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Sample records for commercial equipment additional

  1. Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

    2004-08-02

    Energy efficiency standards set minimum levels of energy efficiency that must be met by new products. Depending on the dynamics of the market and the level of the standard, the effect on the market for a given product may be small, moderate, or large. Energy efficiency standards address a number of market failures that exist in the buildings sector. Decisions about efficiency levels often are made by people who will not be responsible for the energy bill, such as landlords or developers of commercial buildings. Many buildings are occupied for their entire lives by very temporary owners or renters, each unwilling to make long-term investments that would mostly reward subsequent users. And sometimes what looks like apathy about efficiency merely reflects inadequate information or time invested to evaluate it. In addition to these sector-specific market failures, energy efficiency standards address the endemic failure of energy prices to incorporate externalities. In the U.S., energy efficiency standards for consumer products were first implemented in California in 1977. National standards became effective starting in 1988. By the end of 2001, national standards were in effect for over a dozen residential appliances, as well as for a number of commercial sector products. Updated standards will take effect in the next few years for several products. Outside the U.S., over 30 countries have adopted minimum energy performance standards. Technologies and markets are dynamic, and additional opportunities to improve energy efficiency exist. There are two main avenues for extending energy efficiency standards. One is upgrading standards that already exist for specific products. The other is adopting standards for products that are not covered by existing standards. In the absence of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards, it is likely that many new products will enter the stock with lower levels of energy efficiency than would otherwise be the case. Once in the stock

  2. Water-Using Equipment: Commercial and Industrial

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2006-01-24

    Water is an important aspect of many facets in energy engineering. While the previous article detailed domestic related water-using equipment such as toilets and showerheads, this article focuses on various types of water-using equipment in commercial and industrial facilities, including commercial dishwashers and laundry, single-pass cooling equipment, boilers and steam generators, cooling towers, and landscape irrigation. Opportunities for water and energy conservation are explained, including both technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes. Water management planning and leak detection are also included as they are essential to a successful water management program.

  3. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Commercial Lawn Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program produced this guide to help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits. This guide provides information about equipment powered by propane, ethanol, compressed natural gas, biodiesel, and electricity, as well as advanced engine technology. In addition to providing an overview for organizations considering alternative fuel lawn equipment, this guide may also be helpful for organizations that want to consider using additional alternative fueled equipment.

  4. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program produced this guide to help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits. This guide provides information about equipment powered by propane, ethanol, compressed natural gas, biodiesel, and electricity, as well as advanced engine technology. In addition to providing an overview for organizations considering alternative fuel lawn equipment, this guide may also be helpful for organizations that want to consider using additional alternative fueled equipment.

  5. 10 CFR 429.44 - Commercial water heating equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Commercial water heating equipment. 429.44 Section 429.44... PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.44 Commercial water heating equipment... to commercial WH equipment; and (2) For each basic model of commercial water heating (WH)...

  6. 10 CFR 429.44 - Commercial water heating equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Commercial water heating equipment. 429.44 Section 429.44... PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.44 Commercial water heating equipment... each basic model of commercial water heating (WH) equipment, efficiency must be determined either...

  7. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2E: Commercial equipment utility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Examination of commercial equipment technologies revealed that the functional performance requirements of space processing equipment could generally be met by state-of-the-art design practices. Thus, an apparatus could be evolved from a standard item or derived by custom design using present technologies. About 15 percent of the equipment needed has no analogous commercial base of derivation and requires special development. This equipment is involved primarily with contactless heating and position control. The derivation of payloads using commercial equipment sources provides a broad and potentially cost-effective base upon which to draw. The derivation of payload equipment from commercial technologies poses other issues beyond that of the identifiable functional performance, but preliminary results on testing of selected equipment testing appear quite favorable. During this phase of the SPA study, several aspects of commercial equipment utility were assessed and considered. These included safety, packaging and structural, power conditioning (electrical/electronic), thermal and materials of construction.

