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Sample records for combining three-dimensional surface

  1. Surface fitting three-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Ford, C. P., III

    1975-01-01

    The geometry of general three-dimensional bodies was generated from coordinates of points in several cross sections. Since these points may not be on smooth curves, they are divided into groups forming segments and general conic sections are curve fit in a least-squares sense to each segment of a cross section. The conic sections are then blended in the longitudinal direction through longitudinal curves. Both the cross-sectional and longitudinal curves may be modified by specifying particular segments as straight lines or specifying slopes at selected points. This method was used to surface fit a 70 deg slab delta wing and the HL-10 Lifting Body. The results for the delta wing were very close to the exact geometry. Although there is no exact solution for the lifting body, the surface fit generated a smooth surface with cross-sectional planes very close to prescribed coordinate points.

  2. Surface fitting three-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    The geometry of general three-dimensional bodies is generated from coordinates of points in several cross sections. Since these points may not be smooth, they are divided into segments and general conic sections are curve fit in a least-squares sense to each segment of a cross section. The conic sections are then blended in the longitudinal direction by fitting parametric cubic-spline curves through coordinate points which define the conic sections in the cross-sectional planes. Both the cross-sectional and longitudinal curves may be modified by specifying particular segments as straight lines and slopes at selected points. Slopes may be continuous or discontinuous and finite or infinite. After a satisfactory surface fit has been obtained, cards may be punched with the data necessary to form a geometry subroutine package for use in other computer programs. At any position on the body, coordinates, slopes and second partial derivatives are calculated. The method is applied to a blunted 70 deg delta wing, and it was found to generate the geometry very well.

  3. Mapping three-dimensional surface deformation by combining multiple-aperture interferometry and conventional interferometry: Application to the June 2007 eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jung, H.-S.; Lu, Zhiming; Won, J.-S.; Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta

    2011-01-01

    Surface deformation caused by an intrusion and small eruption during June 17-19, 2007, along the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, was three-dimensionally reconstructed from radar interferograms acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) phased-array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) (PALSAR) instrument. To retrieve the 3-D surface deformation, a method that combines multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI) and conventional interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques was applied to one ascending and one descending ALOS PALSAR interferometric pair. The maximum displacements as a result of the intrusion and eruption are about 0.8, 2, and 0.7 m in the east, north, and up components, respectively. The radar-measured 3-D surface deformation agrees with GPS data from 24 sites on the volcano, and the root-mean-square errors in the east, north, and up components of the displacement are 1.6, 3.6, and 2.1 cm, respectively. Since a horizontal deformation of more than 1 m was dominantly in the north-northwest-south-southeast direction, a significant improvement of the north-south component measurement was achieved by the inclusion of MAI measurements that can reach a standard deviation of 3.6 cm. A 3-D deformation reconstruction through the combination of conventional InSAR and MAI will allow for better modeling, and hence, a more comprehensive understanding, of the source geometry associated with volcanic, seismic, and other processes that are manifested by surface deformation.

  4. Three dimensional nanofabrication using surface forces

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jeong-Hyun; Azam, Anum; Gracias, David H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe strategies to curve, rotate, align and bond precisely patterned two dimensional (2D) nanoscale panels using forces derived from a minimization of surface area of liquefying or coalescing metallic grains. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by discussing variations in template size, patterns and material composition. The strategy provides a solution path to overcome the limitation of inherently two dimensional lithographic processes by transforming 2D templates into mechanically robust and precisely patterned nanoscale curved structures and polyhedra with considerable versatility in material composition. PMID:20507147

  5. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures.

  6. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures. PMID:26381761

  7. Three-dimensional calculation of windmill surface pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valarezo, W. O.; Liebeck, R. H.

    A three-dimensional panel method capable of computing the flow about propellers is applied to the prediction of blade surface pressures for windmill configurations. Computed surface pressures at various conditions are compared to experimental data and to predictions based on Blade Element Theory (BET). The panel method is used to compute flows about complex three-dimensional geometries and to numerically predict trends not easily obtainable from experimental efforts due to the difficulty and expense of the required instrumentation. These new three-dimensional computations exhibit better agreement with experimental data than standard BET-based predictions. Also, the reported increment in lift carrying capability of rotating lifting surfaces over surfaces in rectilinear translational motion is captured by the panel method and is shown to be an inviscid effect.

  8. Surface reconstruction of a three-dimensional ultrasonic flaw

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Lat S.

    1992-08-01

    In three-dimensional inverse scattering problems, the reconstruction of a solid scatterter is often difficult, if not impossible, and computationally expensive due to the dimensionality. To obtain only the geometrical information, a surface reconstruction algorithm is naturally more desirable since no additional knowledge can be gained from doing the solid reconstruction and the computation is reduced to two dimensions. With the application of the first Born approximation, this paper proposes a simple surfaces reconstruction technique for a three-dimensional target. In general, this method is ill-posed. However, the numerical instability part of the ill-posedness is removable when the surface has a two-fold symmetry with respect to a plane. To demonstrate this approach, three analytical examples are shown. 10 refs.

  9. Surface reconstruction of a three-dimensional ultrasonic flaw

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Lat S.

    1992-01-01

    In three-dimensional inverse scattering problems, the reconstruction of a solid scatterter is often difficult, if not impossible, and computationally expensive due to the dimensionality. To obtain only the geometrical information, a surface reconstruction algorithm is naturally more desirable since no additional knowledge can be gained from doing the solid reconstruction and the computation is reduced to two dimensions. With the application of the first Born approximation, this paper proposes a simple surfaces reconstruction technique for a three-dimensional target. In general, this method is ill-posed. However, the numerical instability part of the ill-posedness is removable when the surface has a two-fold symmetry with respect to a plane. To demonstrate this approach, three analytical examples are shown. 10 refs.

  10. Three-dimensional potential energy surface of Ar–CO

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki

    2015-01-14

    A three-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface of the Ar–CO complex has been determined by fitting most of the previously reported spectroscopic data, where observed transition frequencies by microwave, millimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave, and infrared spectroscopy were reproduced simultaneously within their experimental accuracies. A free rotor model Hamiltonian considering all the freedom of motions for an atom-diatom system was applied to calculate vibration-rotation energies. A three-dimensional potential energy surface obtained by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory was parameterized by a model function consisting of 46 parameters. They were used as initial values for the least-squares analysis of the experimental data. A total of 20 parameters were optimized to reproduce all the spectroscopic data.

  11. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction for industrial computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannier, M. W.; Knapp, R. H.; Gayou, D. E.; Sammon, N. P.; Butterfield, R. L.; Larson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Modern high resolution medical computed tomography (CT) scanners can produce geometrically accurate sectional images of many types of industrial objects. Computer software has been developed to convert serial CT scans into a three-dimensional surface form, suitable for display on the scanner itself. This software, originally developed for imaging the skull, has been adapted for application to industrial CT scanning, where serial CT scans thrrough an object of interest may be reconstructed to demonstrate spatial relationships in three dimensions that cannot be easily understood using the original slices. The methods of three-dimensional reconstruction and solid modeling are reviewed, and reconstruction in three dimensions from CT scans through familiar objects is demonstrated.

  12. The perception of three-dimensionality across continuous surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Kent A.

    1989-01-01

    The apparent three-dimensionality of a viewed surface presumably corresponds to several internal preceptual quantities, such as surface curvature, local surface orientation, and depth. These quantities are mathematically related for points within the silhouette bounds of a smooth, continuous surface. For instance, surface curvature is related to the rate of change of local surface orientation, and surface orientation is related to the local gradient of distance. It is not clear to what extent these 3D quantities are determined directly from image information rather than indirectly from mathematically related forms, by differentiation or by integration within boundary constraints. An open empirical question, for example, is to what extent surface curvature is perceived directly, and to what extent it is quantitative rather than qualitative. In addition to surface orientation and curvature, one derives an impression of depth, i.e., variations in apparent egocentric distance. A static orthographic image is essentially devoid of depth information, and any quantitative depth impression must be inferred from surface orientation and other sources. Such conversion of orientation to depth does appear to occur, and even to prevail over stereoscopic depth information under some circumstances.

  13. Three-dimensional surface imaging system for assessing human obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bugao; Yu, Wurong; Yao, Ming; Pepper, M. Reese; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H.

    2009-10-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity suggests a need to develop a convenient, reliable, and economical tool for assessment of this condition. Three-dimensional (3-D) body surface imaging has emerged as an exciting technology for the estimation of body composition. We present a new 3-D body imaging system, which is designed for enhanced portability, affordability, and functionality. In this system, stereo vision technology is used to satisfy the requirement for a simple hardware setup and fast image acquisition. The portability of the system is created via a two-stand configuration, and the accuracy of body volume measurements is improved by customizing stereo matching and surface reconstruction algorithms that target specific problems in 3-D body imaging. Body measurement functions dedicated to body composition assessment also are developed. The overall performance of the system is evaluated in human subjects by comparison to other conventional anthropometric methods, as well as air displacement plethysmography, for body fat assessment.

  14. A Three-Dimensional Receiver Operator Characteristic Surface Diagnostic Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves are commonly applied as metrics for quantifying the performance of binary fault detection systems. An ROC curve provides a visual representation of a detection system s True Positive Rate versus False Positive Rate sensitivity as the detection threshold is varied. The area under the curve provides a measure of fault detection performance independent of the applied detection threshold. While the standard ROC curve is well suited for quantifying binary fault detection performance, it is not suitable for quantifying the classification performance of multi-fault classification problems. Furthermore, it does not provide a measure of diagnostic latency. To address these shortcomings, a novel three-dimensional receiver operator characteristic (3D ROC) surface metric has been developed. This is done by generating and applying two separate curves: the standard ROC curve reflecting fault detection performance, and a second curve reflecting fault classification performance. A third dimension, diagnostic latency, is added giving rise to 3D ROC surfaces. Applying numerical integration techniques, the volumes under and between the surfaces are calculated to produce metrics of the diagnostic system s detection and classification performance. This paper will describe the 3D ROC surface metric in detail, and present an example of its application for quantifying the performance of aircraft engine gas path diagnostic methods. Metric limitations and potential enhancements are also discussed

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction of surface nanoarchitecture from two-dimensional datasets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The design of biomaterial surfaces relies heavily on the ability to accurately measure and visualize the three-dimensional surface nanoarchitecture of substrata. Here, we present a technique for producing three-dimensional surface models using displacement maps that are based on the data obtained from two-dimensional analyses. This technique is particularly useful when applied to scanning electron micrographs that have been calibrated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) roughness data. The evaluation of four different surface types, including thin titanium films, silicon wafers, polystyrene cell culture dishes and dragonfly wings confirmed that this technique is particularly effective for the visualization of conductive surfaces such as metallic titanium. The technique is particularly useful for visualizing surfaces that cannot be easily analyzed using AFM. The speed and ease with which electron micrographs can be recorded, combined with a relatively simple process for generating displacement maps, make this technique useful for the assessment of the surface topography of biomaterials. PMID:24410821

  16. Three-dimensional surface anthropometry: Applications to the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Peter R. M.; Rioux, Marc

    1997-09-01

    Anthropometry is the study of the measurement of the human body. By tradition this has been carried out taking the measurements from body surface landmarks, such as circumferences and breadths, using simple instruments like tape measures and calipers. Three-dimensional (3D) surface anthropometry enables us to extend the study to 3D geometry and morphology of mainly external human body tissues. It includes the acquisition, indexing, transmission, archiving, retrieval, interrogation and analysis of body size, shape, and surface together with their variability throughout growth and development to adulthood. While 3D surface anthropometry surveying is relatively new, anthropometric surveying using traditional tools, such as calipers and tape measures, is not. Recorded studies of the human form date back to ancient times. Since at least the 17th century 1 investigators have made attempts to measure the human body for physical properties such as weight, size, and centre of mass. Martin documented 'standard' body measurement methods in a handbook in 1928. 2 This paper reviews the past and current literature devoted to the applications of 3D anthropometry because true 3D scanning of the complete human body is fast becoming a reality. We attempt to take readers through different forms of technology which deal with simple forms of projected light to the more complex advanced forms of laser and video technology giving low and/or high resolution 3D data. Information is also given about image capture of size and shape of the whole as well as most component parts of the human body. In particular, the review describes with explanations a multitude of applications, for example, medical, product design, human engineering, anthropometry and ergonomics etc.

  17. Combined Labelled and Label-free SERS Probes for Triplex Three-dimensional Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Bai, Xiangru; Su, Le; Du, Zhanwei; Shen, Aiguo; Materny, Arnulf; Hu, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Cells are complex chemical systems, where the molecular composition at different cellular locations and specific intracellular chemical interactions determine the biological function. An in-situ nondestructive characterization of the complicated chemical processes (like e.g. apoptosis) is the goal of our study. Here, we present the results of simultaneous and three-dimensional imaging of double organelles (nucleus and membrane) in single HeLa cells by means of either labelled or label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This combination of imaging with and without labels is not possible when using fluorescence microscopy. The SERS technique is used for a stereoscopic description of the intrinsic chemical nature of nuclei and the precise localization of folate (FA) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the membrane under highly confocal conditions. We also report on the time-dependent changes of cell nuclei as well as membrane receptor proteins during apoptosis analyzed by statistical multivariate methods. The multiplex three-dimensional SERS imaging technique allows for both temporal (real time) and spatial (multiple organelles and molecules in three-dimensional space) live-cell imaging and therefore provides a new and attractive 2D/3D tracing method in biomedicine on subcellular level.

  18. Combined Labelled and Label-free SERS Probes for Triplex Three-dimensional Cellular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Bai, Xiangru; Su, Le; Du, Zhanwei; Shen, Aiguo; Materny, Arnulf; Hu, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Cells are complex chemical systems, where the molecular composition at different cellular locations and specific intracellular chemical interactions determine the biological function. An in-situ nondestructive characterization of the complicated chemical processes (like e.g. apoptosis) is the goal of our study. Here, we present the results of simultaneous and three-dimensional imaging of double organelles (nucleus and membrane) in single HeLa cells by means of either labelled or label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This combination of imaging with and without labels is not possible when using fluorescence microscopy. The SERS technique is used for a stereoscopic description of the intrinsic chemical nature of nuclei and the precise localization of folate (FA) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the membrane under highly confocal conditions. We also report on the time-dependent changes of cell nuclei as well as membrane receptor proteins during apoptosis analyzed by statistical multivariate methods. The multiplex three-dimensional SERS imaging technique allows for both temporal (real time) and spatial (multiple organelles and molecules in three-dimensional space) live-cell imaging and therefore provides a new and attractive 2D/3D tracing method in biomedicine on subcellular level. PMID:26781186

  19. Three-dimensional ovarian cancer models: imaging and therapeutic combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Rizvi, Imran; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-02-01

    We introduce a new platform to study treatment response in adherent micrometastatic ovarian cancer, combining an in vitro 3D model, with custom quantitative analysis routines to report growth and cytotoxic response in large sets of image data. OVCAR-5 human ovarian cancer cells were grown on a bed of Growth Factor Reduced MatrigelTM (GFR MatrigelTM). Using batch analysis routines to analyze longitudinal image data we show that in vitro tumor growth leads to a reproducible log-normal size distribution with two well-defined peaks. These distinct growth modes correspond to a population with approximately constant diameter of 20μm over the time probed, while the other peak corresponds to a more rapidly assembling sub-distribution of micronodules which shifts towards larger peak center positions with mean equivalent diameters of 92μm, 120μm and 150μm at days 7, 10 and 17 following plating. At day 10, 3D and monolayer cultures were treated with a regimen of either carboplatin or photodynamic therapy. Using a quantitative fluorescence imaging approach we report dose response curves and demonstrate that 3D nodules are significantly less sensitive to treatment than the same cells grown in monolayer. 3D cultures subject to 5J/cm2 PDT (250nM BPD-MA) exhibited a mean viability of 80% (95% CI = 73% to 82%) relative to no treatment control. 3D cultures subject to carboplatin treatment at 100μM concentration exhibited a mean viability of 92% (95% CI =86% to 97%). A combination treatment of 5J/cm2 PDT followed by 100μM carboplatin yielded an enhanced cytotoxic effect with mean viability of 46%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (35 % to 46%).

  20. Three-dimensional tongue surfaces from ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Maureen; Lundberg, Andrew

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents 3D tongue surfaces reconstructed from sixty cross-sectional slices of the tongue. Surfaces were reconstructed for sustained vocalizations of 18 American English sounds. Electropalatography (EPG) data also were collected for the sounds to compare tongue surface shape with tongue-palate contact patterns. The ultrasound data were grouped into four tongue shape categories. These classes were front raising, complete channel, back raising, two-point displacement. The first three categories contained both vowels and consonants, the last only consonants. The EPG data indicated three categories of tongue-palate contact: bilateral, cross-sectional, combination of the two. Vowels used only the first pattern, consonants used all three. The EPG data provided an observably distinction in contact pattern between consonants and vowels. The ultrasound tongue surface data did not. The conclusion was that the tongue actually has a limited repertoire of shapes, and positions them against the palate in different ways for consonants vs. vowels to create narrow channels, divert airflow and produce sound.

  1. Three-dimensional imaging system combining vision and ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wykes, Catherine; Chou, Tsung N.

    1994-11-01

    Vision systems are being applied to a wide range of inspection problems in manufacturing. In 2D systems, a single video camera captures an image of the object and application of suitable image processing techniques enables information about dimension, shape and the presence of features and flaws to be extracted from the image. This can be used to recognize, inspect and/or measure the part. 3D measurement is also possible with vision systems but requires the use of either two or more cameras, or structured lighting (i.e. stripes or grids) and the processing of such images is necessarily considerably more complex, and therefore slower and more expensive than 3D imaging. Ultrasonic imaging is widely used in medical and NDT applications to give 3D images; in these systems, the ultrasound is propagated into a liquid or a solid. Imaging using air-borne ultrasound is much less advanced, mainly due to the limited availability of suitable sensors. Unique 2D ultrasonic ranging systems using in-house built phased arrays have been developed in Nottingham which enable both the range and bearing of targets to be measured. The ultrasonic/vision system will combine the excellent lateral resolution of a vision system with the straightforward range acquisition of the ultrasonic system. The system is expected to extend the use of vision systems in automation, particularly in the area of automated assembly where it can eliminate the need for expensive jigs and orienting part-feeders.

  2. An improved evaluation of surface finish with a three dimensional tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    GRANDADAM; PREBET; RIOUT

    1980-01-01

    The design and programming of an automated three dimensional surface finish tester is described. The device produces a three dimensional image of the microscopic texture of the examined surface. The surface finish tester presents the following advantages over conventional profilometry: (1) more complete exploration of surface texture by successive probe sweeps; (2) automation of measuring and calculating; (3) more accurate representation of the derived parameters; (4) analysis of the degree of homogeneity of the surface; (5) three dimensional graphic representation accurately depicting the state of the surface; (6) detection of local imperfections; and (7) detection of scoring that occurred during machining.

  3. Quasi-three-dimensional turbomachinery flow calculations on multiple hub-to-shroud stream surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, H. D.; Ragsdell, K. M.; Robinson, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from a quasi-three-dimensional calculation of steady (relative), inviscid, adiabatic, subsonic/shock-free transonic flow on multiple hub-to-shroud stream surfaces through turbomachinery blade rows. The quasi-three-dimensional technique incorporates some three-dimensional effects while retaining much of the simplicity of two-dimensional computational methods. Three typical turbomachinery flowfield calculations are presented including an axial-flow compressor rotor, a turbine stator vane cascade, and a radial-inflow turbine rotor. The calculations were performed using quasi-three-dimensional extensions of existing two-dimensional methods. The current results represent an intermediate step in the complete quasi-three-dimensional solution process. However, the results demonstrate the usefulness of the quasi-three-dimensional technique in complementing and extending the applicability of the two-dimensional methods of turbomachinery flow analysis.

  4. Three-dimensional surface imaging in plastic surgery: foundation, practical applications, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jessica B; Small, Kevin H; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface imaging has gained clinical acceptance in plastic and reconstructive surgery. In contrast to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging, three-dimensional surface imaging relies on triangulation in stereophotography to measure surface x, y, and z coordinates. This study reviews the past, present, and future directions of three-dimensional topographic imaging in plastic surgery. Historically, three-dimensional imaging technology was first used in a clinical setting in 1944 to diagnose orthodontologic conditions. Karlan established its use in the field of plastic surgery in 1979, analyzing contours and documenting facial asymmetries. Present use of three-dimensional surface imaging has focused on standardizing patient topographic measurements to enhance preoperative planning and to improve postoperative outcomes. Various measurements (e.g., volume, surface area, vector distance, curvature) have been applied to breast, body, and facial topography to augment patient analysis. Despite the rapid progression of the clinical applications of three-dimensional imaging, current use of this technology is focused on the surgeon's perspective and secondarily the patient's perspective. Advancements in patient simulation may improve patient-physician communication, education, and satisfaction. However, a communal database of three-dimensional surface images integrated with emerging three-dimensional printing and portable information technology will validate measurements and strengthen preoperative planning and postoperative outcomes. Three-dimensional surface imaging is a useful adjunct to plastic and reconstructive surgery practices and standardizes measurements to create objectivity in a subjective field. Key improvements in three-dimensional imaging technology may significantly enhance the quality of plastic and reconstructive surgery in the near future. PMID:25835245

  5. Fitting manifold surfaces to three-dimensional point clouds.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Cindy M; Crisco, Joseph J; Laidlaw, David H

    2002-02-01

    We present a technique for fitting a smooth, locally parameterized surface model (called the manifold surface model) to unevenly scattered data describing an anatomical structure. These data are acquired from medical imaging modalities such as CT scans or MRI. The manifold surface is useful for problems which require analyzable or parametric surfaces fitted to data acquired from surfaces of arbitrary topology (e.g., entire bones). This surface modeling work is part of a larger project to model and analyze skeletal joints, in particular the complex of small bones within the wrist and hand. To demonstrate the suitability of this model we fit to several different bones in the hand, and to the same bone from multiple people.

  6. Numerical procedures for three-dimensional computational surface thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Models and equations for surface thermochemistry and near-surface thermophysics of aerodynamically-heated thermal protection materials are reviewed, with particular emphasis on computational boundary conditions for surface mass and energy transfer. The surface energy and mass balances, coupled with an appropriate ablation or surface catalysis model, provide complete thermochemical boundary conditions for a true multidisciplinary solution of the fully coupled fluid-dynamics/solid mechanics problem. Practical approximate solutions can be obtained by using a detailed model with full thermophysics for either the solid or fluid phase amd a semianalytic method for the other half of the problem. A significant increase in the state-of-the-art in aerothermal computational fluid dynamics is possible by uniting CFD methodology with surface thermochemistry boundary conditions and the heat-balance-integral method.

  7. Surface grid generation for complex three-dimensional geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Raymond Ching-Chung

    1988-01-01

    An outline is presented for the creation of surface grids from primitive geometry data such as obtained from CAD/CAM systems. The general procedure is applicable to any geometry including full aircraft with wing, nacelle, and empennage. When developed in an interactive graphics environment, a code base on this procedure is expected to substantially improve the turn around time for generating surface grids on complex geometries. Results are shown for a general hypersonic airplane geometry.

  8. Surface grid generation for complex three-dimensional geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Raymond Ching-Chung

    1988-01-01

    An outline is presented for the creation of surface grids from primitive geometry data such as obtained from CAD/CAM systems. The general procedure is applicable to any geometry including full aircraft with wing, nacelle, and empennage. When developed in an interactive graphics environment, a code based on this procedure is expected to substantially improve the turn around time for generating surface grids on complex geometries. Results are shown for a general hypersonic airplane geometry.

  9. Structured light optical microscopy for three-dimensional reconstruction of technical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettel, Johannes; Reinecke, Holger; Müller, Claas

    2016-04-01

    In microsystems technology quality control of micro structured surfaces with different surface properties is playing an ever more important role. The process of quality control incorporates three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of specularand diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. Due to the demand on high measurement accuracy and data acquisition rates, structured light optical microscopy has become a valuable solution to solve this problem providing high vertical and lateral resolution. However, 3D reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces still remains a challenge to optical measurement principles. In this paper we present a measurement principle based on structured light optical microscopy which enables 3D reconstruction of specular- and diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. It is realized using two light paths of a stereo microscope equipped with different magnification levels. The right optical path of the stereo microscope is used to project structured light onto the object surface. The left optical path is used to capture the structured illuminated object surface with a camera. Structured light patterns are generated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) device in combination with a high power Light Emitting Diode (LED). Structured light patterns are realized as a matrix of discrete light spots to illuminate defined areas on the object surface. The introduced measurement principle is based on multiple and parallel processed point measurements. Analysis of the measured Point Spread Function (PSF) by pattern recognition and model fitting algorithms enables the precise calculation of 3D coordinates. Using exemplary technical surfaces we demonstrate the successful application of our measurement principle.

  10. New Display-type Analyzer for Three-dimensional Fermi Surface Mapping and Atomic Orbital Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Shigenai, Shin; Hirama, Yoshiteru; Matsui, Fumihiko; Hamada, Yoji; Nakanishi, Koji; Namba, Hidetoshi; Kitamura, Toshiro; Soejima, Hiroyoshi; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2007-01-19

    We have developed and installed a new Display-type ANAlyzer (DIANA) at Ritsumeikan SR center BL-7. We measured the angle-integrated energy distribution curve of poly-crystal gold and the photoelectron intensity angular distribution (PIAD) of HOPG to estimate the total energy resolution and to check the condition of the analyzer. The total energy resolution ({delta}E/E) is up to 0.78%, which is much higher than the old type. The PIAD of HOPG we obtained was the ring pattern as expected. Therefore, a detailed three-dimensional Fermi surface mapping and an analysis of the atomic orbitals constituting the electron energy bands are possible by combining them with a linearly polarized synchrotron radiation.

  11. New Display-type Analyzer for Three-dimensional Fermi Surface Mapping and Atomic Orbital Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Shigenai, Shin; Hirama, Yoshiteru; Hamada, Yoji; Nakanishi, Koji; Namba, Hidetoshi; Kitamura, Toshiro; Soejima, Hiroyoshi; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed and installed a new Display-type ANAlyzer (DIANA) at Ritsumeikan SR center BL-7. We measured the angle-integrated energy distribution curve of poly-crystal gold and the photoelectron intensity angular distribution (PIAD) of HOPG to estimate the total energy resolution and to check the condition of the analyzer. The total energy resolution (ΔE/E) is up to 0.78%, which is much higher than the old type. The PIAD of HOPG we obtained was the ring pattern as expected. Therefore, a detailed three-dimensional Fermi surface mapping and an analysis of the atomic orbitals constituting the electron energy bands are possible by combining them with a linearly polarized synchrotron radiation.

  12. Hydrodynamic theory of surface excitations of three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vildanov, N. M.

    2011-03-01

    Edge excitations of a fractional quantum Hall system can be derived as surface excitations of an incompressible quantum droplet using one-dimensional chiral bosonization. Here we show that an analogous approach can be developed to characterize surface states of three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulators. The key ingredient of our theory is the Luther’s multidimensional bosonization construction.

  13. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF), and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment) in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg(-1) respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer.

  14. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF), and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment) in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg-1 respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer. PMID:26047012

  15. A numerical study of three-dimensional surface tension driven convection with fre surface deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1992-01-01

    The steady three-dimensional thermocapillary motion with a deformable free surface is studied numerically in both normal and zero gravity environments. Flow configurations consist of a square cavity heated from the side. In the analysis, the free surface is allowed to deform and the grid distribution is adapted to the surface deformation. The divergence-free condition is satisfied by using a dual time-stepping approach in the numerical scheme. Convective flux derivatives are evaluated using a third-order accurate upwind-biased flux-split differencing technique. The numerical solutions at the midplane of the square cavity are compared with the results from two-dimensional calculations. In addition, numerial results for cases under zero and normal gravity conditions are compared. Significantly different flow structures and surface deformation have been observed. The comparison of calculated results will be compared with experimental data in the updated version of this paper.

  16. Three-dimensional reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces using structured light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettel, Johannes; Müller, Claas; Reinecke, Holger

    2014-11-01

    In computer assisted quality control the three-dimensional reconstruction of technical surfaces is playing an ever more important role. Due to the demand on high measurement accuracy and data acquisition rates, structured light optical microscopy has become a valuable solution for the three-dimensional measurement of technical surfaces with high vertical and lateral resolution. However, the three-dimensional reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces with very low surface-roughness and local slopes still remains a challenge to optical measurement principles. Furthermore the high data acquisition rates of current optical measurement systems depend on highly complex and expensive scanning-techniques making them impractical for inline quality control. In this paper we present a novel measurement principle based on a multi-pinhole structured light solution without moving parts which enables the threedimensional reconstruction of specular and diffuse reflecting technical surfaces. This measurement principle is based on multiple and parallel processed point-measurements. These point measurements are realized by spatially locating and analyzing the resulting Point Spread Function (PSF) in parallel for each point measurement. Analysis of the PSF is realized by pattern recognition and model-fitting algorithms accelerated by current Graphics-Processing-Unit (GPU) hardware to reach suitable measurement rates. Using the example of optical surfaces with very low surface-roughness we demonstrate the three-dimensional reconstruction of these surfaces by applying our measurement principle. Thereby we show that the resulting high measurement accuracy enables cost-efficient three-dimensional surface reconstruction suitable for inline quality control.

  17. Evaluation of optical flow algorithms for tracking endocardial surfaces on three-dimensional ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qi; Angelini, Elsa D.; Herz, Susan L.; Ingrassia, Christopher M.; Gerard, Olivier; Costa, Kevin D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.; Laine, Andrew F.

    2005-04-01

    With relatively high frame rates and the ability to acquire volume data sets with a stationary transducer, 3D ultrasound systems, based on matrix phased array transducers, provide valuable three-dimensional information, from which quantitative measures of cardiac function can be extracted. Such analyses require segmentation and visual tracking of the left ventricular endocardial border. Due to the large size of the volumetric data sets, manual tracing of the endocardial border is tedious and impractical for clinical applications. Therefore the development of automatic methods for tracking three-dimensional endocardial motion is essential. In this study, we evaluate a four-dimensional optical flow motion tracking algorithm to determine its capability to follow the endocardial border in three dimensional ultrasound data through time. The four-dimensional optical flow method was implemented using three-dimensional correlation. We tested the algorithm on an experimental open-chest dog data set and a clinical data set acquired with a Philips' iE33 three-dimensional ultrasound machine. Initialized with left ventricular endocardial data points obtained from manual tracing at end-diastole, the algorithm automatically tracked these points frame by frame through the whole cardiac cycle. A finite element surface was fitted through the data points obtained by both optical flow tracking and manual tracing by an experienced observer for quantitative comparison of the results. Parameterization of the finite element surfaces was performed and maps displaying relative differences between the manual and semi-automatic methods were compared. The results showed good consistency between manual tracing and optical flow estimation on 73% of the entire surface with fewer than 10% difference. In addition, the optical flow motion tracking algorithm greatly reduced processing time (about 94% reduction compared to human involvement per cardiac cycle) for analyzing cardiac function in three-dimensional

  18. Combined three-dimensional computer vision and epi-illumination fluorescence imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Yova, Dido; Politopoulos, Kostas

    2012-03-01

    Most of the reported fluorescence imaging methods and systems highlight the need for three-dimensional information of the inspected region surface geometry. The scope of this manuscript is to introduce an epi-illumination fluorescence imaging system, which has been enhanced with a binocular machine vision system for the translation of the inverse problem solution to the global coordinates system. The epi-illumination fluorescence imaging system is consisted of a structured scanning excitation source, which increases the spatial differentiation of the measured data, and a telecentric lens, which increases the angular differentiation. On the other hand, the binocular system is based on the projection of a structured light pattern on the inspected area, for the solution of the correspondence problem between the stereo pair. The functionality of the system has been evaluated on tissue phantoms and calibration objects. The reconstruction accuracy of the fluorophores distribution, as resulted from the root mean square error between the actual distribution and the outcome of the forward solver, was more than 80%. On the other hand, the surface three-dimensional reconstruction of the inspected region presented 0.067+/-0.004 mm accuracy, as resulted from the mean Euclidean distance between the three-dimensional position of the real world points and those reconstructed.

  19. Surface representations of two- and three-dimensional fluid flow topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1990-01-01

    We discuss our work using critical point analysis to generate representations of the vector field topology of numerical flow data sets. Critical points are located and characterized in a two-dimensional domain, which may be either a two-dimensional flow field or the tangential velocity field near a three-dimensional body. Tangent curves are then integrated out along the principal directions of certain classes of critical points. The points and curves are linked to form a skeleton representing the two-dimensional vector field topology. When generated from the tangential velocity field near a body in a three-dimensional flow, the skeleton includes the critical points and curves which provide a basis for analyzing the three-dimensional structure of the flow separation. The points along the separation curves in the skeleton are used to start tangent curve integrations to generate surfaces representing the topology of the associated flow separations.

  20. Surface waves in three-dimensional electromagnetic composites and their effect on homogenization.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y Z; Jiang, Li Jun; Markel, Vadim A; Tsukerman, Igor

    2013-05-01

    Reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves at the boundaries of periodic composites (electromagnetic/optical metamaterials) depends in general on both bulk and surface waves. We investigate the interplay of these two contributions using three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations and a recently developed non-asymptotic homogenization theory.

  1. Manipulation of fluids in three-dimensional porous photonic structures with patterned surface properties

    DOEpatents

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Burgess, Ian B.; Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Loncar, Marko

    2016-03-08

    A three-dimensional porous photonic structure, whose internal pore surfaces can be provided with desired surface properties in a spatially selective manner with arbitrary patterns, and methods for making the same are described. When exposed to a fluid (e.g., via immersion or wicking), the fluid can selectively penetrate the regions of the structure with compatible surface properties. Broad applications, for example in security, encryption and document authentication, as well as in areas such as simple microfluidics and diagnostics, are anticipated.

  2. Ultrasound-guided three-dimensional needle steering in biological tissue with curved surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abayazid, Momen; Moreira, Pedro; Shahriari, Navid; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering a bevel-tipped flexible needle under ultrasound guidance toward a physical target while avoiding a physical obstacle embedded in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue with curved surfaces. An ultrasound pre-operative scan is performed for three-dimensional (3D) target localization and shape reconstruction. A controller based on implicit force control is developed to align the transducer with curved surfaces to assure the maximum contact area, and thus obtain an image of sufficient quality. We experimentally investigate the effect of needle insertion system parameters such as insertion speed, needle diameter and bevel angle on target motion to adjust the parameters that minimize the target motion during insertion. A fast sampling-based path planner is used to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We present experimental results for target reconstruction and needle insertion procedures in gelatin-based phantoms and biological tissue. Mean targeting errors of 1.46 ± 0.37 mm, 1.29 ± 0.29 mm and 1.82 ± 0.58 mm are obtained for phantoms with inclined, curved and combined (inclined and curved) surfaces, respectively, for insertion distance of 86–103 mm. The achieved targeting errors suggest that our approach is sufficient for targeting lesions of 3 mm radius that can be detected using clinical ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:25455165

  3. Three-dimensional surface microfluidics enabled by spatiotemporal control of elastic fluidic interface.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lingfei; Pan, Tingrui

    2010-12-01

    As an emerging alternative to the conventional counterpart, surface microfluidics incorporates both intrinsic resistive solid-liquid and elastic frictionless gas-liquid interfaces, leading to unique flow-pressure characteristics. Furthermore, the open-surface microfluidic platforms can be fabricated on a monolithic substrate with high wettability contrast by the previously reported one-step lithographic process of a photosensitive superhydrophobic nanocomposite material, which permits flexible fluidic operations and direct surface modifications. In the paper, we first present three-dimensional microfluidic manipulations utilizing the unconventional gas-liquid interfaces of surface microfluidics, outlined by the micropatterned wetting boundaries (also known as the triple lines). In contrast to the primary linear (resistive) nature of the conventional closed-channel microfluidics, the distinct elastic interface of surface microfluidics enables remarkable three-dimensional (deformable) and time-dependent (capacitive) operations of the flow. Specifically, spatiotemporal dependence of microflow patterns on the planar fluidic surfaces has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally characterized. Utilizing the unconventional interface-enabled flow-pressure relationship, novel surface fluidic operations, including microflow regulation and flow-controlled switching, have been demonstrated and fully investigated. Furthermore, three-dimensional surface microfluidic networks together with analog-to-digital stereo-flow activations have been established, in which miniature capillary bridges form fluidic connections between two independent surface microfluidic circuits.

  4. Three-dimensional printing and porous metallic surfaces: a new orthopedic application.

    PubMed

    Melican, M C; Zimmerman, M C; Dhillon, M S; Ponnambalam, A R; Curodeau, A; Parsons, J R

    2001-05-01

    As-cast, porous surfaced CoCr implants were tested for bone interfacial shear strength in a canine transcortical model. Three-dimensional printing (3DP) was used to create complex molds with a dimensional resolution of 175 microm. 3DP is a solid freeform fabrication technique that can generate ceramic pieces by printing binder onto a bed of ceramic powder. A printhead is rastered across the powder, building a monolithic mold, layer by layer. Using these 3DP molds, surfaces can be textured "as-cast," eliminating the need for additional processing as with commercially available sintered beads or wire mesh surfaces. Three experimental textures were fabricated, each consisting of a surface layer and deep layer with distinct individual porosities. The surface layer ranged from a porosity of 38% (Surface Y) to 67% (Surface Z), whereas the deep layer ranged from 39% (Surface Z) to 63% (Surface Y). An intermediate texture was fabricated that consisted of 43% porosity in both surface and deep layers (Surface X). Control surfaces were commercial sintered beaded coatings with a nominal porosity of 37%. A well-documented canine transcortical implant model was utilized to evaluate these experimental surfaces. In this model, five cylindrical implants were placed in transverse bicortical defects in each femur of purpose bred coonhounds. A Latin Square technique was used to randomize the experimental implants left to right and proximal to distal within a given animal and among animals. Each experimental site was paired with a porous coated control site located at the same level in the contralateral limb. Thus, for each of the three time periods (6, 12, and 26 weeks) five dogs were utilized, yielding a total of 24 experimental sites and 24 matched pair control sites. At each time period, mechanical push-out tests were used to evaluate interfacial shear strength. Other specimens were subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Macrotexture Z, with the highest surface porosity, failed

  5. Resolving three-dimensional surface displacements from InSAR measurements: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, Z. W.; Ding, X. L.; Zhu, J. J.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Q.

    2014-06-01

    One-dimensional measurement along the Line-Of-Sight (LOS) direction has greatly limited the capability of InSAR technique in the investigation of surface displacements and their dynamics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to resolve complete three-dimensional (3-D) displacements from InSAR measurements. This contribution is intended to provide a systematic review of the progress achieved in this field. Based on an analysis of the InSAR LOS measurements, we first cover two commonly used techniques, i.e., Offset-Tracking and multi-aperture InSAR (MAI), with which the surface displacement in the azimuth direction can be measured together with the LOS displacement. Several methods for mapping 3-D displacements using InSAR measurements are subsequently presented and categorized into three groups: (i) combination of multi-pass LOS and azimuth measurements; (ii) integration of InSAR and GPS data; and (iii) prior information assisted approaches. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are analyzed to show the applicability of each method to specific 3-D displacement mapping cases, in hope to provide a useful guidance in choosing a suitable approach accordingly. Finally, suggestions for resolving the challenging issues and outlook of future research are given.

  6. Autostereoscopy-based three-dimensional on-machine measuring system for micro-structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Cheung, Chi Fai; Ren, Mingjun; Zhou, Liqiu; Zhao, Xing

    2014-10-20

    Traditional off-line measuring systems find it difficult to measure micro-structured workpieces which have a large volume and heavy weight, such as micro-structured patterned precision roller drums. This paper proposes an autostereoscopy-based three-dimensional (3D) measuring method and develops an innovative measuring system for the 3D on-machine measurement of the micro-structured surfaces, an Autostereoscopy-based Three-Dimensional On-machine Measuring (ATDOM) system. The ATDOM system is compact and capable of fast data acquisition and high accuracy in 3D computational reconstruction of complex surfaces under different measuring environments. A prototype ATDOM system is experimentally verified through a series of measurement experiments conducted on a precision machine tool. The results indicate that the ATDOM system provides an important means for efficient and reliable on-machine measurement of micro-structured surfaces. PMID:25401597

  7. Three-dimensional facial surface analysis of patients with skeletal malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Alves, Patrícia Valéria Milanezi; Zhao, Linping; Patel, Pravin K; Bolognese, Ana M

    2009-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) laser surface scanning analysis has taken hold in orthodontics, as well as craniomaxillofacial and plastic surgery as a new tool that can navigate away from the limitations of conventional two-dimensional methods. Various techniques for 3D reconstruction of the face have been used in diagnosis, treatment planning and simulation, and outcomes follow-up. The aim of the current prospective study was to present some technical aspects for the assessment of facial changes after orthodontic and orthognathic surgery treatment using 3D laser surface scanning. The technique proposed for facial surface shape analysis represented three-dimensionally the expected surgical changes, and the reduction of the postoperative swelling was verified. This study provides technical information from the data collection to the 3D virtual soft-tissue analysis that can be useful for diagnostic information, treatment planning, future comparisons of treatment stability or facial postoperative swelling, and soft-tissue profile assessment.

  8. Three-dimensional surface grid generation for calculation of thermal radiation shape factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, Hany M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique is described to generate three dimensional surface grids suitable for calculating shape factors for thermal radiative heat transfer. The surface under consideration is approximated by finite triangular elements generated in a special manner. The grid is generated by dividing the surface into a two dimensional array of nodes. Each node is defined by its coordinates. Each set of four adjacent nodes is used to construct two triangular elements. Each triangular element is characterized by the vector representation of its vertices. Vector algebra is used to calculate all desired geometric properties of grid elements. The properties are used to determine the shape factor between the element and an area element in space. The grid generation can be graphically displayed using any software with three dimensional features. DISSPLA was used to view the grids.

  9. A three dimensional scaffold with precise micro-architecture and surface micro-textures

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Alvaro; Kim, Eun Jung; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Fleischman, Aaron J.; Muschler, George F.; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) structure comprising precisely defined microarchitecture and surface micro-textures, designed to present specific physical cues to cells and tissues, may provide an efficient scaffold in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. We report a fabrication technique based on microfabrication and soft lithography that permits for the development of 3D scaffolds with both precisely engineered architecture and tailored surface topography. The scaffold fabrication technique consists of three key steps starting with microfabrication of a mold using an epoxy-based photoresist (SU-8), followed by dual-sided molding of a single layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using a mechanical jig for precise motion control; and finally, alignment, stacking, and adhesion of multiple PDMS layers to achieve a 3D structure. This technique was used to produce 3D Texture and 3D Smooth PDMS scaffolds, where the surface topography comprised 10 μm-diameter/height posts and smooth surfaces, respectively. The potential utility of the 3D microfabricated scaffolds, and the role of surface topography, were subsequently investigated in vitro with a combined heterogeneous population of adult human stem cells and their resultant progenitor cells, collectively termed connective tissue progenitors (CTPs), under conditions promoting the osteoblastic phenotype. Examination of bone-marrow derived CTPs cultured on the 3D Texture scaffold for 9 days revealed cell growth in three dimensions and increased cell numbers compared to those on the 3D Smooth scaffold. Furthermore, expression of alkaline phosphatase mRNA was higher on the 3D Texture scaffold, while osteocalcin mRNA expression was comparable for both types of scaffolds. PMID:19524292

  10. System maintenance manual for master modeling of aerodynamic surfaces by three-dimensional explicit representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    A system of computer programs has been developed to model general three-dimensional surfaces. Surfaces are modeled as sets of parametric bicubic patches. There are also capabilities to transform coordinate to compute mesh/surface intersection normals, and to format input data for a transonic potential flow analysis. A graphical display of surface models and intersection normals is available. There are additional capabilities to regulate point spacing on input curves and to compute surface intersection curves. Internal details of the implementation of this system are explained, and maintenance procedures are specified.

  11. Three-dimensional imaging of localized surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Olivia; de la Peña, Francisco; Leary, Rowan K; Holland, Daniel J; Ducati, Caterina; Midgley, Paul A

    2013-10-01

    The remarkable optical properties of metal nanoparticles are governed by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs). The sensitivity of each LSPR mode, whose spatial distribution and resonant energy depend on the nanoparticle structure, composition and environment, has given rise to many potential photonic, optoelectronic, catalytic, photovoltaic, and gas- and bio-sensing applications. However, the precise interplay between the three-dimensional (3D) nanoparticle structure and the LSPRs is not always fully understood and a spectrally sensitive 3D imaging technique is needed to visualize the excitation on the nanometre scale. Here we show that 3D images related to LSPRs of an individual silver nanocube can be reconstructed through the application of electron energy-loss spectrum imaging, mapping the excitation across a range of orientations, with a novel combination of non-negative matrix factorization, compressed sensing and electron tomography. Our results extend the idea of substrate-mediated hybridization of dipolar and quadrupolar modes predicted by theory, simulations, and electron and optical spectroscopy, and provide experimental evidence of higher-energy mode hybridization. This work represents an advance both in the understanding of the optical response of noble-metal nanoparticles and in the probing, analysis and visualization of LSPRs.

  12. An Iterative Method for Improving the Quality of Reconstruction of a Three-Dimensional Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, G.N.; Levin, G.G.; Sukhorukov, K.A.

    2005-12-15

    A complex image with constraints imposed on the amplitude and phase image components is processed using the Gerchberg iterative algorithm for the first time. The use of the Gerchberg iterative algorithm makes it possible to improve the quality of a three-dimensional surface profile reconstructed by the previously proposed method that is based on the multiangle projection of fringes and the joint processing of the obtained images by Fourier synthesis.

  13. Apparent motion determined by surface layout not by disparity or three-dimensional distance.

    PubMed

    He, Z J; Nakayama, K

    1994-01-13

    The most meaningful events ecologically, including the motion of objects, occur in relation to or on surfaces. We run along the ground, cars travel on roads, balls roll across lawns, and so on. Even though there are other motions, such as flying of birds, it is likely that motion along surfaces is more frequent and more significant biologically. To examine whether events occurring in relation to surfaces have a preferred status in terms of visual representation, we asked whether the phenomenon of apparent motion would show a preference for motion attached to surfaces. We used a competitive three-dimensional motion paradigm and found that there is a preference to see motion between tokens placed within the same disparity as opposed to different planes. Supporting our surface-layout hypothesis, the effect of disparity was eliminated either by slanting the tokens so that they were all seen within the same surface plane or by inserting a single slanted background surface upon which the tokens could rest. Additionally, a highly curved stereoscopic surface led to the perception of a more circuitous motion path defined by that surface, instead of the shortest path in three-dimensional space.

  14. Laser electro-optic system for rapid three-dimensional /3-D/ topographic mapping of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, M. D.; Altschuler, B. R.; Taboada, J.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the generic utility of a robot in a factory/assembly environment could be substantially enhanced by providing a vision capability to the robot. A standard videocamera for robot vision provides a two-dimensional image which contains insufficient information for a detailed three-dimensional reconstruction of an object. Approaches which supply the additional information needed for the three-dimensional mapping of objects with complex surface shapes are briefly considered and a description is presented of a laser-based system which can provide three-dimensional vision to a robot. The system consists of a laser beam array generator, an optical image recorder, and software for controlling the required operations. The projection of a laser beam array onto a surface produces a dot pattern image which is viewed from one or more suitable perspectives. Attention is given to the mathematical method employed, the space coding technique, the approaches used for obtaining the transformation parameters, the optics for laser beam array generation, the hardware for beam array coding, and aspects of image acquisition.

  15. Modeling self-excited combustion instabilities using a combination of two- and three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvazinski, Matthew Evan

    Self-excited combustion instabilities have been studied using a combination of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. This work was undertaken to assess the ability of CFD simulations to generate the high-amplitude resonant combustion dynamics without external forcing or a combustion response function. Specifically, detached eddy simulations (DES), which allow for significantly coarser grid resolutions in wall bounded flows than traditional large eddy simulations (LES), were investigated for their capability of simulating the instability. A single-element laboratory rocket combustor which produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities is used for the configuration. The model rocket combustor uses an injector configuration based on practical oxidizer-rich staged-combustion devices; a sudden expansion combustion section; and uses decomposed hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer and gaseous methane as the fuel. A better understanding of the physics has been achieved using a series of diagnostics. Standard CFD outputs like instantaneous and time averaged flowfield outputs are combined with other tools, like the Rayleigh index to provide additional insight. The Rayleigh index is used to identify local regions in the combustor which are responsible for driving and damping the instability. By comparing the Rayleigh index to flowfield parameters it is possible to connect damping and driving to specific flowfield conditions. A cost effective procedure to compute multidimensional local Rayleigh index was developed. This work shows that combustion instabilities can be qualitatively simulated using two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations for fuel rich operating conditions. A full three-dimensional simulation produces a higher level of instability which agrees quite well with the experimental results. In addition to matching the level of instability the three-dimensional simulation also predicts the harmonic nature of the instability that is

  16. Near-field mapping of three-dimensional surface charge poles for hybridized plasmon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Ringe, Emilie; Hou, Mengjing; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2015-10-01

    We describe a new computational approach to mapping three-dimensional (3D) surface charge poles and thus to determine complicated and hybridized plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures via finite element method (FEM) calculations. 3D surface charge distributions at the near-field resonance energies are calculated directly using Gauss' law. For a nanosphere dimer, we demonstrate that higher-order hybridized plasmon modes can be addressed clearly. As an improvement to conventional mapping approaches, this new approach provides a better understanding of comprehensive physical image of plasmonic systems necessary for fundamental studies and spectroscopy applications.

  17. Real-time three-dimensional surface measurement by color encoded light projection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. Y.; Li, Y. F.; Guan, Q.; Xiao, G.

    2006-09-11

    Existing noncontact methods for surface measurement suffer from the disadvantages of poor reliability, low scanning speed, or high cost. The authors present a method for real-time three-dimensional data acquisition by a color-coded vision sensor composed of common components. The authors use a digital projector controlled by computer to generate desired color light patterns. The unique indexing of the light codes is a key problem and is solved in this study so that surface perception can be performed with only local pattern analysis of the neighbor color codes in a single image. Experimental examples and performance analysis are provided.

  18. Three-Dimensional Computational Model for Flow in an Over-Expanded Nozzle With Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, K. S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Hunter, Craig A.; Massey, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    A three-Dimensional computational model is used to simulate flow in a non-axisymmetric, convergent-divergent nozzle incorporating porous cavities for shock-boundary layer interaction control. The nozzle has an expansion ratio (exit area/throat area) of 1.797 and a design nozzle pressure ratio of 8.78. Flow fields for the baseline nozzle (no porosity) and for the nozzle with porous surfaces of 10% openness are computed for Nozzle Pressure Ratio (NPR) varying from 1.29 to 9.54. The three dimensional computational results indicate that baseline (no porosity) nozzle performance is dominated by unstable, shock-induced, boundary-layer separation at over-expanded conditions. For NPR less than or equal to 1.8, the separation is three dimensional, somewhat unsteady, and confined to a bubble (with partial reattachment over the nozzle flap). For NPR greater than or equal to 2.0, separation is steady and fully detached, and becomes more two dimensional as NPR increased. Numerical simulation of porous configurations indicates that a porous patch is capable of controlling off design separation in the nozzle by either alleviating separation or by encouraging stable separation of the exhaust flow. In the present paper, computational simulation results, wall centerline pressure, mach contours, and thrust efficiency ratio are presented, discussed and compared with experimental data. Results indicate that comparisons are in good agreement with experimental data. The three-dimensional simulation improves the comparisons for over-expanded flow conditions as compared with two-dimensional assumptions.

  19. A method to evaluate the three-dimensional roughness of fracture surfaces in brittle geomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tatone, Bryan S A; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2009-12-01

    Conventionally, the evaluation of fracture surface roughness in brittle geomaterials, such as concrete and rock, has been based on the measurement and analysis of two-dimensional profiles rather than three-dimensional (3D) surfaces. The primary reason for doing so was the lack of tools capable of making 3D measurements. However, in recent years, several optical and mechanical measurement tools have become available, which are capable of quickly and accurately producing high resolution point clouds defining 3D surfaces. This paper provides a methodology for evaluating the surface roughness and roughness anisotropy using these 3D surface measurements. The methodology is presented step-by-step to allow others to easily adopt and implement the process to analyze their own surface measurement data. The methodology is demonstrated by digitizing a series of concrete fracture surfaces and comparing the estimated 3D roughness parameters with qualitative observations and estimates of the well-known roughness coefficient, R(s).

  20. Transport signatures of surface potentials on three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Das, Sourin

    2016-02-01

    The spin-momentum-locked nature of the robust surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators (3D TIs) makes them promising candidates for spintronics applications. Surface potentials which respect time-reversal symmetry can exist at the surface between a 3D TI and the trivial vacuum. These potentials can distort the spin texture of the surface states while retaining their gapless nature. In this work, the effect of all such surface potentials on the spin textures is studied. Since a tunnel magnetoresistance signal carries the information of the spin texture, it is proposed that spin-polarized tunneling of electrons to a 3D TI surface can be used to uniquely identify the surface potentials and quantitatively characterize them.

  1. Testing photogrammetry-based techniques for three-dimensional surface documentation in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr; Jurda, Mikoláš

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface technologies particularly close range photogrammetry and optical surface scanning have recently advanced into affordable, flexible and accurate techniques. Forensic postmortem investigation as performed on a daily basis, however, has not yet fully benefited from their potentials. In the present paper, we tested two approaches to 3D external body documentation - digital camera-based photogrammetry combined with commercial Agisoft PhotoScan(®) software and stereophotogrammetry-based Vectra H1(®), a portable handheld surface scanner. In order to conduct the study three human subjects were selected, a living person, a 25-year-old female, and two forensic cases admitted for postmortem examination at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic (both 63-year-old males), one dead to traumatic, self-inflicted, injuries (suicide by hanging), the other diagnosed with the heart failure. All three cases were photographed in 360° manner with a Nikon 7000 digital camera and simultaneously documented with the handheld scanner. In addition to having recorded the pre-autopsy phase of the forensic cases, both techniques were employed in various stages of autopsy. The sets of collected digital images (approximately 100 per case) were further processed to generate point clouds and 3D meshes. Final 3D models (a pair per individual) were counted for numbers of points and polygons, then assessed visually and compared quantitatively using ICP alignment algorithm and a cloud point comparison technique based on closest point to point distances. Both techniques were proven to be easy to handle and equally laborious. While collecting the images at autopsy took around 20min, the post-processing was much more time-demanding and required up to 10h of computation time. Moreover, for the full-body scanning the post-processing of the handheld scanner required rather time-consuming manual image alignment. In all instances the applied approaches

  2. Testing photogrammetry-based techniques for three-dimensional surface documentation in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr; Jurda, Mikoláš

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface technologies particularly close range photogrammetry and optical surface scanning have recently advanced into affordable, flexible and accurate techniques. Forensic postmortem investigation as performed on a daily basis, however, has not yet fully benefited from their potentials. In the present paper, we tested two approaches to 3D external body documentation - digital camera-based photogrammetry combined with commercial Agisoft PhotoScan(®) software and stereophotogrammetry-based Vectra H1(®), a portable handheld surface scanner. In order to conduct the study three human subjects were selected, a living person, a 25-year-old female, and two forensic cases admitted for postmortem examination at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic (both 63-year-old males), one dead to traumatic, self-inflicted, injuries (suicide by hanging), the other diagnosed with the heart failure. All three cases were photographed in 360° manner with a Nikon 7000 digital camera and simultaneously documented with the handheld scanner. In addition to having recorded the pre-autopsy phase of the forensic cases, both techniques were employed in various stages of autopsy. The sets of collected digital images (approximately 100 per case) were further processed to generate point clouds and 3D meshes. Final 3D models (a pair per individual) were counted for numbers of points and polygons, then assessed visually and compared quantitatively using ICP alignment algorithm and a cloud point comparison technique based on closest point to point distances. Both techniques were proven to be easy to handle and equally laborious. While collecting the images at autopsy took around 20min, the post-processing was much more time-demanding and required up to 10h of computation time. Moreover, for the full-body scanning the post-processing of the handheld scanner required rather time-consuming manual image alignment. In all instances the applied approaches

  3. Coma aberrations in combined two- and three-dimensional STED nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Antonello, Jacopo; Kromann, Emil B.; Burke, Daniel; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopes, like all super-resolution methods, are sensitive to aberrations. Of particular importance are aberrations that affect the quality of the depletion focus, which requires a point of near-zero intensity surrounded by strong illumination. We present analysis, modeling, and experimental measurements that show the effects of coma aberrations on depletion patterns of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) STED configurations. Specifically, we find that identical coma aberrations create focal shifts in opposite directions in 2D and 3D STED. This phenomenon could affect the precision of microscopic measurements and has ramifications for the efficacy of combined 2D/3D STED systems. PMID:27472636

  4. Three dimensional complex plasma structures in a combined radio frequency and direct current discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitic, S.; Klumov, B. A.; Khrapak, S. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the first detailed analysis of large three dimensional (3D) complex plasma structures in experiments performed in pure rf and combined rf+dc discharge modes. Inductively coupled plasma is generated by an rf coil wrapped around the vertically positioned cylindrical glass tube at a pressure of 0.3 mbar. In addition, dc plasma can be generated by applying voltage to the electrodes at the ends of the tube far from the rf coil. The injected monodisperse particles are levitated in the plasma below the coil. A scanning laser sheet and a high resolution camera are used to determine the 3D positions of about 105 particles. The observed bowl-shaped particle clouds reveal coexistence of various structures, including well-distinguished solid-like, less ordered liquid-like, and pronounced string-like phases. New criteria to identify string-like structures are proposed.

  5. Coma aberrations in combined two- and three-dimensional STED nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; Kromann, Emil B; Burke, Daniel; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J

    2016-08-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopes, like all super-resolution methods, are sensitive to aberrations. Of particular importance are aberrations that affect the quality of the depletion focus, which requires a point of near-zero intensity surrounded by strong illumination. We present analysis, modeling, and experimental measurements that show the effects of coma aberrations on depletion patterns of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) STED configurations. Specifically, we find that identical coma aberrations create focal shifts in opposite directions in 2D and 3D STED. This phenomenon could affect the precision of microscopic measurements and has ramifications for the efficacy of combined 2D/3D STED systems. PMID:27472636

  6. Surface element-mapping of three dimensional structures by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresko, Christian; Kohns, Peter; Ankerhold, Georg

    2014-09-01

    During lateral mapping with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) the focal position of the plasma-generating laser needs to be kept stable on the sample surface area to be probed. Therefore, three-dimensional structures like edged surfaces require a permanent re-focusing. We describe a new auto-focusing technique to perform surface elemental mapping with LIBS by correcting the focusing lens-to-sample distance using a direct monitoring of the LIBS signal intensity. This method allows the scanning of surfaces with strong height fluctuations of several millimeters without the need of any additional devices. The auto-focusing method is valuable for LIBS applications made on complex-shaped samples or simply to improve the measurement reproducibility. Applications are LIBS analyses of samples exhibiting drill holes or steep edges. Our procedure does not need a constant focal plane and follows the topographic profile of the sample surface. Impurities and material inclusions are well detected. From the topographic information additionally obtained, a three-dimensional image of the sample can be deduced. Depth resolution is limited by the Rayleigh range of the LIBS laser light. The method is best suited for low energy laser pulses with high repetition rate and infrared emission.

