symptoms of OIC. No new safety issues were observed which were attributable to the long-term administration of OXN PR. PMID:25346155

  5. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  6. Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating area. Non-original spa pool is partially visible on right. - Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  8. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  9. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  10. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  11. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  12. Quality measure attainment with dapagliflozin plus metformin extended-release as initial combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: a post hoc pooled analysis of two clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Kelly F; Katz, Arie; Sheehan, John J

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of quality measures attempts to improve safety and health outcomes and to reduce costs. In two Phase III trials in treatment-naive patients with type 2 diabetes, dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d as initial combination therapy with metformin extended-release (XR) significantly reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C) from baseline to 24 weeks and allowed higher proportions of patients to achieve A1C <7% vs dapagliflozin or metformin monotherapy. Objective A pooled analysis of data from these two studies assessed the effect of dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d plus metformin XR (combination therapy) compared with placebo plus metformin XR (metformin monotherapy) on diabetes quality measures. Quality measures include laboratory measures of A1C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as well as vital status measures of blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI). The proportion of patients achieving A1C, BP, and LDL-C individual and composite measures was assessed, as was the proportion with baseline BMI ≥25 kg/m2 who lost ≥4.5 kg. Subgroup analyses by baseline BMI were also performed. Results A total of 194 and 211 patients were treated with dapagliflozin 5- or 10-mg/d combination therapy, respectively, and 409 with metformin monotherapy. Significantly higher proportions of patients achieved A1C ≤6.5%, <7%, or <8% with combination therapy vs metformin monotherapy (P<0.02). Significantly higher proportions of patients achieved BP <140/90 mmHg (P<0.02 for each dapagliflozin dose) and BP <130/80 mmHg (P<0.02 with dapagliflozin 5 mg/d only) with combination therapy vs metformin monotherapy. Similar proportions (29%–33%) of patients had LDL-C <100 mg/dL across treatment groups. A higher proportion of patients with baseline BMI ≥25 kg/m2 lost ≥4.5 kg with combination therapy. Combination therapy had a more robust effect on patients with higher baseline BMI. Conclusion Initial combination therapy with dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d and metformin improved

  13. Next Generation Sequencing of Pooled Samples: Guideline for Variants’ Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Santosh; Mangano, Eleonora; Barizzone, Nadia; Bordoni, Roberta; Sorosina, Melissa; Clarelli, Ferdinando; Corrado, Lucia; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; D’Alfonso, Sandra; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing large number of individuals, which is often needed for population genetics studies, is still economically challenging despite falling costs of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Pool-seq is an alternative cost- and time-effective option in which DNA from several individuals is pooled for sequencing. However, pooling of DNA creates new problems and challenges for accurate variant call and allele frequency (AF) estimation. In particular, sequencing errors confound with the alleles present at low frequency in the pools possibly giving rise to false positive variants. We sequenced 996 individuals in 83 pools (12 individuals/pool) in a targeted re-sequencing experiment. We show that Pool-seq AFs are robust and reliable by comparing them with public variant databases and in-house SNP-genotyping data of individual subjects of pools. Furthermore, we propose a simple filtering guideline for the removal of spurious variants based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. We experimentally validated our filters by comparing Pool-seq to individual sequencing data showing that the filters remove most of the false variants while retaining majority of true variants. The proposed guideline is fairly generic in nature and could be easily applied in other Pool-seq experiments. PMID:27670852

  14. Estimating GFR using Serum Cystatin C Alone and in Combination with Serum Creatinine: A Pooled Analysis of 3418 Individuals with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Lesley A; Coresh, Josef; Schmid, Christopher H; Feldman, Harold I.; Froissart, Marc; Kusek, John; Rossert, Jerome; Van Lente, Frederick; Bruce, Robert D.; Zhang, Yaping (Lucy); Greene, Tom; Levey, Andrew S

    2008-01-01

    thus providing an alternative GFR estimate that is not linked to muscle mass. An equation including Scys in combination with Scr, age, sex and race provide most accurate estimates. PMID:18295055

  15. Consequences of combining siRNA-mediated DNA methyltransferase 1 depletion with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in human leukemic KG1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Vispé, Stéphane; Deroide, Arthur; Davoine, Emeline; Desjobert, Cécile; Lestienne, Fabrice; Fournier, Lucie; Novosad, Natacha; Bréand, Sophie; Besse, Jérôme; Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg; De Vries, Luc; Cussac, Didier; Riond, Joëlle; Arimondo, Paola B.

    2015-01-01

    5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine are clinically used to treat patients with blood neoplasia. Their antileukemic property is mediated by the trapping and the subsequent degradation of a family of proteins, the DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B) leading to DNA demethylation, tumor suppressor gene re-expression and DNA damage. Here we studied the respective role of each DNMT in the human leukemia KG1 cell line using a RNA interference approach. In addition we addressed the role of DNA damage formation in DNA demethylation by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Our data show that DNMT1 is the main DNMT involved in DNA methylation maintenance in KG1 cells and in mediating DNA damage formation upon exposure to 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Moreover, KG1 cells express the DNMT1 protein at a level above the one required to ensure DNA methylation maintenance, and we identified a threshold for DNMT1 depletion that needs to be exceeded to achieve DNA demethylation. Most interestingly, by combining DNMT1 siRNA and treatment with low dose of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, it is possible to uncouple DNA damage formation from DNA demethylation. This work strongly suggests that a direct pharmacological inhibition of DNMT1, unlike the use of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, should lead to tumor suppressor gene hypomethylation and re-expression without inducing major DNA damage in leukemia. PMID:25948775

  16. Construction of two fluorescence-labeled non-combined DNA index system miniSTR multiplex systems to analyze degraded DNA samples in the Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Li, Shujin; Cong, Bin; Li, Xia; Guo, Xia; He, Lujun; Ye, Jian; Pei, Li

    2010-09-01

    MiniSTR loci have been demonstrated to be an effective approach in recovering genetic information from degraded specimens, because of the reduced PCR amplicon sizes which improved the PCR efficiency. Eight non-combined DNA index system miniSTR loci suitable for the Chinese Han Population were analyzed in 300 unrelated Chinese Han individuals using two novel five fluorescence-labeled miniSTR multiplex systems(multiplex I: D10S1248, D2S441, D1S1677 and D9S2157; multiplex II: D9S1122, D10S1435, D12ATA63, D2S1776 and Amelogenin). The allele frequency distribution and forensic parameters in the Chinese Han Population were reported in this article. The Exact Test demonstrated that all loci surveyed here were found to be no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The accumulated power of discrimination and power of exclusion for the eight loci were 0.999999992 and 0.98, respectively. The highly degraded DNA from artificially degraded samples and the degraded forensic case work samples was assessed with the two miniSTR multiplex systems, and the results showed that the systems were quite effective.

  17. Combined inhibition of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase restores caspase-8 expression and sensitizes SCLC cells to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Kaminskyy, Vitaliy O; Surova, Olga V; Vaculova, Alena; Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising drug for the treatment of tumors; however, a number of cancer cells are resistant to this cytokine. Among the mechanisms of resistance of small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) to TRAIL is the lack of caspase-8 expression. Although methylation of the caspase-8 promoter has been suggested as the main mechanism of caspase-8 silencing, we showed that reduction of the enzymes involved in DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 1, 3a and 3b, was not sufficient to significantly restore caspase-8 expression in SCLC cells, signifying that other mechanisms are involved in caspase-8 silencing. We found that combination of the DNMT inhibitor decitabine with an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC) significantly increased caspase-8 expression in SCLC cells at the RNA and protein levels. Among all studied HDAC inhibitors, valproic acid (VPA) and CI-994 showed prolonged effects on histone acetylation, while combination with decitabine produced the most prominent effects on caspase-8 re-expression. Moreover, a significant reduction of survivin and cIAP-1 proteins level was observed after treatment with VPA. The combination of two drugs sensitized SCLC cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, involving mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and was accompanied by Bid cleavage, activation of Bax, and release of cytochrome c. Both initiator caspase-8 and -9 were required for the sensitization of SCLC cells to TRAIL. Thus, efficient restoration of caspase-8 expression in SCLC cells is achieved when a combination of DNMT and HDAC inhibitors is used, suggesting a combination of decitabine and VPA or CI-994 as a potential treatment for sensitization of SCLC cells lacking caspase-8 to TRAIL. PMID:21771726

  18. Disentangling pooled triad genotypes for association studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Umbach, David M; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2014-09-01

    Association studies that genotype affected offspring and their parents (triads) offer robustness to genetic population structure while enabling assessments of maternal effects, parent-of-origin effects, and gene-by-environment interaction. We propose case-parents designs that use pooled DNA specimens to make economical use of limited available specimens. One can markedly reduce the number of genotyping assays required by randomly partitioning the case-parent triads into pooling sets of h triads each and creating three pools from every pooling set, one pool each for mothers, fathers, and offspring. Maximum-likelihood estimation of relative risk parameters proceeds via log-linear modeling using the expectation-maximization algorithm. The approach can assess offspring and maternal genetic effects and accommodate genotyping errors and missing genotypes. We compare the power of our proposed analysis for testing offspring and maternal genetic effects to that based on a difference approach and that of the gold standard based on individual genotypes, under a range of allele frequencies, missing parent proportions, and genotyping error rates. Power calculations show that the pooling strategies cause only modest reductions in power if genotyping errors are low, while reducing genotyping costs and conserving limited specimens.

  19. Microbial life in Champagne Pool, a geothermal spring in Waiotapu, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Adrian; Morgan, Hugh W; McDonald, Ian R; Daughney, Christopher J

    2007-07-01

    Surveys of Champagne Pool, one of New Zealand's largest terrestrial hot springs and rich in arsenic ions and compounds, have been restricted to geological and geochemical descriptions, and a few microbiological studies applying culture-independent methods. In the current investigation, a combination of culture and culture-independent approaches were chosen to determine microbial density and diversity in Champagne Pool. Recovered total DNA and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) content of spring water revealed relatively low values compared to other geothermal springs within New Zealand and are in good agreement with low cell numbers of 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(6) cells/ml obtained for Champagne Pool water samples by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA (small-subunit ribosomal nucleic acid) gene clone library analyses of environmental DNA indicated the abundance of Sulfurihydrogenibium, Sulfolobus, and Thermofilum-like populations in Champagne Pool. From these results, media were selected to target the enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing and sulfur-dependent microorganisms. Three isolates were successfully obtained having 16S rRNA gene sequences with similarities of approximately 98% to Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, 94% to Sulfurihydrogenibium azorense, and 99% to Thermococcus waiotapuensis, respectively.

  20. Pools for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  1. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  2. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  3. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    Aquarium granuloma; Fish tank granuloma ... Risks include exposure to swimming pools, salt water aquariums, or ocean fish. ... Wash hands and arms thoroughly after cleaning aquariums. Or, wear rubber gloves when cleaning.

  4. An Xpb Mouse Model for Combined Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne Syndrome Reveals Progeroid Features upon Further Attenuation of DNA Repair▿

    PubMed Central

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Weeda, Geert; de Wit, Jan; Mitchell, James R.; Beems, Rudolf B.; van Steeg, Harry; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.

    2009-01-01

    Patients carrying mutations in the XPB helicase subunit of the basal transcription and nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor TFIIH display the combined cancer and developmental-progeroid disorder xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome (XPCS). Due to the dual transcription repair role of XPB and the absence of animal models, the underlying molecular mechanisms of XPBXPCS are largely uncharacterized. Here we show that severe alterations in Xpb cause embryonic lethality and that knock-in mice closely mimicking an XPCS patient-derived XPB mutation recapitulate the UV sensitivity typical for XP but fail to show overt CS features unless the DNA repair capacity is further challenged by crossings to the NER-deficient Xpa background. Interestingly, the XpbXPCS Xpa double mutants display a remarkable interanimal variance, which points to stochastic DNA damage accumulation as an important determinant of clinical diversity in NER syndromes. Furthermore, mice carrying the XpbXPCS mutation together with a point mutation in the second TFIIH helicase Xpd are healthy at birth but display neonatal lethality, indicating that transcription efficiency is sufficient to permit embryonal development even when both TFIIH helicases are crippled. The double-mutant cells exhibit sensitivity to oxidative stress, suggesting a role for endogenous DNA damage in the onset of XPB-associated CS. PMID:19114557

  5. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization using Au/Fe3O4 magnetic composites combined with silver enhancement.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Hui; Li, Jin-Yi; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    A novel method is described for the highly effective amplifying electrochemical response of DNA based on oligonucleotides functionalized with Au/Fe(3)O(4) nanocomposites by the aid of silver (Ag) enhancement. Via electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly, the prepared Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles form nano-clusters coated with a bilayer composed of polystyrene sulfonate sodium salt (PSS) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), which are in favor of adsorbing lots of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the surface. The application of magnetic Fe(3)O(4) made the procedures much more simple, convenient and feasible. The resulting composites were then used as labels via the Au-S bond for the DNA hybridization, followed by catalytic deposition of silver on the gold tags. Such an assay is then combined with a sensitive anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) measurement of multiple silver nanoparticle tracers. A 27-mer sequence DNA target is detected at a glassy carbon (GC) electrode with a detection limit down to ca. 100 aM, which is 800 times lower than that obtained using gold nanoparticles only as labels in the control experiments. This Fe(3)O(4)/PSS/PDDA/Au composite offers a great promising future for the ultrasensitive detection of other biorecognition events.

  6. Combining peptide and DNA for protein assay: CRIP1 detection for breast cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haona; Li, Hao; Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoying; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a novel method for a protein assay is proposed which uses the specific protein-binding peptide of the target protein and sequence-specific DNA to interact with the target as the capture and detection probe, respectively. Meanwhile, since the DNA sequence can be coupled with gold nanoparticles to amplify the signal readout, a sensitive and easily operated method for protein assay is developed. We have also employed a transcription factor named as cysteine-rich intestinal protein 1 (CRIP1), which has been identified as an ideal biomarker for staging of breast cancer, as the model protein for this study. With the proposed method, CRIP1 can be determined in a linear range from 1.25 to 10.13 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 1.25 ng/mL. Furthermore, the proposed method can be directly used to assay CRIP1 in tissue samples. Owing to its desirable sensitivity, excellent reproducibility, and high selectivity, the proposed method may hold great potential in clinical practice in the future.

  7. A two-dimensional pooling strategy for rare variant detection on next-generation sequencing platforms.

    PubMed

    Zuzarte, Philip C; Denroche, Robert E; Fehringer, Gordon; Katzov-Eckert, Hagit; Hung, Rayjean J; McPherson, John D

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for pooling and sequencing DNA from a large number of individual samples while preserving information regarding sample identity. DNA from 576 individuals was arranged into four 12 row by 12 column matrices and then pooled by row and by column resulting in 96 total pools with 12 individuals in each pool. Pooling of DNA was carried out in a two-dimensional fashion, such that DNA from each individual is present in exactly one row pool and exactly one column pool. By considering the variants observed in the rows and columns of a matrix we are able to trace rare variants back to the specific individuals that carry them. The pooled DNA samples were enriched over a 250 kb region previously identified by GWAS to significantly predispose individuals to lung cancer. All 96 pools (12 row and 12 column pools from 4 matrices) were barcoded and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument with an average depth of coverage greater than 4,000×. Verification based on Ion PGM sequencing confirmed the presence of 91.4% of confidently classified SNVs assayed. In this way, each individual sample is sequenced in multiple pools providing more accurate variant calling than a single pool or a multiplexed approach. This provides a powerful method for rare variant detection in regions of interest at a reduced cost to the researcher.

  8. Highly sensitive DNA detection and point mutation identification: an electrochemical approach based on the combined use of ligase and reverse molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zai-Sheng; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2007-06-01

    A novel strategy is described for highly sensitive DNA detection and point mutation identification based on the combination of reverse molecular beacon with DNA ligase. A 5'-phosphoryl and 3'-ferrocene terminated DNA sequence is used as detection probe, which may be ligated to capture DNA immobilized on an electrode surface in the presence of a target DNA strand that is complementary to the ends of each DNA, since this allows formation of a nicked, double-stranded DNA. The ligation product may form a hairpin structure after the removal of target DNA. By this method, target DNA can be determined in the range from 3.4 x 10(-12) to 1.4 x 10(-7) M with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-12) M. In contrast to existing methods based on the conformation change of redox-labeled oligonucleotides, the proposed strategy offers several substantial advantages: first, the background peak current is eliminated as the ferrocene (Fc)-tagged oligonucleotide probe is specifically ligated to capture DNA; second, a "signal-on" mechanism makes the current intensity increase with increasing target DNA concentration; third, improved current signal is obtained due to the formation of the hairpin structure of ligation products. Additionally, the present system exhibits excellent capability to discriminate mutant target sequences from fully complementary target sequences.

  9. A computer programme for estimation of genetic risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information.

    PubMed Central

    Sarfarazi, M; Williams, H

    1986-01-01

    A computer programme is presented for calculating the recurrence risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information such as carrier detection tests. The methods of computation are shown in the given examples. The programme can be used with either a single DNA probe or two 'flanking' DNA probes for both familial and isolated case pedigrees. For isolated case families the mutation rate at the disease locus can be taken into account in conjunction with the DNA probe data. PMID:3754009

  10. Pool-riffle Maintenance in Mountain Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Pool-riffles are maintained through a combination of at least several mechanisms that operate and interact over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Velocity or shear reversal is subsumed within several of these mechanisms, however a growing body of work suggests that (1) flow convergence into pools, (2) structuring of riffle crest sediments, and (3) local feedbacks between flood stage bedform evolution and hydrodynamics may be disproportionately important. We additionally propose that temporal and spatial patterns of sediment sorting across pool-riffles may also provide some level of bedform maintenance. A comprehensive understanding of these maintenance mechanisms is needed. We will report results of several flume experiments for autogenic pool-riffles. The experiments examined pool-riffle maintenance processes under variable flood and sediment supply conditions. A focus of our work is to characterize spatial and temporal patterns of pool-riffle sediment sorting, and to examine this in relation to temporal patterns of bedform evolution. The experiments represent a 5:1 scale-model of a prototype reach of a pool-riffle stream located within the University of British Columbia Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, Maple Ridge, BC.

  11. Autofocus using adaptive prediction approximation combined search for the fluorescence microscope in second-generation DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hancong; Liu, Jinfeng; Li, Yang; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Chenxu; Lu, Hua

    2014-07-10

    Autofocus is an important technique for high-speed image acquisition in the second-generation DNA sequencing system, and this paper studies the passive focus algorithm for the system, which consists of two parts: focus measurement (FM) and focus search (FS). Based on the properties of DNA chips' images, we choose the normalized variance as the FM algorithm and develop a new robust FS named adaptive prediction approximation combined search (APACS). APACS utilizes golden section search (GSS) to approximate the focus position and engages the curve-fitting search (CFS) to predict the position simultaneously in every step of GSS. When the difference between consecutive predictions meets the set precision, the search finishes. Otherwise, it ends as GSS. In APACS, we also propose an estimation method, named the combination of centroid estimation and overdetermined equations estimation by least squares solution, to calculate the initial vector for the nonlinear equations in APACS prediction, which reduces the iterations and accelerates the search. The simulation and measured results demonstrate that APACS not only maintains the stability but also reduces the focus time compared with GSS and CFS, which indicates APACS is a robust and fast FS for the fluorescence microscope in a sequencing system.

  12. Venom landscapes: mining the complexity of spider venoms via a combined cDNA and mass spectrometric approach.

    PubMed

    Escoubas, Pierre; Sollod, Brianna; King, Glenn F

    2006-05-01

    The complexity of Australian funnel-web spider venoms has been explored via the combined use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry coupled with chromatographic separation and the analysis of venom-gland cDNA libraries. The results show that these venoms are far more complex than previously realized. We show that the venoms of Australian funnel-web spiders contain many hundreds of peptides that follow a bimodal distribution, with about 75% of the peptides having a mass of 3000-5000 Da. The mass spectral data were validated by matching the experimentally observed masses with those predicted from peptide sequences derived from analysis of venom-gland cDNA libraries. We show that multiple isoforms of these peptides are found in small chromatographic windows, which suggests that the wide distribution of close molecular weights among the chromatographic fractions probably reflects a diversity of structures and physicochemical properties. The combination of all predicted and measured parameters permits the interpretation of three-dimensional 'venom landscapes' derived from LC-MALDI analysis. We propose that these venom landscapes might have predictive value for the discovery of various groups of pharmacologically distinct toxins in complex venoms.

  13. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Megan L; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C; White, Nicole E; Byard, Roger W; Bellgard, Matthew I; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J N; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F; Bunce, Michael

    2015-12-10

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines.

  14. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Byard, Roger W.; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines.

  15. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Byard, Roger W.; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines. PMID:26658160

  16. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Megan L; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C; White, Nicole E; Byard, Roger W; Bellgard, Matthew I; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J N; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F; Bunce, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines. PMID:26658160

  17. To pool or not to pool

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.

    1998-07-01

    In world electricity markets, third party access to transmission and distribution networks on non-discriminatory terms is available to generators and retail suppliers. Some market participants may believe that they are able to negotiate better terms and more market share through bilateral contracts than they would be able to obtain in a pool. Hence such companies will either argue against the development of a pool or seek to make membership of it optional. These companies are therefore seeking to ensure their continued ability to exercise their market power. Inevitably, those companies who would suffer in this form of market will advocate a more transparent arrangement where the market power of other organizations is curbed. The physical nature of the country and plant is also an important factor. Hydro-electric plant can, within water limitations, react very quickly to changing demand. These plant do not therefore require elaborate operating schedules hence market prices can be set ignoring physical plant characteristics. The ability of fossil fuel plant to respond is highly dependent on the operating condition of the plant. These generators need to plan their operations well in advance hence prices cannot be set in complete disregard of the generating plants' ability to meet the resulting schedule. The development of competitive markets is not, however, solely driven by commercial issues. Political and economic considerations such as stranded assets and the protection of indigenous industries, such as coal mines, can greatly influence the nature of the markets. Most countries have accepted the wisdom of having some form of pool. The choice of market mechanism will therefore be driven by: Physical constraints of the country infrastructure and plant; Market power of participants; and Political pressures on the Government. Of these factors political pressures tend to carry the greatest influence.

  18. Delivery and processing of exogenous double-stranded DNA in mouse CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and their cell cycle changes upon combined treatment with cyclophosphamide and double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Dolgova, Evgenia V; Efremov, Yaroslav R; Orishchenko, Konstantin E; Andrushkevich, Oleg M; Alyamkina, Ekaterina A; Proskurina, Anastasia S; Bayborodin, Sergey I; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Popova, Nelly A; Chernykh, Elena R; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Taranov, Oleg S; Omigov, Vladimir V; Minkevich, Alexandra M; Rogachev, Vladimir A; Bogachev, Sergey S; Shurdov, Mikhail A

    2013-10-10

    We previously reported that fragments of exogenous double-stranded DNA can be internalized by mouse bone marrow cells without any transfection. Our present analysis shows that only 2% of bone marrow cells take up the fragments of extracellular exogenous DNA. Of these, ~45% of the cells correspond to CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Taking into account that CD34+ stem cells constituted 2.5% of the total cell population in the bone marrow samples analyzed, these data indicate that as much as 40% of CD34+ cells readily internalize fragments of extracellular exogenous DNA. This suggests that internalization of fragmented dsDNA is a general feature of poorly differentiated cells, in particular CD34+ bone marrow cells. When linearized plasmid DNA was used as a source of exogenous DNA, we observed that exonucleolytic processing and ligation of double-stranded DNA termini occurred in the bone marrow cells that had this DNA internalized. We also recovered "hybrid" plasmids that encompass kanamycin-resistance gene from the exogenous plasmid DNA and the fragments of plasmids from host enterobacteria, which is suggestive of recombination events taking place upon DNA internalization. CD34+ cells make up the distinctive bone marrow cell population that internalizes extracellular DNA. Cell cycle analysis of CD34+ cells treated with cyclophosphamide only or in combination with dsDNA, suggests that these cells have distinct biologic responses to these treatments. Namely, whereas upon cyclophosphamide treatment bone marrow stem cells become arrested at S-G2 phases, combined cyclophosphamide+dsDNA treatment leads to cell cycle progression without any delay. This indicates that when the genome is undergoing repair of interstrand crosslinks, injection of fragmented exogenous dsDNA results in immediate reconstitution of genome integrity. We observe that cyclophosphamide-only or a combined cyclophosphamide+dsDNA treatment of cells lead to two distinct waves of apoptosis in CD34

  19. Improved Heterosis Prediction by Combining Information on DNA- and Metabolic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Tanja; Steinfath, Matthias; Andorf, Sandra; Lisec, Jan; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Altmann, Thomas; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Background Hybrids represent a cornerstone in the success story of breeding programs. The fundamental principle underlying this success is the phenomenon of hybrid vigour, or heterosis. It describes an advantage of the offspring as compared to the two parental lines with respect to parameters such as growth and resistance against abiotic or biotic stress. Dominance, overdominance or epistasis based models are commonly used explanations. Conclusion/Significance The heterosis level is clearly a function of the combination of the parents used for offspring production. This results in a major challenge for plant breeders, as usually several thousand combinations of parents have to be tested for identifying the best combinations. Thus, any approach to reliably predict heterosis levels based on properties of the parental lines would be highly beneficial for plant breeding. Methodology/Principal Findings Recently, genetic data have been used to predict heterosis. Here we show that a combination of parental genetic and metabolic markers, identified via feature selection and minimum-description-length based regression methods, significantly improves the prediction of biomass heterosis in resulting offspring. These findings will help furthering our understanding of the molecular basis of heterosis, revealing, for instance, the presence of nonlinear genotype-phenotype relationships. In addition, we describe a possible approach for accelerated selection in plant breeding. PMID:19370148

  20. Vernal Pool Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nancy; Colburn, Betsy

    This curriculum guide accompanies Certified: A Citizen's Step-by-Step Guide to Protecting Vernal Pools which is designed to train volunteers in the process of identifying vernal pool habitat so that as many of these pools as possible can be certified by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program. Vernal pools are a kind of…

  1. Combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences resolve the interrelations of the major Australasian marsupial radiations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J; McLenachan, Patricia A; Down, Christin; Gibb, Gillian C; Penny, David

    2006-02-01

    Australasian marsupials include three major radiations, the insectivorous/carnivorous Dasyuromorphia, the omnivorous bandicoots (Peramelemorphia), and the largely herbivorous diprotodontians. Morphologists have generally considered the bandicoots and diprotodontians to be closely related, most prominently because they are both syndactylous (with the 2nd and 3rd pedal digits being fused). Molecular studies have been unable to confirm or reject this Syndactyla hypothesis. Here we present new mitochondrial (mt) genomes from a spiny bandicoot (Echymipera rufescens) and two dasyurids, a fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) and a northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus). By comparing trees derived from pairwise base-frequency differences between taxa with standard (absolute, uncorrected) distance trees, we infer that composition bias among mt protein-coding and RNA sequences is sufficient to mislead tree reconstruction. This can explain incongruence between trees obtained from mt and nuclear data sets. However, after excluding major sources of compositional heterogeneity, both the "reduced-bias" mt and nuclear data sets clearly favor a bandicoot plus dasyuromorphian association, as well as a grouping of kangaroos and possums (Phalangeriformes) among diprotodontians. Notably, alternatives to these groupings could only be confidently rejected by combining the mt and nuclear data. Elsewhere on the tree, Dromiciops appears to be sister to the monophyletic Australasian marsupials, whereas the placement of the marsupial mole (Notoryctes) remains problematic. More generally, we contend that it is desirable to combine mt genome and nuclear sequences for inferring vertebrate phylogeny, but as separately modeled process partitions. This strategy depends on detecting and excluding (or accounting for) major sources of non-historical signal, such as from compositional non-stationarity. [Base composition; combined data; marsupial; mitochondrial genome; phylogeny.].

  2. Combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences resolve the interrelations of the major Australasian marsupial radiations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J; McLenachan, Patricia A; Down, Christin; Gibb, Gillian C; Penny, David

    2006-02-01

    Australasian marsupials include three major radiations, the insectivorous/carnivorous Dasyuromorphia, the omnivorous bandicoots (Peramelemorphia), and the largely herbivorous diprotodontians. Morphologists have generally considered the bandicoots and diprotodontians to be closely related, most prominently because they are both syndactylous (with the 2nd and 3rd pedal digits being fused). Molecular studies have been unable to confirm or reject this Syndactyla hypothesis. Here we present new mitochondrial (mt) genomes from a spiny bandicoot (Echymipera rufescens) and two dasyurids, a fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) and a northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus). By comparing trees derived from pairwise base-frequency differences between taxa with standard (absolute, uncorrected) distance trees, we infer that composition bias among mt protein-coding and RNA sequences is sufficient to mislead tree reconstruction. This can explain incongruence between trees obtained from mt and nuclear data sets. However, after excluding major sources of compositional heterogeneity, both the "reduced-bias" mt and nuclear data sets clearly favor a bandicoot plus dasyuromorphian association, as well as a grouping of kangaroos and possums (Phalangeriformes) among diprotodontians. Notably, alternatives to these groupings could only be confidently rejected by combining the mt and nuclear data. Elsewhere on the tree, Dromiciops appears to be sister to the monophyletic Australasian marsupials, whereas the placement of the marsupial mole (Notoryctes) remains problematic. More generally, we contend that it is desirable to combine mt genome and nuclear sequences for inferring vertebrate phylogeny, but as separately modeled process partitions. This strategy depends on detecting and excluding (or accounting for) major sources of non-historical signal, such as from compositional non-stationarity. [Base composition; combined data; marsupial; mitochondrial genome; phylogeny.]. PMID:16507529

  3. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines.