  8. 77 FR 75400 - Labeling Requirements for Commercial and Industrial Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Request... conservation standards for certain commercial and industrial equipment, and requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to administer an energy conservation program for the equipment, including the development of...

  9. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be

  10. 78 FR 8998 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... Industrial Equipment: Proposed Determination of Commercial and Industrial Compressors as Covered Equipment... to the notice of proposed determination, published December 31, 2012, about commercial and industrial... proposed determination that commercial and industrial compressors meet the criteria for covered equipment...

  11. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    SciTech Connect

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project

  12. Miscellaneous equipment in commercial buildings: The inventory, utilization, and consumption by equipment type

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.

    1990-09-01

    The nature of the miscellaneous equipment (devices other than permanently installed lighting and those used for space conditioning) in commercial buildings is diverse, comprising a wide variety of devices that are subject to varied patterns of use. This portion of the commercial load is frequently underestimated, and widely hypothesized to be growing. These properties make it a particularly difficult load to characterize for purposes of demand-side management. In the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), over 100 commercial sites in the Pacific Northwest have been metered at the end-use level for several years. Detailed inspections of the equipment in them have also been conducted. This paper describes how the ELCAP data have been used to estimate three fundamental properties of the various types of equipment in several classes of commercial buildings: (1) the installed capacity per unit floor area, (2) utilization of the equipment relative to the installed capacity, and (3) the resulting energy consumption by building type and for the Pacific Northwest commercial sector as a whole. Applications for the results include assessment of conservation potential, prediction of equipment loads from survey data, estimating equipment loads for energy audits, targeting of conservation technology development, and disaggregating building total or mixed end-use data. 4 tabs., refs.

  13. 10 CFR 429.44 - Commercial water heating equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... energy usage of a basic model for which consumers would favor lower values shall be greater than or equal... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Commercial water heating equipment. 429.44 Section 429.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR...

  14. Commercial Truck/Equipment Technician. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for commercial truck and equipment technician is an employer-verified competency list that evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives throughout Ohio. The task list of the National…

  15. Variable Temperature Equipment for a Commercial Magnetic Susceptibility Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Variable temperature equipment for the magnetic susceptibility balance MSB-MK1 of Sherwood Scientific, Ltd., is described. The sample temperature is controlled with streaming air heated by water in a heat exchanger. Whereas the balance as sold commercially can be used only for room temperature measurements, the setup we designed extends the…

  16. Variable Temperature Equipment for a Commercial Magnetic Susceptibility Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Variable temperature equipment for the magnetic susceptibility balance MSB-MK1 of Sherwood Scientific, Ltd., is described. The sample temperature is controlled with streaming air heated by water in a heat exchanger. Whereas the balance as sold commercially can be used only for room temperature measurements, the setup we designed extends the…

  17. Selection of Additive Manufacturing (AM) Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    Recent advancements in technology have enabled Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as Three-Dimensional (3-D) printing, to become a powerful ...Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been tracking AM over recent years and is considering investing in...9 1 I. INTRODUCTION Additive Manufacturing (AM) has become a very powerful

  18. 78 FR 11996 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Commercial and Industrial Pumps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 RIN 1904-AC54 Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Commercial and Industrial Pumps AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... CONTACT: Mr. Charles Llenza, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

  19. History and current status of commercial pulsed laser deposition equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will review the history of the scale-up of the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process from small areas ∼1 cm2 up to 10 m2 starting in about 1987. It also documents the history of commercialization of PLD as various companies become involved in selling fully integrated laser deposition tools starting in 1989. The paper will highlight the current state of the art of commercial PLD equipment for R&D that is available on the market today from mainstream vendors as well as production-oriented applications directed at piezo-electric materials for microelectromechanical systems and high-temperature superconductors for coated-conductor applications. The paper clearly demonstrates that considerable improvements have been made to scaling this unique physical vapour deposition process to useful substrate sizes, and that commercial deposition equipment is readily available from a variety of vendors to address a wide variety of technologically important thin-film applications.

  20. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE... Pipeline Components § 192.171 Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment. (a) Each compressor station...