  7. A nanoporous surface is essential for glomerular podocyte differentiation in three-dimensional culture

    PubMed Central

    Zennaro, Cristina; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Bakeine, Gerald James; Delfino, Riccarda; Tonon, Federica; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Gabriele; Artero, Mary; Tormen, Massimo; Carraro, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well recognized that cell–matrix interactions are based on both molecular and geometrical characteristics, the relationship between specific cell types and the three-dimensional morphology of the surface to which they are attached is poorly understood. This is particularly true for glomerular podocytes – the gatekeepers of glomerular filtration – which completely enwrap the glomerular basement membrane with their primary and secondary ramifications. Nanotechnologies produce biocompatible materials which offer the possibility to build substrates which differ only by topology in order to mimic the spatial organization of diverse basement membranes. With this in mind, we produced and utilized rough and porous surfaces obtained from silicon to analyze the behavior of two diverse ramified cells: glomerular podocytes and a neuronal cell line used as a control. Proper differentiation and development of ramifications of both cell types was largely influenced by topographical characteristics. Confirming previous data, the neuronal cell line acquired features of maturation on rough nanosurfaces. In contrast, podocytes developed and matured preferentially on nanoporous surfaces provided with grooves, as shown by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton stress fibers and the proper development of vinculin-positive focal adhesions. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that in vitro studies regarding podocyte attachment to the glomerular basement membrane should take into account the geometrical properties of the surface on which the tests are conducted because physiological cellular activity depends on the three-dimensional microenvironment. PMID:27757030

  8. Fragile surface zero-energy flat bands in three-dimensional chiral superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We study surface zero-energy flat bands in three-dimensional chiral superconductors with pz(px+i py) ν -wave pairing symmetry (ν is a nonzero integer), based on topological arguments and tunneling conductance. It is shown that the surface flat bands are fragile against (i) the surface misorientation and (ii) the surface Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The fragility of (i) is specific to chiral SCs, whereas that of (ii) happens for general odd-parity SCs. We demonstrate that these flat-band instabilities vanish or suppress a zero-bias conductance peak in a normal/insulator/superconductor junction, which behavior is clearly different from high-Tc cuprates and noncentrosymmetric superconductors. By calculating the angle-resolved conductance, we also discuss a topological surface state associated with the coexistence of line and point nodes.

  9. Investigation on three-dimensional surface roughness evaluation of engineering ceramic for rotary ultrasonic grinding machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shiliang; Zhao, Hong; Jing, Juntao

    2015-12-01

    Surface roughness has considerable influence on its quality and function of products in precision and ultra-precision machining, and the same situation applies to engineering ceramic for rotary ultrasonic grinding machining (RUGM). This paper presents a new parameter, called fractal root mean square deviation, for evaluating engineering ceramic three-dimensional (3D) surface roughness of RUGM. Based on engineering ceramics surface of RUGM is typical isotropic, the mathematical model of fractal root mean square deviation was established, and it possesses double characteristics of absolute measurement and multi-scale. Then validation has been implemented, and fractal root mean square deviation is superior to evaluate engineering ceramic 3D surface roughness with better resolution and sensitivity. Furthermore, the relationship between main factor parameters and fractal root mean square deviation was proposed. The evaluation parameter and the results could be implemented in practice to get higher quality surface.

  10. Three-dimensional unsteady lifting surface theory in the subsonic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuessner, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    The methods of the unsteady lifting surface theory are surveyed. Linearized Euler's equations are simplified by means of a Galileo-Lorentz transformation and a Laplace transformation so that the time and the compressibility of the fluid are limited to two constants. The solutions to this simplified problem are represented as integrals with a differential nucleus; these results in tolerance conditions, for which any exact solution must suffice. It is shown that none of the existing three-dimensional lifting surface theories in subsonic range satisfy these conditions. An oscillating elliptic lifting surface which satisfies the tolerance conditions is calculated through the use of Lame's functions. Numerical examples are calculated for the borderline cases of infinitely stretched elliptic lifting surfaces and of circular lifting surfaces. Out of the harmonic solutions any such temporal changes of the down current are calculated through the use of an inverse Laplace transformation.

  11. Three-dimensional flow of a viscoelastic fluid on an exponentially stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal Ashraf, M.; Hayat, T.; Shehzad, S. A.; Malaikah, H.

    2016-05-01

    An analysis of a three-dimensional viscoelastic fluid flow over an exponentially stretching surface is carried out in the presence of heat transfer. Constitutive equations of a second-grade fluid are employed. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced by appropriate transformations to ordinary differential equations. Series solutions of these equations are found, and their convergence is discussed. The influence of the prominent parameters involved in the heat transfer process is analyzed. It is found that the effects of the Prandtl number, viscoelastic parameter, velocity ratio parameter, and temperature exponent on the Nusselt number are qualitatively similar.

  12. Interactive computer graphic surface modeling of three-dimensional solid domains for boundary element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perucchio, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the boundary element method (BEM) as a valid tool for solving problems in structural mechanics and in other fields of applied physics is discussed. The development of an integrated interactive computer graphic system for the application of the BEM to three dimensional problems in elastostatics is described. The integration of interactive computer graphic techniques and the BEM takes place at the preprocessing and postprocessing stages of the analysis process, when, respectively, the data base is generated and the results are interpreted. The interactive computer graphic modeling techniques used for generating and discretizing the boundary surfaces of a solid domain are outlined.

  13. Modeling self-excited combustion instabilities using a combination of two- and three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvazinski, Matthew Evan

    Self-excited combustion instabilities have been studied using a combination of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. This work was undertaken to assess the ability of CFD simulations to generate the high-amplitude resonant combustion dynamics without external forcing or a combustion response function. Specifically, detached eddy simulations (DES), which allow for significantly coarser grid resolutions in wall bounded flows than traditional large eddy simulations (LES), were investigated for their capability of simulating the instability. A single-element laboratory rocket combustor which produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities is used for the configuration. The model rocket combustor uses an injector configuration based on practical oxidizer-rich staged-combustion devices; a sudden expansion combustion section; and uses decomposed hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer and gaseous methane as the fuel. A better understanding of the physics has been achieved using a series of diagnostics. Standard CFD outputs like instantaneous and time averaged flowfield outputs are combined with other tools, like the Rayleigh index to provide additional insight. The Rayleigh index is used to identify local regions in the combustor which are responsible for driving and damping the instability. By comparing the Rayleigh index to flowfield parameters it is possible to connect damping and driving to specific flowfield conditions. A cost effective procedure to compute multidimensional local Rayleigh index was developed. This work shows that combustion instabilities can be qualitatively simulated using two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations for fuel rich operating conditions. A full three-dimensional simulation produces a higher level of instability which agrees quite well with the experimental results. In addition to matching the level of instability the three-dimensional simulation also predicts the harmonic nature of the instability that is

  14. Three-dimensional assessment of dental casts' occlusal surfaces using two impression materials.

    PubMed

    Tarawneh, F M; Panos, P G; Athanasiou, A E

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess by means of a three-dimensional computed tomography scanning system the occlusal surface characteristics of dental casts made using two different impression materials. Alginate and polyvinyl siloxane impressions were taken of 20 dental students resulting in 40 dental casts. The casts were paired for each student separately so that each pair consisted of an alginate poured cast and a polyvinyl siloxane poured out cast. The casts were scanned using FlashCT scanner and for each cast, a three-dimensional digital image was obtained. The digitized casts were processed using the three-dimensional imaging software Geomagic Studio 9. A total of 464 paired teeth were digitally separated and superimposed. For each tooth, two measurements were obtained corresponding to the two different impression materials used. The two sets of volumes for all digitally separated teeth were compared and analysed using the Wilcoxon signed test. Larger volume measurements were obtained for teeth separated from alginate poured out casts than from their corresponding ones from polyvinyl siloxane casts (P = 0.005). When the teeth were divided into the groups of incisors, canines and premolars/molars, only the last one exhibited significant difference (P = 0.00). The mean difference between the volumes measured for all 464 teeth separated was 0.041 mm(3) (+/-0.33). The occlusal surfaces of teeth appear differently in dental casts depending on the impression materials used. Impressions of dental casts should be utilized with caution in relation to their research application and in reference with dental wear studies.

  15. Fabrication of amphiphobic surface by using titanium anodization for large-area three-dimensional substrates.

    PubMed

    Barthwal, Sumit; Kim, Young Su; Lim, Si-Hyung

    2013-06-15

    Superamphiphobic functional Ti foils were fabricated using anodization techniques. By varying the supply voltage and anodization time, a two-step anodization method was used to maximize the contact angle of water and various oils. The morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surface is important to achieve superamphiphobicitiy. The anodized surface maintained good superamphiphobic stability with long-term storage. Furthermore, the wettability properties toward both water and various oils can be easily and reversibly switched from hydrophobic and oleophobic to hydrophilic and oleophilic, respectively, and vice versa via air-plasma treatment and fluorination. The developed simple technique can be applied to any large-area three-dimensional surfaces to fabricate amphiphobic Ti surfaces. PMID:23545242

  16. Application of S-transform profilometry in train wheel surface three dimensional measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiqing; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Jiayuan

    2015-12-01

    A three dimensional (3D) measurement method for train wheel surface is proposed based on S-transform profilometry. This method is based on S-transform in fringe analysis. A fringe pattern with a carrier frequency component is projected onto the wheel tread, the deformed fringe patterns caused by the height distribution of wheel surface is recorded as an image, and the fundamental spectrum of S-transform spectra from the image is abstracted by use of weighting filters, then the wrapped phase is obtained by IFFT of the fundamental spectrum. 2D-SRNCP (sorting by reliability following a non-continuous path) phase unwrapping algorithm is used to unwrap phase, which can be used to reconstruct the surface distribution of wheel. Simulation and testing experiment is taken and the result shows that, comparing with light-section method, this method can realize a faster inspection and a higher accuracy measurement of 3D wheel surface.

  17. Three-dimensional reconstruction of surface-breaking flaws using finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchtein, R. Schifini; Bruno, A. C.

    2000-05-01

    We present an iterative algorithm that reconstructs the geometry of three-dimensional surface-breaking flaws from measurements using an NDE magnetic flux leakage technique. Several surface-breaking flaws in a ferromagnetic sample have been modeled using the finite element method and later reconstructed by an optimization routine. This reconstruction was achieved by modifying the coordinates of several surface nodes of the finite element mesh, solving the magnetostatic problem, and optimizing it by a least-squares method. The magnetic field was measured above the surface of the sample. This inverse solution algorithm might be particularly useful to characterize flaws detected by magnetic in-line inspection tools in oil and gas pipelines.

  18. Fabrication of amphiphobic surface by using titanium anodization for large-area three-dimensional substrates.

    PubMed

    Barthwal, Sumit; Kim, Young Su; Lim, Si-Hyung

    2013-06-15

    Superamphiphobic functional Ti foils were fabricated using anodization techniques. By varying the supply voltage and anodization time, a two-step anodization method was used to maximize the contact angle of water and various oils. The morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surface is important to achieve superamphiphobicitiy. The anodized surface maintained good superamphiphobic stability with long-term storage. Furthermore, the wettability properties toward both water and various oils can be easily and reversibly switched from hydrophobic and oleophobic to hydrophilic and oleophilic, respectively, and vice versa via air-plasma treatment and fluorination. The developed simple technique can be applied to any large-area three-dimensional surfaces to fabricate amphiphobic Ti surfaces.

  19. A three-dimensional parametric mesher with surface boundary-layer capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, R.; Karamete, B. K.; Mestreau, E. L.; Dey, S.

    2014-08-01

    A novel parametric surface meshing technique is presented. Its distinctive feature relies on successive approximations of the CAD geometry through a hierarchical process where geometric information is gathered incrementally. A detailed review of zero- and first-order surface approximations and their impact on parametric surface meshing algorithms is performed. The proposed approach emphasizes the use of three-dimensional information in order to be as independent as possible of the parametrization to overcome limitations of meshing purely in the parametric plane. The presented technique includes semi-structured boundary-layer surface mesh generation which is a critical capability for accurate solutions to flows around geometries that have leading edge features. Numerous examples illustrate the method's robustness and ability to high-quality meshes for complex CAD geometries.

  20. Combined optimal quantization and lossless coding of digital holograms of three-dimensional objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortt, Alison E.; Naughton, Thomas J.; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-10-01

    Digital holography is an inherently three-dimensional (3D) technique for the capture of real-world objects. Many existing 3D imaging and processing techniques are based on the explicit combination of several 2D perspectives (or light stripes, etc.) through digital image processing. The advantage of recording a hologram is that multiple 2D perspectives can be optically combined in parallel, and in a constant number of steps independent of the hologram size. Although holography and its capabilities have been known for many decades, it is only very recently that digital holography has been practically investigated due to the recent development of megapixel digital sensors with sufficient spatial resolution and dynamic range. The applications of digital holography could include 3D television, virtual reality, and medical imaging. If these applications are realized, compression standards will have to be defined. We outline the techniques that have been proposed to date for the compression of digital hologram data and show that they are comparable to the performance of what in communication theory is known as optimal signal quantization. We adapt the optimal signal quantization technique to complex-valued 2D signals. The technique relies on knowledge of the histograms of real and imaginary values in the digital holograms. Our digital holograms of 3D objects are captured using phase-shift interferometry. We complete the compression procedure by applying lossless techniques to the quantized holographic pixels.

  1. Image system for three dimensional, 360 DEGREE, time sequence surface mapping of moving objects

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Shin-Yee

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional motion camera system comprises a light projector placed between two synchronous video cameras all focused on an object-of-interest. The light projector shines a sharp pattern of vertical lines (Ronchi ruling) on the object-of-interest that appear to be bent differently to each camera by virtue of the surface shape of the object-of-interest and the relative geometry of the cameras, light projector and object-of-interest Each video frame is captured in a computer memory and analyzed. Since the relative geometry is known and the system pre-calibrated, the unknown three-dimensional shape of the object-of-interest can be solved for by matching the intersections of the projected light lines with orthogonal epipolar lines corresponding to horizontal rows in the video camera frames. A surface reconstruction is made and displayed on a monitor screen. For 360.degree. all around coverage of theobject-of-interest, two additional sets of light projectors and corresponding cameras are distributed about 120.degree. apart from one another.

  2. Image system for three dimensional, 360{degree}, time sequence surface mapping of moving objects

    DOEpatents

    Lu, S.Y.

    1998-12-22

    A three-dimensional motion camera system comprises a light projector placed between two synchronous video cameras all focused on an object-of-interest. The light projector shines a sharp pattern of vertical lines (Ronchi ruling) on the object-of-interest that appear to be bent differently to each camera by virtue of the surface shape of the object-of-interest and the relative geometry of the cameras, light projector and object-of-interest. Each video frame is captured in a computer memory and analyzed. Since the relative geometry is known and the system pre-calibrated, the unknown three-dimensional shape of the object-of-interest can be solved for by matching the intersections of the projected light lines with orthogonal epipolar lines corresponding to horizontal rows in the video camera frames. A surface reconstruction is made and displayed on a monitor screen. For 360{degree} all around coverage of the object-of-interest, two additional sets of light projectors and corresponding cameras are distributed about 120{degree} apart from one another. 20 figs.

  3. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction within noncontact diffuse optical tomography using structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Kirstin; Hartmann, Raimo; Bischoff, Tobias; Oelerich, Jan O.; Finkensieper, Stephan; Heverhagen, Johannes T.

    2012-12-01

    A main field in biomedical optics research is diffuse optical tomography, where intensity variations of the transmitted light traversing through tissue are detected. Mathematical models and reconstruction algorithms based on finite element methods and Monte Carlo simulations describe the light transport inside the tissue and determine differences in absorption and scattering coefficients. Precise knowledge of the sample's surface shape and orientation is required to provide boundary conditions for these techniques. We propose an integrated method based on structured light three-dimensional (3-D) scanning that provides detailed surface information of the object, which is usable for volume mesh creation and allows the normalization of the intensity dispersion between surface and camera. The experimental setup is complemented by polarization difference imaging to avoid overlaying byproducts caused by inter-reflections and multiple scattering in semitransparent tissue.

  4. Digital multi-step phase-shifting profilometry for three-dimensional ballscrew surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Yen, Tzu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    A digital multi-step phase-shifting profilometry for three-dimensional (3-D) ballscrew surface imaging is presented. The 3-D digital imaging system is capable of capturing fringe pattern images. The straight fringe patterns generated by software in the computer are projected onto the ballscrew surface by the DLP projector. The distorted fringe patterns are captured by the CCD camera at different detecting directions for reconstruction algorithms. The seven-step phase-shifting algorithm and quality guided path unwrapping algorithm are used to calculate absolute phase at each pixel position. The 3-D calibration method is used to obtain the relationship between the absolute phase map and ballscrew shape. The angular dependence of 3-D shape imaging for ballscrews is analyzed and characterized. The experimental results may provide a novel, fast, and high accuracy imaging system to inspect the surface features of the ballscrew without length limitation for automated optical inspection industry.

  5. Fabrication of a Au-polystyrene sphere substrate with three-dimensional nanofeatures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaotang; Xu, Zongwei; Li, Kang; Fang, Fengzhou; Wang, Liyang

    2015-11-01

    Methods for fabricating three-dimensional nanofeature arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates were explored by combining the self-assembly of nanoscale polystyrene (PS) spheres with subsequent Au film ion sputter coating modulation. The substrate's nanoscale hot-spot features were controlled using the Au coating film thickness regulation and focused ion beam (FIB) nano-patterning regulation methods. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the substrate morphology and the enhancement mechanism of the three-dimensional SERS substrate. PS microspheres with diameters of 151 nm and 360 nm were coated with Au layers of different thicknesses ranging from 10 nm to 270 nm. The configuration of the Au-PS spheres can be regulated to hexagonal close packing with nanoscale V-shaped slits with a 10-20 nm gap pattern. Nanoscale Au particles and clusters with a clear outline covered the surface of the PS spheres, in which the multiple-scale structures increase the specific surface area of the SERS-active substrate. Nanoscale cracks formed on the smaller Au-PS spheres with a diameter of 151 nm, which also exhibited strong SERS activity. The substrate surface temperature regularly increased after Au coating, and the thermal expansion coefficient difference and PS glass transition properties were studied to explain the Au-PS spheres nanofeature configuration development. The fabricated Au-PS spheres SERS feature is a type of three-dimensional and highly ordered array, which can show Raman scattering characteristics by providing a SERS enhancement factor of greater than 107.

  6. Three-dimensional assessment of condylar surface changes and remodeling after orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hye; Lee, Woo-Jin; Shin, Jae-Myung; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate condylar surface changes and remodeling after orthognathic surgery using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) imaging, including comparisons between the right and left sides and between the sexes. Materials and Methods Forty patients (20 males and 20 females) who underwent multi-detector CT examinations before and after surgery were selected. Three-dimensional images comprising thousands of points on the condylar surface were obtained before and after surgery. For the quantitative assessment of condylar surface changes, point-to-point (preoperative-to-postoperative) distances were calculated using D processing software. These point-to-point distances were converted to a color map. In order to evaluate the types of condylar remodeling, the condylar head was divided into six areas (anteromedial, anteromiddle, anterolateral, posteromedial, posteromiddle, and posterolateral areas) and each area was classified into three types of condylar remodeling (bone formation, no change, and bone resorption) based on the color map. Additionally, comparative analyses were performed between the right and left sides and according to sex. Results The mean of the average point-to-point distances on condylar surface was 0.11±0.03 mm. Bone resorption occurred more frequently than other types of condylar remodeling, especially in the lateral areas. However, bone formation in the anteromedial area was particularly prominent. No significant difference was found between the right and left condyles, but condylar surface changes in males were significantly larger than in females. Conclusion This study revealed that condylar remodeling exhibited a tendency towards bone resorption, especially in the lateral areas. Condylar surface changes occurred, but were small. PMID:27051636

  7. Three-dimensional superresolution colocalization of intracellular protein superstructures and the cell surface in live Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Lew, Matthew D; Lee, Steven F; Ptacin, Jerod L; Lee, Marissa K; Twieg, Robert J; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W E

    2011-11-15

    Recently, single-molecule imaging and photocontrol have enabled superresolution optical microscopy of cellular structures beyond Abbe's diffraction limit, extending the frontier of noninvasive imaging of structures within living cells. However, live-cell superresolution imaging has been challenged by the need to image three-dimensional (3D) structures relative to their biological context, such as the cellular membrane. We have developed a technique, termed superresolution by power-dependent active intermittency and points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography (SPRAIPAINT) that combines imaging of intracellular enhanced YFP (eYFP) fusions (SPRAI) with stochastic localization of the cell surface (PAINT) to image two different fluorophores sequentially with only one laser. Simple light-induced blinking of eYFP and collisional flux onto the cell surface by Nile red are used to achieve single-molecule localizations, without any antibody labeling, cell membrane permeabilization, or thiol-oxygen scavenger systems required. Here we demonstrate live-cell 3D superresolution imaging of Crescentin-eYFP, a cytoskeletal fluorescent protein fusion, colocalized with the surface of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus using a double-helix point spread function microscope. Three-dimensional colocalization of intracellular protein structures and the cell surface with superresolution optical microscopy opens the door for the analysis of protein interactions in living cells with excellent precision (20-40 nm in 3D) over a large field of view (12 12 μm).

  8. Atomically resolved three-dimensional structures of electrolyte aqueous solutions near a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-07-15

    Interfacial liquid layers play a central role in a variety of phenomena ranging from friction to molecular recognition. Liquids near a solid surface form an interfacial layer where the molecular structure is different from that of the bulk. Here we report atomic resolution three-dimensional images of electrolyte solutions near a mica surface that demonstrate the existence of three types of interfacial structures. At low concentrations (0.01-1 M), cations are adsorbed onto the mica. The cation layer is topped by a few hydration layers. At higher concentrations, the interfacial layer extends several nanometres into the liquid. It involves the alternation of cation and anion planes. Fluid Density Functional calculations show that water molecules are a critical factor for stabilizing the structure of the interfacial layer. The interfacial layer stabilizes a crystal-like structure compatible with liquid-like ion and solvent mobilities. At saturation, some ions precipitate and small crystals are formed on the mica.

  9. Atomically resolved three-dimensional structures of electrolyte aqueous solutions near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial liquid layers play a central role in a variety of phenomena ranging from friction to molecular recognition. Liquids near a solid surface form an interfacial layer where the molecular structure is different from that of the bulk. Here we report atomic resolution three-dimensional images of electrolyte solutions near a mica surface that demonstrate the existence of three types of interfacial structures. At low concentrations (0.01-1 M), cations are adsorbed onto the mica. The cation layer is topped by a few hydration layers. At higher concentrations, the interfacial layer extends several nanometres into the liquid. It involves the alternation of cation and anion planes. Fluid Density Functional calculations show that water molecules are a critical factor for stabilizing the structure of the interfacial layer. The interfacial layer stabilizes a crystal-like structure compatible with liquid-like ion and solvent mobilities. At saturation, some ions precipitate and small crystals are formed on the mica.

  10. Parallel Simulation of Three-Dimensional Free Surface Fluid Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    BAER,THOMAS A.; SACKINGER,PHILIP A.; SUBIA,SAMUEL R.

    1999-10-14

    Simulation of viscous three-dimensional fluid flow typically involves a large number of unknowns. When free surfaces are included, the number of unknowns increases dramatically. Consequently, this class of problem is an obvious application of parallel high performance computing. We describe parallel computation of viscous, incompressible, free surface, Newtonian fluid flow problems that include dynamic contact fines. The Galerkin finite element method was used to discretize the fully-coupled governing conservation equations and a ''pseudo-solid'' mesh mapping approach was used to determine the shape of the free surface. In this approach, the finite element mesh is allowed to deform to satisfy quasi-static solid mechanics equations subject to geometric or kinematic constraints on the boundaries. As a result, nodal displacements must be included in the set of unknowns. Other issues discussed are the proper constraints appearing along the dynamic contact line in three dimensions. Issues affecting efficient parallel simulations include problem decomposition to equally distribute computational work among a SPMD computer and determination of robust, scalable preconditioners for the distributed matrix systems that must be solved. Solution continuation strategies important for serial simulations have an enhanced relevance in a parallel coquting environment due to the difficulty of solving large scale systems. Parallel computations will be demonstrated on an example taken from the coating flow industry: flow in the vicinity of a slot coater edge. This is a three dimensional free surface problem possessing a contact line that advances at the web speed in one region but transitions to static behavior in another region. As such, a significant fraction of the computational time is devoted to processing boundary data. Discussion focuses on parallel speed ups for fixed problem size, a class of problems of immediate practical importance.

  11. Novel fabrication technology for three-dimensional high surface area pyrolized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Vinh; Shimada, Mark; Szeto, David; Mukherjee, Partha P.; Kang, Qinjun; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Madou, Marc J.

    2010-04-01

    High specific surface area structures are used in a variety of applications including production of highly sensitive biosensors, fabrication of separation membranes, manufacturing of high throughput catalytic microreactors, and development of efficient electrodes for batteries and fuel cells. In many electrochemical applications (i.e. sensors and batteries) it's also critical to have good conductive properties of the fabricated high surface area structures. For energy harvesting technologies such as batteries and fuel cells, careful design of surface-to-volume ratio of the electrode surface is important, because while high specific surface area facilitates electrochemical reaction rates, it also increases overall electrode resistance. Thus, it is desirable to construct electrodes with a range of hierarchical features (for example with fractal structures). We invented a novel fabrication technology for creating three-dimensional conductive high surface area structures based on the deposition and subsequent processing of the electroactive polymers (EAP). The proposed fabrication technique is capable of fast and inexpensive production of high surface area structures with the designed geometry, porosity, and conductivity.

  12. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffolds combined with bone marrow cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yao, Qingqiang; Guo, Yang; Mao, Fengyong; Liu, Shuai; Xu, Yan; Wang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic potential of three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite (PCL-HA) scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells in vitro and the effect of PCL-HA scaffolds on osteochondral repair in vivo. Here, bone marrow was added to the prepared PCL-HA scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 10 weeks. Osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of 29 knees in 17 New Zealand white rabbits, which were then divided into four groups that underwent: implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds (left knee, n = 17; Group 1), microfracture (right knee, n = 6; Group 2), autologous osteochondral transplantation (right knee, n = 6; Group 3), and no treatment (right knee, n = 5; Control). Extracellular matrix produced by bone marrow cells covered the surface and filled the pores of PCL-HA scaffolds after 10 weeks in culture. Moreover, many cell-laden cartilage lacunae were observed, and cartilage matrix was concentrated in the PCL-HA scaffolds. After a 12-week repair period, Group 1 showed excellent vertical and lateral integration with host bone, but incomplete cartilage regeneration and matrix accumulation. An uneven surface of regenerated cartilage and reduced distribution of cartilage matrix were observed in Group 2. In addition, abnormal bone growth and unstable integration between repaired and host tissues were detected. For Group 3, the integration between transplanted and host cartilage was interrupted. Our findings indicate that the PCL-HA scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells improved chondrogenesis in vitro and implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds for osteochondral repairenhanced integration with host bone. However, cartilage regeneration remained unsatisfactory. The addition of trophic factors or the use of precultured cell-PCL-HA constructs for accelerated osteochondral repair requires further investigation.

  13. Enhanced three-dimensional stochastic adjustment for combined volcano geodetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Potro, R.; Muller, C.

    2009-12-01

    Volcano geodesy is unquestionably a necessary technique in studies of physical volcanology and for eruption early warning systems. However, as every volcano geodesist knows, obtaining measurements of the required resolution using traditional campaigns and techniques is time consuming and requires a large manpower. Moreover, most volcano geodetic networks worldwide use a combination of data from traditional techniques; levelling, electronic distance measurements (EDM), triangulation and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) but, in most cases, these data are surveyed, analysed and adjusted independently. This then leaves it to the authors’ criteria to decide which technique renders the most realistic results in each case. Herein we present a way of solving the problem of inter-methodology data integration in a cost-effective manner following a methodology were all the geodetic data of a redundant, combined network (e.g. surveyed by GNSS, levelling, distance, angular data, INSAR, extensometers, etc.) is adjusted stochastically within a single three-dimensional referential frame. The adjustment methodology is based on the least mean square method and links the data with its geometrical component providing combined, precise, three-dimensional, displacement vectors, relative to external reference points as well as stochastically-quantified, benchmark-specific, uncertainty ellipsoids. Three steps in the adjustment allow identifying, and hence dismissing, flagrant measurement errors (antenna height, atmospheric effects, etc.), checking the consistency of external reference points and a final adjustment of the data. Moreover, since the statistical indicators can be obtained from expected uncertainties in the measurements of the different geodetic techniques used (i.e. independent of the measured data), it is possible to run a priori simulations of a geodetic network in order to constrain its resolution, and reduce logistics, before the network is even built. In this

  14. Reusable three-dimensional nanostructured substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To date, fabricating three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured substrate with small nanogap was a laborious challenge by conventional fabrication techniques. In this article, we address a simple, low-cost, large-area, and spatially controllable method to fabricate 3D nanostructures, involving hemisphere, hemiellipsoid, and pyramidal pits based on nanosphere lithography (NSL). These 3D nanostructures were used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecule. The average SERS enhancement factor achieved up to 1011. The inevitably negative influence of the adhesion-promoting intermediate layer of Cr or Ti was resolved by using such kind of 3D nanostructures. The nanostructured quartz substrate is a free platform as a SERS substrate and is nondestructive when altering with different metal films and is recyclable, which avoids the laborious and complicated fabricating procedures. PMID:24417892

  15. Three-dimensional topographies of water surface dimples formed by superhydrophobic water strider legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Zheng, Y. L.; Lu, H. Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Tian, Y.

    2016-10-01

    A water strider has a remarkable capability to stand and walk freely on water. Supporting forces of a water strider and a bionic robot have been calculated from the side view of pressed depth of legs to reconstruct the water surface dimples. However, in situ measurements of the multiple leg forces and significantly small leg/water contact dimples have not been realized yet. In this study, a shadow method was proposed to reconstruct the in situ three-dimensional topographies of leg/water contact dimples and their corresponding supporting forces. Results indicated that the supporting forces were affected by the depth, width, and length of the dimple, and that the maximum dimple depth was not proportional to the supporting forces. The shadow method also has advantages in disclosing tiny supporting force of legs in their subtle actions. These results are helpful for understanding the locomotion principles of water-walking insects and the design of biomimetic aquatic devices.

  16. New efficient algorithm for the isometric embedding of 2-surface metrics in three dimensional Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Wolfgang; McDonald, Jonathan R.; Miller, Warner A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new numerical method for the isometric embedding of 2-geometries specified by their 2-metrics in three-dimensional Euclidean space. Our approach is to directly solve the fundamental embedding equation supplemented by six conditions that fix translations and rotations of the embedded surface. This set of equations is discretized by means of a pseudospectral collocation point method. The resulting nonlinear system of equations are then solved by a Newton-Raphson scheme. We explain our numerical algorithm in detail. By studying several examples we show that our method converges provided we start the Newton-Raphson scheme from a suitable initial guess. Our novel method is very efficient for smooth 2-metrics.

  17. Review of three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for oncoplastic, reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Rachel L; Stevens, Roger J G; Harris, Paul A; Rusby, Jennifer E

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional surface imaging (3D-SI) is being marketed as a tool in aesthetic breast surgery. It has recently also been studied in the objective evaluation of cosmetic outcome of oncological procedures. The aim of this review is to summarise the use of 3D-SI in oncoplastic, reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery. An extensive literature review was undertaken to identify published studies. Two reviewers independently screened all abstracts and selected relevant articles using specific inclusion criteria. Seventy two articles relating to 3D-SI for breast surgery were identified. These covered endpoints such as image acquisition, calculations and data obtainable, comparison of 3D and 2D imaging and clinical research applications of 3D-SI. The literature provides a favourable view of 3D-SI. However, evidence of its superiority over current methods of clinical decision making, surgical planning, communication and evaluation of outcome is required before it can be accepted into mainstream practice.

  18. Methodology for three-dimensional reconstruction of the tongue surface from ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Sonies, Barbara C.

    1995-05-01

    A three-dimensional ultrasound imaging system was developed for studying tongue configurations during speech and swallowing. A sequence of two-dimensional ultrasound B- mode images was acquired by moving the ultrasound transducer under the subject's chin. A six-degree-of-freedom electromagnetic position sensor was used in order to determine the spatial position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer during the scanning. Registration of image slices was achieved by using a time code generator to synchronize ultrasound images with the spatial information. Techniques were developed for 3D reconstruction of the tongue surface from multi-planar ultrasound scans using both commercial software and NIH- developed programs for PC and Macintosh computers. The system demonstrated its potential to quickly acquire and reconstruct 3D tongue images, and to assist speech pathologists and radiologists in speech and swallowing disorder diagnosis.

  19. The Application of Three-Dimensional Surface Imaging System in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Yang, Xin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system has gained popularity worldwide in clinical application. Unlike computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, it has the ability to capture 3D images with both shape and texture information. This feature has made it quite useful for plastic surgeons. This review article is mainly focusing on demonstrating the current status and analyzing the future of the application of 3D surface imaging systems in plastic and reconstructive surgery.Currently, 3D surface imaging system is mainly used in plastic and reconstructive surgery to help improve the reliability of surgical planning and assessing surgical outcome objectively. There have already been reports of its using on plastic and reconstructive surgery from head to toe. Studies on facial aging process, online applications development, and so on, have also been done through the use of 3D surface imaging system.Because different types of 3D surface imaging devices have their own advantages and disadvantages, a basic knowledge of their features is required and careful thought should be taken to choose the one that best fits a surgeon's demand.In the future, by integrating with other imaging tools and the 3D printing technology, 3D surface imaging system will play an important role in individualized surgical planning, implants production, meticulous surgical simulation, operative techniques training, and patient education. PMID:27015345

  20. Tissue growth into three-dimensional composite scaffolds with controlled micro-features and nanotopographical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Arash; Dunlop, John W C; Fratzl, Peter; Bagheri, Reza; Vossoughi, Manouchehr

    2013-10-01

    Controlling topographic features at all length scales is of great importance for the interaction of cells with tissue regenerative materials. We utilized an indirect three-dimensional printing method to fabricate polymeric scaffolds with pre-defined and controlled external and internal architecture that had an interconnected structure with macro- (400-500 μm) and micro- (∼25 μm) porosity. Polycaprolactone (PCL) was used as model system to study the kinetics of tissue growth within porous scaffolds. The surface of the scaffolds was decorated with TiO2 and bioactive glass (BG) nanoparticles to the better match to nanoarchitecture of extracellular matrix (ECM). Micrometric BG particles were also used to reveal the effect of particle size on the cell behavior. Observation of tissue growth and enzyme activity on two-dimensional (2D) films and three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds showed effects of nanoparticle inclusion and of surface curvature on the cellular adhesion, proliferation, and kinetics of preosteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) tissue growth into the pore channels. It was found that the presence of nanoparticles in the substrate impaired cellular adhesion and proliferation in 3D structures. Evaluation of alkaline phosphate activity showed that the presence of the hard particles affects differentiation of the cells on 2D films. Notwithstanding, the effect of particles on cell differentiation was not as strong as that seen by the curvature of the substrate. We observed different effects of nanofeatures on 2D structures with those of 3D scaffolds, which influence the cell proliferation and differentiation for non-load-bearing applications in bone regenerative medicine. PMID:23463703

  1. Imaging three-dimensional surface objects with submolecular resolution by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, César; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Shimizu, Tomoko K; Custance, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    Submolecular imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been established as a stunning technique to reveal the chemical structure of unknown molecules, to characterize intramolecular charge distributions and bond ordering, as well as to study chemical transformations and intermolecular interactions. So far, most of these feats were achieved on planar molecular systems because high-resolution imaging of three-dimensional (3D) surface structures with AFM remains challenging. Here we present a method for high-resolution imaging of nonplanar molecules and 3D surface systems using AFM with silicon cantilevers as force sensors. We demonstrate this method by resolving the step-edges of the (101) anatase surface at the atomic scale by simultaneously visualizing the structure of a pentacene molecule together with the atomic positions of the substrate and by resolving the contour and probe-surface force field on a C60 molecule with intramolecular resolution. The method reported here holds substantial promise for the study of 3D surface systems such as nanotubes, clusters, nanoparticles, polymers, and biomolecules using AFM with high resolution.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of surface roughness of resin composites after finishing and polishing

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena S; Sainudeen, Shan; Padmanabhan, Prabeesh; Vijayashankar, L V; Sujathan, Unu; Pillai, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to investigate the effects of finishing and polishing procedures on four novel resin composites using three-dimensional optical profilometer. Materials and Methods: Four composites classified according to their filler size, were selected: Filtek™ Z350 XT/Nanofill (3M™ ESPE™), Esthet-X HD/Hybrid (Dentsply Caulk), Te Econom/Microfill (Ivoclar Vivadent®), Tetric EvoCeram® /Nanohybrid (Ivoclar Vivadent®). Composite specimens were made in Plexiglass mold and polished with Soflex (3M ESPE), Enhance + Pogo (Dentsply Caulk). Both the systems were used according to the manufacturers’ instructions, and the polished surfaces were assessed with an optical profilometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal-Wallis test and further pairwise comparison were performed by Mann-Whitney test. Results: The smoothest surfaces for all the resin composites tested were obtained from the Mylar strip; statistically significant differences were observed among them (P = 0.001). The order of composites was ranked from the lowest to highest surface roughness; Filtek Z350 XT < Te Econom < Tetric EvoCeram < Esthet XHD. Pairwise multiple comparison with Mann-Whitney test showed Filtek Z350 to have the smoothest surface and the least with Teric EvoCeram. Among the polishing systems, Soflex showed the smoothest surface and was significantly different from Pogo (P = 0.046). Conclusions: The effectiveness of the polishing systems seems to be dependent on the material used, treatment modality and also on the filler particle size. PMID:26957802

  3. Simultaneous formation of ultrahigh surface area and three-dimensional hierarchical porous graphene-like networks for fast and highly stable supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunyong; Li, Zesheng; Shen, Pei Kang

    2013-05-01

    A new one-step ion-exchange/activation combination method using a metal-ion exchanged resin as a carbon precursor is used to prepare a ultrahigh surface area and three-dimensional hierarchical porous graphene-like networks for fast and highly stable supercapacitors.

  4. Towards three-dimensional Weyl-surface semimetals in graphene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chengyong; Chen, Yuanping; Xie, Yuee; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Zhang, S. B.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene as a two-dimensional topological semimetal has attracted much attention for its outstanding properties. In contrast, three-dimensional (3D) topological semimetals of carbon are still rare. Searching for such materials with salient physics has become a new direction in carbon research. Here, using first-principles calculations and tight-binding modeling, we propose a new class of Weyl semimetals based on three types of 3D graphene networks. In the band structures of these materials, two flat Weyl surfaces appear in the Brillouin zone, which straddle the Fermi level and are robust against external strain. Their unique atomic and electronic structures enable applications in correlated electronics, as well as in energy storage, molecular sieves, and catalysis. When the networks are cut, the resulting slabs and nanowires remain semimetallic with Weyl lines and points at the Fermi surfaces, respectively. Between the Weyl lines, flat surface bands emerge with possible strong magnetism. The robustness of these structures can be traced back to a bulk topological invariant, ensured by the sublattice symmetry, and to the one-dimensional Weyl semimetal behavior of the zigzag carbon chain.Graphene as a two-dimensional topological semimetal has attracted much attention for its outstanding properties. In contrast, three-dimensional (3D) topological semimetals of carbon are still rare. Searching for such materials with salient physics has become a new direction in carbon research. Here, using first-principles calculations and tight-binding modeling, we propose a new class of Weyl semimetals based on three types of 3D graphene networks. In the band structures of these materials, two flat Weyl surfaces appear in the Brillouin zone, which straddle the Fermi level and are robust against external strain. Their unique atomic and electronic structures enable applications in correlated electronics, as well as in energy storage, molecular sieves, and catalysis. When the networks

  5. Three-dimensional quantification of facial symmetry in adolescents using laser surface scanning.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Jelena; Toma, Arshed M; Zhurov, Alexei I; Richmond, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Laser scanning is a non-invasive method for three-dimensional assessment of facial morphology and symmetry. The aim of this study was to quantify facial symmetry in healthy adolescents and explore if there is any gender difference. Facial scans of 270 subjects, 123 males and 147 females (aged 15.3 ± 0.1 years, range 14.6-15.6), were randomly selected from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Facial scans were processed and analysed using in-house developed subroutines for commercial software. The surface matching between the original face and its mirror image was measured for the whole face, upper, middle, and lower facial thirds. In addition, 3 angular and 14 linear parameters were measured. The percentage of symmetry of the whole face was significantly lower in males (53.49 ± 10.73 per cent) than in females (58.50 ± 10.27 per cent; P < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in the amount of symmetry among facial thirds within each gender (P > 0.05). Average values of linear parameters were less than 1 mm and did not differ significantly between genders (P > 0.05). One angular parameter showed slight lip line asymmetry in both genders. Faces of male 15-year-old adolescents were less symmetric than those of females, but the difference in the amount of symmetry, albeit statistically significant, may not be clinically relevant. Upper, middle, and lower thirds of the face did not differ in the amount of three-dimensional symmetry. Angular and linear parameters of facial symmetry did not show any gender difference.

  6. Measurement and characterization of three-dimensional microstructures on precision roller surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, L. B.; Cheung, C. F.; Lee, W. B.; To, S.; Ren, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Precision roller with microstructures is the key tooling component in the precision embossing by roller process such as Roll-to-Roll to manufacture optical plastic plates or films with three dimensional (3D)-microstructures. Measurement and analysis of 3D-microstructures on a precision roller is essential before the embossing process is being undertaken to ensure the quality of the embossed surfaces. Different from 3D-microstructures on a planar surface, it is difficult to measure and characterize the 3D-microstructures on the cylindrical surface of a precision roller due to the geometrical complexity of such integrated surfaces such as V-groove microstructures on a cylindrical surface. This paper presents a study of method and algorithms for the measurement and characterization of 3D-microstructures on a precision roller surface. A feature-based characterization method (FBCM) is proposed to analyze the V-groove microstructures. In this method, a normal template is generated based on the design specifications, and the measured data is fitted with the feature points. Hence alignment and matching of the measured data to the normal template based on the derived feature points are undertaken. After that the V-groove is characterized by some feature parameters such as pitch, depth, angle of the V-grooves. The method also provides an approach for the analysis of burs generated during the machining of Vgroove microstructures. A precision roller with V-groove microstructures has been machined by a Four-axis ultraprecision machine and the machined surface is measured by a contact measuring instrument. The measured data are then characterized and analyzed by the proposed FBCM. The results are presented and discussed, and they indicate the dominant and regular machining errors that are involved in the machining of the V-groove microstructures on roller surfaces.

  7. Towards three-dimensional Weyl-surface semimetals in graphene networks.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chengyong; Chen, Yuanping; Xie, Yuee; Yang, Shengyuan A; Cohen, Marvin L; Zhang, S B

    2016-04-01

    Graphene as a two-dimensional topological semimetal has attracted much attention for its outstanding properties. In contrast, three-dimensional (3D) topological semimetals of carbon are still rare. Searching for such materials with salient physics has become a new direction in carbon research. Here, using first-principles calculations and tight-binding modeling, we propose a new class of Weyl semimetals based on three types of 3D graphene networks. In the band structures of these materials, two flat Weyl surfaces appear in the Brillouin zone, which straddle the Fermi level and are robust against external strain. Their unique atomic and electronic structures enable applications in correlated electronics, as well as in energy storage, molecular sieves, and catalysis. When the networks are cut, the resulting slabs and nanowires remain semimetallic with Weyl lines and points at the Fermi surfaces, respectively. Between the Weyl lines, flat surface bands emerge with possible strong magnetism. The robustness of these structures can be traced back to a bulk topological invariant, ensured by the sublattice symmetry, and to the one-dimensional Weyl semimetal behavior of the zigzag carbon chain. PMID:26971563

  8. Half-filled Landau level, topological insulator surfaces, and three-dimensional quantum spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2016-02-01

    We synthesize and partly review recent developments relating the physics of the half-filled Landau level in two dimensions to correlated surface states of topological insulators in three dimensions. The latter are in turn related to the physics of certain three-dimensional quantum spin liquid states. The resulting insights provide an interesting answer to the old question of how particle-hole symmetry is realized in composite fermion liquids. Specifically the metallic state at filling ν =1/2 —described originally in pioneering work by Halperin, Lee, and Read as a liquid of composite fermions—was proposed recently by Son to be described by a particle-hole symmetric effective field theory distinct from that in the prior literature. We show how the relation to topological insulator surface states leads to a physical understanding of the correctness of this proposal. We develop a simple picture of the particle-hole symmetric composite fermion through a modification of older pictures as electrically neutral "dipolar" particles. We revisit the phenomenology of composite fermi liquids (with or without particle-hole symmetry), and show that their heat/electrical transport dramatically violates the conventional Wiedemann-Franz law but satisfies a modified one. We also discuss the implications of these insights for finding physical realizations of correlated topological insulator surfaces.

  9. [Three-dimensional vertically aligned CNTs coated by Ag nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scattering].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Jie; Fan, Tuo; Ren, Wen-Jie; Lai, Chun-Hong

    2014-09-01

    In order to make surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates contained more "hot spots" in a three-dimensional (3D) focal volume, and can be adsorbed more probe molecules and metal nanoparticles, to obtain stronger Raman spectral signal, a new structure based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated by Ag nanoparticles for surface Raman enhancement is presented. The vertically aligned CNTs are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A silver film is first deposited on the vertically aligned CNTs by magnetron sputtering. The samples are then annealed at different temperature to cause the different size silver nanoparticles to coat on the surface and sidewalls of vertically aligned CNTs. The result of scanning electron microscopy(SEM) shows that Ag nanoparticles are attached onto the sidewalls and tips of the vertically aligned CNTs, as the annealing temperature is different , pitch size, morphology and space between the silver nanoparticles is vary. Rhodamine 6G is served as the probe analyte. Raman spectrum measurement indicates that: the higher the concentration of R6G, the stronger the Raman intensity, but R6G concentration increase with the enhanced Raman intensity varies nonlinearly; when annealing temperature is 450 °C, the average size of silver nanoparticles is about 100 to 120 nm, while annealing temperature is 400 °C, the average size is about 70 nm, and the Raman intensity of 450 °C is superior to the annealing temperature that of 400 °C and 350 °C. PMID:25532342

  10. A scaffoldless technique for self-generation of three-dimensional keratinospheroids on liquid crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Soon, C F; Thong, K T; Tee, K S; Ismail, A B; Denyer, M; Ahmad, M K; Kong, Y H; Vyomesh, P; Cheong, S C

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model using cholesteryl ester based lyotropic liquid crystal (LC) substrates. Keratinocytes were deposited randomly on the LC surface where they self-assembled into 3D microtissues or keratinospheroids. The cell density required to form spheroids was optimized. We investigated cell viability using dead/live cell assays. The adhesion characteristics of cells within the microtissues were determined using histological sectioning and immunofluorescence staining. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the biochemistry of the keratinospheroids. We found that both cells and microtissues could migrate on the LC surface. The viability study indicated approximately 80% viability of cells in the microtissues up to 20 days of culture. Strong intercellular adhesion was observed in the stratification of the multi-layered microspheroids using field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and histochemical staining. The cytoskeleton and vinculins of the cells in the microtissues were expressed diffusely, but the microtissues were enriched with lipids and nucleic acids, which indicates close resemblance to the conditions in vivo. The basic 3D culture model based on LC may be used for cell and microtissue migration studies in response to cytochemical treatment. PMID:27008034

  11. Atomically resolved three-dimensional structures of electrolyte aqueous solutions near a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial liquid layers play a central role in a variety of phenomena ranging from friction to molecular recognition. Liquids near a solid surface form an interfacial layer where the molecular structure is different from that of the bulk. Here we report atomic resolution three-dimensional images of electrolyte solutions near a mica surface that demonstrate the existence of three types of interfacial structures. At low concentrations (0.01-1 M), cations are adsorbed onto the mica. The cation layer is topped by a few hydration layers. At higher concentrations, the interfacial layer extends several nanometres into the liquid. It involves the alternation of cation and anion planes. Fluid Density Functional calculations show that water molecules are a critical factor for stabilizing the structure of the interfacial layer. The interfacial layer stabilizes a crystal-like structure compatible with liquid-like ion and solvent mobilities. At saturation, some ions precipitate and small crystals are formed on the mica. PMID:27416784

  12. Cinematic three-dimensional surface display of cardiac blood pool tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, N.; Machida, K.; Takishima, T.; Mamiya, T.; Takahashi, T.; Kamano, T.; Tamaki, S.; Ban, R. )

    1991-02-01

    A method of three-dimensional cinematic display (3D cine) of cardiac blood pool tomography is described. ECG-gated transaxial blood pool imaging was obtained from a set of projection images that were collected from 32 images with 10 ECG-gated images per projection during a 180 degrees arc of a rotating gamma camera. A surface contour of the blood pool was determined by a set of isocount lines (40-55% of the maximum pixel counts) of the transaxial images. 3D cine was made by a depth-shading method, in which brightness of a given point on the contour was set proportional to the distance between the viewing plane and the point and to the incident angle formed by the viewing line and the surface of the point. In 15 patients, 3D cine showed hypokinesia, akinesia, dyskinesia, ventricular aneurysm, and opposite motions of the atria and ventricles. Diagnoses of left ventricular motion by 3D cine agreed well with those by echocardiography and contrast left ventriculography.

  13. Atomically resolved three-dimensional structures of electrolyte aqueous solutions near a solid surface

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial liquid layers play a central role in a variety of phenomena ranging from friction to molecular recognition. Liquids near a solid surface form an interfacial layer where the molecular structure is different from that of the bulk. Here we report atomic resolution three-dimensional images of electrolyte solutions near a mica surface that demonstrate the existence of three types of interfacial structures. At low concentrations (0.01–1 M), cations are adsorbed onto the mica. The cation layer is topped by a few hydration layers. At higher concentrations, the interfacial layer extends several nanometres into the liquid. It involves the alternation of cation and anion planes. Fluid Density Functional calculations show that water molecules are a critical factor for stabilizing the structure of the interfacial layer. The interfacial layer stabilizes a crystal-like structure compatible with liquid-like ion and solvent mobilities. At saturation, some ions precipitate and small crystals are formed on the mica. PMID:27416784

  14. Implicit Three-Dimensional Geo-Modelling Based on HRBF Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, J.; Zhou, W.; Wu, L.

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) geological models are important representations of the results of regional geological surveys. However, the process of constructing 3D geological models from two-dimensional (2D) geological elements remains difficult and time-consuming. This paper proposes a method of migrating from 2D elements to 3D models. First, the geological interfaces were constructed using the Hermite Radial Basis Function (HRBF) to interpolate the boundaries and attitude data. Then, the subsurface geological bodies were extracted from the spatial map area using the Boolean method between the HRBF surface and the fundamental body. Finally, the top surfaces of the geological bodies were constructed by coupling the geological boundaries to digital elevation models. Based on this workflow, a prototype system was developed, and typical geological structures (e.g., folds, faults, and strata) were simulated. Geological modes were constructed through this workflow based on realistic regional geological survey data. For extended applications in 3D modelling of other kinds of geo-objects, mining ore body models and urban geotechnical engineering stratum models were constructed by this method from drill-hole data. The model construction process was rapid, and the resulting models accorded with the constraints of the original data.

  15. Reconciling surface plate motions with rapid three-dimensional mantle flow around a slab edge.

    PubMed

    Jadamec, Margarete A; Billen, Magali I

    2010-05-20

    The direction of tectonic plate motion at the Earth's surface and the flow field of the mantle inferred from seismic anisotropy are well correlated globally, suggesting large-scale coupling between the mantle and the surface plates. The fit is typically poor at subduction zones, however, where regional observations of seismic anisotropy suggest that the direction of mantle flow is not parallel to and may be several times faster than plate motions. Here we present three-dimensional numerical models of buoyancy-driven deformation with realistic slab geometry for the Alaska subduction-transform system and use them to determine the origin of this regional decoupling of flow. We find that near a subduction zone edge, mantle flow velocities can have magnitudes of more than ten times the surface plate motions, whereas surface plate velocities are consistent with plate motions and the complex mantle flow field is consistent with observations from seismic anisotropy. The seismic anisotropy observations constrain the shape of the eastern slab edge and require non-Newtonian mantle rheology. The incorporation of the non-Newtonian viscosity results in mantle viscosities of 10(17) to 10(18) Pa s in regions of high strain rate (10(-12) s(-1)), and this low viscosity enables the mantle flow field to decouple partially from the motion of the surface plates. These results imply local rapid transport of geochemical signatures through subduction zones and that the internal deformation of slabs decreases the slab-pull force available to drive subducting plates. PMID:20485433

  16. Three-dimensional shape variation of talar surface morphology in hominoid primates.

    PubMed

    Parr, W C H; Soligo, C; Smaers, J; Chatterjee, H J; Ruto, A; Cornish, L; Wroe, S

    2014-07-01

    The hominoid foot is of particular interest to biological anthropologists, as changes in its anatomy through time reflect the adoption of terrestrial locomotion, particularly in species of Australopithecus and Homo. Understanding the osteological morphology associated with changes in whole foot function and the development of the plantar medial longitudinal foot arch are key to understanding the transition through habitual bipedalism in australopithecines to obligate bipedalism and long-distance running in Homo. The talus is ideal for studying relationships between morphology and function in this context, as it is a major contributor to the adduction-abduction, plantar-dorsal flexion and inversion-eversion of the foot, and transmits all forces encountered from the foot to the leg. The talar surface is predominantly covered by articular facets, which have different quantifiable morphological characters, including surface area, surface curvature and orientation. The talus also presents challenges to the investigator, as its globular shape is very difficult to quantify accurately and reproducibly. Here we apply a three-dimensional approach using type 3 landmarks (slid semilandmarks) that are geometrically homologous to determine overall talar shape variations in a range of living and fossil hominoid taxa. Additionally, we use novel approaches to quantify the relative orientations and curvatures of talar articular facets by determining the principal vectors of facet orientation and fitting spheres to articular facets. The resulting metrics are analysed using phylogenetic regressions and principal components analyses. Our results suggest that articular surface curvatures reflect locomotor specialisations with, in particular, orangutans having more highly curved facets in all but the calcaneal facet. Similarly, our approach to quantifying articular facet orientation appears to be effective in discriminating between extant hominoid species, and may therefore provide a

  17. Three dimensional microscopic surface profiles of membranes reconstructed from freeze etching electrol micrographs.

    PubMed

    Krbecek, R; Gebhardt, C; Gruler, H; Sackmann, E

    1979-06-13

    A method of three-dimensional reconstruction of the surface profile of artificial and natural membranes from freeze quenched electron micrographs is presented. The method is based on the analysis of the variation in thickness of platinum layers, deposited under an oblique angle. In essence, it is reminiscent of the method of Eratosthenes to measure the earth's radius. The thickness of etch-like protrusions of membranes could be determined to an accuracy of about 3 A. True distances on curved surfaces rather than projections of distances are obtained. The method has been applied to both model membranes and biological membranes. The essential results are: 1. Detailed information on the symmetry and the molecular structure of the crystalline phases of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine was obtained. The microscopic surface profile of the ripple structure observed between the pretransition and the main transition was analysed. In accordance with a previous model we found that the ripple structure is caused by the spontaneous curvature of the monolayers. The surface profiles of the ripple structure and of the low temperature biaxial phase could be clearly distinguished. 2. The sizes and shapes of lipid domains formed by both thermically and charge-induced lateral phase separation were determined. This showed that the visual inspection of electron micrographs may lead to a considerable underestimation of the domain size. Conclusions may be drawn concerning the different phases formed upon lateral phase separation. 3. As a biological example, yeast cell membranes were studied. The method allows one to distinguish between different membrane-bound proteins by measuring the width-to-height ratio of the particles. The deformation of the lipid layer in the environment of the proteins may be determined. This deformation contains information about lipid-mediated long-range interactions between membrane proteins. PMID:378255

  18. Three-dimensional shape variation of talar surface morphology in hominoid primates

    PubMed Central

    Parr, W C H; Soligo, C; Smaers, J; Chatterjee, H J; Ruto, A; Cornish, L; Wroe, S

    2014-01-01

    The hominoid foot is of particular interest to biological anthropologists, as changes in its anatomy through time reflect the adoption of terrestrial locomotion, particularly in species of Australopithecus and Homo. Understanding the osteological morphology associated with changes in whole foot function and the development of the plantar medial longitudinal foot arch are key to understanding the transition through habitual bipedalism in australopithecines to obligate bipedalism and long-distance running in Homo. The talus is ideal for studying relationships between morphology and function in this context, as it is a major contributor to the adduction–abduction, plantar–dorsal flexion and inversion–eversion of the foot, and transmits all forces encountered from the foot to the leg. The talar surface is predominantly covered by articular facets, which have different quantifiable morphological characters, including surface area, surface curvature and orientation. The talus also presents challenges to the investigator, as its globular shape is very difficult to quantify accurately and reproducibly. Here we apply a three-dimensional approach using type 3 landmarks (slid semilandmarks) that are geometrically homologous to determine overall talar shape variations in a range of living and fossil hominoid taxa. Additionally, we use novel approaches to quantify the relative orientations and curvatures of talar articular facets by determining the principal vectors of facet orientation and fitting spheres to articular facets. The resulting metrics are analysed using phylogenetic regressions and principal components analyses. Our results suggest that articular surface curvatures reflect locomotor specialisations with, in particular, orang-utans having more highly curved facets in all but the calcaneal facet. Similarly, our approach to quantifying articular facet orientation appears to be effective in discriminating between extant hominoid species, and may therefore

  19. Three dimensional microscopic surface profiles of membranes reconstructed from freeze etching electrol micrographs.

    PubMed

    Krbecek, R; Gebhardt, C; Gruler, H; Sackmann, E

    1979-06-13

    A method of three-dimensional reconstruction of the surface profile of artificial and natural membranes from freeze quenched electron micrographs is presented. The method is based on the analysis of the variation in thickness of platinum layers, deposited under an oblique angle. In essence, it is reminiscent of the method of Eratosthenes to measure the earth's radius. The thickness of etch-like protrusions of membranes could be determined to an accuracy of about 3 A. True distances on curved surfaces rather than projections of distances are obtained. The method has been applied to both model membranes and biological membranes. The essential results are: 1. Detailed information on the symmetry and the molecular structure of the crystalline phases of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine was obtained. The microscopic surface profile of the ripple structure observed between the pretransition and the main transition was analysed. In accordance with a previous model we found that the ripple structure is caused by the spontaneous curvature of the monolayers. The surface profiles of the ripple structure and of the low temperature biaxial phase could be clearly distinguished. 2. The sizes and shapes of lipid domains formed by both thermically and charge-induced lateral phase separation were determined. This showed that the visual inspection of electron micrographs may lead to a considerable underestimation of the domain size. Conclusions may be drawn concerning the different phases formed upon lateral phase separation. 3. As a biological example, yeast cell membranes were studied. The method allows one to distinguish between different membrane-bound proteins by measuring the width-to-height ratio of the particles. The deformation of the lipid layer in the environment of the proteins may be determined. This deformation contains information about lipid-mediated long-range interactions between membrane proteins.