  4. Epigenetic age predictions based on buccal swabs are more precise in combination with cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures

    PubMed Central

    Eipel, Monika; Mayer, Felix; Arent, Tanja; Ferreira, Marcelo R. P.; Birkhofer, Carina; Gerstenmaier, Uwe; Costa, Ivan G.; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is reflected by highly reproducible DNA methylation (DNAm) changes that open new perspectives for estimation of chronological age in legal medicine. DNA can be harvested non-invasively from cells at the inside of a person's cheek using buccal swabs – but these specimens resemble heterogeneous mixtures of buccal epithelial cells and leukocytes with different epigenetic makeup. In this study, we have trained an age predictor based on three age-associated CpG sites (associated with the genes PDE4C, ASPA, and ITGA2B) for swab samples to reach a mean absolute deviation (MAD) between predicted and chronological age of 4.3 years in a training set and of 7.03 years in a validation set. Subsequently, the composition of buccal epithelial cells versus leukocytes was estimated by two additional CpGs (associated with the genes CD6 and SERPINB5). Results of this “Buccal-Cell-Signature” correlated with cell counts in cytological stains (R2 = 0.94). Combination of cell type-specific and age-associated CpGs into one multivariate model enabled age predictions with MADs of 5.09 years and 5.12 years in two independent validation sets. Our results demonstrate that the cellular composition in buccal swab samples can be determined by DNAm at two cell type-specific CpGs to improve epigenetic age predictions. PMID:27249102

  5. [Combined use of irradiation and DNA tumor vaccine to treat canine oral malignant melanoma: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Herzog, A; Buchholz, J; Ruess-Melzer, K; Lang, J; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2013-02-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral tumor in dogs, characterized by rapid growth, local invasion, and high metastatic rate. The goal of this study was to evaluate the combination of radiation therapy and DNA tumor vaccine. We hypothesized, that the concurrent use would not increase toxicity. Nine dogs with oral melanoma were treated with 4 fractions of 8 Gray at 7-day intervals. The vaccine was given 4 times every 14 days, beginning at the first radiation fraction. Local acute radiation toxicities were assessed according to the VRTOG toxicity scoring scheme over a time period of 7 weeks. In none of the evaluated dogs, mucositis, dermatitis and conjunctivitis exceeded grade 2. In 3 dogs mild fever, lethargy, and local swelling at the injection site were seen after vaccine application. In conclusion, the concurrent administration of radiation therapy and vaccine was well tolerated in all dogs. PMID:23385072

  6. A universal protocol for the combined isolation of metabolites, DNA, long RNAs, small RNAs, and proteins from plants and microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Valledor, Luis; Escandón, Mónica; Meijón, Mónica; Nukarinen, Ella; Cañal, María Jesús; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-07-01

    Here, we describe a method for the combined metabolomic, proteomic, transcriptomic and genomic analysis from one single sample as a major step for multilevel data integration strategies in systems biology. While extracting proteins and DNA, this protocol also allows the separation of metabolites into polar and lipid fractions, as well as RNA fractionation into long and small RNAs, thus allowing a broad range of transcriptional studies. The isolated biomolecules are suitable for analysis with different methods that range from electrophoresis and blotting to state-of-the-art procedures based on mass spectrometry (accurate metabolite profiling, shot-gun proteomics) or massive sequencing technologies (transcript analysis). The low amount of starting tissue, its cost-efficiency compared with the utilization of commercial kits, and its performance over a wide range of plant, microbial, and algal species such as Chlamydomonas, Arabidopsis, Populus, or Pinus, makes this method a universal alternative for multiple molecular isolation from plant tissues.

  7. Genetic variants in DNA repair pathways and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers: combined analysis of data from two genome-wide association studies in European populations.

    PubMed

    Babron, Marie-Claude; Kazma, Rémi; Gaborieau, Valérie; McKay, James; Brennan, Paul; Sarasin, Alain; Benhamou, Simone

    2014-07-01

    DNA repair pathways are good candidates for upper aerodigestive tract cancer susceptibility because of their critical role in maintaining genome integrity. We have selected 13 pathways involved in DNA repair representing 212 autosomal genes. To assess the role of these pathways and their associated genes, two European data sets from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium were pooled, totaling 1954 cases and 3121 controls, with documented demographic, lifetime alcohol and tobacco consumption information. We applied an innovative approach that tests single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-sets within DNA repair pathways and then within genes belonging to the significant pathways. We showed an association between the polymerase pathway and oral cavity/pharynx cancers (P-corrected = 4.45 × 10(-) (2)), explained entirely by the association with one SNP, rs1494961 (P = 2.65 × 10(-) (4)), a missense mutation V306I in the second exon of HELQ gene. We also found an association between the cell cycle regulation pathway and esophagus cancer (P-corrected = 1.48 × 10(-) (2)), explained by three SNPs located within or near CSNK1E gene: rs1534891 (P = 1.27 × 10(-) (4)), rs7289981 (P = 3.37 × 10(-) (3)) and rs13054361 (P = 4.09 × 10(-) (3)). As a first attempt to investigate pathway-level associations, our results suggest a role of specific DNA repair genes/pathways in specific upper aerodigestive tract cancer sites. PMID:24658182

  8. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  9. Transformation of primary human embryonic kidney cells to anchorage independence by a combination of BK virus DNA and the Harvey-ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, A.; Pater, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    Primary human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells were transformed by a focus assay with BK virus (BKV) DNA molecularly cloned at its unique EcoRI site. Both viral DNA sequences and viral tumor antigens were present and expressed in all the foci that the authors examined. However, cells isolated from foci were incapable of growth in soft agar. They then examined the transformation of HEK cells after their transfection with a combination of BKV DNA and either the normal or the activated form of the human Ha-ras oncogene (EJ c-Ha-ras-1). Only the cells transfected with a combination of BKV DNA and the activated form of Ha-ras DNAs were present in the transformed colonies. BKV tumor antigens and the Ha-ras p21 protein were also expressed.

  10. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  11. The Future of Pooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  12. Anti-dsDNA antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: A combination of two quantitative methods and the ANA pattern is the most efficient strategy of detection.

    PubMed

    Almeida González, Delia; Roces Varela, Alfredo; Marcelino Rodríguez, Itahisa; González Vera, Alexander; Delgado Sánchez, Mónica; Aznar Esquivel, Antonio; Casañas Rodríguez, Carlos; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Several methods have been used to measure anti-double-stranded DNA auto-antibody (anti-dsDNA). Our aim was to determine the most efficient strategy to test anti-dsDNA in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, anti-dsDNA and anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) tests were requested for 644 patients. Anti-dsDNA was tested by RIA, ELISA and CLIA in all patients. The results indicated that 78 patients had a positive anti-dsDNA test according to at least one of the methods. After a 3-year follow-up period only 26 patients were diagnosed with SLE. We evaluated each method and combination of methods. Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) increased with the number of assay methods used (p=0.002 for trend), and PPV was 100% in patients whose results were positive by all three anti-dsDNA assay methods. The proportion of anti-dsDNA-positive patients who had SLE was highest (82%; p b 0.001) among those with a homogeneous pattern of ANA staining, followed by those with a speckled pattern. In ANA positive patients, when only RIA was considered, 59% of anti-dsDNA-positive patients had SLE, but when RIA and CLIA were both considered, all patients with positive results on both tests had SLE. The combination of RIA+CLIA in patients with homogeneous and speckled ANA staining showed a similar cost and higher sensitivity than RIA alone in ANA positive patients (p b 0.001). We conclude that the most efficient strategy was to combine simultaneously two quantitative and sensitive methods but only in patients with a homogeneous or speckled pattern of ANA staining. This approach maximized specificity and PPV, and reduced costs.

  13. Determining the Architecture of a Protein-DNA Complex by Combining FeBABE Cleavage Analyses, 3-D Printed Structures, and the ICM Molsoft Program.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Knipling, Leslie; Hinton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Determining the structure of a protein-DNA complex can be difficult, particularly if the protein does not bind tightly to the DNA, if there are no homologous proteins from which the DNA binding can be inferred, and/or if only portions of the protein can be crystallized. If the protein comprises just a part of a large multi-subunit complex, other complications can arise such as the complex being too large for NMR studies, or it is not possible to obtain the amounts of protein and nucleic acids needed for crystallographic analyses. Here, we describe a technique we used to map the position of an activator protein relative to the DNA within a large transcription complex. We determined the position of the activator on the DNA from data generated using activator proteins that had been conjugated at specific residues with the chemical cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). These analyses were combined with 3-D models of the available structures of portions of the activator protein and B-form DNA to obtain a 3-D picture of the protein relative to the DNA. Finally, the Molsoft program was used to refine the position, revealing the architecture of the protein-DNA within the transcription complex. PMID:26404142

  14. Ultra-low Doping on Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides using DNA Nanostructure Doped by a Combination of Lanthanide and Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Hyung-Youl; Shim, Jaewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jeon, Jaeho; Lee, Sungjoo; Roh, Yonghan; Park, Sung Ha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we propose a novel DNA-based doping method on MoS2 and WSe2 films, which enables ultra-low n- and p-doping control and allows for proper adjustments in device performance. This is achieved by selecting and/or combining different types of divalent metal and trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions on DNA nanostructures, using the newly proposed concept of Co-DNA (DNA functionalized by both divalent metal and trivalent Ln ions). The available n-doping range on the MoS2 by Ln-DNA is between 6 × 109 and 2.6 × 1010 cm−2. The p-doping change on WSe2 by Ln-DNA is adjusted between −1.0 × 1010 and −2.4 × 1010 cm−2. In Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA doping, a light p-doping is observed on MoS2 and WSe2 (~1010 cm−2). However, in the devices doped by Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA, a light n-doping (~1010 cm−2) occurs. A significant increase in on-current is also observed on the MoS2 and WSe2 devices, which are, respectively, doped by Tb3+- and Gd3+-Co-DNA, due to the reduction of effective barrier heights by the doping. In terms of optoelectronic device performance, the Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA (n-doping) and the Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA (p-doping) improve the MoS2 and WSe2 photodetectors, respectively. We also show an excellent absorbing property by Tb3+ ions on the TMD photodetectors. PMID:26838524

  15. Ultra-low Doping on Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides using DNA Nanostructure Doped by a Combination of Lanthanide and Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Hyung-Youl; Shim, Jaewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jeon, Jaeho; Lee, Sungjoo; Roh, Yonghan; Park, Sung Ha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we propose a novel DNA-based doping method on MoS2 and WSe2 films, which enables ultra-low n- and p-doping control and allows for proper adjustments in device performance. This is achieved by selecting and/or combining different types of divalent metal and trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions on DNA nanostructures, using the newly proposed concept of Co-DNA (DNA functionalized by both divalent metal and trivalent Ln ions). The available n-doping range on the MoS2 by Ln-DNA is between 6 × 109 and 2.6 × 1010 cm-2. The p-doping change on WSe2 by Ln-DNA is adjusted between -1.0 × 1010 and -2.4 × 1010 cm-2. In Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA doping, a light p-doping is observed on MoS2 and WSe2 (~1010 cm-2). However, in the devices doped by Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA, a light n-doping (~1010 cm-2) occurs. A significant increase in on-current is also observed on the MoS2 and WSe2 devices, which are, respectively, doped by Tb3+- and Gd3+-Co-DNA, due to the reduction of effective barrier heights by the doping. In terms of optoelectronic device performance, the Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA (n-doping) and the Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA (p-doping) improve the MoS2 and WSe2 photodetectors, respectively. We also show an excellent absorbing property by Tb3+ ions on the TMD photodetectors.

  16. Combining morphology, DNA sequences, and morphometrics: revising closely related species in the orb-weaving spider genus Araniella (Araneae, Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Spasojevic, Tamara; Kropf, Christian; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lasut, Liana

    2016-01-01

    The integration of independent data sets could solve problems in both traditional and DNA-based taxonomy. The aim of this study is to investigate the power of CO1 sequences and of morphometrics to distinguish closely related species in the spider genus Araniella. We put special emphasis on the species pair A. cucurbitina (Clerck, 1757) and A. opisthographa (Kulczyński, 1905) since the females are morphologically difficult to distinguish and often misidentified. A total of 216 sequences of eight Araniella species from seven European countries, North America and Asia were included in the molecular analysis. The results from both maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic inference indicate successful separation of six out of eight Araniella species, including A. cucurbitina and A. opisthographa. For the same six species, we detect no overlap of intra- and interspecific genetic divergence, leading to successful species identification with a threshold approach. In addition, morphometric analysis of the epigyna of A. cucurbitina and A. opisthographa supports species separation by two best explanatory ratios: receptaculum length and distance between receptaculum and copulatory duct. Although a small overlap in the ratios exists, the species identification rate increases when combining morphometric and molecular data, which demonstrates the efficiency of integrative approaches for distinguishing closely related species. However, none of the molecular approaches was able to separate closely related A. alpica (L. Koch, 1869) and A. inconspicua (Simon, 1874) due to shared CO1 haplotypes. Considering the clear morphological separation of the males and different habitat preferences, incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization could have led to identical CO1 sequences. Therefore, DNA-barcoding must be thoroughly tested even within small homogenous genera of spiders. PMID:27395098

  17. Allergic to Pool Water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To identify the allergy problem of a 36-year old swimming instructor, who experiences heavy itching and rashes whenever she comes in contact with pool water. Patch tests were performed with European standard series and materials from the work floor. A positive patch test to aluminum chloride and flocculant was observed. Occupational dermatitis is, based on a contact allergy to aluminum chloride in the flocculant. PMID:22993713

  18. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  19. Combined immunization using DNA-Sm14 and DNA-Hsp65 increases CD8+ memory T cells, reduces chronic pathology and decreases egg viability during Schistosoma mansoni infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most important neglected diseases found in developing countries and affects 249 million people worldwide. The development of an efficient vaccination strategy is essential for the control of this disease. Previous work showed partial protection induced by DNA-Sm14 against Schistosoma mansoni infection, whereas DNA-Hsp65 showed immunostimulatory properties against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer and antifibrotic properties in an egg-induced granuloma model. Methods C57BL/6 mice received 4 doses of DNA-Sm14 (100 μg/dose) and DNA-Hsp65 (100 μg/dose), simultaneously administrated, or DNA-Sm14 alone, once a week, during four weeks. Three groups were included: 1- Control (no immunization); 2- DNA-Sm14; 3- DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65. Two weeks following last immunization, animals were challenged subcutaneously with 30 cercariae. Fifteen, 48 and 69 days after infection splenocytes were collected to evaluate the number of CD8+ memory T cells (CD44highCD62low) using flow cytometry. Forty-eight days after challenge adult worms were collected by portal veins perfusion and intestines were collected to analyze the intestinal egg viability. Histological, immunohistochemical and soluble quantification of collagen and α-SMA accumulation were performed on the liver. Results In the current work, we tested a new vaccination strategy using DNA-Sm14 with DNA-Hsp65 to potentiate the protection against schistosomiasis. Combined vaccination increased the number of CD8+ memory T cells and decreased egg viability on the intestinal wall of infected mice. In addition, simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 reduced collagen and α-SMA accumulation during the chronic phase of granuloma formation. Conclusion Simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 showed an immunostimulatory potential and antifibrotic property that is associated with the reduction of tissue damage on Schistosoma mansoni experimental infection. PMID

  20. Energy pooling upconversion in organic molecular systems.

    PubMed

    LaCount, Michael D; Weingarten, Daniel; Hu, Nan; Shaheen, Sean E; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Walba, David M; Lusk, Mark T

    2015-04-30

    A combination of molecular quantum electrodynamics, perturbation theory, and ab initio calculations was used to create a computational methodology capable of estimating the rate of three-body singlet upconversion in organic molecular assemblies. The approach was applied to quantify the conditions under which such relaxation rates, known as energy pooling, become meaningful for two test systems, stilbene-fluorescein and hexabenzocoronene-oligothiophene. Both exhibit low intramolecular conversion, but intermolecular configurations exist in which pooling efficiency is at least 90% when placed in competition with more conventional relaxation pathways. For stilbene-fluorescein, the results are consistent with data generated in an earlier experimental investigation. Exercising these model systems facilitated the development of a set of design rules for the optimization of energy pooling. PMID:25793313

  1. Immunization with DNA vaccines encoding glycoprotein D or glycoprotein B, alone or in combination, induces protective immunity in animal models of herpes simplex virus-2 disease.

    PubMed

    McClements, W L; Armstrong, M E; Keys, R D; Liu, M A

    1996-10-15

    DNA vaccines expressing herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) full-length glycoprotein D (gD), or a truncated form of HSV-2 glycoprotein B (gB) were evaluated for protective efficacy in two experimental models of HSV-2 infection. Intramuscular (i.m.) injection of mice showed that each construction induced neutralizing serum antibodies and protected the mice from lethal HSV-2 infection. Dose-titration studies showed that low doses (< or = 1 microgram) of either DNA construction induced protective immunity, and that a single immunization with the gD construction was effective. The two DNAs were then tested in a low-dosage combination in guinea pigs. Immune sera from DNA-injected animals had antibodies to both gD and gB, and virus neutralizing activity. When challenged by vaginal infection with HSV-2, the DNA-immunized animals were significantly protected from primary genital disease.

  2. Sampling and Pooling Methods for Capturing Herd Level Antibiotic Resistance in Swine Feces using qPCR and CFU Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mellerup, Anders; Ståhl, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to define the sampling level and method combination that captures antibiotic resistance at pig herd level utilizing qPCR antibiotic resistance gene quantification and culture-based quantification of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria. Fourteen qPCR assays for commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were developed, and used to quantify antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA from swine fecal samples that were obtained using different sampling and pooling methods. In parallel, the number of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria was determined in the same swine fecal samples. The results showed that the qPCR assays were capable of detecting differences in antibiotic resistance levels in individual animals that the coliform bacteria colony forming units (CFU) could not. Also, the qPCR assays more accurately quantified antibiotic resistance genes when comparing individual sampling and pooling methods. qPCR on pooled samples was found to be a good representative for the general resistance level in a pig herd compared to the coliform CFU counts. It had significantly reduced relative standard deviations compared to coliform CFU counts in the same samples, and therefore differences in antibiotic resistance levels between samples were more readily detected. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe sampling and pooling methods for qPCR quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA extracted from swine feces. PMID:26114765

  3. Sampling and Pooling Methods for Capturing Herd Level Antibiotic Resistance in Swine Feces using qPCR and CFU Approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gunilla Veslemøy; Mellerup, Anders; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Ståhl, Marie; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Angen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to define the sampling level and method combination that captures antibiotic resistance at pig herd level utilizing qPCR antibiotic resistance gene quantification and culture-based quantification of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria. Fourteen qPCR assays for commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were developed, and used to quantify antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA from swine fecal samples that were obtained using different sampling and pooling methods. In parallel, the number of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria was determined in the same swine fecal samples. The results showed that the qPCR assays were capable of detecting differences in antibiotic resistance levels in individual animals that the coliform bacteria colony forming units (CFU) could not. Also, the qPCR assays more accurately quantified antibiotic resistance genes when comparing individual sampling and pooling methods. qPCR on pooled samples was found to be a good representative for the general resistance level in a pig herd compared to the coliform CFU counts. It had significantly reduced relative standard deviations compared to coliform CFU counts in the same samples, and therefore differences in antibiotic resistance levels between samples were more readily detected. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe sampling and pooling methods for qPCR quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA extracted from swine feces.

  4. High efficiency gene transfer using chitosan/DNA nanoparticles with specific combinations of molecular weight and degree of deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Lavertu, Marc; Méthot, Stephane; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Buschmann, Michael D

    2006-09-01

    Chitosan is a biodegradable natural polysaccharide that has shown potential for gene delivery, although the ideal molecular weight (MW) and degree of deacetylation (DDA) for this application have not been elucidated. To examine the influence of these parameters on gene transfer, we produced chitosans with different DDAs (98%, 92%, 80% and 72%) and depolymerized them with nitrous acid to obtain different MWs (150, 80, 40 and 10 kDa). We produced 64 formulations of chitosan/pDNA complexes (16 chitosans, 2 amine-to-phosphate (N:P) ratios of 5:1 and 10:1 and 2 transfection media pH of 6.5 and 7.1), characterized them for size and surface charge, and tested them for gene transfection in HEK 293 cells in vitro. Several formulations produced high levels of transgene expression while two conditions, 92-10-5 and 80-10-10 [DDA-MW-N:P ratio] at pH 6.5, showed equivalence to our best positive control. The results also revealed an important coupling between DDA and MW of chitosan in determining transgene expression. Maximum expression was obtained with a certain combination of DDA and MW that depended on N:P ratio and the pH, but similar expression levels could be achieved by simultaneously lowering MW and increasing DDA or lowering DDA and increasing MW, suggesting a predominant role of particle stability, through co-operative electrostatic binding, in determining transfection efficiency.

  5. Using minimum DNA marker loci for accurate population classification in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using few DNA markers to classify genetic background of a germplasm pool will help breeders make a quick decision while saving time and resources. WHICHLOCI is a computer program that selects the best combination of loci for population assignment through empiric analysis of molecular marker data. Th...

  6. Comet-assay in combination with PNA-FISH detects mutagen-induced DNA damage and specific repeat sequences in the damaged DNA of transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, G; Rapp, A; Arutyunyan, R; Greulich, K O; Gebhart, E

    2005-03-01

    The Comet-assay was applied to three transformed cell lines (HT1080, CCRF-CEM line and CHO) which were treated with the cytostatics bleomycin (BLM) or mitomycin C (MMC). In addition, PNA probes for the telomere repeat (TTAGGG)(n) were used for detection of telomeric DNA sequences in the damaged DNA. Data were compared with previously obtained results from peripheral leukocytes. The amount of migrating DNA increased in all cell types in a dose-dependent manner after BLM exposure. CHO cells reacted sensitively at low doses of the mutagen, and leukocytes had the highest dose-related effect up to 25 IU/ml which, however, did not further increase. A rather linear dose response characterized the HT1080 cells, the effect was lowest for the CCRF-CEM cells. While MMC at lower doses increased the percentage of migrating DNA in a dose-dependent manner, the higher doses induced shorter comets, on average, than the lower ones in all cell lines. With PNA-Comet-FISH obvious differences were found between the studied cell lines with respect to quantitative head/tail distribution of telomeric signals after BLM exposure. A large number of signal spots of various sizes were found in CHO cells, very small signals could be detected in the comets of both neoplasia cell lines. Dose-dependence of telomeres in the tail was most pro-nounced in CCRF-CEM and normal leukocytes, less in HT1080. The steepest dose-related increase of telomeric signals in the tail was found in CHO cells. The ratio between the migrated DNA and the telomeric signals in the tail varied distinctly between the examined cell types from 3:1 to 1:1. Taken together, Comet-FISH can detect mutagenic effects on specific DNA sequences. This may be of high practical value if amplified DNA sequences will be addressed by those examinations in future. PMID:15702234

  7. Novel strategy combining SYBR Green I with carbon nanotubes for highly sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium DNA.

    PubMed

    Mao, Pingdao; Ning, Yi; Li, Wenkai; Peng, Zhihui; Chen, Yongzhe; Deng, Le

    2014-01-10

    A simple, selective, sensitive and label-free fluorescent method for detecting trpS-harboring Salmonella typhimurium was developed in this study. This assay used the non-covalent interaction of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes with SWNTs, since SWNTs can quench fluorescence. Fluorescence recovery (78% with 1.8 nM target DNA) was detected in the presence of target DNA as ssDNA probes detached from SWNTs hybridized with target DNA, and the resulting double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) intercalated with SYBR Green I (SG) dyes. The increasing fluorescence intensity reached 4.54-fold. In contrast, mismatched oligonucleotides (1- or 3-nt difference to the target DNA) did not contribute to significant fluorescent recovery, which demonstrated the specificity of the assay. The increasing fluorescence intensity increased 3.15-fold when purified PCR products containing complementary sequences of trpS gene were detected. These results confirmed the ability to use this assay for detecting real samples. PMID:24267562

  8. Synergistic anti-breast cancer effect of a combined treatment with the methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine and the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Chik, Flora; Machnes, Ziv; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    DNA-demethylating agents activate tumor suppressor genes that are silenced by DNA methylation in cancer and are therefore emerging as a novel approach to cancer therapy. 5-azacytidine (VIDAZA), the first representative of this class of drugs was approved for treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes and is currently being tested on other cancers including solid tumors. However, 5-azacytidine or its deoxy-analog, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-azaCdR) could also induce methylated prometastatic genes by DNA demethylation and induce cancer cell invasiveness. Since 5-azacytidine is a potent cancer growth inhibitor, we tested whether combining it with a DNA-methylating agent, the methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), would block the adverse demethylating activity of 5-azaCdR while maintaining its growth suppression effects. We show here using several invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines that SAM inhibits global- and gene-specific demethylation induced by 5-azaCdR, prevents 5-azaCdR activation of prometastatic genes uPA and MMP2, resulting in inhibition of cell invasiveness while augmenting the growth inhibitory effects of 5-azaCdR and its effects on tumor suppressor genes. Combination of drugs acting on the DNA methylation machinery at different levels is proposed as a new strategy for epigenetic therapy of cancer.

  9. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  10. Combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the antitumor activity of E7 DNA vaccines by increasing Ag-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  11. Combined exposure to nano-silica and lead induced potentiation of oxidative stress and DNA damage in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Feng; Yuan, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li-Zhong; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yi-Mei; Peng, Shuang-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidence has confirmed that exposure to ambient particulate matters (PM) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Ambient PM is a complex mixture of particles and air pollutants. Harmful effects of PM are specifically associated with ultrafine particles (UFPs) that can adsorb high concentrations of toxic air pollutants and are easily inhaled into the lungs. However, combined effects of UFPs and air pollutants on human health remain unclear. In the present study, we elucidated the combined toxicity of silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO2), a typical UFP, and lead acetate (Pb), a typical air pollutant. Lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were exposed to nano-SiO2 and Pb alone or their combination, and their combined toxicity was investigated by focusing on cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage. Factorial analyses were performed to determine the potential interactions between nano-SiO2 and Pb. Our results showed that exposure of A549 cells to a modest cytotoxic concentration of Pb alone induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by elevated reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation, and reduced glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. In addition, exposure of A549 cells to Pb alone induced DNA damage, as evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Exposure of A549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentration of nano-SiO2 did not induce cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, exposure to the combination of nano-SiO2 and Pb potentiated oxidative stress and DNA damage in A549 cells. Factorial analyses indicated that the potentiation of combined toxicity of nano-SiO2 and Pb was induced by additive or synergistic interactions.

  12. Microwave-assisted digestion combined with silica-based spin column for DNA isolation from human bones.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir-Kaynak, Elif; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-10-01

    A protocol for the extraction of DNA from ancient skeletal material was developed. Bone specimen samples (powder or slice), buffer, pretreatment, and extraction methodologies were compared to investigate the best conditions yielding the highest concentration of DNA. The degree of extract contamination by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors was compared as well. Pretreatment was carried out using agitation in an incubator shaker and microwave digestion. Subsequently, DNA from bones was isolated by the classical organic phenol-chloroform extraction and silica-based spin columns. Decalcification buffer for total demineralization was required as well as lysis buffer for cell lysis to obtain DNA, whereas microwave-assisted digestion proved to be very rapid, with an incubation time of 2min instead of 24h at an incubator shaker without using lysis buffer. The correction of isolated DNA was detected using real-time PCR with melt curve analysis, which was 82.8±0.2°C for highly repetitive α-satellite gene region specific for human chromosome 17 (locus D17Z1). Consequently, microwave-based DNA digestion followed by silica column yielded a high-purity DNA with a concentration of 19.40ng/μl and proved to be a superior alternative to the phenol-chloroform method, presenting an environmentally friendly and efficient technique for DNA extraction.

  13. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using (13)C and (15)N labeling.

    PubMed

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA - the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method - has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to (13)C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the (13)C (14)N (-) recombinant ion and the use of the (13)C: (12)C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  14. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling

    PubMed Central

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C 14N - recombinant ion and the use of the 13C: 12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  15. Utility of the trnH–psbA Intergenic Spacer Region and Its Combinations as Plant DNA Barcodes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Dong; Li, Huan; Cherny, Stacey S.; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background The trnH–psbA intergenic spacer region has been used in many DNA barcoding studies. However, a comprehensive evaluation with rigorous sequence preprocessing and statistical testing on the utility of trnH–psbA and its combinations as DNA barcodes is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences were searched from GenBank for a meta-analysis on the usefulness of trnH–psbA and its combinations as DNA barcodes. After preprocessing, we constructed full and matching data sets that contained 17 983 trnH–psbA sequences and 2190 sets of trnH–psbA, matK, rbcL, and ITS2 sequences from the same sample, repectively. These datasets were used to analyze the ability of trnH–psbA and its combinations to discriminate species by the BLAST and BLAST+P methods. The Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate the significance of performance differences. For the full data set, the identification success rates of trnH–psbA exceeded 70% in 18 families and 12 genera, respectively. For the matching data set, the identification rates of trnH–psbA were significantly higher than those of the other loci in two families and four genera. Similarly, the identification rates of trnH–psbA+ITS2 were significantly higher than those of matK+rbcL in 18 families and 21 genera. Conclusion/Significane This study provides valuable information on the higher utility of trnH–psbA and its combinations. We found that trnH–psbA+ITS2 combination performs better or equally well compared with other combinations in most taxonomic groups investigated. This information will guide the optimal usage of trnH–psbA and its combinations for species identification. PMID:23155412

  16. Synaptic vesicle pools: an update.

    PubMed

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or "pools". We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are "fixed". Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  17. Implications of patent pools on innovation regarding antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    Noehrenberg, Eric

    2010-01-19

    Patent pools have been promoted as an innovative means of promoting the production of fixed-dose combination antiretroviral medicines (ARVs), which can be particularly appropriate for resource-poor settings. An important question, however, is what are the implications of patent pools on innovation for creating new and improved antiretrovirals. Indeed, given the continuing mutation of HIV and growing resistance to existing treatments, continued innovation in ARV development is vital for addressing these challenges. Would patent pools be a hindrance or rather a stimulus for further innovation? This question is particularly relevant in light of UNITAID's initiative to create a patent pool for ARV development, focusing on pediatric formulations and new combinations, by the end of 2009. In this article, the author argues that a voluntary and well-designed patent pool, involving both innovative and generic manufacturers, focused on developing fixed-dose combinations for resource-poor markets with the greatest need, could actually stimulate increased innovation to meet these needs. Indeed, by bringing together the major ARV producers worldwide to collaborate on developing products which will meet the needs of the poorest, an ARV patent pool could create significant public health benefits. UNITAID has taken the lead in designing and implementing such a pool and UNITAID's experience will have important lessons for policy-makers in the future.

  18. Identification of invasive fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients by combining an Aspergillus specific PCR with a multifungal DNA-microarray from primary clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Boch, T; Reinwald, M; Postina, P; Cornely, O A; Vehreschild, J J; Heußel, C P; Heinz, W J; Hoenigl, M; Eigl, S; Lehrnbecher, T; Hahn, J; Claus, B; Lauten, M; Egerer, G; Müller, M C; Will, S; Merker, N; Hofmann, W-K; Buchheidt, D; Spiess, B

    2015-12-01

    The increasing incidence of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), most of all invasive aspergillosis (IA) in immunocompromised patients emphasises the need to improve the diagnostic tools for detection of fungal pathogens. We investigated the diagnostic performance of a multifungal DNA-microarray detecting 15 different fungi [Aspergillus, Candida, Fusarium, Mucor, Rhizopus, Scedosporium and Trichosporon species (spp.)] in addition to an Aspergillus specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Biopsies, bronchoalveolar lavage and peripheral blood samples of 133 immunocompromised patients (pts) were investigated by a multifungal DNA-microarray as well as a nested Aspergillus specific PCR assay. Patients had proven (n = 18), probable (n = 29), possible (n = 48) and no IFD (n = 38) and were mostly under antifungal therapy at the time of sampling. The results were compared to culture, histopathology, imaging and serology, respectively. For the non-Aspergillus IFD the microarray analysis yielded in all samples a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80%. Best results for the detection of all IFD were achieved by combining DNA-microarray and Aspergillus specific PCR in biopsy samples (sensitivity 79%; specificity 71%). The molecular assays in combination identify genomic DNA of fungal pathogens and may improve identification of causative pathogens of IFD and help overcoming the diagnostic uncertainty of culture and/or histopathology findings, even during antifungal therapy.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of aberrant methylation in human breast cancer cells using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells undergo massive alterations to their DNA methylation patterns that result in aberrant gene expression and malignant phenotypes. However, the mechanisms that underlie methylome changes are not well understood nor is the genomic distribution of DNA methylation changes well characterized. Results Here, we performed methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) to obtain whole-genome DNA methylation profiles for eight human breast cancer cell (BCC) lines and for normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). The MeDIP-seq analysis generated non-biased DNA methylation maps by covering almost the entire genome with sufficient depth and resolution. The most prominent feature of the BCC lines compared to HMEC was a massively reduced methylation level particularly in CpG-poor regions. While hypomethylation did not appear to be associated with particular genomic features, hypermethylation preferentially occurred at CpG-rich gene-related regions independently of the distance from transcription start sites. We also investigated methylome alterations during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in MCF7 cells. EMT induction was associated with specific alterations to the methylation patterns of gene-related CpG-rich regions, although overall methylation levels were not significantly altered. Moreover, approximately 40% of the epithelial cell-specific methylation patterns in gene-related regions were altered to those typical of mesenchymal cells, suggesting a cell-type specific regulation of DNA methylation. Conclusions This study provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of the methylome of human mammary cell lines and has produced novel insights into the mechanisms of methylome alteration during tumorigenesis and the interdependence between DNA methylome alterations and morphological changes. PMID:20181289

  20. Ibuprofen causes photocleavage through ROS generation and intercalates with DNA: a combined biophysical and molecular docking approach.

    PubMed

    Husain, Mohammed Amir; Sarwar, Tarique; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Tabish, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    Ibuprofen is an important nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug endowed with various pharmacological and biological activities. In the present study, the photochemical properties of ibuprofen were evaluated by assaying the generation of various reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, singlet oxygen and the hydroxyl radical. ROS generated by ibuprofen in the presence of white light causes DNA strand scission as observed by plasmid nicking assay. Ibuprofen induced ROS generation is also capable of causing DNA degradation in lymphocytes as observed by photocomet assay. ROS generation properties of ibuprofen were further strengthened by the formation of carbonyl groups in BSA and TBARS in linoleic acid as observed by carbonyl assay and lipid peroxidation assay respectively. We have also investigated the mode of interaction of ibuprofen with calf thymus DNA through a series of in vitro experiments. UV-visible spectroscopy established the formation of a complex between ibuprofen and Ct DNA. The steady state fluorescence experiments at different temperatures revealed a binding constant of ∼10(4) L mol(-1), which is indicative of intercalative binding between ibuprofen and the DNA helix. Analysis of the various thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS calculated at different temperatures indicated that the hydrogen bonds played a major role in the interaction. The intercalative binding mode is further confirmed by competitive displacement assays, urea denaturation, iodide quenching, viscosity measurements and CD analysis. In silico molecular docking revealed the binding of ibuprofen within the GC base pairs of DNA, confirming the intercalative binding mode.

  1. One simple DNA extraction device and its combination with modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid on-field detection of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Yinan; Chen, Lili; Quan, Sheng; Jiang, Shimeng; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Quickness, simplicity, and effectiveness are the three major criteria for establishing a good molecular diagnosis method in many fields. Herein we report a novel detection system for genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which can be utilized to perform both on-field quick screening and routine laboratory diagnosis. In this system, a newly designed inexpensive DNA extraction device was used in combination with a modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (vLAMP) assay. The main parts of the DNA extraction device included a silica gel membrane filtration column and a modified syringe. The DNA extraction device could be easily operated without using other laboratory instruments, making it applicable to an on-field GMO test. High-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and isothermal amplification could be quickly isolated from plant tissues using this device within 15 min. In the modified vLAMP assay, a microcrystalline wax encapsulated detection bead containing SYBR green fluorescent dye was introduced to avoid dye inhibition and cross-contaminations from post-LAMP operation. The system was successfully applied and validated in screening and identification of GM rice, soybean, and maize samples collected from both field testing and the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) proficiency test program, which demonstrated that it was well-adapted to both on-field testing and/or routine laboratory analysis of GMOs. PMID:23181490

  2. The effect of two pre-cryopreservation single layer colloidal centrifugation protocols in combination with different freezing extenders on the fragmentation dynamics of thawed equine sperm DNA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variability among stallions in terms of semen cryopreservation quality renders it difficult to arrive at a standardized cryopreservation method. Different extenders and processing techniques (such us colloidal centrifugation) are used in order to optimize post-thaw sperm quality. Sperm chromatin integrity analysis is an effective tool for assessing such quality. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two single layer colloidal centrifugation protocols (prior to cryopreservation) in combination with three commercial freezing extenders on the post-thaw chromatin integrity of equine sperm samples at different post-thaw incubation (37°C) times (i.e., their DNA fragmentation dynamics). Results Post-thaw DNA fragmentation levels in semen samples subjected to either of the colloidal centrifugation protocols were significantly lower (p<0.05) immediately after thawing and after 4 h of incubation at 37°C compared to samples that underwent standard (control) centrifugation. The use of InraFreeze® extender was associated with significantly less DNA fragmentation than the use of Botu-Crio® extender at 6 h of incubation, and than the use of either Botu-Crio® or Gent® extender at 24 h of incubation (p<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that single layer colloidal centrifugation performed with extended or raw semen prior to cryopreservation reduces DNA fragmentation during the first four hours after thawing. Further studies are needed to determine the influence of freezing extenders on equine sperm DNA fragmentation dynamics. PMID:23217215

  3. One simple DNA extraction device and its combination with modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid on-field detection of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Yinan; Chen, Lili; Quan, Sheng; Jiang, Shimeng; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Quickness, simplicity, and effectiveness are the three major criteria for establishing a good molecular diagnosis method in many fields. Herein we report a novel detection system for genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which can be utilized to perform both on-field quick screening and routine laboratory diagnosis. In this system, a newly designed inexpensive DNA extraction device was used in combination with a modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (vLAMP) assay. The main parts of the DNA extraction device included a silica gel membrane filtration column and a modified syringe. The DNA extraction device could be easily operated without using other laboratory instruments, making it applicable to an on-field GMO test. High-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and isothermal amplification could be quickly isolated from plant tissues using this device within 15 min. In the modified vLAMP assay, a microcrystalline wax encapsulated detection bead containing SYBR green fluorescent dye was introduced to avoid dye inhibition and cross-contaminations from post-LAMP operation. The system was successfully applied and validated in screening and identification of GM rice, soybean, and maize samples collected from both field testing and the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) proficiency test program, which demonstrated that it was well-adapted to both on-field testing and/or routine laboratory analysis of GMOs.

  4. Correlation of in Situ Oxazolidine Formation with Highly Synergistic Cytotoxicity and DNA Cross-Linking in Cancer Cells from Combinations of Doxorubicin and Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Benjamin L; Mooz, Erin L; Wiener, Laura Elizabeth; Koch, Gary G; Koch, Tad H

    2016-03-10

    Anthracyclines are a class of antitumor compounds that are successful and widely used but suffer from cardiotoxicity and acquired tumor resistance. Formaldehyde interacts with anthracyclines to enhance antitumor efficacy, bypass resistance mechanisms, improve the therapeutic profile, and change the mechanism of action from a topoisomerase II poison to a DNA cross-linker. Contrary to current dogma, we show that both efficient DNA cross-linking and potent synergy in combination with formaldehyde correlate with the anthracycline's ability to form cyclic formaldehyde conjugates as oxazolidine moieties and that the cyclic conjugates are better cross-linking agents and cytotoxins than acyclic conjugates. We also provide evidence that suggests that the oxazolidine forms in situ, since cotreatment with doxorubicin and formaldehyde is highly cytotoxic to dox-resistant tumor cell lines, and that this benefit is absent in combinations of formaldehyde and epirubicin, which cannot form stable oxazolidines. These results have potential clinical implications in the active field of anthracycline prodrug design and development.

  5. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    The thesis work focusses upon two aspects of DNA, the polymer and the molecular code. Our approach was to bring single molecule micromanipulation methods to the study of DNA. It included a home built optical microscope combined with an atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer. This combined approach led to a novel method to graft a single DNA molecule onto a force cantilever using the optical tweezer and local heating. With this method, a force versus extension assay of double stranded DNA was realized. The resolution was about 10 picoN. To improve on this force measurement resolution, a simple light backscattering technique was developed and used to probe the DNA polymer flexibility and its fluctuations. It combined the optical tweezer to trap a DNA tethered bead and the laser backscattering to detect the beads Brownian fluctuations. With this technique the resolution was about 0.1 picoN with a millisecond access time, and the whole entropic part of the DNA force-extension was measured. With this experimental strategy, we measured the polymerization of the protein RecA on an isolated double stranded DNA. We observed the progressive decoration of RecA on the l DNA molecule, which results in the extension of l , due to unwinding of the double helix. The dynamics of polymerization, the resulting change in the DNA entropic elasticity and the role of ATP hydrolysis were the main parts of the study. A simple model for RecA assembly on DNA was proposed. This work presents a first step in the study of genetic recombination. Recently we have started a study of equilibrium binding which utilizes fluorescence polarization methods to probe the polymerization of RecA on single stranded DNA. In addition to the study of material properties of DNA and DNA-RecA, we have developed experiments for which the code of the DNA is central. We studied one aspect of DNA as a molecular code, using different techniques. In particular the programmatic use of template specificity makes

  6. Tidal Pools--Miniature Oceans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Linda Perry

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the biological activity in tidal pools is provided. The importance of environmental factors such as oxygen supply, temperature, salinity, and light is detailed. Plants and animals that might be found in a tidal pool are identified and described. (BT)

  7. Design of hydrotherapy exercise pools.

    PubMed

    Edlich, R F; Abidin, M R; Becker, D G; Pavlovich, L J; Dang, M T

    1988-01-01

    Several hydrotherapy pools have been designed specifically for a variety of aquatic exercise. Aqua-Ark positions the exerciser in the center of the pool for deep-water exercise. Aqua-Trex is a shallow underwater treadmill system for water walking or jogging. Swim-Ex generates an adjustable laminar flow that permits swimming without turning. Musculoskeletal conditioning can be accomplished in the above-ground Arjo shallow-water exercise pool. A hydrotherapy pool also can be custom designed for musculoskeletal conditioning in its shallow part and cardiovascular conditioning in a deeper portion of the pool. Regardless of the type of exercise, there is general agreement that the specific exercise conducted in water requires significantly more energy expenditure than when the same exercise is performed on land. PMID:3192611

  8. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42-44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica.

  9. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42-44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  10. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42–44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  11. Combined treatment with vitamin B12b and ascorbic acid causes in vitro DNA degradation in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A I; Akatov, V S; Kreshchenko, N D; Solov'eva, M E; Leshchenko, V V; Lezhnev, E I; Yakubovskaya, R I

    2001-04-01

    Incubation of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and HEp-2 human epidermoid laryngeal carcinoma cells with hydroxycobalamin (vitamin B12b) and ascorbic acid induced generation and accumulation of double-stranded DNA fragments (23,000 b.p. and longer) in cells. The same vitamins alone in the same concentrations produced no such effects. DNA degradation in HEp-2 cells caused by long-term (4 h) incubation with 5-25 microM hydroxycobalamin and ascorbic acid (1:10-1:40 molar ratio) at 37 degrees C was comparable with that induced by gamma-irradiation in a dose of 150 Gy at 4 degrees C.

  12. The combined effects of BDE47 and BaP on oxidatively generated DNA damage in L02 cells and the possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    An, Jing; Yin, Lingling; Shang, Yu; Zhong, Yufang; Zhang, Xinyu; Wu, Minghong; Yu, Zhiqiang; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Huang, Yuecheng

    2011-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) coexist widely in the environment and have generated adverse effects on the environment and human health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined toxic effects of these chemicals and the related mechanism. L02 cells were exposed to BDE47 (5, 10μmol/L) or/and BaP (50μmol/L) in different administration order. The cell growth and survival, DNA strand breaks, oxidative stress index (ROS, SOD, GSH, and MDA), LDH release and the expression level of CYP1 family members were measured. The result showed that BDE47 or/and BaP had no effect on the cell growth and survival under the present conditions. However, compared with the groups treated with BDE47 or BaP alone, the combined-treated groups induced significantly elevated DNA strand breaks, ROS production, and MDA level. Especially, pretreatment with BDE47 followed by BaP led to the strongest effects. Addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) markedly reduced the ROS level and partly suppressed the DNA strand breaks induced by BDE47 or/and BaP. Meanwhile, the combined treatment groups also markedly increased the SOD activity, GSH content, and LDH release level compared with the control group. The real-time PCR results showed that BaP could significantly induce the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, however, the pre-treatment with BDE47 appeared to attenuate the BaP-induced CYP1 expression. All of above findings indicated that BDE47 and BaP had a synergistic effect on oxidatively generated DNA damage in L02 cells via regulation on the oxidative stress response and the expression of CYP1 metabolism enzymes.

  13. Taxonomic Confusion Permits the Unchecked Invasion of Vernal Pools in California by Glyceria declinata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast DNA molecular markers and recently established morphological characters were used to confirm the widespread invasion of California's vernal pools by European low Glyceria (Glyceria declinata). Morphological similarities between low Glyceria and western mannagrass (Glyceria occidentalis)...

  14. 13 CFR 120.1708 - Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pool Certificates. 120.1708... of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1708 Pool Certificates. (a) SBA Guarantee of Pool Certificates. SBA guarantees to a Pool Investor the timely payment...

  15. 13 CFR 120.1708 - Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool Certificates. 120.1708... of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1708 Pool Certificates. (a) SBA Guarantee of Pool Certificates. SBA guarantees to a Pool Investor the timely payment...

  16. 13 CFR 120.1708 - Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pool Certificates. 120.1708... of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1708 Pool Certificates. (a) SBA Guarantee of Pool Certificates. SBA guarantees to a Pool Investor the timely payment...

  17. 13 CFR 120.1708 - Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pool Certificates. 120.1708... of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1708 Pool Certificates. (a) SBA Guarantee of Pool Certificates. SBA guarantees to a Pool Investor the timely payment...

  18. 13 CFR 120.1708 - Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pool Certificates. 120.1708... of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1708 Pool Certificates. (a) SBA Guarantee of Pool Certificates. SBA guarantees to a Pool Investor the timely payment...

  19. Controls on Filling and Evacuation of Sediment in Waterfall Plunge Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Many waterfalls are characterized by the presence of deep plunge pools that experience periods of sediment fill and evacuation. These cycles of sediment fill are a first order control on the relative magnitude of lateral versus vertical erosion at the base of waterfalls, as vertical incision requires cover-free plunge pools to expose the bedrock floor, while lateral erosion can occur when pools are partially filled and plunge-pool walls are exposed. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model describing sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools, limiting our ability to predict waterfall retreat. To address this knowledge gap, we performed detailed laboratory experiments measuring plunge-pool sediment transport capacity (Qsc_pool) under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. Our experimental plunge-pool sediment transport capacity measurements match well with a mechanistic model we developed which combines existing waterfall jet theory with a modified Rouse profile to predict sediment transport capacity as a function of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration at the plunge-pool lip. Comparing the transport capacity of plunge pools to lower gradient portions of rivers (Qsc_river) shows that, for transport limited conditions, plunge pools fill with sediment under modest water discharges when Qsc_river > Qsc_pool, and empty to bedrock under high discharges when Qsc_pool > Qsc_river. These results are consistent with field observations of sand-filled plunge pools with downstream boulder rims, implying filling and excavation of plunge pools over single-storm timescales. Thus, partial filling of waterfall plunge pools may provide a mechanism to promote lateral undercutting and retreat of waterfalls in homogeneous rock in which plunge-pool vertical incision occurs during brief large floods that expose bedrock, whereas lateral erosion may prevail during smaller events.

  20. Membrane Destruction and DNA Binding of Staphylococcus aureus Cells Induced by Carvacrol and Its Combined Effect with a Pulsed Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Gong, De-Ming; Huang, Yan-Bo

    2016-08-17

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol, CAR) is an antibacterial ingredient that occurs naturally in the leaves of the plant Origanum vulgare. The antimicrobial mechanism of CAR against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 was investigated in the study. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that exposure to CAR at low concentrations induced a marked increase in the level of unbranched fatty acids (from 34.90 ± 1.77% to 62.37 ± 4.26%). Moreover, CAR at higher levels severely damaged the integrity and morphologies of the S. aureus cell membrane. The DNA-binding properties of CAR were also investigated using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and atomic-force microscopy. The results showed that CAR bound to DNA via the minor-groove mode, mildly perturbed the DNA secondary structure, and induced DNA molecules to be aggregated. Furthermore, a combination of CAR with a pulsed-electric field was found to exhibit strong synergistic effects on S. aureus. PMID:27420472

  1. Development of a 24-locus multiplex system to incorporate the core loci in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and the European Standard Set (ESS).

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Shen, Hongying; Tian, Huaizhou; Jin, Ping; Jiang, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    The 24-locus multiplex system allows co-amplification and fluorescent detection of 24 loci (23 STR loci and Amelogenin), including STR loci in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and the ESS (European Standard Set) as well as five additional loci (D2S1338, D6S1043, D19S433, Penta D and Penta E) commonly used in commercial kits. It facilitates data sharing and minimizes adventitious matches within national or between international DNA databases. Additionally, the system can amplify directly from blood and buccal samples spotted on filter paper and swabs and reduce the cycling time to less than one hour and a half. Primers, internal size standard, allelic ladders and matrix standard set were designed and created in-house with a design strategy to work in this multiplex. Developmental validation experiments followed the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) and the Chinese National Standard (GA/T815-2009) guidelines. The system was evaluated by species specificity, sensitivity, stability, precision and accuracy, case-type samples, population, mixture and PCR-based studies. The results demonstrate that the 24-locus multiplex system is a robust and reliable identification assay as required for forensic DNA typing and databasing.

  2. Membrane Destruction and DNA Binding of Staphylococcus aureus Cells Induced by Carvacrol and Its Combined Effect with a Pulsed Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Gong, De-Ming; Huang, Yan-Bo

    2016-08-17

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol, CAR) is an antibacterial ingredient that occurs naturally in the leaves of the plant Origanum vulgare. The antimicrobial mechanism of CAR against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 was investigated in the study. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that exposure to CAR at low concentrations induced a marked increase in the level of unbranched fatty acids (from 34.90 ± 1.77% to 62.37 ± 4.26%). Moreover, CAR at higher levels severely damaged the integrity and morphologies of the S. aureus cell membrane. The DNA-binding properties of CAR were also investigated using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and atomic-force microscopy. The results showed that CAR bound to DNA via the minor-groove mode, mildly perturbed the DNA secondary structure, and induced DNA molecules to be aggregated. Furthermore, a combination of CAR with a pulsed-electric field was found to exhibit strong synergistic effects on S. aureus.

  3. Visual recovery in a man with the rare combination of mtDNA 11778 LHON mutation and a MS-like disease after mitoxantrone therapy.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, C; Gbadamosi, J; Heesen, C

    2002-10-01

    We describe a young man with prognostic unfavourable homoplasmatic mitochondrial DNA(mt DNA) 11778 Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) point mutation and confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS). This combination of LHON and MS-like disease is rare in both sexes, and in men has been described in only a few case reports. In a 4-year follow-up during immunosuppressive therapy with mitoxantrone, we found a remarkable time delayed visual recovery 12 months after acute onset of rapid sequential bilateral subtotal visual loss followed by episodes of isolated acute demyelinative optic neuropathy. Visual recovery to such extent after this latency is uncommon in both mtDNA 11778 LHON mutation and optic neuritis (ON) in MS. Relapses in visual deterioration must be considered as extremely rare in LHON. This case might support the hypothesis of an immunological pathogenetic factor in combined LHON and MS, and possibly in LHON alone. We suggest a search for the LHON mutation in MS patients with predominant visual impairment, independent of patients' gender.

  4. Combination of 768-well microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis with duplex PCR of X and Y chromosome markers for quality control of epidemiological DNA banks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuwen; Chen, Xiao-he; Day, Ian N M

    2006-08-01

    Large DNA banks for human epidemiological studies have become an increasingly important research tool. The power of genotype-phenotype studies is dependent both on the quality of phenotyping and of genotyping and of correct linking of phenotypes to genotypes. Samples must be tracked through numerous steps between subject or patient and post-genotypic data. Only one phenotype, sex, has a perfect and binary correlation with genotype. In mixed sex studies, it may be advantageous for purposes of quality control to keep sexes mixed during the steps from acquisition to DNA bank, in order to be able to check later for sample swaps. We have designed a duplex PCR combining an amplicon from MAOA marking the X chromosome and an amplicon from DDX3Y marking the Y chromosome. We combined this with a simple economical palmtop sized 768-well microplate compatible electrophoresis system developed in-house for examination of duplex PCR products. We applied this quality control test in the validation of two DNA banks.

  5. Induction of cytokine production in cholesteatoma keratinocytes by extracellular high-mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 combined with DNA released by apoptotic cholesteatoma keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhangcai; Wang, Zhengmin; Liang, Qiong; Zhu, Yaying; du, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    High-mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1), a nuclear DNA binding protein, was recently rediscovered as a new proinflammatory cytokine. The purpose of this study was to determine HMGB-1 expression in vivo and to identify the effect of extracellular HMGB-1 in inflammatory process associated with bone destruction in cholesteatoma. We investigated the expression and location of HMGB-1 in the cholesteatoma and healthy skin using an immunofluorescence assay. We also detected apoptosis and DNA fragments in the cholesteatoma by TUNEL staining. HMGB-1 concentration in apoptotic supernatants from UV light-treated cells, culture supernatants and its translocation in cholesteatoma keratinocytes stimulated by supernatants from UV light-treated cells were measured by immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. Cultures of human cholesteatoma keratinocytes were exposed to CpG-DNA, HMGB-1, or CpG-DNA complexed to HMGB-1 for 24 h. Cytokines in the culture supernatant were measured by ELISA. In addition, levels of proinflammatory cytokines released by cholesteatoma keratinocytes stimulated by supernatants from UV light-treated cells with or without anti-HMGB-1 antibodies and supernatants from UV light-treated cells with DNase 1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of HMGB-1 in cholesteatoma increased and it translocated both to the cytoplasm and extracellular space. Furthermore, the HMGB-1 concentration in supernatants increased significantly after addition of supernatants from UV light-treated cells. TNF-α and IL-1β can be induced by purified HMGB-1 combined with CpG-DNA in the cholesteatoma keratinocytes. In addition, supernatants of apoptotic cells containing HMGB-1-DNA were effective in inducing TNF-α and IL-1β secretion. This study suggested that persistent expression of extracellular HMGB-1 and DNA fragments in cholesteatoma leads to TNF-α and IL-1β production, causing bone resorption and destruction. Thus, we have

  6. Combination of DNA Prime – Adenovirus Boost Immunization with Entecavir Elicits Sustained Control of Chronic Hepatitis B in the Woodchuck Model

    PubMed Central

    Kosinska, Anna D.; Zhang, Ejuan; Johrden, Lena; Liu, Jia; Seiz, Pia L.; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Ma, Zhiyong; Kemper, Thekla; Fiedler, Melanie; Glebe, Dieter; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A potent therapeutic T-cell vaccine may be an alternative treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Previously, we developed a DNA prime-adenovirus (AdV) boost vaccination protocol that could elicit strong and specific CD8+ T-cell responses to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) core antigen (WHcAg) in mice. In the present study, we first examined whether this new prime-boost immunization could induce WHcAg-specific T-cell responses and effectively control WHV replication in the WHV-transgenic mouse model. Secondly, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of this new vaccination strategy in chronically WHV-infected woodchucks in combination with a potent antiviral treatment. Immunization of WHV-transgenic mice by DNA prime-AdV boost regimen elicited potent and functional WHcAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response that consequently resulted in the reduction of the WHV load below the detection limit in more than 70% of animals. The combination therapy of entecavir (ETV) treatment and DNA prime-AdV boost immunization in chronic WHV carriers resulted in WHsAg- and WHcAg-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, which were not detectable in ETV-only treated controls. Woodchucks receiving the combination therapy showed a prolonged suppression of WHV replication and lower WHsAg levels compared to controls. Moreover, two of four immunized carriers remained WHV negative after the end of ETV treatment and developed anti-WHs antibodies. These results demonstrate that the combined antiviral and vaccination approach efficiently elicited sustained immunological control of chronic hepadnaviral infection in woodchucks and may be a new promising therapeutic strategy in patients. PMID:23785279

  7. Formation of the southern Bay of Bengal cold pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Umasankar; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Behara, Ambica

    2016-09-01

    A pool of relatively cooler water, called here as the southern Bay of Bengal cold pool, exists around Sri Lanka and southern tip of India during the summer monsoon. This cold pool is enveloped by the larger Indian Ocean warm pool and is believed to affect the intraseasonal variations of summer monsoon rainfall. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the formation of the cold pool using a combination of both satellite data sets and a general circulation model of the Indian Ocean. Sea surface temperature (SST) within the cold pool, after the steady increase during the February-April period, decreases first during a pre-monsoon spell in April and then with the monsoon onset during May. The onset cooling is stronger (~1.8°C) than the pre-monsoon cooling (~0.8°C) and culminates in the formation of the cold pool. Analysis of the model temperature equation shows that SST decrease during both events is primarily due to a decrease in incoming solar radiation and an increase in latent heat loss. These changes in the net heat flux are brought about by the arrival of cloud bands above the cold pool during both periods. During the pre-monsoon period, a cloud band originates in the western equatorial Indian Ocean and subsequently arrives above the cold pool. Similarly, during the monsoon onset, a band of clouds originating in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean comes over the cold pool region. A lead-lag correlation calculation between daily SST and rainfall anomalies suggest that cooling in SST occurs in response to rainfall events with a lag of 5 days. These sequence of events occur every year with certain amount of interannual variability.

  8. Detection of Leishmania-specific DNA and surface antigens using a combination of functionalized magnetic beads and cadmium selenite quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Andreadou, Margarita; Liandris, Emmanouil; Gazouli, Maria; Mataragka, Antonia; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Goutas, Nikolaοs; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Ikonomopoulos, John

    2016-04-01

    Leishmaniosis is a zoonotic disease that affects millions of people especially in resource-poor settings. The development of reliable diagnostic assays that do not require dedicated equipment or highly trained personnel would improve early diagnosis and effective control. For this purpose, a combination of magnetic bead and cadmium selenite quantum dot probes was applied for the detection of Leishmania-specific surface antigens (proteins) and DNA. Both analytes are isolated from the solution using magnetic bead capture probes whereas the presence of the targeted molecules is demonstrated by quantum dot detection probes. The sensitivity and specificity of this method reached 100% based on an assessment performed on 55 cultured isolates of various microbial pathogens. The low limit of detection was 3125 ng/μl and 10(3)cells/ml for Leishmania DNA and protein, respectively. The method shows considerable potential for clinical application in human and veterinary medicine, especially in resource-poor settings. PMID:26658854

  9. 13 CFR 120.1706 - Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. 120.1706 Section 120.1706 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Pools § 120.1706 Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. The Pool Originator must retain...

  10. 13 CFR 120.1706 - Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. 120.1706 Section 120.1706 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Pools § 120.1706 Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. The Pool Originator must retain...