  20. Three-dimensional shape variation of talar surface morphology in hominoid primates.

    PubMed

    Parr, W C H; Soligo, C; Smaers, J; Chatterjee, H J; Ruto, A; Cornish, L; Wroe, S

    2014-07-01

    The hominoid foot is of particular interest to biological anthropologists, as changes in its anatomy through time reflect the adoption of terrestrial locomotion, particularly in species of Australopithecus and Homo. Understanding the osteological morphology associated with changes in whole foot function and the development of the plantar medial longitudinal foot arch are key to understanding the transition through habitual bipedalism in australopithecines to obligate bipedalism and long-distance running in Homo. The talus is ideal for studying relationships between morphology and function in this context, as it is a major contributor to the adduction-abduction, plantar-dorsal flexion and inversion-eversion of the foot, and transmits all forces encountered from the foot to the leg. The talar surface is predominantly covered by articular facets, which have different quantifiable morphological characters, including surface area, surface curvature and orientation. The talus also presents challenges to the investigator, as its globular shape is very difficult to quantify accurately and reproducibly. Here we apply a three-dimensional approach using type 3 landmarks (slid semilandmarks) that are geometrically homologous to determine overall talar shape variations in a range of living and fossil hominoid taxa. Additionally, we use novel approaches to quantify the relative orientations and curvatures of talar articular facets by determining the principal vectors of facet orientation and fitting spheres to articular facets. The resulting metrics are analysed using phylogenetic regressions and principal components analyses. Our results suggest that articular surface curvatures reflect locomotor specialisations with, in particular, orangutans having more highly curved facets in all but the calcaneal facet. Similarly, our approach to quantifying articular facet orientation appears to be effective in discriminating between extant hominoid species, and may therefore provide a

  1. Three-dimensional tomography of the beryllium fermi surface: surface charge redistribution.

    PubMed

    Vobornik, I; Fujii, J; Hochstrasser, M; Krizmancic, D; Viol, C E; Panaccione, G; Fabris, S; Baroni, S; Rossi, G

    2007-10-19

    The discontinuity in the lattice periodic potential at surfaces often leads to the creation of new electronic surface states. We developed a photoemission based Fermi surface tomography whose surface sensitivity allowed us to quantify the charge redistribution on the Be(0001) surface. The volume enclosed by the bulklike Fermi surface is significantly reduced at the surface, consistent with the charge transfer to the two surface states as estimated from the area within their two-dimensional Fermi contours. This result represents the first quantification of the charge redistribution on a natural surface termination. PMID:17995274

  2. Three-Dimensional Clustered Nanostructures for Microfluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Li, Kerui; Purcell, Francis J; Zhao, De; Zhang, Wei; He, Zhongyuan; Tan, Shuai; Tang, Zhenguan; Wang, Hongzhi; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-09-21

    A materials fabrication concept based on a fluid-construction strategy to create three-dimensional (3D) ZnO@ZnS-Ag active nanostructures at arbitrary position within confined microchannels to form an integrated microfluidic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) system is presented. The fluid-construction process allowed facile construction of the nanostructured substrates, which were shown to possess a substantial number of integrated hot spots that support SERS activity. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis suggested that the 3D clustered geometry facilitated hot spot formation. High sensitivity and good recycle performance were demonstrated using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) and a mixture of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-MBA as target organic pollutants to evaluate the SERS microfluidic device performance. The 3D clustered nanostructures were also effective in the detection of a representative nerve agent and biomolecule. The results of this investigation provide a materials and process approach to the fabrication of requisite nanostructures for the online detection of organic pollutants, devices for real-time observation of environmental hazards, and personal-health monitoring.

  3. Cytopede: A Three-Dimensional Tool for Modeling Cell Motility on a Flat Surface

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, Micah

    2010-01-01

    Abstract When cultured on flat surfaces, fibroblasts and many other cells spread to form thin lamellar sheets. Motion then occurs by extension of the sheet at the leading edge and retraction at the trailing edge. Comprehensive quantitative models of these phenomena have so far been lacking and to address this need, we have designed a three-dimensional code called Cytopede specialized for the simulation of the mechanical and signaling behavior of plated cells. Under assumptions by which the cytosol and the cytoskeleton are treated from a continuum mechanical perspective, Cytopede uses the finite element method to solve mass and momentum equations for each phase, and thus determine the time evolution of cellular models. We present the physical concepts that underlie Cytopede together with the algorithms used for their implementation. We then validate the approach by a computation of the spread of a viscous sessile droplet. Finally, to exemplify how Cytopede enables the testing of ideas about cell mechanics, we simulate a simple fibroblast model. We show how Cytopede allows computation, not only of basic characteristics of shape and velocity, but also of maps of cell thickness, cytoskeletal density, cytoskeletal flow, and substratum tractions that are readily compared with experimental data. PMID:20958108

  4. DNA-guided assembly of three-dimensional nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-An; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-03-01

    Surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has drawn much attention in recent years because its ability to greatly enhance Raman signals to allow for the detection of molecules at low concentration. When using metallic nanoparticles as SERS substrates, many studies have shown that the size of the interparticle gap significantly affects the enhancement of the Raman signals. Given that the optimal interparticle gap is as small as a few nanometers, fabricating sensitive, uniform, and reproducible SERS substrates remains challenging. Here we report a three-dimensional SERS substrate created through the assembly of core-shell nanoparticles using DNA. By using DNA of appropriate sequence and length, DNA-functionalized nanoparticles were assembled into ordered and highly packed nanostructures. The interparticle distance was precisely controlled by adjusting the design of the DNA and the thickness of the silver shell coated on the gold nanoparticles. Compared with randomly aggregated nanoparticles, the interparticle distance in the synthesized nanostructures can be more uniform and better controlled. In addition, the DNA-guided assembly process allows us to create precise nanostructures without using complex and expensive fabrication methods. The study demonstrates that the synthesized nanostructures can be used as effective SERS substrates to successfully measure the Raman signals of malachite green, a toxic compound that is sometimes illegally used on fish, as well as Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) at low concentrations.

  5. Determination of quadric equation coefficients describing three-dimensional surfaces, their constraint and skewed planes, and view point areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoletti, C. J.; Pond, J. E.; Vance, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    Mathematical model and a digital computer BLITZ language programming technique computes coefficients of quadric equations describing cylinders, paraboloids, ellipsoids, or planes with any orientation to a reference system, coordinates of a vector, and coefficients of quadric surfaces which limit the surface of three-dimensional space.

  6. A combined direct/inverse three-dimensional transonic wing design method for vector computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weed, R. A.; Carlson, L. A.; Anderson, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional transonic-wing design algorithm for vector computers is developed, and the results of sample computations are presented graphically. The method incorporates the direct/inverse scheme of Carlson (1975), a Cartesian grid system with boundary conditions applied at a mean plane, and a potential-flow solver based on the conservative form of the full potential equation and using the ZEBRA II vectorizable solution algorithm of South et al. (1980). The accuracy and consistency of the method with regard to direct and inverse analysis and trailing-edge closure are verified in the test computations.

  7. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of near-surface flows over the Martian north polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, Thomas R.; Howard, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements made by Viking Lander VL-2 (48 N) have shown that the near-surface wind and temperature regime on Mars displays striking similarities to terrestrial counterparts. The diurnal radiative cycle is responsible for establishment of a well-defined thermal circulation in which downslope (Katabatic) flows prevail during the nighttime hours and weak upslope (anabatic) conditions prevail during the daytime. Previous work has indicated that the slope flows are much like those found on Earth, particularly the Katabatic winds, which show striking similarities to drainage flows observed over Antarctica. The low-level wind regime appears to be an important factor in the scouring of the martian landscape. The north polar cap shows evidence of eolian features such as dunes, frost streaks, and grooves from Viking imagery. The direction of the prevailing wind can in cases be inferred from the eolian features. We examine the thermally induced flows that result from the radiative heating and cooling of the martian north polar region using a comprehensive three-dimensional atmospheric mesoscale numerical model. The same model has been used previously for simulation of Antarctic Katabatic winds. The model equations are written in terrain-following coordinates to allow for irregular terrain; prognostic equations include the flux forms of the horizontal momentum equations, temperature, continuity. A surface energy budget equation is also incorporated in which the surface temperature is determined. Explicit parameterization of both terrestrial (longwave) and solar (shortwave) radiation is included. Turbulent transfer of heat and momentum in the martian atmosphere is assumed to follow the similarity expressions in the surface boundary layer on Earth. The terrain heights for the martian north polar region have been obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey map and digitized onto a 57x57 grid with a spacing of 75 km. The resulting terrain map is shown in Fig. 1. The vertical grid

  8. Heat Transfer Enhancement By Three-Dimensional Surface Roughness Technique In Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najeeb, Umair

    This thesis experimentally investigates the enhancement of single-phase heat transfer, frictional loss and pressure drop characteristics in a Single Heater Element Loop Tester (SHELT). The heater element simulates a single fuel rod for Pressurized Nuclear reactor. In this experimental investigation, the effect of the outer surface roughness of a simulated nuclear rod bundle was studied. The outer surface of a simulated fuel rod was created with a three-dimensional (Diamond-shaped blocks) surface roughness. The angle of corrugation for each diamond was 45 degrees. The length of each side of a diamond block is 1 mm. The depth of each diamond block was 0.3 mm. The pitch of the pattern was 1.614 mm. The simulated fuel rod had an outside diameter of 9.5 mm and wall thickness of 1.5 mm and was placed in a test-section made of 38.1 mm inner diameter, wall thickness 6.35 mm aluminum pipe. The Simulated fuel rod was made of Nickel 200 and Inconel 625 materials. The fuel rod was connected to 10 KW DC power supply. The Inconel 625 material of the rod with an electrical resistance of 32.3 kO was used to generate heat inside the test-section. The heat energy dissipated from the Inconel tube due to the flow of electrical current flows into the working fluid across the rod at constant heat flux conditions. The DI water was employed as working fluid for this experimental investigation. The temperature and pressure readings for both smooth and rough regions of the fuel rod were recorded and compared later to find enhancement in heat transfer coefficient and increment in the pressure drops. Tests were conducted for Reynold's Numbers ranging from 10e4 to 10e5. Enhancement in heat transfer coefficient at all Re was recorded. The maximum heat transfer co-efficient enhancement recorded was 86% at Re = 4.18e5. It was also observed that the pressure drop and friction factor increased by 14.7% due to the increased surface roughness.

  9. Three-Dimensional Surface Imaging is an Effective Tool for Measuring Breast Volume: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Yeon; Kim, Min Jung; Lew, Dae Hyun; Song, Seung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate breast volume assessment is a prerequisite to preoperative planning, as well as intraoperative decision making in breast reconstruction surgery. The use of three-dimensional surface imaging (3D scanning) to assess breast volume has many advantages. However, before employing 3D scanning in the field, the tool's validity should be demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to confirm the validity of 3D-scanning technology for evaluating breast volume. Methods We reviewed the charts of 25 patients who underwent breast reconstruction surgery immediately after total mastectomy. Breast volumes using the Axis Three 3D scanner, water-displacement technique, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained bilaterally in the preoperative period. During the operation, the tissue removed during total mastectomy was weighed and the specimen volume was calculated from the weight. Then, we compared the volume obtained from 3D scanning with those obtained using the water-displacement technique, MRI, and the calculated volume of the tissue removed. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of breast volumes obtained from 3D scanning, as compared to the volumes obtained using the water-displacement technique and specimen weight, demonstrated excellent reliability. The ICC of breast volumes obtained using 3D scanning, as compared to those obtained by MRI, demonstrated substantial reliability. Passing-Bablok regression showed agreement between 3D scanning and the water-displacement technique, and showed a linear association of 3D scanning with MRI and specimen volume, respectively. Conclusions When compared with the classical water-displacement technique and MRI-based volumetry, 3D scanning showed significant reliability and a linear association with the other two methods. PMID:27689050

  10. Chemical functionalization of surfaces for building three-dimensional engineered biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Marco E.; Mansur, Alexandra A. P.; Mansur, Herman S.

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a new approach for developing biosensors based on enzymatic systems with designed three-dimensional structures. Silica glass slides were chemically functionalized at surfaces by reacting with organosilanes, 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPTES), and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), using sol-gel process at room temperature. The functionalization of the supports was characterized by contact angle measurements and FTIR spectroscopy. The first enzyme layer was covalently immobilized to the support by a bi-functional linker (glutaraldehyde). The second enzyme layer was deposited using the protein conjugation method based on the high affinity "avidin-biotin" interactions. Each enzyme was biotinylated before being added to the nanostructured system and avidin was used as the binder between consecutive enzyme layers. The biochemical response was assayed at all stages to certify that the enzymatic bioactivity was retained throughout the entire layer-by-layer (LBL) process. The model of building 3D-enzymatic systems was evaluated using the enzymatic structure with glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). It was verified that the amino-modified support presented the highest bioactivity response compared to the other chemical functionalities. Moreover, the bienzyme nanostructure demonstrated relevant biochemical activity upon injecting the glucose substrate into the system. Finally, as a proof of concept, the bienzyme systems were assayed using real samples of regular and sugar-free soft drinks where they effectively behaved as structured biosensor for glucose with the built-in 3D hybrid architecture. Based on the results, it can be foreseen the development of promising new nanomaterials for several analytical applications such as monitoring the quality of food and beverages for nutrition purposes.

  11. Three-Dimensional Surface Imaging is an Effective Tool for Measuring Breast Volume: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Yeon; Kim, Min Jung; Lew, Dae Hyun; Song, Seung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate breast volume assessment is a prerequisite to preoperative planning, as well as intraoperative decision making in breast reconstruction surgery. The use of three-dimensional surface imaging (3D scanning) to assess breast volume has many advantages. However, before employing 3D scanning in the field, the tool's validity should be demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to confirm the validity of 3D-scanning technology for evaluating breast volume. Methods We reviewed the charts of 25 patients who underwent breast reconstruction surgery immediately after total mastectomy. Breast volumes using the Axis Three 3D scanner, water-displacement technique, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained bilaterally in the preoperative period. During the operation, the tissue removed during total mastectomy was weighed and the specimen volume was calculated from the weight. Then, we compared the volume obtained from 3D scanning with those obtained using the water-displacement technique, MRI, and the calculated volume of the tissue removed. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of breast volumes obtained from 3D scanning, as compared to the volumes obtained using the water-displacement technique and specimen weight, demonstrated excellent reliability. The ICC of breast volumes obtained using 3D scanning, as compared to those obtained by MRI, demonstrated substantial reliability. Passing-Bablok regression showed agreement between 3D scanning and the water-displacement technique, and showed a linear association of 3D scanning with MRI and specimen volume, respectively. Conclusions When compared with the classical water-displacement technique and MRI-based volumetry, 3D scanning showed significant reliability and a linear association with the other two methods.

  12. Determining Surface Plasmon Resonance Response Factors for Deposition onto Three-Dimensional Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Roper, D. Keith

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsic sorption rates of ligand/receptor binding have been measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using response factors for deposition of proteins or smaller molecules on planar surfaces. In this study generalized expressions for SPR response factor and effective refractive index are developed to measure rates of analyte sorption onto 3-D surfaces. The expressions are specialized for two limiting cases of immediate practical interest and broad applicability: analyte deposition onto a homogeneous anisotropic porous media and deposition onto close-packed solid spheres adjacent to the sensor surface. These new equations specify media capacity, characteristic size and analyte concentration that are necessary to obtain identifiable responses from interaction with anisotropic porous media or chromatographic resin. These developments are illustrated by comparing response factors for Adenovirus Type 5 on planar surfaces, porous media and adsorptive spheres. PMID:19844593

  13. Three Dimensional Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    2014-03-01

    Dirac points on the Fermi surface of two dimensional graphene are responsible for its unique electronic behavior. One can ask whether any three dimensional materials support similar pseudorelativistic physics in their bulk electronic spectra. This possibility has been investigated theoretically and is now supported by two successful experimental demonstrations reported during the last year. In this talk, I will summarize the various ways in which Dirac semimetals can be realized in three dimensions with primary focus on a specific theory developed on the basis of representations of crystal spacegroups. A three dimensional Dirac (Weyl) semimetal can appear in the presence (absence) of inversion symmetry by tuning parameters to the phase boundary separating a bulk insulating and a topological insulating phase. More generally, we find that specific rules governing crystal symmetry representations of electrons with spin lead to robust Dirac points at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. Combining these rules with microscopic considerations identifies six candidate Dirac semimetals. Another method towards engineering Dirac semimetals involves combining crystal symmetry and band inversion. Several candidate materials have been proposed utilizing this mechanism and one of the candidates has been successfully demonstrated as a Dirac semimetal in two independent experiments. Work carried out in collaboration with: Julia A. Steinberg, Steve M. Young, J.C.Y. Teo, C.L. Kane, E.J. Mele and Andrew M. Rappe.

  14. Large-scale three-dimensional measurement via combining 3D scanner and laser rangefinder.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinlong; Sun, Zhengxing; Bai, Suqin

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) measurement method of large-scale objects by integrating a 3D scanner and a laser rangefinder. The 3D scanner, used to perform partial section measurement, is fixed on a robotic arm which can slide on a guide rail. The laser rangefinder, used to compute poses of the 3D scanner, is rigidly connected to the 3D scanner. During large-scale measurement, after measuring a partial section, the 3D scanner is straightly moved forward along the guide rail to measure another section. Meanwhile, the poses of the 3D scanner are estimated according to its moved distance for different partial section alignments. The performance and effectiveness are evaluated by experiments. PMID:25967194

  15. Hybrid Tissue Engineering Scaffolds by Combination of Three-Dimensional Printing and Cell Photoencapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Marica; Van Hoorick, Jasper; Hölzl, Katja; Tromayer, Maximilian; Gruber, Peter; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Liska, Robert; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers versatile possibilities for adapting the structural parameters of tissue engineering scaffolds. However, it is also essential to develop procedures allowing efficient cell seeding independent of scaffold geometry and pore size. The aim of this study was to establish a method for seeding the scaffolds using photopolymerizable cell-laden hydrogels. The latter facilitates convenient preparation, and handling of cell suspension, while distributing the hydrogel precursor throughout the pores, before it is cross-linked with light. In addition, encapsulation of living cells within hydrogels can produce constructs with high initial cell loading and intimate cell-matrix contact, similar to that of the natural extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Three dimensional scaffolds were produced from poly(lactic) acid (PLA) by means of fused deposition modeling. A solution of methacrylamide-modified gelatin (Gel-MOD) in cell culture medium containing photoinitiator Li-TPO-L was used as a hydrogel precursor. Being an enzymatically degradable derivative of natural collagen, gelatin-based matrices are biomimetic and potentially support the process of cell-induced remodeling. Preosteoblast cells MC3T3-E1 at a density of 10 × 106 cells per 1 mL were used for testing the seeding procedure and cell proliferation studies. Obtained results indicate that produced constructs support cell survival and proliferation over extended duration of our experiment. The established two-step approach for scaffold seeding with the cells is simple, rapid, and is shown to be highly reproducible. Furthermore, it enables precise control of the initial cell density, while yielding their uniform distribution throughout the scaffold. Such hybrid tissue engineering constructs merge the advantages of rigid 3D printed constructs with the soft hydrogel matrix, potentially mimicking the process of ECM remodeling. PMID:26858826

  16. Low-resistance gateless high electron mobility transistors using three-dimensional inverted pyramidal AlGaN/GaN surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hongyun; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, three-dimensional gateless AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were demonstrated with 54% reduction in electrical resistance and 73% increase in surface area compared with conventional gateless HEMTs on planar substrates. Inverted pyramidal AlGaN/GaN surfaces were microfabricated using potassium hydroxide etched silicon with exposed (111) surfaces and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of coherent AlGaN/GaN thin films. In addition, electrical characterization of the devices showed that a combination of series and parallel connections of the highly conductive two-dimensional electron gas along the pyramidal geometry resulted in a significant reduction in electrical resistance at both room and high temperatures (up to 300 °C). This three-dimensional HEMT architecture can be leveraged to realize low-power and reliable power electronics, as well as harsh environment sensors with increased surface area.

  17. MHD three-dimensional flow of viscoelastic fluid over an exponentially stretching surface with variable thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaedi, A.; Hayat, T.; Muhammad, T.; Shehzad, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    This study models the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three-dimensional boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluid. The flow is due to the exponentially stretching surface. The heat transfer analysis is performed through prescribed surface temperature (PST) and prescribed surface heat flux (PHF). The thermal conductivity is taken temperature dependent. Series solutions of velocities and temperatures are constructed. Graphical results for PST and PHF cases are plotted and analyzed. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers are presented and discussed.

  18. Gold nanoparticle-paper as a three-dimensional surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Ying Hui; Li, Dan; Simon, George P; Garnier, Gil

    2012-06-12

    This work investigates the effect of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) addition to paper substrate and examines the ability of these composite materials to amplify the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of a dye adsorbed. Paper has a three-dimensional (3D), porous, and heterogeneous morphology. The manner in which paper adsorbs the nanoparticles is crucial to its SERS properties, particularly with regards to aggregation. In this work, we sought to maintain the same degree of aggregation, while changing the concentration of nanoparticles deposited on paper. We achieved this by dipping paper into AuNP solutions of different, known concentration and found that the initial packing density of AuNPs in solutions was retained on paper with the same degree of aggregation. The surface coverage of AuNPs on paper was found to scale linearly to their concentration profile in solutions. The SERS performances of the AuNP-treated papers were evaluated with 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) as the Raman molecule, and their SERS intensities increased linearly with the AuNPs' concentration. Compared to AuNP-treated silicon, the Raman enhancement factor (EF) from paper was relatively higher due to a more uniform and greater degree of adsorption of AuNPs. The effect of the spatial distribution of AuNPs in their substrates on SERS activity was also investigated. In this experiment, the number of AuNPs was kept constant (a 1 μL droplet of AuNPs was deposited on all substrates), and the distribution profile of AuNPs was controlled by the nature of the substrate: paper, silicon, and hydrophobized paper. The AuNP droplet on paper showed the most reproducible and sensitive SERS signal. This highlighted the role of the z-distribution (through film) of AuNPs within the bulk of the paper, producing a 3D multilayer structure to allow inter- and intralayer plasmon coupling, and hence amplifying the SERS signal. The SERS performance of nanoparticle-functionalized paper can thus be optimized by

  19. Gold nanoparticle-paper as a three-dimensional surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Ying Hui; Li, Dan; Simon, George P; Garnier, Gil

    2012-06-12

    This work investigates the effect of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) addition to paper substrate and examines the ability of these composite materials to amplify the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of a dye adsorbed. Paper has a three-dimensional (3D), porous, and heterogeneous morphology. The manner in which paper adsorbs the nanoparticles is crucial to its SERS properties, particularly with regards to aggregation. In this work, we sought to maintain the same degree of aggregation, while changing the concentration of nanoparticles deposited on paper. We achieved this by dipping paper into AuNP solutions of different, known concentration and found that the initial packing density of AuNPs in solutions was retained on paper with the same degree of aggregation. The surface coverage of AuNPs on paper was found to scale linearly to their concentration profile in solutions. The SERS performances of the AuNP-treated papers were evaluated with 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) as the Raman molecule, and their SERS intensities increased linearly with the AuNPs' concentration. Compared to AuNP-treated silicon, the Raman enhancement factor (EF) from paper was relatively higher due to a more uniform and greater degree of adsorption of AuNPs. The effect of the spatial distribution of AuNPs in their substrates on SERS activity was also investigated. In this experiment, the number of AuNPs was kept constant (a 1 μL droplet of AuNPs was deposited on all substrates), and the distribution profile of AuNPs was controlled by the nature of the substrate: paper, silicon, and hydrophobized paper. The AuNP droplet on paper showed the most reproducible and sensitive SERS signal. This highlighted the role of the z-distribution (through film) of AuNPs within the bulk of the paper, producing a 3D multilayer structure to allow inter- and intralayer plasmon coupling, and hence amplifying the SERS signal. The SERS performance of nanoparticle-functionalized paper can thus be optimized by

  20. Combined Use of GPS and Accelerometry Reveals Fine Scale Three-Dimensional Foraging Behaviour in the Short-Tailed Shearwater.

    PubMed

    Berlincourt, Maud; Angel, Lauren P; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    Determining the foraging behaviour of free-ranging marine animals is fundamental for assessing their habitat use and how they may respond to changes in the environment. However, despite recent advances in bio-logging technology, collecting information on both at-sea movement patterns and activity budgets still remains difficult in small pelagic seabird species due to the constraints of instrument size. The short-tailed shearwater, the most abundant seabird species in Australia (ca 23 million individuals), is a highly pelagic procellariiform. Despite its ecological importance to the region, almost nothing is known about its at-sea behaviour, in particular, its foraging activity. Using a combination of GPS and tri-axial accelerometer data-loggers, the fine scale three-dimensional foraging behaviour of 10 breeding individuals from two colonies was investigated. Five at-sea behaviours were identified: (1) resting on water, (2) flapping flight, (3) gliding flight, (4) foraging (i.e., surface foraging and diving events), and (5) taking-off. There were substantial intra- and inter- individual variations in activity patterns, with individuals spending on average 45.8% (range: 17.1-70.0%) of time at sea resting on water and 18.2% (range: 2.3-49.6%) foraging. Individuals made 76.4 ± 65.3 dives (range: 8-237) per foraging trip (mean duration 9.0 ± 1.9 s), with dives also recorded during night-time. With the continued miniaturisation of recording devices, the use of combined data-loggers could provide us with further insights into the foraging behaviour of small procellariiforms, helping to better understand interactions with their prey.

  1. Combined Use of GPS and Accelerometry Reveals Fine Scale Three-Dimensional Foraging Behaviour in the Short-Tailed Shearwater

    PubMed Central

    Berlincourt, Maud; Angel, Lauren P.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the foraging behaviour of free-ranging marine animals is fundamental for assessing their habitat use and how they may respond to changes in the environment. However, despite recent advances in bio-logging technology, collecting information on both at-sea movement patterns and activity budgets still remains difficult in small pelagic seabird species due to the constraints of instrument size. The short-tailed shearwater, the most abundant seabird species in Australia (ca 23 million individuals), is a highly pelagic procellariiform. Despite its ecological importance to the region, almost nothing is known about its at-sea behaviour, in particular, its foraging activity. Using a combination of GPS and tri-axial accelerometer data-loggers, the fine scale three-dimensional foraging behaviour of 10 breeding individuals from two colonies was investigated. Five at-sea behaviours were identified: (1) resting on water, (2) flapping flight, (3) gliding flight, (4) foraging (i.e., surface foraging and diving events), and (5) taking-off. There were substantial intra- and inter- individual variations in activity patterns, with individuals spending on average 45.8% (range: 17.1–70.0%) of time at sea resting on water and 18.2% (range: 2.3–49.6%) foraging. Individuals made 76.4 ± 65.3 dives (range: 8–237) per foraging trip (mean duration 9.0 ± 1.9 s), with dives also recorded during night-time. With the continued miniaturisation of recording devices, the use of combined data-loggers could provide us with further insights into the foraging behaviour of small procellariiforms, helping to better understand interactions with their prey. PMID:26439491

  2. Combined Use of GPS and Accelerometry Reveals Fine Scale Three-Dimensional Foraging Behaviour in the Short-Tailed Shearwater.

    PubMed

    Berlincourt, Maud; Angel, Lauren P; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    Determining the foraging behaviour of free-ranging marine animals is fundamental for assessing their habitat use and how they may respond to changes in the environment. However, despite recent advances in bio-logging technology, collecting information on both at-sea movement patterns and activity budgets still remains difficult in small pelagic seabird species due to the constraints of instrument size. The short-tailed shearwater, the most abundant seabird species in Australia (ca 23 million individuals), is a highly pelagic procellariiform. Despite its ecological importance to the region, almost nothing is known about its at-sea behaviour, in particular, its foraging activity. Using a combination of GPS and tri-axial accelerometer data-loggers, the fine scale three-dimensional foraging behaviour of 10 breeding individuals from two colonies was investigated. Five at-sea behaviours were identified: (1) resting on water, (2) flapping flight, (3) gliding flight, (4) foraging (i.e., surface foraging and diving events), and (5) taking-off. There were substantial intra- and inter- individual variations in activity patterns, with individuals spending on average 45.8% (range: 17.1-70.0%) of time at sea resting on water and 18.2% (range: 2.3-49.6%) foraging. Individuals made 76.4 ± 65.3 dives (range: 8-237) per foraging trip (mean duration 9.0 ± 1.9 s), with dives also recorded during night-time. With the continued miniaturisation of recording devices, the use of combined data-loggers could provide us with further insights into the foraging behaviour of small procellariiforms, helping to better understand interactions with their prey. PMID:26439491

  3. Three-dimensional computer-assisted simulation combining facial skeleton with facial morphology for orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, L H; Chen, W H

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a 3-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design (CAD) simulation system to plan surgical procedures and predict postoperative changes in orthognathic surgery patients. A computer-generated imaging model was developed by combining a 3D reconstructed cephalometric skeletal image and a laser-scanned facial surface image. Moreover, postoperative data were studied and linked to the simulator model for programming and executing simulated surgical procedures. Interactive editing capabilities allow surgeons to operate CAD surgical simulation, and predicted results can be presented graphically and numerically. The results indicate that the integration of 3D images and CAD techniques have a potential for simulating surgery and providing graphic information to patients in obtaining an informed consent.

  4. Diatom Valve Three-Dimensional Representation: A New Imaging Method Based on Combined Microscopies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; De Tommasi, Edoardo; Coppola, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; Dardano, Principia

    2016-01-01

    The frustule of diatoms, unicellular microalgae, shows very interesting photonic features, generally related to its complicated and quasi-periodic micro- and nano-structure. In order to simulate light propagation inside and through this natural structure, it is important to develop three-dimensional (3D) models for synthetic replica with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a new method that generates images of microscopic diatoms with high definition, by merging scanning electron microscopy and digital holography microscopy or atomic force microscopy data. Starting from two digital images, both acquired separately with standard characterization procedures, a high spatial resolution (Δz = λ/20, Δx = Δy ≅ 100 nm, at least) 3D model of the object has been generated. Then, the two sets of data have been processed by matrix formalism, using an original mathematical algorithm implemented on a commercially available software. The developed methodology could be also of broad interest in the design and fabrication of micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems. PMID:27690008

  5. A system for combined three-dimensional morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Jones, Arthur; Garcia-Rodriguez, Enrique; Yuan Chen, Ping; Idica, Adam; Lockett, Stephen J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

    2002-04-25

    We present a new system for simultaneous morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue samples. The system is composed of a computer assisted microscope and a JAVA-based image display, analysis and visualization program that allows acquisition, annotation, meaningful storage, three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of structures of interest in thick sectioned tissue specimens. We describe the system in detail and illustrate its use by imaging, reconstructing and analyzing two complete tissue blocks which were differently processed and stained. One block was obtained from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lumpectomy specimen and stained alternatively with Hematoxilyn and Eosin (H&E), and with a counterstain and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ERB-B2 gene. The second block contained a fully sectioned mammary gland of a mouse, stained for Histology with H&E. We show how the system greatly reduces the amount of interaction required for the acquisition and analysis and is therefore suitable for studies that require morphologically driven, wide scale (e.g., whole gland) analysis of complex tissue samples or cultures.

  6. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Brogaard, Louise; Flagstad, Frederikke Bjergvang; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Summerfield, Artur; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured in materials other than polystyrene and applying three-dimensional structures more similar to the in vivo environment. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an often used polymer for lab-on-a-chip devices but not much is known about the effect of changing the culture surface material from polystyrene to PDMS. In the present study the differentiation of porcine monocytes to monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) was investigated using CD172apos pig blood monocytes stimulated with GM-CSF and IL-4. Monocytes were cultured on surfaces made of two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene) differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material and architecture. Distinct clustering of cells, based on similar expression patterns of 46 genes of interest, was seen for cells isolated from two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS. Changing the material from polystyrene to PDMS resulted in cells with expression patterns usually associated with macrophage expression (upregulation of CD163 and downregulation of CD1a, FLT3, LAMP3 and BATF3). However, this was purely based on gene expression level, and no functional assays were included in this study which would be necessary in order to classify the cells as being macrophages. When changing to three-dimensional culture the cells became increasingly activated in terms of IL6, IL8, IL10 and CCR5 gene expression. Further stimulation with LPS resulted

  7. Comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of surface plasmon polariton modes at uniaxial liquid crystal-metal interface.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yin-Ray; Lee, Tsun-Hsiun; Wu, Zheng-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hung, Yu-Ju

    2015-12-14

    This paper describes the derivation of surface plasmon polariton modes associated with the generalized three-dimensional rotation of liquid crystal molecules on a metal film. The calculated dispersion relation was verified by coupling laser light into surface plasmon polariton waves in a one-dimensional grating device. The grating-assisted plasmon coupling condition was consistent with the formulated k(spp) value. This provides a general rule for the design of liquid-crystal tunable plasmonic devices. PMID:26699027

  8. User's manual for master: Modeling of aerodynamic surfaces by 3-dimensional explicit representation. [input to three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    A system of computer programs was developed to model general three dimensional surfaces. Surfaces are modeled as sets of parametric bicubic patches. There are also capabilities to transform coordinates, to compute mesh/surface intersection normals, and to format input data for a transonic potential flow analysis. A graphical display of surface models and intersection normals is available. There are additional capabilities to regulate point spacing on input curves and to compute surface/surface intersection curves. Input and output data formats are described; detailed suggestions are given for user input. Instructions for execution are given, and examples are shown.

  9. Two-step design method for highly compact three-dimensional freeform optical system for LED surface light source.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianglong; Li, Hongtao; Han, Yanjun; Luo, Yi

    2014-10-20

    Designing an illumination system for a surface light source with a strict compactness requirement is quite challenging, especially for the general three-dimensional (3D) case. In accordance with the two key features of an expected illumination distribution, i.e., a well-controlled boundary and a precise illumination pattern, a two-step design method is proposed in this paper for highly compact 3D freeform illumination systems. In the first step, a target shape scaling strategy is combined with an iterative feedback modification algorithm to generate an optimized freeform optical system with a well-controlled boundary of the target distribution. In the second step, a set of selected radii of the system obtained in the first step are optimized to further improve the illuminating quality within the target region. The method is quite flexible and effective to design highly compact optical systems with almost no restriction on the shape of the desired target field. As examples, three highly compact freeform lenses with ratio of center height h of the lens and the maximum dimension D of the source ≤ 2.5:1 are designed for LED surface light sources to form a uniform illumination distribution on a rectangular, a cross-shaped and a complex cross pierced target plane respectively. High light control efficiency of η > 0.7 as well as low relative standard illumination deviation of RSD < 0.07 is obtained simultaneously for all the three design examples. PMID:25607306

  10. Solution of the surface Euler equations for accurate three-dimensional boundary-layer analysis of aerodynamic configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, V.; Harris, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The three-dimensional boundary-layer equations in the limit as the normal coordinate tends to infinity are called the surface Euler equations. The present paper describes an accurate method for generating edge conditions for three-dimensional boundary-layer codes using these equations. The inviscid pressure distribution is first interpolated to the boundary-layer grid. The surface Euler equations are then solved with this pressure field and a prescribed set of initial and boundary conditions to yield the velocities along the two surface coordinate directions. Results for typical wing and fuselage geometries are presented. The smoothness and accuracy of the edge conditions obtained are found to be superior to the conventional interpolation procedures.

  11. Three-dimensional surface profiling and optical characterization of liquid microlens using a Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenhui; Hall, Gunnsteinn; Zeng, Xuefeng; Zhu, Difeng; Eliceiri, Kevin; Jiang, Hongrui

    2011-04-25

    We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) surface profiling of the water-oil interface in a tunable liquid microlens using a Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor. The principles and the optical setup for achieving 3D surface measurements are presented and a hydrogel-actuated liquid lens was measured at different focal lengths. The 3D surface profiles are then used to study the optical properties of the liquid lens. Our method of 3D surface profiling could foster the improvement of liquid lens design and fabrication, including surface treatment and aberration reduction.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of eye surface pathologies and contact lens fit with high resolution spectral optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kałużny, B.; Szkulmowska, A.; Bajraszewski, T.; Szkulmowski, M.; Targowski, P.; Kowalczyk, A.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To show potential of Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography system for high resolution, cross-sectional and three-dimensional imaging of eye surface pathologies. Methods: High-speed spectral OCT prototype instrument with 4.5 μm axial resolution was designed and constructed for clinical use. Measurements of anterior segment of human eye have been performed in ophthalmology clinic on 86 patients suffering various eye surface disorders including corneal dystrophies, corneal scars, conjunctival folds, keratoconus, bullus keratopathy, filtration blebs and other post-operative changes. Additionally, examinations of contact lens fit on 97 healthy corneas have been performed up to date. Results: High quality, high resolution cross-sectional images and three-dimensional reconstructions of cornea, conjunctiva and sclera of pathologic eyes together with examples of numerical analysis including segmentation of fluid in filtration blebs, scars and deposits are shown. Quantitative analysis of contact lens fit is demonstrated.

  13. Quadratic resonance in the three-dimensional oscillations of inviscid drops with surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, R.; Brown, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The moderate-amplitude, three-dimensional oscillations of an inviscid drop are described in terms of spherical harmonics. Specific oscillation modes are resonantly coupled by quadratic nonlinearities caused by inertia, capillarity, and drop deformation. The equations describing the interactions of these modes are derived from the variational principle for the appropriate Lagrangian by expressing the modal amplitudes to be functions of a slow time scale and by preaveraging the Lagrangian over the time scale of the primary oscillations. Stochastic motions are predicted for nonaxisymmetric deformations starting from most initial conditions, even those arbitrarily close to the axisymmetric shapes. The stochasticity is characterized by a redistribution of the energy contained in the initial deformation over all the degrees of freedom of the interacting modes.

  14. Imaging surface spectroscopy for two- and three-dimensional characterization of materials.

    PubMed

    Hutter, H; Brunner, C; Nikolov, S; Mittermayer, C; Grasserbauer, M

    1996-06-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) exhibits a unique potential for the measurement of two-and three-dimensional distributions of trace elements in advanced materials, which is demonstrated on relevant technological problems. One example is the characterization of high purity iron. With this material segregation experiments have been performed and the initial and final distribution of the trace elements have been measured. Another example is the investigation of the corrosion behaviour of high purity chromium. Samples oxidized with (16)O and (18)O have been measured to explain the growing and adhesion of the oxide layer. All imaging techniques generate a vast quantitiy of data. In order to extract the important information the assistance of chemometric tools is essential. Detection of chemical phases by classification using neural networks or de-noising of scanning-SIMS images by wavelet-filtering demonstrates the increase of the performance of analytical imaging techniques.

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of CPA to the multimillijoule level in tapered Yb-doped fibers for coherent combining systems.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Alexey; Anashkina, Elena; Kim, Arkady; Meyerov, Iosif; Lebedev, Sergey; Sergeev, Alexander; Mourou, Gerard

    2014-11-17

    We developed a three-dimensional numerical model of Large-Mode-Area chirped pulse fiber amplifiers which includes nonlinear beam propagation in nonuniform multimode waveguides as well as gain spectrum dynamics in quasi-three-level active ions. We used our model in tapered Yb-doped fiber amplifiers and showed that single-mode propagation is maintained along the taper even in the presence of strong Kerr nonlinearity and saturated gain, allowing extraction of up to 3 mJ of output energy in 1 ns pulse. Energy scaling and its limitation as well as the influence of fiber taper bending and core irregularities on the amplifier performance were studied. We also investigated numerically the capabilities for compression and coherent combining of up to 36 perturbed amplifying channels and showed more than 70% combining efficiency, even with up to 11% of high-order modes in individual channels. PMID:25402067

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of CPA to the multimillijoule level in tapered Yb-doped fibers for coherent combining systems.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Alexey; Anashkina, Elena; Kim, Arkady; Meyerov, Iosif; Lebedev, Sergey; Sergeev, Alexander; Mourou, Gerard

    2014-11-17

    We developed a three-dimensional numerical model of Large-Mode-Area chirped pulse fiber amplifiers which includes nonlinear beam propagation in nonuniform multimode waveguides as well as gain spectrum dynamics in quasi-three-level active ions. We used our model in tapered Yb-doped fiber amplifiers and showed that single-mode propagation is maintained along the taper even in the presence of strong Kerr nonlinearity and saturated gain, allowing extraction of up to 3 mJ of output energy in 1 ns pulse. Energy scaling and its limitation as well as the influence of fiber taper bending and core irregularities on the amplifier performance were studied. We also investigated numerically the capabilities for compression and coherent combining of up to 36 perturbed amplifying channels and showed more than 70% combining efficiency, even with up to 11% of high-order modes in individual channels.

  17. Three-dimensional finite difference viscoelastic wave modelling including surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestholm, Stig

    1999-12-01

    I have undertaken 3-D finite difference (FD) modelling of seismic scattering fromfree-surface topography. Exact free-surface boundary conditions for arbitrary 3-D topographies have been derived for the particle velocities. The boundary conditions are combined with a velocity-stress formulation of the full viscoelastic wave equations. A curved grid represents the physical medium and its upper boundary represents the free-surface topography. The wave equations are numerically discretized by an eighth-order FD method on a staggered grid in space, and a leap-frog technique and the Crank-Nicholson method in time. I simulate scattering from teleseismic P waves by using plane incident wave fronts and real topography from a 60 x 60 km area that includes the NORESS array of seismic receiver stations in southeastern Norway. Synthetic snapshots and seismograms of the wavefield show clear conversion from P to Rg (short-period fundamental-mode Rayleigh) waves in areas of rough topography, which is consistent with numerous observations. By parallelization on fast supercomputers, it is possible to model higher frequencies and/or larger areas than before.

  18. A laminar cortical model of stereopsis and three-dimensional surface perception.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen; Howe, Piers D L

    2003-03-01

    A laminar cortical model of stereopsis and later stages of 3D surface perception is developed and simulated. The model describes how initial stages of monocular and binocular oriented filtering interact with later stages of 3D boundary formation and surface filling-in in the lateral geniculate nucleus and cortical areas V1, V2, and V4. In particular, it details how interactions between layers 4, 3B, and 2/3A in V1 and V2 contribute to stereopsis, and clarifies how binocular and monocular information combine to form 3D boundary and surface representations. Along the way, the model modifies and significantly extends the disparity energy model. Neural explanations are given for psychophysical data concerning: contrast variations of dichoptic masking and the correspondence problem, the effect of interocular contrast differences on stereoacuity, Panum's limiting case, the Venetian blind illusion, stereopsis with polarity-reversed stereograms, da Vinci stereopsis, and various lightness illusions. By relating physiology to psychophysics, the model provides new functional insights and predictions about laminar cortical architecture.

  19. Freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms by combining three-dimensional printing and casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shuwei; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Haili; Han, Yilin; Dong, Erbao; Liu, Bin; Liu, Wendong; Cromeens, Barrett; Adler, Brent; Besner, Gail; Ray, William; Hoehne, Brad; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Appropriate surgical planning is important for improved clinical outcome and minimal complications in many surgical operations, such as a conjoined twin separation surgery. We combine 3D printing with casting and assembling to produce a solid phantom of high fidelity to help surgeons for better preparation of the conjoined twin separation surgery. 3D computer models of individual organs were reconstructed based on CT scanned data of the conjoined twins. The models were sliced, processed, and converted to an appropriate format for Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). The skeletons of the phantom were printed directly by FDM using Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) material, while internal soft organs were fabricated by casting silicon materials of different compositions in FDM printed molds. The skeleton and the internal organs were then assembled with appropriate fixtures to maintain their relative positional accuracies. The assembly was placed in a FMD printed shell mold of the patient body for further casting. For clear differentiation of different internal organs, CT contrast agents of different compositions were added in the silicon cast materials. The produced phantom was scanned by CT again and compared with that of the original computer models of the conjoined twins in order to verify the structural and positional fidelity. Our preliminary experiments showed that combining 3D printing with casting is an effective way to produce solid phantoms of high fidelity for the improved surgical planning in many clinical applications.

  20. Evaluation of the Fish Passage Effectiveness of the Bonneville I Prototype Surface Collector using Three-Dimensional Ultrasonic Fish Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Derrek M; Weiland, Mark A; Moursund, Robert; Carlson, Thomas J

    2001-05-01

    This report describes tests conducted at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River in the spring of 2000 using three-dimensional acoustic telemetry and computational fluid dynamics hydraulic modeling to observe the response of outmigrating juvenile steelhead and yearling chinook to a prototype surface collector installed at the Powerhouse. The study described in this report was one of several conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to prepare a decision document on which of two bypass methods: surface flow bypass or extended-length submersible bar screens to use to help smolts pass around Bonneville dams without going through the turbines.

  1. Nanoscale chemical mapping using three-dimensional adiabatic compression of surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Francesco; Das, Gobind; Candeloro, Patrizio; Patrini, Maddalena; Galli, Matteo; Bek, Alpan; Lazzarino, Marco; Maksymov, Ivan; Liberale, Carlo; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    The fields of plasmonics, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy have recently undergone considerable development, but independently of one another. By combining these techniques, a range of complementary information could be simultaneously obtained at a single molecule level. Here, we report the design, fabrication and application of a photonic-plasmonic device that is fully compatible with atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Our approach relies on the generation and localization of surface plasmon polaritons by means of adiabatic compression through a metallic tapered waveguide to create strongly enhanced Raman excitation in a region just a few nanometres across. The tapered waveguide can also be used as an atomic force microscope tip. Using the device, topographic, chemical and structural information about silicon nanocrystals may be obtained with a spatial resolution of 7 nm.

  2. An interactive user-friendly approach to surface-fitting three-dimensional geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1988-01-01

    A surface-fitting technique has been developed which addresses two problems with existing geometry packages: computer storage requirements and the time required of the user for the initial setup of the geometry model. Coordinates of cross sections are fit using segments of general conic sections. The next step is to blend the cross-sectional curve-fits in the longitudinal direction using general conics to fit specific meridional half-planes. Provisions are made to allow the fitting of fuselages and wings so that entire wing-body combinations may be modeled. This report includes the development of the technique along with a User's Guide for the various menus within the program. Results for the modeling of the Space Shuttle and a proposed Aeroassist Flight Experiment geometry are presented.

  3. Semiclassical dynamics on multiple electronic surfaces - Three-dimensional treatment of reactive F + H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komornicki, A.; Morokuma, K.; George, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    The role of electron transitions in collisions is studied for the F + H2 reaction by combining quasi-classical Monte Carlo trajectories with a semiclassical decoupling approximation for the electron transitions. Attention is directed at the reaction of excited state F atoms reacting to form ground state products; the reactants are initiated in either of two spin-orbit states of the atom with the diatom in the ground vibrational state and the lowest four rotational states, at relative translational energies of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 eV. Even if the reactants are initiated on the excited state surface, the reactive cross sections (which are classically forbidden) are significant. The major dynamical effects of the excited state reaction are the flow of reactant electronic energy into product internal energy.

  4. Rapid three-dimensional chromoscan system of body surface based on digital fringe projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bin; Liang, Jin; Li, Jie; Ren, Maodong

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a rapid body scanning system that uses optical digital fringe projection method. Twelve cameras and four digital projectors are placed around the human body from four different directions, so that the body surface threedimensional( 3D) point cloud data can be scanned in 5~8 seconds. It can overcome many difficulties in a traditional measurement method, such as laser scanning causes damage to human eye and low splicing accuracy using structured white light scanning system. First, an accurate calibration method based on close-range photogrammetry, is proposed and verified for calibrating the twelve cameras and the four digital projectors simultaneously, where a 1m×2m plate as calibration target with feature points pasted on its two-sides is used. An experiment indicates that the proposed calibration method, with a re-projection error less than 0.05pixels, has a considerable accuracy. The whole 3D body surface color point cloud data can be measured without splice different views of point cloud, because of the high accuracy calibration results. Then, in order to measure the whole body point cloud data with high accuracy, a combination of single and stereo camera measuring method, based on digital fringe projection, has presented to calculating 3D point cloud data. At last, a novel body chromoscan system is developed and a human body 3D digital model was scanned, by which a physical body model was manufactured using 3D printing technology.

  5. Cell volume control at a surface for three-dimensional grid generation packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Weilmuenster, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    An alternate method of calculating the cell size for orthogonality control in the solution of Poisson's 3D space equations is presented. The method provides the capability to enforce a better initial guess for the grid distribution required for boundary layer resolution. This grid point distribution is accomplished by enforcing grid spacing from a grid block boundary where orthogonality is required. The actual grid spacing or cell size for that boundary is determined by the two or four adjacent boundaries in the grid block definition, which are two dimensional grids. These two dimensional grids are in turn defined by the user using insight into the flow field and boundary layer characteristics. The adjoining boundaries are extended using a multifunctional blending scheme, with user control of the blending and interpolating functions to be used. This grid generation procedure results in an enhanced computational fluid dynamics calculation by allowing a quicker resolution of the configuration's boundary layer and flow field and by limiting the number of grid re-adaptations. The cell size specification calculation was applied to a variety of configurations ranging from axisymmetric to complex three-dimensional configurations. Representative grids are shown for the Space Shuttle and the Langley Lifting Body (HL-20).

  6. Three-dimensional secondary surface geomorphology of submarine landslides on northwest Pacific plate guyots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, N. Christian; King, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Slump and debris slides form on seamounts as they grow, age, and are transported across the sea floor. Slump scars, evident as amphitheater headwalls, are a good morphological indicator where a landslide has occurred. Radical changes in the lower flank slope angles are also good indicators. Debris flows can be surmised by hummocky topography, with the larger blocks being nearer the main edifice. A cursory inspection of the Pacific plate from younger to older shows: (1) the Hawaiian-Emperor Ridge from Loihi to Suiko at 65 Ma, where the lower flank slopes increase with age, (2) Mammerickx seamount in the Mapmakers on 140 Ma crust, out of the fractured region, still showing moats and having no sign of landslides, (3) Castor and Pollux guyots of the Michelson Ridge on 150 Ma crust, where the debris field size is added to or overprinted by later volcanics, to (4) Hunk, Jennings, and Jaybee guyots in the Marcus-Wake seamounts on 160 Ma crust, where later fracture zone formation may have helped form landslides. None of the older seamounts have been dated. Three-dimensional views aid in the location and description of landslides.

  7. In vivo microvascular network imaging of the human retina combined with an automatic three-dimensional segmentation method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shenghai; Piao, Zhonglie; Zhu, Jiang; Lu, Fan; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Microvascular network of the retina plays an important role in diagnosis and monitoring of various retinal diseases. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) segmentation method with intensity-based Doppler variance (IBDV) based on swept-source optical coherence tomography. The automatic 3-D segmentation method is used to obtain seven surfaces of intraretinal layers. The microvascular network of the retina, which is acquired by the IBDV method, can be divided into six layers. The microvascular network of the six individual layers is visualized, and the morphology and contrast images can be improved by using the segmentation method. This method has potential for earlier diagnosis and precise monitoring in retinal vascular diseases. PMID:26169790

  8. Surface-step defect in three-dimensional topological insulators: Electric manipulation of spin and quantum spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Guo, Ai-Min; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2016-08-01

    We study the influence of a step defect on surface states in three-dimensional topological insulators subject to a perpendicular magnetic field. By calculating the energy spectrum of the surface states, we find that Landau levels (LLs) can form on flat regions of the surface and are distant from the step defect, and several subbands emerge at the side surface of the step defect. The subband which connects to the two zeroth LLs is spin polarized and chiral. In particular, when the electron transports along the side surface, the electron spin direction can be manipulated arbitrarily by gate voltage. Also, no reflection occurs even if the electron spin direction is changed. This provides a fascinating avenue to control the electron spin easily and coherently. In addition, regarding the subbands with a high LL index, there exist spin-momentum locking helical states and the quantum spin Hall effect can appear.

  9. An equivalent body surface charge model representing three-dimensional bioelectrical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, B.; Chernyak, Y. B.; Cohen, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    A new surface-source model has been developed to account for the bioelectrical potential on the body surface. A single-layer surface-charge model on the body surface has been developed to equivalently represent bioelectrical sources inside the body. The boundary conditions on the body surface are discussed in relation to the surface-charge in a half-space conductive medium. The equivalent body surface-charge is shown to be proportional to the normal component of the electric field on the body surface just outside the body. The spatial resolution of the equivalent surface-charge distribution appears intermediate between those of the body surface potential distribution and the body surface Laplacian distribution. An analytic relationship between the equivalent surface-charge and the surface Laplacian of the potential was found for a half-space conductive medium. The effects of finite spatial sampling and noise on the reconstruction of the equivalent surface-charge were evaluated by computer simulations. It was found through computer simulations that the reconstruction of the equivalent body surface-charge from the body surface Laplacian distribution is very stable against noise and finite spatial sampling. The present results suggest that the equivalent body surface-charge model may provide an additional insight to our understanding of bioelectric phenomena.

  10. Atmospheric plasma jet array in parallel electric and gas flow fields for three-dimensional surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Z.; Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    This letter reports on electrical and optical characteristics of a ten-channel atmospheric pressure glow discharge jet array in parallel electric and gas flow fields. Challenged with complex three-dimensional substrates including surgical tissue forceps and sloped plastic plate of up to 15°, the jet array is shown to achieve excellent jet-to-jet uniformity both in time and in space. Its spatial uniformity is four times better than a comparable single jet when both are used to treat a 15° sloped substrate. These benefits are likely from an effective self-adjustment mechanism among individual jets facilitated by individualized ballast and spatial redistribution of surface charges.

  11. In vivo, label-free, three-dimensional quantitative imaging of liver surface using multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jie; Kang, Yuzhan; Xu, Shuoyu; Peng, Qiwen; So, Peter T. C.; Yu, Hanry

    2014-07-01

    Various structural features on the liver surface reflect functional changes in the liver. The visualization of these surface features with molecular specificity is of particular relevance to understanding the physiology and diseases of the liver. Using multi-photon microscopy (MPM), we have developed a label-free, three-dimensional quantitative and sensitive method to visualize various structural features of liver surface in living rat. MPM could quantitatively image the microstructural features of liver surface with respect to the sinuosity of collagen fiber, the elastic fiber structure, the ratio between elastin and collagen, collagen content, and the metabolic state of the hepatocytes that are correlative with the pathophysiologically induced changes in the regions of interest. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a useful tool for pathophysiological studies and possible diagnosis of the liver diseases with further development.

  12. In vivo, label-free, three-dimensional quantitative imaging of liver surface using multi-photon microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, Shuangmu E-mail: hanry-yu@nuhs.edu.sg; Yan, Jie; Kang, Yuzhan; Peng, Qiwen; and others

    2014-07-14

    Various structural features on the liver surface reflect functional changes in the liver. The visualization of these surface features with molecular specificity is of particular relevance to understanding the physiology and diseases of the liver. Using multi-photon microscopy (MPM), we have developed a label-free, three-dimensional quantitative and sensitive method to visualize various structural features of liver surface in living rat. MPM could quantitatively image the microstructural features of liver surface with respect to the sinuosity of collagen fiber, the elastic fiber structure, the ratio between elastin and collagen, collagen content, and the metabolic state of the hepatocytes that are correlative with the pathophysiologically induced changes in the regions of interest. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a useful tool for pathophysiological studies and possible diagnosis of the liver diseases with further development.

  13. Three-dimensional flow with heat transfer of a viscoelastic fluid over a stretching surface with a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Rajeswari; Sabaskar, J.

    2016-03-01

    The present research study deals with the steady flow and heat transfer of a viscoelastic fluid over a stretching surface in two lateral directions with a magnetic field applied normal to the surface. The fluid far away from the surface is ambient and the motion in the flow field is caused by stretching surface in two directions. This result is a three-dimensional flow instead of two-dimensional as considered by many authors. Self-similar solutions are obtained numerically. For some particular cases, closed form analytical solutions are also obtained. The numerical calculations show that the skin friction coefficients in x- and y-directions and the heat transfer coefficient decrease with the increasing elastic parameter, but they increase with the stretching parameter. The heat transfer coefficient for the constant heat flux case is higher than that of the constant wall temperature case.

  14. Three-dimensional topological insulator in a magnetic field: chiral side surface states and quantized Hall conductance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Yang; Wang, Xiang-Rong; Xie, X C

    2012-01-11

    Low energy excitation of surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3DTI) can be described by Dirac fermions. By using a tight-binding model, the transport properties of the surface states in a uniform magnetic field are investigated. It is found that chiral surface states parallel to the magnetic field are responsible for the quantized Hall (QH) conductance (2n + 1)e²/h multiplied by the number of Dirac cones. Due to the two-dimensional nature of the surface states, the robustness of the QH conductance against impurity scattering is determined by the oddness and evenness of the Dirac cone number. An experimental setup for transport measurement is proposed.

  15. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging of the in vivo lung: combining spiral computed tomography with multiplanar and volumetric rendering techniques.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, J E; Ney, D R; Fishman, E K

    1994-02-01

    We applied multiplanar techniques and a modified version of our volumetric rendering program for three-dimensional imaging to single-breath hold spiral computed tomography (CT) datasets to generate two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D) images of the in vivo lung. We report details of the combined 2-D/3-D spiral CT technique along with three representative cases from our initial experience.

  16. Three-Dimensional Surface Parameters and Multi-Fractal Spectrum of Corroded Steel

    PubMed Central

    Shanhua, Xu; Songbo, Ren; Youde, Wang

    2015-01-01

    To study multi-fractal behavior of corroded steel surface, a range of fractal surfaces of corroded surfaces of Q235 steel were constructed by using the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot method under a high total accuracy. The multi-fractal spectrum of fractal surface of corroded steel was calculated to study the multi-fractal characteristics of the W-M corroded surface. Based on the shape feature of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded steel surface, the least squares method was applied to the quadratic fitting of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface. The fitting function was quantitatively analyzed to simplify the calculation of multi-fractal characteristics of corroded surface. The results showed that the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface was fitted well with the method using quadratic curve fitting, and the evolution rules and trends were forecasted accurately. The findings can be applied to research on the mechanisms of corroded surface formation of steel and provide a new approach for the establishment of corrosion damage constitutive models of steel. PMID:26121468

  17. Three-Dimensional Surface Parameters and Multi-Fractal Spectrum of Corroded Steel.

    PubMed

    Shanhua, Xu; Songbo, Ren; Youde, Wang

    2015-01-01

    To study multi-fractal behavior of corroded steel surface, a range of fractal surfaces of corroded surfaces of Q235 steel were constructed by using the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot method under a high total accuracy. The multi-fractal spectrum of fractal surface of corroded steel was calculated to study the multi-fractal characteristics of the W-M corroded surface. Based on the shape feature of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded steel surface, the least squares method was applied to the quadratic fitting of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface. The fitting function was quantitatively analyzed to simplify the calculation of multi-fractal characteristics of corroded surface. The results showed that the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface was fitted well with the method using quadratic curve fitting, and the evolution rules and trends were forecasted accurately. The findings can be applied to research on the mechanisms of corroded surface formation of steel and provide a new approach for the establishment of corrosion damage constitutive models of steel.

  18. Pseudospin-valve effect on transport in junctions of three-dimensional topological insulator surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Roychowdhury, Krishanu; Das, Sourin

    2016-07-01

    We show that the surface states of pristine 3D topological insulators (TIs) are analogs of ferromagnetic half metals due to complete polarization of an emergent momentum independent pseudospin (SU(2)) degree of freedom on the surface. To put this claim on firm footing, we present results for TI surfaces perpendicular to the crystal growth axis, which clearly show that the tunneling conductance between two such TI surfaces of the same TI material is dominated by this half metallic behavior leading to physics reminiscent of a spin-valve. Further using the generalized tunnel magnetoresistance derived in this work we also study the tunneling current between arbitrary TI surfaces. We also perform a comprehensive study of the effect of all possible surface potentials allowed by time reversal symmetry on this spin-valve effect and show that it is robust against most of such potentials.