  11. 13 CFR 120.1706 - Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. 120.1706 Section 120.1706 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Pools § 120.1706 Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. The Pool Originator must retain...

  12. 13 CFR 120.1706 - Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. 120.1706 Section 120.1706 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Pools § 120.1706 Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. The Pool Originator must retain...

  13. 13 CFR 120.1706 - Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. 120.1706 Section 120.1706 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Pools § 120.1706 Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. The Pool Originator must retain...

  14. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  15. Incorporating incorporating economic models into seasonal pool conservation planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loftin, Cyndy; Bell, Kathleen P.; Freeman, Robert C.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Massachusetts, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Maine have adopted regulatory zones around seasonal (vernal) pools to conserve terrestrial habitat for pool-breeding amphibians. Most amphibians require access to distinct seasonal habitats in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems because of their complex life histories. These habitat requirements make them particularly vulnerable to land uses that destroy habitat or limit connectivity (or permeability) among habitats. Regulatory efforts focusing on breeding pools without consideration of terrestrial habitat needs will not ensure the persistence of pool-breeding amphibians. We used GIS to combine a discrete-choice, parcel-scale economic model of land conversion with a landscape permeability model based on known habitat requirements of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in Maine (USA) to examine permeability among habitat elements for alternative future scenarios. The economic model predicts future landscapes under different subdivision open space and vernal pool regulatory requirements. Our model showed that even “no build” permit zones extending 76 m (250 ft) outward from the pool edge were insufficient to assure permeability among required habitat elements. Furthermore, effectiveness of permit zones may be inconsistent due to interactions with other growth management policies, highlighting the need for local and state planning for the long-term persistence of pool-breeding amphibians in developing landscapes.

  16. Structure of Low-Lying Excited States of Guanine in DNA and Solution: Combined Molecular Mechanics and High-Level Coupled Cluster Studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kowalski, Karol; Valiev, Marat

    2007-01-01

    High-level ab-initio equation-of-motion coupled-cluster methods with singles, doubles, and noniterative triples are used, in conjunction with the combined quantum mechanical molecular mechanics approach, to investigate the structure of low-lying excited states of the guanine base in DNA and solvated environments. Our results indicate that while the excitation energy of the first excited state is barely changed compared to its gas-phase counterpart, the excitation energy of the second excited state is blue-shifted by 0.24 eV.

  17. Inhibition of DNA Topoisomerase Type IIα (TOP2A) by Mitoxantrone and Its Halogenated Derivatives: A Combined Density Functional and Molecular Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Abu Saleh, Md.; Solayman, Md.; Hoque, Mohammad Mazharol; Khan, Mohammad A. K.; Sarwar, Mohammed G.; Halim, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, mitoxantrone and its halogenated derivatives have been designed by density functional theory (DFT) to explore their structural and thermodynamical properties. The performance of these drugs was also evaluated to inhibit DNA topoisomerase type IIα (TOP2A) by molecular docking calculation. Noncovalent interactions play significant role in improving the performance of halogenated drugs. The combined quantum and molecular mechanics calculations revealed that CF3 containing drug shows better preference in inhibiting the TOP2A compared to other modified drugs. PMID:27088089

  18. Personal identification of cold case remains through combined contribution from anthropological, mtDNA and bomb–pulse dating analyses*†

    PubMed Central

    Speller, Camilla F.; Spalding, Kirsty L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Hildebrand, Dean; Moore, Jason; Mathewes, Rolf; Skinner, Mark F.; Yang, Dongya Y.

    2013-01-01

    In 1968, a child’s cranium was recovered from the banks of a northern Canadian river, and held in trust until the ‘cold case’ was re-opened in 2005. The cranium underwent re-analysis at the Centre for Forensic Research, Simon Fraser University, using recently developed anthropological, ‘bomb-pulse’ radiocarbon analysis and forensic DNA techniques. Craniometrics, skeletal ossification and dental formation indicated an age-at-death of 4.4 ±1 years. Radiocarbon analysis of enamel from two teeth indicated a year of birth between 1958–1962. Forensic DNA analysis indicated the child was male, and the obtained mitochondrial profile matched a living maternal relative of the presumed missing child. These multi-disciplinary analyses resulted in a legal identification 41 years after the discovery of the remains, highlighting the enormous potential of combining radiocarbon analysis with anthropological and mtDNA analyses in producing confident personal identifications for forensic cold cases dating to within the last 60 years. PMID:22804335

  19. Reproductive morphology and DNA sequences of the brown alga Platysiphon verticillatus support the new combination Platysiphon glacialis.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hiroshi; Hanyuda, Takeaki; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Kai, Atsushi; Lane, Chris E; McDevit, Dan; Küpper, Frithjof C; Saunders, Gary W

    2015-10-01

    Platysiphon verticillatus, a brown alga endemic to the Arctic, was described based on vegetative specimens collected at Inglefield Bay, West Greenland. The species is distinctive in having a lanceolate blade-like thallus terminated by a terete portion, both covered with hair-like assimilatory filaments. Punctaria glacialis was described from Eastern Greenland, and the species differs from other Punctaria species in lacking hairs and plurilocular zoidangia. Unilocular zoidangia were reported, but instead of zoids being released they formed cell walls in situ developing the appearance of plurilocular zoidangia. However, the fate of the zoids, as well as the walled cells was not traced, and the life history of the alga has remained unclear. By comparing DNA sequences (cox1, cox3, and rDNA ITS2) of specimens morphologically referable to Platysiphon verticillatus and Punctaria glacialis collected at Baffin Island, as well as re-examining morphology and studying crude cultures, we concluded that they are the same taxonomic entity. Furthermore, their cox3 sequence and vegetative morphology agreed with those of the type specimen of Punctaria glacialis. Consequently, we propose Platysiphon glacialis comb. nov. The life cycle could not be completed in culture, but we hypothesize that in situ germination of the unizoids produces reduced gametophytes housed in peripheral tissue of erect sporophytic thalli. PMID:26986887

  20. Response of arsenic-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage, and metal imbalance to combined administration of DMSA and monoisoamyl-DMSA during chronic arsenic poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, S; Flora, S J S

    2007-03-01

    Arsenic and its compounds cause adverse health effects in humans. Current treatment employs administration of thiol chelators, such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane 1-sulfonate (DMPS), which facilitate its excretion from the body. However, these chelating agents are compromised by number of limitations due to their lipophobic nature, particularly in case of chronic poisoning. Combination therapy is a new approach to ensure enhanced removal of metal from the body, reduced doses of potentially toxic chelators, and no redistribution of metal from one organ to another, following chronic metal exposure. The present study attempts to investigate dose-related effects of two thiol chelators, DMSA and one of its new analogues, monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA), when administered in combination with the aim of achieving normalization of altered biochemical parameters suggestive of oxidative stress and depletion of inorganic arsenic following chronic arsenic exposure. Twenty-five adult male Wistar rats were given 25 ppm arsenic for 10 weeks followed by chelation therapy with the above chelating agents at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg (orally) when administered individually or 0.15 mmol/kg and 0.3 mmol/kg (once daily for 5 consecutive days), respectively, when administered in combination. Arsenic exposure led to the inhibition of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and depletion of glutathione (GSH) level. These changes were accompanied by significant depletion of hemoglobin, RBC and Hct as well as blood superoxide dismutase (SOD) acitivity. There was an increase in hepatic and renal levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, while GSH:GSSG ratio decreased significantly, accompanied by a significant increase in metallothionein (MT) in hepatocytes. DNA damage based on denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed significant loss in the integrity of DNA extracted from the liver of arsenic

  1. Human parvovirus PARV4 in plasma pools of Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y-Y; Guo, Y; Zhao, X; Wang, Z; Lv, M-M; Yan, Q-P; Zhang, J-G

    2012-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is present in blood and blood products. As the presence and levels of PARV4 in Chinese source plasma pools have never been determined, we implemented real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the presence of PARV4 in source plasma pools in China. Results showed that 26·15% (51/195) of lots tested positive for PARV4. The amounts of DNA ranged from 2·83 × 10(3) copies/ml to 2·35×10(7) copies/ml plasma. The high level of PARV4 in plasma pools may pose a potential risk to recipients. Further studies on the pathogenesis of PARV4 are urgently required.

  2. Sediment transport through self-adjusting, bedrock-walled waterfall plunge pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-05-01

    Many waterfalls have deep plunge pools that are often partially or fully filled with sediment. Sediment fill may control plunge-pool bedrock erosion rates, partially determine habitat availability for aquatic organisms, and affect sediment routing and debris flow initiation. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model to describe sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools. Here we develop an analytical model to predict steady-state plunge-pool depth and sediment-transport capacity by combining existing jet theory with sediment transport mechanics. Our model predicts plunge-pool sediment-transport capacity increases with increasing river discharge, flow velocity, and waterfall drop height and decreases with increasing plunge-pool depth, radius, and grain size. We tested the model using flume experiments under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. The model and experiments show that through morphodynamic feedbacks, plunge pools aggrade to reach shallower equilibrium pool depths in response to increases in imposed sediment supply. Our theory for steady-state pool depth matches the experiments with an R2 value of 0.8, with discrepancies likely due to model simplifications of the hydraulics and sediment transport. Analysis of 75 waterfalls suggests that the water depths in natural plunge pools are strongly influenced by upstream sediment supply, and our model provides a mass-conserving framework to predict sediment and water storage in waterfall plunge pools for sediment routing, habitat assessment, and bedrock erosion modeling.

  3. Combination of ADH1B*2/ALDH2*2 polymorphisms alters acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the blood of Japanese alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Manabu; Hori, Kimiko; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Yokoyama, Akira; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2012-09-01

    The acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages is an evident carcinogen for the esophagus. Genetic polymorphisms of the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genes are associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, the exact mechanism via which these genetic polymorphisms affect esophageal carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. ADH1B*2 is involved in overproduction of acetaldehyde due to increased ethanol metabolism into acetaldehyde, and ALDH2*2 is involved in accumulation of acetaldehyde due to the deficiency of acetaldehyde metabolism. Acetaldehyde can interact with DNA and form DNA adducts, resulting in DNA damage. N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dG) is the most abundant DNA adduct derived from acetaldehyde. Therefore, we quantified N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood samples from 66 Japanese alcoholic patients using liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, and investigated the relationship between N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels and ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes. The median N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels (25th percentile, 75th percentile) in patients with ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*2, and ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*2 were 2.14 (0.97, 2.37)/10(7) bases, 2.38 (1.18, 2.98)/10(7) bases, 5.38 (3.19, 6.52)/10(7) bases, and 21.04 (12.75, 34.80)/10(7) bases, respectively. In the ALDH2*1/*2 group, N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in ADH1B*2 carriers than in the ADH1B*1/*1 group (P < 0.01). N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in the ALDH2*1/*2 group than in the ALDH2*1/*1 group, regardless of ADH1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1, P < 0.05; ADH1B*2 carriers, P < 0.01) N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood DNA of the alcoholics was remarkably higher in individuals with a combination of the ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 alleles. These results provide a new perspective on the carcinogenicity of the acetaldehyde associated with

  4. Correlation of in Situ Oxazolidine Formation with Highly Synergistic Cytotoxicity and DNA Cross-Linking in Cancer Cells from Combinations of Doxorubicin and Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Benjamin L; Mooz, Erin L; Wiener, Laura Elizabeth; Koch, Gary G; Koch, Tad H

    2016-03-10

    Anthracyclines are a class of antitumor compounds that are successful and widely used but suffer from cardiotoxicity and acquired tumor resistance. Formaldehyde interacts with anthracyclines to enhance antitumor efficacy, bypass resistance mechanisms, improve the therapeutic profile, and change the mechanism of action from a topoisomerase II poison to a DNA cross-linker. Contrary to current dogma, we show that both efficient DNA cross-linking and potent synergy in combination with formaldehyde correlate with the anthracycline's ability to form cyclic formaldehyde conjugates as oxazolidine moieties and that the cyclic conjugates are better cross-linking agents and cytotoxins than acyclic conjugates. We also provide evidence that suggests that the oxazolidine forms in situ, since cotreatment with doxorubicin and formaldehyde is highly cytotoxic to dox-resistant tumor cell lines, and that this benefit is absent in combinations of formaldehyde and epirubicin, which cannot form stable oxazolidines. These results have potential clinical implications in the active field of anthracycline prodrug design and development. PMID:26881291

  5. Inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis in UV-irradiated mouse skin by 2-difluoromethylornithine, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), and their combination

    SciTech Connect

    Kaepyaho, K.; Lauharanta, J.; Jaenne, J.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of mouse skin to UVB irradiation greatly enhanced the biosynthesis and accumulation of putrescine and spermidine before or concomitantly with stimulation of epidermal macromolecular (DNA and protein) synthesis. Topical treatment of UV-exposed skin with 2 inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) prevented the enhanced epidermal accumulation of polyamines, especially spermidine, and also inhibited the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA and protein. When applied in combination, these 2 antimetabolites of polyamines produced an inhibition of macromolecular synthesis that was at least additive: (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation decreased by 80% and (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation by 44% as compared with the UVB-irradiated control mice. A slight decrease in the ratio of (/sup 3/H)histidine/(/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation indicated that protein synthesis of the differentiating cell layers was also affected by the inhibitors. The effects of the combined DFMO and MGBG treatment were partially reversed by concomitant topical application of spermidine.

  6. Combination of running exercise and high dose of anabolic androgenic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, increases protamine deficiency and DNA damage in rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Shokri, S; Hemadi, M; Bayat, G; Bahmanzadeh, M; Jafari-Anarkooli, I; Mashkani, Beta

    2014-03-01

    High doses of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are used by some athletes to increase muscle mass, that is often associated with male infertility. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible cause/s of male infertility using a rat model by analysing sperm quality, including its protamine content and DNA integrity, as well as pregnancy rate. Five groups of male Wistar rats were treated for 10 weeks as follows: nandrolone decanoate (10 mg kg(-1) per week) (ND); running exercise (50 min per day, 5 days a week) (EX); Combination of ND and exercise (ND-EX); nandrolone decanoate solvent (Sham); and control without any injection or exercise (CO). Deterioration in sperm quantity was observed in all test groups (P ≤ 0.01). The frequency of fertile rats was decreased in the ND-EX and ND groups (P ≤ 0.05). Chromomycin-A3 staining showed a protamine deficiency in the epididymal spermatozoa in the ND-EX rats (P ≤ 0.05). Chromatin analysis indicated an abnormal maturation of the sperm nuclei in all test groups compared with the controls (P ≤ 0.05). TUNEL analyses showed a highly significant increase in apoptosis in the EX, ND, and ND-EX groups (P ≤ 0.01). Our data show that a combination of exercise and high doses of nandrolone decanoate negatively influences the DNA integrity and protamine content resulting in lower sperm quality and reduced pregnancy rate.

  7. Carbon concentrations and transformations in peatland pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Pippa; Holden, Joseph; Baird, Andrew; Turner, Edward; Dooling, Gemma; Billett, Mike; McKenzie, Rebecca; Leith, Fraser; Dinsmore, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    Peatland pools may act as important features for aquatic and gaseous carbon production, transformation and release. Peatland restoration often results in new pools being created. Here we compare aquatic carbon concentrations in nearby natural and artificial pool systems monitored at three sites in northern Scotland over a three-year period. We found significant differences in pool water carbon concentrations between pool types with larger dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) in artificial pools. The differences were strong for all sites and occurred in all seasons. Importantly, the DOC outflows from natural pools were markedly lower than the DOC flowing into natural pools showing that processes in these pools were transforming and removing the DOC. These effects were not found in the artificial pools. Data on the composition of the DOC (absorbance ratios, specific ultraviolet absorbance) suggested that natural pools tended to have DOC that had been processed, and was older (radiocarbon dating) while the DOC in artificial pools was young and had not undergone much biochemical processing. Slope position was an important factor influencing pool DOC with those pools with a longer upslope contributing area and collecting water with a longer hillslope residence time having larger DOC concentrations. Dissolved methane (CH4) concentrations were not significantly different between pool types but the concentrations were always above atmospheric levels with values ˜ 200 times atmospheric concentrations not uncommon. Dissolved CO2 concentrations in the artificial pools were extremely large; typically ˜20 times atmospheric levels while those in natural pools were typically only just above atmospheric levels. The pools were strong sources of CH4 and CO2 evasion from the peat system. The smaller size of the artificial pools means that more of their CO2 is stored in the water until it reaches the stream system, while the larger natural pools have

  8. 47 CFR 97.523 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Question pools. 97.523 Section 97.523... SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.523 Question pools. All VECs must cooperate in maintaining one question pool for each written examination element. Each question pool must contain at least 10 times...

  9. 47 CFR 97.523 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Question pools. 97.523 Section 97.523... SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.523 Question pools. All VECs must cooperate in maintaining one question pool for each written examination element. Each question pool must contain at least 10 times...

  10. 47 CFR 13.215 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Question pools. 13.215 Section 13.215... Question pools. The question pool for each written examination element will be composed of questions acceptable to the FCC. Each question pool must contain at least five (5) times the number of...

  11. 47 CFR 97.523 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Question pools. 97.523 Section 97.523... SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.523 Question pools. All VECs must cooperate in maintaining one question pool for each written examination element. Each question pool must contain at least 10 times...

  12. 47 CFR 13.215 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Question pools. 13.215 Section 13.215... Question pools. The question pool for each written examination element will be composed of questions acceptable to the FCC. Each question pool must contain at least five (5) times the number of...

  13. 47 CFR 13.215 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Question pools. 13.215 Section 13.215... Question pools. The question pool for each written examination element will be composed of questions acceptable to the FCC. Each question pool must contain at least five (5) times the number of...

  14. 47 CFR 97.523 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Question pools. 97.523 Section 97.523... SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.523 Question pools. All VECs must cooperate in maintaining one question pool for each written examination element. Each question pool must contain at least 10 times...

  15. 47 CFR 13.215 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Question pools. 13.215 Section 13.215... Question pools. The question pool for each written examination element will be composed of questions acceptable to the FCC. Each question pool must contain at least five (5) times the number of...

  16. 47 CFR 13.215 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Question pools. 13.215 Section 13.215... Question pools. The question pool for each written examination element will be composed of questions acceptable to the FCC. Each question pool must contain at least five (5) times the number of...

  17. 47 CFR 97.523 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Question pools. 97.523 Section 97.523... SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.523 Question pools. All VECs must cooperate in maintaining one question pool for each written examination element. Each question pool must contain at least 10 times...

  18. HYDROLOGY AND LANDSCAPE CONNECTIVITY OF VERNAL POOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vernal pools are shaped by hydrologic processes which influence many aspects of pool function. The hydrologic budget of a pool can be summarized by a water balance equation that relates changes in the amount of water in the pool to precipitation, ground- and surface-water flows, ...

  19. Swimming Pools. Managing School Facilities, Guide 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This guide for schools with swimming pools offers advice concerning appropriate training for pool managers, the importance of water quality and testing, safety in the handling of chemicals, maintenance and cleaning requirements, pool security, and health concerns. The guide covers both indoor and outdoor pools, explains some technical terms,…

  20. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall...

  1. Where is DNA preserved in soil organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Claudio; Beneduce, Luciano; Plaza, César

    2015-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) consists of long chains of alternating sugar and phosphate residues twisted in the form of a helix. Upon decomposition of plant and animal debris, this nucleic acid is released into the soil, where its fate is still not completely understood. In fact, although DNA is one of the organic compounds from living cells that is apparently broken down rapidly in soils, it is also potentially capable of being incorporated in (or interact with) the precursors of humic molecules. In order to track DNA occurrence in soil organic matter (SOM) fractions, an experiment was set up as a randomized complete block design with two factors, namely biochar addition and organic amendment. In particular, biochar (BC), applied at a rate of 20 t/ha, was combined with municipal solid waste compost (BC+MC) at a rate equivalent to 75 kg/ha of potentially available N, and with sewage sludge (BC+SS) at a rate equivalent to 75 kg/ha of potentially available N. Using a physical fractionation method, free SOM located between aggregates (unprotected C pool; FR), SOM occluded within macroaggregates (C pool weakly protected by physical mechanisms; MA), SOM occluded within microaggregates (C pool strongly protected by physical mechanisms; MI), and SOM associated with the mineral fractions (chemically-protected C pool; MIN) were separated from soil samples. DNA was then isolated from each fraction of the two series, as well as from the unamended soil (C) and from the bulk soils (WS), using Powersoil DNA isolation kit (MoBio, CA, USA) with a modified protocol. Data clearly show that the DNA survived the SOM fractionation, thus suggesting that physical fractionation methods create less artifacts compared to the chemical ones. Moreover, in both BC+MC and BC+SS series, most of the isolated DNA was present in the FR fraction, followed by the MA and the MI fractions. No DNA was recovered from the MIN fraction. This finding supports the idea that most of the DNA occurring in the SOM

  2. Priming with a Simplified Intradermal HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Regimen followed by Boosting with Recombinant HIV-1 MVA Vaccine Is Safe and Immunogenic: A Phase IIa Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Joachim, Agricola; Geldmacher, Christof; Mann, Philipp; Moshiro, Candida; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius; Maboko, Leonard; Missanga, Marco; Kaluwa, Bahati; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Podola, Lilly; Bauer, Asli; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Marovich, Mary; Moss, Bernard; Hoelscher, Michael; Gotch, Frances; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Stout, Richard; McCormack, Sheena; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Robb, Merlin L.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Bakari, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Intradermal priming with HIV-1 DNA plasmids followed by HIV-1MVA boosting induces strong and broad cellular and humoral immune responses. In our previous HIVIS-03 trial, we used 5 injections with 2 pools of HIV-DNA at separate sites for each priming immunization. The present study explores whether HIV-DNA priming can be simplified by reducing the number of DNA injections and administration of combined versus separated plasmid pools. Methods In this phase IIa, randomized trial, priming was performed using 5 injections of HIV-DNA, 1000 μg total dose, (3 Env and 2 Gag encoding plasmids) compared to two “simplified” regimens of 2 injections of HIV-DNA, 600 μg total dose, of Env- and Gag-encoding plasmid pools with each pool either administered separately or combined. HIV-DNA immunizations were given intradermally at weeks 0, 4, and 12. Boosting was performed intramuscularly with 108 pfu HIV-MVA at weeks 30 and 46. Results 129 healthy Tanzanian participants were enrolled. There were no differences in adverse events between the groups. The proportion of IFN-γ ELISpot responders to Gag and/or Env peptides after the second HIV-MVA boost did not differ significantly between the groups primed with 2 injections of combined HIV-DNA pools, 2 injections with separated pools, and 5 injections with separated pools (90%, 97% and 97%). There were no significant differences in the magnitude of Gag and/or Env IFN-γ ELISpot responses, in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses measured as IFN-γ/IL-2 production by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) or in response rates and median titers for binding antibodies to Env gp160 between study groups. Conclusions A simplified intradermal vaccination regimen with 2 injections of a total of 600 μg with combined HIV-DNA plasmids primed cellular responses as efficiently as the standard regimen of 5 injections of a total of 1000 μg with separated plasmid pools after boosting twice with HIV-MVA. Trial Registration World Health

  3. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Gabe V.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Donaldson, Alan D.

    1991-01-01

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  4. Possible effect of biotechnology on plant gene pools in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Aynur

    2015-01-01

    The recent rapid developments in biotechnology have made great contributions to the study of plant gene pools. The application of in vitro methods in freeze storage and DNA protection techniques in fast production studies has made major advances. From that aspect, biotechnology is an indispensable means for the protection of plant gene pools, which includes the insurance of sustainable agriculture and development of species. Besides all the positive developments, one of the primary risks posed by the uncontrolled spreading of genetically modified organisms is the possibility for other non-target organisms to be negatively affected. Genes of plant origin should be given priority in this type of studies by taking into consideration such negative effects that may result in disruption of ecological balance and damage to plant genetic pools. Turkey, due to its ecological conditions and history, has a very important position in terms of plant gene pools. This richness ought to be protected without corrupting its natural quality and natural evolution process in order to provide the sources of species that will be required for future sustainable agricultural applications. Thus, attention should be paid to the use of biotechnological methods, which play an important role especially in the protection and use of local and original plant gene pools. PMID:26019612

  5. Comparison of Exposure Controls, Item Pool Characteristics, and Population Distributions for CAT Using the Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, HwaYoung; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated item exposure control procedures under various combinations of item pool characteristics and ability distributions in computerized adaptive testing based on the partial credit model. Three variables were manipulated: item pool characteristics (120 items for each of easy, medium, and hard item pools), two ability…

  6. An Evaluation of Individualized and Pool Slot Development for Public Service Employment: The Vermont Experience. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Robert E.

    Public Service Employment slots can be developed in three ways: (1) by establishing a pool of jobs into which trainees can be placed; (2) by developing individualized slots for each trainee; (3) by combining the pool and individualized approaches. In terms of administrative and cost efficiency, there is little difference between the pool and the…

  7. Response of soil carbon matter pools to elevated CO2 and warming in a semi-arid grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Warming and elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) can elicit contrasting responses on different SOM pools, thus to understand the effects of combined factors it is necessary to evaluate individual pools. Over two years, we assessed responses to eCO2 and warming of SOM pools, their susceptibility to decomp...

  8. No Evidence of Neandertal mtDNA Contribution to Early Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The retrieval of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from four Neandertal fossils from Germany, Russia, and Croatia has demonstrated that these individuals carried closely related mtDNAs that are not found among current humans. However, these results do not definitively resolve the question of a possible Neandertal contribution to the gene pool of modern humans since such a contribution might have been erased by genetic drift or by the continuous influx of modern human DNA into the Neandertal gene pool. A further concern is that if some Neandertals carried mtDNA sequences similar to contemporaneous humans, such sequences may be erroneously regarded as modern contaminations when retrieved from fossils. Here we address these issues by the analysis of 24 Neandertal and 40 early modern human remains. The biomolecular preservation of four Neandertals and of five early modern humans was good enough to suggest the preservation of DNA. All four Neandertals yielded mtDNA sequences similar to those previously determined from Neandertal individuals, whereas none of the five early modern humans contained such mtDNA sequences. In combination with current mtDNA data, this excludes any large genetic contribution by Neandertals to early modern humans, but does not rule out the possibility of a smaller contribution. PMID:15024415

  9. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  10. Individual and combined effects of DNA methylation and copy number alterations on miRNA expression in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The global effect of copy number and epigenetic alterations on miRNA expression in cancer is poorly understood. In the present study, we integrate genome-wide DNA methylation, copy number and miRNA expression and identify genetic mechanisms underlying miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. Results We identify 70 miRNAs whose expression was associated with alterations in copy number or methylation, or both. Among these, five miRNA families are represented. Interestingly, the members of these families are encoded on different chromosomes and are complementarily altered by gain or hypomethylation across the patients. In an independent breast cancer cohort of 123 patients, 41 of the 70 miRNAs were confirmed with respect to aberration pattern and association to expression. In vitro functional experiments were performed in breast cancer cell lines with miRNA mimics to evaluate the phenotype of the replicated miRNAs. let-7e-3p, which in tumors is found associated with hypermethylation, is shown to induce apoptosis and reduce cell viability, and low let-7e-3p expression is associated with poorer prognosis. The overexpression of three other miRNAs associated with copy number gain, miR-21-3p, miR-148b-3p and miR-151a-5p, increases proliferation of breast cancer cell lines. In addition, miR-151a-5p enhances the levels of phosphorylated AKT protein. Conclusions Our data provide novel evidence of the mechanisms behind miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. The study contributes to the understanding of how methylation and copy number alterations influence miRNA expression, emphasizing miRNA functionality through redundant encoding, and suggests novel miRNAs important in breast cancer. PMID:24257477

  11. Photophysics and photochemistry of a DNA-protein cross-linking model: a synergistic approach combining experiments and theory.

    PubMed

    Micciarelli, Marco; Valadan, Mohammadhassan; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Di Fabio, Giovanni; De Napoli, Lorenzo; Bonella, Sara; Röthlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano; Altucci, Carlo; Velotta, Raffaele

    2014-05-15

    The photophysical and photochemical properties of 5-benzyluracil and 5,6-benzyluracil, the latter produced by photocyclization of the former through irradiation with femtosecond UV laser pulses, are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The absorption spectra of the two molecules are compared, and the principal electronic transitions involved are discussed, with particular emphasis on the perturbation induced on the two chromophore species (uracil and benzene) by their proximity. The photoproduct formation for different irradiation times was verified with high-performance liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The steady-state fluorescence demonstrates that the fluorescence is a distinctive physical observable for detection and selective identification of 5- and 5,6-benzyluracil. The principal electronic decay paths of the two molecules, obtained through TDDFT calculations, explain the features observed in the emission spectra and the photoreactivity of 5-benzyluracil. The order of magnitude of the lifetime of the excited states is derived with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements and rationalized with the help of the computational findings. Finally, the spectroscopic data collected are used to derive the photocyclization and fluorescence quantum yields. In obtaining a global picture of the photophysical and photochemical properties of the two molecules, our findings demonstrates that the use of 5-benzyluracil as a model system to study the proximity relations of a DNA base with a close-lying aromatic amino acid is valid at a local level since the main characteristics of the decay processes from the excited states of the uracil/thymine molecules remain almost unchanged in 5-benzyluracil, the main perturbation arising from the presence of the close-lying aromatic group.