  19. High-Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound Used for Three-Dimensional Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    2001-01-01

    To interface with other solids, many surfaces are engineered via methods such as plating, coating, and machining to produce a functional surface ensuring successful end products. In addition, subsurface properties such as hardness, residual stress, deformation, chemical composition, and microstructure are often linked to surface characteristics. Surface topography, therefore, contains the signatures of the surface and possibly links to volumetric properties, and as a result serves as a vital link between surface design, manufacturing, and performance. Hence, surface topography can be used to diagnose, monitor, and control fabrication methods. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the measurement of surface topography is important in developing high-temperature structural materials and for profiling the surface changes of materials during microgravity combustion experiments. A prior study demonstrated that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz could profile surfaces with a 25-m depth resolution and a 400-m lateral resolution over a 1.4-mm depth range. In this work, we address the question of whether higher frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications. To this end, we employed 10- and 25-MHz focused ultrasonic transducers in the water-coupled mode. The surface profile results seen in this investigation for 25-MHz water-coupled ultrasound, in comparison to those for 1-MHz air-coupled ultrasound, represent an 8 times improvement in depth resolution (3 vs. 25 m seen in practice), an improvement of at least 2 times in lateral resolution (180 vs. 400 m calculated and observed in practice), and an improvement in vertical depth range of 4 times (calculated).

  20. Guided evolution of bulk metallic glass nanostructures: A platform for designing three-dimensional electrocatalytic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Doubek, Gustavo; Sekol, Ryan C.; Li, Jinyang; Ryu, Won -Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Nejati, Siamak; Moy, Eric; Reid, Candy; Carmo, Marcelo; Linardi, Marcelo; Bordeenithikasem, Punnathat; Kinser, Emily; Liu, Yanhui; Tong, Xiao; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Taylor, Andre D.

    2015-12-22

    Precise control over catalyst surface composition and structure is necessary to improve the function of electrochemical systems. To that end, bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys with atomically dispersed elements provide a highly processable, nanoscale platform for electrocatalysis and surface modification. Here we report on nanostructures of Pt-based BMGs that are modified with various subtractive and additive processes to improve their electrochemical performance.

  1. Testing Limits on Matte Surface Color Perception in Three-Dimensional Scenes with Complex Light Fields

    PubMed Central

    Doerschner, K.; Boyaci, H.; Maloney, L. T.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated limits on the human visual system’s ability to discount directional variation in complex lights field when estimating Lambertian surface color. Directional variation in the light field was represented in the frequency domain using spherical harmonics. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function of a Lambertian surface acts as a low-pass filter on directional variation in the light field. Consequently, the visual system needs to discount only the low-pass component of the incident light corresponding to the first nine terms of a spherical harmonics expansion (Basri & Jacobs, 2001; Ramamoorthi & Hanrahan, 2001) to accurately estimate surface color. We test experimentally whether the visual system discounts directional variation in the light field up to this physical limit. Our results are consistent with the claim that the visual system can compensate for all of the complexity in the light field that affects the appearance of Lambertian surfaces. PMID:18053846

  2. Polarized radiance fields under a dynamic ocean surface: a three-dimensional radiative transfer solution

    SciTech Connect

    You Yu; Zhai Pengwang; Kattawar, George W.; Yang Ping

    2009-06-01

    The hybrid matrix operator, Monte Carlo (HMOMC) method previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1063-1071 (2008)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001063] is improved by neglecting higher-order terms in the coupling of the matrix operators and by introducing a dual grid scheme. The computational efficiency for solving the vector radiative transfer equation in a full 3D coupled atmosphere-surface-ocean system is substantially improved, and, thus, large-scale simulations of the radiance distribution become feasible. The improved method is applied to the computation of the polarized radiance field under realistic surface waves simulated by the power spectral density method. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first time that the polarized radiance field under a dynamic ocean surface and the underwater image of an object above such an ocean surface have been reported.

  3. Combined technology for clomazone herbicide wastewater treatment: three-dimensional packed-bed electrochemical oxidation and biological contact degradation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yujie; Liu, Junfeng; Zhu, Limin; Wei, Jinzhi

    2013-01-01

    The clomazone herbicide wastewater was treated using a combined technology composed of electrochemical catalytic oxidation and biological contact degradation. A new type of electrochemical reactor was fabricated and a Ti/SnO2 electrode was chosen as the anode in electrochemical-oxidation reactor and stainless steel as the cathode. Ceramic rings loaded with SnO2 were used as three-dimensional electrodes forming a packed bed. The operation parameters that might influence the degradation of organic contaminants in the clomazone wastewater were optimized. When the cell voltage was set at 30 V and the volume of particle electrodes was designed as two-thirds of the volume of the total reactor bed, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate could reach 82% after 120 min electrolysis, and the ratio of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)/COD of wastewater increased from 0.12 to 0.38. After 12 h degradation with biological contact oxidation, the total COD removal rate of the combined technology reached 95%, and effluent COD was below 120 mg/L. The results demonstrated that this electrocatalytic oxidation method can be used as a pretreatment for refractory organic wastewater before biological treatment.

  4. Wiedemann-Franz-type relation between shot noise and thermal conduction of Majorana surface states in a three-dimensional topological superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnezdilov, N. V.; Diez, M.; Pacholski, M. J.; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2016-09-01

    We compare the thermal conductance Gthermal (at temperature T ) and the electrical shot-noise power Pshot (at bias voltage V ≫kBT /e ) of Majorana fermions on the two-dimensional surface of a three-dimensional topological superconductor. We present analytical and numerical calculations to demonstrate that, for a local coupling between the superconductor and metal contacts, Gthermal/Pshot=L T /e V (with L the Lorenz number). This relation is ensured by the combination of electron-hole and time-reversal symmetries, irrespective of the microscopics of the surface Hamiltonian, and provides for a purely electrical way to detect the charge-neutral Majorana surface states. A surface of aspect ratio W /L ≫1 has the universal shot-noise power Pshot=(W /L ) ×(e2/h ) ×(e V /2 π ) .

  5. Effects of bulk charged impurities on the bulk and surface transport in three-dimensional topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, B.; Chen, T.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2013-09-15

    In the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), the physics of doped semiconductors exists literally side-by-side with the physics of ultrarelativistic Dirac fermions. This unusual pairing creates a novel playground for studying the interplay between disorder and electronic transport. In this mini-review, we focus on the disorder caused by the three-dimensionally distributed charged impurities that are ubiquitous in TIs, and we outline the effects it has on both the bulk and surface transport in TIs. We present self-consistent theories for Coulomb screening both in the bulk and at the surface, discuss the magnitude of the disorder potential in each case, and present results for the conductivity. In the bulk, where the band gap leads to thermally activated transport, we show how disorder leads to a smaller-than-expected activation energy that gives way to variable-range hopping at low temperatures. We confirm this enhanced conductivity with numerical simulations that also allow us to explore different degrees of impurity compensation. For the surface, where the TI has gapless Dirac modes, we present a theory of disorder and screening of deep impurities, and we calculate the corresponding zero-temperature conductivity. We also comment on the growth of the disorder potential in passing from the surface of the TI into the bulk. Finally, we discuss how the presence of a gap at the Dirac point, introduced by some source of time-reversal symmetry breaking, affects the disorder potential at the surface and the mid-gap density of states.

  6. Bulk-Induced 1/f Noise at the Surface of Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Semonti; Banerjee, Mitali; Nhalil, Hariharan; Islam, Saurav; Dasgupta, Chandan; Elizabeth, Suja; Ghosh, Arindam

    2015-12-22

    Slow intrinsic fluctuations of resistance, also known as the flicker noise or 1/f-noise, in the surface transport of strong topological insulators (TIs) is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here, we have systematically explored the 1/f-noise in field-effect transistors (FET) of mechanically exfoliated Bi1.6Sb0.4Te2Se TI films when transport occurs predominantly via the surface states. We find that the slow kinetics of the charge disorder within the bulk of the TI induces mobility fluctuations at the surface, providing a new source of intrinsic 1/f-noise that is unique to bulk TI systems. At small channel thickness, the noise magnitude can be extremely small, corresponding to the phenomenological Hooge parameter γH as low as ≈10(-4), but it increases rapidly when channel thickness exceeds ∼1 μm. From the temperature (T)-dependence of noise, which displayed sharp peaks at characteristic values of T, we identified generation-recombination processes from interband transitions within the TI bulk as the dominant source of the mobility fluctuations in surface transport. Our experiment not only establishes an intrinsic microscopic origin of noise in TI surface channels, but also reveals a unique spectroscopic information on the impurity bands that can be useful in bulk TI systems in general.

  7. A three-dimensional phase diagram of growth-induced surface instabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiming; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-01-01

    A variety of fascinating morphological patterns arise on surfaces of growing, developing or aging tissues, organs and microorganism colonies. These patterns can be classified into creases, wrinkles, folds, period-doubles, ridges and delaminated-buckles according to their distinctive topographical characteristics. One universal mechanism for the pattern formation has been long believed to be the mismatch strains between biological layers with different expanding or shrinking rates, which induce mechanical instabilities. However, a general model that accounts for the formation and evolution of these various surface-instability patterns still does not exist. Here, we take biological structures at their current states as thermodynamic systems, treat each instability pattern as a thermodynamic phase, and construct a unified phase diagram that can quantitatively predict various types of growth-induced surface instabilities. We further validate the phase diagram with our experiments on surface instabilities induced by mismatch strains as well as the reported data on growth-induced instabilities in various biological systems. The predicted wavelengths and amplitudes of various instability patterns match well with our experimental data. It is expected that the unified phase diagram will not only advance the understanding of biological morphogenesis, but also significantly facilitate the design of new materials and structures by rationally harnessing surface instabilities. PMID:25748825

  8. A three-dimensional analysis of the geometry and curvature of the proximal tibial articular surface of hominoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Emily K.; Karnick, Pushpak

    2006-02-01

    This study uses new three-dimensional imaging techniques to compare the articular curvature of the proximal tibial articular surface of hominoids. It has been hypothesized that the curvature of the anteroposterior contour of the lateral condyle in particular can be used to differentiate humans and apes and reflect locomotor function. This study draws from a large comparative sample of extant hominoids to obtain quantitative curvature data. Three-dimensional models of the proximal tibiae of 26 human, 15 chimpanzee, 15 gorilla, 17 orangutan, 16 gibbon and four Australopithecus fossil casts (AL 129-1b, AL 288-1aq, AL 333x-26, KNM-KP 29285A) were acquired with a Cyberware Model 15 laser digitizer. Curvature analysis was accomplished using a software program developed at Arizona State University's Partnership for Research In Stereo Modeling (PRISM) lab, which enables the user to extract curvature profiles and compute the difference between analogous curves from different specimens. Results indicate that the curvature of chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan tibiae is significantly different from the curvature of human tibiae, thus supporting the hypothesized dichotomy between humans and great apes. The non-significant difference between gibbons and all other taxa indicates that gibbons have an intermediate pattern of articular curvature. All four Australopithecus tibia were aligned with the great apes.

  9. Three-Dimensional Planetary Surface Tracking Based on a Simple Ultra-Wideband Impulse-Radio Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.; Ni, David; Ngo, Phong

    2010-01-01

    Several prototype ultra-wideband (UWB) impulse-radio (IR) tracking systems are currently under development at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). These systems are being studied for use in tracking of Lunar/Mars rovers and astronauts during early exploration missions when satellite navigation systems (such as GPS) are not available. To date, the systems that have been designed and tested are intended only for two-dimensional location and tracking, but these designs can all be extended to three-dimensional tracking with only minor modifications and increases in complexity. In this presentation, we will briefly review the design and performance of two of the current 2-D systems: one designed specifically for short-range, extremely high-precision tracking (approximately 1-2 cm resolution) and the other designed specifically for much longer range tracking with less stringent precision requirements (1-2 m resolution). We will then discuss a new multi-purpose system design based on a simple UWB-IR architecture that can be deployed easily on a planetary surface to support arbitrary three-dimensional localization and tracking applications. We will discuss utilization of this system as an infrastructure to provide both short-range and long-range tracking and analyze the localization performance of the system in several different configurations. We will give theoretical performance bounds for some canonical system configurations and compare these performance bounds with both numerical simulations of the system as well as actual experimental system performance evaluations.

  10. Expansion of engrafting human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in three-dimensional scaffolds with surface-immobilized fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qi; Chai, Chou; Jiang, Xue-Song; Leong, Kam W.; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2008-01-01

    An efficient and practical ex vivo expansion methodology for human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) is critical in realizing the potential of HSPC transplantation in treating a variety of hematologic disorders and as a supportive therapy for malignant diseases. We report here an expansion strategy using a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold conjugated with an extracellular matrix molecule, fibronectin (FN), to partially mimic the hematopoietic stem cell niche. FN-immobilized 3D polyethylene terephthalate (PET) scaffold was synthesized and evaluated for HSPC expansion efficiency, in comparison with a FN-immobilized 2D PET substrate and a 3D scaffold with FN supplemented in the medium. Covalent conjugation of FN produced substrate and scaffold with higher cell expansion efficiency than that on their unmodified counterparts. After 10 days of culture in serum-free medium, human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells cultured in FN-conjugated scaffold yielded the highest expansion of CD34+ cells (∼100 fold) and long-term culture initiating cells (∼47-fold). The expanded human CD34+ cells successfully reconstituted hematopoiesis in NOD/SCID mice. This study demonstrated the synergistic effect between the three-dimensionality of the scaffold and surface-conjugated FN, and the potential of this FN-conjugated 3D scaffold for ex vivo expansion of HSPCs. PMID:16739181

  11. Three-dimensional surface deformation derived from airborne interferometric UAVSAR: Application to the Slumgullion Landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbridge, Brent G.; Bürgmann, Roland; Fielding, Eric; Hensley, Scott; Schulz, William H.

    2016-05-01

    In order to provide surface geodetic measurements with "landslide-wide" spatial coverage, we develop and validate a method for the characterization of 3-D surface deformation using the unique capabilities of the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry system. We apply our method at the well-studied Slumgullion Landslide, which is 3.9 km long and moves persistently at rates up to ˜2 cm/day. A comparison with concurrent GPS measurements validates this method and shows that it provides reliable and accurate 3-D surface deformation measurements. The UAVSAR-derived vector velocity field measurements accurately capture the sharp boundaries defining previously identified kinematic units and geomorphic domains within the landslide. We acquired data across the landslide during spring and summer and identify that the landslide moves more slowly during summer except at its head, presumably in response to spatiotemporal variations in snowmelt infiltration. In order to constrain the mechanics controlling landslide motion from surface velocity measurements, we present an inversion framework for the extraction of slide thickness and basal geometry from dense 3-D surface velocity fields. We find that the average depth of the Slumgullion Landslide is 7.5 m, several meters less than previous depth estimates. We show that by considering a viscoplastic rheology, we can derive tighter theoretical bounds on the rheological parameter relating mean horizontal flow rate to surface velocity. Using inclinometer data for slow-moving, clay-rich landslides across the globe, we find a consistent value for the rheological parameter of 0.85 ± 0.08.

  12. Efficient Solution of Three-Dimensional Problems of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Scattering by Open Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turc, Catalin; Anand, Akash; Bruno, Oscar; Chaubell, Julian

    2011-01-01

    We present a computational methodology (a novel Nystrom approach based on use of a non-overlapping patch technique and Chebyshev discretizations) for efficient solution of problems of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering by open surfaces. Our integral equation formulations (1) Incorporate, as ansatz, the singular nature of open-surface integral-equation solutions, and (2) For the Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE), use analytical regularizes that effectively reduce the number of iterations required by iterative linear-algebra solution based on Krylov-subspace iterative solvers.

  13. Three-dimensional low Reynolds number flows with a free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, D.; Gutfinger, C.

    1977-01-01

    The two-dimensional leveling problem (Degani, Gutfinger, 1976) is extended to three dimensions in the case where the flow Re number is very low and attention is paid to the free surface boundary condition with surface tension effects included. The no-slip boundary condition on the wall is observed. The numerical solution falls back on the Marker and Cell (MAC) method (Harlow and Welch, 1965) with the computation region divided into a finite number of stationary rectangular cells (or boxes in the 3-D case) and fluid flow traverses the cells (or boxes).

  14. Three-dimensional surface deformation mapping by convensional interferometry and multiple aperture interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jung, H.-S.; Lu, Zhiming; Lee, C.-W.

    2011-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique has been successfully used for mapping surface deformations [1-2], but it has been normally limited to a measurement along the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction. For this reason, it is impossible to determine the north (N-S) component of surface deformation because of using data from near-polar orbiting satellites, and it is not sufficient to resolve the parameters of models for earthquakes and volcanic activities because there is a marked trade-off among model parameters [3]. ?? 2011 KIEES.

  15. The surface morphology analysis based on progressive approximation method using confocal three-dimensional micro X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Sun, Tianxi; Wang, Kai; Qin, Min; Yang, Kui; Wang, Jinbang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-08-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro X-ray fluorescence (3D MXRF) is an excellent surface analysis technology. For a confocal structure, only the X-rays from the confocal volume can be detected. Confocal 3D MXRF has been widely used for analysing elements, the distribution of elements and 3D image of some special samples. However, it has rarely been applied to analysing surface topography by surface scanning. In this paper, a confocal 3D MXRF technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics was proposed for determining surface topography. A corresponding surface adaptive algorithm based on a progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. The surface topography of the letter "R" on a coin of the People's Republic of China and a small pit on painted pottery were obtained. The surface topography of the "R" and the pit are clearly shown in the two figures. Compared with the method in our previous study, it exhibits a higher scanning efficiency. This approach could be used for two-dimensional (2D) elemental mapping or 3D elemental voxel mapping measurements as an auxiliary method. It also could be used for analysing elemental mapping while obtaining the surface topography of a sample in 2D elemental mapping measurement.

  16. Determination of earth-surface point displacements and their three-dimensional representation in a subsidence area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberg, H. G.

    1986-11-01

    The study area is one section of the Tia Juana Oilfield on the east shore of Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela. It has an area of about 45 km 2. The absolute vertical subsidence component attains 4 m, due to the oil extraction in the last 50 years. Some years ago, the boundary area of the subsidence cone showed cracks in the earth's surface. The length of the crackline is about 4 km. Strong horizontal movements were observed along this rupture zone. To study the horizontal component of the earth-surface movement, a high-precision traverse network was installed and measured, the first time in June 1978 and reobserved in December 1978. In 1984 another measurement compaign was carried out which permitted a comparison of the results of the two epochs. To know the behavior of the affected field better, a three-dimensional representation of horizontal and vertical measurements, including the orientation of the resultant vector, was made.

  17. Effect of liquid uptake on critical heat flux utilizing a three dimensional, interconnected alumina nano porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    June Zhang, Bong; Kim, Kwang J.

    2012-07-01

    In this letter, we propose a three dimensional, interconnected alumina nano porous surface (ANPS), which shows significant critical heat flux (CHF) and a reduction of wall superheat. ANPS is versatile in morphology modifications such as thickness and pore diameter and is used to enhance heat transfer. Structurally well-defined, porous wicks are efficient to absorb and spread liquid into a porous matrix. To characterize various surface wetting environments, synthetic approaches of wetting and liquid absorption have been carried out. We have studied the quantitative evaluation of liquid uptake utilizing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The CHF augment trend is well matched with the amount of liquid absorbed into the porous media, pre-determined by the EIS.

  18. ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTIVE SURFACE MODIFICATIONS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL POLYPROPYLENE FUMARATE SCAFFOLDS

    PubMed Central

    Runge, M. Brett; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Polypropylene fumarate (PPF) scaffolds fabricated by rapid prototyping technique were surface modified by solution deposition of electrically conductive polypyrrole coatings with or without hydroxyapatite. Scaffolds were electrically conductive with resistivity as low as 2Ω. Scaffold characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis shows both polypyrrole and hydroxyapatite are present. Cell viability, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation were analyzed using human fetal osteoblast cells. These studies show that surface modification using hydroxyapatite improved cell attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts onto the PPF scaffolds. Alkaline phosphatase activity as a marker for osteogenic differentiation of cell to mature osteoblasts was analyzed. Our data reveal that osteoblasts maintained their phenotype on PPF scaffolds with and without coatings. Thus, these scaffolds could be appropriate candidates for our future in vivo studies. PMID:22051167

  19. Magnetic islands and singular currents at rational surfaces in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Loizu, J.; Hudson, S.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Helander, P.

    2015-02-15

    Using the recently developed multiregion, relaxed MHD (MRxMHD) theory, which bridges the gap between Taylor's relaxation theory and ideal MHD, we provide a thorough analytical and numerical proof of the formation of singular currents at rational surfaces in non-axisymmetric ideal MHD equilibria. These include the force-free singular current density represented by a Dirac δ-function, which presumably prevents the formation of islands, and the Pfirsch-Schlüter 1/x singular current, which arises as a result of finite pressure gradient. An analytical model based on linearized MRxMHD is derived that can accurately (1) describe the formation of magnetic islands at resonant rational surfaces, (2) retrieve the ideal MHD limit where magnetic islands are shielded, and (3) compute the subsequent formation of singular currents. The analytical results are benchmarked against numerical simulations carried out with a fully nonlinear implementation of MRxMHD.

  20. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Lin, Xue; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-09-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces.

  1. Morphology of foliar trichomes of the Chinese cork oak Quercus variabilis by electron microscopy and three-dimensional surface profiling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woo; Cho, Do-Hyun; Kim, Pan-Gi

    2011-06-01

    Morphology of foliar trichomes was analyzed in Quercus variabilis by electron microscopy and three-dimensional surface profiling. Leaves from suppressed or dominant sprouts of the oak species were collected after a forest fire to unravel the effects of the disturbance factor on sprouting of the oak species. Scanning electron microscopy revealed two types of trichomes depending on the leaf surface. The trichomes on the adaxial surface were branched and constricted, and possessed a single row of thin-walled cells with a collapsed morphology (glandular branched uniseriate trichomes). Meanwhile, the trichomes on the abaxial surface were star-shaped, unfused with each other, and had 6 to 10 rays (nonglandular simple stellate trichomes). An apparent proliferation of trichomes was evident on the adaxial surface of the dominant sprouts. Uniseriate trichomes could be discernable as an elevation from the surface by white light scanning interferometry. By transmission electron microscopy, thin and convoluted cell wall, degenerated cytoplasm, and a single row of cells were characteristic of the trichomes on the adaxial surface. The thick cell walls of the mature trichomes on the abaxial surface represented the nonglandular nature. This is the first report on the morphological and ultrastructural characterization of foliar trichomes of the oak species.

  2. An optical profilometer for spatial characterization of three-dimensional surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L., IV; Burcher, E. E.; Skolaut, M. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The design concept and system operation of an optical profilometer are discussed, and a preliminary evaluation of a breadboard system is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the optical profilometer technique. Measurement results are presented for several test surfaces; and to illustrate a typical application, results are shown for a cleft palate cast used by dental surgeons. Finally, recommendations are made for future development of the optical profilometer technique for specific engineering or scientific applications.

  3. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction.

    PubMed

    Baykara, Mehmet Z; Dagdeviren, Omur E; Schwendemann, Todd C; Mönig, Harry; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation.In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface.

  4. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction for evaluation of the abrasion effects on textile fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, A. O.; Fiadeiro, P. T.; Miguel, R. A. L.

    2006-02-01

    Abrasion is responsible for many surface changes that occur on garments. For this reason, the evaluation of its effects becomes very important for the textile industry. In particular, pilling formation is a phenomenon that results of the abrasion process and affects fabrics more significantly altering their surface severely. The present work presents a method based on optical triangulation that enables topographic reconstructions of textile fabric samples and consequently, makes possible the evaluation and the quantification of the pilling formation that results from their topographic changes. Specific algorithms, written in the MatLab programming language, were developed and implemented to control the image data acquisition, storage and processing procedures. Finally, with the available processed data was possible to reconstruct the surface of fabric samples in three-dimensions and also, a coefficient to express the pilling formation occurred on the analyzed fabrics was achieved. Several tests and experiences have been carried out and the obtained results shown that this method is robust and precise.

  5. Three-dimensional range data interpolation using B-spline surface fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songtao; Zhao, Dongming

    2000-05-01

    Many optical range sensors use an Equal Angle Increment (EAI) sampling. This type of sensors uses rotating mirrors with a constant angular velocity using radar and triangulation techniques, where the sensor sends and receives the modulated coherent light through the mirror. Such an EAI model generates data for surface geometrical description that has to be converted, in many applications, into data which meet the desired Equal Distance Increment orthographic projection model. For an accurate analysis in 3D images, a 3D interpolation scheme is needed to resample the range data into spatially equally-distance sampling data that emulate the Cartesian orthographic projection model. In this paper, a resampling approach using a B-Spline surface fitting is proposed. The first step is to select a new scale for all X, Y, Z directions based on the 3D Cartesian coordinates of range data obtained from the sensor parameters. The size of the new range image and the new coordinates of each point are then computed according to the actual references of (X, Y, Z) coordinates and the new scale. The new range data are interpolated using a B-Spline surface fitting based on the new Cartesian coordinates. The experiments show that this 3D interpolation approach provides a geometrically accurate solution for many industrial applications which deploy the EAI sampling sensors.

  6. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Gyral Shape and Cortical Surface Asymmetries in Schizophrenia: Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Narr, Katherine L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Sharma, Tonmoy; Moussai, Jacob; Zoumalan, Chris; Rayman, Janice; Toga, Arthur W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective People with schizophrenia exhibit abnormalities in brain structure, often in the left hemisphere. Disturbed structural lateralization is controversial, however, and effects appear mediated by gender. The authors mapped differences between schizophrenic and normal subjects in gyral asymmetries, complexity, and variability across the entire cortex. Method Asymmetry and shape profiles for 25 schizophrenic patients (15 men) and 28 demographically similar normal subjects (15 men) were obtained for 38 gyral regions, including the sylvian fissure and temporal and postcentral gyri, by using magnetic resonance data and a novel surface-based mesh-modeling approach. Cortical complexity was examined for sex and diagnosis effects in lobar regions. Intragroup variability was quantified and visualized to assess regional group abnormalities at the cortical surface. Results The patients showed greater variability in frontal areas than the comparison subjects. They also had significant deviations in gyral complexity asymmetry in the superior frontal cortex. In temporoparietal regions, significant gyral asymmetries were present in both groups. Sex differences were apparent in superior temporal gyral measures, and cortical complexity in inferior frontal regions was significantly greater in men. Conclusions Cortical variability and complexity show regional abnormalities in the frontal cortex potentially specific to schizophrenia. The results indicate highly significant temporoparietal gyral asymmetries in both diagnostic groups, contrary to reports of less lateralization in schizophrenia. Substantially larger study groups are necessary to isolate smaller deviations in surface asymmetries, if present in schizophrenia, suggesting their diagnostic value is minimal. PMID:11156807

  7. Numerical modeling of three-dimensional open elastic waveguides combining semi-analytical finite element and perfectly matched layer methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, K. L.; Treyssède, F.; Hazard, C.

    2015-05-01

    Among the numerous techniques of non-destructive evaluation, elastic guided waves are of particular interest to evaluate defects inside industrial and civil elongated structures owing to their ability to propagate over long distances. However for guiding structures buried in large solid media, waves can be strongly attenuated along the guide axis due to the energy radiation into the surrounding medium, usually considered as unbounded. Hence, searching the less attenuated modes becomes necessary in order to maximize the inspection distance. In the numerical modeling of embedded waveguides, the main difficulty is to account for the unbounded section. This paper presents a numerical approach combining a semi-analytical finite element method and a perfectly matched layer (PML) technique to compute the so-called trapped and leaky modes in three-dimensional embedded elastic waveguides of arbitrary cross-section. Two kinds of PML, namely the Cartesian PML and the radial PML, are considered. In order to understand the various spectral objects obtained by the method, the PML parameters effects upon the eigenvalue spectrum are highlighted through analytical studies and numerical experiments. Then, dispersion curves are computed for test cases taken from the literature in order to validate the approach.

  8. Development of a Turbulence-Resolving, Three-dimensional, Free Water Surface Numerical Model for Recirculation Eddies in Grand Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akahori, R.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, sand bars, which are built in recirculation areas downstream of channel expansions are valuable resources, particularly as natural habitat for endangered native fish and recreation sites for recreation. Since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, there has been a reduction in the size of recirculation eddy bars. Simulated floods in the Colorado after tributary flood sediment input from the Paria River are being investigated as a method of rebuilding recirculation eddy beaches. Time-averaged, two-dimensional (and quasi- three-dimensional) numerical models have been employed to predict deposition during these beach/habit-building test flows. However, behind channel expansion areas, flows are strongly three-dimensional and the cross-channel flow is driven primarily by upwelling boils along the eddy fence that are neither stationary in time or space. Furthermore, these strong vertical motions along the eddy fence preclude use of the hydrostatic assumption. In this study, a non-hydrostatic three-dimensional numerical model is presented in order to calculate flow velocity in channels having rapid channel expansions. This model employs the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence modeling technique. LES uses spatial filtering to separate flows into gird scale and sub-gird scale rather than time averaging, thus it directly calculates large-scale turbulent motions. Also, this model employs a moving grid system and the Body Fitted Coordinate (BFC) system. These grid and coordinate systems allow the model to calculate time-dependent free water surface levels induced by large-scale turbulent motions. The model_fs calculation results are compared to existing experimental results of an open channel flow expansion in a laboratory flume. The comparison shows that the model succeeds to reproduce several key features of the flow, such as the temporally- and vertically-averaged horizontal recirculation eddy structure, and the time-averaged cross

  9. A three dimensional radiative transfer method for optical remote sensing of vegetated land surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, Ghassem; Myneni, Ranga B.; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1991-01-01

    In the application of remote sensing at optical wavelengths to vegetated surfaces from satellite borne high resolution instruments, an understanding of the various physical mechanisms that contribute to the measured signal is important. A numerical method of solving the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions is reported. The reliability of coding and accuracy of the algorithm are evaluated by benchmarching. Parametrization of the methods and results of a simulation are presented. The method is tested with experimental data of canopy bidirectional reflectance factors. The effect of spatial heterogeneity on the relationship between the simple ratio and normalized vrs absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) is discussed.

  10. Using Three-Dimensional Passive Seismic Imaging to Capture Near-Surface Weathering and Its Influence on Overlying Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. J.; Dueker, K. G.; Riebe, C. S.; Chen, P.; Flinchum, B. A.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    In mountain landscapes, vegetation is tightly coupled to elevation through orographic effects on temperature and precipitation. However, at any given elevation, vegetation can vary markedly due to non-climatic factors such as lithology. For example, tree-canopy cover correlates strongly with bedrock composition in the Sierra Nevada, California, via mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We are exploring the hypothesis that vegetation varies across bedrock types in the Sierra Nevada due to differences in near-surface fracture density that influence the availability of water for plants. Our approach uses data collected from autonomous seismic nodes that record seismic energy generated by ambient sources such as wind, rivers, and road traffic. By deploying the nodes across the landscape in arrays spanning 200 m on a side, we can obtain a three-dimensional image of spatial variations in near-surface weathering. Data presented here will be derived from arrays deployed for 3 days each spanning an area of 0.04 km2 at each of three sites underlain by Sierra Nevada granites and granodiorites. To isolate the effects of lithology on vegetation, we chose sites that span a range of forest cover and mafic-mineral content but have similar microclimate (i.e., with similar aspect and elevation). Our data will provide a three-dimensional model of P- and S-wave velocity structure, which we can invert using a Hertz-Mindlin porosity model to constrain the thickness and degree of fracturing and thus the subsurface water-holding potential for plants. We will explore the hypothesis that the densest vegetation occurs within bedrock with the densest fracturing, due to enhanced availability of water in the near surface. We will present a comparison of our results from the Sierra Nevada and results from similar experiments at the Snowy Range and Blair Wallis field sites of the Wyoming Center for Environmental Hydrology and Geophysics.

  11. Ultrahigh Surface Area Three-Dimensional Porous Graphitic Carbon from Conjugated Polymeric Molecular Framework.

    PubMed

    To, John W F; Chen, Zheng; Yao, Hongbin; He, Jiajun; Kim, Kwanpyo; Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Pan, Lijia; Wilcox, Jennifer; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-05-27

    Porous graphitic carbon is essential for many applications such as energy storage devices, catalysts, and sorbents. However, current graphitic carbons are limited by low conductivity, low surface area, and ineffective pore structure. Here we report a scalable synthesis of porous graphitic carbons using a conjugated polymeric molecular framework as precursor. The multivalent cross-linker and rigid conjugated framework help to maintain micro- and mesoporous structures, while promoting graphitization during carbonization and chemical activation. The above unique design results in a class of highly graphitic carbons at temperature as low as 800 °C with record-high surface area (4073 m(2) g(-1)), large pore volume (2.26 cm(-3)), and hierarchical pore architecture. Such carbons simultaneously exhibit electrical conductivity >3 times more than activated carbons, very high electrochemical activity at high mass loading, and high stability, as demonstrated by supercapacitors and lithium-sulfur batteries with excellent performance. Moreover, the synthesis can be readily tuned to make a broad range of graphitic carbons with desired structures and compositions for many applications.

  12. Ultrahigh Surface Area Three-Dimensional Porous Graphitic Carbon from Conjugated Polymeric Molecular Framework

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Porous graphitic carbon is essential for many applications such as energy storage devices, catalysts, and sorbents. However, current graphitic carbons are limited by low conductivity, low surface area, and ineffective pore structure. Here we report a scalable synthesis of porous graphitic carbons using a conjugated polymeric molecular framework as precursor. The multivalent cross-linker and rigid conjugated framework help to maintain micro- and mesoporous structures, while promoting graphitization during carbonization and chemical activation. The above unique design results in a class of highly graphitic carbons at temperature as low as 800 °C with record-high surface area (4073 m2 g–1), large pore volume (2.26 cm–3), and hierarchical pore architecture. Such carbons simultaneously exhibit electrical conductivity >3 times more than activated carbons, very high electrochemical activity at high mass loading, and high stability, as demonstrated by supercapacitors and lithium–sulfur batteries with excellent performance. Moreover, the synthesis can be readily tuned to make a broad range of graphitic carbons with desired structures and compositions for many applications. PMID:27162953

  13. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving "acoustic tweezers" in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner.

  14. Ultrahigh Surface Area Three-Dimensional Porous Graphitic Carbon from Conjugated Polymeric Molecular Framework.

    PubMed

    To, John W F; Chen, Zheng; Yao, Hongbin; He, Jiajun; Kim, Kwanpyo; Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Pan, Lijia; Wilcox, Jennifer; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-05-27

    Porous graphitic carbon is essential for many applications such as energy storage devices, catalysts, and sorbents. However, current graphitic carbons are limited by low conductivity, low surface area, and ineffective pore structure. Here we report a scalable synthesis of porous graphitic carbons using a conjugated polymeric molecular framework as precursor. The multivalent cross-linker and rigid conjugated framework help to maintain micro- and mesoporous structures, while promoting graphitization during carbonization and chemical activation. The above unique design results in a class of highly graphitic carbons at temperature as low as 800 °C with record-high surface area (4073 m(2) g(-1)), large pore volume (2.26 cm(-3)), and hierarchical pore architecture. Such carbons simultaneously exhibit electrical conductivity >3 times more than activated carbons, very high electrochemical activity at high mass loading, and high stability, as demonstrated by supercapacitors and lithium-sulfur batteries with excellent performance. Moreover, the synthesis can be readily tuned to make a broad range of graphitic carbons with desired structures and compositions for many applications. PMID:27162953

  15. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P.; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving “acoustic tweezers” in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner. PMID:26811444

  16. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving "acoustic tweezers" in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner. PMID:26811444

  17. Molecular-scale investigations of structures and surface charge distribution of surfactant aggregates by three-dimensional force mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2014-02-07

    Surface charges on nanoscale structures in liquids, such as biomolecules and nano-micelles, play an essentially important role in their structural stability as well as their chemical activities. These structures interact with each other through electric double layers (EDLs) formed by the counter ions in electrolyte solution. Although static-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) including colloidal-probe AFM is a powerful technique for surface charge density measurements and EDL analysis on a submicron scale in liquids, precise surface charge density analysis with single-nanometer resolution has not been made because of its limitation of the resolution and the detection sensitivity. Here we demonstrate molecular-scale surface charge measurements of self-assembled micellar structures, molecular hemicylinders of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), by three-dimensional (3D) force mapping based on frequency modulation AFM. The SDS hemicylindrical structures with a diameter of 4.8 nm on a graphite surface were clearly imaged. We have succeeded in visualizing 3D EDL forces on the SDS hemicylinder surfaces and obtaining the molecular-scale charge density for the first time. The results showed that the surface charge on the trench regions between the hemicylinders was much smaller than that on the hemicylinder tops. The method can be applied to a wide variety of local charge distribution studies, such as spatial charge variation on a single protein molecule.

  18. Three dimensional modeling and inversion of Borehole-surface Electrical Resistivity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, D.; Liu, Y.; Qin, M.

    2013-12-01

    After a long time of exploration, many oil fields have stepped into the high water-cut period. It is sorely needed to determining the oil-water distribution and water flooding front. Borehole-surface electrical resistivity tomography (BSERT) system is a low-cost measurement with wide measuring scope and small influence on the reservoir. So it is gaining more and more application in detecting water flooding areas and evaluating residual oil distribution in oil fields. In BSERT system, current is connected with the steel casing of the observation well. The current flows along the long casing and transmits to the surface through inhomogeneous layers. Then received electric potential difference data on the surface can be used to inverse the deep subsurface resistivity distribution. This study presents the 3D modeling and inversion method of electrical resistivity data. In an extensive literature, the steel casing is treated as a transmission line current source with infinite small radius and constant current density. However, in practical multi-layered formations with different resistivity, the current density along the casing is not constant. In this study, the steel casing is modeled by a 2.5e-7 ohm-m physical volume that the casing occupies in the finite element mesh. Radius of the casing can be set to a little bigger than the true radius, and this helps reduce the element number and computation time. The current supply point is set on the center of the top surface of the physical volume. The homogeneous formation modeling result shows the same precision as the transmission line current source model. The multi-layered formation modeling result shows that the current density along the casing is high in the low-resistivity layer, and low in the high-resistivity layer. These results are more reasonable. Moreover, the deviated and horizontal well can be simulated as simple as the vertical well using this modeling method. Based on this forward modeling method, the

  19. Applications of Defocused Digital Particle Image Velocimetry to Simultaneous Dynamic Three-Dimensional Mapping of Solid Surfaces and Their Induced Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño Graff, Emilio; Pereira, Francisco; Dabiri, Dana; Gharib, Morteza

    2004-11-01

    DDPIV is a direct extension of DPIV into the third spatial dimension. It is capable of mapping solid surfaces in three dimensions and calculating three-dimensional velocity fields of fluid flows using tracer particles in a pre-determined laser-illuminated volume. Elements belonging to the solid surface can be separated from flow elements through pattern recognition, marker recognition, or optical separation (polarization, color bias, etc.) when necessary, though in more repeatable phenomena the mapping of the surface and flow can be done in separate instances and then combined through phase averaging. Experiments were conducted with a thin, transparent plate flapping in water seeded with tracer particles to demonstrate the viability of this technique.

  20. Three-dimensional spin mapping of antiferromagnetic nanopyramids having spatially alternating surface anisotropy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkang; Smith, Arthur R

    2012-11-14

    Antiferromagnets play a key role in modern spintronic devices owing to their ability to modify the switching behavior of adjacent ferromagnets via the exchange bias effect. Consequently, detailed measurements of the spin structure at antiferromagnetic interfaces and surfaces are highly desirable, not only for advancing technologies but also for enabling new insights into the underlying physics. Here using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at room-temperature, we reveal in three-dimensions an orthogonal spin structure on antiferromagnetic compound nanopyramids. Contrary to expected uniaxial anisotropy based on bulk properties, the atomic terraces are found to have alternating in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic anisotropies. The observed layer-wise alternation in anisotropy could have strong influences on future nanoscale spintronic applications.

  1. Computed myography: three-dimensional reconstruction of motor functions from surface EMG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Doel, Kees; Ascher, Uri M.; Pai, Dinesh K.

    2008-12-01

    We describe a methodology called computed myography to qualitatively and quantitatively determine the activation level of individual muscles by voltage measurements from an array of voltage sensors on the skin surface. A finite element model for electrostatics simulation is constructed from morphometric data. For the inverse problem, we utilize a generalized Tikhonov regularization. This imposes smoothness on the reconstructed sources inside the muscles and suppresses sources outside the muscles using a penalty term. Results from experiments with simulated and human data are presented for activation reconstructions of three muscles in the upper arm (biceps brachii, bracialis and triceps). This approach potentially offers a new clinical tool to sensitively assess muscle function in patients suffering from neurological disorders (e.g., spinal cord injury), and could more accurately guide advances in the evaluation of specific rehabilitation training regimens.

  2. Lymphocyte locomotion and attachment on two-dimensional surfaces and in three-dimensional matrices

    PubMed Central

    Haston, WS; Shields, JM; Wilkinson, PC

    1982-01-01

    The adhesion and locomotion of mouse peripheral lymph node lymphocytes on 2-D protein- coated substrata and in 3-D matrices were compared. Lymphocytes did not adhere to, or migrate on, 2-D substrata suck as serum- or fibronectin-coated glass. They did attach to and migrate in hydrated 3-D collagen lattices. When the collagen was dehydrated to form a 2-D surface, lymphocyte attachment to it was reduced. We propose that lymphocytes, which are poorly adhesive, are able to attach to and migrate in 3-D matrices by a nonadhesive mechanism such as the extension and expansion of pseudopodia through gaps in the matrix, which could provide purchase for movement in the absence of discrete intermolecular adhesions. This was supported by studies using serum-coated micropore filters, since lymphocytes attached to and migrated into filters with pore sizes large enough (3 or 8 mum) to allow pseudopod penetration but did not attach to filters made of an identical material (cellulose esters) but of narrow pore size (0.22 or 0.45 mum). Cinematographic studies of lymphocyte locomotion in collagen gels were also consistent with the above hypothesis, since lymphocytes showed a more variable morphology than is typically seen on plane surfaces, with formation of many small pseudopodia expanded to give a marked constriction between the cell and the pseudopod. These extensions often remained fixed with respect to the environment as the lymphocyte moved away from or past them. This suggests that the pseudopodia were inserted into gaps in the gel matrix and acted as anchorage points for locomotion. PMID:7085756

  3. Seizure Localization using Three-Dimensional Surface Projections of Intracranial EEG Power

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Youngblood, Mark W.; Farooque, Pue; Han, Xiao; Jhun, Stephen; Chen, William; Goncharova, Irina; Vives, Kenneth; Spencer, Dennis D.; Zaveri, Hitten; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial EEG (icEEG) provides a critical road map for epilepsy surgery but has become increasingly difficult to interpret as technology has allowed the number of icEEG channels to grow. Borrowing methods from neuroimaging, we aimed to simplify data analysis and increase consistency between reviewers by using 3D Surface Projections of Intracranial EEG poweR (3D-SPIER). We analyzed 139 seizures from 48 intractable epilepsy patients (28 temporal and 20 extratemporal) who had icEEG recordings, epilepsy surgery, and at least one year of post-surgical follow-up. We coregistered and plotted icEEG β frequency band signal power over time onto MRI-based surface renderings for each patient, to create color 3D-SPIER movies. Two independent reviewers interpreted the icEEG data using visual analysis vs. 3D-SPIER, blinded to any clinical information. Overall agreement rates between 3D-SPIER and icEEG visual analysis or surgery were about 90% for side of seizure onset, 80% for lobe, and just under 80% for sublobar localization. These agreement rates were improved when flexible thresholds or frequency ranges were allowed for 3D SPIER, especially for sublobar localization. Interestingly, agreement was better for patients with good surgical outcome than for patients with poor outcome. Localization using 3D-SPIER was measurably faster and considered qualitatively easier to interpret than visual analysis. These findings suggest that 3D-SPIER could be an improved diagnostic method for presurgical seizure localization in patients with intractable epilepsy and may also be useful for mapping normal brain function. PMID:23850575

  4. On the three-dimensional interaction of a rotor-tip vortex with a cylindrical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Burggraf, Odus R.; Conlisk, A. T.

    2000-12-01

    The collision of a strong vortex with a surface is an important problem because significant impulsive loads may be generated. Prediction of helicopter fatigue lifetime may be limited by an inability to predict these loads accurately. Experimental results for the impingement of a helicopter rotor-tip vortex on a cylindrical airframe show a suction peak on the top of the airframe that strengthens and then weakens within milliseconds. A simple line-vortex model can predict the experimental results if the vortex is at least two vortex-core radii away from the airframe. After this, the model predicts continually deepening rather than lessening suction as the vortex stretches. Experimental results suggest that axial flow within the core of a tip vortex has an impact on the airframe pressure distribution upon close approach. The mechanism for this is hypothesized to be the inviscid redistribution of the vorticity field within the vortex as the axial velocity stagnates. Two models of a tip vortex with axial flow are considered. First, a classical axisymmetric line vortex with a cutoff parameter is superimposed with vortex ringlets suitably placed to represent the helically wound vortex shed by the rotor tip. Thus, inclusion of axial flow is found to advect vortex core thinning away from the point of closest interaction as the vortex stretches around the cylindrical surface during the collision process. With less local thinning, vorticity in the cutoff parameter model significantly overlaps the solid cylinder in an unphysical manner, highlighting the fact that the vortex core must deform from its original cylindrical shape. A second model is then developed in which axial and azimuthal vorticity are confined within a rectangular-section vortex. Area and aspect ratio of this vortex can be varied independently to simulate deformation of the vortex core. Both axial velocity and core deformation are shown to be important to calculate the local induced pressure loads properly

  5. Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy and determination of the three dimensional potential energy surface for Ar–CS

    SciTech Connect

    Niida, Chisato; Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kohguchi, Hiroshi

    2014-03-14

    Pure rotational transitions of the Ar–CS van der Waals complex have been observed by Fourier Transform Microwave (FTMW) and FTMW-millimeter wave double resonance spectroscopy. Rotational transitions of v{sub s} = 0, 1, and 2 were able to be observed for normal CS, together with those of C{sup 34}S in v{sub s} = 0, where v{sub s} stands for the quantum number of the CS stretching vibration. The observed transition frequencies were analyzed by a free rotor model Hamiltonian, where rovibrational energies were calculated as dynamical motions of the three nuclei on a three-dimensional potential energy surface, expressed by analytical functions with 57 parameters. Initial values for the potential parameters were obtained by high-level ab initio calculations. Fifteen parameters were adjusted among the 57 parameters to reproduce all the observed transition frequencies with the standard deviation of the fit to be 0.028 MHz.

  6. Three-dimensional modeling of light rays on the surface of a slanted lenticular array for autostereoscopic displays.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Min; Kang, In-Byeong

    2013-08-10

    In this paper, we developed an optical model describing the behavior of light at the surface of a slanted lenticular array for autostereoscopic displays in three dimensions and simulated the optical characteristics of autostereoscopic displays using the Monte Carlo method under actual design conditions. The behavior of light is analyzed by light rays for selected inclination and azimuthal angles; numerical aberrations and conditions of total internal reflection for the lenticular array were found. The intensity and the three-dimensional crosstalk distributions calculated from our model coincide very well with those from conventional design software, and our model shows highly enhanced calculation speed that is 67 times faster than that of the conventional software. From the results, we think that the optical model is very useful for predicting the optical characteristics of autostereoscopic displays with enhanced calculation speed.

  7. Complex surface three-dimensional shape measurement method based on defocused Gray code plus phase-shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhuohuan; Fu, Yanjun; Li, Biao; Chai, Minggang

    2016-08-01

    Binary pattern defocused projection method can overcome the nonlinear gamma of the projector, as well as filter high harmonics and high-frequency noise. However, high-accuracy three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of complex surface using it still remains a challenge. Therefore, a novel Gray code plus phase-shifting method based on defocusing is proposed to solve the problem. The edges of Gray code patterns become blurred owing to defocus, which makes the recovery of accurate Gray code patterns difficult. To solve this problem, the positive and inverse Gray code patterns are projected to obtain threshold values, which are used to achieve the binarization of Gray code patterns. This method is robust and suitable for different defocus levels. Compared with the traditional Gray code plus phase-shifting method, the experimental results prove the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method.

  8. Nano-scale three dimensional surface relief features using single exposure counterpropagating multiple evanescent waves interference phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Chua, Jeun Kee; Tan, Sia Kim; Lin, Qun Yin

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, fabrication of nano-scale 3-D features by total internal reflection generated single exposure counter propagating multiple evanescent waves interference lithography (TIR-MEWIL) in a positive tone resist is investigated numerically. Using a four incident plane waves configuration from an 364nm wavelength illumination source, the simulated results indicate that the proposed technique shows potential in realizing periodic surface relief features with diameter as small as 0.08lambda and height-to-diameter aspect ratio as high as 10. It is also demonstrated that the sensitivity of multiple evanescent waves' interference depends on the polarization and phase of the incident plane waves, and can be tailored to obtain different geometry features. A modified cellular automata algorithm has been employed to simulate three-dimensional photoresist profiles that would result from exposure to the studied evanescent waves interference configurations.

  9. Three-dimensional flow separation over a surface-mounted hemisphere in pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Flow separation over a surface-mounted obstacle is prevalent in numerous applications. Previous studies of 3D separation around protuberances have been limited to steady flow. In biological and geophysical flows, pulsatile conditions are frequently encountered, yet this situation has not been extensively studied. Primarily motivated by our previous studies of the flow patterns observed in various human vocal fold pathologies such as polyps, our research aimed to fill this gap in the knowledge concerning unsteady 3D flow separation. This is achieved by characterizing velocity fields surrounding the obstacle, focused primarily on the vortical flow structures and dynamics that occur around a hemispheroid in pulsatile flow. As part of this study, two-dimensional, instantaneous and phase-averaged particle image velocimetry data in both steady and pulsatile flows are presented and compared. Coherent vortical flow structures have been identified by their swirling strength. This analysis revealed flow structures with dynamics dependent on the pulsatile forcing function. A mechanism to explain the formation and observed dynamics of these flow structures based on the self-induced velocity of vortex rings interacting with the unsteady flow is proposed.

  10. Photoconductivity oscillations in surface state of three-dimensional topological insulator subjected to a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, J. M.; Yao, J. D.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-05-21

    We describe a theoretical study of the terahertz (THz) radiation field-induced dc transport response of the surface state of a 3D topological insulator that has been subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field. Using the Landau–Floquet state and linear response theory, we obtain the photoconductivity characteristics for various types of polarized THz field. The longitudinal photoconductivity shows a clear oscillatory dependence on ω/ω{sub B}, where ω{sub B}=v{sub F}√(2eB/ℏ). This oscillation occurs because of the oscillatory structure of the Landau density of states and occurs in agreement with the photon-assisted transitions between the different Landau levels. The THz field's polarization has a major influence on the photoconductivity. A linear transverse polarization will lead to the most obvious oscillation, while the circular polarization is next to it, but the longitudinal polarization has no influence. We also discuss the broadening effect on the impurity potential and its influence. The findings with regard to the interactions between topological insulators and THz fields actually open a path toward the development of THz device applications of topological insulators.

  11. Exotic quantum critical point on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Zhen; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke

    2016-07-01

    In the last few years a lot of exotic and anomalous topological phases were constructed by proliferating the vortexlike topological defects on the surface of the 3 d topological insulator (TI) [Fidkowski et al., Phys. Rev. X 3, 041016 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevX.3.041016; Chen et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 165132 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.165132; Bonderson et al., J. Stat. Mech. (2013) P09016, 10.1088/1742-5468/2013/09/P09016; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. B 88, 115137 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.115137; Metlitski et al., Phys. Rev. B 92, 125111 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.125111]. In this work, rather than considering topological phases at the boundary, we will study quantum critical points driven by vortexlike topological defects. In general, we will discuss a (2 +1 )d quantum phase transition described by the following field theory: L =ψ ¯γμ(∂μ-i aμ) ψ +| (∂μ-i k aμ) ϕ| 2+r|ϕ | 2+g |ϕ| 4 , with tuning parameter r , arbitrary integer k , Dirac fermion ψ , and complex scalar bosonic field ϕ , which both couple to the same (2 +1 )d dynamical noncompact U(1) gauge field aμ. The physical meaning of these quantities/fields will be explained in the text. Making use of the new duality formalism developed in [Metlitski et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 245151 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245151; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. X 5, 041031 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.041031; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 085110 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.085110; D. T. Son, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027], we demonstrate that this quantum critical point has a quasi-self-dual nature. And at this quantum critical point, various universal quantities such as the electrical conductivity and scaling dimension of gauge-invariant operators, can be calculated systematically through a 1 /k2 expansion, based on the observation that the limit k →+∞ corresponds to an ordinary 3 d X Y transition.

  12. Application of ground-penetrating radar imagery for three-dimensional visualisation of near-surface structures in ice-rich permafrost, Barrow, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munroe, J.S.; Doolittle, J.A.; Kanevskiy, M.Z.; Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Nelson, F.E.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Shur, Y.; Kimble, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar (3D GPR) was used to investigate the subsurface structure of ice-wedge polygons and other features of the frozen active layer and near-surface permafrost near Barrow, Alaska. Surveys were conducted at three sites located on landscapes of different geomorphic age. At each site, sediment cores were collected and characterised to aid interpretation of GPR data. At two sites, 3D GPR was able to delineate subsurface ice-wedge networks with high fidelity. Three-dimensional GPR data also revealed a fundamental difference in ice-wedge morphology between these two sites that is consistent with differences in landscape age. At a third site, the combination of two-dimensional and 3D GPR revealed the location of an active frost boil with ataxitic cryostructure. When supplemented by analysis of soil cores, 3D GPR offers considerable potential for imaging, interpreting and 3D mapping of near-surface soil and ice structures in permafrost environments.

  13. Enhanced electrical percolation due to interconnection of three-dimensional pentacene islands in thin films on low surface energy polyimide gate dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sang Yoon; Shin, Kwonwoo; Kim, Se Hyun; Jeon, Hayoung; Kang, Jin Ho; Yang, Hoichang; Park, Chan Eon

    2006-10-19

    The role of lateral interconnections between three-dimensional pentacene islands on low surface energy polyimide gate dielectrics was investigated by the measurement of the surface coverage dependence of the charge mobility and the use of conducting-probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). From the correlation between the electrical characteristics and the morphological evolution of the three-dimensionally grown pentacene films-based field-effect transistors, we found that during film growth, the formation of interconnections between the three-dimensional pentacene islands that are isolated at the early stage contributes significantly to the enhancement process of charge mobility. The CP-AFM current mapping images of the pentacene films also indicate that the lateral interconnections play an important role in the formation of good electrical percolation pathways between the three-dimensional pentacene islands.

  14. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marutschke, Christoph; Walters, Deron; Cleveland, Jason; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika

    2014-08-01

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic—yet decisive—question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid-liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface.

  15. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marutschke, Christoph; Walters, Deron; Walters, Deron; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika

    2014-08-22

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic - yet decisive - question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid-liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface. PMID:25074402

  16. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marutschke, Christoph; Walters, Deron; Walters, Deron; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika

    2014-08-22

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic - yet decisive - question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid-liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface.

  17. Three-dimensional visualization of nanostructured surfaces and bacterial attachment using Autodesk® Maya®.

    PubMed

    Boshkovikj, Veselin; Fluke, Christopher J; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2014-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in understanding the ways in which bacteria interact with nano-structured surfaces. As a result, there is a need for innovative approaches to enable researchers to visualize the biological processes taking place, despite the fact that it is not possible to directly observe these processes. We present a novel approach for the three-dimensional visualization of bacterial interactions with nano-structured surfaces using the software package Autodesk Maya. Our approach comprises a semi-automated stage, where actual surface topographic parameters, obtained using an atomic force microscope, are imported into Maya via a custom Python script, followed by a 'creative stage', where the bacterial cells and their interactions with the surfaces are visualized using available experimental data. The 'Dynamics' and 'nDynamics' capabilities of the Maya software allowed the construction and visualization of plausible interaction scenarios. This capability provides a practical aid to knowledge discovery, assists in the dissemination of research results, and provides an opportunity for an improved public understanding. We validated our approach by graphically depicting the interactions between the two bacteria being used for modeling purposes, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with different titanium substrate surfaces that are routinely used in the production of biomedical devices. PMID:24577105

  18. Three-dimensional visualization of nanostructured surfaces and bacterial attachment using Autodesk® Maya®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkovikj, Veselin; Fluke, Christopher J.; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2014-02-01

    There has been a growing interest in understanding the ways in which bacteria interact with nano-structured surfaces. As a result, there is a need for innovative approaches to enable researchers to visualize the biological processes taking place, despite the fact that it is not possible to directly observe these processes. We present a novel approach for the three-dimensional visualization of bacterial interactions with nano-structured surfaces using the software package Autodesk Maya. Our approach comprises a semi-automated stage, where actual surface topographic parameters, obtained using an atomic force microscope, are imported into Maya via a custom Python script, followed by a `creative stage', where the bacterial cells and their interactions with the surfaces are visualized using available experimental data. The `Dynamics' and `nDynamics' capabilities of the Maya software allowed the construction and visualization of plausible interaction scenarios. This capability provides a practical aid to knowledge discovery, assists in the dissemination of research results, and provides an opportunity for an improved public understanding. We validated our approach by graphically depicting the interactions between the two bacteria being used for modeling purposes, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with different titanium substrate surfaces that are routinely used in the production of biomedical devices.

  19. Three-dimensional visualization of nanostructured surfaces and bacterial attachment using Autodesk® Maya®.

    PubMed

    Boshkovikj, Veselin; Fluke, Christopher J; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2014-02-28

    There has been a growing interest in understanding the ways in which bacteria interact with nano-structured surfaces. As a result, there is a need for innovative approaches to enable researchers to visualize the biological processes taking place, despite the fact that it is not possible to directly observe these processes. We present a novel approach for the three-dimensional visualization of bacterial interactions with nano-structured surfaces using the software package Autodesk Maya. Our approach comprises a semi-automated stage, where actual surface topographic parameters, obtained using an atomic force microscope, are imported into Maya via a custom Python script, followed by a 'creative stage', where the bacterial cells and their interactions with the surfaces are visualized using available experimental data. The 'Dynamics' and 'nDynamics' capabilities of the Maya software allowed the construction and visualization of plausible interaction scenarios. This capability provides a practical aid to knowledge discovery, assists in the dissemination of research results, and provides an opportunity for an improved public understanding. We validated our approach by graphically depicting the interactions between the two bacteria being used for modeling purposes, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with different titanium substrate surfaces that are routinely used in the production of biomedical devices.