  12. Combining real-time PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing to provide quantitative comparisons of fungal aerosol populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Lang-Yona, Naama; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Rudich, Yinon; Peccia, Jordan

    2014-02-01

    We examined fungal communities associated with the PM10 mass of Rehovot, Israel outdoor air samples collected in the spring and fall seasons. Fungal communities were described by 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the fungal ribosomal RNA encoding gene. To allow for a more quantitative comparison of fungal exposure in humans, the relative abundance values of specific taxa were transformed to absolute concentrations through multiplying these values by the sample's total fungal spore concentration (derived from universal fungal qPCR). Next, the sequencing-based absolute concentrations for Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. were compared to taxon-specific qPCR concentrations for A. alternata, C. cladosporioides, E. nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. derived from the same spring and fall aerosol samples. Results of these comparisons showed that the absolute concentration values generated from pyrosequencing were strongly associated with the concentration values derived from taxon-specific qPCR (for all four species, p < 0.005, all R > 0.70). The correlation coefficients were greater for species present in higher concentrations. Our microbial aerosol population analyses demonstrated that fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was higher in the spring compared to the fall (p = 0.02), and principal coordinate analysis showed distinct seasonal differences in taxa distribution (ANOSIM p = 0.004). Among genera containing allergenic and/or pathogenic species, the absolute concentrations of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Cladosporium were greater in the fall, while Cryptococcus, Penicillium, and Ulocladium concentrations were greater in the spring. The transformation of pyrosequencing fungal population relative abundance data to absolute concentrations can improve next-generation DNA sequencing-based quantitative aerosol exposure

  13. Interactions between pool geometry and hydraulics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, D.M.; Nelson, J.M.; Wohl, E.E.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental and computational research approach was used to determine interactions between pool geometry and hydraulics. A 20-m-long, 1.8-m-wide flume was used to investigate the effect of four different geometric aspects of pool shape on flow velocity. Plywood sections were used to systematically alter constriction width, pool depth, pool length, and pool exit-slope gradient, each at two separate levels. Using the resulting 16 unique geometries with measured pool velocities in four-way factorial analyses produced an empirical assessment of the role of the four geometric aspects on the pool flow patterns and hence the stability of the pool. To complement the conclusions of these analyses, a two-dimensional computational flow model was used to investigate the relationships between pool geometry and flow patterns over a wider range of conditions. Both experimental and computational results show that constriction and depth effects dominate in the jet section of the pool and that pool length exhibits an increasing effect within the recirculating-eddy system. The pool exit slope appears to force flow reattachment. Pool length controls recirculating-eddy length and vena contracta strength. In turn, the vena contracta and recirculating eddy control velocities throughout the pool.

  14. Combination of treatment with death receptor 5-specific antibody with therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination generates enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih Wen; Monie, Archana; Trimble, Cornelia; Alvarez, Ronald D; Huh, Warner K; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Straughn, J Michael; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Yagita, Hideo; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-08-12

    There is currently a vital need for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the control of advanced stage cancers. Antigen-specific immunotherapy and the employment of antibodies against the death receptor 5 (DR5) have emerged as two potentially promising strategies for cancer treatment. In the current study, we hypothesize that the combination of treatment with the anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody, MD5-1 with a DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 antigen (CRT/E7(detox)) administered via gene gun would lead to further enhancement of E7-specific immune responses as well as anti-tumor effects. Our results indicated that mice bearing the E7-expressing tumor, TC-1 treated with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody followed by CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generated the most potent therapeutic anti-tumor effects as well as highest levels of E7-specific CD8+ T cells among all the groups tested. In addition, treatment with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody was capable of rendering the TC-1 tumor cells more susceptible to lysis by E7-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our findings serve as an important foundation for future clinical translation.

  15. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Liu, Wen-juan; Zhang, Yu-dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-xia; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-01-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capillary electrophoresis, the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped. A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group, and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965. The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population’s genetic background, for individual identification, and for paternity testing in forensic practice. PMID:23733431

  16. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Liu, Wen-juan; Zhang, Yu-dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-xia; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-06-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capillary electrophoresis, the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped. A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group, and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965. The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population's genetic background, for individual identification, and for paternity testing in forensic practice.

  17. Monte Carlo Test Assembly for Item Pool Analysis and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    A new test assembly algorithm based on a Monte Carlo random search is presented in this article. A major advantage of the Monte Carlo test assembly over other approaches (integer programming or enumerative heuristics) is that it performs a uniform sampling from the item pool, which provides every feasible item combination (test) with an equal…

  18. Folic acid or combination of folic acid and vitamin B(12) prevents short-term arsenic trioxide-induced systemic and mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sangita; Mukherjee, Sandip; Maiti, Anasuya; Karmakar, Subhra; Das, Asankur Sekhar; Mukherjee, Maitrayee; Nanda, Arunabha; Mitra, Chandan

    2009-08-01

    The effect of folic acid and folic acid + vitamin B(12) supplementation upon short-term arsenic-induced systemic and pancreatic islet cell mitochondria oxidative stress was investigated in male rats. Arsenic trioxide was administered orally at a dose of 3 mg kg body weight(-1) day(-1) for 30 days, and folic acid and vitamin B(12) were administered at a dose of 36 and 0.63 microg kg body weight(-1) day(-1), respectively, for 30 days. Compared to control, arsenic-treated group showed a significant increase in the levels of systemic oxidative markers, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and hydroxyl radical (OH(-)) formation, which were found decreased significantly after supplementation either with folic acid or a combination of folic acid + vitamin B(12). Similar supplementations were found effective against arsenic-induced oxidative marker changes (MDA, NO, and OH(-)) in pancreatic islet cell mitochondria. Also, low activities of antioxidant defense enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, and level of antioxidant glutathione, all could regain significantly on supplementations both against systemic and islet cell mitochondria oxidative stress. Results of agarose-gel electrophoresis of DNA from lymphocytes and islet cells of arsenic-exposed rats showed DNA smearing, which could be reduced with simultaneous administration either with folic acid or a combination of folic acid + vitamin B(12). Significantly, similar supplementations were found effective in increasing the urinary clearance of arsenic. Together, these results indicate that folic acid and vitamin B(12) may be effective to reduce the arsenic-induced damage at molecular target level.

  19. Integration of Known DNA, RNA and Protein Biomarkers Provides Prediction of Anti-TNF Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from the COMBINE Study

    PubMed Central

    Folkersen, Lasse; Brynedal, Boel; Diaz-Gallo, Lina Marcela; Ramsköld, Daniel; Shchetynsky, Klementy; Westerlind, Helga; Sundström, Yvonne; Schepis, Danika; Hensvold, Aase; Vivar, Nancy; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Brunak, Søren; Malmström, Vivianne; Catrina, Anca; Moerch, Ulrik GW; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Berg, Louise

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) several recent efforts have sought to discover means of predicting which patients would benefit from treatment. However, results have been discrepant with few successful replications. Our objective was to build a biobank with DNA, RNA and protein measurements to test the claim that the current state-of-the-art precision medicine will benefit RA patients. METHODS: We collected 451 blood samples from 61 healthy individuals and 185 RA patients initiating treatment, before treatment initiation and at a 3 month follow-up time. All samples were subjected to high-throughput RNA sequencing, DNA genotyping, extensive proteomics and flow cytometry measurements, as well as comprehensive clinical phenotyping. Literature review identified 2 proteins, 52 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 72 gene-expression biomarkers that had previously been proposed as predictors of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitor response (ΔDAS28-CRP). RESULTS: From these published TNFi biomarkers we found that 2 protein, 2 SNP and 8 mRNA biomarkers could be replicated in the 59 TNF initiating patients. Combining these replicated biomarkers into a single signature we found that we could explain 51% of the variation in ΔDAS28-CRP. This corresponds to a sensitivity of 0.73 and specificity of 0.78 for the prediction of three month ΔDAS28-CRP better than –1.2. CONCLUSIONS: The COMBINE biobank is currently the largest collection of multi-omics data from RA patients with high potential for discovery and replication. Taking advantage of this we surveyed the current state-of-the-art of drug-response stratification in RA, and identified a small set of previously published biomarkers available in peripheral blood which predicts clinical response to TNF blockade in this independent cohort. PMID:27532898

  20. Triploblastic relationships with emphasis on the acoelomates and the position of Gnathostomulida, Cycliophora, Plathelminthes, and Chaetognatha: a combined approach of 18S rDNA sequences and morphology.

    PubMed

    Giribet, G; Distel, D L; Polz, M; Sterrer, W; Wheeler, W C

    2000-09-01

    Triploblastic relationships were examined in the light of molecular and morphological evidence. Representatives for all triploblastic "phyla" (except Loricifera) were represented by both sources of phylogenetic data. The 18S ribosomal (rDNA) sequence data for 145 terminal taxa and 276 morphological characters coded for 36 supraspecific taxa were combined in a total evidence regime to determine the most consistent picture of triploblastic relationships for these data. Only triploblastic taxa are used to avoid rooting with distant outgroups, which seems to happen because of the extreme distance that separates diploblastic from triploblastic taxa according to the 18S rDNA data. Multiple phylogenetic analyses performed with variable analysis parameters yield largely inconsistent results for certain groups such as Chaetognatha, Acoela, and Nemertodermatida. A normalized incongruence length metric is used to assay the relative merit of the multiple analyses. The combined analysis having the least character incongruence yields the following scheme of relationships of four main clades: (1) Deuterostomia [((Echinodermata + Enteropneusta) (Cephalochordata (Urochordata + Vertebrata)))]; (2) Ecdysozoa [(((Priapulida + Kinorhyncha) (Nematoda + Nematomorpha)) ((Onychophora + Tardigrada) Arthropoda))]; (3) Trochozoa [((Phoronida + Brachiopoda) (Entoprocta (Nemertea (Sipuncula (Mollusca (Pogonophora (Echiura + Annelida)))))))]; and (4) Platyzoa [((Gnathostomulida (Cycliophora + Syndermata)) (Gastrotricha + Plathelminthes))]. Chaetognatha, Nemertodermatida, and Bryozoa cannot be assigned to any one of these four groups. For the first time, a data analysis recognizes a clade of acoelomates, the Platyzoa (sensu Cavalier-Smith, Biol. Rev. 73:203-266, 1998). Other relationships that corroborate some morphological analyses are the existence of a clade that groups Gnathostomulida + Syndermata (= Gnathifera), which is expanded to include the enigmatic phylum Cycliophora, as sister group

  1. Triploblastic relationships with emphasis on the acoelomates and the position of Gnathostomulida, Cycliophora, Plathelminthes, and Chaetognatha: a combined approach of 18S rDNA sequences and morphology.

    PubMed

    Giribet, G; Distel, D L; Polz, M; Sterrer, W; Wheeler, W C

    2000-09-01

    Triploblastic relationships were examined in the light of molecular and morphological evidence. Representatives for all triploblastic "phyla" (except Loricifera) were represented by both sources of phylogenetic data. The 18S ribosomal (rDNA) sequence data for 145 terminal taxa and 276 morphological characters coded for 36 supraspecific taxa were combined in a total evidence regime to determine the most consistent picture of triploblastic relationships for these data. Only triploblastic taxa are used to avoid rooting with distant outgroups, which seems to happen because of the extreme distance that separates diploblastic from triploblastic taxa according to the 18S rDNA data. Multiple phylogenetic analyses performed with variable analysis parameters yield largely inconsistent results for certain groups such as Chaetognatha, Acoela, and Nemertodermatida. A normalized incongruence length metric is used to assay the relative merit of the multiple analyses. The combined analysis having the least character incongruence yields the following scheme of relationships of four main clades: (1) Deuterostomia [((Echinodermata + Enteropneusta) (Cephalochordata (Urochordata + Vertebrata)))]; (2) Ecdysozoa [(((Priapulida + Kinorhyncha) (Nematoda + Nematomorpha)) ((Onychophora + Tardigrada) Arthropoda))]; (3) Trochozoa [((Phoronida + Brachiopoda) (Entoprocta (Nemertea (Sipuncula (Mollusca (Pogonophora (Echiura + Annelida)))))))]; and (4) Platyzoa [((Gnathostomulida (Cycliophora + Syndermata)) (Gastrotricha + Plathelminthes))]. Chaetognatha, Nemertodermatida, and Bryozoa cannot be assigned to any one of these four groups. For the first time, a data analysis recognizes a clade of acoelomates, the Platyzoa (sensu Cavalier-Smith, Biol. Rev. 73:203-266, 1998). Other relationships that corroborate some morphological analyses are the existence of a clade that groups Gnathostomulida + Syndermata (= Gnathifera), which is expanded to include the enigmatic phylum Cycliophora, as sister group

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of Middle American cichlids (Cichlidae, Heroini) based on combined evidence from nuclear genes, mtDNA, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Rícan, Oldrich; Zardoya, Rafael; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2008-12-01

    Heroine cichlids are the second largest and very diverse tribe of Neotropical cichlids, and the only cichlid group that inhabits Mesoamerica. The taxonomy of heroines is complex because monophyly of most genera has never been demonstrated, and many species groups are without applicable generic names after their removal from the catch-all genus Cichlasoma (sensu Regan, 1905). Hence, a robust phylogeny for the group is largely wanting. A rather complete heroine phylogeny based on cytb sequence data is available [Concheiro Pérez, G.A., Rícan O., Ortí G., Bermingham, E., Doadrio, I., Zardoya, R. 2007. Phylogeny and biogeography of 91 species of heroine cichlids (Teleostei: Cichlidae) based on sequences of the cytochrome b gene. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 43, 91-110], and in the present study, we have added and analyzed independent data sets (nuclear and morphological) to further confirm and strengthen the cytb-phylogenetic hypothesis. We have analyzed a combined cytb-nuclear (RAG1 and two S7 introns) data set of 48 species representing main heroine lineages to achieve further resolution of heroine higher taxonomic levels and a combined cytb-morphological data set of 92 species to stabilize generic taxonomy. The recovered phylogenies supported the circumamazonian--CAM--Heroini (sensu Concheiro Peréz et al., 2007) as a monophyletic group, that could be divided into six main clades: (1) australoheroines (the southernmost heroine genus Australoheros), (2) nandopsines (the Antillean genus Nandopsis), (3) caquetaines (including the north western Amazonian genera Caquetaia and Heroina), (4) astatheroines (including Astatheros, Herotilapia and Rocio), (5) amphilophines (including Amphilophus and related genera), and (6) herichthyines (including Herichthyis and related genera). Nuclear and mitochondrial data partitions arrived at highly congruent topologies. Suprageneric relationships were influenced mainly by the nuclear signal, as well as the most basal phylogenetic position

  3. Genomics of crop wild relatives: expanding the gene pool for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Plant breeders require access to new genetic diversity to satisfy the demands of a growing human population for more food that can be produced in a variable or changing climate and to deliver the high-quality food with nutritional and health benefits demanded by consumers. The close relatives of domesticated plants, crop wild relatives (CWRs), represent a practical gene pool for use by plant breeders. Genomics of CWR generates data that support the use of CWR to expand the genetic diversity of crop plants. Advances in DNA sequencing technology are enabling the efficient sequencing of CWR and their increased use in crop improvement. As the sequencing of genomes of major crop species is completed, attention has shifted to analysis of the wider gene pool of major crops including CWR. A combination of de novo sequencing and resequencing is required to efficiently explore useful genetic variation in CWR. Analysis of the nuclear genome, transcriptome and maternal (chloroplast and mitochondrial) genome of CWR is facilitating their use in crop improvement. Genome analysis results in discovery of useful alleles in CWR and identification of regions of the genome in which diversity has been lost in domestication bottlenecks. Targeting of high priority CWR for sequencing will maximize the contribution of genome sequencing of CWR. Coordination of global efforts to apply genomics has the potential to accelerate access to and conservation of the biodiversity essential to the sustainability of agriculture and food production. PMID:26311018

  4. Genomics of crop wild relatives: expanding the gene pool for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Plant breeders require access to new genetic diversity to satisfy the demands of a growing human population for more food that can be produced in a variable or changing climate and to deliver the high-quality food with nutritional and health benefits demanded by consumers. The close relatives of domesticated plants, crop wild relatives (CWRs), represent a practical gene pool for use by plant breeders. Genomics of CWR generates data that support the use of CWR to expand the genetic diversity of crop plants. Advances in DNA sequencing technology are enabling the efficient sequencing of CWR and their increased use in crop improvement. As the sequencing of genomes of major crop species is completed, attention has shifted to analysis of the wider gene pool of major crops including CWR. A combination of de novo sequencing and resequencing is required to efficiently explore useful genetic variation in CWR. Analysis of the nuclear genome, transcriptome and maternal (chloroplast and mitochondrial) genome of CWR is facilitating their use in crop improvement. Genome analysis results in discovery of useful alleles in CWR and identification of regions of the genome in which diversity has been lost in domestication bottlenecks. Targeting of high priority CWR for sequencing will maximize the contribution of genome sequencing of CWR. Coordination of global efforts to apply genomics has the potential to accelerate access to and conservation of the biodiversity essential to the sustainability of agriculture and food production.

  5. Evolution of the assassin’s arms: insights from a phylogeny of combined transcriptomic and ribosomal DNA data (Heteroptera: Reduvioidea)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junxia; Gordon, Eric R. L.; Forthman, Michael; Hwang, Wei Song; Walden, Kim; Swanson, Daniel R.; Johnson, Kevin P.; Meier, Rudolf; Weirauch, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Assassin bugs (Reduvioidea) are one of the most diverse (>7,000 spp.) lineages of predatory animals and have evolved an astounding diversity of raptorial leg modifications for handling prey. The evolution of these modifications is not well understood due to the lack of a robust phylogeny, especially at deeper nodes. We here utilize refined data from transcriptomes (370 loci) to stabilize the backbone phylogeny of Reduvioidea, revealing the position of major clades (e.g., the Chagas disease vectors Triatominae). Analyses combining transcriptomic and Sanger-sequencing datasets result in the first well-resolved phylogeny of Reduvioidea. Despite amounts of missing data, the transcriptomic loci resolve deeper nodes while the targeted ribosomal genes anchor taxa at shallower nodes, both with high support. This phylogeny reveals patterns of raptorial leg evolution across major leg types. Hairy attachment structures (fossula spongiosa), present in the ancestor of Reduvioidea, were lost multiple times within the clade. In contrast to prior hypotheses, this loss is not directly correlated with the evolution of alternative raptorial leg types. Our results suggest that prey type, predatory behavior, salivary toxicity, and morphological adaptations pose intricate and interrelated factors influencing the evolution of this diverse group of predators. PMID:26916580

  6. Evolution of the assassin's arms: insights from a phylogeny of combined transcriptomic and ribosomal DNA data (Heteroptera: Reduvioidea).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junxia; Gordon, Eric R L; Forthman, Michael; Hwang, Wei Song; Walden, Kim; Swanson, Daniel R; Johnson, Kevin P; Meier, Rudolf; Weirauch, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Assassin bugs (Reduvioidea) are one of the most diverse (>7,000 spp.) lineages of predatory animals and have evolved an astounding diversity of raptorial leg modifications for handling prey. The evolution of these modifications is not well understood due to the lack of a robust phylogeny, especially at deeper nodes. We here utilize refined data from transcriptomes (370 loci) to stabilize the backbone phylogeny of Reduvioidea, revealing the position of major clades (e.g., the Chagas disease vectors Triatominae). Analyses combining transcriptomic and Sanger-sequencing datasets result in the first well-resolved phylogeny of Reduvioidea. Despite amounts of missing data, the transcriptomic loci resolve deeper nodes while the targeted ribosomal genes anchor taxa at shallower nodes, both with high support. This phylogeny reveals patterns of raptorial leg evolution across major leg types. Hairy attachment structures (fossula spongiosa), present in the ancestor of Reduvioidea, were lost multiple times within the clade. In contrast to prior hypotheses, this loss is not directly correlated with the evolution of alternative raptorial leg types. Our results suggest that prey type, predatory behavior, salivary toxicity, and morphological adaptations pose intricate and interrelated factors influencing the evolution of this diverse group of predators. PMID:26916580

  7. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis can rapidly display the bacterial diversity contained in 16S rDNA clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Burr, M D; Clark, S J; Spear, C R; Camper, A K

    2006-05-01

    Two different strategies for molecular analysis of bacterial diversity, 16S rDNA cloning and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), were combined into a single protocol that took advantage of the best attributes of each: the ability of cloning to package DNA sequence information and the ability of DGGE to display a community profile. In this combined protocol, polymerase chain reaction products from environmental DNA were cloned, and then DGGE was used to screen the clone libraries. Both individual clones and pools of randomly selected clones were analyzed by DGGE, and these migration patterns were compared to the conventional DGGE profile produced directly from environmental DNA. For two simple bacterial communities (biofilm from a humics-fed laboratory reactor and planktonic bacteria filtered from an urban freshwater pond), pools of 35-50 clones produced DGGE profiles that contained most of the bands visible in the conventional DGGE profiles, indicating that the clone pools were adequate for identifying the dominant genotypes. However, DGGE profiles of two different pools of 50 clones from a lawn soil clone library were distinctly different from each other and from the conventional DGGE profile, indicating that this small number of clones poorly represented the bacterial diversity in soil. Individual clones with the same apparent DGGE mobility as prominent bands in the humics reactor community profiles were sequenced from the clone plasmid DNA rather than from bands excised from the gel. Because a longer fragment was cloned (approximately 1500 bp) than was actually analyzed in DGGE (approximately 350 bp), far more sequence information was available using this approach that could have been recovered from an excised gel band. This clone/DGGE protocol permitted rapid analysis of the microbial diversity in the two moderately complex systems, but was limited in its ability to represent the diversity in the soil microbial community. Nonetheless, clone/DGGE is

  8. [Infections transmitted in swimming pools].

    PubMed

    von Suzani, C; Hazeghi, P

    1976-01-01

    Public swimmingpools can be the source of infections due to micro-organism such as mycobacterium balnei, adeno and enteroviruses, the virus of plantar warts and molluscum contagiosum, the TRIC-Agent of swimmingpool-conjonctivitis and pathogenic fungi. The transmission of trichomonas vaginalis is considered unlikely-Water of pools, supposed to present satisfactory qualities by standard controls, was found to contain pathogenic staphylococci and pseudomonas aeruginosa. Effective preventive measures include the continuous recording of the redox-potential of the water, limiting the number of visitors to pool design specifications, better desinfection of sanitary installations, regular maintenance of technical equipment including frequent backwashing of filters and exclusion of visitors with communicable disease.

  9. DNA Tetrominoes: The Construction of DNA Nanostructures Using Self-Organised Heterogeneous Deoxyribonucleic Acids Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Rahim, Mohd Syafiq; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2015-01-01

    The unique programmability of nucleic acids offers alternative in constructing excitable and functional nanostructures. This work introduces an autonomous protocol to construct DNA Tetris shapes (L-Shape, B-Shape, T-Shape and I-Shape) using modular DNA blocks. The protocol exploits the rich number of sequence combinations available from the nucleic acid alphabets, thus allowing for diversity to be applied in designing various DNA nanostructures. Instead of a deterministic set of sequences corresponding to a particular design, the protocol promotes a large pool of DNA shapes that can assemble to conform to any desired structures. By utilising evolutionary programming in the design stage, DNA blocks are subjected to processes such as sequence insertion, deletion and base shifting in order to enrich the diversity of the resulting shapes based on a set of cascading filters. The optimisation algorithm allows mutation to be exerted indefinitely on the candidate sequences until these sequences complied with all the four fitness criteria. Generated candidates from the protocol are in agreement with the filter cascades and thermodynamic simulation. Further validation using gel electrophoresis indicated the formation of the designed shapes. Thus, supporting the plausibility of constructing DNA nanostructures in a more hierarchical, modular, and interchangeable manner. PMID:26258940

  10. Pool power control in remelting systems

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Melgaard, David K.; Beaman, Joseph J.

    2011-12-13

    An apparatus for and method of controlling a remelting furnace comprising adjusting current supplied to an electrode based upon a predetermined pool power reference value and adjusting the electrode drive speed based upon the predetermined pool power reference value.

  11. Pool Safety: A Few Simple Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents suggestions by the National Swimming Pool Safety Committee on how to keep children safe while swimming. Ideas include maintaining strict adult supervision, pool and spa barriers, and knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (SM)

  12. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  13. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communication (404) 639-3286 CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools A study of public pools done ... The E. coli is a marker for fecal contamination. Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive ...

  14. Absence of DNA damage after 60-Hz electromagnetic field exposure combined with ionizing radiation, hydrogen peroxide, or c-Myc overexpression.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Choi, Seo-Hyun; Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Myung, Sung Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2014-03-01

    The principal objective of this study was to assess the DNA damage in a normal cell line system after exposure to 60 Hz of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) and particularly in combination with various external factors, via comet assays. NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells, WI-38 human lung fibroblast cells, L132 human lung epithelial cells, and MCF10A human mammary gland epithelial cells were exposed for 4 or 16 h to a 60-Hz, 1 mT uniform magnetic field in the presence or absence of ionizing radiation (IR, 1 Gy), H(2)O(2) (50 μM), or c-Myc oncogenic activation. The results obtained showed no significant differences between the cells exposed to ELF-MF alone and the unexposed cells. Moreover, no synergistic or additive effects were observed after 4 or 16 h of pre-exposure to 1 mT ELF-MF or simultaneous exposure to ELF-MF combined with IR, H(2)O(2), or c-Myc activation.

  15. Swimming pools soak up the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoghi, D.; Hesse, P.; Schiller, T.

    1996-05-01

    Solar pool heaters survived the boom and bust solar years of the 1970s and 1980s. Today they are even popular and cost-effective in parts of the country where many people think solar is impractical. This article discusses the following topics: how solar pool heaters work; types of solar pool heater collectors; collector and pump sizing; collector siting and mounting; systems costs and economics; pool covers. 3 figs.

  16. CCL17 combined with CCL19 as a nasal adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity of an anti-caries DNA vaccine in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan-hong; Yu, Fei; Zeng, Chang; Cao, Li-hua; Zhang, Zhou; Xu, Qing-an

    2016-01-01

    Aim: CCL19 and its receptor CCR7 are essential molecules for facilitating the trafficking of mature dendritic cells (DCs) and helping to establish a microenvironment in lymphoid tissues to initiate primary immune responses, whereas CCL17 is required in the CCR7-CCL19-dependent migration of DCs. In this study we examined whether co-administration of CCL17 and CCL19 could enhance the immunogenicity of an anti-caries DNA vaccine, pCIA-P, in rodents. Methods: Plasmids encoding CCL17 (pCCL17/VAX) and CCL19 (pCCL19/VAX) were constructed. BALB/c mice were intranasally administered pCCL17/VAX, pCCL19/VAX, or pCCL17/VAX plus pCCL19/VAX, the migration of DCs to the spleen and draining lymph nodes (DLNs) was assessed with flow cytometry. The mice were co-administered pCIA-P; and the anti-PAc antibodies in the serum and saliva were detected with ELISA. Wistar rats were orally challenged with Streptococcus mutans and then administered pCIA-P in combination with pCCL17/VAX, pCCL19/VAX, or pCCL17/VAX plus pCCL19/VAX. The amount of S mutans sustained on rat molar surfaces was assessed using a colony forming assay. Caries activity was scored with the Keyes method. Results: Co-administration of the CCL17 and CCL19 genes in mice caused a greater increase in the number of mature DCs in the spleen and DLNs compared with administration of CCL17 or CCL19 genes alone. CCL17 and CCL19 double-adjuvant plus pCIA-P induced significantly higher levels of anti-PAc salivary IgA and anti-PAc serum IgG antibody in mice, and strengthened the ability of pCIA-P in inhibiting the colonization of S mutans on rat tooth surfaces. The caries activity of the combined adjuvant group was significantly lower than that of the pCCL17/VAX or the pCCL19/VAX group. Conclusion: A nasal adjuvant consisting of a combination of CCL17 and CCL19 attracts more mature DCs to secondary lymphoid tissues, inducing enhanced antibody responses against the anti-caries DNA vaccine pCIA-P and reducing S mutans infection in

  17. Prediction of rare single-nucleotide causative mutations for muscular diseases in pooled next-generation sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Maria Brigida; Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Nigro, Vincenzo; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2014-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a new approach for biomedical research, useful for the diagnosis of genetic diseases in extremely heterogeneous conditions. In this work, we describe how data generated by high-throughput NGS experiments can be analyzed to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA samples of patients affected by neuromuscular disorders. In particular, we consider untagged pooled NGS data, where DNA samples of different individuals are combined in a single experiment, still providing information with an uncertainty limited to only two patients. At the moment, only few publications address the problem of SNPs detection in pooled experiments, and existing tools are often inaccurate. We propose a computational procedure consisting of two parts. In the first, data are filtered by means of decision rules. The second phase is based on a supervised classification technique. In the present work, we compare different de facto standard supervised and unsupervised procedures to identify and classify variants potentially related to muscular diseases, and we discuss results in terms of statistical and biological validation.

  18. Multiplex sequencing of pooled mitochondrial genomes-a crucial step toward biodiversity analysis using mito-metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Tan, Meihua; Meng, Guanliang; Yang, Shenzhou; Su, Xu; Liu, Shanlin; Song, Wenhui; Li, Yiyuan; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Aibing; Zhou, Xin

    2014-12-16

    The advent in high-throughput-sequencing (HTS) technologies has revolutionized conventional biodiversity research by enabling parallel capture of DNA sequences possessing species-level diagnosis. However, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based implementation is biased by the efficiency of primer binding across lineages of organisms. A PCR-free HTS approach will alleviate this artefact and significantly improve upon the multi-locus method utilizing full mitogenomes. Here we developed a novel multiplex sequencing and assembly pipeline allowing for simultaneous acquisition of full mitogenomes from pooled animals without DNA enrichment or amplification. By concatenating assemblies from three de novo assemblers, we obtained high-quality mitogenomes for all 49 pooled taxa, with 36 species >15 kb and the remaining >10 kb, including 20 complete mitogenomes and nearly all protein coding genes (99.6%). The assembly quality was carefully validated with Sanger sequences, reference genomes and conservativeness of protein coding genes across taxa. The new method was effective even for closely related taxa, e.g. three Drosophila spp., demonstrating its broad utility for biodiversity research and mito-phylogenomics. Finally, the in silico simulation showed that by recruiting multiple mito-loci, taxon detection was improved at a fixed sequencing depth. Combined, these results demonstrate the plausibility of a multi-locus mito-metagenomics approach as the next phase of the current single-locus metabarcoding method.

  19. Apparatus for heating a swimming pool

    SciTech Connect

    Kremen, R.D.

    1983-09-06

    This disclosure relates to a solar heater apparatus for a swimming pool which incorporates a submersible suspendible black body sheet to serve as a device to absorb solar radiation and transfer the collected energy to the pool water so that the pool water can be efficiently heated.

  20. 24 CFR 320.9 - Pool administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pool administration. 320.9 Section...-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.9 Pool administration. The Association will only... prescribed by the Association. Pool administration requirements are set forth in such agreements or...

  1. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  2. 10 CFR 429.24 - Pool heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pool heaters. 429.24 Section 429.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.24 Pool heaters. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to pool heaters; and (2) For...

  3. 10 CFR 429.24 - Pool heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pool heaters. 429.24 Section 429.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.24 Pool heaters. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to pool heaters; and (2) For...

  4. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  5. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  6. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  7. 10 CFR 429.24 - Pool heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pool heaters. 429.24 Section 429.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.24 Pool heaters. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to pool heaters; and (2) For...

  8. 24 CFR 320.9 - Pool administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pool administration. 320.9 Section...-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.9 Pool administration. The Association will only... prescribed by the Association. Pool administration requirements are set forth in such agreements or...

  9. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  10. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  11. 24 CFR 320.9 - Pool administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pool administration. 320.9 Section...-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.9 Pool administration. The Association will only... prescribed by the Association. Pool administration requirements are set forth in such agreements or...

  12. 24 CFR 320.9 - Pool administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pool administration. 320.9 Section...-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.9 Pool administration. The Association will only... prescribed by the Association. Pool administration requirements are set forth in such agreements or...

  13. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  14. 7 CFR 1005.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1005.7 Section 1005.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1005.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  15. 7 CFR 1006.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1006.7 Section 1006.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1006.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  16. 7 CFR 1001.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1001.7 Section 1001.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1001.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant described in paragraph (h)...

  17. 7 CFR 1005.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1005.7 Section 1005.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1005.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  18. 7 CFR 1124.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1124.7 Section 1124.7 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Definitions § 1124.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or a system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant specified...

  19. 7 CFR 1030.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1030.7 Section 1030.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1030.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (h)...

  20. 7 CFR 1001.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1001.7 Section 1001.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1001.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant described in paragraph (h)...

  1. 7 CFR 1033.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1033.7 Section 1033.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1033.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (j) of...

  2. 7 CFR 1033.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1033.7 Section 1033.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1033.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (j) of...

  3. 7 CFR 1131.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1131.7 Section 1131.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1131.7 Pool plant. Pool Plant means a plant or unit of plants specified in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (g) of this...

  4. 7 CFR 1007.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1007.7 Section 1007.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1007.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  5. 7 CFR 1126.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1126.7 Section 1126.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1126.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  6. 7 CFR 1131.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1131.7 Section 1131.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1131.7 Pool plant. Pool Plant means a plant or unit of plants specified in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (g) of this...

  7. 7 CFR 1032.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1032.7 Section 1032.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1032.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (i) of...

  8. 7 CFR 1032.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1032.7 Section 1032.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1032.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (i) of...

  9. 7 CFR 1007.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1007.7 Section 1007.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1007.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  10. 7 CFR 1006.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1006.7 Section 1006.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1006.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  11. 7 CFR 1126.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1126.7 Section 1126.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1126.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  12. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  13. 24 CFR 320.9 - Pool administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pool administration. 320.9 Section...-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.9 Pool administration. The Association will only... prescribed by the Association. Pool administration requirements are set forth in such agreements or...

  14. 1968 Listing of Swimming Pool Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    An up-to-date listing of swimming pool equipment including--(1) companies authorized to display the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standards relating to diatomite type filters, (3) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standard relating to sand type…

  15. Regression for skewed biomarker outcomes subject to pooling.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Emily M; Lyles, Robert H; Manatunga, Amita K; Danaher, Michelle; Perkins, Neil J; Schisterman, Enrique F

    2014-03-01

    Epidemiological studies involving biomarkers are often hindered by prohibitively expensive laboratory tests. Strategically pooling specimens prior to performing these lab assays has been shown to effectively reduce cost with minimal information loss in a logistic regression setting. When the goal is to perform regression with a continuous biomarker as the outcome, regression analysis of pooled specimens may not be straightforward, particularly if the outcome is right-skewed. In such cases, we demonstrate that a slight modification of a standard multiple linear regression model for poolwise data can provide valid and precise coefficient estimates when pools are formed by combining biospecimens from subjects with identical covariate values. When these x-homogeneous pools cannot be formed, we propose a Monte Carlo expectation maximization (MCEM) algorithm to compute maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs). Simulation studies demonstrate that these analytical methods provide essentially unbiased estimates of coefficient parameters as well as their standard errors when appropriate assumptions are met. Furthermore, we show how one can utilize the fully observed covariate data to inform the pooling strategy, yielding a high level of statistical efficiency at a fraction of the total lab cost. PMID:24521420

  16. Solution structure of a DNA decamer containing the antiviral drug ganciclovir: combined use of NMR, restrained molecular dynamics, and full relaxation matrix refinement.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Marshalko, S; Schurter, E; Kumar, S; Beardsley, G P; Schweitzer, B I

    1997-05-01

    The nucleoside analog 9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (ganciclovir, DHPG) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment of a variety of herpes viruses in immunocompromised patients and in a gene therapy protocol that has shown promising activity for the treatment of cancer. To probe the structural effects of ganciclovir when incorporated into DNA, we determined and compared the solution structure of a modified ganciclovir-containing decamer duplex [d(CTG)(ganciclovir)d(ATCCAG)]2 and a control duplex d[(CTGGATCCAG)]2 using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 1H and 31P resonances in both duplexes were assigned using a combination of 2-D 1H and 31P NMR experiments. Proton-proton distances determined from NOESY data and dihedral angles determined from DQF-COSY data were used in restrained molecular dynamics simulations starting from canonical A- and B-form DNA models. Both the control and ganciclovir sets of simulations converged to B-type structures. These structures were subjected to full relaxation matrix refinement to produce final structures that were in excellent agreement with the observed NOE intensities. Examination of the final ganciclovir-containing structures reveals that the base of the ganciclovir residue is hydrogen bonded to its complementary dC and is stacked in the helix; in fact, the base of ganciclovir exhibits increased stacking with the 5' base relative to the control. Interestingly, some of the most significant distortions in the structures occur 3' to the lesion site, including a noticeable kink in the sugar-phosphate backbone at this position. Further examination reveals that the backbone conformation, sugar pucker, and glycosidic torsion angle of the residue 3' to the lesion site all indicate an A-type conformation at this position. A possible correlation of these structural findings with results obtained from earlier biochemical studies will be discussed.

  17. Solution structure of a DNA decamer containing the antiviral drug ganciclovir: combined use of NMR, restrained molecular dynamics, and full relaxation matrix refinement.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Marshalko, S; Schurter, E; Kumar, S; Beardsley, G P; Schweitzer, B I

    1997-05-01

    The nucleoside analog 9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (ganciclovir, DHPG) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment of a variety of herpes viruses in immunocompromised patients and in a gene therapy protocol that has shown promising activity for the treatment of cancer. To probe the structural effects of ganciclovir when incorporated into DNA, we determined and compared the solution structure of a modified ganciclovir-containing decamer duplex [d(CTG)(ganciclovir)d(ATCCAG)]2 and a control duplex d[(CTGGATCCAG)]2 using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 1H and 31P resonances in both duplexes were assigned using a combination of 2-D 1H and 31P NMR experiments. Proton-proton distances determined from NOESY data and dihedral angles determined from DQF-COSY data were used in restrained molecular dynamics simulations starting from canonical A- and B-form DNA models. Both the control and ganciclovir sets of simulations converged to B-type structures. These structures were subjected to full relaxation matrix refinement to produce final structures that were in excellent agreement with the observed NOE intensities. Examination of the final ganciclovir-containing structures reveals that the base of the ganciclovir residue is hydrogen bonded to its complementary dC and is stacked in the helix; in fact, the base of ganciclovir exhibits increased stacking with the 5' base relative to the control. Interestingly, some of the most significant distortions in the structures occur 3' to the lesion site, including a noticeable kink in the sugar-phosphate backbone at this position. Further examination reveals that the backbone conformation, sugar pucker, and glycosidic torsion angle of the residue 3' to the lesion site all indicate an A-type conformation at this position. A possible correlation of these structural findings with results obtained from earlier biochemical studies will be discussed. PMID:9154915

  18. Bile acids in combination with low pH induce oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage: relevance to the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Katerina; Payne, Claire M; Chavarria, Melissa; Ramsey, Lois; Dvorakova, Barbora; Bernstein, Harris; Holubec, Hana; Sampliner, Richard E; Guy, Naihsuan; Condon, Amanda; Bernstein, Carol; Green, Sylvan B; Prasad, Anil; Garewal, Harinder S

    2007-01-01

    Background Barrett's oesophagus is a premalignant condition associated with an increased risk for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (ADCA). Previous studies indicated that oxidative damage contributes to the development of ADCA. Objective To test the hypothesis that bile acids and gastric acid, two components of refluxate, can induce oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage. Methods Oxidative stress was evaluated by staining Barrett's oesophagus tissues with different degrees of dysplasia with 8‐hydroxy‐deoxyguanosine (8‐OH‐dG) antibody. The levels of 8‐OH‐dG were also evaluated ex vivo in Barrett's oesophagus tissues incubated for 10 min with control medium and medium acidified to pH 4 and supplemented with 0.5 mM bile acid cocktail. Furthermore, three oesophageal cell lines (Seg‐1 cells, Barrett's oesophagus cells and HET‐1A cells) were exposed to control media, media containing 0.1 mM bile acid cocktail, media acidified to pH 4, and media at pH 4 supplemented with 0.1 mM bile acid cocktail, and evaluated for induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed that 8‐OH‐dG is formed mainly in the epithelial cells in dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. Importantly, incubation of Barrett's oesophagus tissues with the combination of bile acid cocktail and acid leads to increased formation of 8‐OH‐dG. An increase in ROS in oesophageal cells was detected after exposure to pH 4 and bile acid cocktail. Conclusions Oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage can be induced in oesophageal tissues and cells by short exposures to bile acids and low pH. These alterations may underlie the development of Barrett's oesophagus and tumour progression. PMID:17145738

  19. Phylogenetic study of Baylisascaris schroederi isolated from Qinling subspecies of giant panda in China based on combined nuclear 5.8S and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Hui; Li, Hong-Mei; Ryan, Una M; Cong, Mei-Mei; Hu, Bing; Gao, Man; Ren, Wan-Xin; Wang, Xing-Ye; Zhang, Shui-Ping; Lin, Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Yu, San-Ke

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) region spanning 5.8S rDNA and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of Baylisascaris schroederi isolated from the Qinling subspecies of giant panda in Shaanxi Province, China were amplified and sequenced. Sequence variations in the two rDNA regions within B. schroederi and among species in the family Ascarididae were examined. The lengths of B. schroederi 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences were 156 bp and 327 bp, respectively, and no nucleotide variation was found in these two rDNA regions among the 20 B. schroederi samples examined, and these ITS-2 sequences were identical to that of B. schroederi isolated from giant panda in Sichuan province, China. The inter-species differences in 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences among members of the family Ascarididae were 0-1.3% and 0-17.7%, respectively. Phylogenetic relationships among species in the Ascarididae were re-constructed by Bayesian inference (Bayes), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses, based on combined sequences of 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA. All B. schroederi samples clustered together and sistered to B. transfuga with high posterior probabilities/bootstrap values, which further confirmed that nematodes isolated from the Qinling subspecies of giant panda in Shaanxi Province, China represent B. schroederi. Because of the large number of ambiguously aligned sequence positions (difficulty of inferring homology by positions), ITS-2 sequence alone is likely unsuitable for phylogenetic analyses at the family level, but the combined 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences provide alternative genetic markers for the identification of B. schroederi and for phylogenetic analysis of parasites in the family Ascarididae.

  20. Sensitive Visual Detection of AHPND Bacteria Using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles as Probes.

    PubMed

    Arunrut, Narong; Kampeera, Jantana; Sirithammajak, Sarawut; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Proespraiwong, Porranee; Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a component cause of early mortality syndrome (EMS) of shrimp. In 2013, the causative agent was found to be unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND) that contained a 69 kbp plasmid (pAP1) carrying binary Pir-like toxin genes PirvpA and PirvpB. In Thailand, AHPND was first recognized in 2012, prior to knowledge of the causative agent, and it subsequently led to a precipitous drop in shrimp production. After VPAHPND was characterized, a major focus of the AHPND control strategy was to monitor broodstock shrimp and post larvae for freedom from VPAHPND by nucleic acid amplification methods, most of which required use of expensive and sophisticated equipment not readily available in a shrimp farm setting. Here, we describe a simpler but equally sensitive approach for detection of VPAHPND based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) combined with unaided visual reading of positive amplification products using a DNA-functionalized, ssDNA-labled nanogold probe (AuNP). The target for the special set of six LAMP primers used was the VPAHPND PirvpA gene. The LAMP reaction was carried out at 65°C for 45 min followed by addition of the red AuNP solution and further incubation at 65°C for 5 min, allowing any PirvpA gene amplicons present to hybridize with the probe. Hybridization protected the AuNP against aggregation, so that the solution color remained red upon subsequent salt addition (positive test result) while unprotected AuNP aggregated and underwent a color change from red to blue and eventually precipitated (negative result). The total assay time was approximately 50 min. The detection limit (100 CFU) was comparable to that of other commonly-used methods for nested PCR detection of VPAHPND and 100-times more sensitive than 1-step PCR detection methods (104 CFU) that used amplicon detection by electrophoresis or spectrophotometry. There was no cross reaction with DNA templates derived from non

  1. γ-H2AX responds to DNA damage induced by long-term exposure to combined low-dose-rate neutron and γ-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junlin; He, Ying; Shen, Xianrong; Jiang, Dingwen; Wang, Qingrong; Liu, Qiong; Fang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Risk estimates for low-dose radiation (LDR) remain controversial. The possible involvement of DNA repair-related genes in long-term low-dose-rate neutron-gamma radiation exposure is poorly understood. In this study, 60 rats were divided into control groups and irradiated groups, which were exposed to low-dose-rate n-γ combined radiation (LDCR) for 15, 30, or 60 days. The effects of different cumulative radiation doses on peripheral blood cell (PBC), subsets of T cells of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and DNA damage repair were investigated. Real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to detect expression of DNA DSB-repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway, such as Ku70 and Ku80, in PBL. The mRNA level of H2AX and the expression level of γ-H2AX were detected by real-time PCR, immunoblot, and flow cytometry. White blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT) of all ionizing radiation (IR) groups decreased significantly, while no difference was seen between the 30 day and 60 day exposure groups. The numbers of CD3(+), CD4(+) T cells and CD4(+)/CD8(+) in the PBL of IR groups were lower than in the control group. In the 30 day and 60 day exposure groups, CD8(+) T cells decreased significantly. Real-time PCR and immunoblot results showed no significant difference in the mRNA and protein expression of Ku70 and Ku80 between the control groups and IR groups. However, the mRNA of H2AX increased significantly, and there was a positive correlation with dose. There was no difference in the protein expression of γ-H2AX between 30 day and 60 day groups, which may help to explain the damage to PBL. In conclusion, PBL damage increased with cumulative dose, suggesting that γ-H2AX, but neither Ku70 nor Ku80, plays an important role in PBL impairment induced by LDCR.

  2. Sensitive Visual Detection of AHPND Bacteria Using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles as Probes

    PubMed Central

    Arunrut, Narong; Kampeera, Jantana; Sirithammajak, Sarawut; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Proespraiwong, Porranee; Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a component cause of early mortality syndrome (EMS) of shrimp. In 2013, the causative agent was found to be unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND) that contained a 69 kbp plasmid (pAP1) carrying binary Pir-like toxin genes PirvpA and PirvpB. In Thailand, AHPND was first recognized in 2012, prior to knowledge of the causative agent, and it subsequently led to a precipitous drop in shrimp production. After VPAHPND was characterized, a major focus of the AHPND control strategy was to monitor broodstock shrimp and post larvae for freedom from VPAHPND by nucleic acid amplification methods, most of which required use of expensive and sophisticated equipment not readily available in a shrimp farm setting. Here, we describe a simpler but equally sensitive approach for detection of VPAHPND based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) combined with unaided visual reading of positive amplification products using a DNA-functionalized, ssDNA-labled nanogold probe (AuNP). The target for the special set of six LAMP primers used was the VPAHPND PirvpA gene. The LAMP reaction was carried out at 65°C for 45 min followed by addition of the red AuNP solution and further incubation at 65°C for 5 min, allowing any PirvpA gene amplicons present to hybridize with the probe. Hybridization protected the AuNP against aggregation, so that the solution color remained red upon subsequent salt addition (positive test result) while unprotected AuNP aggregated and underwent a color change from red to blue and eventually precipitated (negative result). The total assay time was approximately 50 min. The detection limit (100 CFU) was comparable to that of other commonly-used methods for nested PCR detection of VPAHPND and 100-times more sensitive than 1-step PCR detection methods (104 CFU) that used amplicon detection by electrophoresis or spectrophotometry. There was no cross reaction with DNA templates derived from non

  3. Sensitive Visual Detection of AHPND Bacteria Using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles as Probes.

    PubMed

    Arunrut, Narong; Kampeera, Jantana; Sirithammajak, Sarawut; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Proespraiwong, Porranee; Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a component cause of early mortality syndrome (EMS) of shrimp. In 2013, the causative agent was found to be unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND) that contained a 69 kbp plasmid (pAP1) carrying binary Pir-like toxin genes PirvpA and PirvpB. In Thailand, AHPND was first recognized in 2012, prior to knowledge of the causative agent, and it subsequently led to a precipitous drop in shrimp production. After VPAHPND was characterized, a major focus of the AHPND control strategy was to monitor broodstock shrimp and post larvae for freedom from VPAHPND by nucleic acid amplification methods, most of which required use of expensive and sophisticated equipment not readily available in a shrimp farm setting. Here, we describe a simpler but equally sensitive approach for detection of VPAHPND based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) combined with unaided visual reading of positive amplification products using a DNA-functionalized, ssDNA-labled nanogold probe (AuNP). The target for the special set of six LAMP primers used was the VPAHPND PirvpA gene. The LAMP reaction was carried out at 65°C for 45 min followed by addition of the red AuNP solution and further incubation at 65°C for 5 min, allowing any PirvpA gene amplicons present to hybridize with the probe. Hybridization protected the AuNP against aggregation, so that the solution color remained red upon subsequent salt addition (positive test result) while unprotected AuNP aggregated and underwent a color change from red to blue and eventually precipitated (negative result). The total assay time was approximately 50 min. The detection limit (100 CFU) was comparable to that of other commonly-used methods for nested PCR detection of VPAHPND and 100-times more sensitive than 1-step PCR detection methods (104 CFU) that used amplicon detection by electrophoresis or spectrophotometry. There was no cross reaction with DNA templates derived from non

  4. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates

    PubMed Central

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10–90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content. PMID:27271574

  5. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    PubMed

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  6. Patent Pools: Intellectual Property Rights and Competition

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major players to form a cartel that excludes new competitors. For all the above reasons, patent pools are subject to regulatory clearance because they could result in a monopoly. The aim of this article is to present the relationship between patents and competition in a broad context. PMID:20200607

  7. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  8. Microbiological analysis in three diverse natural geothermal bathing pools in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Thorolfsdottir, Berglind Osk Th; Marteinsson, Viggo Thor

    2013-03-14

    Natural thermal bathing pools contain geothermal water that is very popular to bathe in but the water is not sterilized, irradiated or treated in any way. Increasing tourism in Iceland will lead to increasing numbers of bath guests, which can in turn affect the microbial flora in the pools and therefore user safety. Today, there is no legislation that applies to natural geothermal pools in Iceland, as the water is not used for consumption and the pools are not defined as public swimming pools. In this study, we conducted a microbiological analysis on three popular but different natural pools in Iceland, located at Lýsuhóll, Hveravellir and Landmannalaugar. Total bacterial counts were performed by flow cytometry, and with plate count at 22 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C. The presence of viable coliforms, Enterococcus spp. and pseudomonads were investigated by growth experiments on selective media. All samples were screened for noroviruses by real time PCR. The results indicate higher fecal contamination in the geothermal pools where the geothermal water flow was low and bathing guest count was high during the day. The number of cultivated Pseudomonas spp. was high (13,000-40,000 cfu/100 mL) in the natural pools, and several strains were isolated and classified as opportunistic pathogens. Norovirus was not detected in the three pools. DNA was extracted from one-liter samples in each pool and analyzed by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed different microbial communities between the pools and they were primarily composed of alpha-, beta- and gammaproteobacteria.

  9. Microbiological Analysis in Three Diverse Natural Geothermal Bathing Pools in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Thorolfsdottir, Berglind Osk Th.; Marteinsson, Viggo Thor

    2013-01-01

    Natural thermal bathing pools contain geothermal water that is very popular to bathe in but the water is not sterilized, irradiated or treated in any way. Increasing tourism in Iceland will lead to increasing numbers of bath guests, which can in turn affect the microbial flora in the pools and therefore user safety. Today, there is no legislation that applies to natural geothermal pools in Iceland, as the water is not used for consumption and the pools are not defined as public swimming pools. In this study, we conducted a microbiological analysis on three popular but different natural pools in Iceland, located at Lýsuhóll, Hveravellir and Landmannalaugar. Total bacterial counts were performed by flow cytometry, and with plate count at 22 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C. The presence of viable coliforms, Enterococcus spp. and pseudomonads were investigated by growth experiments on selective media. All samples were screened for noroviruses by real time PCR. The results indicate higher fecal contamination in the geothermal pools where the geothermal water flow was low and bathing guest count was high during the day. The number of cultivated Pseudomonas spp. was high (13,000–40,000 cfu/100 mL) in the natural pools, and several strains were isolated and classified as opportunistic pathogens. Norovirus was not detected in the three pools. DNA was extracted from one-liter samples in each pool and analyzed by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed different microbial communities between the pools and they were primarily composed of alpha-, beta- and gammaproteobacteria. PMID:23493033

  10. The Transportable Auxin Pool 1

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, R. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1970-01-01

    Evidences from experiments with stem sections of sunflower seedlings suggest that the transport of auxin may be limited by a restricted pool size of transportable auxin and restrictions in the availability of transport sites. A steady state of transport is observed over a range of lengths of stem sections, and over a wide range of auxin contents. The capacity of the sections to transport a pulse of auxin declines with aging after cutting, 50% decline occurring at about 10+ hours; the transportability of a pulse of auxin declines rapidly after the completion of uptake, 50% decline occurring at about 1 hour. A chase treatment with unlabeled auxin does not alter transport, but a pretreatment with auxin depressed subsequent transport for about 1 hour. In depleted tissues such pretreatment is not inhibitory but rather is promotive of transport. The interpretation offered is that transport is limited by the pool size and transport sites, and roles for these factors are suggested in relation to the auxin transport gradient and the tropistic responses. PMID:16657273

  11. Deciphering transcriptional networks that govern Coffea arabica seed development using combined cDNA array and real-time RT-PCR approaches.

    PubMed

    Salmona, Jordi; Dussert, Stéphane; Descroix, Frédéric; de Kochko, Alexandre; Bertrand, Benoît; Joët, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Due to its economic importance, Coffea arabica is becoming the subject of increasing genomic research and, in particular, the genes involved in the final chemical composition of the bean and the sensorial quality of the coffee beverage. The aim of the present study was to decipher the transcriptional networks that govern the development of the C. arabica seed, a model for non-orthodox albuminous seeds of tropical origin. For this purpose, we developed a transcriptomic approach combining two techniques: targeted cDNA arrays, containing 266 selected candidate gene sequences, and real-time RT-PCR on a large subset of 111 genes. The combination of the two techniques allowed us to limit detection of false positives and to reveal the advantages of using large real-time RT-PCR screening. Multivariate analysis was conducted on both datasets and results were broadly convergent. First, principle component analysis (PCA) revealed a dramatic re-programming of the transcriptional machinery between early cell division and elongation, storage and maturation phases. Second, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) led to the identification of 11 distinct patterns of gene expression during seed development as well as to the detection of genes expressed at specific developmental stages that can be used as functional markers of phenological changes. In addition, this study led to the description of gene expression profiles for quality-related genes, most of them formerly uncharacterised in Coffea. Their involvement in storage compound synthesis and accumulation during endosperm development and final metabolic re-adjustments during maturation is discussed. PMID:18026845

  12. Superior Protective Immunity against Murine Listeriosis by Combined Vaccination with CpG DNA and Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Christina; Panthel, Klaus; Jellbauer, Stefan; Köhn, Brigitte; Roider, Elisabeth; Partilla, Miriam; Heesemann, Jürgen; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Rüssmann, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Preexisting antivector immunity can severely compromise the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium live vaccines to induce protective CD8 T-cell frequencies after type III secretion system-mediated heterologous protein translocation in orally immunized mice. To circumvent this problem, we injected CpG DNA admixed to the immunodominant p60217-225 peptide from Listeria monocytogenes subcutaneously into BALB/c mice and coadministered a p60-translocating Salmonella strain by the orogastric route. The distribution of tetramer-positive p60217-225-specific effector and memory CD8 T cells was analyzed by costaining of lymphocytes with CD62L and CD127. In contrast to the single oral application of recombinant Salmonella or single immunization with CpG and p60, in the spleens from mice immunized with a combination of both vaccine types a significantly higher level of p60-specific CD8 T cells with a predominance of the effector memory T-cell subset was detected. In vivo protection studies revealed that this CD8 T-cell population conferred sterile protective immunity against a lethal infection with L. monocytogenes. However, p60-specific central memory CD8 T cells induced by single vaccination with CpG and p60 were not able confer effective protection against rapidly replicating intracellular Listeria. In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence that the combination of Salmonella type III-mediated antigen delivery and CpG immunization is an attractive novel vaccination strategy to modulate CD8 differentiation patterns toward distinct antigen-specific T-cell subsets with favorable protective capacities. PMID:19797070

  13. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression analysis of cDNA encoding metalloprotein II (MP II) induced by single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) in polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazuo; Zhou, Yibing; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Na; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-11-01

    We amplified and analyzed the complete cDNA of metalloprotein II (MP II) from the somatic muscle of the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, the full length cDNA is 904 bp encoding 119 amino acids. The MP II cDNA sequence was subjected to BLAST searching in NCBI and was found to share high homology with hemerythrin of other worms. MP II expression of P. aibuhitensis exposed to single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) was analyzed using real time-PCR. MP II mRNA expression increased at the start of Cu(II) exposure, then decreased and finally return to the normal level. Expression pattern of MP II under Cd(II) exposure was time- and dose-dependent. MP II expression induced by a combination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) was similar to that induced by Cd(II) alone.

  14. Antisense vimentin cDNA combined with chondroitinase ABC promotes axon regeneration and functional recovery following spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongzhi; Yan, Yi; Xia, Haijian; Zhao, Tianzhi; Chu, Weihua; Hu, Shengli; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiangkai

    2015-03-17

    The formation of glial scar restricts axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult mammalian. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are mostly secreted by reactive astrocytes, which form dense scar tissues after SCI. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), which can digest CSPGs, is a promising therapeutic strategy for SCI. However, to date ChABC has exhibited only limited success in the treatment of chronic SCI. The intermediate filament protein vimentin underpins the cytoskeleton of reactive astrocytes. We targeted glial scar in injured spinal cord by sustained infusion of ChABC and antisense vimentin cDNA. Using anterograde tracing, BBB scoring and hind limb placing response, we found that this combined treatment promoted axon regeneration and functional recovery after SCI in rats. Our results indicate that axon regeneration may be promoted by modified physical and biochemical characteristics of intra- and extracellular architecture in glial scar tissues. Theses findings could potentially help us to understand better the composition of glial scar in central nervous system injury.

  15. Allele frequencies of combined DNA index system (CODIS) and non-CODIS short tandem repeat loci in Goiás, Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodovalho, R G; Santos, G S; Cavalcanti, L M; Moura, B F S M; Rodrigues, E L; Lima, P R; Gigonzac, M A D; Vieira, T C

    2015-07-03

    In studies of human identification, obtaining a high standard of outcomes and satisfactory conclusions are directly related to the use of highly polymorphic molecular markers. In addition to the combined DNA index system (CODIS) group, it is also important to implement non-CODIS markers into the analysis, as they increase the power of discrimination. During the identification process, it is essential to consider the genetic variation among distinct groups of populations, as the allele frequencies are directly associated with the power of discrimination. However, the population of Goiás, a State located in Central Brazil, is characterized by a highly mixed population due to its diverse ethnic origins. In this study, a survey of the allelic frequencies in the Goiás population was carried out using a molecular assembly composed of 21 autosomal loci both from and external to the CODIS group. The new data, for some of the markers used, were statistically similar to those from previous studies. This consistency means that the use of these markers might serve as a parameter for future population comparisons. The results from these analyses further our knowledge of the study of human identification.