  20. Three-dimensional visualization of nanostructured surfaces and bacterial attachment using Autodesk® Maya®

    PubMed Central

    Boshkovikj, Veselin; Fluke, Christopher J.; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in understanding the ways in which bacteria interact with nano-structured surfaces. As a result, there is a need for innovative approaches to enable researchers to visualize the biological processes taking place, despite the fact that it is not possible to directly observe these processes. We present a novel approach for the three-dimensional visualization of bacterial interactions with nano-structured surfaces using the software package Autodesk Maya. Our approach comprises a semi-automated stage, where actual surface topographic parameters, obtained using an atomic force microscope, are imported into Maya via a custom Python script, followed by a ‘creative stage', where the bacterial cells and their interactions with the surfaces are visualized using available experimental data. The ‘Dynamics' and ‘nDynamics' capabilities of the Maya software allowed the construction and visualization of plausible interaction scenarios. This capability provides a practical aid to knowledge discovery, assists in the dissemination of research results, and provides an opportunity for an improved public understanding. We validated our approach by graphically depicting the interactions between the two bacteria being used for modeling purposes, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with different titanium substrate surfaces that are routinely used in the production of biomedical devices. PMID:24577105

  1. Quantitative model of cellulite: three-dimensional skin surface topography, biophysical characterization, and relationship to human perception.

    PubMed

    Smalls, Lola K; Lee, Caroline Y; Whitestone, Jennifer; Kitzmiller, W John; Wickett, R Randall; Visscher, Marty O

    2005-01-01

    Gynoid lipodystrophy (cellulite) is the irregular, dimpled skin surface of the thighs, abdomen, and buttocks in 85% of post-adolescent women. The distinctive surface morphology is believed to result when subcutaneous adipose tissue protrudes into the lower reticular dermis, thereby creating irregularities at the surface. The biomechanical properties of epidermal and dermal tissue may also influence severity. Cellulite-affected thigh sites were measured in 51 females with varying degrees of cellulite, in 11 non-cellulite controls, and in 10 male controls. A non-contact high-resolution three-dimensional laser surface scanner was used to quantify the skin surface morphology and determine specific roughness values. The scans were evaluated by experts and naive judges (n=62). Body composition was evaluated via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; dermal thickness and the dermal-subcutaneous junction were evaluated via high-resolution 3D ultrasound and surface photography under compression. Biomechanical properties were also measured. The roughness parameters Svm (mean depth of the lowest valleys) and Sdr (ratio between the roughness surface area and the area of the xy plane) were highly correlated to the expert image grades and, therefore, designated as the quantitative measures of cellulite severity. The strength of the correlations among naive grades, expert grades, and roughness values confirmed that the data quantitatively evaluate the human perception of cellulite. Cellulite severity was correlated to BMI, thigh circumference, percent thigh fat, architecture of the dermal-subcutaneous border (ultrasound surface area, red-band SD from compressed images), compliance, and stiffness (negative correlation). Cellulite severity was predicted by the percent fat and the area of the dermal-subcutaneous border. The biomechanical properties did not significantly contribute to the prediction. Comparison of the parameters for females and males further suggest that percent thigh fat

  2. Two-dimensional sectioned images and three-dimensional surface models for learning the anatomy of the female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Sun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Hwang, Sung Bae; Har, Dong-Hwan; Moon, Young Lae; Chung, Min Suk

    2013-01-01

    In the Visible Korean project, serially sectioned images of the pelvis were made from a female cadaver. Outlines of significant structures in the sectioned images were drawn and stacked to build surface models. To improve the accessibility and informational content of these data, a five-step process was designed and implemented. First, 154 pelvic structures were outlined with additional surface reconstruction to prepare the image data. Second, the sectioned and outlined images (in a browsing software) as well as the surface models (in a PDF file) were placed on the Visible Korean homepage in a readily-accessible format. Third, all image data were visualized with interactive elements to stimulate creative learning. Fourth, two-dimensional (2D) images and three-dimensional (3D) models were superimposed on one another to provide context and spatial information for students viewing these data. Fifth, images were designed such that structure names would be shown when the mouse pointer hovered over the 2D images or the 3D models. The state-of-the-art sectioned images, outlined images, and surface models, arranged and systematized as described in this study, will aid students in understanding the anatomy of female pelvis. The graphic data accompanied by corresponding magnetic resonance images and computed tomographs are expected to promote the production of 3D simulators for clinical practice.

  3. Two-dimensional sectioned images and three-dimensional surface models for learning the anatomy of the female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Sun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Hwang, Sung Bae; Har, Dong-Hwan; Moon, Young Lae; Chung, Min Suk

    2013-01-01

    In the Visible Korean project, serially sectioned images of the pelvis were made from a female cadaver. Outlines of significant structures in the sectioned images were drawn and stacked to build surface models. To improve the accessibility and informational content of these data, a five-step process was designed and implemented. First, 154 pelvic structures were outlined with additional surface reconstruction to prepare the image data. Second, the sectioned and outlined images (in a browsing software) as well as the surface models (in a PDF file) were placed on the Visible Korean homepage in a readily-accessible format. Third, all image data were visualized with interactive elements to stimulate creative learning. Fourth, two-dimensional (2D) images and three-dimensional (3D) models were superimposed on one another to provide context and spatial information for students viewing these data. Fifth, images were designed such that structure names would be shown when the mouse pointer hovered over the 2D images or the 3D models. The state-of-the-art sectioned images, outlined images, and surface models, arranged and systematized as described in this study, will aid students in understanding the anatomy of female pelvis. The graphic data accompanied by corresponding magnetic resonance images and computed tomographs are expected to promote the production of 3D simulators for clinical practice. PMID:23463707

  4. Facile Synthesis of Three-Dimensional ZnO Nanostructure: Realization of a Multifunctional Stable Superhydrophobic Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Xia, Jun; Lei, Wei; Wang, Baoping

    2011-01-01

    Background After comprehensive study of various superhydrophobic phenomena in nature, it is no longer a puzzle for researchers to realize such fetching surfaces. However, the different types of artificial surfaces may get wetted and lose its water repellence if there exist defects or the liquid is under pressure. With respect to the industry applications, in which the resistance of wetting transition is critical important, new nanostructure satisfied a certain geometric criterion should be designed to hold a stable gas film at the base area to avoid the wet transition. Methodology A thermal deposition method was utilized to produce a thin ZnO seeds membrane on the aluminum foil. And then a chemical self-assemble technology was developed in present work to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical dune-like ZnO architecture based on the prepared seeds membrane. Results Hierarchical ZnO with micro scale dune-like structure and core-sharing nanosheets was generated. The characterization results showed that there exist plenty of gaps and interfaces among the micro-dune and nanosheets, and thus the surface area was enlarged by such a unique morphology. Benefited from this unique 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructure, the obtained surface exhibited stable water repellency after modification with Teflon, and furthermore, based on solid theory analysis, such 3D ZnO nanostructure would exhibit excellent sensing performance. PMID:22194987

  5. A Tool for Teaching Three-Dimensional Dermatomes Combined with Distribution of Cutaneous Nerves on the Limbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    A teaching tool that facilitates student understanding of a three-dimensional (3D) integration of dermatomes with peripheral cutaneous nerve field distributions is described. This model is inspired by the confusion in novice learners between dermatome maps and nerve field distribution maps. This confusion leads to the misconception that these two…

  6. Robust prediction of three-dimensional spinal curve from back surface for non-invasive follow-up of scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Charles; Labelle, Hubert; Ronsky, Janet; Zernicke, Ronald

    2005-04-01

    Spinal curvature progression in scoliosis patients is monitored from X-rays, and this serial exposure to harmful radiation increases the incidence of developing cancer. With the aim of reducing the invasiveness of follow-up, this study seeks to relate the three-dimensional external surface to the internal geometry, having assumed that that the physiological links between these are sufficiently regular across patients. A database was used of 194 quasi-simultaneous acquisitions of two X-rays and a 3D laser scan of the entire trunk. Data was processed to sets of datapoints representing the trunk surface and spinal curve. Functional data analyses were performed using generalized Fourier series using a Haar basis and functional minimum noise fractions. The resulting coefficients became inputs and outputs, respectively, to an array of support vector regression (SVR) machines. SVR parameters were set based on theoretical results, and cross-validation increased confidence in the system's performance. Predicted lateral and frontal views of the spinal curve from the back surface demonstrated average L2-errors of 6.13 and 4.38 millimetres, respectively, across the test set; these compared favourably with measurement error in data. This constitutes a first robust prediction of the 3D spinal curve from external data using learning techniques.

  7. Formulation of reduced surface integral equations for the electromagnetic wave scattering from three-dimensional layered dielectric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciric, I. R.

    2008-08-01

    A reduction procedure is developed for an arbitrarily shaped layered dielectric body using for each interface a single unknown function to which the classical surface electric and magnetic currents are related by some surface operators. These operators and single functions are determined recursively from one interface to the next. This allows us to derive the field everywhere from the solution of a surface integral equation in only one vector function relative to only the interface between the layered body and the source region. Since the reduction operators are independent of the structure of the outside region and of the given field source, and also invariant under translation and rotation, the analysis of the three-dimensional electromagnetic wave scattering and propagation for systems of multilayered or/and multiply nested dielectric bodies based on reduced single integral equations is substantially more efficient than that based on existing coupled integral equation formulations using electric and magnetic currents on all the interfaces, especially for configurations with identical such bodies arbitrarily located and oriented with respect to each other.

  8. Comb-calibrated laser ranging for three-dimensional surface profiling with micrometer-level precision at a distance.

    PubMed

    Baumann, E; Giorgetta, F R; Deschênes, J-D; Swann, W C; Coddington, I; Newbury, N R

    2014-10-20

    Non-contact surface mapping at a distance is interesting in diverse applications including industrial metrology, manufacturing, forensics, and artifact documentation and preservation. Frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) laser detection and ranging (LADAR) is a promising approach since it offers shot-noise limited precision/accuracy, high resolution and high sensitivity. We demonstrate a scanning imaging system based on a frequency-comb calibrated FMCW LADAR and real-time digital signal processing. This system can obtain three-dimensional images of a diffusely scattering surface at stand-off distances up to 10.5 m with sub-micrometer accuracy and with a precision below 10 µm, limited by fundamental speckle noise. Because of its shot-noise limited sensitivity, this comb-calibrated FMCW LADAR has a large dynamic range, which enables precise mapping of scenes with vastly differing reflectivities such as metal, dirt or vegetation. The current system is implemented with fiber-optic components, but the basic system architecture is compatible with future optically integrated, on-chip systems. PMID:25401525

  9. Topology of three-dimensional separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Peake, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that patterns of skin-friction lines and external streamlines reflect the properties of continuous vector fields, topology rules define a small number of singular points (nodes, saddle points, and foci) that characterize the patterns on the surface and on particular projections of the flow (e.g., the crossflow plane). The restricted number of singular points and the rules that they obey are considered as an organizing principle whose finite number of elements can be combined in various ways to connect together the properties common to all steady three dimensional viscous flows. Introduction of a distinction between local and global properties of the flow resolves an ambiguity in the proper definition of a three dimensional separated flow. Adoption of the notions of topological structure, structural stability, and bifurcation provides a framework to describe how three dimensional separated flows originate and succeed each other as the relevant parameters of the problem are varied.

  10. MESA meets MURaM. Surface effects in main-sequence solar-like oscillators computed using three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. H.; Beeck, B.; Cameron, R. H.; Gizon, L.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Space-based observations of solar-like oscillators have identified large numbers of stars in which many individual mode frequencies can be precisely measured. However, current stellar models predict oscillation frequencies that are systematically affected by simplified modelling of the near-surface layers. Aims: We use three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to better model the near-surface equilibrium structure of dwarfs with spectral types F3, G2, K0 and K5, and examine the differences between oscillation mode frequencies computed in stellar models with and without the improved near-surface equilibrium structure. Methods: We precisely match stellar models to the simulations' gravities and effective temperatures at the surface, and to the temporally- and horizontally-averaged densities and pressures at their deepest points. We then replace the near-surface structure with that of the averaged simulation and compute the change in the oscillation mode frequencies. We also fit the differences using several parametric models currently available in the literature. Results: The surface effect in the stars of solar-type and later is qualitatively similar and changes steadily with decreasing effective temperature. In particular, the point of greatest frequency difference decreases slightly as a fraction of the acoustic cut-off frequency and the overall scale of the surface effect decreases. The surface effect in the hot, F3-type star follows the same trend in scale (i.e. it is larger in magnitude) but shows a different overall variation with mode frequency. We find that a two-term fit using the cube and inverse of the frequency divided by the mode inertia is best able to reproduce the surface terms across all four spectral types, although the scaled solar term and a modified Lorentzian function also match the three cooler simulations reasonably well. Conclusions: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of near-surface convection can be

  11. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF6-air interface with a minimum-surface feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF6-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability.

  12. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF_{6}-air interface with a minimum-surface feature.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF_{6}-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability. PMID:26871149

  13. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF_{6}-air interface with a minimum-surface feature.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF_{6}-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability.

  14. Three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid towards stretching surface with heat generation/absorption.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqar Azeem; Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the steady three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface with heat generation/absorption effects. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These nonlinear ordinary differential equations are then solved analytically by using the homotpy analysis method (HAM). Graphically results are presented and discussed for various parameters, namely, Deborah numbers β1 and β2, heat generation/absorption parameter λ, Prandtl parameter Pr, Brownian motion parameters Nb, thermophoresis parameter Nt and Lewis number Le. We have seen that the increasing values of the Brownian motion parameter Nt and thermophoresis parameter Nt leads to an increase in the temperature field and thermal boundary layer thickness while the opposite behavior is observed for concentration field and concentration boundary layer thickness. To see the validity of the present work, the numerical results are compared with the analytical solutions obtained by Homotopy analysis method and noted an excellent agreement for the limiting cases. PMID:25170945

  15. Three-dimensional triple hierarchy formed by self-assembly of wax crystals on CuO nanowires for nonwettable surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Young; Pechook, Sasha; Jeon, Deok-Jin; Pokroy, Boaz; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2014-04-01

    Novel hierarchical surfaces combining paraffin wax crystals and CuO nanowires are presented. We demonstrate a bioinspired hierarchical wax on nanowire (NW) structures having high water and ethylene glycol repellence. In general, vertically grown nanowire arrays can provide a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) due to extremely high surface roughness but cannot repel ethylene glycol. In this paper, C36H74 and C50H102 waxes are thermally evaporated on the surface of CuO NWs, forming highly ordered, three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structures via self-assembly of wax crystals. These two and three level hierarchical structures provide perfect self-cleaning characteristics, with water contact angles (CAs) exceeding 170°. Furthermore, C36H74 and C50H102 wax crystals assembled perpendicularly to the longitudinal NW axis form a re-entrant (that is, a multivalued surface topography) curvature enabling high repellence to ethylene glycol (EG) with CAs exceeding 160°. We analyze the wettability dependence on wax crystal size and structure for the optimization of nonwettable hierarchical structured surfaces.

  16. Fabrication of three-dimensional porous scaffolds of complicated shape for tissue engineering. I. Compression molding based on flexible-rigid combined mold.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linbo; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Junchuan; Ding, Jiandong

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for the fabrication of complexly shaped three-dimensional porous scaffolds has been developed by combining modified compression molding and conventional particulate leaching. The resultant scaffolds of various shapes, including some shaped like auricles, were made of hydrophobic biodegradable and bioresorbable poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) and poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A polymer-particulate mixture was first prepared by the conventional solvent casting method and then compressively molded in a specially designed flexible-rigid combined mold which facilitates shaping and mold release during the fabrication process. The molding was carried out at a moderate temperature, above the glass transition temperature and below the flow temperature of these amorphous polymers. A porous scaffold was then obtained after particulate leaching. The pores are highly interconnected and uniformly distributed both in the bulk and on the external surface of the scaffolds, and the porosity can exceed 90%. The mechanical properties of the resultant porous scaffolds are satisfactory as determined by measurements of compressive modulus and compressive stress at 10% strain. Good viability of cells seeded in the porous scaffolds was confirmed. This novel fabrication method is promising in tissue engineering because of its ability to produce precise and complexly (anatomically) shaped porous scaffolds.

  17. Application of Three-Dimensionally Printed Probe and Reservoir to Critical Micelle Concentration Determination by Microvolume Surface Tension Measurement.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shohei; Choda, Naoki; Takahashi, Haruyuki; Sato, Tomomi; Taira, Hikaru; Mukai, Kei

    2016-08-01

    It is important to determine a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of a surfactant in a protein formulation for stabilizing the protein at maximum by preventing it from interfacial denaturation. There are several techniques for CMC determination. Among them, surface tensiometry is the most common approach because this has a long history and much data at many research fields. However, large amount of sample solution is usually required for the measurement (e.g., more than 1 mL is necessary when a standard reservoir like a glass petri dish is used). This is one of the hurdles for protein formulators because only a small amount of protein could be used at the early-stage development. In this research, we tried to minimize the required amount of sample solution for surface tension measurement by developing appropriate probe and reservoir using a three-dimensional printer (3D printer). The advantages and capabilities of 3D printer are (1) to control the shape and size of the printed material precisely, (2) to change the figure freely, and (3) to prepare the prototype quickly. After the experiments and thereby the refinement of probe as well as reservoir, we found that CMCs of polysorbate 20, polysorbate 80, and poloxamer 188 in water and protein formulations could be precisely detected using a probe 0.5 mm in diameter and small reservoir with a pocket of 7.5 mm in diameter/0.25 mm in depth which were made by a 3D printer. Furthermore, the required sample solution per each measurement could be reduced to 80 μL, which means more than 90% reduction against a standard reservoir. PMID:27321235

  18. A diagnostic approach in Alzheimer`s disease using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections of Fluorine-18-FDG PET

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Frey, K.A.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    To improve the diagnostic performance of PET as an aid in evaluating patients suspected of having Alzheimer`s disease, the authors developed a fully automated method which generates comprehensive image presentations and objective diagnostic indices. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET image sets were collected from 37 patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease (including questionable and mild dementia), 22 normal subjects and 5 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Following stereotactic anatomic standardization, metabolic activity on an individual`s PET image set was extracted to a set of predefined surface pixels (three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection, 3D-SSP), which was used in the subsequent analysis. A normal database was created by averaging extracted datasets of the normal subjects. Patients` datasets were compared individually with the normal database by calculating a Z-score on a pixel-by-pixel basis and were displayed in 3D-SSP views for visual inspections. Diagnostic indices were then generated based on averaged Z-scores for the association cortices. Patterns and severities of metabolic reduction in patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease were seen in the standard 3D-SSP views of extracted raw data and statistical Z-scores. When discriminating patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease from normal subjects, diagnostic indices of the parietal association cortex and unilaterally averaged parietal-temporal-frontal cortex showed sensitivities of 95% and 97%, respectively, with a specificity of 100%. Neither index yielded false-positive results for cerebrovascular disease. 3D-SSP enables quantitative data extraction and reliable localization of metabolic abnormalities by means of stereotactic coordinates. The proposed method is a promising approach for interpreting functional brain PET scans. 45 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Application of Three-Dimensionally Printed Probe and Reservoir to Critical Micelle Concentration Determination by Microvolume Surface Tension Measurement.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shohei; Choda, Naoki; Takahashi, Haruyuki; Sato, Tomomi; Taira, Hikaru; Mukai, Kei

    2016-08-01

    It is important to determine a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of a surfactant in a protein formulation for stabilizing the protein at maximum by preventing it from interfacial denaturation. There are several techniques for CMC determination. Among them, surface tensiometry is the most common approach because this has a long history and much data at many research fields. However, large amount of sample solution is usually required for the measurement (e.g., more than 1 mL is necessary when a standard reservoir like a glass petri dish is used). This is one of the hurdles for protein formulators because only a small amount of protein could be used at the early-stage development. In this research, we tried to minimize the required amount of sample solution for surface tension measurement by developing appropriate probe and reservoir using a three-dimensional printer (3D printer). The advantages and capabilities of 3D printer are (1) to control the shape and size of the printed material precisely, (2) to change the figure freely, and (3) to prepare the prototype quickly. After the experiments and thereby the refinement of probe as well as reservoir, we found that CMCs of polysorbate 20, polysorbate 80, and poloxamer 188 in water and protein formulations could be precisely detected using a probe 0.5 mm in diameter and small reservoir with a pocket of 7.5 mm in diameter/0.25 mm in depth which were made by a 3D printer. Furthermore, the required sample solution per each measurement could be reduced to 80 μL, which means more than 90% reduction against a standard reservoir.

  20. Mesoscopic nonequilibrium thermodynamics of solid surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities under the capillary and electromigration forces in anisotropic three-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Ogurtani, Tarik Omer

    2006-04-14

    A theory of irreversible thermodynamics of curved surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities is elaborated to give a full consideration of the effects of the specific surface Gibbs free energy anisotropy in addition to the diffusional anisotropy, on the morphological evolution of surfaces and interfaces in crystalline solids. To entangle this intricate problem, the internal entropy production associated with arbitrary virtual displacements of triple junction and ordinary points on the interfacial layers, embedded in a multicomponent, multiphase, anisotropic composite continuum system, is formulated by adapting a mesoscopic description of the orientation dependence of the chemical potentials in terms of the rotational degree of freedom of individual microelements. The rate of local internal entropy production resulted generalized forces and conjugated fluxes not only for the grain boundary triple junction transversal and longitudinal movements, but also for the ordinary points. The natural combination of the mesoscopic approach coupled with the rigorous theory of irreversible thermodynamics developed previously by the global entropy production hypothesis yields a well-posed, nonlinear, moving free-boundary value problem in two-dimensional (2D) space, as a unified theory. The results obtained for 2D space are generalized into the three-dimensional continuum by utilizing the invariant properties of the vector operators in connection with the descriptions of curved surfaces in differential geometry. This mathematical model after normalization and scaling procedures may be easily adapted for computer simulation studies without introducing any additional phenomenological system parameters (the generalized mobilities), other than the enlarged concept of the surface stiffness.

  1. Residence Times and Pathway Analysis Using a Coupled Three-Dimensional Variably Saturated Groundwater Flow and Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2007-12-01

    The analysis of residence times and pathways of solutes in the subsurface is important in the characterization of biogeochemical processes and contaminant transport. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have shown power law (fractal) residence time distributions because of the fractal character of the topography. The theoretical studies focused on a steady-state analysis of the flow field utilizing an undulating water table boundary condition that follows the topography. However, processes of the vadose zone including root water uptake and evaporation have been neglected until this work. In this study, the three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater flow model ParFlow, coupled to a land surface model, is used to study the influence of processes of the vadose zone on pathways and residence time distributions. A small catchment is simulated incorporating topography; land and soil cover information; and one year of realistic atmospheric forcing. Transient Lagrangian transport simulations of a conservative tracer are performed, also including dispersion (i.e. heterogeneity), to develop spectral transforms of the arrival time distributions. The resulting power spectra show power law behavior over a wide range of scales. While the spectral scaling exponent (SSP) decreases with increasing heterogeneity, the influence of the vadose zone appears to cause an increase in the SSP. Additionally, the effect of explicit representation of subsurface heterogeneity and spatial model resolution on the scaling behavior is studied. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under contract W-7405-Eng-48. This project was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL.

  2. Resolution analysis of finite fault source inversion using one- and three-dimensional Green's functions 2. Combining seismic and geodetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Graves, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Using numerical tests for a prescribed heterogeneous earthquake slip distribution, we examine the importance of accurate Green's functions (GF) for finite fault source inversions which rely on coseismic GPS displacements and leveling line uplift alone and in combination with near-source strong ground motions. The static displacements, while sensitive to the three-dimensional (3-D) structure, are less so than seismic waveforms and thus are an important contribution, particularly when used in conjunction with waveform inversions. For numerical tests of an earthquake source and data distribution modeled after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, a joint geodetic and seismic inversion allows for reasonable recovery of the heterogeneous slip distribution on the fault. In contrast, inaccurate 3-D GFs or multiple 1-D GFs allow only partial recovery of the slip distribution given strong motion data alone. Likewise, using just the GPS and leveling line data requires significant smoothing for inversion stability, and hence, only a blurred vision of the prescribed slip is recovered. Although the half-space approximation for computing the surface static deformation field is no longer justifiable based on the high level of accuracy for current GPS data acquisition and the computed differences between 3-D and half-space surface displacements, a layered 1-D approximation to 3-D Earth structure provides adequate representation of the surface displacement field. However, even with the half-space approximation, geodetic data can provide additional slip resolution in the joint seismic and geodetic inversion provided a priori fault location and geometry are correct. Nevertheless, the sensitivity of the static displacements to the Earth structure begs caution for interpretation of surface displacements, particularly those recorded at monuments located in or near basin environments. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Baselines for three-dimensional perception of combined linear and angular self-motion with changing rotational axis.

    PubMed

    Holly, J E

    2000-01-01

    The laws of physics explain many human misperceptions of whole-body passive self-motion. One classic misperception occurs in a rotating chair in the dark: If the chair is decelerated to a stop after a period of counterclockwise rotation, then a subject will typically perceive clockwise rotation. The laws of physics show that, indeed, a clockwise rotation would be perceived even by a perfect processor of angular acceleration information, assuming that the processor is initialized (prior to the deceleration) with a typical subject's initial perception - of no rotation in this case. The motion perceived by a perfect acceleration processor serves as a baseline by which to judge human self-motion perception; this baseline makes a rough prediction and also forms a basis for comparison, with uniquely physiological properties of perception showing up as deviations from the baseline. These same principles, using the motion perceived by a perfect acceleration processor as a baseline, are used in the present paper to investigate complex motions that involve simultaneous linear and angular accelerations with a changing axis of rotation. Baselines - motions that would be perceived by a perfect acceleration processor, given the same initial perception (prior to the motion of interest) as that of a typical subject - are computed for the acceleration and deceleration stages of centrifuge runs in which the human carriage tilts along with the vector resultant of the centripetal and gravity vectors. The computations generate a three-dimensional picture of the motion perceived by a perfect acceleration processor, by simultaneously using all six interacting degrees of freedom (three angular and three linear) and taking into account the non-commutativity of rotations in three dimensions. The resulting three-dimensional baselines predict stronger perceptual effects during deceleration than during acceleration, despite the equal magnitudes (with opposite direction) of forces on the

  4. Computer program for quasi-three-dimensional calculation of surface velocities and choking flow for turbomachine blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program, CHANEL, can obtain quasi-three-dimensional solutions in any well-guided channel. Conditions that can be handled by program that could not be handled previously are nonuniform inlet temperature, pressure, prewhirl, nonaxial flow where meridional flow angle, meridional stream-line curvature, and radius can vary as desired from hub to tip.

  5. The magic of mid-face three-dimensional contour alterations combining alloplastic and soft tissue suspension technologies.

    PubMed

    Terino, Edward O; Edward, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Recent advances in the technology of implant designs and shapes, as well as improved understanding of the principles of facial aesthetics, give the plastic surgeon, for the first time, tools to precisely and permanently change faces in specific areas and with minimum morbidity. Cosmetic facial surgeons must learn and understand the zonal anatomy of the malar-midface region to be prepared for growing patient demands regarding analysis and alteration of facial cheek contours. This article describes and illustrates contemporary technology that uses alloplastic implants throughout the face. Three-dimensional changes in facial form and shape using alloplastic augmentation techniques are essential for creating aesthetic beauty and are the "final chapter" of the development of cosmetic facial surgery.

  6. Three-dimensional welding residual stresses evaluation based on the eigenstrain methodology via X-ray measurements at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Masaru

    2014-12-01

    In order to assure structural integrity for operating welded structures, it is necessary to evaluate crack growth rate and crack propagation direction for each observed crack non-destructively. Here, three dimensional (3D) welding residual stresses must be evaluated to predict crack propagation. Today, X-ray diffraction is used and the ultrasonic method has been proposed as non-destructive method to measure residual stresses. However, it is impossible to determine residual stress distributions in the thickness direction. Although residual stresses through a depth of several tens of millimeters can be evaluated non-destructively by neutron diffraction, it cannot be used as an on-site measurement technique. This is because neutron diffraction is only available in special irradiation facilities. Author pays attention to the bead flush method based on the eigenstrain methodology. In this method, 3D welding residual stresses are calculated by an elastic Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis from eigenstrains which are evaluated by an inverse analysis from released strains by strain gauges in the removal of the reinforcement of the weld. Here, the removal of the excess metal can be regarded as non-destructive treatment because toe of weld which may become crack starters can be eliminated. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for welded plates and pipes even with relatively lower bead height. In actual measurements, stress evaluation accuracy becomes poorer because measured values of strain gauges are affected by processing strains on the machined surface. In the previous studies, the author has developed the bead flush method that is free from the influence of the affecting strains by using residual strains on surface by X-ray diffraction. However, stress evaluation accuracy is not good enough because of relatively poor measurement accuracy of X-ray diffraction. In this study, a method to improve the estimation accuracy of residual stresses in this method is

  7. Extracting Metrics for Three-dimensional Root Systems: Volume and Surface Analysis from In-soil X-ray Computed Tomography Data.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A; Adams, Lexor; Beck, Anthon N; McKinney, Adriana L; Varga, Tamas

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots play a critical role in plant-soil-microbe interactions that occur in the rhizosphere, as well as processes with important implications to climate change and crop management. Quantitative size information on roots in their native environment is invaluable for studying root growth and environmental processes involving plants. X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has been demonstrated to be an effective tool for in situ root scanning and analysis. We aimed to develop a costless and efficient tool that approximates the surface and volume of the root regardless of its shape from three-dimensional (3D) tomography data. The root structure of a Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) specimen was imaged using XCT. The root was reconstructed, and the primary root structure was extracted from the data using a combination of licensed and open-source software. An isosurface polygonal mesh was then created for ease of analysis. We have developed the standalone application imeshJ, generated in MATLAB(1), to calculate root volume and surface area from the mesh. The outputs of imeshJ are surface area (in mm(2)) and the volume (in mm(3)). The process, utilizing a unique combination of tools from imaging to quantitative root analysis, is described. A combination of XCT and open-source software proved to be a powerful combination to noninvasively image plant root samples, segment root data, and extract quantitative information from the 3D data. This methodology of processing 3D data should be applicable to other material/sample systems where there is connectivity between components of similar X-ray attenuation and difficulties arise with segmentation. PMID:27168248

  8. Extracting Metrics for Three-dimensional Root Systems: Volume and Surface Analysis from In-soil X-ray Computed Tomography Data.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A; Adams, Lexor; Beck, Anthon N; McKinney, Adriana L; Varga, Tamas

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots play a critical role in plant-soil-microbe interactions that occur in the rhizosphere, as well as processes with important implications to climate change and crop management. Quantitative size information on roots in their native environment is invaluable for studying root growth and environmental processes involving plants. X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has been demonstrated to be an effective tool for in situ root scanning and analysis. We aimed to develop a costless and efficient tool that approximates the surface and volume of the root regardless of its shape from three-dimensional (3D) tomography data. The root structure of a Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) specimen was imaged using XCT. The root was reconstructed, and the primary root structure was extracted from the data using a combination of licensed and open-source software. An isosurface polygonal mesh was then created for ease of analysis. We have developed the standalone application imeshJ, generated in MATLAB(1), to calculate root volume and surface area from the mesh. The outputs of imeshJ are surface area (in mm(2)) and the volume (in mm(3)). The process, utilizing a unique combination of tools from imaging to quantitative root analysis, is described. A combination of XCT and open-source software proved to be a powerful combination to noninvasively image plant root samples, segment root data, and extract quantitative information from the 3D data. This methodology of processing 3D data should be applicable to other material/sample systems where there is connectivity between components of similar X-ray attenuation and difficulties arise with segmentation.

  9. The effects of three-dimensional defects on one-way surface plasmon propagation for photonic topological insulators comprised of continuum media

    PubMed Central

    Hassani Gangaraj, S. Ali; Nemilentsau, Andrei; Hanson, George W.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated one-way surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) at the interface of a continuum magnetoplasma material and metal, in the presence of three-dimensional surface defects. Bulk electromagnetic modes of continuum materials have Chern numbers, analogous to those of photonic crystals. This can lead to the appearance of topologically-protected surface modes at material interfaces, propagating at frequencies inside the bandgap of the bulk materials. Previous studies considered two-dimensional structures; here we consider the effect of three-dimensional defects, and show that, although backward propagation/reflection cannot occur, side scattering does take place and has significant effect on the propagation of the surface mode. Several different waveguiding geometries are considered for reducing the effects of side-scattering, and we also consider the effects of metal loss. PMID:27444542

  10. Combining micro computed tomography and three-dimensional registration to evaluate local strains in shape memory scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Therese; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; de Wild, Michael; Küffer, Jürg; Münch, Christoph; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Müller, Bert

    2014-02-01

    Appropriate mechanical stimulation of bony tissue enhances osseointegration of load-bearing implants. Uniaxial compression of porous implants locally results in tensile and compressive strains. Their experimental determination is the objective of this study. Selective laser melting is applied to produce open-porous NiTi scaffolds of cubic units. To measure displacement and strain fields within the compressed scaffold, the authors took advantage of synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography during temperature increase and non-rigid three-dimensional data registration. Uniaxial scaffold compression of 6% led to local compressive and tensile strains of up to 15%. The experiments validate modeling by means of the finite element method. Increasing the temperature during the tomography experiment from 15 to 37°C at a rate of 4 K h(-1), one can locally identify the phase transition from martensite to austenite. It starts at ≈ 24°C on the scaffolds bottom, proceeds up towards the top and terminates at ≈ 34°C on the periphery of the scaffold. The results allow not only design optimization of the scaffold architecture, but also estimation of maximal displacements before cracks are initiated and of optimized mechanical stimuli around porous metallic load-bearing implants within the physiological temperature range. PMID:24257506

  11. A combinatorial variation in surface chemistry and pore size of three-dimensional porous poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds modulates the behaviors of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingdi; Tan, Ke; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterial properties play significant roles in controlling cellular behaviors. The objective of the present study was to investigate how pore size and surface chemistry of three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds regulate the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro in combination. First, on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films, the hydrolytic treatment was found to stimulate the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human MSCs (hMSCs) in comparison with pristine films, while the aminolysis showed mixed effects. Then, 3D porous PCL scaffolds with varying pore sizes (100-200μm, 200-300μm and 300-450μm) were fabricated and subjected to either hydrolysis or aminolysis. It was found that a pore size of 200-300μm with hydrolysis in 3D scaffolds was the most favorable condition for growth of hMSCs. Importantly, while a pore size of 200-300μm with hydrolysis for 1h supported the best osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, the chondrogenic differentiation was greatest in scaffolds with a pore size of 300-450μm and treated with aminolysis for 1h. Taken together, these results suggest that surface chemistry and pore size of 3D porous scaffolds may potentially have a synergistic impact on the behaviors of MSCs.

  12. Three-dimensional crustal structure of the Vøring Margin (NE Atlantic): A combined seismic and gravity image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torne, M.; Fernandez, M.; Wheeler, W.; Karpuz, R.

    2003-02-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) crustal structure of the Vøring Margin is investigated by integrating results from reflection and wide-angle seismic data, well log data, and 3-D gravity modeling. The reduced "crustal" Bouguer anomaly, obtained after computing the gravity effects of the water layer and Cenozoic and Cretaceous sedimentary cover, displays an arcuate-shaped gravity high that coincides with the Cretaceous subbasins. The Pre-Cretaceous layer varies in thickness from 7 to 8 km below the Vøring Marginal High to <2 km in the Mesozoic depocenters and is overlying a relative "high-density" upper-middle crust (2850 kg m-3). Underlying the upper-middle crust, there is a "high-velocity/density" body, which is imaged along the Marginal High and western region of the Vøring Basin. The High Velocity Body shallows to <14 km depth in the western end of the Marginal High and thins out toward the eastern and southeastern regions of the basin. Regions of thick crust (˜24 km) are located in the eastern and southern parts of the basin and northern and central parts of the Marginal High, whereas thinner crust is observed at the southwest region of the study area (˜16 km) and in the Fenris Graben region and Utgard High (˜18 km). Residual gravity anomalies are related to the distribution of interbedded volcanics and to the presence of sedimentary subbasins under the Marginal High. Crustal thinning is not directly related to thickening of the HVB and/or the location of Cretaceous depocentres, indicating a major rejuvenation of the Cretaceous Moho related to the Maastritchian-Paleocene rifting episode and massive emplacement of igneous material during breakup.

  13. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization procedure based on discrete sensitivity analysis is extended to treat three-dimensional geometries. The function of sensitivity analysis is to directly couple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with numerical optimization techniques, which facilitates the construction of efficient direct-design methods. The development of a practical three-dimensional design procedures entails many challenges, such as: (1) the demand for significant efficiency improvements over current design methods; (2) a general and flexible three-dimensional surface representation; and (3) the efficient solution of very large systems of linear algebraic equations. It is demonstrated that each of these challenges is overcome by: (1) employing fully implicit (Newton) methods for the CFD analyses; (2) adopting a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of two- and three-dimensional surfaces; and (3) using preconditioned conjugate gradient-like linear system solvers. Whereas each of these extensions independently yields an improvement in computational efficiency, the combined effect of implementing all the extensions simultaneously results in a significant factor of 50 decrease in computational time and a factor of eight reduction in memory over the most efficient design strategies in current use. The new aerodynamic shape optimization procedure is demonstrated in the design of both two- and three-dimensional inviscid aerodynamic problems including a two-dimensional supersonic internal/external nozzle, two-dimensional transonic airfoils (resulting in supercritical shapes), three-dimensional transport wings, and three-dimensional supersonic delta wings. Each design application results in realistic and useful optimized shapes.

  14. Reconstruction of mechanically recorded sound from an edison cylinder using three dimensional non-contact optical surface metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Fadeyev, V.; Haber, C.; Maul, C.; McBride, J.W.; Golden, M.

    2004-04-20

    Audio information stored in the undulations of grooves in a medium such as a phonograph disc record or cylinder may be reconstructed, without contact, by measuring the groove shape using precision optical metrology methods and digital image processing. The viability of this approach was recently demonstrated on a 78 rpm shellac disc using two dimensional image acquisition and analysis methods. The present work reports the first three dimensional reconstruction of mechanically recorded sound. The source material, a celluloid cylinder, was scanned using color coded confocal microscopy techniques and resulted in a faithful playback of the recorded information.

  15. Three-Dimensional Thermal Boundary Layer Corrections for Circular Heat Flux Gauges Mounted in a Flat Plate with a Surface Temperature Discontinuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Haddad, G. F.; Chen, R.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed in an effort to determine thermal boundary layer correction factors for circular convective heat flux gauges (such as Schmidt-Boelter and plug type)mounted flush in a flat plate subjected to a stepwise surface temperature discontinuity. Turbulent flow solutions with temperature-dependent properties are obtained for a free stream Reynolds number of 1E6, and freestream Mach numbers of 2 and 4. The effect of gauge diameter and the plate surface temperature have been investigated. The 3-D CFD results for the heat flux correction factors are compared to quasi-21) results deduced from constant property integral solutions and also 2-D CFD analysis with both constant and variable properties. The role of three-dimensionality and of property variations on the heat flux correction factors has been demonstrated.

  16. A Realistic Three-dimensional Scene Model (RTDS) for simulating the Surface Temperature over Sparsely Vegetated Surface from a Remote Sensor and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Zhou, J.; Li, M.; Liu, S.; Song, L.; Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Validations of the remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) are necessary due to the strong sensitivity of temperature as an input parameter for many models. LST products with large errors may lead to significant uncertainties in subsequent applications. Most of the current validation methods rely on direct LST comparisons between the ground measurements at a single site and its corresponding pixel. However, due to the scale-mismatch, it is inappropriate to use the single-site data to evaluate the whole pixel value, especially over sparsely vegetated pixels or other heterogeneous pixels. Based on the geometric optical model, a ground-based realistic three-dimensional scene model (RTDS) is developed by taking into account the sun-ground target-sensor geometry, to calculate the surface temperature for a mixed pixel. In this model, the ground-based realistic three-dimensional scene is reconstructed, and the surface of the scene is divided into little surface elements. The sun light is treated as parallel rays in order to calculate the Boolean value of each surface element observed by the remote sensor to judge shadow or illumination, and thus we get the fraction of each component of the scene using face-factor. The RTDS modeled LST has the same extent as the field-of-view of the remote sensor. Therefore, it is comparable with the estimates of remotely sensed LST. The measurements over a sparsely vegetated surface in the downstream area of Heihe River basin are used to test the RTDS model. The results show that the calculated LST with the RTDS model agree well with the ground measurements. When the size of element is less than 0.1 m2, the modeled surface temperatures have negligible differences. The influences of different distributions of ground scene on the results are analyzed and the results indicate that the distribution of ground scene has a great impact on the calculated surface temperature. The proposed RTDS model provides a bridge to solve the problem of

  17. Time dependent three-dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction on the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    The first successful application of the three-dimensional quantum body frame wave packet approach to reactive scattering is reported for the H + H2 exchange reaction on the LSTH potential surface. The method used is based on a procedure for calculating total reaction probabilities from wave packets. It is found that converged, vibrationally resolved reactive probabilities can be calculated with a grid that is not much larger than required for the pure inelastic calculation. Tabular results are presented for several energies.

  18. Three-dimensional soil moisture profile retrieval by assimilation of near-surface measurements: Simplified Kalman filter covariance forecasting and field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jeffrey P.; Willgoose, Garry R.; Kalma, Jetse D.

    2002-12-01

    The Kalman filter data assimilation technique is applied to a distributed three-dimensional soil moisture model for retrieval of the soil moisture profile in a 6 ha catchment using near-surface soil moisture measurements. A simplified Kalman filter covariance forecasting methodology is developed based on forecasting of the state correlations and imposed state variances. This covariance forecasting technique, termed the modified Kalman filter, was then used in a 1 month three-dimensional field application. Two updating scenarios were tested: (1) updating every 2 to 3 days and (2) a single update. The data used were from the Nerrigundah field site, near Newcastle, Australia. This study demonstrates the feasibility of data assimilation in a quasi three-dimensional distributed soil moisture model, provided simplified covariance forecasting techniques are used. It also identifies that (1) the soil moisture profile cannot be retrieved from near-surface soil moisture measurements when the near-surface and deep soil layers become decoupled, such as during extreme drying events; (2) if simulation of the soil moisture profile is already good, the assimilation can result in a slight degradation, but if the simulation is poor, assimilation can yield a significant improvement; (3) soil moisture profile retrieval results are independent of initial conditions; and (4) the required update frequency is a function of the errors in model physics and forcing data.

  19. Thermal Pollution Mathematical Model. Volume 6: Verification of Three-Dimensional Free-Surface Model at Anclote Anchorage. [environment impact of thermal discharges from power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Tuann, S. Y.; Lee, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The free-surface model presented is for tidal estuaries and coastal regions where ambient tidal forces play an important role in the dispersal of heated water. The model is time dependent, three dimensional, and can handle irregular bottom topography. The vertical stretching coordinate is adopted for better treatment of kinematic condition at the water surface. The results include surface elevation, velocity, and temperature. The model was verified at the Anclote Anchorage site of Florida Power Company. Two data bases at four tidal stages for winter and summer conditions were used to verify the model. Differences between measured and predicted temperatures are on an average of less than 1 C.

  20. Controlling Planar and Vertical Ordering in Three-Dimensional (In,Ga)As Quantum Dot Lattices by GaAs Surface Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidbauer, M.; Seydmohamadi, Sh.; Wang, Zh.M.; Mazur, Yu.I.; Salamo, G.J.; Grigoriev, D.; Schaefer, P.; Koehler, R.; Hanke, M.

    2006-02-17

    Anisotropic surface diffusion and strain are used to explain the formation of three-dimensional (In,Ga)As quantum dot lattices. The diffusion characteristics of the surface, coupled with the elastic anisotropy of the matrix, provides an excellent opportunity to influence the dot positions. In particular, quantum dots that are laterally organized into long chains or chessboard two-dimensional arrays vertically organized with strict vertical ordering or vertical ordering that is inclined to the sample surface normal are accurately predicted and observed.

  1. Effect of geometry variations on lee-surface vortex-induced heating for flat-bottom three-dimensional bodies at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    Studies have shown that vortices can produce relatively severe heating on the leeward surfaces of conceptual hypersonic vehicles and that surface geometry can strongly influence this vortex-induced heating. Results which show the effects of systematic geometry variations on the vortex-induced lee-surface heating on simple flat-bottom three-dimensional bodies at angles of attack of 20 deg and 40 deg are presented. The tests were conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 6 and at a Reynolds number of 1.71 x 10 to the 7th power per meter.

  2. A Treatment Planning Method for Sequentially Combining Radiopharmaceutical Therapy and External Radiation Therapy;External beam therapy; Radiopharmaceutical therapy; Three-dimensional dosimetry; Treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sebastien; He Bin; Esaias, Caroline E.; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate three-dimensional dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning method, using the patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (D{sub RPT}) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent 2-Gy-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTD{sub RPT} map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTD{sub RPT}. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed that would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTD{sub sum} to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results: The average voxel NTD{sub RPT} to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (range, 1-85 Gy); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTD{sub RPT} from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTD{sub sum} to tumor was 71.5 Gy (range, 40-135 Gy) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTD{sub sum} equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions: A method that enables real-time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded.

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering in three-dimensional ordered Au nanoparticles in anodic porous alumina matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Toshiaki; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Masuda, Hideki

    2011-12-01

    The fabrication of a three-dimensional (3D) ordered array of metal and/or metal oxide nanoparticles in an anodic porous alumina matrix and the application of a 3D array of Au nanoparticles as a substrate for the measurement of surfaceenhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are discussed. The 3D structure is prepared by a repeated process composed of the formation of nanoholes by the anodization of Al and the subsequent electrochemical deposition of a metal into the holes. The dependence of the SERS intensity on the number of layers of the Au nanoparticle array was examined. In addition, the effect of the gap size between Au nanoparticles was also investigated. The present process allows the fabrication of 3D functional optical devices based on the enhancement of the electric field of incident light.

  4. Mineralization of collagen may occur on fibril surfaces: evidence from conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Song, M. J.; Arena, J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Marko, M.; Owen, C.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the normally calcifying leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, has been investigated at an ultrastructural level with conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy, computed tomography, and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods. Specimens treated by either aqueous or anhydrous techniques and resin-embedded were appropriately sectioned and regions of early tendon mineralization were photographed. On the basis of individual photomicrographs, stereoscopic pairs of images, and tomographic three-dimensional image reconstructions, platelet-shaped crystals may be demonstrated for the first time in association with the surface of collagen fibrils. Mineral is also observed in closely parallel arrays within collagen hole and overlap zones. The mineral deposition at these spatially distinct locations in the tendon provides insight into possible means by which calcification is mediated by collagen as a fundamental event in skeletal and dental formation among vertebrates.

  5. Three-dimensional photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Bryan; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2010-02-01

    The concept of three-dimensional (3D) photovoltaics is explored computationally using a genetic algorithm to optimize the energy production in a day for arbitrarily shaped 3D solar cells confined to a given area footprint and total volume. Our simulations demonstrate that the performance of 3D photovoltaic structures scales linearly with height, leading to volumetric energy conversion, and provides power fairly evenly throughout the day. Furthermore, we show that optimal 3D structures are not simple box-like shapes, and that design attributes such as reflectivity could be optimized using three-dimensionality.

  6. Three-dimensional photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Bryan; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2010-03-01

    The concept of three-dimensional (3D) photovoltaics is explored computationally using a genetic algorithm to optimize the energy production in a day for arbitrarily shaped 3D solar cells confined to a given area footprint and total volume. Our simulations demonstrate that the performance of 3D photovoltaic structures scales linearly with height, leading to volumetric energy conversion, and provides power fairly evenly throughout the day. Furthermore, we show that optimal 3D shapes are not simple box-like shapes, and that design attributes such as reflectivity can be optimized in new ways using three-dimensionality.

  7. Three-dimensional, two-species magnetohydrodynamic studies of the early time behaviors of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2 barium release

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Lianghai Li, Lei; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Yiteng

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional, two-species (Ba{sup +} and H{sup +}) MHD model to study the early time behaviors of a barium release at about 1 R{sub E} like Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2, with emphasis placed on the three-dimensional evolution of the barium cloud and its effects on the ambient plasma environment. We find that the perturbations caused by the cloud are the combined results of the initial injection, the radial expansion, and the diamagnetic effect and propagate as fast MHD waves in the magnetosphere. In return, the transverse expansion and the cross-B motion of barium ions are constrained by the magnetic force, which lead to a field-aligned striation of ions and the decoupling of these ions from the neutrals. Our simulation shows the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity in the barium cloud. The estimated time scale for the cavity evolution might be much shorter if photoionization time scale and field aligned expansion of barium ions are considered. In addition, our two species MHD simulation also finds the snowplow effect resulting from the momentum coupling between barium ions and background H{sup +}, which creates density hole and bumps in the background H{sup +} when barium ions expanding along the magnetic field lines.

  8. Method for the determination of the three-dimensional aerodynamic field of a rotor-stator combination to compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandra, Sridhar M.; Bober, Lawrence J.; Khandelwal, Suresh

    1987-01-01

    Using the lifting surface theory and the acceleration potential method for the flow field of an axial turbocompressor stage, a recursive and a direct method are presented that make use of the eigenfunction solutions of the isolated rotor and stator to solve for the rotor-stator interaction problem. The net pressure distribution on the rotor and stator blades is represented by modified Birnbaum series, whose coefficients are determined using a matrix procedure and satisfying the boundary conditions on the surface of the blades. The relation between the matrix operators of the recursive and the direct methods is also shown. Expressions have been given for the blade circulation, the axial and tangential forces on the blade, the rotor power required, and the induced upwash velocity of the stage.

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of the surface mode supported in Čerenkov and Smith-Purcell free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Yashvir; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-06-01

    In Čerenkov and Smith-Purcell free-electron lasers (FELs), a resonant interaction between the electron beam and the copropagating surface mode can produce a copious amount of coherent terahertz radiation. We perform a three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the surface mode, taking the effect of attenuation into account, and set up 3D Maxwell-Lorentz equations for both these systems. Based on this analysis, we determine the requirements on the electron beam parameters, i.e., beam emittance, beam size and beam current for the successful operation of a Čerenkov FEL.

  10. Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous nitroxide polymer brush electrodes prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer polymerization for organic radical batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Hao; Chou, Wei-Jen; Lee, Jyh-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and electrochemical performance of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) nitroxide polymer brush electrodes for organic radical batteries are reported. The 3DOM electrodes are synthesized via polystyrene colloidal crystal templating with electropolymerization of polypyrrole, modification of surface initiator, and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The discharge capacity of the 3DOM electrodes is proportional to the thickness of the inverse opal. The discharge capacity of the 3DOM electrode at a discharge rate of 5 C is 40 times higher than that of the planar electrode; its cycle-life performance exhibits 96.1% retention after 250 cycles.

  11. Three-dimensional localization of T-cell receptors in relation to microvilli using a combination of superresolution microscopies

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yunmin; Riven, Inbal; Feigelson, Sara W.; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Tohya, Kazuo; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Alon, Ronen; Haran, Gilad

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte microvilli are flexible projections enriched with adhesion molecules. The role of these cellular projections in the ability of T cells to probe antigen-presenting cells has been elusive. In this study, we probe the spatial relation of microvilli and T-cell receptors (TCRs), the major molecules responsible for antigen recognition on the T-cell membrane. To this end, an effective and robust methodology for mapping membrane protein distribution in relation to the 3D surface structure of cells is introduced, based on two complementary superresolution microscopies. Strikingly, TCRs are found to be highly localized on microvilli, in both peripheral blood human T cells and differentiated effector T cells, and are barely found on the cell body. This is a decisive demonstration that different types of T cells universally localize their TCRs to microvilli, immediately pointing to these surface projections as effective sensors for antigenic moieties. This finding also suggests how previously reported membrane clusters might form, with microvilli serving as anchors for specific T-cell surface molecules. PMID:27647916

  12. Adjoint Methods for Adjusting Three-Dimensional Atmosphere and Surface Properties to Fit Multi-Angle Multi-Pixel Polarimetric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, William G.; Cairns, Brian; Bal, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    This paper derives an efficient procedure for using the three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) to adjust atmosphere and surface properties and improve their fit with multi-angle/multi-pixel radiometric and polarimetric measurements of scattered sunlight. The proposed adjoint method uses the 3D VRTE to compute the measurement misfit function and the adjoint 3D VRTE to compute its gradient with respect to all unknown parameters. In the remote sensing problems of interest, the scalar-valued misfit function quantifies agreement with data as a function of atmosphere and surface properties, and its gradient guides the search through this parameter space. Remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface in a three-dimensional region may require thousands of unknown parameters and millions of data points. Many approaches would require calls to the 3D VRTE solver in proportion to the number of unknown parameters or measurements. To avoid this issue of scale, we focus on computing the gradient of the misfit function as an alternative to the Jacobian of the measurement operator. The resulting adjoint method provides a way to adjust 3D atmosphere and surface properties with only two calls to the 3D VRTE solver for each spectral channel, regardless of the number of retrieval parameters, measurement view angles or pixels. This gives a procedure for adjusting atmosphere and surface parameters that will scale to the large problems of 3D remote sensing. For certain types of multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements, this encourages the development of a new class of three-dimensional retrieval algorithms with more flexible parametrizations of spatial heterogeneity, less reliance on data screening procedures, and improved coverage in terms of the resolved physical processes in the Earth?s atmosphere.

  13. A three-dimensional application with the numerical grid generation code: EAGLE (utilizing an externally generated surface)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) is a multiblock grid generation and steady-state flow solver system. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation, a composite block structure grid generation scheme, and a multiblock implicit Euler flow solver algorithm. The three codes are intended to be used sequentially from the definition of the configuration under study to the flow solution about the configuration. EAGLE was specifically designed to aid in the analysis of both freestream and interference flow field configurations. These configurations can be comprised of single or multiple bodies ranging from simple axisymmetric airframes to complex aircraft shapes with external weapons. Each body can be arbitrarily shaped with or without multiple lifting surfaces. Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any CRAY machine with or without Solid State Disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all CRAY machines using the FORTRAN Compiler CF177. The use of namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and to operate Program EAGLE. Recently, the Code was modified to operate on other computers, especially the Sun Spare4 Workstation. Several two-dimensional grid configurations were completely and successfully developed using EAGLE. Currently, EAGLE is being used for three-dimension grid applications.

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-19

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  15. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  16. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL KINETIC-MHD MODEL OF THE GLOBAL HELIOSPHERE WITH THE HELIOPAUSE-SURFACE FITTING

    SciTech Connect

    Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.

    2015-10-15

    This paper provides a detailed description of the latest version of our model of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM). This model has already been applied to the analysis of Lyα absorption spectra toward nearby stars and for analyses of Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN data. Katushkina et al. (this issue) used the model results to analyze IBEX-Lo data. At the same time, the details of this model have not yet been published. This is a three-dimensional (3D) kinetic-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) model that takes into account SW and interstellar plasmas (including α particles in SW and helium ions in LISM), the solar and interstellar magnetic fields, and interstellar hydrogen atoms. The latitudinal dependence of SW and the actual flow direction of the interstellar gas with respect to the Sun are also taken into account in the model. It was very essential that our numerical code was developed in such a way that any numerical diffusion or reconnection across the heliopause were not allowed in the model. The heliospheric current sheet is a rotational discontinuity in the ideal MHD and can be treated kinematically. In the paper, we focus in particular on the effects of the heliospheric magnetic field and on the heliolatitudinal dependence of SW.

  18. Three-dimensional Kinetic-MHD Model of the Global Heliosphere with the Heliopause-surface Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the latest version of our model of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM). This model has already been applied to the analysis of Lyα absorption spectra toward nearby stars and for analyses of Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN data. Katushkina et al. (this issue) used the model results to analyze IBEX-Lo data. At the same time, the details of this model have not yet been published. This is a three-dimensional (3D) kinetic-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) model that takes into account SW and interstellar plasmas (including α particles in SW and helium ions in LISM), the solar and interstellar magnetic fields, and interstellar hydrogen atoms. The latitudinal dependence of SW and the actual flow direction of the interstellar gas with respect to the Sun are also taken into account in the model. It was very essential that our numerical code was developed in such a way that any numerical diffusion or reconnection across the heliopause were not allowed in the model. The heliospheric current sheet is a rotational discontinuity in the ideal MHD and can be treated kinematically. In the paper, we focus in particular on the effects of the heliospheric magnetic field and on the heliolatitudinal dependence of SW.

  19. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  20. Three Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Rocket-based Combined-cycle Engine Response During Mode Transition Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jack R.; McRae, D. Scott; Bond, Ryan B.; Steffan, Christopher (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The GTX program at NASA Glenn Research Center is designed to develop a launch vehicle concept based on rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion. Experimental testing, cycle analysis, and computational fluid dynamics modeling have all demonstrated the viability of the GTX concept, yet significant technical issues and challenges still remain. Our research effort develops a unique capability for dynamic CFD simulation of complete high-speed propulsion devices and focuses this technology toward analysis of the GTX response during critical mode transition events. Our principal attention is focused on Mode 1/Mode 2 operation, in which initial rocket propulsion is transitioned into thermal-throat ramjet propulsion. A critical element of the GTX concept is the use of an Independent Ramjet Stream (IRS) cycle to provide propulsion at Mach numbers less than 3. In the IRS cycle, rocket thrust is initially used for primary power, and the hot rocket plume is used as a flame-holding mechanism for hydrogen fuel injected into the secondary air stream. A critical aspect is the establishment of a thermal throat in the secondary stream through the combination of area reduction effects and combustion-induced heat release. This is a necessity to enable the power-down of the rocket and the eventual shift to ramjet mode. Our focus in this first year of the grant has been in three areas, each progressing directly toward the key initial goal of simulating thermal throat formation during the IRS cycle: CFD algorithm development; simulation of Mode 1 experiments conducted at Glenn's Rig 1 facility; and IRS cycle simulations. The remainder of this report discusses each of these efforts in detail and presents a plan of work for the next year.

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction of painted human interphase chromosomes: active and inactive X chromosome territories have similar volumes but differ in shape and surface structure

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    This study provides a three-dimensional (3D) analysis of differences between the 3D morphology of active and inactive human X interphase chromosomes (Xa and Xi territories). Chromosome territories were painted in formaldehyde-fixed, three-dimensionally intact human diploid female amniotic fluid cell nuclei (46, XX) with X-specific whole chromosome compositive probes. The colocalization of a 4,6-diamidino-2- phenylindole dihydrochloride-stained Barr body with one of the two painted X territories allowed the unequivocal discrimination of the inactive X from its active counterpart. Light optical serial sections were obtained with a confocal laser scanning microscope. 3D- reconstructed Xa territories revealed a flatter shape and exhibited a larger and more irregular surface when compared to the apparently smoother surface and rounder shape of Xi territories. The relationship between territory surface and volume was quantified by the determination of a dimensionless roundness factor (RF). RF and surface area measurements showed a highly significant difference between Xa and Xi territories (P < 0.001) in contrast to volume differences (P > 0.1). For comparison with an autosome of similar DNA content, chromosome 7 territories were additionally painted. The 3D morphology of the chromosome 7 territories was similar to the Xa territory but differed strongly from the Xi territory with respect to RF and surface area (P < 0.001). PMID:8978813

  2. Combined three-dimensional magnetic resonance guided optical spectroscopy for functional and molecular imaging of human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Davis, Scott C.; Jiang, Shudong; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2011-07-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance is used to image high-risk patients for breast cancer because of its higher sensitivity to tumors than mammography. We focus on Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) imaging and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT), emerging imaging techniques that non-invasively quantify optical properties of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water content, scattering, lipid concentration and endogenous Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) emission. We present methods on combining the synergistic attributes of DCE-MR, NIRS, and FMT for in-vivo imaging of breast cancer in three dimensions using a custom optical MR breast coil and diffusion based light modeling software, NIRFAST. We present example results from a breast cancer patient. Preliminary results show elevated hemoglobin values and water fraction. Fluorescence values in the tumor region, however, were not always elevated above the surrounding tissue as we had expected. The additional information gained from NIRS and FMT may improve the ability to distinguish between malignant and benign lesions during MR imaging. These dual modality instruments will provide complex anatomical and molecular prognostic information, and may decrease the number of biopsies, thereby improving patient care.