  16. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. PMID:27123586

  17. Metformin synergizes 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) combination therapy through impairing intracellular ATP production and DNA repair in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jaslyn Sian-Siu; Ng, Char-Hong; Tan, Si Hoey; Malik, Rozita Abdul; Teh, Yew-Ching; Tan, Boon-Shing; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; See, Mee-Hoong; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Yip, Cheng-Har; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Hii, Ling-Wei; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2015-10-01

    Metformin, an AMPK activator, has been reported to improve pathological response to chemotherapy in diabetic breast cancer patients. To date, its mechanism of action in cancer, especially in cancer stem cells (CSCs) have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin, but not other AMPK activators (e.g. AICAR and A-769662), synergizes 5-fluouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) combination chemotherapy in non-stem breast cancer cells and breast cancer stem cells. We show that this occurs through an AMPK-dependent mechanism in parental breast cancer cell lines. In contrast, the synergistic effects of metformin and FEC occurred in an AMPK-independent mechanism in breast CSCs. Further analyses revealed that metformin accelerated glucose consumption and lactate production more severely in the breast CSCs but the production of intracellular ATP was severely hampered, leading to a severe energy crisis and impairs the ability of CSCs to repair FEC-induced DNA damage. Indeed, addition of extracellular ATP completely abrogated the synergistic effects of metformin on FEC sensitivity in breast CSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that metformin synergizes FEC sensitivity through distinct mechanism in parental breast cancer cell lines and CSCs, thus providing further evidence for the clinical relevance of metformin for the treatment of cancers. PMID:26276035

  18. 1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE POOL BUILDING 307 AND THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE POOL BUILDING 307 AND THE POOL 308, LOOKING WEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Pool Building & Swimming Pool, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  19. Combination of electron microscopic in situ hybridization and anti-DNA antibody labelling reveals a peculiar arrangement of ribosomal DNA in the fibrillar centres of the plant cell nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Sato, Seiichi

    2002-01-01

    The fibrillar centres (FCs) in the nucleoli of Allium cepa usually contained compact dense chromatin, which was always surrounded with light fibrous material (LFM). Distribution of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in the FCs was examined by in situ hybridization at the light and electron microscopic levels and the results were compared with those obtained by immunogold labelling with anti-DNA antibodies. Anti-DNA antibodies heavily labelled the dense chromatin of the FCs but scarcely labelled the LFM. However, electron microscopic in situ hybridization using the 18S rDNA probe showed that the label in the dense chromatin was extremely weak compared with that obtained by the anti-DNA antibody labelling: the specific label with anti-DNA antibodies of the dense chromatin was about 15 times as much as that of the LFM, whereas the specific label with in situ hybridization in the dense chromatin was only about 1.7 times higher than in the LFM. These results suggest that the rDNA encoding rRNA is preferentially released from the dense chromatin and that non-transcribed intergenic spacers remain in the dense chromatin as the anchoring sites of rDNA. PMID:12227553

  20. Monitoring of four DNA extraction methods upstream of high-throughput sequencing of Anisakidae nematodes.

    PubMed

    Seesao, Y; Audebert, C; Verrez-Bagnis, V; Merlin, S; Jérôme, M; Viscogliosi, E; Dei-Cas, E; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Gay, M

    2014-07-01

    Different methods were evaluated to extract DNA from pooled nematodes belonging to Anisakis, Contracaecum, Pseudoterranova and Hysterothylacium genera isolated from edible fish. Pooled DNA extraction is the first and compulsory step to allow the identification of a large number of samples through high-throughput DNA sequencing with drastic time and cost reductions. PMID:24845469

  1. Drowning in disinfection byproducts? Assessing swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Zwiener, Christian; Richardson, Susan D; DeMarini, David M; De Marini, David M; Grummt, Tamara; Glauner, Thomas; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2007-01-15

    Disinfection is mandatory for swimming pools: public pools are usually disinfected by gaseous chlorine or sodium hypochlorite and cartridge filters; home pools typically use stabilized chlorine. These methods produce a variety of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), such as trihalomethanes (THMs), which are regulated carcinogenic DBPs in drinking water that have been detected in the blood and breath of swimmers and of nonswimmers at indoor pools. Also produced are halogenated acetic acids (HAAs) and haloketones, which irritate the eyes, skin, and mucous membranes; trichloramine, which is linked with swimming-pool-associated asthma; and halogenated derivatives of UV sun screens, some of which show endocrine effects. Precursors of DBPs include human body substances, chemicals used in cosmetics and sun screens, and natural organic matter. Analytical research has focused also on the identification of an additional portion of unknown DBPs using gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)/MS/MS with derivatization. Children swimmers have an increased risk of developing asthma and infections of the respiratory tract and ear. A 1.6-2.0-fold increased risk for bladder cancer has been associated with swimming or showering/bathing with chlorinated water. Bladder cancer risk from THM exposure (all routes combined) was greatest among those with the GSTT1-1 gene. This suggests a mechanism involving distribution of THMs to the bladder by dermal/inhalation exposure and activation there by GSTT1-1 to mutagens. DBPs may be reduced by engineering and behavioral means, such as applying new oxidation and filtration methods, reducing bromide and iodide in the source water, increasing air circulation in indoor pools, and assuring the cleanliness of swimmers. The positive health effects gained by swimming can be increased by reducing the potential adverse health risks. PMID:17310693

  2. 13 CFR 120.1709 - Transfers of Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... transfer. The Pool Investor must supply the following information in the letter: (1) Pool number; (2) Pool... recovery. At the same time a Pool Investor submits a letter of transmittal for a Pool Certificate pursuant... will supply the transfer information to the Pool Investor....

  3. Radioisotope Power System Pool Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusick, Jeffrey J.; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for NASA deep space science missions have historically used static thermoelectric-based designs because they are highly reliable, and their radioisotope heat sources can be passively cooled throughout the mission life cycle. Recently, a significant effort to develop a dynamic RPS, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), was conducted by NASA and the Department of Energy, because Stirling based designs offer energy conversion efficiencies four times higher than heritage thermoelectric designs; and the efficiency would proportionately reduce the amount of radioisotope fuel needed for the same power output. However, the long term reliability of a Stirling based design is a concern compared to thermoelectric designs, because for certain Stirling system architectures the radioisotope heat sources must be actively cooled via the dynamic operation of Stirling converters throughout the mission life cycle. To address this reliability concern, a new dynamic Stirling cycle RPS architecture is proposed called the RPS Pool Concept.

  4. A novel quantitative assay of mitophagy: Combining high content fluorescence microscopy and mitochondrial DNA load to quantify mitophagy and identify novel pharmacological tools against pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Diot, Alan; Hinks-Roberts, Alex; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Dombi, Eszter; Morten, Karl; Brady, Stefen; Fratter, Carl; Carver, Janet; Muir, Rebecca; Davis, Ryan; Green, Charlotte J; Johnston, Iain; Hilton-Jones, David; Sue, Carolyn; Mortiboys, Heather; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular mechanism for the recycling of mitochondrial fragments. This process is able to improve mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quality in heteroplasmic mtDNA disease, in which mutant mtDNA co-exists with normal mtDNA. In disorders where the load of mutant mtDNA determines disease severity it is likely to be an important determinant of disease progression. Measuring mitophagy is technically demanding. We used pharmacological modulators of autophagy to validate two techniques for quantifying mitophagy. First we used the IN Cell 1000 analyzer to quantify mitochondrial co-localisation with LC3-II positive autophagosomes. Unlike conventional fluorescence and electron microscopy, this high-throughput system is sufficiently sensitive to detect transient low frequency autophagosomes. Secondly, because mitophagy preferentially removes pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutants, we developed a heteroplasmy assay based on loss of m.3243A>G mtDNA, during culture conditions requiring oxidative metabolism ("energetic stress"). The effects of the pharmacological modulators on these two measures were consistent, confirming that the high throughput imaging output (autophagosomes co-localising with mitochondria) reflects mitochondrial quality control. To further validate these methods, we performed a more detailed study using metformin, the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug that is still sometimes used in Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness (MIDD). This confirmed our initial findings and revealed that metformin inhibits mitophagy at clinically relevant concentrations, suggesting that it may have novel therapeutic uses. PMID:26196248

  5. Heat transfer from internally heated hemispherical pools

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Ellsion, P.G.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on heat transfer from internally heated ZnSO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O pools to the walls of hemispherical containers. This experimental technique provides data for a heat transfer system that has to date been only theoretically treated. Three different sizes of copper hemispherical containers were used: 240, 280, 320 mm in diameter. The pool container served both as a heat transfer surface and as an electrode. The opposing electrode was a copper disk, 50 mm in diameter located at the top of the pool in the center. The top surface of the pool was open to the atmosphere.

  6. Identification of human DNA in forensic evidence by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a colorimetric gold nanoparticle hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Watthanapanpituck, Khanistha; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Chu, Eric; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2014-11-01

    A DNA test based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric gold nanoparticle (AuNP) hybridization probe to detect the presence of human DNA in forensic evidence was developed. The LAMP primer set targeted eight regions of the human cytochrome b, and its specificity was verified against the DNA of 11 animal species, which included animals closely related to humans, such as chimpanzee and orangutan. By using the AuNP probe, sequence-specific LAMP product could be detected and the test result could be visualized through the change in color. The limit of detection was demonstrated with reproducibility to be as low as 718 fg of genomic DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 100 plasmid DNA copies containing the cytochrome b DNA target region. A simple DNA extraction method for the commonly found forensic biological samples was also devised to streamline the test process. This LAMP-AuNP human DNA test showed to be a robust, specific, and cost-effective tool for the forensic identification of human specimens without requiring sophisticated laboratory instruments.

  7. A new species of Harpacticella Sars, 1908 (Copepoda, Harpacticoida), from a tidal pool on Jeju Island, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghan; Kim, Kichoon; Lee, Wonchoel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Harpacticella Sars, 1908 is described from a tidal pool on Jeju Island, Korea. Harpacticella jejuensis sp. n. is closely related to Harpacticella itoi Chang & Kim, 1991, with regard to the structure of P1 exp-1 and enp-1, the length of P1 exp-1 and exp-2, and the setal number of the P5 exopod in males. However, the new species is clearly distinguishable from Harpacticella itoi by the combined following characters: six setae on the P5 exopod in females, one naked seta on the inner margin of P1 exp-2, the short endopod of P1 compared to the exopod, and a naked long seta on the proximal inner margin of the P5 exopod of males. The mtCOI partial sequence is provided as a DNA barcode for the new species. PMID:25349505

  8. Combining pseudo dinucleotide composition with the Z curve method to improve the accuracy of predicting DNA elements: a case study in recombination spots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chuan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Hua, Hong-Li; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Labena, Abraham Alemayehu; Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2016-08-16

    Pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC) and Z curve showed excellent performance in the classification issues of nucleotide sequences in bioinformatics. Inspired by the principle of Z curve theory, we improved PseDNC to give the phase-specific PseDNC (psPseDNC). In this study, we used the prediction of recombination spots as a case to illustrate the capability of psPseDNC and also PseDNC fused with Z curve theory based on a novel machine learning method named large margin distribution machine (LDM). We verified that combining the two widely used approaches could generate better performance compared to only using PseDNC with a support vector machine based (SVM-based) model. The best Mathew's correlation coefficient (MCC) achieved by our LDM-based model was 0.7037 through the rigorous jackknife test and improved by ∼6.6%, ∼3.2%, and ∼2.4% compared with three previous studies. Similarly, the accuracy was improved by 3.2% compared with our previous iRSpot-PseDNC web server through an independent data test. These results demonstrate that the joint use of PseDNC and Z curve enhances performance and can extract more information from a biological sequence. To facilitate research in this area, we constructed a user-friendly web server for predicting hot/cold spots, HcsPredictor, which can be freely accessed from . In summary, we provided a united algorithm by integrating Z curve with PseDNC. We hope this united algorithm could be extended to other classification issues in DNA elements.

  9. Combined effects of DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3A polymorphisms and urinary total arsenic levels on the risk for clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Mei; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Hsieh, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Wei-Jen; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2016-08-15

    Our previous study showed that high urinary total arsenic levels were associated with higher odds ratio (OR) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) might influence DNMT enzyme activity associated with tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the association of five SNPs from DNMT1 (rs8101626 and rs2228611), DNMT3A (rs34048824 and rs1550117), and DNMT3B (rs1569686) with the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We also examined the combined effects of DNMT genotypes and urinary arsenic levels on ccRCC risk. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study, which included 293 subjects with ccRCC and 293 age- and gender-matched controls. The urinary arsenic species were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotypes were investigated using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. We observed that the DNMT1 rs8101626 G/G genotype was significantly associated with reduced odds ratio (OR) of ccRCC [OR=0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.99]. Subjects with concurrent DNMT1 rs8101626 A/A+A/G and DNMT3A rs34048824 T/T+T/C genotypes had significantly higher OR for ccRCC [OR=2.88, 95% CI 1.44-5.77]. Participants with the high-risk genotype of DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 with concurrently high urinary total arsenic levels had even higher OR of ccRCC in a dose-response manner. This is the first study to evaluate variant DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 genotypes that modify the arsenic-related ccRCC risk in a geographic area without significant arsenic exposure in Taiwan. PMID:27292127

  10. Combining pseudo dinucleotide composition with the Z curve method to improve the accuracy of predicting DNA elements: a case study in recombination spots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chuan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Hua, Hong-Li; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Labena, Abraham Alemayehu; Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2016-08-16

    Pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC) and Z curve showed excellent performance in the classification issues of nucleotide sequences in bioinformatics. Inspired by the principle of Z curve theory, we improved PseDNC to give the phase-specific PseDNC (psPseDNC). In this study, we used the prediction of recombination spots as a case to illustrate the capability of psPseDNC and also PseDNC fused with Z curve theory based on a novel machine learning method named large margin distribution machine (LDM). We verified that combining the two widely used approaches could generate better performance compared to only using PseDNC with a support vector machine based (SVM-based) model. The best Mathew's correlation coefficient (MCC) achieved by our LDM-based model was 0.7037 through the rigorous jackknife test and improved by ∼6.6%, ∼3.2%, and ∼2.4% compared with three previous studies. Similarly, the accuracy was improved by 3.2% compared with our previous iRSpot-PseDNC web server through an independent data test. These results demonstrate that the joint use of PseDNC and Z curve enhances performance and can extract more information from a biological sequence. To facilitate research in this area, we constructed a user-friendly web server for predicting hot/cold spots, HcsPredictor, which can be freely accessed from . In summary, we provided a united algorithm by integrating Z curve with PseDNC. We hope this united algorithm could be extended to other classification issues in DNA elements. PMID:27410247

  11. A NOVEL APPROACH TO SPENT FUEL POOL DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Demmer

    2011-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been at the forefront of developing methods to reduce the cost and schedule of deactivating spent fuel pools (SFP). Several pools have been deactivated at the INL using an underwater approach with divers. These projects provided a basis for the INL cooperation with the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 SFP (Exelon Generation Company) deactivation. It represents the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating process. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and allowing safer, more cost effective deactivation. The INL pioneered underwater coating process was used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by INL and Exelon to decommission SFPs using the underwater coating process. The rationale used to select the underwater coating process and the advantages and disadvantages are described. Special circumstances are also discussed, such as the use of a remotely-operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible. A larger project, the INTEC-603 SFP in-situ (grouting) deactivation, is reviewed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are discussed and a Lessons Learned evaluation is included.

  12. Experimental characterization of the weld pool flow in a TIG configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, M.; Masquère, M.; Freton, P.; Franceries, X.; Gonzalez, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process relies on heat transfer between plasma and work piece leading to a metallic weld pool. Combination of different forces produces movements on the molten pool surface. One of our aims is to determine the velocity on the weld pool surface. This provides a set of data that leads to a deeper comprehension of the flow behavior and allows us to validate numerical models used to study TIG parameters. In this paper, two diagnostic methods developed with high speed imaging for the determination of velocity of an AISI 304L stainless steel molten pool are presented. Application of the two methods to a metallic weld pool under helium with a current intensity of 100 A provides velocity values around 0.70 m/s which are in good agreement with literature works.

  13. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced.

  14. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced. PMID:27322762

  15. Titration of varicella-zoster virus DNA in throat swabs from varicella patients by combined use of PCR and microplate hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hondo, R; Ito, S; Inouye, S

    1995-01-01

    We devised a simple procedure for titration of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA in throat swabs from varicella patients. DNA which was extracted from throat swabs, together with known copy numbers of a cloned VZV DNA fragment, were 10-fold serially diluted and used as template in PCR. The PCR products, after heat denaturation, again serially diluted in 1.5 M NaCl and adsorbed to microplate wells. Then, biotin-labeled DNA probes were hybridized with the immobilized DNA. The hybridization signal was produced by streptavidin-conjugated beta-galactosidase and a fluorogenic enzyme substrate. By comparing the titration curves of a clinical specimen with those of the cloned fragment, of which detection limit was about 10 copies, we estimated the copy numbers of VZV DNA in the specimen. With this technique, we evaluated the degree of potential contagiousness of the patient along the course of infection: we found that varicella patients possessed highest quantity of VZV DNA in the throat on the first day of illness.

  16. Virtual manipulation of topography to test potential pool-riffle maintenance mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, numerical experimentation with two-dimensional hydraulic modeling of pool-riffle river topography drawing on the testbed data from the classic Keller (1971) study was used to investigate the effect of synthetically manipulating topography on the occurrence and magnitude of velocity and Shields stress reversals in a pool-riffle sequence. Reversals in velocity and shear stress have been used to explore mechanisms of pool-riffle maintenance, while Shields stress (a combined measure of transport capacity and substrate erodibility) is emerging in importance. The original site topography was modeled alongside six altered ones to evaluate the sensitivity of hydraulic reversals to subtle morphology - five incrementally wider pools and a filled pool. The Caamaño (2009) criterion, a simplified geometric threshold for predicting velocity reversals, was applied to each terrain to evaluate its utility. The original pool-riffle topography was just over the threshold for a velocity reversal and well over the threshold for a strong Shields stress reversal. Overall, pool widening caused a predominantly local response, with change to pool hydraulics and no change in section-averaged velocity in the riffle beyond the initial widening of 10%. Filling in the pool significantly increased the magnitude of reversals, whereas expanding it eliminated the occurrence of a reversal in mean velocity, though the Shields stress reversal persisted because of strong differentiation in bed material texture. Using Shields stress as a reversal parameter enabled the quantification of pool modification effects on pool-riffle resiliency. The Caamaño (2009) criterion accurately predicted reversal occurrence for the altered terrains with exaggerated effects, but failed to predict the weak reversal for the original topography. Two-dimensional modeling coupled with previously accepted hydrologic, geomorphic, and engineering analyses is vital in project design and evaluation prior to

  17. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5...

  18. A Training Program for Swimming Pool Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, James R., Jr.; Mihalik, Brian J.

    1985-01-01

    In the United States today, there is a dramatic shortage of qualified public swimming pool operators. This article describes a training program initiated in South Carolina to serve the needs of everyone responsible for and involved in the safe operation and management of a public swimming pool. (MT)

  19. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... types of salt water pools shall be so operated that complete circulation and replacement of the water in... equipped so as to provide complete circulation, replacement, and filtration of the water in the pool every six hours or less. Suitable means of chlorination and, if necessary, other treatment of the...

  20. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5...

  1. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... types of salt water pools shall be so operated that complete circulation and replacement of the water in... equipped so as to provide complete circulation, replacement, and filtration of the water in the pool every six hours or less. Suitable means of chlorination and, if necessary, other treatment of the...

  2. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... types of salt water pools shall be so operated that complete circulation and replacement of the water in... equipped so as to provide complete circulation, replacement, and filtration of the water in the pool every six hours or less. Suitable means of chlorination and, if necessary, other treatment of the...

  3. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... types of salt water pools shall be so operated that complete circulation and replacement of the water in... equipped so as to provide complete circulation, replacement, and filtration of the water in the pool every six hours or less. Suitable means of chlorination and, if necessary, other treatment of the...

  4. The Chemistry of Swimming Pool Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Carl; Langhus, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The study of chemistry involved in the maintenance of a swimming pool provides a lot of chemical education to the students, including the demonstration of the importance of pH in water chemistry. The various chemical aspects hidden in the maintenance of the pool are being described.

  5. National decline in invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures in association with uptake of combined first trimester and cell-free DNA aneuploidy screening.

    PubMed

    Robson, Stephen J; Hui, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    In late 2012, a new screening test for fetal aneuploidy based on circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) became available to Australian women. The introduction of this technology in the United States has led to a reduction in invasive diagnostic procedures. Analysis of the number of amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS) procedures performed in Australia from 1994 to 2014 shows that the introduction of cfDNA testing has been associated with the most rapid decline in invasive procedures in the last 20 years. This change has important implications for training in, and maintenance of, the procedural skills of amniocentesis and CVS. PMID:26259499

  6. National decline in invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures in association with uptake of combined first trimester and cell-free DNA aneuploidy screening.

    PubMed

    Robson, Stephen J; Hui, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    In late 2012, a new screening test for fetal aneuploidy based on circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) became available to Australian women. The introduction of this technology in the United States has led to a reduction in invasive diagnostic procedures. Analysis of the number of amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS) procedures performed in Australia from 1994 to 2014 shows that the introduction of cfDNA testing has been associated with the most rapid decline in invasive procedures in the last 20 years. This change has important implications for training in, and maintenance of, the procedural skills of amniocentesis and CVS.

  7. A Biosignature Suite from Cave Pool Precipitates, Cottonwood Cave, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melim, L. A.; Liescheidt, R.; Northup, D. E.; Spilde, M. N.; Boston, P. J.; Queen, J. M.

    2009-11-01

    Calcite cave pool precipitates often display a variety of potential biosignatures from the macroscopic to the submicroscopic. A fossil cave pool in Cottonwood Cave, New Mexico, exhibits older stalactites and stalagmites that are completely coated in brown, laminated calcitic crust that extends down as pool fingers and u-loops. The pool fingers and u-loops are mainly micrite to clotted micrite, some recrystallized to microspar, with some isopachous spar layers. Micrite, particularly clotted micrite, is usually interpreted by carbonate workers as microbial in origin. Scanning electron microscopy examination of etched pool fingers, u-loops, and the brown crust revealed abundant calcified microbial filaments and biofilm. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed that these features have excess carbon, above that found in pure calcite. Independent carbon analysis indicated that these same samples contain up to 0.2% organic carbon. Since pool fingers hang down but form underwater, we hypothesize they are biogenic with hanging microbial filaments or biofilm acting as nuclei for calcite precipitation. Because of the abundance of micrite and fossil filaments, we further hypothesize that these pendant features formed during a period of plentiful nutrients and active hydrological activity when the pool was literally dripping with microbial slime. Although each of these lines of evidence could be interpreted in other ways, their combined weight strongly suggests the cave pool precipitates in Cottonwood Cave are biogenic. These investigations can be used to help inform extraterrestrial life-detection studies.

  8. A biosignature suite from cave pool precipitates, Cottonwood Cave, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Melim, L A; Liescheidt, R; Northup, D E; Spilde, M N; Boston, P J; Queen, J M

    2009-11-01

    Calcite cave pool precipitates often display a variety of potential biosignatures from the macroscopic to the submicroscopic. A fossil cave pool in Cottonwood Cave, New Mexico, exhibits older stalactites and stalagmites that are completely coated in brown, laminated calcitic crust that extends down as pool fingers and u-loops. The pool fingers and u-loops are mainly micrite to clotted micrite, some recrystallized to microspar, with some isopachous spar layers. Micrite, particularly clotted micrite, is usually interpreted by carbonate workers as microbial in origin. Scanning electron microscopy examination of etched pool fingers, u-loops, and the brown crust revealed abundant calcified microbial filaments and biofilm. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed that these features have excess carbon, above that found in pure calcite. Independent carbon analysis indicated that these same samples contain up to 0.2% organic carbon. Since pool fingers hang down but form underwater, we hypothesize they are biogenic with hanging microbial filaments or biofilm acting as nuclei for calcite precipitation. Because of the abundance of micrite and fossil filaments, we further hypothesize that these pendant features formed during a period of plentiful nutrients and active hydrological activity when the pool was literally dripping with microbial slime. Although each of these lines of evidence could be interpreted in other ways, their combined weight strongly suggests the cave pool precipitates in Cottonwood Cave are biogenic. These investigations can be used to help inform extraterrestrial life-detection studies.

  9. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  10. Titration of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA in urine by combined use of PCR and microplate hybridization in a renal transplant patient with HCMV pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Meigata, K; Hondo, R; Fujima, A; Shinkai-Shibata, M; Itoh, S; Kikuchi, K; Ando, Y; Ichikawa, N; Nomura, Y; Watanabe, K; Degawa, H; Beck, Y; Tomikawa, S; Nagao, T; Uchida, H

    1996-06-01

    We titrated human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA in urine specimens obtained from 14 healthy individuals and a renal transplant patient with HCMV pneumonitis by modifying the method for titration of varicella-zoster virus DNA previously described (1,2). Of 14 HCMV seropositive healthy individuals, 13 had HCMV DNA under the detection limit of 10(2.0) copies/ml, whereas one person had 10(2.0) copies/ml. The viral DNA in urine samples was at a low level in healthy individuals with latent infection. In a case with HCMV pneumonitis after renal transplantation, the amount of HCMV DNA in urine gradually increased from the level under 10(2.0) copies/ml and reached a peak of 10(4.7) copies/ml one month prior to the manifestation of pneumonitis. It, thereafter, decreased with the course of clinical remission, and finally settled at under 10(2.0) copies/ml. Serial titrations of HCMV DNA in urine specimens proved to be useful in identifying recipients at risk of developing active HCMV infection after renal transplantation and as a guide for treatment of patients.

  11. Design report on SCDAP/RELAP5 model improvements - debris bed and molten pool behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, C.M.; Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.

    1994-11-01

    the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 computer code is designed to describe the overall reactor coolant system thermal-hydraulic response, core damage progression, and in combination with VICTORIA, fission product release and transport during severe accidents. Improvements for existing debris bed and molten pool models in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code are described in this report. Model improvements to address (a) debris bed formation, heating, and melting; (b) molten pool formation and growth; and (c) molten pool crust failure are discussed. Relevant data, existing models, proposed modeling changes, and the anticipated impact of the changes are discussed. Recommendations for the assessment of improved models are provided.

  12. poolMC: Smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Typically, pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments implies mixing mRNA from several biological-replicate samples before hybridization onto a microarray chip. Here we describe an alternative smart pooling strategy in which different samples, not necessarily biological replicates, are pooled in an information theoretic efficient way. Further, each sample is tested on multiple chips, but always in pools made up of different samples. The end goal is to exploit the compressibility of microarray data to reduce the number of chips used and increase the robustness to noise in measurements. Results A theoretical framework to perform smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments was established and the software implementation of the pooling and decoding algorithms was developed in MATLAB. A proof-of-concept smart pooled experiment was performed using validated biological samples on commercially available gene chips. Differential-expression analysis of the smart pooled data was performed and compared against the unpooled control experiment. Conclusions The theoretical developments and experimental demonstration in this paper provide a useful starting point to investigate smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments. Although the smart pooled experiment did not compare favorably with the control, the experiment highlighted important conditions for the successful implementation of smart pooling - linearity of measurements, sparsity in data, and large experiment size. PMID:20525223

  13. Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

  14. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool...

  15. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool...

  16. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool...

  17. 48 CFR 9.703 - Contracting with individual pool members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individual pool members. 9.703 Section 9.703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.703 Contracting with individual pool members. (a) Pool members may submit...

  18. 13 CFR 120.1709 - Transfers of Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfers of Pool Certificates... Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1709 Transfers of Pool Certificates. (a) Transfer of Pool Certificates. A Pool Certificate is transferable....

  19. 48 CFR 9.702 - Contracting with pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contracting with pools. 9... PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.702 Contracting with pools. (a) Except as specified in this subpart, a pool shall be treated the same as any...

  20. 48 CFR 9.703 - Contracting with individual pool members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... individual pool members. 9.703 Section 9.703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.703 Contracting with individual pool members. (a) Pool members may submit...

  1. 13 CFR 120.1709 - Transfers of Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfers of Pool Certificates... Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1709 Transfers of Pool Certificates. (a) Transfer of Pool Certificates. A Pool Certificate is transferable....

  2. 13 CFR 120.1709 - Transfers of Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfers of Pool Certificates... Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1709 Transfers of Pool Certificates. (a) Transfer of Pool Certificates. A Pool Certificate is transferable....

  3. 48 CFR 9.703 - Contracting with individual pool members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... individual pool members. 9.703 Section 9.703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.703 Contracting with individual pool members. (a) Pool members may submit...

  4. 48 CFR 9.702 - Contracting with pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contracting with pools. 9... PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.702 Contracting with pools. (a) Except as specified in this subpart, a pool shall be treated the same as any...

  5. 13 CFR 120.1709 - Transfers of Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfers of Pool Certificates... Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1709 Transfers of Pool Certificates. (a) Transfer of Pool Certificates. A Pool Certificate is transferable....

  6. 48 CFR 9.702 - Contracting with pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contracting with pools. 9... PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.702 Contracting with pools. (a) Except as specified in this subpart, a pool shall be treated the same as any...

  7. 48 CFR 9.703 - Contracting with individual pool members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individual pool members. 9.703 Section 9.703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.703 Contracting with individual pool members. (a) Pool members may submit...

  8. 48 CFR 9.702 - Contracting with pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contracting with pools. 9... PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.702 Contracting with pools. (a) Except as specified in this subpart, a pool shall be treated the same as any...

  9. Swimming Pools. A Guide to Their Planning, Design and Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrielsen, M. Alexander, Ed.

    Information is presented regarding all phases of swimming pool development and operation from earliest planning considerations to final programing. This comprehensive book covers--(1) the steps involved in planning a pool, (2) designing the pool, (3) water circulation, filtration, and treatment, (4) community pools, school and agency pools, and…

  10. 48 CFR 9.703 - Contracting with individual pool members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual pool members. 9.703 Section 9.703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.703 Contracting with individual pool members. (a) Pool members may submit...

  11. 48 CFR 9.702 - Contracting with pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contracting with pools. 9... PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Defense Production Pools and Research and Development Pools 9.702 Contracting with pools. (a) Except as specified in this subpart, a pool shall be treated the same as any...