  3. Three-Dimensional Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Cell Surface Antigen-Manganese Transporter MntC

    SciTech Connect

    Gribenko, Alexey; Mosyak, Lidia; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Parris, Kevin; Svenson, Kristine; Moran, Justin; Chu, Ling; Li, Sheng; Liu, Tong; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Green, Bruce A.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Matsuka, Yury V.

    2013-08-23

    MntC is a metal-binding protein component of the Mn2 +-specific mntABC transporter from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The protein is expressed during the early stages of infection and was proven to be effective at reducing both S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections in a murine animal model when used as a vaccine antigen. MntC is currently being tested in human clinical trials as a component of a multiantigen vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus infections. To better understand the biological function of MntC, we are providing structural and biophysical characterization of the protein in this work. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and suggests two potential metal binding modes, which may lead to reversible as well as irreversible metal binding. Precise Mn2 +-binding affinity of the protein was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments using a competition approach. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments confirmed that divalent metals can indeed bind to MntC reversibly as well as irreversibly. Finally, Mn2 +-induced structural and dynamics changes have been characterized using spectroscopic methods and deuterium–hydrogen exchange mass spectroscopy. Results of the experiments show that these changes are minimal and are largely restricted to the structural elements involved in metal coordination. Therefore, it is unlikely that antibody binding to this antigen will be affected by the occupancy of the metal-binding site by Mn2 +.

  4. Determination of the flow stress of a magnetorheological fluid under three-dimensional stress states by using a combination of extrusion test and FEM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-yi; Wang, Zhong-jin

    2016-12-01

    Magnetorheological fluid (MR fluid), a kind of smart material, has been used as a new pressure-carrying medium in magnetorheological pressure forming (MRPF). The mechanical property of MR fluid under the pressure significantly affects the sheet formability. However, there is little knowledge on the deformation behavior of MR fluid under three-dimensional stress states. In this paper, a new procedure via a combination of extrusion test and FEM simulation has been proposed to determine the flow stress of MR fluids. The experimental device for extrusion test of MR fluids was designed. The flow stresses of a MR fluid (MRF-J01T) under four different magnetic fields were determined through the proposed procedure. In addition, the obtained flow stresses were used in the following FEM simulations to verify the accuracy by comparing with the experimental results. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental data, which supports the correctness and practicability of the proposed method.

  5. Gutzwiller density functional studies of FeAs-based superconductors: structure optimization and evidence for a three-dimensional Fermi surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangtao; Qian, Yumin; Xu, Gang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong

    2010-01-29

    The electronic structures of FeAs compounds are sensitive to FeAs bonding, which is described unsuccessfully by the local density approximation (LDA). Treating the multiorbital fluctuations from ab inito LDA+Gutzwiller method, we can now predict the correct FeAs bond length and bonding strength, which will explain the observed "soft phonon." The bands are narrowed by a factor of 2 from their LDA widths. The d{3z{2}-r{2}} orbital is pushed up to cross the Fermi level, forming a three-dimensional Fermi surface, which reduces the anisotropy. The interorbital Hund's coupling J rather than U plays a crucial role in obtaining these results.

  6. Isolation and identification of cancer stem cells from human osteosarcom by serum-free three-dimensional culture combined with anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Song; Li, Feng; Xiao, Jun; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Zhong; Chen, Wenjian; Niu, Pengyan

    2010-02-01

    The cancer stem cells (CSCs) from human osteosarcoma by serum-free three-dimensional culture combined with anticancer drugs were isolated and identified. The primary cells derived from human osteosarcoma were digested by trypsin to prepare a single-cell suspension, and mixed homogeneously into 1.2% alginate gel. Single-cell alginate gel was cultured with serum-free DMEM/F12 medium. Epirubicin (0.8 microg/mL) was added to the medium to enrich CSCs. After cultured conventionally for 7 to 10 days, most of cells suspended in alginate gel were killed by epirubicin. But few cells survived and some single-cell cloning spheres formed. Immunofluorescent staining for Oct3/4 and Nanog was implemented to find cells with properties of self-renewal and multi-potential differentiation. Cells from cloning spheres were transplanted into BALB/c mice to detect the tumorigenicity in vivo. The results showed that some cells positive for Oct3/4 (TRITC) and Nanog (TRITC) were found in single-cell cloning spheres, and most of positive cells were concentrated in the core of sphere. Cells from spheres could form osteosarcoma in the body of mice. It was concluded that cells from single-cell cloning spheres had the properties of the expression of parts of stem cell genes (Oct3/4 and Nanog), resisting anti-cancer drugs, and tumorigenicity in vivo. To sum up, it is believed that cells obtained from osteosarcoma by serum-free three-dimensional culture combined with anticancer drugs are cancer stem cells. PMID:20155460

  7. Electronic structure, Dirac points and Fermi arc surface states in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Na3Bi from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiji, Liang; Chaoyu, Chen; Zhijun, Wang; Youguo, Shi; Ya, Feng; Hemian, Yi; Zhuojin, Xie; Shaolong, He; Junfeng, He; Yingying, Peng; Yan, Liu; Defa, Liu; Cheng, Hu; Lin, Zhao; Guodong, Liu; Xiaoli, Dong; Jun, Zhang; M, Nakatake; H, Iwasawa; K, Shimada; M, Arita; H, Namatame; M, Taniguchi; Zuyan, Xu; Chuangtian, Chen; Hongming, Weng; Xi, Dai; Zhong, Fang; Xing-Jiang, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals have linearly dispersive 3D Dirac nodes where the conduction band and valence band are connected. They have isolated 3D Dirac nodes in the whole Brillouin zone and can be viewed as a 3D counterpart of graphene. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that the 3D Dirac semimetal state can be realized in a simple stoichiometric compound A 3Bi (A = Na, K, Rb). Here we report comprehensive high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements on the two cleaved surfaces, (001) and (100), of Na3Bi. On the (001) surface, by comparison with theoretical calculations, we provide a proper assignment of the observed bands, and in particular, pinpoint the band that is responsible for the formation of the three-dimensional Dirac cones. We observe clear evidence of 3D Dirac cones in the three-dimensional momentum space by directly measuring on the k x –k y plane and by varying the photon energy to get access to different out-of-plane k z s. In addition, we reveal new features around the Brillouin zone corners that may be related with surface reconstruction. On the (100) surface, our ARPES measurements over a large momentum space raise an issue on the selection of the basic Brillouin zone in the (100) plane. We directly observe two isolated 3D Dirac nodes on the (100) surface. We observe the signature of the Fermi-arc surface states connecting the two 3D Dirac nodes that extend to a binding energy of ∼150 meV before merging into the bulk band. Our observations constitute strong evidence on the existence of the Dirac semimetal state in Na3Bi that are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental work. In addition, our results provide new information to clarify on the nature of the band that forms the 3D Dirac cones, on the possible formation of surface reconstruction of the (001) surface, and on the issue of basic Brillouin zone selection for the (100) surface. Project supported by the

  8. Electronic structure, Dirac points and Fermi arc surface states in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Na3Bi from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiji, Liang; Chaoyu, Chen; Zhijun, Wang; Youguo, Shi; Ya, Feng; Hemian, Yi; Zhuojin, Xie; Shaolong, He; Junfeng, He; Yingying, Peng; Yan, Liu; Defa, Liu; Cheng, Hu; Lin, Zhao; Guodong, Liu; Xiaoli, Dong; Jun, Zhang; M, Nakatake; H, Iwasawa; K, Shimada; M, Arita; H, Namatame; M, Taniguchi; Zuyan, Xu; Chuangtian, Chen; Hongming, Weng; Xi, Dai; Zhong, Fang; Xing-Jiang, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals have linearly dispersive 3D Dirac nodes where the conduction band and valence band are connected. They have isolated 3D Dirac nodes in the whole Brillouin zone and can be viewed as a 3D counterpart of graphene. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that the 3D Dirac semimetal state can be realized in a simple stoichiometric compound A 3Bi (A = Na, K, Rb). Here we report comprehensive high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements on the two cleaved surfaces, (001) and (100), of Na3Bi. On the (001) surface, by comparison with theoretical calculations, we provide a proper assignment of the observed bands, and in particular, pinpoint the band that is responsible for the formation of the three-dimensional Dirac cones. We observe clear evidence of 3D Dirac cones in the three-dimensional momentum space by directly measuring on the k x -k y plane and by varying the photon energy to get access to different out-of-plane k z s. In addition, we reveal new features around the Brillouin zone corners that may be related with surface reconstruction. On the (100) surface, our ARPES measurements over a large momentum space raise an issue on the selection of the basic Brillouin zone in the (100) plane. We directly observe two isolated 3D Dirac nodes on the (100) surface. We observe the signature of the Fermi-arc surface states connecting the two 3D Dirac nodes that extend to a binding energy of ˜150 meV before merging into the bulk band. Our observations constitute strong evidence on the existence of the Dirac semimetal state in Na3Bi that are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental work. In addition, our results provide new information to clarify on the nature of the band that forms the 3D Dirac cones, on the possible formation of surface reconstruction of the (001) surface, and on the issue of basic Brillouin zone selection for the (100) surface. Project supported by the

  9. Combined particle-image velocimetry and force analysis of the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction of a natural owl wing.

    PubMed

    Winzen, A; Roidl, B; Schröder, W

    2016-04-01

    Low-speed aerodynamics has gained increasing interest due to its relevance for the design process of small flying air vehicles. These small aircraft operate at similar aerodynamic conditions as, e.g. birds which therefore can serve as role models of how to overcome the well-known problems of low Reynolds number flight. The flight of the barn owl is characterized by a very low flight velocity in conjunction with a low noise emission and a high level of maneuverability at stable flight conditions. To investigate the complex three-dimensional flow field and the corresponding local structural deformation in combination with their influence on the resulting aerodynamic forces, time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry and force and moment measurements are performed on a prepared natural barn owl wing. Several spanwise positions are measured via PIV in a range of angles of attack [Formula: see text] 6° and Reynolds numbers 40 000 [Formula: see text] 120 000 based on the chord length. Additionally, the resulting forces and moments are recorded for -10° ≤ α ≤ 15° at the same Reynolds numbers. Depending on the spanwise position, the angle of attack, and the Reynolds number, the flow field on the wing's pressure side is characterized by either a region of flow separation, causing large-scale vortical structures which lead to a time-dependent deflection of the flexible wing structure or wing regions showing no instantaneous deflection but a reduction of the time-averaged mean wing curvature. Based on the force measurements the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction is assumed to considerably impact the aerodynamic forces acting on the wing leading to a strong mechanical loading of the interface between the wing and body. These time-depending loads which result from the flexibility of the wing should be taken into consideration for the design of future small flying air vehicles using flexible wing structures.

  10. Combined particle-image velocimetry and force analysis of the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction of a natural owl wing.

    PubMed

    Winzen, A; Roidl, B; Schröder, W

    2016-04-01

    Low-speed aerodynamics has gained increasing interest due to its relevance for the design process of small flying air vehicles. These small aircraft operate at similar aerodynamic conditions as, e.g. birds which therefore can serve as role models of how to overcome the well-known problems of low Reynolds number flight. The flight of the barn owl is characterized by a very low flight velocity in conjunction with a low noise emission and a high level of maneuverability at stable flight conditions. To investigate the complex three-dimensional flow field and the corresponding local structural deformation in combination with their influence on the resulting aerodynamic forces, time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry and force and moment measurements are performed on a prepared natural barn owl wing. Several spanwise positions are measured via PIV in a range of angles of attack [Formula: see text] 6° and Reynolds numbers 40 000 [Formula: see text] 120 000 based on the chord length. Additionally, the resulting forces and moments are recorded for -10° ≤ α ≤ 15° at the same Reynolds numbers. Depending on the spanwise position, the angle of attack, and the Reynolds number, the flow field on the wing's pressure side is characterized by either a region of flow separation, causing large-scale vortical structures which lead to a time-dependent deflection of the flexible wing structure or wing regions showing no instantaneous deflection but a reduction of the time-averaged mean wing curvature. Based on the force measurements the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction is assumed to considerably impact the aerodynamic forces acting on the wing leading to a strong mechanical loading of the interface between the wing and body. These time-depending loads which result from the flexibility of the wing should be taken into consideration for the design of future small flying air vehicles using flexible wing structures. PMID:27033298

  11. Accuracy Assessment of Three-dimensional Surface Reconstructions of In vivo Teeth from Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yan-Hui; Hu, Hong-Cheng; Lu, Song-He; Wu, Yu-Wei; Li, Wei-Ran; Tang, Zhi-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: The accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been particularly important in dentistry, which will affect the effectiveness of diagnosis, treatment plan, and outcome in clinical practice. The aims of this study were to assess the linear, volumetric, and geometric accuracy of 3D reconstructions from CBCT and to investigate the influence of voxel size and CBCT system on the reconstructions results. Methods: Fifty teeth from 18 orthodontic patients were assigned to three groups as NewTom VG 0.15 mm group (NewTom VG; voxel size: 0.15 mm; n = 17), NewTom VG 0.30 mm group (NewTom VG; voxel size: 0.30 mm; n = 16), and VATECH DCTPRO 0.30 mm group (VATECH DCTPRO; voxel size: 0.30 mm; n = 17). The 3D reconstruction models of the teeth were segmented from CBCT data manually using Mimics 18.0 (Materialise Dental, Leuven, Belgium), and the extracted teeth were scanned by 3Shape optical scanner (3Shape A/S, Denmark). Linear and volumetric deviations were separately assessed by comparing the length and volume of the 3D reconstruction model with physical measurement by paired t-test. Geometric deviations were assessed by the root mean square value of the imposed 3D reconstruction and optical models by one-sample t-test. To assess the influence of voxel size and CBCT system on 3D reconstruction, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used (α = 0.05). Results: The linear, volumetric, and geometric deviations were −0.03 ± 0.48 mm, −5.4 ± 2.8%, and 0.117 ± 0.018 mm for NewTom VG 0.15 mm group; −0.45 ± 0.42 mm, −4.5 ± 3.4%, and 0.116 ± 0.014 mm for NewTom VG 0.30 mm group; and −0.93 ± 0.40 mm, −4.8 ± 5.1%, and 0.194 ± 0.117 mm for VATECH DCTPRO 0.30 mm group, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between groups in terms of linear measurement (P < 0.001), but no significant difference in terms of volumetric measurement (P = 0.774). No statistically significant difference were

  12. Three-dimensional metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce

    2012-06-12

    A fabrication method is capable of creating canonical metamaterial structures arrayed in a three-dimensional geometry. The method uses a membrane suspended over a cavity with predefined pattern as a directional evaporation mask. Metallic and/or dielectric material can be evaporated at high vacuum through the patterned membrane to deposit resonator structures on the interior walls of the cavity, thereby providing a unit cell of micron-scale dimension. The method can produce volumetric metamaterial structures comprising layers of such unit cells of resonator structures.

  13. Application of three-dimensionally area-selective atomic layer deposition for selectively coating the vertical surfaces of standing nanopillars

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenjing; Zhang, Kenan; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Tiaoxing; Sun, Yan; Chen, Xin; Dai, Ning

    2014-01-01

    We describe a strategy for selectively coating the vertical surfaces of standing nanopillars using area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD). Hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are utilised to selectively inhibit the coating of oxides on the modified horizontal regions to ensure that only the vertical surfaces of vertical standing nanorods are coated using ALD processes. This method makes it possible to fabricate vertical nanodevices using a simple process of depositing oxide layer on a vertical surface, and can also be applied to the area-selective surface passivation of other standing structures. PMID:24662775

  14. Automatic leveling procedure by use of the spring method in measurement of three-dimensional surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ariura, Yasutsune; Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki

    2008-12-01

    Leveling of specimen surfaces is very important in measurement of surface roughness. If the surface is not leveled, the measured roughness has large distortion and less vertical measurement range. It is convenient to utilize some automatic leveling procedures instead of manual leveling which needs longer adjustment time. In automatic leveling, a new algorithm is proposed, which is named the spring method superior to the least square method. The spring method has an advantage that a part of tentative data points is used to calculate the surface inclination, so the obtained results are less influenced by local pits for example. As examples, the spring method was applied to actual engineered surfaces, which were milled, shot-peened, and ground surfaces, and also an artificial ditched surface. The results went well for the calculation of the surface inclinations and consequently the specimen surfaces were leveled with less distortion and large vertical measurement range can be achieved. It is also found the least square method is a special case of the spring method with using all sampling data points. That means the spring method is a comprehensive procedure including the least square method. This must become a very strong and robust method in automatic leveling algorithm

  15. Crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase in Fe-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Na Hyun; Lee, Kyujoon; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Jinsu; Jang, Jungwon; Kim, Jinhee

    2014-06-23

    In Fe-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, we have observed higher mobility, larger linear magnetoresistance, and anomalous quantum oscillations. The angle dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations gives two different periodicities depending on the angle from the c-axis. The low-angle SdH period is identified with a surface origin, while the high-angle period is against the surface origin. The high-angle SdH period well agrees with the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) period with a bulk origin. The physical parameters obtained from the quantum oscillations support the crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase by Fe doping in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  16. Bistatic scattering from a three-dimensional object above a two-dimensional randomly rough surface modeled with the parallel FDTD approach.

    PubMed

    Guo, L-X; Li, J; Zeng, H

    2009-11-01

    We present an investigation of the electromagnetic scattering from a three-dimensional (3-D) object above a two-dimensional (2-D) randomly rough surface. A Message Passing Interface-based parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach is used, and the uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) medium is adopted for truncation of the FDTD lattices, in which the finite-difference equations can be used for the total computation domain by properly choosing the uniaxial parameters. This makes the parallel FDTD algorithm easier to implement. The parallel performance with different number of processors is illustrated for one rough surface realization and shows that the computation time of our parallel FDTD algorithm is dramatically reduced relative to a single-processor implementation. Finally, the composite scattering coefficients versus scattered and azimuthal angle are presented and analyzed for different conditions, including the surface roughness, the dielectric constants, the polarization, and the size of the 3-D object.

  17. Charged-particle energy loss by the excitation of surface magnetoplasmons in a structure with two- and three-dimensional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Averkov, Yu. O. Prokopenko, Yu. V.; Yakovenko, V. M.

    2015-10-15

    Electron energy loss by the excitation of surface magnetoplasma oscillations by an electron moving along a static magnetic field in vacuum over a two-dimensional plasma layer on the surface of three-dimensional plasma half-space has been studied theoretically. Electron energy loss by the excitation of surface magnetoplasmons has been calculated in the electrostatic approximation. It has been shown that the type of the dispersion law of electrons in such a plasma (quadratic for a two-dimensional Drude gas or linear for graphene) can be determined from the qualitative character of the dependence of the maximum of the spectral density of this loss on the electron density in the two-dimensional plasma.

  18. Electromagnetic scattering analysis of a three-dimensional-cavity-backed aperture in an infinite ground plane using a combined finite element method/method of moments approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1995-01-01

    A combined finite element method/method of moments (FEM/MoM) approach is used to analyze the electromagnetic scattering properties of a three-dimensional-cavity-backed aperture in an infinite ground plane. The FEM is used to formulate the fields inside the cavity, and the MoM (with subdomain bases) in both spectral and spatial domains is used to formulate the fields above the ground plane. Fields in the aperture and the cavity are solved using a system of equations resulting from the combination of the FEM and the MoM. By virtue of the FEM, this combined approach is applicable to all arbitrarily shaped cavities with inhomogeneous material fillings, and because of the subdomain bases used in the MoM, the apertures can be of any arbitrary shape. This approach leads to a partly sparse and partly full symmetric matrix, which is efficiently solved using a biconjugate gradient algorithm. Numerical results are presented to validate the analysis.

  19. River terrace sand and gravel deposit reserve estimation using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography for bedrock surface detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Penn, S.; Meldrum, P. I.; Kuras, O.; Loke, M. H.; Gunn, D. A.

    2013-06-01

    We describe the application of 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to the characterisation and reserve estimation of an economic fluvial sand and gravel deposit. Due to the smoothness constraints used to regularise the inversion, it can be difficult to accurately determine the geometry of sharp interfaces. We have therefore considered two approaches to interface detection that we have applied to the 3D ERT results in an attempt to provide an accurate and objective assessment of the bedrock surface elevation. The first is a gradient-based approach, in which the steepest gradient of the vertical resistivity profile is assumed to correspond to the elevation of the mineral/bedrock interface. The second method uses an intrusive sample point to identify the interface resistivity at a location within the model, from which an iso-resistivity surface is identified that is assumed to define the interface. Validation of these methods has been achieved through direct comparison with observed bedrock surface elevations that were measured using real-time-kinematic GPS subsequent to the 3D ERT survey when quarrying exposed the bedrock surface. The gradient-based edge detector severely underestimated the depth to bedrock in this case, whereas the interface resistivity method produced bedrock surface elevations that were in close agreement with the GPS-derived surface. The failure of the gradient-based method is attributed to insufficient model sensitivity in the region of the bedrock surface, whereas the success of the interface resistivity method is a consequence of the homogeneity of the mineral and bedrock, resulting in a consistent interface resistivity. These results highlight the need for some intrusive data for model validation and for edge detection approaches to be chosen on the basis of local geological conditions.

  20. Simultaneous Characterization of Nanoparticle Size and Particle-Surface Interactions with Three-Dimensional Nanophotonic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Dakota; Schein, Perry; Erickson, David

    2016-09-01

    The behavior of a nanoparticle in solution depends strongly on the particle's physical and chemical characteristics, most notably the particle size and the surface properties. Accurately characterizing these properties is critical for quality control in a wide variety of industries. To understand a complex and polydisperse nanoparticle suspension, however, ensemble averaging is not sufficient, and there is a great need for direct measurements of size and surface properties at the individual nanoparticle level. In this work, we present an analysis technique for simultaneous characterization of particle-surface interactions and size using near-field light scattering and verify it using Brownian-dynamics simulations. Using a nanophotonic waveguide, single particles can be stably held near the waveguide's surface by strongly localized optical forces. By tracking the dynamic 3D motion of the particle under the influence of these forces using an optical microscope, it is possible to extract the particle-surface interaction forces, as well as to estimate the size and refractive index of the nanoparticle. Because of the strong light-scattering signal, this method is viable for high-throughput characterization of particles as small as 100 nm in only a few seconds each.

  1. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Urban Aerosols by use of a Combined Lidar, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and X-Ray Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Frejafon, E; Kasparian, J; Rambaldi, P; Yu, J; Vezin, B; Wolf, J P

    1998-04-20

    We present a novel method of characterizing urban aerosols that combines scanning-electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and lidar measurements. Inversion algorithms, based on fractal aerosol models, allowed us to compute the scattering coefficients of the measured size distribution. The alpha and beta coefficients were used to invert lidar data, yielding what to our knowledge are the first quantitative three-dimensional measurements of the aerosol mass concentrations in urban conditions. The combined method was used during an extensive experiment in Lyon in the summer of 1996. Size distributions exhibit two main modes, at 0.1 and 0.9 mum, the composition of which was determined by x-ray microanalysis. The first mode is soot, and the second is composed of 60% coarse soot particles and 40% silica particles. Lidar measurements showed a homogeneous aerosol concentration within the mixing layer and a steep gradient above. Measurements made over 24 h also showed loads that were due to traffic rush hours and the dynamics of the height of the planetary boundary layer. PMID:18273146

  2. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  3. Three-dimensional analysis of scattering by pressure-release plane surfaces and the validity of the image solution.

    PubMed

    Welton, P J

    2012-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the scattering integrals in three dimensions, numerous approximations are used to obtain closed-form solutions. By considering the scattering by an infinite, pressure-release plane surface, the effects of various phase approximations and source directivity approximations can be examined independently of the surface roughness. Calculations are carried out using the Fraunhofer and Fresnel phase approximations, and two directivity approximations. It has been shown experimentally that the image solution is valid for the reflection of an acoustic beam by an infinite, pressure-release plane surface if the plane is in the farfield of the source. Consequently, the image solution is used to compare analytical solutions obtained using various phase and directivity approximations, and it is found that both the Fresnel phase approximation and a realistic directivity approximation are required to achieve a good fit. The solution produced by the Fraunhofer phase approximation is obtained as an asymptotic limit of the modified Fresnel solution. Criteria for the validity of the Fraunhofer and Fresnel phase approximations are developed. The Fresnel phase approximation is valid under fairly broad conditions, but the Fraunhofer phase approximation is never valid for an infinite plane surface that must be in the farfield of the source.

  4. Two-Dimensional Sectioned Images and Three-Dimensional Surface Models for Learning the Anatomy of the Female Pelvis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Dong Sun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Hwang, Sung Bae; Har, Dong-Hwan; Moon, Young Lae; Chung, Min Suk

    2013-01-01

    In the Visible Korean project, serially sectioned images of the pelvis were made from a female cadaver. Outlines of significant structures in the sectioned images were drawn and stacked to build surface models. To improve the accessibility and informational content of these data, a five-step process was designed and implemented. First, 154 pelvic…

  5. Three-Dimensional Adhesion Map Based on Surface and Interfacial Cutting Analysis System for Predicting Adhesion Properties of Composite Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyuman; Byun, Seoungwoo; Cho, Inseong; Ryou, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Yong Min

    2016-09-14

    Using a surface and interfacial cutting analysis system (SAICAS) that can measure the adhesion strength of a composite electrode at a specific depth from the surface, we can subdivide the adhesion strength of a composite electrode into two classes: (1) the adhesion strength between the Al current collector and the cathode composite electrode (FAl-Ca) and (2) the adhesion strength measured at the mid-depth of the cathode composite electrode (Fmid). Both adhesion strengths, FAl-Ca and Fmid, increase with increasing electrode density and loading level. From the SAICAS measurement, we obtain a mathematical equation that governs the adhesion strength of the composite electrodes. This equation revealed a maximum accuracy of 97.2% and 96.1% for FAl-Ca and Fmid, respectively, for four randomly chosen composite electrodes varying in electrode density and loading level. PMID:27398829

  6. A three-dimensional WRF-based precipitation equation and its application in the analysis of roles of surface evaporation in a torrential rainfall event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjie; Cui, Xiaopeng; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-03-01

    Based on the governing equations for water species in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a three-dimensional WRF-based surface precipitation equation was obtained and applied to investigate the surface rainfall processes of a torrential rain event. Sensitivity experiments were performed to further explore roles of surface evaporation in the heavy rainfall event. The results show that the contributions of moisture-related processes to precipitation (QWV, including water vapor local change (QWVL), surface evaporation (QWVE), moisture advection (QWVA), and so on) dominate the torrential rain event, while the contributions of cloud-related processes (QCM) also play indispensable roles whose maximum net contributions could exceed 20%. QWVA dominates the budget of water vapor, while QWVL and QWVE play smaller but by no means negligible roles in the event. Sensitivity experiments show that the changes of surface evaporation affect both moisture-related processes and cloud-related processes, and then influence the intensity and regional redistribution of precipitation. Surface evaporation favors the accumulation of convective available potential energy and enhances the instability of atmosphere, being prone to the development of convective systems. Meanwhile, it also affects the development of vertical motions and cloud systems. Thus accurate estimation of surface evaporation is necessary for accurate simulation and forecast of surface precipitation.

  7. Three-Dimensional Surface Geophysical Exploration of the 200-Series Tanks at the 241-C Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, N.; McNeill, M.; Dunham, Ralph; Glaser, Danney R.

    2014-02-26

    A surface geophysical exploration (SGE) survey using direct current electrical resistivity was conducted within the C Tank Farm in the vicinity of the 200-Series tanks at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This survey was the second successful SGE survey to utilize the Geotection(TM)-180 Resistivity Monitoring System which facilitated a much larger survey size and faster data acquisition rate. The primary objective of the C Tank Farm SGE survey was to provide geophysical data and subsurface imaging results to support the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation, as outlined in the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation / Corrective Measures work plan RPP-PLAN-39114.

  8. "Spot and hop": internal referencing for surface plasmon resonance imaging using a three-dimensional microfluidic flow cell array.

    PubMed

    Eddings, Mark A; Eckman, Josh W; Arana, Carlos A; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Connolly, John E; Gale, Bruce K; Myszka, David G

    2009-02-15

    We have developed a novel referencing technique for surface plasmon resonance imaging systems referred to as "spot and hop." The technique enables internal referencing for individual flow cells in a parallel processing microfluidic network. Internal referencing provides the ability to correct for nonspecific binding and instrument drift, significantly improving data quality at each region of interest. The performance of a 48-flow-cell device was demonstrated through a series of studies, including "rise and fall" time, ligand preconcentration, ligand immobilization, analyte binding, and regeneration tests. Interfacing parallel processing fluidics with imaging systems will significantly expand the throughput and applications of array-based optical biosensors while retaining high data quality.

  9. Quantification of facial movements by optical instruments: surface laser scanning and optoelectronic three-dimensional motion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sidequersky, Fernanda Vincia; Verzé, Laura; Mapelli, Andrea; Ramieri, Guglielmo Amedeo; Sforza, Chiarella

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of displacements of tracing landmarks in standardized facial movements. Forty healthy persons were evaluated in 2 different groups (20 men and 20 women, aged 18-30 years) with optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning. The displacements of tracing landmarks in brow lift and smile were calculated, and the 2 methods (optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning) were compared in healthy persons. Side-related differences were found in the tracing landmark (superciliare) during brow lift movements between both methods (the largest movements were found on the right side, P = 0.044), whereas in smile movements the tracing landmark cheilion did not show significant differences between the 2 sides. In both movements, the differences of the tracing landmark displacements between the 2 systems and sexes were on average less than 2 mm, without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). In conclusion, normal young adult men and women had similar standardized facial movements. The 2 analyzed movements can be measured by both optical instruments with comparable results.

  10. Repeated-measure validation of craniofacial metrics from three-dimensional surface scans: application to medical genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Eric A.; Corner, Brian D.; Li, Peng; Beecher, Robert M.; Deutsch, Curtis

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, medical geneticists have employed visual inspection (anthroposcopy) to clinically evaluate dysmorphology. In the last 20 years, there has been an increasing trend towards quantitative assessment to render diagnosis of anomalies more objective and reliable. These methods have focused on direct anthropometry, using a combination of classical physical anthropology tools and new instruments tailor-made to describe craniofacial morphometry. These methods are painstaking and require that the patient remain still for extended periods of time. Most recently, semiautomated techniques (e.g., structured light scanning) have been developed to capture the geometry of the face in a matter of seconds. In this paper, we establish that direct anthropometry and structured light scanning yield reliable measurements, with remarkably high levels of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability, as well as validity (contrasting the two methods).

  11. Predicting aerodynamic characteristics of vortical flows on three-dimensional configurations using a surface-singularity panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1983-01-01

    A general low-order surface-singularity panel method is used to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of a problem where a wing-tip vortex from one wing closely interacts with an aft mounted wing in a low Reynolds Number flow; i.e., 125,000. Nonlinear effects due to wake roll-up and the influence of the wings on the vortex path are included in the calculation by using a coupled iterative wake relaxation scheme. The interaction also affects the wing pressures and boundary layer characteristics: these effects are also considered using coupled integral boundary layer codes and preliminary calculations using free vortex sheet separation modelling are included. Calculated results are compared with water tunnel experimental data with generally remarkably good agreement.

  12. Plasmonic Colloidosomes as Three-Dimensional SERS Platforms with Enhanced Surface Area for Multiphase Sub-Microliter Toxin Sensing.

    PubMed

    Phan-Quang, Gia Chuong; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Phang, In Yee; Ling, Xing Yi

    2015-08-10

    Colloidosomes are robust microcapsules attractive for molecular sensing because of their characteristic micron size, large specific surface area, and dual-phase stability. However, current colloidosome sensors are limited to qualitative fluorogenic receptor-based detection, which restrict their applicability to a narrow range of molecules. Here, we introduce plasmonic colloidosome constructed from Ag nanocubes as an emulsion-based 3D SERS platform. The colloidosomes exhibit excellent mechanical robustness, flexible size tunability, versatility to merge, and ultrasensitivity in SERS quantitation of food/industrial toxins down to sub-femtomole levels. Using just 0.5 μL of sample volumes, our plasmonic colloidosomes exhibit >3000-fold higher SERS sensitivity over conventional suspension platform. Notably, we demonstrate the first high-throughput multiplex molecular sensing across multiple liquid phases. PMID:26120021

  13. Multiple solutions of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows induced by a stretching flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Ishak, Anuar

    2015-08-01

    New solutions of flow induced by a biorthogonally stretching surface are reported. The flexible membrane has linear stretching rate a along the x-axis and b along the y-axis. A similarity reduction of the Navier-Stokes equations yields a coupled pair of ordinary differential equations governed the single parameter α = b / a . Dual solutions are found in the region αt < α ⩽ 1 , where αt = - 0.2514 . One of the two components of the dual solutions exhibits algebraic decay in the far field. It appears that no self-similar solutions exist for α <αt . It is also shown that the exact solution for flow induced by a unilaterally stretching sheet due to Crane has dual solutions with algebraic decay in the far field.

  14. Free energy calculation using molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory. II. Thermodynamic integration along a spatial reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Tatsuhiko; Ikuta, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Fumio

    2011-01-28

    We propose the thermodynamic integration along a spatial reaction coordinate using the molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory. This method provides a free energy calculation in solution along the reaction coordinate defined by the Cartesian coordinates of the solute atoms. The proposed method is based on the blue moon algorithm which can, in principle, handle any reaction coordinate as far as it is defined by the solute atom positions. In this article, we apply the present method to the complex formation process of the crown ether 18-Crown-6 (18C6) with the potassium ion in an aqueous solution. The separation between the geometric centers of these two molecules is taken to be the reaction coordinate for this system. The potential of mean force (PMF) becomes the maximum at the separation between the molecular centers being ∼4 Å, which can be identified as the free energy barrier in the process of the molecular recognition. In a separation further than the free energy barrier, the PMF is slightly reduced to exhibit a plateau. In the region closer than the free energy barrier, approach of the potassium ion to the center of 18C6 also decreases the PMF. When the potassium ion is accommodated at the center of 18C6, the free energy is lower by -5.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol than that at the above mentioned plateau or converged state. By comparing the results with those from the free energy calculation along the coupling parameters obtained in our previous paper [T. Miyata, Y. Ikuta, and F. Hirata, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 044114 (2010)], it is found that the effective interaction in water between 18C6 and the potassium ion vanishes beyond the molecular-center-separation of 10 Å. Furthermore, the conformation of 18C6 is found to be significantly changed depending upon the 18C6-K(+) distance. A proper conformational sampling and an accurate solvent treatment are crucial for realizing the accurate PMF, and we believe

  15. Three dimensional visualization of engineered bone and soft tissue by combined x-ray micro-diffraction and phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedola, Alessia; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Burghammer, Manfred; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Chen, Rong Chang; Dreossi, Diego; Sodini, Nicola; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Computed x-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is the most valuable tool for a three dimensional (3D) and non destructive analysis of the tissue engineered bone morphology. We used a Talbot interferometer installed at SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron (Trieste, Italy) for a precise 3D reconstruction of both bone and soft connective tissue, regenerated in vivo within a porous scaffold. For the first time the x-ray tomographic reconstructions have been combined with x-ray scanning micro-diffraction measurement on the same sample, in order to give an exhaustive identification of the different tissues participating to the biomineralization process. As a result, we were able to investigate in detail the different densities in the tissues, distinguishing the 3D organization of the amorphous calcium phosphate from the collagen matrix. Our experimental approach allows for a deeper understanding of the role of collagen matrix in the organic-mineral transition, which is a crucial issue for the development of new bio-inspired composites.

  16. Influence of Magnetic Field in Three-Dimensional Flow of Couple Stress Nanofluid over a Nonlinearly Stretching Surface with Convective Condition

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Aziz, Arsalan; Muhammad, Taseer; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three-dimensional flow of couple stress nanofluid subject to the convective boundary condition. Flow is generated due to a nonlinear stretching of the surface in two lateral directions. Temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions are studied through the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Couple stress fluid is considered electrically conducting through a non-uniform applied magnetic field. Mathematical formulation is developed via boundary layer approach. Nonlinear ordinary differential systems are constructed by employing suitable transformations. The resulting systems have been solved for the convergent series solutions of velocities, temperature and nanoparticles concentration profiles. Graphs are sketched to see the effects of different interesting flow parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions. Numerical values are computed to analyze the values of skin-friction coefficients and Nusselt number. PMID:26714259

  17. Three-Dimensional Cu2ZnSnS4 Films with Modified Surface for Thin-Film Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Guo, Jianlai; Liu, Chang; Guo, Hang

    2015-08-12

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an important material in low-cost thin film solar cells and is also a promising candidate for lithium storage. In this work, a novel three-dimensional CZTS film coated with a lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) film is fabricated for the first time and is applied to thin-film lithium-ion batteries. The modified film exhibits an excellent performance of ∼900 mAh g(-1) (450 μAh cm(-2) μm(-1)), even after 75 cycles. Morphology integrity is still maintained after repeated lithiation/delithiation, and the main reaction mechanism is analyzed in detail. The significant findings from this study indicate the striking advantages of modifying both the surface and structure of alloy-based electrodes for energy storage. PMID:26192026

  18. Influence of Magnetic Field in Three-Dimensional Flow of Couple Stress Nanofluid over a Nonlinearly Stretching Surface with Convective Condition.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Aziz, Arsalan; Muhammad, Taseer; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three-dimensional flow of couple stress nanofluid subject to the convective boundary condition. Flow is generated due to a nonlinear stretching of the surface in two lateral directions. Temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions are studied through the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Couple stress fluid is considered electrically conducting through a non-uniform applied magnetic field. Mathematical formulation is developed via boundary layer approach. Nonlinear ordinary differential systems are constructed by employing suitable transformations. The resulting systems have been solved for the convergent series solutions of velocities, temperature and nanoparticles concentration profiles. Graphs are sketched to see the effects of different interesting flow parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions. Numerical values are computed to analyze the values of skin-friction coefficients and Nusselt number. PMID:26714259

  19. Direct design of freeform surfaces and freeform imaging systems with a point-by-point three-dimensional construction-iteration method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Zhu, Jun; Wu, Xiaofei; Jin, Guofan

    2015-04-20

    In this paper, we proposed a general direct design method for three-dimensional freeform surfaces and freeform imaging systems based on a construction-iteration process. In the preliminary surfaces-construction process, the coordinates as well as the surface normals of the data points on the multiple freeform surfaces can be calculated directly considering the rays of multiple fields and different pupil coordinates. Then, an iterative process is employed to significantly improve the image quality or achieve a better mapping relationship of the light rays. Three iteration types which are normal iteration, negative feedback and successive approximation are given. The proposed construction-iteration method is applied in the design of an easy aligned, low F-number off-axis three-mirror system. The primary and tertiary mirrors can be fabricated on a single substrate and form a single element in the final system. The secondary mirror is simply a plane mirror. With this configuration, the alignment difficulty of a freeform system can be greatly reduced. After the preliminary surfaces-construction stage, the freeform surfaces in the optical system can be generated directly from an initial planar system. Then, with the iterative process, the average RMS spot diameter decreased by 75.4% compared with the system before iterations, and the maximum absolute distortion decreased by 94.2%. After further optimization with optical design software, good image quality which is closed to diffraction-limited is achieved. PMID:25969065

  20. New Technology-Large-Area Three- Dimensional Surface Profiling Using Only Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasound-Given 1999 R&D 100 Award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Surface topography, which significantly affects the performance of many industrial components, is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over small areas or with optical scattering methods over larger areas. To develop air-coupled surface profilometry, the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated a Space Act Agreement with Sonix, Inc., through two Glenn programs, the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Program (HITEMP) and COMMTECH. The work resulted in quantitative surface topography profiles obtained using only high-frequency, focused ultrasonic pulses in air. The method is nondestructive, noninvasive, and noncontact, and it does not require light-reflective surfaces. Air surface profiling may be desirable when diamond-tip or laserbased methods are impractical, such as over large areas, when a significant depth range is required, or for curved surfaces. When the configuration is optimized, the method is reasonably rapid and all the quantitative analysis facilities are online, including two- and three-dimensional visualization, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling.

  1. Three-dimensional surface imaging by multi-frequency phase shift profilometry with angle and pattern modeling for system calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhou

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D surface imaging system based on the well-known phase shift profilometry. To yield the analytical solutions, four shifted phases and three high carrier frequencies are used to compute the phase map and reduce the noises that are caused by the inherent optical aberrations and external influences, e.g. different illumination light sources, uneven intensity distribution and automatic image processing algorithms. To reduce the system noise, we propose to model the pattern of the calibration grid in a virtual space. To obtain the modeled pattern, we use a plane to intercept the rays that are modeled by the proposed angle modeling method. In the world coordinate system, the angle and the pattern are computed based on the calibration data. A registration method is used to transform the modeled pattern in the virtual space to the ideal pattern in the world coordinate system by computing the least squared errors between the true points in the modeled pattern and the measured points in the practical pattern. The modeled (true) points are used for re-calibration of the 3D imaging system. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy increases considerably and the MSE is reduced from 0.95 mm to 0.65 mm (32% average error decrease) after replacing the measured points with the true points for calibration.

  2. Silver dendrites decorated filter membrane as highly sensitive and reproducible three dimensional surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Lu, Ya; Zhang, Congyun; Fu, Yizheng; Moeendarbari, Sina; Shelke, Sandesh R.; Liu, Yaqing; Hao, Yaowu

    2016-11-01

    We report a novel and flexible surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on filter membranes decorated with silver dendritic nanostructures. The SERS-active substrate was fabricated via electrodeposition, where hierarchical silver dendrites were uniformly and firmly deposited within and on the top of the porous filter membranes. The morphological evolution of silver dendrites was investigated at different deposition times, and the effect of the components of electrolyte was also studied. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were performed to reveal the distribution of electric filed when Ag dendrites were illuminated with 785 nm light. Such 3D SERS-active substrate exhibits extremely high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. Raman signal sensitivity for rhodamine 6G was tested as high as 1 × 10-11 M with 12% average intensity variations at the major Raman peak. Additionally, the as-synthesized robust substrate displays high stability under an ambient condition for several months. This 3D eco-friendly filter membrane-based substrate provides not only high density of SERS hot spots, but also a very large area for capturing target analytes. It has potential applications for the detection of trace organic contaminants in the environment.

  3. Broad-band three dimensional nanocave ZnO thin film photodetectors enhanced by Au surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengwei; Xu, Zhen; Yin, Min; Lin, Qingfeng; Lu, Linfeng; Xue, Xinzhong; Zhu, Xufei; Cui, Yanxia; Fan, Zhiyong; Ding, Yiling; Tian, Li; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Li, Dongdong

    2016-04-28

    ZnO semiconductor films with periodic 3D nanocave patterns were fabricated by the thermal nanoimprinting technology, which is promising for photodetectors with enhanced light harvesting capability. The Au nanoparticles were further introduced into the ZnO films, which boosts the UV response of ZnO films and extends the photodetection to visible regions. The best UV photoresponse was detected on the 3D nanocave ZnO-Au hybrid films, attributing to the light trapping mechanism of 3D periodic structures and the driving force of the Schottky barrier at the ZnO/Au interface, while the high visible photoresponse of ZnO-Au hybrid films mainly results from the hot electron generation and injection process over the Schottky junctions mediated by Au surface plasmon resonances. The work provides a cost-effective pathway to develop large-scale periodic 3D nanopatterned thin film photodetectors and is promising for the future deployment of high performance optoelectronic devices. PMID:27073045

  4. Comparison of three-dimensional proximal isovelocity surface area to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for quantifying mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Nicolas; Wustmann, Kerstin; Hürzeler, Michael; Wahl, Andreas; de Marchi, Stefano F; Steck, Hélène; Zürcher, Fabian; Seiler, Christian

    2015-04-15

    The aim of our study was to evaluate 3-dimensional (3D) color Doppler proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) as a tool for quantitative assessment of mitral regurgitation (MR) against in vitro and in vivo reference methods. A customized 3D PISA software was validated in vitro against a flowmeter MR phantom. Sixty consecutive patients, with ≥mild MR of any cause, were recruited and the regurgitant volume (RVol) was measured by 2D PISA, 3D peak PISA, and 3D integrated PISA, using transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was used as reference method. Flowmeter RVol was associated with 3D integrated PISA as follows: y = 0.64x + 4.7, r(2) = 0.97, p <0.0001 for TEE and y = 0.88x + 4.07, r(2) = 0.96, p <0.0001 for TTE. The bias and limit of agreement in the Bland-Altman analysis were 6.8 ml [-3.5 to 17.1] for TEE and -0.059 ml [-6.2 to 6.1] for TTE. In vivo, TEE-derived 3D integrated PISA was the most accurate method for MR quantification compared to CMR: r(2) = 0.76, y = 0.95x - 3.95, p <0.0001; 5.1 ml (-14.7 to 26.5). It was superior to TEE 3D peak PISA (r(2) = 0.67, y = 1.00x + 6.20, p <0.0001; -6.3 ml [-33.4 to 21.0]), TEE 2D PISA (r(2) = 0.54, y = 0.76x + 0.18, p <0.0001; 8.4 ml [-20.4 to 37.2]), and TTE-derived measurements. It was also most accurate by receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve 0.99) for the detection of severe MR, RVol cutoff = 48 ml, sensibility 100%, and specificity 96%. RVol and the cutoff to define severe MR were underestimated using the most accurate method. In conclusion, quantitative 3D color Doppler echocardiography of the PISA permits a more accurate MR assessment than conventional techniques and, consequently, should enable an optimized management of patients suffering from MR. PMID:25747111

  5. Three dimensional ultrasonic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G. H.; Benson, S.; Crawford, S.

    1993-03-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques interrogate components with high frequency acoustic energy. A transducer generates the acoustic energy and converts acoustic energy to electrical signals. The acoustic energy is reflected by abrupt changes in modulus and/or density which can be caused by a defect. Thus defects reflect the ultrasonic energy which is converted into electrical signals. Ultrasonic evaluation typically provides a two dimensional image of internal defects. These images are either planar views (C-scans) or cross-sectional views (B-scans). The planar view is generated by raster scanning an ultrasonic transducer over the component and capturing the amplitude of internal reflections. Depth information is generally ignored. The cross-sectional view is generated by scanning the transducer along a single line and capturing the amplitude and time of flight for each internal reflection. The amplitude and time of flight information is converted into an image of the cross section of the component where the scan was performed. By fusing the C-scan information with the B-scan information a three dimension image of the internal structure of the component can be produced. The three dimensional image can be manipulated by rotating and slicing to produce the optimal view of the internal structure. The high frequency ultrasonic energy requires a liquid coupling media and thus applications for imaging in liquid environments are well suited to ultrasonic techniques. Examples of potential ultrasonic imaging applications are: Inside liquid filled tanks, inside the human body, and underwater.

  6. Three-dimensional records of surface displacement on the Superstition Hills fault zone associated with the earthquakes of 24 November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.; Saxton, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Seven quadrilaterals, constructed at broadly distributed points on surface breaks within the Superstition Hills fault zone, were repeatedly remeasured after the pair of 24 November 1987 earthquakes to monitor the growing surface displacement. Changes in the dimensions of the quadrilaterals are recalculated to right-lateral and extensional components at millimeter resolution, and vertical components of change are resolved at 0.2mm precision. The displacement component data for four of the seven quadrilaterals record the complete fault movement with respect to an October 1986 base. The three-dimensional motion vectors all describe nearly linear trajectories throughout the observation period, and they indicate smooth shearing on their respective fault surfaces. The inclination of the shear surfaces is generally nearly vertical, except near the south end of the Superstition Hills fault zone where two strands dip northeastward at about 70??. Surface displacement on these strands is right reverse. Another kind of deformation, superimposed on the fault displacements, has been recorded at all quadrilateral sites. It consists of a northwest-southeast contraction or component of contraction that ranged from 0 to 0.1% of the quadrilateral lengths between November 1987 and April 1988. -from Authors

  7. Biomechanical aspects of segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm for controlled anterior tooth movement: A three-dimensional finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Hiroya; Tominaga, Jun-ya; Hamanaka, Ryo; Sumi, Mayumi; Chiang, Pao-Chang; Tanaka, Motohiro; Koga, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The porpose of this study was to determine the optimal length of power arms for achieving controlled anterior tooth movement in segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm. A three-dimensional finite element method was applied for the simulation of en masse anterior tooth retraction in segmented power arm mechanics. The type of tooth movement, namely, the location of center of rotation of the maxillary central incisor in association with power arm length, was calculated after the retraction force was applied. When a 0.017 × 0.022-in archwire was inserted into the 0.018-in slot bracket, bodily movement was obtained at 9.1 mm length of power arm, namely, at the level of 1.8 mm above the center of resistance. In case a 0.018 × 0.025-in full-size archwire was used, bodily movement of the tooth was produced at the power arm length of 7.0 mm, namely, at the level of 0.3 mm below the center of resistance. Segmented arch mechanics required shorter length of power arms for achieving any type of controlled anterior tooth movement as compared to sliding mechanics. Therefore, this space closing mechanics could be widely applied even for the patients whose gingivobuccal fold is shallow. The segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm could provide higher amount of moment-to-force ratio sufficient for controlled anterior tooth movement without generating friction, and vertical forces when applying retraction force parallel to the occlusal plane. It is, therefore, considered that the segmented power arm mechanics has a simple appliance design and allows more efficient and controllable tooth movement. PMID:25610497

  8. Biomechanical aspects of segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm for controlled anterior tooth movement: A three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hiroya; Tominaga, Jun-Ya; Hamanaka, Ryo; Sumi, Mayumi; Chiang, Pao-Chang; Tanaka, Motohiro; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    The porpose of this study was to determine the optimal length of power arms for achieving controlled anterior tooth movement in segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm. A three-dimensional finite element method was applied for the simulation of en masse anterior tooth retraction in segmented power arm mechanics. The type of tooth movement, namely, the location of center of rotation of the maxillary central incisor in association with power arm length, was calculated after the retraction force was applied. When a 0.017 × 0.022-in archwire was inserted into the 0.018-in slot bracket, bodily movement was obtained at 9.1 mm length of power arm, namely, at the level of 1.8 mm above the center of resistance. In case a 0.018 × 0.025-in full-size archwire was used, bodily movement of the tooth was produced at the power arm length of 7.0 mm, namely, at the level of 0.3 mm below the center of resistance. Segmented arch mechanics required shorter length of power arms for achieving any type of controlled anterior tooth movement as compared to sliding mechanics. Therefore, this space closing mechanics could be widely applied even for the patients whose gingivobuccal fold is shallow. The segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm could provide higher amount of moment-to-force ratio sufficient for controlled anterior tooth movement without generating friction, and vertical forces when applying retraction force parallel to the occlusal plane. It is, therefore, considered that the segmented power arm mechanics has a simple appliance design and allows more efficient and controllable tooth movement.

  9. The three-dimensional nonadiabatic dynamics calculation of DH(2)(+) and HD(2)(+) systems by using the trajectory surface hopping method based on the Zhu-Nakamura theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-03-21

    A theoretical investigation on the nonadiabatic processes of the full three-dimensional D(+)+H(2) and H(+)+D(2) reaction systems has been performed by using trajectory surface hopping (TSH) method based on the Zhu-Nakamura (ZN) theory. This ZN-TSH method refers to not only classically allowed hops but also classically forbidden hops. The potential energy surface constructed by Kamisaka et al. is employed in the calculation. A new iterative method is proposed to yield the two-dimensional seam surface from the topography of the adiabatic potential surfaces, in which the inconvenience of directly solving the first-order partial differential equation is avoided. The cross sections of these two systems are calculated for three competing channels of the reactive charge transfer, the nonreactive charge transfer, and the reactive noncharge transfer, for ground rovibrational state of H(2) or D(2). Also, this study provides reaction probabilities of these three processes for the total angular momentum J=0 and ground initial vibrational state of H(2) or D(2). The calculated results from ZN-TSH method are in good agreement with the exact quantum calculations and the experimental measurements.

  10. ChromAlign: A two-step algorithmic procedure for time alignment of three-dimensional LC-MS chromatographic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sadygov, Rovshan G; Maroto, Fernando Martin; Hühmer, Andreas F R

    2006-12-15

    We present an algorithmic approach to align three-dimensional chromatographic surfaces of LC-MS data of complex mixture samples. The approach consists of two steps. In the first step, we prealign chromatographic profiles: two-dimensional projections of chromatographic surfaces. This is accomplished by correlation analysis using fast Fourier transforms. In this step, a temporal offset that maximizes the overlap and dot product between two chromatographic profiles is determined. In the second step, the algorithm generates correlation matrix elements between full mass scans of the reference and sample chromatographic surfaces. The temporal offset from the first step indicates a range of the mass scans that are possibly correlated, then the correlation matrix is calculated only for these mass scans. The correlation matrix carries information on highly correlated scans, but it does not itself determine the scan or time alignment. Alignment is determined as a path in the correlation matrix that maximizes the sum of the correlation matrix elements. The computational complexity of the optimal path generation problem is reduced by the use of dynamic programming. The program produces time-aligned surfaces. The use of the temporal offset from the first step in the second step reduces the computation time for generating the correlation matrix and speeds up the process. The algorithm has been implemented in a program, ChromAlign, developed in C++ language for the .NET2 environment in WINDOWS XP. In this work, we demonstrate the applications of ChromAlign to alignment of LC-MS surfaces of several datasets: a mixture of known proteins, samples from digests of surface proteins of T-cells, and samples prepared from digests of cerebrospinal fluid. ChromAlign accurately aligns the LC-MS surfaces we studied. In these examples, we discuss various aspects of the alignment by ChromAlign, such as constant time axis shifts and warping of chromatographic surfaces.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D

  12. Three-dimensional control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation coupled with a lower-dimensional surface fracture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Raheel; Edwards, Michael G.; Lamine, Sadok; Huisman, Bastiaan A. H.; Pal, Mayur

    2015-12-01

    A novel cell-centred control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation (CVD-MPFA) finite-volume formulation is presented for discrete fracture-matrix simulations on unstructured grids in three-dimensions (3D). The grid is aligned with fractures and barriers which are then modelled as lower-dimensional surface interfaces located between the matrix cells in the physical domain. The three-dimensional pressure equation is solved in the matrix domain coupled with a two-dimensional (2D) surface pressure equation solved over fracture networks via a novel surface CVD-MPFA formulation. The CVD-MPFA formulation naturally handles fractures with anisotropic permeabilities on unstructured grids. Matrix-fracture fluxes are expressed in terms of matrix and fracture pressures and define the transfer function, which is added to the lower-dimensional flow equation and couples the three-dimensional and surface systems. An additional transmission condition is used between matrix cells adjacent to low permeable fractures to couple the velocity and pressure jump across the fractures. Convergence and accuracy of the lower-dimensional fracture model is assessed for highly anisotropic fractures having a range of apertures and permeability tensors. A transport equation for tracer flow is coupled via the Darcy flux for single and intersecting fractures. The lower-dimensional approximation for intersecting fractures avoids the more restrictive CFL condition corresponding to the equi-dimensional approximation with explicit time discretisation. Lower-dimensional fracture model results are compared with equi-dimensional model results. Fractures and barriers are efficiently modelled by lower-dimensional interfaces which yield comparable results to those of the equi-dimensional model. Pressure continuity is built into the model across highly conductive fractures, leading to reduced local degrees of freedom in the CVD-MPFA approximation. The formulation is applied to geologically complex

  13. Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Arrival Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion for Three-Dimensional Seismic Structure Around SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijiang; Maceira, Monica; Roux, Philippe; Thurber, Clifford

    2014-11-01

    We incorporate body-wave arrival time and surface-wave dispersion data into a joint inversion for three-dimensional P-wave and S-wave velocity structure of the crust surrounding the site of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth. The contributions of the two data types to the inversion are controlled by the relative weighting of the respective equations. We find that the trade-off between fitting the two data types, controlled by the weighting, defines a clear optimal solution. Varying the weighting away from the optimal point leads to sharp increases in misfit for one data type with only modest reduction in misfit for the other data type. All the acceptable solutions yield structures with similar primary features, but the smaller-scale features change substantially. When there is a lower relative weight on the surface-wave data, it appears that the solution over-fits the body-wave data, leading to a relatively rough V s model, whereas for the optimal weighting, we obtain a relatively smooth model that is able to fit both the body-wave and surface-wave observations adequately.

  14. Effect of non-isothermal deposition on surface morphology and microstructure of uniform molten aluminum alloy droplets applied to three-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Han-song; Li, He-jun; Qi, Le-hua; Luo, Jun; Zhong, Song-yi; Wu, Yao-feng

    2015-01-01

    Non-isothermal deposition of uniform molten droplets as basic building blocks has a great influence on the geometric profile and microstructure of metallic components fabricated by the drop-based three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. In this paper, the thermal and dynamic behaviors of molten aluminum droplets during non-isothermal deposition were studied numerically and experimentally. The result shows that local solidification and interfacial re-melting occur during the initial period of non-isothermal deposition. The re-melting in microseconds depends greatly on the impacting droplet temperature, the deposition surface temperature, and the thermal contact resistance. Further, the coupling action of subsequent solidification and oscillation behaviors of aluminum droplet fixed on the target surface was also investigated. It is interesting to find that the formation and distribution of the solidified surface morphology, such as the typical micron-sized ripples, are significantly affected by layer-by-layer solidification and underdamped oscillation in the remaining molten metal. Based on the above research, a semiquantitative relationship between external morphology and internal microstructure was proposed, which was further certified by investigating the piled vertical columns. The works should be helpful for the process optimization and non-destructive detection of drop-based 3D printing techniques.

  15. High-resolution, three-dimensional modeling of human leukocyte antigen class I structure and surface electrostatic potential reveals the molecular basis for alloantibody binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Dafforn, Timothy R; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Halsall, David J; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2011-11-01

    The potential of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to stimulate humoral alloimmunity depends on the orientation, accessibility and physiochemical properties of polymorphic amino acids. We have generated high-resolution structural and physiochemical models of all common HLA class I alleles and analyzed the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on surface electrostatic potential. Atomic resolution three-dimensional structural models of HLA class I molecules were generated using the MODELLER computer algorithm. The molecular surface electrostatic potential was calculated using the DelPhi program. To confirm that electrostatic surface topography reflects known HLA B cell epitopes, we examined Bw4 and Bw6 and ascertained the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on their tertiary and physiochemical composition. The HLA protein structures generated performed well when subjected to stereochemical and energy-based testing for structural integrity. The electrostatic pattern and conformation of Bw4 and Bw6 epitopes are maintained among HLA molecules even when expressed in a different structural context. Importantly, variation in epitope amino acid composition does not always translate into a different electrostatic motif, providing an explanation for serologic cross-reactivity. Mutations of critical amino acids that abrogate antibody binding also induce distinct changes in epitope electrostatic properties. In conclusion, high-resolution structural modeling provides a physiochemical explanation for serologic patterns of antibody binding and provides novel insights into HLA immunogenicity. PMID:21840357

  16. Monitoring groundwater-surface water interaction using time-series and time-frequency analysis of transient three-dimensional electrical resistivity changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse resistivity imaging is increasingly used to monitor hydrologic processes. Compared to conventional hydrologic measurements, surface time-lapse resistivity provides superior spatial coverage in two or three dimensions, potentially high-resolution information in time, and information in the absence of wells. However, interpretation of time-lapse electrical tomograms is complicated by the ever-increasing size and complexity of long-term, three-dimensional (3-D) time series conductivity data sets. Here we use 3-D surface time-lapse electrical imaging to monitor subsurface electrical conductivity variations associated with stage-driven groundwater-surface water interactions along a stretch of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 near Richland, Washington, USA. We reduce the resulting 3-D conductivity time series using both time-series and time-frequency analyses to isolate a paleochannel causing enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions. Correlation analysis on the time-lapse imaging results concisely represents enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions within the paleochannel, and provides information concerning groundwater flow velocities. Time-frequency analysis using the Stockwell (S) transform provides additional information by identifying the stage periodicities driving groundwater-surface water interactions due to upstream dam operations, and identifying segments in time-frequency space when these interactions are most active. These results provide new insight into the distribution and timing of river water intrusion into the Hanford 300 Area, which has a governing influence on the behavior of a uranium plume left over from historical nuclear fuel processing operations.