  12. Optimum blending gives best pool octane

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.E.

    1986-01-20

    Optimum blending of gasoline components can increase the pool octane by 0.1 to 0.5 numbers. To achieve the optimum octane blending scheme, accurate octane blending values must be obtained. These blending values can be developed from an interaction blending study or from generalized predicted interaction coefficients. Many refiners are blending in a non-optimum fashion so that there are some cheap octanes available for the taking by simply changing to an optimum blending scheme. A study of 1984 gasoline compositions indicated that many refiners were blending in a non-optimum fashion and that ''pool octane'' could have been increased almost 0.5 octane. The term pool octane usually refers to the weighted average octane of all of the gasoline components. It can be calculated by multiplying the octane of each component by its fraction of the pool and adding the results. If the components are blended into two or more grades, a second pool octane could be calculated by multiplying the octane of each grade, before any lead antiknock addition, by its fraction of the total pool. The second pool octane will differ from the first because the components do not blend linearly. The octane of a 50:50 blend of two components may be higher or lower than the average of the octanes of the two components.

  13. Single and Combined Effects of Deoxynivalenol Mycotoxin and a Microbial Feed Additive on Lymphocyte DNA Damage and Oxidative Stress in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha A.; Ghareeb, Khaled; Dadak, Agnes; Hess, Michael; Böhm, Josef

    2014-01-01

    The immune and intestinal epithelial cells are particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON). The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of DON and/or a microbial feed additive on the DNA damage of blood lymphocytes and on the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in broilers. A total of forty 1-d-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments (10 birds per group) for 5 wk. The dietary treatments were 1) basal diet; 2) basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/kg feed; 3) basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/kg feed and supplemented with 2.5 kg/ton of feed of Mycofix Select; 4) basal diet supplemented with Mycofix Select (2.5 kg/ton of feed). At the end of the feeding trial, blood were collected for measuring the level of lymphocyte DNA damage of blood and the TBARS level was measured in plasma, heart, kidney, duodenum and jejunum. The dietary exposure of DON caused a significant increase (P = 0.001) of DNA damage in blood lymphocytes (31.99±0.89%) as indicated in the tail of comet assay. Interestingly addition of Mycofix Select to DON contaminated diet decreased (P = 0.001) the DNA damage (19.82±1.75%) induced by DON. In order to clarify the involvement of lipid peroxidation in the DNA damage of DON, TBARS levels was measured. A significant increase (P = 0.001) in the level of TBARS (23±2 nmol/mg) was observed in the jejunal tissue suggesting that the lipid peroxidation might be involved in the DNA damage. The results indicate that DON is cytotoxic and genotoxic to the chicken intestinal and immune cells and the feed additive have potential ability to prevent DNA damage induced by DON. PMID:24498242

  14. Distributed Technologies in a Data Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, K.; Conover, H.; Graves, S.; He, Y.; Regner, K.; Smith, M.

    2004-12-01

    A Data Pool is an on-line repository providing interactive and programmatic access to data products through a variety of services. The University of Alabama in Huntsville has developed and deployed such a Data Pool in conjunction with the DISCOVER project, a collaboration with NASA and Remote Sensing Systems. DISCOVER provides long-term ocean and climate data from a variety of passive microwave satellite instruments, including such products as sea-surface temperature and wind, air temperature, atmospheric water vapor, cloud water and rain rate. The Data Pool provides multiple methods to access and visualize these products, including conventional HTTP and FTP access, as well as data services that provide for enhanced usability and interoperability, such as GridFTP, OPeNDAP, OpenGIS-compliant web mapping and coverage services, and custom subsetting and packaging services. This paper will focus on the distributed service technologies used in the Data Pool, which spans heterogeneous machines at multiple locations. For example, in order to provide seamless access to data at multiple sites, the Data Pool provides catalog services for all data products at the various data server locations. Under development is an automated metadata generation tool that crawls the online data repositories regularly to dynamically update the Data Pool catalog with information about newly generated data files. For efficient handling of data orders across distributed repositories, the Data Pool also implements distributed data processing services on the file servers where the data resides. Ontologies are planned to support automated service chaining for custom user requests. The UAH Data Pool is based on a configurable technology framework that integrates distributed data services with a web interface and a set of centralized database services for catalogs and order tracking. While this instantiation of the Data Pool was implemented to meet the needs of the DISCOVER project, the framework was

  15. An Enhanced Synthetic Multiclade DNA Prime Induces Improved Cross-Clade-Reactive Functional Antibodies when Combined with an Adjuvanted Protein Boost in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Megan C.; Hutnick, Natalie A.; Pollara, Justin; Myles, Devin J. F.; Williams, Constance; Yan, Jian; LaBranche, Celia C.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Montefiori, David; Barnett, Susan W.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The search for an efficacious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine remains a pressing need. The moderate success of the RV144 Thai clinical vaccine trial suggested that vaccine-induced HIV-1-specific antibodies can reduce the risk of HIV-1 infection. We have made several improvements to the DNA platform and have previously shown that improved DNA vaccines alone are capable of inducing both binding and neutralizing antibodies in small-animal models. In this study, we explored how an improved DNA prime and recombinant protein boost would impact HIV-specific vaccine immunogenicity in rhesus macaques (RhM). After DNA immunization with either a single HIV Env consensus sequence or multiple constructs expressing HIV subtype-specific Env consensus sequences, we detected both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to all vaccine immunogens. These T-cell responses were further increased after protein boosting to levels exceeding those of DNA-only or protein-only immunization. In addition, we observed antibodies that exhibited robust cross-clade binding and neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity after immunization with the DNA prime-protein boost regimen, with the multiple-Env formulation inducing a more robust and broader response than the single-Env formulation. The magnitude and functionality of these responses emphasize the strong priming effect improved DNA immunogens can induce, which are further expanded upon protein boost. These results support further study of an improved synthetic DNA prime together with a protein boost for enhancing anti-HIV immune responses. IMPORTANCE Even with effective antiretroviral drugs, HIV remains an enormous global health burden. Vaccine development has been problematic in part due to the high degree of diversity and poor immunogenicity of the HIV Env protein. Studies suggest that a relevant HIV vaccine will likely need to induce broad cellular and humoral responses from a simple vaccine

  16. SPR-DNA array for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in combination with loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Nawattanapaiboon, Kawin; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Santanirand, Pitak; Vongsakulyanon, Apirom; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Sutapun, Boonsong; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we evaluated surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) as a DNA biosensor for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections. The DNA sample were collected from clinical specimens, including sputum and blood hemoculture were undergone LAMP amplification for 0.18 kbp and 0.23 kbp DNA fragments of femB and mecA genes, respectively. The self-assembled monolayer surface (SAMs) was used for immobilized streptavidin-biotinylated probes on the sensor surface for the detection of LAMP amplicons from MRSA. Both LAMP amplicons were simultaneously hybridized with ssDNA probes immobilized onto a bio-functionalized surface to detect specific targets in the multiplex DNA array platform. In addition, the sensor surface could be regenerated allowing at least five cycles of use with a shortened assay time. The detection limit of LAMP-SPR sensing was 10 copies/µl and LAMP-SPR sensing system showed a good selectivity toward the MRSA.

  17. Sensitive and selective amplification of methylated DNA sequences using helper-dependent chain reaction in combination with a methylation-dependent restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rand, Keith N; Young, Graeme P; Ho, Thu; Molloy, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique for specific amplification of rare methylated DNA fragments in a high background of unmethylated sequences that avoids the need of bisulphite conversion. The methylation-dependent restriction enzyme GlaI is used to selectively cut methylated DNA. Then targeted fragments are tagged using specially designed 'helper' oligonucleotides that are also used to maintain selection in subsequent amplification cycles in a process called 'helper-dependent chain reaction'. The process uses disabled primers called 'drivers' that can only prime on each cycle if the helpers recognize specific sequences within the target amplicon. In this way, selection for the sequence of interest is maintained throughout the amplification, preventing amplification of unwanted sequences. Here we show how the method can be applied to methylated Septin 9, a promising biomarker for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. The GlaI digestion and subsequent amplification can all be done in a single tube. A detection sensitivity of 0.1% methylated DNA in a background of unmethylated DNA was achieved, which was similar to the well-established Heavy Methyl method that requires bisulphite-treated DNA.

  18. Targeted gene integration using the combination of a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein and phiC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Higuchi, Yuriko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-09-30

    PhiC31 integrase-based vectors can integrate therapeutic genes selectively into attP or pseudo-attP sites in genomes, but considerable numbers of pseudo-attP sites in human genomes exist inside endogenous gene-coding regions. To avoid endogenous gene disruptions, we aimed to enhance the integration site-specificity of the phiC31 integrase-based vector using a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein containing Gal4 and LexA DNA-binding motifs. The dual DNA-binding protein was designed to tether the UAS-containing donor vector to the target sequence, the LexA operator, and restrict integration to sites close to the LexA operator. To analyze the site-specificity in chromosomal integration, a human cell line having LexA operators on the genome was established, and the cell line was transfected with donor vectors expressing the DNA-binding protein and the phiC31 integrase expression vector (helper vector). Quantitative PCR indicated that integration around the LexA operator was 26-fold higher with the UAS-containing donor vector than with the control. Sequence analysis confirmed that the integration occurred around the LexA operator. The dual DNA-binding protein-based targeted integration strategy developed herein would allow safer and more reliable genetic manipulations for various applications, including gene and cell therapies.

  19. Photolysis of inorganic chloramines and efficiency of trichloramine abatement by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Fabian; Widler, Tobias; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

    2014-06-01

    Trichloramine, one of the three inorganic chloramines (mono-, di- and trichloramine), is a problematic disinfection by-product in recreational pool water since it causes skin and eye irritations as well as irritations of the respiratory tract. The most commonly used chloramine mitigation strategy in pool water is UV treatment. Experiments with membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) confirmed that inorganic chloramines are effectively degraded by UV irradiation with low-pressure (LP) and medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamps (apparent quantum yields (QY): NH2Cl = 0.50 (LP) and 0.31 (MP) mol einstein(-1), NHCl2: 1.06 (LP) and 0.85 (MP) mol einstein(-1)). Trichloramine showed the fastest depletion with a quantum yield slightly above 2 mol einstein(-1) in purified (LP and MP) and pool water (MP). This high quantum yield can partly be explained by reactions involving OH radicals (purified water) and the reaction of trichloramine with moieties formed during UV irradiation of pool water. The presence of free chlorine affects trichloramine degradation (QY: ∼1.5 mol einstein(-1)) since it scavenges OH radicals and competes with trichloramine for reactive species (e.g. organic amines). Measurements in a pool facility revealed that the installed UV reactors degraded trichloramine by 40-50% as expected from laboratory experiments. However, trichloramine reduction in the pools was less pronounced than in the UV reactors. Model calculations combining pool hydraulics with formation/abatement of trichloramine showed that there was a fast trichloramine formation in the pool from the residual chlorine and nitrogenous precursors. The main factors influencing trichloramine concentrations in pool water are the free chlorine concentration and the UV treatment in combination with the recirculation rate through the water treatment system.

  20. A combined computational and experimental study on DNA-photocleavage of Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(bpy)2(L)]2+ (L = pip, o-mopip and p-mopip).

    PubMed

    Xu, Lian-Cai; Shi, Shuo; Li, Jun; Liao, Si-Yan; Zheng, Kang-Cheng; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2008-01-14

    A combined computational and experimental study on DNA-photocleavage by Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(bpy)2(L)]2+ 1-3 (bpy = 2,2-bipyridine; L: pip = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, o-mopip = 2-(2-methoxyphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline and p-mopip = 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline) has been carried out. The DNA-photocleavage behavior of these complexes was comparably measured by the gel electrophoresis experiments. The experimental results show that they can induce considerable DNA-photocleavage, and have different DNA-photocleavage efficiencies (phi) following the order phi (1) < phi (2) < phi (3). In order to understand their DNA-photocleavage mechanism and trend, the theoretical studies on the geometric and electronic structures of these complexes in the ground state (S0), the first singlet excited state (S1) and triplet excited states (T1), have been carried out using the density functional theory (DFT/TD-DFT), Hartree-Fock (HF) and configuration interaction singles (CIS) methods. In particular, the reduction potentials (E*red) of the excited complexes in aqueous solution, which seem to be closely responsible for the DNA-photocleavage behavior, were calculated to be 0.966 V (vs. SCE) for complex , 1.024 V (vs. SCE) for complex and 1.030 V (vs. SCE) for complex , respectively. Such computational results show that the reduction potentials of the excited complexes reach the theoretical range for oxidizing some DNA-bases, and follow the order E*red (1) < E*red (2) < E*red (3). Therefore, here, in addition to the general theoretical explanation of their DNA-photocleavage mechanism according to our recent report, a further explanation on the trend of their DNA-photocleavage efficiencies, i.e., phi (1) < phi (2) < phi (3), was reasonably carried out, on the basis of the calculated electrochemical properties in the excited states as well as general photochemical insights. PMID:18097496

  1. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pools

    PubMed Central

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Font-Ribera, Laia; Liviac, Danae; Bustamante, Mariona; Espinoza, Felicidad; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Espinosa, Aina; Fernandez, Pilar; DeMarini, David M.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Grummt, Tamara; Marcos, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk. A recent study (Villanueva et al. 2007; Am J Epidemiol 165:148–156) found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools relative to those not attending. Objectives We evaluated adults who swam in chlorinated pools to determine whether exposure to DBPs in pool water is associated with biomarkers of genotoxicity. Methods We collected blood, urine, and exhaled air samples from 49 nonsmoking adult volunteers before and after they swam for 40 min in an indoor chlorinated pool. We estimated associations between the concentrations of four trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and changes in micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage (comet assay) in peripheral blood lymphocytes before and 1 hr after swimming; urine mutagenicity (Ames assay) before and 2 hr after swimming; and MN in exfoliated urothelial cells before and 2 weeks after swimming. We also estimated associations and interactions with polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair or to DBP metabolism. Results After swimming, the total concentration of the four THMs in exhaled breath was seven times higher than before swimming. The change in the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes after swimming increased in association with higher exhaled concentrations of the brominated THMs (p = 0.03 for bromodichloromethane, p = 0.05 for chlorodibromomethane, p = 0.01 for bromoform) but not chloroform. Swimming was not associated with DNA damage detectable by the comet assay. Urine mutagenicity increased significantly after swimming, in association with the higher concentration of exhaled bromoform (p = 0.004). We found no significant associations with changes in micronucleated urothelial cells. Conclusions Our findings support potential genotoxic effects of exposure to DBPs from swimming pools. The positive health effects gained by swimming could be increased by reducing the potential health

  2. Viruses-to-mobile genetic elements skew in the deep Atlantis II brine pool sediments.

    PubMed

    Adel, Mustafa; Elbehery, Ali H A; Aziz, Sherry K; Aziz, Ramy K; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Siam, Rania

    2016-01-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea has 25 brine pools with different physical and geochemical characteristics. Atlantis II (ATIID), Discovery Deeps (DD) and Chain Deep (CD) are characterized by high salinity, temperature and metal content. Several studies reported microbial communities in these brine pools, but few studies addressed the brine pool sediments. Therefore, sediment cores were collected from ATIID, DD, CD brine pools and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Sixteen different lithologic sediment sections were subjected to shotgun DNA pyrosequencing to generate 1.47 billion base pairs (1.47 × 10(9) bp). We generated sediment-specific reads and attempted to annotate all reads. We report the phylogenetic and biochemical uniqueness of the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. In contrary to all other sediment sections, bacteria dominate the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. This decrease in virus-to-bacteria ratio in selected sections and depth coincided with an overrepresentation of mobile genetic elements. Skewing in the composition of viruses-to-mobile genetic elements may uniquely contribute to the distinct microbial consortium in sediments in proximity to hydrothermally active vents of the Red Sea and possibly in their surroundings, through differential horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27596223

  3. Viruses-to-mobile genetic elements skew in the deep Atlantis II brine pool sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, Mustafa; Elbehery, Ali H. A.; Aziz, Sherry K.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Siam, Rania

    2016-09-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea has 25 brine pools with different physical and geochemical characteristics. Atlantis II (ATIID), Discovery Deeps (DD) and Chain Deep (CD) are characterized by high salinity, temperature and metal content. Several studies reported microbial communities in these brine pools, but few studies addressed the brine pool sediments. Therefore, sediment cores were collected from ATIID, DD, CD brine pools and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Sixteen different lithologic sediment sections were subjected to shotgun DNA pyrosequencing to generate 1.47 billion base pairs (1.47 × 109 bp). We generated sediment-specific reads and attempted to annotate all reads. We report the phylogenetic and biochemical uniqueness of the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. In contrary to all other sediment sections, bacteria dominate the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. This decrease in virus-to-bacteria ratio in selected sections and depth coincided with an overrepresentation of mobile genetic elements. Skewing in the composition of viruses-to-mobile genetic elements may uniquely contribute to the distinct microbial consortium in sediments in proximity to hydrothermally active vents of the Red Sea and possibly in their surroundings, through differential horizontal gene transfer.

  4. Viruses-to-mobile genetic elements skew in the deep Atlantis II brine pool sediments.

    PubMed

    Adel, Mustafa; Elbehery, Ali H A; Aziz, Sherry K; Aziz, Ramy K; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Siam, Rania

    2016-09-06

    The central rift of the Red Sea has 25 brine pools with different physical and geochemical characteristics. Atlantis II (ATIID), Discovery Deeps (DD) and Chain Deep (CD) are characterized by high salinity, temperature and metal content. Several studies reported microbial communities in these brine pools, but few studies addressed the brine pool sediments. Therefore, sediment cores were collected from ATIID, DD, CD brine pools and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Sixteen different lithologic sediment sections were subjected to shotgun DNA pyrosequencing to generate 1.47 billion base pairs (1.47 × 10(9) bp). We generated sediment-specific reads and attempted to annotate all reads. We report the phylogenetic and biochemical uniqueness of the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. In contrary to all other sediment sections, bacteria dominate the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. This decrease in virus-to-bacteria ratio in selected sections and depth coincided with an overrepresentation of mobile genetic elements. Skewing in the composition of viruses-to-mobile genetic elements may uniquely contribute to the distinct microbial consortium in sediments in proximity to hydrothermally active vents of the Red Sea and possibly in their surroundings, through differential horizontal gene transfer.

  5. Viruses-to-mobile genetic elements skew in the deep Atlantis II brine pool sediments

    PubMed Central

    Adel, Mustafa; Elbehery, Ali H. A.; Aziz, Sherry K.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Siam, Rania

    2016-01-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea has 25 brine pools with different physical and geochemical characteristics. Atlantis II (ATIID), Discovery Deeps (DD) and Chain Deep (CD) are characterized by high salinity, temperature and metal content. Several studies reported microbial communities in these brine pools, but few studies addressed the brine pool sediments. Therefore, sediment cores were collected from ATIID, DD, CD brine pools and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Sixteen different lithologic sediment sections were subjected to shotgun DNA pyrosequencing to generate 1.47 billion base pairs (1.47 × 109 bp). We generated sediment-specific reads and attempted to annotate all reads. We report the phylogenetic and biochemical uniqueness of the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. In contrary to all other sediment sections, bacteria dominate the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. This decrease in virus-to-bacteria ratio in selected sections and depth coincided with an overrepresentation of mobile genetic elements. Skewing in the composition of viruses-to-mobile genetic elements may uniquely contribute to the distinct microbial consortium in sediments in proximity to hydrothermally active vents of the Red Sea and possibly in their surroundings, through differential horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27596223

  6. Solid-phase based on-chip DNA purification through a valve-free stepwise injection of multiple reagents employing centrifugal force combined with a hydrophobic capillary barrier pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hainan; Tran, Hong Hanh; Chung, Bong Hyun; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2013-03-21

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique for sequentially introducing multiple sample liquids into microchannels driven by centrifugal force combined with a hydrophobic barrier pressure and apply the technique for performing solid-phase based on-chip DNA purification. Three microchannels with varying widths, all equipped with independent sample reservoirs at the inlets, were fabricated on a hydrophobic elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). First, glass beads were packed inside the reaction chamber, and a whole cell containing the DNA extract was introduced into the widest channel by applying centrifugal force for physical adsorption of the DNA onto the glass beads. Next, washing and elution solutions were sequentially introduced into the intermediate and narrowest microchannels, respectively, by gradually increasing the amount of centrifugal force. Through a precise manipulation of the centrifugal force, the DNA adsorbed onto the glass beads was successfully washed and eluted in a continuous manner without the need to introduce each solution manually. A stepwise injection of liquids was successfully demonstrated using multiple ink solutions, the results of which corresponded well with the theoretical analyses. As a practical application, the D1S80 locus of human genomic DNA, which is widely used for forensic purposes, was successfully purified using the microdevice introduced in this study, as demonstrated through successful target amplification. This will pave the way for the construction of a control-free valve system for realizing on-chip DNA purification, which is one of the most labor-intensive and hard-to-miniaturize components, on a greatly simplified and miniaturized platform employing hydrophobic PDMS.

  7. Bartonella spp. DNA associated with biting flies from California.

    PubMed

    Chung, Crystal Y; Kasten, Rickie W; Paff, Sandra M; Van Horn, Brian A; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Boulouis, Henri-Jean; Chomel, Bruno B

    2004-07-01

    Bartonella DNA was investigated in 104 horn flies (Haematobia spp.), 60 stable flies (Stomoxys spp.), 11 deer flies (Chrysops spp.), and 11 horse flies (Tabanus spp.) collected on cattle in California. Partial sequencing indicated B. bovis DNA in the horn fly pool and B. henselae type M DNA in one stable fly. PMID:15324557

  8. [Microecology of nuclear reactor pool water].

    PubMed

    Mal'tsev, V N; Saadavi, A; Aĭiad, A; El'gaui, O; Shlip, M

    1996-01-01

    In the course of research it was found that the circulation of pool water through the nuclear reactor core produces a bactericidal effect of microflora due to the influence of radiation of various types. The amount of microbes returns to initial level after 2-4 months after circulation was stopped. Microflora of pool water comprises large amounts of coccus, Gram-positive rods, fungi and a lower content of Gram-negative rods if compared to water which had been used to fill reactor pool. No difference in radioresistance was noticed for unitype microbes isolated from initial water and from reactor pool water. Quality of microflora reflects a unique phenomenon called "selection" which results in vanishing of all the radiosensitive types of microbes and survival of the radioresistant types. Radioresistance grows with increasing of catalase and nuclease activity.

  9. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Tide Pool Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Students investigated the salinity of tide pools at different levels in the intertidal zone. Data are analyzed collectively. Students graphed and discussed data. Included are suggestions for evaluation and further study. (Author)

  10. Unique Prokaryotic Consortia in Geochemically Distinct Sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and Discovery Deep Brine Pools

    PubMed Central

    Siam, Rania; Mustafa, Ghada A.; Sharaf, Hazem; Moustafa, Ahmed; Ramadan, Adham R.; Antunes, Andre; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Stingl, Uli; Marsis, Nardine G. R.; Coolen, Marco J. L.; Sogin, Mitchell; Ferreira, Ari J. S.; Dorry, Hamza El

    2012-01-01

    The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The ‘polyextremophiles’ that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that one sulfur (S)-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N)-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1), group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1), and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction. PMID:22916172

  11. How to map your industry's profit pool.

    PubMed

    Gadiesh, O; Gilbert, J L

    1998-01-01

    Many managers chart strategy without a full understanding of the sources and distribution of profits in their industry. Sometimes they focus their sights on revenues instead of profits, mistakenly assuming that revenue growth will eventually translate into profit growth. In other cases, they simply lack the data or the analytical tools required to isolate and measure variations in profitability. In this Manager's Tool Kit, the authors present a way to think clearly about where the money's being made in any industry. They describe a framework for analyzing how profits are distributed among the activities that form an industry's value chain. Such an analysis can provide a company's managers with a rich understanding of their industry's profit structure--what the authors call its profit pool--enabling them to identify which activities are generating disproportionately large or small shares of profits. Even more important, a profit-pool map opens a window onto the underlying structure of the industry, helping managers see the various forces that are determining the distribution of profits. As such, a profit-pool map provides a solid basis for strategic thinking. Mapping a profit pool involves four steps: defining the boundaries of the pool, estimating the pool's overall size, estimating the size of each value-chain activity in the pool, and checking and reconciling the calculations. The authors briefly describe each step and then apply the process by providing a detailed example of a hypothetical retail bank. They conclude by looking at ways of organizing the data in chart form as a first step toward plotting a profit-pool strategy.

  12. Performance Study of Swimming Pool Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a controlled laboratory study on the efficiency and emissions of swimming pool heaters based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected variations in operational parameters. Swimming pool heater sales trends have indicated a significant decline in the number of conventional natural gas-fired swimming pool heaters (NGPH). On Long Island the decline has been quite sharp, on the order of 50%, in new installations since 2001. The major portion of the decline has been offset by a significant increase in the sales of electric powered heat pump pool heaters (HPPH) that have been gaining market favor. National Grid contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to measure performance factors in order to compare the relative energy, environmental and economic consequences of using one technology versus the other. A field study was deemed inappropriate because of the wide range of differences in actual load variations (pool size), geographic orientations, ground plantings and shading variations, number of hours of use, seasonal use variations, occupancy patterns, hour of the day use patterns, temperature selection, etc. A decision was made to perform a controlled laboratory study based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected operational variations in parameters. Critical to this are the frequency of use, temperature selection, and sizing of the heater to the associated pool heating loads. This would be accomplished by installing a limited amount of relatively simple compact field data acquisition units on selected pool installations. This data included gas usage when available and alternately heater power or gas consumption rates were inferred from the manufacturer's specifications when direct metering was not available in the field. Figure 1 illustrates a typical pool heater installation layout.

  13. Profit pools: a fresh look at strategy.

    PubMed

    Gadiesh, O; Gilbert, J L

    1998-01-01

    In charting strategy, many managers focus on revenue growth, assuming that profits will follow. But that approach is dangerous: today's deep revenue pool may become tomorrow's dry hole. To create strategies that result in profitable growth, managers need to look beyond revenues to see the shape of their industry's profit pool. The authors define an industry's profit pool as the total profits earned at all points along the industry's value chain. Although the concept is simple, the structure of a profit pool is usually quite complex. The pool will be deeper in some segments of the value chain than in others, and depths will vary within an individual segment as well. Segment profitability may, for example, vary widely by customer group, product category, geographic market, and distribution channel. Moreover, the pattern of profit concentration in an industry will often be very different from the pattern of revenue concentration. The authors describe how successful companies have gained competitive advantage by developing sophisticated profit-pool strategies. They explain how U-Haul identified new sources of profit in the consumer-truck-rental industry; how Merck reached beyond its traditional value-chain role to protect its profits in the pharmaceuticals industry; how Dell rebounded from a misguided channel decision by refocusing on its traditional source of profit; and how Anheuser-Busch made a series of astute product, pricing, and operating decisions to dominate the beer industry's profit pool. The companies with the best understanding of their industry's profit pool, the authors argue, will be in the best position to thrive over the long term.

  14. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  15. Electromagnetic Interference in a Private Swimming Pool

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Sandia; Lavu, Madhav; Atoui, Moustapha; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2016-01-01

    Although current lead design and filtering capabilities have greatly improved, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) from environmental sources has been increasingly reported in patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device (CIED) [1]. Few cases of inappropriate intracardiac Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) associated with swimming pool has been described [2]. Here we present a case of 64 year old male who presented with an interesting EMI signal that was subsequently identified to be related to AC current leak in his swimming pool. PMID:27479205

  16. Characterisation of the Permafrost Carbon Pool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuhry, P.; Grosse, G.; Harden, J.W.; Hugelius, G.; Koven, C.D.; Ping, C.-L.; Schirrmeister, L.; Tarnocai, C.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimate of the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in the northern permafrost region of 1672 Petagrams (Pg) C is much larger than previously reported and needs to be incorporated in global soil carbon (C) inventories. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD), extended to include the range 0–300 cm, is now available online for wider use by the scientific community. An important future aim is to provide quantitative uncertainty ranges for C pool estimates. Recent studies have greatly improved understanding of the regional patterns, landscape distribution and vertical (soil horizon) partitioning of the permafrost C pool in the upper 3 m of soils. However, the deeper C pools in unconsolidated Quaternary deposits need to be better constrained. A general lability classification of the permafrost C pool should be developed to address potential C release upon thaw. The permafrost C pool and its dynamics are beginning to be incorporated into Earth System models, although key periglacial processes such as thermokarst still need to be properly represented to obtain a better quantification of the full permafrost C feedback on global climate change.

  17. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  18. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many Earthbound applications, such as steam-generation power plants, petroleum, and other chemical plants. Also, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  19. Using the ubiquitous pH meter combined with a loop mediated isothermal amplification method for facile and sensitive detection of Nosema bombycis genomic DNA PTP1.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shunbi; Yuan, Yali; Song, Yue; Zhuo, Ying; Li, Tian; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-12-28

    Here we show an amplification-coupled detection method for directly measuring released hydrogen ions during the loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) procedure by using a pH meter. The genomic DNA of Nosema bombycis (N. bombycis) was amplified and detected by employing this LAMP-pH meter platform for the first time.

  20. Regulation of power pools and system operators: An international comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J. Jr.; Tenenbaum, B.; Woolf, F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper focuses on the governance and regulation of power pools outside the United States. The current governance and regulatory arrangements for four power pools, as developed in pool documents and government regulations and laws, are compared and contrasted. The power pools analyzed are located in England and Wales, Australia, Canada, and Scandinavia. Topics discussed in relation to these pools are the effects of structure on governance, how each pool has dealt with a number of basic governance decisions, how the pools monitor the markets, ways in which regulators and other institutions control pools, and self-governance issues.