  17. Explicitly correlated three-dimensional potential-energy surface of the thiazyl-hydride-helium weakly bound system and implications for HSN detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajili, Y.; Ben Abdallah, D.; Mogren Al-Mogren, M.; Lique, F.; Francisco, J. S.; Hochlaf, M.

    2016-07-01

    The intermonomer three-dimensional potential-energy surface (3D PES) of the thiazyl-hydride-helium (HSN-He) weakly bound molecular system is generated using the explicitly correlated coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations. The 3D PES is mapped in Jacobi coordinates. This potential-energy surface shows a unique potential well at planar configurations. The depth of this potential is 74.4 c m-1 . This 3D PES is incorporated into a close-coupling and coupled-states quantum dynamical treatment of nuclear motions to deduce the rotational (de-)excitation of HSN by He for energies up to 1400 c m-1 . After averaging over a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, the collisional rate coefficients are derived for temperatures ranging from 5 to 200 K. These data are essential for the identification of HSN molecules in astrophysical media. A comparison between thionitrosyl-hydride—He and HSN-He is performed.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of the water-insoluble protein crambin in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and its minimal solvent-exposed surface.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Chul; Juranić, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Markley, John L

    2006-04-01

    We chose crambin, a hydrophobic and water-insoluble protein originally isolated from the seeds of the plant Crambe abyssinica, as a model for NMR investigations of membrane-associated proteins. We produced isotopically labeled crambin(P22,L25) (variant of crambin containing Pro22 and Leu25) as a cleavable fusion with staphylococcal nuclease and refolded the protein by an approach that has proved successful for the production of proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. We used NMR spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein in two membrane-mimetic environments: in a mixed aqueous-organic solvent (75%/25%, acetone/water) and in DPC micelles. With the sample in the mixed solvent, it was possible to determine (>NH...OC<) hydrogen bonds directly by the detection of (h3)J(NC)' couplings. H-bonds determined in this manner were utilized in the refinement of the NMR-derived protein structures. With the protein in DPC (dodecylphosphocholine) micelles, we used manganous ion as an aqueous paramagnetic probe to determine the surface of crambin that is shielded by the detergent. With the exception of the aqueous solvent exposed loop containing residues 20 and 21, the protein surface was protected by DPC. This suggests that the protein may be similarly embedded in physiological membranes. The strategy described here for the expression and structure determination of crambin should be applicable to structural and functional studies of membrane active toxins and small membrane proteins.

  19. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of the cranial nerves and their nuclei correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Johnson, Aleksandra; Chua, Beng Choon; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the cranial nerves and their nuclei is critical in clinical practice, medical research and education. However to our best knowledge, a comprehensive source capturing full three-dimensional (3D) relationships of the cranial nerves along with surrounding neuroanatomy is not yet available. This work addresses the construction and validation of an atlas of the cranial nerves with their nuclei, correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature, and magnetic resonance imaging. The atlas is interactive, stereotactic, 3D, detailed, fully parcellated, completely labeled, consistent in 3D, electronically dissectible, and scalable. A 3D geometrical model of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves with nuclei was created from an in vivo magnetic resonance scan exploiting in-house developed tools and methods, including tubular and iso-surface modeling, interactive editing, and mesh compression. This virtual model contains 439 objects with 121 different names, labeled based on Terminologia Anatomica. The model was integrated with a 3D atlas of structure, vasculature and tracts developed earlier, and correlated with sectional magnetic resonance anatomy. The whole model or its components can be interactively rotated, zoomed, panned, and add or removed with a simple few clicks. The studied material can be adaptively selected in an in-depth manner by using controls available in the user interface. This atlas is potentially useful for anatomy browsing, user self-testing, automatic student assessment, preparing materials, and localization in clinical neurology.

  20. Generation of bioartificial heart tissue by combining a three-dimensional gel-based cardiac construct with decellularized small intestinal submucosa.

    PubMed

    Vukadinovic-Nikolic, Zlata; Andrée, Birgit; Dorfman, Suzanne E; Pflaum, Michael; Horvath, Tibor; Lux, Marco; Venturini, Letizia; Bär, Antonia; Kensah, George; Lara, Angelica Roa; Tudorache, Igor; Cebotari, Serghei; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2014-02-01

    The in vitro generation of a bioartificial cardiac construct (CC) represents a promising tool for the repair of ischemic heart tissue. Several approaches to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro have been conducted. The main drawback of these studies is the insufficient size of the resulting construct for clinical applications. The focus of this study was the generation of an artificial three-dimensional (3D), contractile, and suturable myocardial patch by combining a gel-based CC with decellularized porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS), thereby engineering an artificial tissue of 11 cm² in size. The alignment and morphology of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (rCMs) in SIS-CC complexes were investigated as well as the re-organization of primary endothelial cells which were co-isolated in the rCM preparation. The ability of a rat heart endothelial cell line (RHE-A) to re-cellularize pre-existing vessel structures within the SIS or a biological vascularized matrix (BioVaM) was determined. SIS-CC contracted spontaneously, uniformly, and rhythmically with an average rate of 200 beats/min in contrast to undirected contractions observed in CC without SIS support. rCM exhibited an elongated morphology with well-defined sarcomeric structures oriented along the longitudinal axis in the SIS-CC, whereas round-shaped and random-arranged rCM were observed in CC. Electric coupling of rCM was demonstrated by microelectrode array measurements. A dense network of CD31⁺/eNOS⁺ cells was detected as permeating the whole construct. Superficial supplementation of RHE-A cells to SIS-CC led to the migration of these cells through the CC, resulting in the re-population of pre-existing vessel structures within the decelluarized SIS. By infusion of RHE-A cells into the BioVaM venous and arterial pedicles, a re-population of the BioVaM vessel bed as well as distribution of RHE-A cells throughout the CC was achieved. Rat endothelial cells within the CC were in contact with RHE-A cells

  1. A combined NDE-fatigue testing and three-dimensional image processing study of a SiC/SiC composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Ghosn, Louis J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Rauser, Richard W.; Zima, John D.

    2004-07-01

    Non destructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical technology for improving the quality of a component in a cost-sparing production environment. NDE detects variations in a material or a component without altering or damaging the test piece. Using these techniques to improve the production process requires characterization of the faults and their influence on the component performance. This task depends on the material properties and on the complexity of the component geometry. Hence, the NDE technique is applied to study the structural durability of ceramic matrix composite materials used in gas turbine engine applications. Matrix voids are common anomalies generated during the melt infiltration process. The effects of these matrix porosities are usually associated with a reduction in the initial overall composite stiffness and an increase in the thermal conductivity of the component. Furthermore, since the role of the matrix as well as the coating is to protect the fibers from the harsh engine environments, the current design approach is to limit the design stress level of CMC components to always be below the first matrix cracking stress. In this study, the effect of matrix porosity on the matrix cracking stress is evaluated using a combined fatigue tensile testing, NDE, and 3 D image processing approach. Computed Tomography (CT) is utilized as the NDE technique to characterize the initial matrix porosity"s locations and sizes in various CMC test specimens. The three dimensional volume rendering approach is exercised to construct the 3 D volume of the specimen based on the geometric modeling of the specimen's CT results using image analysis and geometric modeling software. The same scanned specimens are then fatigue tested to various maximum loads and temperatures to depict the matrix cracking locations in relation to the initial damage. The specimen are then re-scanned and checked for further anomalies and obvious changes in the damage state. Finally, rendered

  2. Three-Dimensional Hierarchical Plasmonic Nano-Architecture Enhanced Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Immuno-Sensor for Cancer Biomarker Detection in Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K.; Zhang, Jianming; Suri, Savan; Evans, Rebecca; Petros, William P.; Gibson, Laura F.; Ma, Dongling; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical plasmonic nano-architecture has been designed for a sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) immuno-sensor for protein biomarker detection. The capture antibody molecules are immobilized on a plasmonic gold triangle nano-array pattern. On the other hand, the detection antibody molecules are linked to the gold nano-star@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich nanoparticles. When protein biomarkers are present, the sandwich nanoparticles are captured over the gold triangle nano-array, forming a confined 3D plasmonic field, leading to the enhanced electromagnetic field in intensity and in 3D space. As a result, the Raman reporter molecules are exposed to a high density of “hot spots”, which amplifies the Raman signal remarkably, improving the sensitivity of the SERS immuno-sensor. This SERS immuno-sensor exhibits a wide linear range (0.1 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL), and a low limit of detection (7 fg/mL) toward human immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein in the buffer solution. This biosensor has been successfully used for detection of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the human blood plasma from clinical breast cancer patient samples. PMID:23659430

  3. The properties of photonic band gap and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized photonic crystals as the mixed polarized modes considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gap (PBG) and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, in which the homogeneous magnetized plasma spheres are immersed in the homogeneous dielectric background, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The dispersive properties of all of the EM modes are studied because the PBG is not only for the extraordinary and ordinary modes but also for the mixed polarized modes. The equations for PBGs also are theoretically deduced. The numerical results show that the PBG and a flatbands region can be observed. The effects of the dielectric constant of dielectric background, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the dispersive properties of all of the EM modes in such 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively. Theoretical simulations show that the PBG can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs with similar structure, the larger PBG can be obtained in such 3D MPPCs. It is also shown that the upper edge of flatbands region cannot be tuned by the filling factor and dielectric constant of dielectric background, but it can be manipulated by the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency.

  4. Similarity solution to three dimensional boundary layer flow of second grade nanofluid past a stretching surface with thermal radiation and heat source/sink

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, T.; Muhammad, Taseer; Shehzad, S. A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-01-15

    Development of human society greatly depends upon solar energy. Heat, electricity and water from nature can be obtained through solar power. Sustainable energy generation at present is a critical issue in human society development. Solar energy is regarded one of the best sources of renewable energy. Hence the purpose of present study is to construct a model for radiative effects in three-dimensional of nanofluid. Flow of second grade fluid by an exponentially stretching surface is considered. Thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects are taken into account in presence of heat source/sink and chemical reaction. Results are derived for the dimensionless velocities, temperature and concentration. Graphs are plotted to examine the impacts of physical parameters on the temperature and concentration. Numerical computations are presented to examine the values of skin-friction coefficients, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is observed that the values of skin-friction coefficients are more for larger values of second grade parameter. Moreover the radiative effects on the temperature and concentration are quite reverse.

  5. Converged three-dimensional quantum mechanical reaction probabilities for the F + H2 reaction on a potential energy surface with realistic entrance and exit channels and comparisons to results for three other surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Gillian C.; Halvick, Philippe; Zhao, Meishan; Truhlar, Donald G.; Yu, Chin-Hui; Kouri, Donald J.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    Accurate three-dimensional quantum mechanical reaction probabilities are presented for the reaction F + H2 yields HF + H on the new global potential energy surface 5SEC for total angular momentum J = 0 over a range of translational energies from 0.15 to 4.6 kcal/mol. It is found that the v-prime = 3 HF vibrational product state has a threshold as low as for v-prime = 2.

  6. The properties of the extraordinary mode and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals based on the magneto-optical Voigt effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Shao-Bin E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Tang, Yi-Jun

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the properties of the extraordinary mode and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic lattices that are composed of the core tellurium (Te) spheres with surrounded by the homogeneous magnetized plasma shells inserted in the air, are theoretically investigated in detail by the plane wave expansion method, as the magneto-optical Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The optical switching or wavelength division multiplexer can be realized by the proposed 3D MPPCs. Our analyses demonstrate that the complete photonic band gaps (PBGs) and two flatbands regions for the extraordinary mode can be observed obviously. PBGs can be tuned by the radius of core Te sphere, the plasma density and the external magnetic field. The flatbands regions are determined by the existence of surface plasmon modes. Numerical simulations also show that if the thickness of magnetized plasma shell is larger than a threshold value, the band structures of the extraordinary mode will be similar to those obtained from the same structure containing the pure magnetized plasma spheres. In this case, the band structures also will not be affected by the inserted core spheres. It is also provided that the upper edges of two flatbands regions will not depend on the topology of lattice. However, the frequencies of lower edges of two flatbands regions will be convergent to the different constants for different lattices, as the thickness of magnetized plasma shell is close to zero.

  7. A Three-Dimensional Numerical Model of Surface Waves in the Surf Zone and Longshore Current Generation over a Plane Beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Johns, B.

    1998-10-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is developed for the propagation of shallow-water short-period surface waves in the surf zone and longshore current generation over a plane beach topography. This model, which is based on Reynolds-averaged non-linear shallow-water (NSW) equations and, hence, includes implicitlythe classical radiation stress concept, resolves time- and space-dependence of the sea surface elevation and the velocity fields during one wave cycle (short-wave-resolving). The generation of turbulence by wave breaking and vertical fluid shear above the beach is parameterized by the application of a generalized turbulence energy closure scheme. The instantaneous position of the moving shoreline is determined from the model equations during the simulated propagation process. In the case of a single incoming wave train, the wave amplitude, wave period and angle of incidence are prescribed at an offshore open boundary by application of a forced radiation condition. For uniform alongshore topographic conditions, when cyclic boundary conditions are appropriate at alongshore open boundaries whose positions are determined by the alongshore component of wavelength in an incoming single wave train, the model is used to determine the (mean) longshore current during one wave cycle. It is shown that the maximum longshore depth-averaged current occurs at an approximate offshore position where the generation of turbulence energy through wave breaking is a maximum. It is further shown that the cross-shore gradient of the longshore momentum flux is of predominant importance in generating longshore currents. Experiments are described that determine the dependence of the computed longshore current on the bottom roughness and the length scale prescription in that part of the turbulence closure scheme pertaining to the parameterization of the wave breaking process. The implications of the model results are discussed in the context of the longshore bedload transport of

  8. Three-dimensional surface-enhanced Raman scattering hotspots in spherical colloidal superstructure for identification and detection of drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Honglin; Wang, Bin; Weng, Shizhuang; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-01-01

    Rapid component separation and robust surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) identification of drugs in real human urine remain an attractive challenge because of the sample complexity, low molecular affinity for metal surface, and inefficient use of hotspots in one- or two-dimensional (2D) geometries. Here, we developed a 5 min strategy of cyclohexane (CYH) extraction for separating amphetamines from human urine. Simultaneously, an oil-in-water emulsion method is used to assemble monodisperse Ag nanoparticles in the CYH phase into spherical colloidal superstructures in the aqueous phase. These superstructures create three-dimensional (3D) SERS hotspots which exist between every two adjacent particles in 3D space, break the traditional 2D limitation, and extend the hotspots into the third dimension along the z-axis. In this platform, a conservative estimate of Raman enhancement factor is larger than 10(7), and the same CYH extraction processing results in a high acceptability and enrichment of drug molecules in 3D hotspots which demonstrates excellent stability and reproducibility and is suitable for the quantitative examination of amphetamines in both aqueous and organic phases. Parallel ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) examinations corroborate an excellent performance of our SERS platform for the quantitative analysis of methamphetamine (MA) in both aqueous solution and real human urine, of which the detection limits reach 1 and 10 ppb, respectively, with tolerable signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, SERS examinations on different proportions of MA and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in human urine demonstrate an excellent capability of multiplex quantification of ultratrace analytes. By virtue of a spectral classification algorithm, we realize the rapid and accurate recognition of weak Raman signals of amphetamines at trace levels and also clearly distinguish various proportions of multiplex components. Our platform for detecting drugs

  9. The properties of the extraordinary mode and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals based on the magneto-optical Voigt effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Tang, Yi-Jun

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the properties of the extraordinary mode and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic lattices that are composed of the core tellurium (Te) spheres with surrounded by the homogeneous magnetized plasma shells inserted in the air, are theoretically investigated in detail by the plane wave expansion method, as the magneto-optical Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The optical switching or wavelength division multiplexer can be realized by the proposed 3D MPPCs. Our analyses demonstrate that the complete photonic band gaps (PBGs) and two flatbands regions for the extraordinary mode can be observed obviously. PBGs can be tuned by the radius of core Te sphere, the plasma density and the external magnetic field. The flatbands regions are determined by the existence of surface plasmon modes. Numerical simulations also show that if the thickness of magnetized plasma shell is larger than a threshold value, the band structures of the extraordinary mode will be similar to those obtained from the same structure containing the pure magnetized plasma spheres. In this case, the band structures also will not be affected by the inserted core spheres. It is also provided that the upper edges of two flatbands regions will not depend on the topology of lattice. However, the frequencies of lower edges of two flatbands regions will be convergent to the different constants for different lattices, as the thickness of magnetized plasma shell is close to zero.

  10. Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Arrival Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data for Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure Around SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Maceira, M.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    The crust around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at depth (SAFOD) has been the subject of many geophysical studies aimed at characterizing in detail the fault zone structure and elucidating the lithologies and physical properties of the surrounding rocks. Seismic methods in particular have revealed the complex two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the crustal volume around SAFOD and the strong velocity reduction in the fault damage zone. In this study we conduct a joint inversion using body-wave arrival times and surface-wave dispersion data to image the P-and S-wave velocity structure of the upper crust surrounding SAFOD. The two data types have complementary strengths - the body-wave data have good resolution at depth, albeit only where there are crossing rays between sources and receivers, whereas the surface waves have very good near-surface resolution and are not dependent on the earthquake source distribution because they are derived from ambient noise. The body-wave data are from local earthquakes and explosions, comprising the dataset analyzed by Zhang et al. (2009). The surface-wave data are for Love waves from ambient noise correlations, and are from Roux et al. (2011). The joint inversion code is based on the regional-scale version of the double-difference (DD) tomography algorithm tomoDD. The surface-wave inversion code that is integrated into the joint inversion algorithm is from Maceira and Ammon (2009). The propagator matrix solver in the algorithm DISPER80 (Saito, 1988) is used for the forward calculation of dispersion curves from layered velocity models. We examined how the structural models vary as we vary the relative weighting of the fit to the two data sets and in comparison to the previous separate inversion results. The joint inversion with the 'optimal' weighting shows more clearly the U-shaped local structure from the Buzzard Canyon Fault on the west side of SAF to the Gold Hill Fault on the east side.

  11. Noninvasive Three-dimensional Cardiac Activation Imaging from Body Surface Potential Maps: A Computational and Experimental Study on a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengzong; Liu, Zhongming; Zhang, Xin; Pogwizd, Steven; He, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac activation imaging (3-DCAI) is a recently developed technique that aims at imaging the activation sequence throughout the 3-D volume of myocardium. 3-DCAI entails the modeling and estimation of the cardiac equivalent current density (ECD) distribution from which the local activation time within myocardium is determined as the time point with the peak amplitude of local ECD estimates. In this paper, we report, for the first time, an experimental study of the performance and applicability of 3-DCAI as judged by measured 3-D cardiac activation sequence using 3-D intra-cardiac mapping, in a group of 4 healthy rabbits during ventricular pacing. During the experiments, the body surface potentials and the intramural bipolar electrical recordings were simultaneously measured in a closed-chest condition to allow for a rigorous evaluation of the noninvasive 3-DCAI algorithm using the intra-cardiac mapping. The ventricular activation sequence non-invasively imaged from the body surface measurements by using 3-DCAI was generally in agreement with that obtained from the invasive intra-cardiac recordings. The overall difference between them, quantified as the root mean square (RMS) error, was 7.42±0.61 ms, and the normalized difference, quantified as the relative error (RE), was 0.24±0.03. The distance from the reconstructed site of initial activation to the actual pacing site, defined as the localization error (LE), was 5.47±1.57 mm. In addition, computer simulations were conducted to provide additional assessment of the performance of the 3-DCAI algorithm using a realistic-geometry rabbit heart-torso model. Averaged over 9 pacing sites, the RE and LE were 0.20±0.07 and 4.56±1.12 mm, respectively, for single-pacing, when 20 μV Gaussian white noise was added to the body surface potentials at 53 body surface locations. Averaged over 8 pairs of dual pacing, the RE was 0.25±0.06 for 20 μV additive noise. The present results obtained through

  12. Transcriptome Dynamics of Developing Photoreceptors in Three-Dimensional Retina Cultures Recapitulates Temporal Sequence of Human Cone and Rod Differentiation Revealing Cell Surface Markers and Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Brooks, Matthew; Homma, Kohei; Zou, Jizhong; Chaitankar, Vijender; Rao, Mahendra; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-12-01

    The derivation of three-dimensional (3D) stratified neural retina from pluripotent stem cells has permitted investigations of human photoreceptors. We have generated a H9 human embryonic stem cell subclone that carries a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter under the control of the promoter of cone-rod homeobox (CRX), an established marker of postmitotic photoreceptor precursors. The CRXp-GFP reporter replicates endogenous CRX expression in vitro when the H9 subclone is induced to form self-organizing 3D retina-like tissue. At day 37, CRX+ photoreceptors appear in the basal or middle part of neural retina and migrate to apical side by day 67. Temporal and spatial patterns of retinal cell type markers recapitulate the predicted sequence of development. Cone gene expression is concomitant with CRX, whereas rod differentiation factor neural retina leucine zipper protein (NRL) is first observed at day 67. At day 90, robust expression of NRL and its target nuclear receptor NR2E3 is evident in many CRX+ cells, while minimal S-opsin and no rhodopsin or L/M-opsin is present. The transcriptome profile, by RNA-seq, of developing human photoreceptors is remarkably concordant with mRNA and immunohistochemistry data available for human fetal retina although many targets of CRX, including phototransduction genes, exhibit a significant delay in expression. We report on temporal changes in gene signatures, including expression of cell surface markers and transcription factors; these expression changes should assist in isolation of photoreceptors at distinct stages of differentiation and in delineating coexpression networks. Our studies establish the first global expression database of developing human photoreceptors, providing a reference map for functional studies in retinal cultures. PMID:26235913

  13. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of head muscles and glands correlated with cranial nerves and surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Chua, Beng Choon; Johnson, Aleksandra; Qian, Guoyu; Poh, Lan Eng; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Bivi, Aminah; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2013-04-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relationships between head muscles and cranial nerves innervating them are complicated. Existing sources present these relationships in illustrations, radiologic scans, or autopsy photographs, which are limited for learning and use. Developed electronic atlases are limited in content, quality, functionality, and/or presentation. We create a truly 3D interactive, stereotactic and high quality atlas, which provides spatial relationships among head muscles, glands and cranial nerves, and correlates them to surface and sectional neuroanatomy. The head muscles and glands were created from a 3T scan by contouring them and generating 3D models. They were named and structured according to Terminologia anatomica. The muscles were divided into: extra-ocular, facial, masticatory and other muscles, and glands into mouth and other glands. The muscles, glands (and also head) were placed in a stereotactic coordinate system. This content was integrated with cranial nerves and neuroanatomy created earlier. To explore this complex content, a scalable user interface was designed with 12 modules including central nervous system (cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord), cranial nerves, muscles, glands, arterial system, venous system, tracts, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, white matter, visual system, head. Anatomy exploration operations include compositing/decompositing, individual/group selection, 3D view-index mapping, 3D labeling, highlighting, distance measuring, 3D brain cutting, and axial/coronal/sagittal triplanar display. To our best knowledge, this is the first truly 3D, stereotactic, interactive, fairly complete atlas of head muscles, and the first attempt to create a 3D stereotactic atlas of glands. Its use ranges from education of students and patients to research to potential clinical applications.

  14. Fermi Surface of Three-Dimensional La1 -xSrxMnO3 Explored by Soft-X-Ray ARPES: Rhombohedral Lattice Distortion and its Effect on Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, L. L.; Krempaský, J.; Staub, U.; Rogalev, V. A.; Schmitt, T.; Shi, M.; Blaha, P.; Mishchenko, A. S.; Veligzhanin, A. A.; Zubavichus, Y. V.; Tsetlin, M. B.; Volfová, H.; Braun, J.; Minár, J.; Strocov, V. N.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic structure of the three-dimensional colossal magnetoresistive perovskite La1 -xSrxMnO3 has been established using soft-x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with its intrinsically sharp definition of three-dimensional electron momentum. The experimental results show much weaker polaronic coupling compared to the bilayer manganites and are consistent with the theoretical band structure including the empirical Hubbard parameter U. The experimental Fermi surface unveils the canonical topology of alternating three-dimensional electron spheres and hole cubes, with their shadow contours manifesting the rhombohedral lattice distortion. This picture has been confirmed by one-step photoemission calculations including displacement of the apical oxygen atoms. The rhombohedral distortion is neutral to the Jahn-Teller effect and thus polaronic coupling, but affects the double-exchange electron hopping and thus the colossal magnetoresistance effect.

  15. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  16. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  17. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surface to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled by Coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The ICAS fills the need for high speed automated organic analysis by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry sensors, and also by radionuclide sensors which combines alpha, beta, and gamma counting.

  18. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, F. F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18-125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the non-plane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ~200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high stress

  19. A Three-dimensional Model for the Estimation of the Vertical Structure of Precipitation and Surface Rain Rates: Application to Stratiform and Convective Rainfall Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Barros, A. P.

    2008-05-01

    In this work, we present a three-dimensional model with detailed microphysics for warm rain that emulates the transient evolution of the spatial drop size distribution (DSDs) in active storm systems. More broadly, this work is a part of an ongoing effort to merge dynamic modeling of the DSD and radar/satellite rainfall observations with the ultimate goal to improve the estimation of the vertical structure of precipitation and surface rain rates. The 3D model is evaluated against different data set of real rainfall events that include stratiform/convective configurations to estimate rain rate over a large area. A dynamic simulation of the evolution of the drop spectra is performed by using realistic boundary conditions retrieved from real rain events. Measured reflectivity fields from TRMM 2A25 products are imposed at the top of the atmospheric domain as an input to the model. In addition, the 3D model incorporates estimation of the 3D air velocity fields characterizing the simulated different rainfall regimes. The modeled temporal evolution of selected integral parameters (reflectivity: Z; rain rate: RNT) is compared against radar and TRMM 2A25 data at different heights throughout the atmospheric domain and against ground based (disdrometer, rain gauges) observations. Average residuals between 3D model and TRMM data (Z: 5%; RNT: 10-40%) are the same order of magnitude than experimental uncertainties and data retrieval procedures (Z±1dBz). Preliminary results show that 3D model rain rate matches TRMM 2A25 rain rate for rain intensity < 7-10mm/h. Above this limit TRMM PR rain rate is higher than predicted by the 3D model. This result begs the question of radar algorithm calibration and the challenge of matching the Z-R relationships to realistic rainfall regimes. The main advantage of using an explicit bin-microphysics model is that it provides a value of the surface rain rate directly from reflectivity measurements above without any assumption concerning the Z

  20. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  1. Three-dimensional marginal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The three dimensional marginal separation of a boundary layer along a line of symmetry is considered. The key equation governing the displacement function is derived, and found to be a nonlinear integral equation in two space variables. This is solved iteratively using a pseudo-spectral approach, based partly in double Fourier space, and partly in physical space. Qualitatively, the results are similar to previously reported two dimensional results (which are also computed to test the accuracy of the numerical scheme); however quantitatively the three dimensional results are much different.

  2. Three-dimensional silicon micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, S.; Song, J.; Dang, Z. Y.; Liang, H. D.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2012-11-01

    A process for fabricating arbitrary-shaped, two- and three-dimensional silicon and porous silicon components has been developed, based on high-energy ion irradiation, such as 250 keV to 1 MeV protons and helium. Irradiation alters the hole current flow during subsequent electrochemical anodization, allowing the anodization rate to be slowed or stopped for low/high fluences. For moderate fluences the anodization rate is selectively stopped only at depths corresponding to the high defect density at the end of ion range, allowing true three-dimensional silicon machining. The use of this process in fields including optics, photonics, holography and nanoscale depth machining is reviewed.

  3. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Charych, D.; Reichart, A.

    2000-06-27

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  4. The Three-Dimensional Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Dale A.; Powell, Harry D.

    1992-01-01

    Provides instructions for helping students construct a three-dimensional model of a constellation. Aluminum foil spheres with various diameters are used to represent stars with various apparent magnitudes. The positions of the stars in the model are determined from constellation maps and by converting actual star distances into millimeters. (PR)

  5. Three-Dimensional Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mura, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a mechanically driven device for generating three-dimensional harmonic space figures with different frequencies and phase angles on the X, Y, and Z axes. Discussed are apparatus, viewing stereo pairs, equations of motion, and using space figures in classroom. (YP)

  6. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  7. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichart, Anke

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  8. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  9. Three-dimensional null point reconnection regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, E. R.; Pontin, D. I.

    2009-12-15

    Recent advances in theory and computational experiments have shown the need to refine the previous categorization of magnetic reconnection at three-dimensional null points--points at which the magnetic field vanishes. We propose here a division into three different types, depending on the nature of the flow near the spine and fan of the null. The spine is an isolated field line which approaches the null (or recedes from it), while the fan is a surface of field lines which recede from it (or approach it). So-called torsional spine reconnection occurs when field lines in the vicinity of the fan rotate, with current becoming concentrated along the spine so that nearby field lines undergo rotational slippage. In torsional fan reconnection field lines near the spine rotate and create a current that is concentrated in the fan with a rotational flux mismatch and rotational slippage. In both of these regimes, the spine and fan are perpendicular and there is no flux transfer across spine or fan. The third regime, called spine-fan reconnection, is the most common in practice and combines elements of the previous spine and fan models. In this case, in response to a generic shearing motion, the null point collapses to form a current sheet that is focused at the null itself, in a sheet that locally spans both the spine and fan. In this regime the spine and fan are no longer perpendicular and there is flux transfer across both of them.

  10. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  11. Facial three-dimensional morphometry.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Serrao, G

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional facial morphometry was investigated in a sample of 40 men and 40 women, with a new noninvasive computerized method. Subjects ranged in age between 19 and 32 years, had sound dentitions, and no craniocervical disorders. For each subject, 16 cutaneous facial landmarks were automatically collected by a system consisting of two infrared camera coupled device (CCD) cameras, real time hardware for the recognition of markers, and software for the three-dimensional reconstruction of landmarks' x, y, z coordinates. From these landmarks, 15 linear and 10 angular measurements, and four linear distance ratios were computed and averaged for sex. For all angular values, both samples showed a narrow variability and no significant gender differences were demonstrated. Conversely, all the linear measurements were significantly higher in men than in women. The highest intersample variability was observed for the measurements of facial height (prevalent vertical dimension), and the lowest for the measurements of facial depth (prevalent horizontal dimension). The proportions of upper and lower face height relative to the anterior face height showed a significant sex difference. Mean values were in good agreement with literature data collected with traditional methods. The described method allowed the direct and noninvasive calculation of three-dimensional linear and angular measurements that would be usefully applied in clinics as a supplement to the classic x-ray cephalometric analyses. PMID:8540488

  12. Three-dimensional effects on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of boundary layer flows along the walls of wind tunnels were studied to validate the transfer of two dimensional calculations to three dimensional transonic flowfield calculations. Results from trials in various wind tunnels were examind to determine the effects of the wall boundary flow on the control surfaces of an airfoil. Models sliding along a groove in the wall of a channel at sub- and transonic speeds were examined, with the finding that with either nonuniformities in the groove, or even if the channel walls are uniform, the lateral boundary layer can cause variations in the central flow region or alter the onset of shock at the transition point. Models for the effects in both turbulence and in the absence of turbulence are formulated, and it is noted that the characteristics of individual wind tunnels must be studied to quantify any existing three dimensional effects.

  13. Three-dimensional Allan fault plane analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, K.S.; Taylor, D.R.; Schnell, R.T.

    1994-12-31

    Allan fault-plane analysis is a useful tool for determining hydrocarbon migration paths and the location of possible traps. While initially developed for Gulf coast deltaic and interdeltaic environments, fault-plane analysis has been successfully applied in many other geologic settings. Where the geology involves several intersecting faults and greater complexity, many two-dimensional displays are required in the investigation and it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately visualize both fault relationships and migration routes. Three-dimensional geospatial fault and structure modeling using computer techniques, however, facilitates both visualization and understanding and extends fault-plane analysis into much more complex situations. When a model is viewed in three dimensions, the strata on both sides of a fault can be seen simultaneously while the true structural character of one or more fault surfaces is preserved. Three-dimensional analysis improves the speed and accuracy of the fault plane methodology.

  14. Analysis of the effects of surface stiffness on the contact interaction between a finger and a cylindrical handle using a three-dimensional hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Dong, Ren G; Warren, Christopher M; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-07-01

    Contact interactions between the hand and handle, such as the contact surface softness and contact surface curvature, will affect both physical effort and musculoskeletal fatigue, thereby the comfort and safety of power tool operations. Previous models of hand gripping can be categorized into two groups: multi-body dynamic models and finite element (FE) models. The goal of the current study is to develop a hybrid FE hand gripping model, which combines the features of conventional FE models and multi-body dynamic models. The proposed model is applied to simulate hand-gripping on a cylindrical handle with covering materials of different softness levels. The model included three finger segments (distal, middle, and proximal phalanxes), three finger joints (the distal interphalangeal (DIP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint), and major anatomical substructures. The model was driven by joint moments, which are the net effects of all passive and active muscular forces acting about the joints. The finger model was first calibrated by using experimental data of human subject tests, and then applied to investigate the effects of surface softness on contact interactions between a finger and a cylindrical handle. Our results show that the maximal compressive stress and strain in the soft tissues of the fingers can be effectively reduced by reducing the stiffness of the covering material.

  15. Analysis of the effects of surface stiffness on the contact interaction between a finger and a cylindrical handle using a three-dimensional hybrid model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, John Z.; Dong, Ren G.; Warren, Christopher M.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Contact interactions between the hand and handle, such as the contact surface softness and contact surface curvature, will affect both physical effort and musculoskeletal fatigue, thereby the comfort and safety of power tool operations. Previous models of hand gripping can be categorized into two groups: multi-body dynamic models and finite element (FE) models. The goal of the current study is to develop a hybrid FE hand gripping model, which combines the features of conventional FE models and multi-body dynamic models. The proposed model is applied to simulate hand-gripping on a cylindrical handle with covering materials of different softness levels. The model included three finger segments (distal, middle, and proximal phalanxes), three finger joints (the distal interphalangeal (DIP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint), and major anatomical substructures. The model was driven by joint moments, which are the net effects of all passive and active muscular forces acting about the joints. The finger model was first calibrated by using experimental data of human subject tests, and then applied to investigate the effects of surface softness on contact interactions between a finger and a cylindrical handle. Our results show that the maximal compressive stress and strain in the soft tissues of the fingers can be effectively reduced by reducing the stiffness of the covering material. PMID:24736020

  16. Occlusion-free monocular three-dimensional vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoracatos, Vassilios E.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a new, occlusion-free, monocular three-dimensional vision system. A matrix of light beams (lasers, fiber optics, etc.), substantially parallel to the optic axis of the lens of a video camera, is projected onto a scene. The corresponding coordinates of the perspective image generated on the video-camera sensor, the focal length of the camera lens, and the lateral position of the projected beams of light are used to determine the 'perspective depth' z* of the three-dimensional real image in the space between the lens and the image plane. Direct inverse perspective transformations are used to reconstruct the three- dimensional real-world scene. This system can lead to the development of three-dimensional real-image sensing devices for manufacturing, medical, and defense-related applications. If combined with existing technology, it has high potential for the development of three- dimensional television.

  17. Three-dimensional visual stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tsunehiro; Fukui, Yukio; Hashimoto, Keizo; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    1995-02-01

    We describe a newly developed three-dimensional visual stimulator (TVS) that can change independently the directions, distances, sizes, luminance, and varieties of two sets of targets for both eyes. It consists of liquid crystal projectors (LCP's) that generate the flexible images of targets, Badal otometers that change target distances without changing the visual angles, and relay-lens systems that change target directions. A special control program is developed for real-time control of six motors and two LCP's in the TVS together with a three-dimensional optometer III that simultaneously measures eye movement, accommodation, pupil diameter, and head movement. distance, 0 to -20 D; direction, 16 horizontally and 15 vertically; size, 0-2 deg visual angle; and luminance, 10-2-10 2 cd/m2. The target images are refreshed at 60 Hz and speeds with which the target makes a smooth change (ramp stimuli) are size, 10 deg/s. A simple application demonstrates the performance.

  18. Three-dimensional C-arm computed tomography combined with fluoroscopic guided pediculoplasty for treatment of vertebral body metastasis with lytic pedicle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gang; Jin, Peng; Li, Min; Lui, Xunwei; Li, Fandong; Xie, Zhiyong; Ding, Juan; Peng, Zhaohui

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate a percutaneous pediculoplasty (PP) technique, using 3-dimensional C-arm CT reformation combined with fluoroscopic guidance for patients presented vertebral body metastasis with lytic pedicle. Thirteen patients (average age 57.8 years) were treated through lytic pedicle approach in our study. Subjective good and partial pain relief was reported with Visual Analogue Scale reduction ≥ 4 in 11/13 patients at 1 month after procedure, two patients with insufficient pain relief died from clinical complications unrelated with PP at 3 month follow-up. Pain relief was maintained in 10 patients at 6 month post-procedural follow-up. One patient died from underlying disease unrelated with the procedure at 5 month follow-up. PP through the lytic pedicle approach under 3-dimensional C-arm CT reformation combined with fluoroscopic guidance was a feasible, safe, and minimally invasive procedure that could provide both the precise control of needle placement and cement injection with one imaging system.

  19. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  20. Three-dimensional nanoscopy of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Harke, Benjamin; Ullal, Chaitanya K; Keller, Jan; Hell, Stefan W

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate the direct three-dimensional imaging of densely packed colloidal nanostructures using stimulated emission depletion microscopy. A combination of two de-excitation patterns yields a resolution of 43 nm in the lateral and 125 nm in the axial direction and an effective focal volume that is by 126-fold smaller than that of a corresponding confocal microscope. The mapping of a model system of spheres organized by confined convective assembly unambiguously identified face-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, random hexagonal close-packed, and body-centered cubic structures.

  1. A neural network combined with a three-dimensional finite element method applied to optimize eddy current and temperature distributions of traveling wave induction heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youhua; Wang, Junhua; Ho, S. L.; Pang, Lingling; Fu, W. N.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, neural networks with a finite element method (FEM) were introduced to predict eddy current distributions on the continuously moving thin conducting strips in traveling wave induction heating (TWIH) equipments. A method that combines a neural network with a finite element method (FEM) is proposed to optimize eddy current distributions of TWIH heater. The trained network used for tested examples shows quite good accuracy of the prediction. The results have then been used with reference to a double-side TWIH in order to analyze the distributions of the magnetic field and eddy current intensity, which accelerates the iterative solution process for the nonlinear coupled electromagnetic matters. The FEM computation of temperature converged conspicuously faster using the prediction results as initial values than using the zero values, and the number of iterations is reduced dramatically. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and characteristics of the proposed method.

  2. Three dimensional magnetic fields in extra high speed modified Lundell alternators computed by a combined vector-scalar magnetic potential finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demerdash, N. A.; Wang, R.; Secunde, R.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) approach was developed and implemented for computation of global magnetic fields in a 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator. The essence of the new method is the combined use of magnetic vector and scalar potential formulations in 3D FEs. This approach makes it practical, using state of the art supercomputer resources, to globally analyze magnetic fields and operating performances of rotating machines which have truly 3D magnetic flux patterns. The 3D FE-computed fields and machine inductances as well as various machine performance simulations of the 14.3 kVA machine are presented in this paper and its two companion papers.

  3. Analysis of three-dimensional-cavity-backed aperture antennas using a Combined Finite Element Method/Method of Moments/Geometrical Theory of Diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1995-01-01

    A combined finite element method (FEM) and method of moments (MoM) technique is presented to analyze the radiation characteristics of a cavity-fed aperture in three dimensions. Generalized feed modeling has been done using the modal expansion of fields in the feed structure. Numerical results for some feeding structures such as a rectangular waveguide, circular waveguide, and coaxial line are presented. The method also uses the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) to predict the effect of a finite ground plane on radiation characteristics. Input admittance calculations for open radiating structures such as a rectangular waveguide, a circular waveguide, and a coaxial line are shown. Numerical data for a coaxial-fed cavity with finite ground plane are verified with experimental data.

  4. Investigating the effects of combined photodynamic and anti-angiogenic therapies using a three-dimensional in-vivo brain tumor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Magalhães, Nzola; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Li, Linda; Liogys, Angela; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2006-02-01

    An in-vivo tumor model composed of multicellular human glioma spheroids implanted on a shell-less chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), has been developed. Following removal of a portion of the ectodermal epithelium layer of the CAM, human glioma spheroids were implanted on day 7 of embryonic development. Tumor invasion, rapid growth and vasculature formation were observed 7 days post implantation. Single tumor cell migration towards blood vessels, angiogenesis and satellite tumor growth were also evident. The human tumor/CAM model is being used to examine the effects of combined ALA PDT and anti-angiogenic agents. The shell-less CAM is well suited for topical, i.p. and i.v. photosensitizer and/or drug application.

  5. High resolution three-dimensional doping profiler

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping profiler provides a Schottky contact at one surface and an ohmic contact at the other. While the two contacts are coupled to a power source, thereby establishing an electrical bias in the semiconductor, a localized light source illuminates the semiconductor to induce a photocurrent. The photocurrent changes in accordance with the doping characteristics of the semiconductor in the illuminated region. By changing the voltage of the power source the depth of the depletion layer can be varied to provide a three dimensional view of the local properties of the semiconductor.

  6. Three dimensional model of the human mandible.

    PubMed

    Muftić, O; Milcić, D; Saucha, J; Carek, V

    2000-07-01

    A new biomechanical three-dimensional (3D) model for the human mandible is proposed. A simple two-dimensional model cannot explain the biomechanics of the human mandible, where muscular forces through occlusion and condylar surfaces are in a state of dynamical 3D equilibrium. All forces are resolved into components according to a selected coordinate system. The muscular forces, which during clenching act on the jaw, along with the necessary force level for chewing, also act as some kind of stabilizers of the mandibular condyles preventing dislocation and loading of nonarticular tissues.

  7. Three-dimensional coil inductor

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional coil inductor is disclosed. The inductor includes a substrate; a set of lower electrically conductive traces positioned on the substrate; a core placed over the lower traces; a set of side electrically conductive traces laid on the core and the lower traces; and a set of upper electrically conductive traces attached to the side traces so as to form the inductor. Fabrication of the inductor includes the steps of forming a set of lower traces on a substrate; positioning a core over the lower traces; forming a set of side traces on the core; connecting the side traces to the lower traces; forming a set of upper traces on the core; and connecting the upper traces to the side traces so as to form a coil structure.

  8. Three-dimensional aromatic networks.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Shinji; Iwanaga, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of aromatic units and linkers are reviewed from various aspects. To understand principles for the construction of such compounds, we generalize the roles of building units, the synthetic approaches, and the classification of networks. As fundamental compounds, cyclophanes with large aromatic units and aromatic macrocycles with linear acetylene linkers are highlighted in terms of transannular interactions between aromatic units, conformational preference, and resolution of chiral derivatives. Polycyclic cage compounds are constructed from building units by linkages via covalent bonds, metal-coordination bonds, or hydrogen bonds. Large cage networks often include a wide range of guest species in their cavity to afford novel inclusion compounds. Topological isomers consisting of two or more macrocycles are formed by cyclization of preorganized species. Some complicated topological networks are constructed by self-assembly of simple building units.

  9. A three-dimensional hierarchical collagen scaffold fabricated by a combined solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and electrospinning process to enhance mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeungHyun; Koh, Young Ho; Kim, GeunHyung

    2010-06-01

    Collagen has the advantage of being very similar to macromolecular substances that can be recognized and metabolized in the biological environment. Although the natural material has superior property for this purpose, its use to fabricate reproducible and pore-structure-controlled 3D structures, which are designed to allow the entry of sufficient cells and the easy diffusion of nutrients, has been limited due to its low processability. Here, we propose a hybrid technology that combines a cryogenic plotting system with an electrospinning process. Using this technique, an easily pore-size-controllable hierarchical 3D scaffold consisting of micro-sized highly porous collagen strands and micro/nano-sized collagen fibers was fabricated. The pore structure of the collagen scaffold was controlled by the collagen micro/nanofibers, which were layered in the scaffold. The hierarchical scaffolds were characterized with respect to initial cell attachment and proliferation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells within the scaffolds. The hierarchical scaffold exhibited incredibly enhanced initial cell attachment and cell compactness between pores of the plotted scaffold relative to the normally designed 3D collagen scaffold.

  10. Phase II Trial of Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Bevacizumab in Combination With Attenuated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Rademaker, Alfred; Bentrem, David J.; Benson, Al B.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Talamonti, Mark S.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate response rate, survival, and toxicity in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients received three cycles of therapy over 10 weeks. In total, treatment consisted of intravenous (IV) gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}, every 1 to 2 weeks (7 doses), IV bevacizumab, 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks (5 doses), and 36 Gy of radiotherapy (2.4-Gy fractions during cycle two). Response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels. Patients with resectable tumors underwent surgery 6 to 8 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Maintenance gemcitabine and bevacizumab doses were delivered to patients who had unresected tumors and no progression. Results: Twenty-eight of the 32 enrolled patients completed all three cycles. The median follow-up was 11.07 months. Most grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in the initial treatment phase; the most frequent toxicities were leukopenia (21%), neutropenia (17%), and nausea (17%). At week 10, 1 patient (4%) had a complete response, 2 patients (7%) had partial responses, 21 patients (75%) had stable disease, and 4 patients (14%) had progressive disease. The median pretreatment and posttreatment CA 19-9 levels (25 patients) were 184.3 and 57.9 U/ml, respectively (p = 0.0006). One of 10 patients proceeding to surgery experienced a major complication. Two of 6 patients undergoing resection had complete pathologic responses. The median progression-free and overall survival durations were 9.9 months and 11.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: The combination of full-dose gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy was active and was not associated with a high rate of major surgical complications.

  11. In vivo assessment of bone ingrowth potential of three-dimensional e-beam produced implant surfaces and the effect of additional treatment by acid etching and hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Biemond, J Elizabeth; Hannink, Gerjon; Jurrius, Annemarijn M G; Verdonschot, Nico; Buma, Pieter

    2012-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of three-dimensional E-beam-produced implant surfaces was examined by histology and compared to a porous plasma-sprayed control. The effects of acid etching and a hydroxyapatite (HA) coating were also evaluated by histology. Specimens were implanted in the distal femur of 10 goats. Histological analysis of bone ingrowth was performed 6 weeks after implantation. The E-beam-produced surfaces showed significantly better bone ingrowth compared to the plasma-sprayed control. Additional treatment of the E-beam surface structures with a HA coating, further improved bone ingrowth potential of these structures significantly. Acid etching of the E-beam structures did not influence bone ingrowth significantly. In conclusion, the HA-coated, E-beam-produced structures are promising potential implant surfaces.

  12. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  13. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  14. Venus - Three-Dimensional Perspective View of Alpha Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A portion of Alpha Regio is displayed in this three-dimensional perspective view of the surface of Venus. Alpha Regio, a topographic upland approximately 1300 kilometers across, is centered on 25 degrees south latitude, 4 degrees east longitude. In 1963, Alpha Regio was the first feature on Venus to be identified from Earth-based radar. The radar-bright area of Alpha Regio is characterized by multiple sets of intersecting trends of structural features such as ridges, troughs, and flat-floored fault valleys that, together, form a polygonal outline. Directly south of the complex ridged terrain is a large ovoid-shaped feature named Eve. The radar-bright spot located centrally within Eve marks the location of the prime meridian of Venus. Magellan synthetic aperture radar data is combined with radar altimetry to develop a three-dimensional map of the surface. Ray tracing is used to generate a perspective view from this map. The vertical scale is exaggerated approximately 23 times. Simulated color and a digital elevation map developed by the U. S. Geological Survey are used to enhance small scale structure. The simulated hues are based on color images recorded by the Soviet Venera 13 and 14 spacecraft. The image was produced at the JPL Multimission Image Processing Laboratory by Eric De Jong, Jeff Hall, and Myche McAuley, and is a single frame from the movie released at the March 5, 1991, press conference.

  15. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsusaka, Katsuhiko; Doi, Motonori; Oshiro, Osamu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2000-08-01

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging equipment for diagnosis requires much time to reconstruct 3D images or fix the view point for observing the 3D image. Thus, it is inconvenient for cardiac diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a new dynamic 3D echocardiography system. The system produces 3D images in real-time and permits changes in view point. This system consists of ultrasound diagnostic equipment, a digitizer and a computer. B-mode images are projected to a virtual 3D space by referring to the position of the probe of the ultrasound diagnosis equipment. The position is obtained by the digitizer to which the ultrasound probe is attached. The 3D cardiac image is constructed from B-mode images obtained simultaneously in the cardiac cycle. To obtain the same moment of heartbeat in the cardiac cycle, this system uses the electrocardiography derived from the diagnosis equipment. The 3D images, which show various scenes of the stage of heartbeat action, are displayed sequentially. The doctor can observe 3D images cut in any plane by pushing a button of the digitizer and zooming with the keyboard. We evaluated our prototype system by observation of a mitral valve in motion.

  16. Three-dimensional laser microvision.

    PubMed

    Shimotahira, H; Iizuka, K; Chu, S C; Wah, C; Costen, F; Yoshikuni, Y

    2001-04-10

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 mum; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 mum. PMID:18357177

  17. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  18. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-22

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered 'quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  19. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the individual data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme which envisages a classical abacus with the beads operated by electron spins. It is inspired by the idea of second quantization, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantized' Hall voltage, representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This concept of `second quantization of memory' realizes the 3D memory architecture with superior reading and operation efficiency, thus is a promising approach for future nonvolatile magnetic random access memory.

  20. True three-dimensional camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornreich, Philipp; Farell, Bart

    2013-01-01

    An imager that can measure the distance from each pixel to the point on the object that is in focus at the pixel is described. This is accomplished by short photo-conducting lightguides at each pixel. In the eye the rods and cones are the fiber-like lightguides. The device uses ambient light that is only coherent in spherical shell-shaped light packets of thickness of one coherence length. Modern semiconductor technology permits the construction of lightguides shorter than a coherence length of ambient light. Each of the frequency components of the broad band light arriving at a pixel has a phase proportional to the distance from an object point to its image pixel. Light frequency components in the packet arriving at a pixel through a convex lens add constructively only if the light comes from the object point in focus at this pixel. The light in packets from all other object points cancels. Thus the pixel receives light from one object point only. The lightguide has contacts along its length. The lightguide charge carriers are generated by the light patterns. These light patterns, and thus the photocurrent, shift in response to the phase of the input signal. Thus, the photocurrent is a function of the distance from the pixel to its object point. Applications include autonomous vehicle navigation and robotic vision. Another application is a crude teleportation system consisting of a camera and a three-dimensional printer at a remote location.

  1. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  2. Three-Dimensional Schlieren Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Cochrane, Andrea

    2004-11-01

    Schlieren systems visualise disturbances that change the index of refraction of a fluid, for example due to temperature or salinity disturbances. `Synthetic schlieren' refers to a recent advance in which these disturbances are visualised with a digital camera and image-processing technology rather than the classical use of parabolic mirrors and a knife-edge. In a typical setup, light from an image of horizontal lines or dots passes almost horizontally through the test section of a fluid to a CCD camera. Refractive index disturbances distort the image and digital comparison of successive images reveals the plan-form structure and time evolution of the disturbances. If the disturbance is effectively two-dimensional, meaning that it is uniform across the line-of-sight of the camera, then its magnitude as well as its structure can measured through simple inversion of an algebraic equation. If the structure is axisymmetric with rotation-axis perpendicular to the line of sight, the magnitude of the disturbance can be measured through inversion of a non-singular square matrix. Here we report upon the extension of this work toward measuring the magnitude of a fully three-dimensional disturbance. This is done by analysing images from two perspectives through the test section and using inversion tomography techniques to reconstruct the disturbance field. The results are tested against theoretical predictions and experimental measurements.

  3. Is the Maxillary Sinus Really Suitable in Sex Determination? A Three-Dimensional Analysis of Maxillary Sinus Volume and Surface Depending on Sex and Dentition.

    PubMed

    Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Heussen, Nicole; Peters, Florian; Steiner, Timm; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus was recently presented as a helpful instrument for sex determination. The aim of the present study was to examine the volume and surface of the fully dentate, partial, and complete edentulous maxillary sinus depending on the sex. Computed tomography data from 276 patients were imported in DICOM format via special virtual planning software, and surfaces (mm) and volumes (mm) of maxillary sinuses were measured. In sex-specific comparisons (women vs men), statistically significant differences for the mean maxillary sinus volume and surface were found between fully dentate (volume, 13,267.77 mm vs 16,623.17 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3480.05 mm vs 4100.83 mm, P < 0.0001) and partially edentulous (volume, 10,577.35 mm vs 14,608.10 mm, P = 0.0002; surface, 2980.11 mm vs 3797.42 mm, P < 0.0001) or complete edentulous sinuses (volume, 11,200.99 mm vs 15,382.29 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3118.32 mm vs 3877.25 mm, P < 0.0001). For males, the statistically different mean values were calculated between fully dentate and partially edentulous (volume, P = 0.0022; surface, P = 0.0048) maxillary sinuses. Between the sexes, no differences were only measured for female and male partially dentate fully edentulous sinuses (2 teeth missing) and between partially edentulous sinuses in women and men (1 teeth vs 2 teeth missing). With a corresponding software program, it is possible to analyze the maxillary sinus precisely. The dentition influences the volume and surface of the pneumatic maxillary sinus. Therefore, sex determination is possible by analysis of the maxillary sinus event through the increase in pneumatization.

  4. Surface deformation as a guide to kinematics and three-dimensional shape of slow-moving, clay-rich landslides, Honolulu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, R.L.; Messerich, J.; Fleming, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Two slow-moving landslides in Honolulu, Hawaii, were the subject of photogrammetric measurements, field mapping, and subsurface investigation to learn whether surface observations can yield useful information consistent with results of subsurface investigation. Mapping focused on structural damage and on surface features such as scarps, shears, and toes. The x-y-z positions of photo-identifiable points were obtained from aerial photographs taken at three different times. The measurements were intended to learn if the shape of the landslide failure surface can be determined from systematic surface observations and whether surface observations about deformation are consistent with photogrammetrically-obtained displacement gradients. Field and aerial photographic measurements were evaluated to identify the boundaries of the landslides, distinguish areas of incipient landslide enlargement, and identify zones of active and passive failure in the landslides. Data reported here apply mainly to the Alani-Paty landslide, a translational, earth-block landslide that damaged property in a 3.4-ha residential area. It began moving in the 1970s and displacement through 1991 totaled 4 m. Thickness, determined from borehole data, ranges from about 7 to 10 m; and the slope of the ground surface averages about 9??. Field evidence of deformation indicated areas of potential landslide enlargement outside the well-formed landslide boundaries. Displacement gradients obtained photogrammetrically and deformation mapping both identified similar zones of active failure (longitudinal stretching) and passive failure (longitudinal shortening) within the body of the landslide. Surface displacement on the landslide is approximately parallel to the broadly concave slip surface.

  5. Three-dimensional geometry of thrust surfaces and the origin of sinuous thrust traces in orogenic belts: Insights from scaled sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Jain, M.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sinuous traces of emerging thrust tips, comprising multiple salients and recesses, are commonly observed in orogenic belts (e.g. Lesser Himalayas of India, Nepal and Bhutan) and in accretionary prisms (e.g. Nankai Trough off the coast of Japan). Lateral (along the strike of the deformation zone) variation in the depths of foreland basins (i.e. variable sediment thickness) or in the strength of the basal detachment, or presence of a curved indenter has been traditionally cited to explain the formation of salients in fold-and-thrust belts, although they are not applicable in all cases. In the present work, we have carried out four series of scaled analog model experiments using dry quartz sand, changing the dip of the basal decollément (β = 0° or 5°) and the basal friction (μb = 0.5 or 0.3) to investigate the 3D shape of thrust surfaces under varying overall boundary conditions, but without any lateral variation of these parameters, within the models. The experimental results show that under all boundary conditions, thrust surfaces are curved both in their dip and strike directions (i.e. spoon-shaped in 3D). Multiple concave-upward and convex-upward segments constitute a thrust surface, which produces a sinuous trace when the tip line intersects the Earth's surface. It is also shown that thrust surface curvatures occur at different scales, and the overall thrust surface roughness (corrugations) has a self-affine fractal geometry.

  6. Three-dimensional turbopump flowfield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Belford, K. A.; Ni, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a flow prediction method applicable to rocket turbopumps. The complex nature of a flowfield in turbopumps is described and examples of flowfields are discussed to illustrate that physics based models and analytical calculation procedures based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are needed to develop reliable design procedures for turbopumps. A CFD code developed at NASA ARC was used as the base code. The turbulence model and boundary conditions in the base code were modified, respectively, to: (1) compute transitional flows and account for extra rates of strain, e.g., rotation; and (2) compute surface heat transfer coefficients and allow computation through multistage turbomachines. Benchmark quality data from two and three-dimensional cascades were used to verify the code. The predictive capabilities of the present CFD code were demonstrated by computing the flow through a radial impeller and a multistage axial flow turbine. Results of the program indicate that the present code operated in a two-dimensional mode is a cost effective alternative to full three-dimensional calculations, and that it permits realistic predictions of unsteady loadings and losses for multistage machines.

  7. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  8. Three-Dimensional Macroassembly of Sandwich-Like, Hierarchical, Porous Carbon/Graphene Nanosheets towards Ultralight, Superhigh Surface Area, Multifunctional Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayi; Yang, Xi; Fu, Zhibing; He, Junhui; Wang, Chaoyang; Wu, Weidong; Zhang, Lin

    2016-02-12

    A new, ultralight, superhigh surface area, multifunctional aerogel, which is macroassembled from sandwich-like, hierarchical, porous carbon/graphene nanosheets, is described. The multifunctional aerogel was characterized by means of XRD, SEM, TEM, Raman spectroscopy, and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy. The multifunctional aerogel had an ultralow density of 8 mg cm(-3) and a superhigh surface area of 2650 m(2)  g(-1) . The multifunctional aerogel was thermal stability and compressible. Meanwhile, the multifunctional aerogel exhibited high capacity for the adsorption of oils and organic solvents, unexpectedly high hydrogen adsorption and good electrochemical performance. PMID:26752085

  9. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars. III. The structure of small-scale magnetic flux concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeck, B.; Schüssler, M.; Cameron, R. H.; Reiners, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The convective envelopes of cool main-sequence stars harbour magnetic fields with a complex global and local structure. These fields affect the near-surface convection and the outer stellar atmospheres in many ways and are responsible for the observable magnetic activity of stars. Aims: Our aim is to understand the local structure in unipolar regions with moderate average magnetic flux density. These correspond to plage regions covering a substantial fraction of the surface of the Sun (and likely also the surface of other Sun-like stars) during periods of high magnetic activity. Methods: We analyse the results of 18 local-box magnetohydrodynamics simulations covering the upper layers of the convection zones and the photospheres of cool main-sequence stars of spectral types F to early M. The average vertical field in these simulations ranges from 20 to 500 G. Results: We find a substantial variation of the properties of the surface magnetoconvection between main-sequence stars of different spectral types. As a consequence of a reduced efficiency of the convective collapse of flux tubes, M dwarfs lack bright magnetic structures in unipolar regions of moderate field strength. The spatial correlation between velocity and the magnetic field as well as the lifetime of magnetic structures and their sizes relative to the granules vary significantly along the model sequence of stellar types. Movies associated to Fig. A.1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. A new algorithm for three-dimensional joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data and its application to the Southern California plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongjian; Zhang, Haijiang; Yao, Huajian; Allam, Amir; Zigone, Dimitri; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Thurber, Clifford; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data to get better 3-D P wave (Vp) and S wave (Vs) velocity models by taking advantage of the complementary strengths of each data set. Our joint inversion algorithm uses a one-step inversion of surface wave traveltime measurements at different periods for 3-D Vs and Vp models without constructing the intermediate phase or group velocity maps. This allows a more straightforward modeling of surface wave traveltime data with the body wave arrival times. We take into consideration the sensitivity of surface wave data with respect to Vp in addition to its large sensitivity to Vs, which means both models are constrained by two different data types. The method is applied to determine 3-D crustal Vp and Vs models using body wave and Rayleigh wave data in the Southern California plate boundary region, which has previously been studied with both double-difference tomography method using body wave arrival times and ambient noise tomography method with Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion measurements. Our approach creates self-consistent and unique models with no prominent gaps, with Rayleigh wave data resolving shallow and large-scale features and body wave data constraining relatively deeper structures where their ray coverage is good. The velocity model from the joint inversion is consistent with local geological structures and produces better fits to observed seismic waveforms than the current Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) model.

  11. An ancient Roman bowl embedded in a soil sample: surface shaded three dimensional display using data from a multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, M; Buls, N; Cleeren, N; Lenchik, L; De Mey, J

    2006-01-01

    We present an unusual application of multidetector CT and shaded surface rendering in the investigation of a soil sample, containing an ancient Roman bronze bowl. The CT findings were of fundamental importance in helping the archaeologists study the bronze bowl from the soil sample.

  12. Amplitude interpretation and visualization of three-dimensional reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Enachescu, M.E. )

    1994-07-01

    Digital recording and processing of modern three-dimensional surveys allow for relative good preservation and correct spatial positioning of seismic reflection amplitude. A four-dimensional seismic reflection field matrix R (x,y,t,A), which can be computer visualized (i.e., real-time interactively rendered, edited, and animated), is now available to the interpreter. The amplitude contains encoded geological information indirectly related to lithologies and reservoir properties. The magnitude of the amplitude depends not only on the acoustic impedance contrast across a boundary, but is also strongly affected by the shape of the reflective boundary. This allows the interpreter to image subtle tectonic and structural elements not obvious on time-structure maps. The use of modern workstations allows for appropriate color coding of the total available amplitude range, routine on-screen time/amplitude extraction, and late display of horizon amplitude maps (horizon slices) or complex amplitude-structure spatial visualization. Stratigraphic, structural, tectonic, fluid distribution, and paleogeographic information are commonly obtained by displaying the amplitude variation A = A(x,y,t) associated with a particular reflective surface or seismic interval. As illustrated with several case histories, traditional structural and stratigraphic interpretation combined with a detailed amplitude study generally greatly enhance extraction of subsurface geological information from a reflection data volume. In the context of three-dimensional seismic surveys, the horizon amplitude map (horizon slice), amplitude attachment to structure and [open quotes]bright clouds[close quotes] displays are very powerful tools available to the interpreter.

  13. Advancing three-dimensional MEMS by complimentary laser micro manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy A.; Williams, John D.; Lemp, Tom; Lehecka, Tom M.; Medina, Francisco; Wicker, Ryan B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes improvements that enable engineers to create three-dimensional MEMS in a variety of materials. It also provides a means for selectively adding three-dimensional, high aspect ratio features to pre-existing PMMA micro molds for subsequent LIGA processing. This complimentary method involves in situ construction of three-dimensional micro molds in a stand-alone configuration or directly adjacent to features formed by x-ray lithography. Three-dimensional micro molds are created by micro stereolithography (MSL), an additive rapid prototyping technology. Alternatively, three-dimensional features may be added by direct femtosecond laser micro machining. Parameters for optimal femtosecond laser micro machining of PMMA at 800 nanometers are presented. The technical discussion also includes strategies for enhancements in the context of material selection and post-process surface finish. This approach may lead to practical, cost-effective 3-D MEMS with the surface finish and throughput advantages of x-ray lithography. Accurate three-dimensional metal microstructures are demonstrated. Challenges remain in process planning for micro stereolithography and development of buried features following femtosecond laser micro machining.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction in free-space whole-body fluorescence tomography of mice using optically reconstructed surface and atlas anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Badea, Cristian T.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-11-01

    We present a 3-D image reconstruction method for free-space fluorescence tomography of mice using hybrid anatomical prior information. Specifically, we use an optically reconstructed surface of the experimental animal and a digital mouse atlas to approximate the anatomy of the animal as structural priors to assist image reconstruction. Experiments are carried out on a cadaver of a nude mouse with a fluorescent inclusion (2.4-mm-diam cylinder) implanted in the chest cavity. Tomographic fluorescence images are reconstructed using an iterative algorithm based on a finite element method. Coregistration of the fluorescence reconstruction and micro-CT (computed tomography) data acquired afterward show good localization accuracy (localization error 1.2+/-0.6 mm). Using the optically reconstructed surface, but without the atlas anatomy, image reconstruction fails to show the fluorescent inclusion correctly. The method demonstrates the utility of anatomical priors in support of free-space fluorescence tomography.

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction in free-space whole-body fluorescence tomography of mice using optically reconstructed surface and atlas anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Badea, Cristian T.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-01-01

    We present a 3-D image reconstruction method for free-space fluorescence tomography of mice using hybrid anatomical prior information. Specifically, we use an optically reconstructed surface of the experimental animal and a digital mouse atlas to approximate the anatomy of the animal as structural priors to assist image reconstruction. Experiments are carried out on a cadaver of a nude mouse with a fluorescent inclusion (2.4-mm-diam cylinder) implanted in the chest cavity. Tomographic fluorescence images are reconstructed using an iterative algorithm based on a finite element method. Coregistration of the fluorescence reconstruction and micro-CT (computed tomography) data acquired afterward show good localization accuracy (localization error 1.2±0.6 mm). Using the optically reconstructed surface, but without the atlas anatomy, image reconstruction fails to show the fluorescent inclusion correctly. The method demonstrates the utility of anatomical priors in support of free-space fluorescence tomography. PMID:20059248

  16. Real-time two- and three-dimensional imaging of monocyte motility and navigation on planar surfaces and in collagen matrices: roles of Rho

    PubMed Central

    Bzymek, Robert; Horsthemke, Markus; Isfort, Katrin; Mohr, Simon; Tjaden, Kerstin; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Thomann, Marlies; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Bähler, Martin; Schwab, Albrecht; Hanley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that macrophages from RhoA/RhoB double knockout mice had increased motility of the cell body, but severely impaired retraction of the tail and membrane extensions, whereas RhoA- or RhoB-deficient cells exhibited mild phenotypes. Here we extended this work and investigated the roles of Rho signaling in primary human blood monocytes migrating in chemotactic gradients and in various settings. Monocyte velocity, but not chemotactic navigation, was modestly dependent on Rho-ROCK-myosin II signaling on a 2D substrate or in a loose collagen type I matrix. Viewed by time-lapse epi-fluorescence microscopy, monocytes appeared to flutter rather than crawl, such that the 3D surface topology of individual cells was difficult to predict. Spinning disk confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction revealed that cells move on planar surfaces and in a loose collagen matrix using prominent, curved planar protrusions, which are rapidly remodeled and reoriented, as well as resorbed. In a dense collagen type I matrix, there is insufficient space for this mode and cells adopt a highly Rho-dependent, lobular mode of motility. Thus, in addition to its role in tail retraction on 2D surfaces, Rho is critical for movement in confined spaces, but is largely redundant for motility and chemotaxis in loose matrices. PMID:27122054

  17. What limits tool use in nonhuman primates? Insights from tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) aligning three-dimensional objects to a surface

    PubMed Central

    la Cour, L. T.; Stone, B. W.; Hopkins, W.; Menzel, C.; Fragaszy, D.

    2013-01-01

    Perceptuomotor functions that support using hand tools can be examined in other manipulation tasks, such as alignment of objects to surfaces. We examined tufted capuchin monkeys’ and chimpanzees’ performance at aligning objects to surfaces while managing one or two spatial relations to do so. We presented 6 subjects of each species with a single stick to place into a groove, two sticks of equal length to place into two grooves, or two sticks joined as a T to place into a T-shaped groove. Tufted capuchins and chimpanzees performed equivalently on these tasks, aligning the straight stick to within 22.5° of parallel to the groove in approximately half of their attempts to place it, and taking more attempts to place the T stick than two straight sticks. The findings provide strong evidence that tufted capuchins and chimpanzees do not reliably align even one prominent axial feature of an object to a surface, and that managing two concurrent allocentric spatial relations in an alignment problem is significantly more challenging to them than managing two sequential relations. In contrast, humans from two years of age display very different perceptuomotor abilities in a similar task: they align sticks to a groove reliably on each attempt, and they readily manage two allocentric spatial relations concurrently. Limitations in aligning objects and in managing two or more relations at a time significantly constrain how nonhuman primates can use hand tools. PMID:23820935

  18. Estimating changes in lighting direction in binocularly viewed three-dimensional scenes

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Holly E.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We examine human ability to detect changes in scene lighting. Thirteen observers viewed three-dimensional rendered scenes stereoscopically. Each scene consisted of a randomly generated three-dimensional “Gaussian bump” surface rendered under a combination of collimated and diffuse light sources. During each trial, the collimated source underwent a small, quick change of position in one of four directions. The observer's task was to classify the direction of the lighting change. All observers were above chance in performing the task. We developed a model that combined two sources of information, a shape map and a shading map, to predict lighting change direction. We used this model to predict patterns of errors both across observers and across scenes differing in shape. We found that errors in estimating lighting direction were primarily the result of errors in representing surface shape. We characterized the surface features that affected performance in the classification task. PMID:21106676

  19. Nanoparticle diffusion within intestinal mucus: Three-dimensional response analysis dissecting the impact of particle surface charge, size and heterogeneity across polyelectrolyte, pegylated and viral particles.

    PubMed

    Abdulkarim, Muthanna; Agulló, Nuria; Cattoz, Beatrice; Griffiths, Peter; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Borros, Salvador Gómez; Gumbleton, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Multiple particle tracking (MPT) methodology was used to dissect the impact of nanoparticle surface charge and size upon particle diffusion through freshly harvested porcine jejunum mucus. The mucus was characterised rheologically and by atomic force microscopy. To vary nanoparticle surface charge we used a series of self-assembly polyelectrolyte particles composed of varying ratios of the negatively charged polyacrylic acid polymer and the positively charged chitosan polymer. This series included a neutral or near-neutral particle to correspond to highly charged but near-neutral viral particles that appear to effectively permeate mucus. In order to negate the confounding issue of self-aggregation of such neutral synthetic particles a sonication step effectively reduced particle size (to less than 340 nm) for a sufficient period to conduct the tracking experiments. Across the polyelectrolyte particles a broad and meaningful relationship was observed between particle diffusion in mucus (×1000 difference between slowest and fastest particle types), particle size (104-373 nm) and particle surface charge (-29 mV to +19.5 mV), where the beneficial characteristic promoting diffusion was a neutral or near-neutral charge. The diffusion of the neutral polyelectrolyte particle (0.02887 cm S(-1)×10(-9)) compared favourably with that of a highly diffusive PEGylated-PLGA particle (0.03182 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)), despite the size of the latter (54 nm diameter) accommodating a reduced steric hindrance with the mucin network. Heterogeneity of particle diffusion within a given particle type revealed the most diffusive 10% sub-population for the neutral polyelectrolyte formulation (5.809 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)) to be faster than that of the most diffusive 10% sub-populations obtained either for the PEGylated-PLGA particle (4.061 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)) or for a capsid adenovirus particle (1.922 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)). While this study has used a simple self-assembly polyelectrolyte system

  20. The three-dimensional structural surface of two beta-sheet scorpion toxins mimics that of an alpha-helical dihydropyridine receptor segment.

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel; Pace, Suzi; Curtis, Suzanne M; Sakowska, Magdalena; Lamb, Graham D; Dulhunty, Angela F; Casarotto, Marco G

    2003-01-01

    An alpha-helical II-III loop segment of the dihydropyridine receptor activates the ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel. We describe a novel manipulation in which this agonist's activity is increased by modifying its surface structure to resemble that of a toxin molecule. In a unique system, native beta-sheet scorpion toxins have been reported to activate skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium channels with high affinity by binding to the same site as the lower-affinity alpha-helical dihydropyridine receptor segment. We increased the alignment of basic residues in the alpha-helical peptide to mimic the spatial orientation of active residues in the scorpion toxin, with a consequent 2-20-fold increase in the activity of the alpha-helical peptide. We hypothesized that, like the native peptide, the modified peptide and the scorpion toxin may bind to a common site. This was supported by (i) similar changes in ryanodine receptor channel gating induced by the native or modified alpha-helical peptide and the beta-sheet toxin, a 10-100-fold reduction in channel closed time, with a < or = 2-fold increase in open dwell time and (ii) a failure of the toxin to further activate channels activated by the peptides. These results suggest that diverse structural scaffolds can present similar conformational surface properties to target common receptor sites. PMID:12429019

  1. Scaffolding for Three-Dimensional Embryonic Vasculogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P.; Aday, Sezin; Ferreira, Lino S.

    Biomaterial scaffolds have great potential to support efficient vascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Vascular cell fate-specific biochemical and biophysical cues have been identified and incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to efficiently direct embryonic vasculogenesis. The resulting vascular-like tissue can be used for regenerative medicine applications, further elucidation of biophysical and biochemical cues governing vasculogenesis, and drug discovery. In this chapter, we give an overview on the following: (1) developmental cues for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, (2) 3D vascular differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs), (3) preparation of 3D scaffolds for the vascular differentiation of hESCs, and (4) the most significant studies combining scaffolding and hESCs for development of vascular-like tissue.

  2. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  3. Steady inviscid three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Chang, S.-C.

    1985-01-01

    The present analysis combines some of the theoretical concepts suggested by Hawthorne (1955) with a numerical integration procedure suggested by Martin (1978). The resulting algorithm is for inviscid subsonic flows. Thus, it is restricted to high Reynolds number flows. Chang and Adamczyk (1983) have provided a detailed derivation of the present algorithm along with a discussion of its stability bounds. The present paper represents a summary of this work. The integration of the continuity equation is considered along with an evaluation of the entropy, total temperature, and vorticity field. Attention is given to the shear-flow algorithm construction, and an application to a shear flow in a turning channel. A description of numerical results is also provided. The discussed algorithm represents a new procedure for solving inviscid subsonic three-dimensional rotational flows.

  4. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  5. Towards microscale electrohydrodynamic three-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankang; Xu, Fangyuan; Cao, Yi; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen

    2016-02-01

    It is challenging for the existing three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques to fabricate high-resolution 3D microstructures with low costs and high efficiency. In this work we present a solvent-based electrohydrodynamic 3D printing technique that allows fabrication of microscale structures like single walls, crossed walls, lattice and concentric circles. Process parameters were optimized to deposit tiny 3D patterns with a wall width smaller than 10 μm and a high aspect ratio of about 60. Tight bonding among neighbour layers could be achieved with a smooth lateral surface. In comparison with the existing microscale 3D printing techniques, the presented method is low-cost, highly efficient and applicable to multiple polymers. It is envisioned that this simple microscale 3D printing strategy might provide an alternative and innovative way for application in MEMS, biosensor and flexible electronics.

  6. Visualization of the sensitivity of the magnetoencephalographic sensor array based on the three-dimensional modeling of cortical surface and volume conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, Sunao; Sutani, Kouichi

    2010-05-01

    Here, we present a system to visualize (i) the distribution of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signal strength in the subject-specific measurement settings predicted by a realistic MEG signal generation model (forward model) and previously published results that are typically presented in the standardized brain coordinates, and (ii) the distribution of the sensitivity of arbitrary selected group of MEG sensors on the subject-specific cortical surface. The current results suggest that (a) our methods to predict MEG field distribution from a priori information about the possible "active" cortical regions obtained from standardized functional magnetic resonance imaging results are useful for determining the sensor sets of interest in the MEG studies for a specific subject under specific measurement condition, and that (b) visualization of the sensitivity of sensor groups could provide the approximate distribution of the MEG sources without solving the MEG inverse problem.

  7. Ordered three-dimensional interconnected nanoarchitectures in anodic porous alumina

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Jaime; Martín-González, Marisol; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Caballero-Calero, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional nanostructures combine properties of nanoscale materials with the advantages of being macro-sized pieces when the time comes to manipulate, measure their properties, or make a device. However, the amount of compounds with the ability to self-organize in ordered three-dimensional nanostructures is limited. Therefore, template-based fabrication strategies become the key approach towards three-dimensional nanostructures. Here we report the simple fabrication of a template based on anodic aluminum oxide, having a well-defined, ordered, tunable, homogeneous 3D nanotubular network in the sub 100 nm range. The three-dimensional templates are then employed to achieve three-dimensional, ordered nanowire-networks in Bi2Te3 and polystyrene. Lastly, we demonstrate the photonic crystal behavior of both the template and the polystyrene three-dimensional nanostructure. Our approach may establish the foundations for future high-throughput, cheap, photonic materials and devices made of simple commodity plastics, metals, and semiconductors. PMID:25342247

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction for high-speed volume measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye; Lane, Robert M.; Chang, Guang-Hwa

    2001-02-01

    Volume measurement is an important process for various industries such as food processing, fruit and vegetable grading, etc. Value or price is often determined by the size of product. In seafood industry, for example, oyster meat is separated into four grades before being packaged. Large size grade means higher selling price than small size. More consistent packaging size is also an indication of high quality. Product size can be measured optically with machine vision technology for on-line inspection and grading systems. Most optical grading techniques use a two-dimensional area projection or the weight of the product to estimate the actual product volume. These methods are subject to measurement inaccuracy because of the missing thickness information. An algorithm combines laser triangulation technique with two-dimensional measurement to reconstruct a three-dimensional surface for volume measurement is introduced in this paper. The result of this technique shows a significant accuracy improvement from the area-projection method

  9. Three-dimensional THz lumped-circuit resonators.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Yanko; Desfond, Pascal; Belacel, Cherif; Becerra, Loïc; Sirtori, Carlo

    2015-06-29

    Our work describes a novel three dimensional meta-material resonator design for optoelectronic applications in the THz spectral range. In our resonant circuits, the capacitors are formed by double-metal regions cladding a dielectric core. Unlike conventional planar metamaterials, the electric field is perpendicular to the surface and totally confined in the dielectric core. Furthermore, the magnetic field, confined in the inductive part, is parallel to the electric field, ruling out coupling through propagation effects. Our geometry thus combines the benefit of double-metal structures that provide parallel plate capacitors, while maintaining the ability of meta-material resonators to adjust independently the capacitive and inductive parts. Furthermore, in our geometry, a constant bias can be applied across the dielectric, making these resonators very suitable for applications such as ultra-low dark current THz quantum detectors and amplifiers based on quantum cascade gain medium.

  10. Three-dimensional graphene-based composites for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based composites have drawn increasing attention for energy applications due to their unique structures and properties. By combining the merits of 3D graphene (3DG), e.g., a porous and interconnected network, a high electrical conductivity, a large accessible surface area, and excellent mechanical strength and thermal stability, with the high chemical/electrochemical activities of active materials, 3DG-based composites show great promise as high-performance electrode materials in various energy devices. This article reviews recent progress in 3DG-based composites and their applications in energy storage/conversion devices, i.e., supercapacitors, lithium-ion batteries, dye-sensitized solar cells, and fuel cells.

  11. Semiautomated hybrid algorithm for estimation of three-dimensional liver surface in CT using dynamic cellular automata and level-sets

    PubMed Central

    Dakua, Sarada Prasad; Abinahed, Julien; Al-Ansari, Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Liver segmentation continues to remain a major challenge, largely due to its intense complexity with surrounding anatomical structures (stomach, kidney, and heart), high noise level and lack of contrast in pathological computed tomography (CT) data. We present an approach to reconstructing the liver surface in low contrast CT. The main contributions are: (1) a stochastic resonance-based methodology in discrete cosine transform domain is developed to enhance the contrast of pathological liver images, (2) a new formulation is proposed to prevent the object boundary, resulting from the cellular automata method, from leaking into the surrounding areas of similar intensity, and (3) a level-set method is suggested to generate intermediate segmentation contours from two segmented slices distantly located in a subject sequence. We have tested the algorithm on real datasets obtained from two sources, Hamad General Hospital and medical image computing and computer-assisted interventions grand challenge workshop. Various parameters in the algorithm, such as w, Δt, z, α, μ, α1, and α2, play imperative roles, thus their values are precisely selected. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluation performed on liver data show promising segmentation accuracy when compared with ground truth data reflecting the potential of the proposed method. PMID:26158101

  12. Novel mutation of the CYP17 gene in two unrelated patients with combined 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency: demonstration of absent enzyme activity by expressing the mutant CYP17 gene and by three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Patocs, Attila; Liko, István; Varga, Ibolya; Gergics, Peter; Boros, Andras; Futo, Laszlo; Kun, Imre; Bertalan, Rita; Toth, Szilvia; Pazmany, Tamas; Toth, Miklós; Szücs, Nikolette; Horanyi, Janos; Glaz, Edit; Racz, Karoly

    2005-11-01

    conclude that expressing the CYP17 gene with functional analysis, combined with three-dimensional computerized modeling of the heme-binding site of the protein provide feasible tools for molecular characterizing of functional consequences of the novel CYP17 mutation on enzyme function. PMID:16176874

  13. Three dimensional fog forecasting in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M.; Masbou, M.; Bott, A.

    2010-07-01

    Fog in complex terrain shows large temporal and spatial variations that can only be simulated with a three-dimensional model, but more modifications than increasing the resolution are needed. For a better representation of fog we present a second moment cloud water scheme with a parametrization of the Köhler theory which is combined with the mixed phase Ferrier microphysics scheme. The more detailed microphysics produce many differences to the first moment Ferrier scheme and are responsible for reproducing the typically low liquid water content of fog. With explicitly predicted droplet number concentrations, sedimentation of cloud water can be modeled without a prescribed fall speed, which mainly affects the vertical distribution of cloud water and the end of the fogs life cycle. The complex topography of the Swiss Alps and its surroundings are used for model testing. As the focus is on the models ability to forecast the spatial distribution of fog, cloud patterns derived from high resolution MSG satellite data, rather than few point observations from ground stations are used. In a continous five day period of anticyclonic conditions, the satellite observed fog patterns showed large day to day variations with almost no fog to large areas of fog. This variability was very well simulated in the three-dimensional fog forecast. The simulations also demonstrate the need for high horizontal resolutions between 1 and 3 km. For model initialization the complex topography is actually a simplifying factor, as cold air flow and pooling are dominating the more uncertain processes of evapotranspiration or errors in the soil moisture field.

  14. Rapid three-dimensional segmentation of the carotid bifurcation from serial MR images.

    PubMed

    Ladak, H M; Milner, J S; Steinman, D A

    2000-02-01

    The current trend in computational hemodynamics is to employ realistic models derived from ex vivo or in vivo imaging. Such studies typically produce a series of images from which the lumen boundaries must first be individually extracted (i.e., two-dimensional segmentation), and then serially reconstructed to produce the three-dimensional lumen surface geometry. In this paper, we present a rapid three-dimensional segmentation technique that combines these two steps, based on the idea of an expanding virtual balloon. This three-dimensional technique is demonstrated in application to finite element meshing and CFD modeling of flow in the carotid bifurcation of a normal volunteer imaged with black blood MRI. Wall shear stress patterns computed using a mesh generated with the three-dimensional technique agree well with those computed using a mesh generated from conventional two-dimensional segmentation and serial reconstruction. In addition to reducing the time required to extract the lumen surface from hours to minutes, our approach is easy to learn and use and requires minimal user intervention, which can potentially increase the accuracy and precision of quantitative and longitudinal studies of hemodynamics and vascular disease. PMID:10790835

  15. View Factor Calculation for Three-Dimensional Geometries.

    1989-06-20

    Version 00 MCVIEW calculates the radiation geometric view factor between surfaces for three dimensional geometries with and without interposed third surface obstructions. It was developed to calculate view factors for input data to heat transfer analysis programs such as SCA-03/TRUMP, SCA-01/HEATING-5 and PSR-199/HEATING-6.

  16. Three Dimensional Imaging with Multiple Wavelength Speckle Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2014-05-28

    We present the design, modeling, construction, and results of a three-dimensional imager based upon multiple-wavelength speckle interferometry. A surface under test is illuminated with tunable laser light in a Michelson interferometer configuration while a speckled image is acquired at each laser frequency step. The resulting hypercube is Fourier transformed in the frequency dimension and the beat frequencies that result map the relative offsets of surface features. Synthetic wavelengths resulting from the laser tuning can probe features ranging from 18 microns to hundreds of millimeters. Three dimensional images will be presented along with modeling results.

  17. Three-Dimensional Contour Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Edward

    2005-01-01

    In summary, this highly conceptual activity helps middle school students understand that the lines on the contour map represent intersections of the surface of the landform with regularly spaced horizontal planes. Building the landform and relating its features to the contour map offer many opportunities for visualization, all grounded in concrete…

  18. Three-dimensional charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  19. Collimation and Stability of Three Dimensional Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, P. E.; Clarke, D. A.; Howell, D. A.

    1993-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of cylindrical jets established in equilibrium with a surrounding uniform medium have been performed. Large scale structures such as helical twisting of the jet, elliptical distortion and bifurcation of the jet, and triangular distortion and trifurcation of the jet have been seen in the simulations. The grid resolution has been sufficient to allow the development of structures on smaller scales and has revealed higher order distortions of the jet surface and complex structure internal to the jet. However, smaller scale surface distortion and internal jet structure do not significantly modify the large scale dynamics. It is the large scale surface distortions and accompanying filamentation that dominate the jet dynamics. Decollimation occurs as the jet bifurcates or trifurcates. Jets with density less than the immediately surrounding medium rapidly decollimate and expand as the jet filaments into multiple streams leading to shock heating and mass entrainment. The resulting morphology resembles a turbulent plume and might be relevant to some FRI type radio sources. Jet densities higher than the immediately surrounding medium are required to produce FRII type radio source jet morphology and protostellar jet morphology. Thus, while jets may be denser or lighter than the external medium through which they propagate, it is the conditions in the cocoon or lobe around the jet that governs the dynamics far behind the jet front. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-8919180, EPSCoR grant EHR-9108761 and NSF-REU grant AST-9300413.

  20. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1996-04-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D and D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surfaces to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled using coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The CLR also provides 3D facility maps which establish a 3D world view within which the robotic sensor system can operate.

  1. Three-Dimensional Reciprocal-Lattice Analysis Using Azimuth-Scan Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction: Determination of Complex Crystal Orientations of Al Grains on Si(111) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Ken; Oi, Hideo; Tanaka, Kota; Kumagai, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    We have applied a three-dimensional (3D) reciprocal-lattice analysis method using a typical reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) system - all RHEED patterns in scanning sample-surface azimuth are converted into 3D reciprocal-lattice space. This analysis method can determine complex crystal orientations of nanoclusters, islands, and grains with multiple domains, which are difficult to obtain from a small number of non-converted two-dimensional RHEED patterns. For an Al-deposited Si(111) surface followed by annealing, we successfully determined new crystal orientations of Al grains: Al(001), Al(012) and Al(011) ∥ Si(111) with Al[100] ∥ Si<0bar 11>. The typical acquisition time of 3D RHEED patterns is 10-20 min, which is shorter than that by a standard X-ray diffraction system with φ and ω scans for 3D reciprocal-lattice mapping. This is one of the advantages of this analysis method, in addition to the convenient observation of in situ vacuum-fabricated nanocrystals on substrate surfaces with high sensitivity.

  2. Three Dimensional Illustrating--Three-Dimensional Vision and Deception of Sensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szállassy, Noémi; Gánóczy, Anita; Kriska, György

    2009-01-01

    The wide-spread digital photography and computer use gave the opportunity for everyone to make three-dimensional pictures and to make them public. The new opportunities with three-dimensional techniques give chance for the birth of new artistic photographs. We present in detail the biological roots of three-dimensional visualization, the phenomena…

  3. Three-dimensional laser window formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless three-dimensional laser windows. These windows represent a major part of specialized, nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems used in a variety of compressor and turbine research test facilities. This report discusses in detail the aspects of three-dimensional laser window formation. It focuses on the unique methodology and the peculiarities associated with the formation of these windows. Included in this discussion are the design criteria, bonding mediums, and evaluation testing for three-dimensional laser windows.

  4. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. Chemical analysis plays a vital role throughout the process of decontamination. Before clean-up operations can begin the site must be characterized with respect to the type and concentration of contaminants, and detailed site mapping must clarify areas of both high and low risk. During remediation activities chemical analysis provides a means to measure progress and to adjust clean-up strategy. Once the clean-up process has been completed the results of chemical analysis will verify that the site is in compliance with federal and local regulations.

  5. Lattice theory of three-dimensional cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the stability of a three-dimensional crack is analyzed within a lattice-statics approximation. The consequence of introducing a jog into the crack face as well as the effects of various nonlinear-force laws are studied. The phenomenon of lattice trapping (upper and lower bounds on the applied stress for an equilibrium crack of given length) is again obtained. It is possible to obtain some physical insight into which aspects of the force law are critical for crack stability. In particular, the inadequacy of a thermodynamic approach - which relates the critical stress to a surface energy corresponding to the area under the cohesive-force-vs-displacement curve - is demonstrated. Surface energy is a global property of the cohesive-force law. Crack stability is sensitive to much more refined aspects of the cohesive-force law. Crack healing is sensitive to the long-range portion of the cohesive force. Crack expansion is sensitive to the position of the maximum in the cohesive-force relation.

  6. Primary and Secondary Three Dimensional Microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, Nicolas

    Today's MEMS devices are limited more so by the batteries that supply their power than the fabrication methods used to build them. Thick battery electrodes are capable of providing adequate energy, but long and tortuous diffusion pathways lead to low power capabilities. On the other hand, thin film batteries can operate at significant current densities but require large surface areas to supply practical energy. This dilemma can be solved by either developing new high capacity materials or by engineering new battery designs that decouple power and energy. Three dimensional batteries redesign traditional configurations to create nonplanar interfaces between battery components. This can be done by introducing hierarchical structures into the electrode shape. Designs such as these provide a maximum surface area over which chemical reactions can occur. Furthermore, by maintaining small feature sizes, ion diffusion and electronic transport distances can remain minimal. Manipulating these properties ensures fast kinetics that are required for high power situations. Energy density is maximized by layering material in the vertical direction, thus ensuring a minimal footprint area. Three dimensional carbon electrodes are fabricated using basic MEMS techniques. A silicon mold is anisotropically etched to produce channels of a predetermined diameter. The channels are then filled using an infiltration technique with electrode slurry. Once dried, the mold is attached to a current collector and etched using a XeF2 process. Electrodes of varying feature sizes have been fabricated using this method with aspect ratios ranging from 3.5:1 to 7:1. 3D carbon electrodes are shown to obtain capacities over 8 mAh/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2, or nearly 700% higher than planar carbon electrodes. When assembled with a planar cathode, the battery cell produced an average discharge capacity of 40 J/cm 2 at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. This places the energy density values slightly less than thick

  7. Three dimensional living neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnenberger, Anna; McLeod, Robert R.; Basta, Tamara; Stowell, Michael H. B.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate holographic optical tweezing combined with step-and-repeat maskless projection micro-stereolithography for fine control of 3D positioning of living cells within a 3D microstructured hydrogel grid. Samples were fabricated using three different cell lines; PC12, NT2/D1 and iPSC. PC12 cells are a rat cell line capable of differentiation into neuron-like cells NT2/D1 cells are a human cell line that exhibit biochemical and developmental properties similar to that of an early embryo and when exposed to retinoic acid the cells differentiate into human neurons useful for studies of human neurological disease. Finally induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) were utilized with the goal of future studies of neural networks fabricated from human iPSC derived neurons. Cells are positioned in the monomer solution with holographic optical tweezers at 1064 nm and then are encapsulated by photopolymerization of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels formed by thiol-ene photo-click chemistry via projection of a 512x512 spatial light modulator (SLM) illuminated at 405 nm. Fabricated samples are incubated in differentiation media such that cells cease to divide and begin to form axons or axon-like structures. By controlling the position of the cells within the encapsulating hydrogel structure the formation of the neural circuits is controlled. The samples fabricated with this system are a useful model for future studies of neural circuit formation, neurological disease, cellular communication, plasticity, and repair mechanisms.

  8. Three-dimensional surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Cevidanes, Lucia H C; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2010-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery, which allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3-dimensional surface models from cone-beam computed tomography, dynamic cephalometry, semiautomatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone, and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intraoperative guidance. The system provides further intraoperative assistance with a computer display showing jaw positions and 3-dimensional positioning guides updated in real time during the surgical procedure. The computer-aided surgery system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training, and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures before the surgery. Computer-aided surgery can make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases.

  9. A moving observer in a three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For many tasks such as retrieving a previously viewed object, an observer must form a representation of the world at one location and use it at another. A world-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the scene built up from visual information would fulfil this requirement, something computer vision now achieves with great speed and accuracy. However, I argue that it is neither easy nor necessary for the brain to do this. I discuss biologically plausible alternatives, including the possibility of avoiding three-dimensional coordinate frames such as ego-centric and world-based representations. For example, the distance, slant and local shape of surfaces dictate the propensity of visual features to move in the image with respect to one another as the observer's perspective changes (through movement or binocular viewing). Such propensities can be stored without the need for three-dimensional reference frames. The problem of representing a stable scene in the face of continual head and eye movements is an appropriate starting place for understanding the goal of three-dimensional vision, more so, I argue, than the case of a static binocular observer. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269608

  10. A moving observer in a three-dimensional world.

    PubMed

    Glennerster, Andrew

    2016-06-19

    For many tasks such as retrieving a previously viewed object, an observer must form a representation of the world at one location and use it at another. A world-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the scene built up from visual information would fulfil this requirement, something computer vision now achieves with great speed and accuracy. However, I argue that it is neither easy nor necessary for the brain to do this. I discuss biologically plausible alternatives, including the possibility of avoiding three-dimensional coordinate frames such as ego-centric and world-based representations. For example, the distance, slant and local shape of surfaces dictate the propensity of visual features to move in the image with respect to one another as the observer's perspective changes (through movement or binocular viewing). Such propensities can be stored without the need for three-dimensional reference frames. The problem of representing a stable scene in the face of continual head and eye movements is an appropriate starting place for understanding the goal of three-dimensional vision, more so, I argue, than the case of a static binocular observer.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'.

  11. A moving observer in a three-dimensional world.

    PubMed

    Glennerster, Andrew

    2016-06-19

    For many tasks such as retrieving a previously viewed object, an observer must form a representation of the world at one location and use it at another. A world-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the scene built up from visual information would fulfil this requirement, something computer vision now achieves with great speed and accuracy. However, I argue that it is neither easy nor necessary for the brain to do this. I discuss biologically plausible alternatives, including the possibility of avoiding three-dimensional coordinate frames such as ego-centric and world-based representations. For example, the distance, slant and local shape of surfaces dictate the propensity of visual features to move in the image with respect to one another as the observer's perspective changes (through movement or binocular viewing). Such propensities can be stored without the need for three-dimensional reference frames. The problem of representing a stable scene in the face of continual head and eye movements is an appropriate starting place for understanding the goal of three-dimensional vision, more so, I argue, than the case of a static binocular observer.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269608

  12. Flow shaping using three-dimensional microscale gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-C.; Roy, Subrata

    2009-08-24

    We introduce a flow shaping mechanism using surface compliant microscale gas discharge. A three-dimensional finite element-based multiscale ionized gas flow code is utilized to analyze charge separation, potential distribution, and flow inducement mechanism. For the case of quiescent flow, a horseshoe-shaped plasma generator is introduced. Due to its unusual shape, the three-dimensional electric force excites a pinching effect on the fluid inside selectively powered electrode arc. Such effect is capable of tripping the flow-ejecting fluid normal to the plane of the actuator and thus can be very useful for many applications.

  13. Double Epitaxy as a Paradigm for Templated Growth of Highly Ordered Three-Dimensional Mesophase Crystals.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yongsoon; Tao, Jinhui; Arey, Bruce W; Wang, Chongmin; Exarhos, Gregory J; De Yoreo, James J; Sushko, Maria L; Liu, Jun

    2016-09-27

    Molecular templating and self-assembly are fundamental mechanisms for controlling the morphology of biominerals, while in synthetic two-dimensional layered materials similar levels of control over materials structure can be achieved through the epitaxial relationship with the substrate. In this study these two concepts are combined to provide an approach for the nucleation and growth of three-dimensional ordered mesophases on solid surfaces. A combined experimental and theoretical study revealed how atomic ordering of the substrate controls the structure of surfactant template and the orientation and morphology of the epitaxially grown inorganic material. This dual epitaxial relationship between the substrate, surfactant template, and inorganic mesophase gives rise to a highly ordered porous mesophase with a well-defined cubic lattice of pores. The level of control over the material's three-dimensional architecture achieved in this one-step synthesis is reminiscent of that in biomineralization.

  14. Double Epitaxy as a Paradigm for Templated Growth of Highly Ordered Three-Dimensional Mesophase Crystals.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yongsoon; Tao, Jinhui; Arey, Bruce W; Wang, Chongmin; Exarhos, Gregory J; De Yoreo, James J; Sushko, Maria L; Liu, Jun

    2016-09-27

    Molecular templating and self-assembly are fundamental mechanisms for controlling the morphology of biominerals, while in synthetic two-dimensional layered materials similar levels of control over materials structure can be achieved through the epitaxial relationship with the substrate. In this study these two concepts are combined to provide an approach for the nucleation and growth of three-dimensional ordered mesophases on solid surfaces. A combined experimental and theoretical study revealed how atomic ordering of the substrate controls the structure of surfactant template and the orientation and morphology of the epitaxially grown inorganic material. This dual epitaxial relationship between the substrate, surfactant template, and inorganic mesophase gives rise to a highly ordered porous mesophase with a well-defined cubic lattice of pores. The level of control over the material's three-dimensional architecture achieved in this one-step synthesis is reminiscent of that in biomineralization. PMID:27576108

  15. Three-Dimensional Extension of a Digital Library Service System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Long

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to provide an overall methodology and case study for the innovation and extension of a digital library, especially the service system. Design/methodology/approach: Based on the three-dimensional structure theory of the information service industry, this paper combines a comprehensive analysis with the practical experiences…

  16. Three-dimensional, three-component wall-PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthe, André; Kondermann, Daniel; Christensen, Carolyn; Goubergrits, Leonid; Garbe, Christoph; Affeld, Klaus; Kertzscher, Ulrich

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new time-resolved three-dimensional, three-component (3D-3C) measurement technique called wall-PIV. It was developed to assess near wall flow fields and shear rates near non-planar surfaces. The method is based on light absorption according to Beer-Lambert’s law. The fluid containing a molecular dye and seeded with buoyant particles is illuminated by a monochromatic, diffuse light. Due to the dye, the depth of view is limited to the near wall layer. The three-dimensional particle positions can be reconstructed by the intensities of the particle’s projection on an image sensor. The flow estimation is performed by a new algorithm, based on learned particle trajectories. Possible sources of measurement errors related to the wall-PIV technique are analyzed. The accuracy analysis was based on single particle experiments and a three-dimensional artificial data set simulating a rotating sphere.

  17. Radiation hardness of three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, Stefano Sciortino, Silvio; Bellini, Marco; Corsi, Chiara; Cindro, Vladimir; Kanxheri, Keida; Servoli, Leonello; Morozzi, Arianna; Passeri, Daniele; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2015-05-11

    The three-dimensional concept in particle detection is based on the fabrication of columnar electrodes perpendicular to the surface of a solid state radiation sensor. It permits to improve the radiation resistance characteristics of a material by lowering the necessary bias voltage and shortening the charge carrier path inside the material. If applied to a long-recognized exceptionally radiation-hard material like diamond, this concept promises to pave the way to the realization of detectors of unprecedented performances. We fabricated conventional and three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors, and tested them before and after neutron damage up to 1.2 ×10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence. We found that the signal collected by the three-dimensional detectors is up to three times higher than that of the conventional planar ones, at the highest neutron damage ever experimented.

  18. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  19. Three dimensional optic tissue culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Cardwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioreactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms normal, functional tissue organization and extracellular matrix.

  20. Three-dimensional measurements of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, S. K.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and retardation experiments conducted in polycarbonate test specimen are described. The transparent test material allows optical interferometry measurements of the fatigue crack opening (and closing) profiles. Crack surface displacements are obtained through the specimen thickness and three dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure are discussed.

  1. Three-Dimensional Icosahedral Phase Field Quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P.; Archer, A. J.; Knobloch, E.; Rucklidge, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the formation and stability of icosahedral quasicrystalline structures using a dynamic phase field crystal model. Nonlinear interactions between density waves at two length scales stabilize three-dimensional quasicrystals. We determine the phase diagram and parameter values required for the quasicrystal to be the global minimum free energy state. We demonstrate that traits that promote the formation of two-dimensional quasicrystals are extant in three dimensions, and highlight the characteristics required for three-dimensional soft matter quasicrystal formation.

  2. Three-dimensional structure of Theiler virus.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, R A; Filman, D J; Fujinami, R S; Icenogle, J P; Hogle, J M

    1992-01-01

    Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus strains are categorized into two groups, a neurovirulent group that rapidly kills the host, and a demyelinating group that causes a generally nonlethal infection of motor neurons followed by a persistent infection of the white matter with demyelinating lesions similar to those found in multiple sclerosis. The three-dimensional structure of the DA strain, a member of the demyelinating group, has been determined at 2.8 A resolution. As in other picornaviruses, the icosahedral capsid is formed by the packing of wedge-shaped eight-stranded antiparallel beta barrels. The surface of Theiler virus has large star-shaped plateaus at the fivefold axes and broad depressions spanning the twofold axes. Several unusual structural features are clustered near one edge of the depression. These include two finger-like loops projecting from the surface (one formed by residues 78-85 of VP1, and the other formed by residues 56-65 of VP3) and a third loop containing three cysteines (residues 87, 89, and 91 of VP3), which appear to be covalently modified. Most of the sequence differences between the demyelinating and neurovirulent groups that could play a role in determining pathogenesis map to the surface of the star-shaped plateau. The distribution of these sequence differences on the surface of the virion is consistent with models in which the differences in the pathogenesis of the two groups of Theiler viruses are the result of differences in immunological or receptor-mediated recognition processes. Images PMID:1549565

  3. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an advanced method of noninvasive infrared imaging of tissues in depth. Heretofore, commercial OCT systems for 3D imaging have been designed principally for external ophthalmological examination. As explained below, such systems have been based on a one-dimensional OCT principle, and in the operation of such a system, 3D imaging is accomplished partly by means of a combination of electronic scanning along the optical (Z) axis and mechanical scanning along the two axes (X and Y) orthogonal to the optical axis. In 3D OCT, 3D imaging involves a form of electronic scanning (without mechanical scanning) along all three axes. Consequently, the need for mechanical adjustment is minimal and the mechanism used to position the OCT probe can be correspondingly more compact. A 3D OCT system also includes a probe of improved design and utilizes advanced signal- processing techniques. Improvements in performance over prior OCT systems include finer resolution, greater speed, and greater depth of field.

  4. Calculation of laminar heating rates on three-dimensional configurations using the axisymmetric analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. H., II

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical method was developed for computing approximate laminar heating rates on three dimensional configurations at angle of attack. The method is based on the axisymmetric analogue which is used to reduce the three dimensional boundary layer equations along surface streamlines to an equivalent axisymmetric form by using the metric coefficient which describes streamline divergence (or convergence). The method was coupled with a three dimensional inviscid flow field program for computing surface streamline paths, metric coefficients, and boundary layer edge conditions.

  5. Full-Scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Instabilities and Rivulet Formulation in Heated Falling Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ramaswamy, B.; Joo, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    A thin film draining on an inclined plate has been studied numerically using finite element method. Three-dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy with a moving boundary are integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian frame of reference. Kinematic equation is solved to precisely update interface location. Rivulet formation based on instability mechanism has been simulated using full-scale computation. Comparisons with long-wave theory are made to validate the numerical scheme. Detailed analysis of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear wave formation and spontaneous rupture forming rivulets under the influence of combined thermocapillary and surface-wave instabilities is performed.

  6. Pliocene three-dimensional global ocean temperature reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Foley, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal structure of the mid-Piacenzian ocean is obtained by combining the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM3) multiproxy sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction with bottom water temperature estimates from 27 locations produced using Mg/Ca paleothermometry based upon the ostracod genus Krithe. Deep water temperature estimates are skewed toward the Atlantic Basin (63% of the locations) and represent depths from 1000m to 4500 m. This reconstruction, meant to serve as a validation data set as well as an initialization for coupled numerical climate models, assumes a Pliocene water mass framework similar to that which exists today, with several important modifications. The area of formation of present day North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) was expanded and extended further north toward the Arctic Ocean during the mid-Piacenzian relative to today. This, combined with a deeper Greenland-Scotland Ridge, allowed a greater volume of warmer NADW to enter the Atlantic Ocean. In the Southern Ocean, the Polar Front Zone was expanded relative to present day, but shifted closer to the Antarctic continent. This, combined with at least seasonal reduction in sea ice extent, resulted in decreased Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) production (relative to present day) as well as possible changes in the depth of intermediate waters. The reconstructed mid-Piacenzian three-dimensional ocean was warmer overall than today, and the hypothesized aerial extent of water masses appears to fit the limited stable isotopic data available for this time period. ?? Author(s) 2009.

  7. Pliocene three-dimensional global ocean temperature reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Foley, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    A snapshot of the thermal structure of the mid-Piacenzian ocean is obtained by combining the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM3) multiproxy sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction with bottom water tempera-5 ture estimates produced using Mg/Ca paleothermometry. This reconstruction assumes a Pliocene water mass framework similar to that which exists today, with several important modifications. The area of formation of present day North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) was expanded and extended further north toward the Arctic Ocean during the mid-Piacenzian relative to today. This, combined with a deeper Greenland-Scotland Ridge, allowed a greater volume of warmer NADW to enter the Atlantic Ocean. In the Southern Ocean, the Polar Front Zone was expanded relative to present day, but shifted closer to the Antarctic continent. This, combined with at least seasonal reduction in sea ice extent, resulted in decreased Antarctic BottomWater (AABW) production (relative to present day) as well as possible changes in the depth of intermediate wa15 ters. The reconstructed mid-Piacenzian three-dimensional ocean was warmer overall than today, and the hypothesized aerial extent of water masses appears to fit the limited stable isotopic data available for this time period. ?? Author(s) 2009.

  8. Pliocene three-dimensional global ocean temperature reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, H. J.; Robinson, M. M.; Foley, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    The thermal structure of the mid-Piacenzian ocean is obtained by combining the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM3) multiproxy sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction with bottom water temperature estimates from 27 locations produced using Mg/Ca paleothermometry based upon the ostracod genus Krithe. Deep water temperature estimates are skewed toward the Atlantic Basin (63% of the locations) and represent depths from 1000 m to 4500 m. This reconstruction, meant to serve as a validation data set as well as an initialization for coupled numerical climate models, assumes a Pliocene water mass framework similar to that which exists today, with several important modifications. The area of formation of present day North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) was expanded and extended further north toward the Arctic Ocean during the mid-Piacenzian relative to today. This, combined with a deeper Greenland-Scotland Ridge, allowed a greater volume of warmer NADW to enter the Atlantic Ocean. In the Southern Ocean, the Polar Front Zone was expanded relative to present day, but shifted closer to the Antarctic continent. This, combined with at least seasonal reduction in sea ice extent, resulted in decreased Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) production (relative to present day) as well as possible changes in the depth of intermediate waters. The reconstructed mid-Piacenzian three-dimensional ocean was warmer overall than today, and the hypothesized aerial extent of water masses appears to fit the limited stable isotopic data available for this time period.

  9. Three dimensional study of Lutetia lineaments network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Aboudan, Alessio; Bistacchi, Andrea; Barbieri, Cesare

    2014-05-01

    The Scientific Imaging System for Rosetta, OSIRIS, acquired an imaging sequence of the Lutetia asteroid, allowing detection of a large number of lineaments distributed over most of its surface (Thomas et al., 2012, Planet. Space Sci., 66, 96-124; Massironi et al., 2012, Planet. Space Sci., 66, 125-136). In general these lineaments can be interpreted as the surface expression of discontinuities such as faults or fractures. Several categories of features has been observed, like troughs, scarps, faults, and ridges. These lineaments are generally more than 50 km long and up to 1.2 km in width, and seem to be arranged in systems (e.g. with common orientation). Moreover, in different geological regions of the asteroid a preferred orientation of lineaments can be recognized, but in all regions there are also lineaments which cross the local preferred trend. Noteworthy, lineaments radial to impact craters, that are common on other asteroidal bodies, are mostly absent on Lutetia (Thomas et al., 2012, Planet. Space Sci., 66, 96-124). However, on a non-spherical body it is not obvious to reconstruct the relationships occurring between the different lineaments. Indeed, lineations that appear to be similarly oriented on different asteroid facets could have no correlation at all (Buczkowski et al., 2007, Icarus, 193, 39-52). In this context, the 3D mapping of lineaments, that we performed directly on the Lutetia shape model, allowed us to obtain a three-dimensional model of these structures that have been reconstructed as planes cutting through the asteroid. This innovative methodology allowed us to detect several structures concentric with respect to the North Pole Crater Cluster, suggesting that these lineaments were originated by these impact events. However most lineaments can be reasonably grouped in different systems of lineaments with no obvious correlation with any impact event detected on the imaged surface. This opens new questions on the origin of these structures and

  10. Wicking Enhancement in Three-Dimensional Hierarchical Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiting; Zhao, Junjie; Bagal, Abhijeet; Dandley, Erinn C; Oldham, Christopher J; Fang, Tiegang; Parsons, Gregory N; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2016-08-16

    Wicking, the absorption of liquid into narrow spaces without the assistance of external forces, has drawn much attention due to its potential applications in many engineering fields. Increasing surface roughness using micro/nanostructures can improve capillary action to enhance wicking. However, reducing the structure length scale can also result in significant viscous forces to impede wicking. In this work, we demonstrate enhanced wicking dynamics by using nanostructures with three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical features to increase the surface area while mitigating the obstruction of liquid flow. The proposed structures were engineered using a combination of interference lithography and hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires, where structures at two length scales were independently designed to control wicking behavior. The fabricated hierarchical 3D structures were tested for water and ethanol wicking properties, demonstrating improved wicking dynamics with intermediate nanowire lengths. The experimental data agree with the derived fluid model based on the balance of capillary and vicious forces. The hierarchical wicking structures can be potentially used in applications in water harvesting surfaces, microfluidics, and integrated heat exchangers. PMID:27459627

  11. Three-dimensional analysis of condylar hyperplasia with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Y; Ohashi, Y; Uchiyama, N; Terada, K; Hanada, K; Sasaki, F

    1991-02-01

    Three-dimensional surface reconstruction imaging from CT scans was used to study the deformity of the mandible in six patients with mandibular asymmetry. High-resolution axial CT scans of the mandible were obtained using Somatom-DR3 (Siemens). COSMOZONE-2SA (Nikon) with PC-9801VX21 (NEC) was used to reconstruct the three-dimensional images. The six patients were divided into two groups. One group was classified as unilateral hybrid forms and the other group was classified hemimandibular elongation on the diagnostic criteria of Obwegeser and Makek (1986). In the three-dimensional surface reconstruction, exact location and the degree of the deformity in the region from the ascending ramus to the condylar head and the lingual aspect from the ascending ramus to the mandibular body were accurately represented. In addition, the three-dimensional images could be easily rotated arbitrarily, precise evaluation could be done at every part of the mandible. On diagnosis, the mandibular morphology classified into the unilateral hybrid forms was presumed to vary from case to case even in the same classification. PMID:2037691

  12. Investigation on the magneto-optical Voigt effects in surface plasmon modes and anisotropic photonic band gap in the three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals as the mixed polarized modes considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Ding, Guo-Wen

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the magneto-optical Voigt effects in surface plasmon modes and anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) of the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic lattices are theoretically investigated based on the modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method, which are the homogeneous Te (tellurium) spheres immersed in the homogeneous magnetized plasma background, as the mixed polarized modes are considered. The more general condition is considered, and the anisotropic PBGs are not only for the extraordinary and ordinary modes but also for mixed polarized modes. The equations for computing such anisotropic PBGs are theoretically deduced. Theoretical simulations show that the anisotropic PBGs and a flatbands region can be observed in the dispersive curve. Compared to the similar 3D MPPCs containing the isotropic dielectric or uniaxial material spheres, the larger PBGs can be obtained as the extraordinary axis of the inserted uniaxial material is along the Г-H symmetry line although the region of flatbands is also different. However, the relative bandwidths of PBGs for such two cases are almost the same. The interesting properties of surface plasmon modes can also be found, which are that the upper edge of flatbands region cannot be tuned by the filling factor but can almost linearly increase on increasing the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field), respectively. The effects of the filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency on the anisotropic PBGs are investigated in detail, respectively. Theoretical calculations also show that such PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above.

  13. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Deformation Measurements Using Stereoscopic Imaging and Digital Speckle Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, H. J.; Proud, W. G.

    2006-07-28

    A technique has been developed to determine experimentally the three-dimensional displacement field on the rear surface of a dynamically deforming plate. The technique combines speckle analysis with stereoscopy, using a modified angular-lens method: this incorporates split-frame photography and a simple method by which the effective lens separation can be adjusted and calibrated in situ. Whilst several analytical models exist to predict deformation in extended or semi-infinite targets, the non-trivial nature of the wave interactions complicates the generation and development of analytical models for targets of finite depth. By interrogating specimens experimentally to acquire three-dimensional strain data points, both analytical and numerical model predictions can be verified more rigorously. The technique is applied to the quasi-static deformation of a rubber sheet and dynamically to Mild Steel sheets of various thicknesses.

  14. Shear wave focusing for three-dimensional sonoelastography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Taylor, Lawrence S; Rubens, Deborah J; Parker, Kevin J

    2002-01-01

    A new vibration scheme is shown to provide localized vibration fields for three-dimensional sonoelastography imaging. The theoretical vibration distributions of double strip loads vibrating normally to the surface of a semi-infinite elastic space are calculated. A localization or focusing of shear waves inbetween the double-strip loads is predicted. Experimentally, two parallel rigid rectangular cross-section bars are mounted on an electromagnetic shaker. Driven by the signal source, the bars vibrate against the surface of a tissue-mimicking phantom. The double-bar source is also used to propagate shear wave into an ex vivo prostate phantom with a 6 mm "tumor" in it. A combination of high frequencies (400-600 Hz) is used to drive the double-bar applicator. In the phantom experiments, a shear wave focal zone with higher vibration amplitude and uniformity predicted by the theory was confirmed. The position of the focal zone is controllable when adjusting the separation of the bars as the theory shows. When this vibration scheme was used in a prostate phantom experiment, high-resolution tumor images with clear boundaries are obtained. The parallel bar is an ideal applicator to create more uniform vibration within a controllable localized volume. The field has uniformity especially in the direction along the bars. PMID:11831818

  15. Vision in our three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of our perceptual experience are dominated by the fact that our two eyes point forward. Whilst the location of our eyes leaves the environment behind our head inaccessible to vision, co-ordinated use of our two eyes gives us direct access to the three-dimensional structure of the scene in front of us, through the mechanism of stereoscopic vision. Scientific understanding of the different brain regions involved in stereoscopic vision and three-dimensional spatial cognition is changing rapidly, with consequent influences on fields as diverse as clinical practice in ophthalmology and the technology of virtual reality devices. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269595

  16. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be constrained as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  17. Three-Dimensional Robotic Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thinh V.

    1989-01-01

    Stereoscopy and motion provide clues to outlines of objects. Digital image-processing system acts as "intelligent" automatic machine-vision system by processing views from stereoscopic television cameras into three-dimensional coordinates of moving object in view. Epipolar-line technique used to find corresponding points in stereoscopic views. Robotic vision system analyzes views from two television cameras to detect rigid three-dimensional objects and reconstruct numerically in terms of coordinates of corner points. Stereoscopy and effects of motion on two images complement each other in providing image-analyzing subsystem with clues to natures and locations of principal features.

  18. Three-Dimensional Extended Bargmann Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Rosseel, Jan

    2016-06-01

    We show that three-dimensional general relativity, augmented with two vector fields, allows for a nonrelativistic limit, different from the standard limit leading to Newtonian gravity, that results in a well-defined action which is of the Chern-Simons type. We show that this three-dimensional "extended Bargmann gravity," after coupling to matter, leads to equations of motion allowing a wider class of background geometries than the ones that one encounters in Newtonian gravity. We give the supersymmetric generalization of these results and point out an important application in the context of calculating partition functions of nonrelativistic field theories using localization techniques.

  19. Three-Dimensional Extended Bargmann Supergravity.

    PubMed

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Rosseel, Jan

    2016-06-24

    We show that three-dimensional general relativity, augmented with two vector fields, allows for a nonrelativistic limit, different from the standard limit leading to Newtonian gravity, that results in a well-defined action which is of the Chern-Simons type. We show that this three-dimensional "extended Bargmann gravity," after coupling to matter, leads to equations of motion allowing a wider class of background geometries than the ones that one encounters in Newtonian gravity. We give the supersymmetric generalization of these results and point out an important application in the context of calculating partition functions of nonrelativistic field theories using localization techniques. PMID:27391712

  20. Three-Dimensional Icosahedral Phase Field Quasicrystal.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, P; Archer, A J; Knobloch, E; Rucklidge, A M

    2016-08-12

    We investigate the formation and stability of icosahedral quasicrystalline structures using a dynamic phase field crystal model. Nonlinear interactions between density waves at two length scales stabilize three-dimensional quasicrystals. We determine the phase diagram and parameter values required for the quasicrystal to be the global minimum free energy state. We demonstrate that traits that promote the formation of two-dimensional quasicrystals are extant in three dimensions, and highlight the characteristics required for three-dimensional soft matter quasicrystal formation. PMID:27563973