  1. New recommended heat gains for commercial cooking equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1998-12-31

    Radiant heat gain from cooking equipment can significantly impact the air-conditioning load and/or human comfort in a commercial kitchen. This paper presents and discusses updated heat gain data for several types of commercial cooking equipment based on recent testing by gas and electric utility research organizations. The cooking equipment was tested under exhaust-only, wall-canopy hoods. The fundamentals of appliance heat gain are reviewed and the new data are compared with data published in the 1993 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, chapter 26, nonresidential cooling and heating load calculations. These updated data are now incorporated in the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, chapter 28, nonresidential cooling and heating load calculations. The paper also discusses appliance heat gain with respect to sizing air-conditioning systems for commercial kitchens and presents representative radiant factors that may be used to estimate heat gain from other sizes or types of gas and electric cooking equipment when appliance specific heat gain data are not avoidable.

  2. Evaluation of Commercially-Available Equipment for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report The Underground Transport Restoration (UTR) project is an inter-agency effort. This effort aims to improve the capability for transit systems to quickly and efficiently recover from a biological contamination incident by refining existing methods, tools and protocols for characterization, clean-up, and clearance of contamination in physical structures (i.e., tunnels, stations) and rolling stock (i.e., subway trains). The aim was to evaluate existing sampling, characterization, and decontamination technologies through experimentation, table-top exercises and operational demonstrations to develop guidance and decision frameworks and support tools through interactions of local, state and federal partners. In this investigation, a survey of commercially-available or fielded equipment was conducted and resulted in three pieces of identified equipment that could be used or rapidly modified for use in dispensing liquid chemicals to decontaminate surfaces following a biological contamination incident. documenting lab-scale testing, field-scale testing, and an equipment demonstration of commercial equipment used to decontaminate subway infrastructure following a biological incident.

  3. 14 CFR 135.178 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Equipment § 135.178 Additional emergency equipment. No person may operate an airplane having a passenger... airplanes, no sign may continue to be used if its luminescence (brightness) decreases to below 100... was type certificated. On these airplanes, no sign may continue to be used if its...

  4. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  5. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Equipment boxes (later addition) one level down from antenna cab, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Equipment boxes (later addition) one level down from antenna cab, looking southwest. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  7. Analysis of commercial equipment and instrumentation for Spacelab payloads, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technical results are presented of a study to investigate analytically the feasibility of using commercially available laboratory equipment and instrumentation in the spacelab in support of various experiments. The feasibility is demonstrated by the breadth of application of commercial, airborne, and military equipment to experiment equipment requirements in the spacelab, and the cost effectiveness of utilizing this class of equipment instead of custom-built aerospace equipment typical of past designs. Equipment design and specifications are discussed.

  8. 78 FR 54197 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Packaged Boilers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency... collection process to consider amending the energy conservation standards for commercial packaged boilers... Technologies Office, Mailstop EE-2J, Framework Document for Commercial Packaged Boilers, Docket No....

  9. 14 CFR 91.1045 - Additional equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... specified in that section. (5) Airborne weather radar as required by § 121.357 of this chapter, as...; or (ii) Airborne weather radar as required by § 135.175 of this chapter. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional equipment requirements....

  10. 14 CFR 91.1045 - Additional equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... specified in that section. (5) Airborne weather radar as required by § 121.357 of this chapter, as...; or (ii) Airborne weather radar as required by § 135.175 of this chapter. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional equipment requirements....

  11. 14 CFR 91.1045 - Additional equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... specified in that section. (5) Airborne weather radar as required by § 121.357 of this chapter, as...; or (ii) Airborne weather radar as required by § 135.175 of this chapter. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional equipment requirements....

  12. 14 CFR 91.1045 - Additional equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... specified in that section. (5) Airborne weather radar as required by § 121.357 of this chapter, as...; or (ii) Airborne weather radar as required by § 135.175 of this chapter. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional equipment requirements....

  13. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design...

  14. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design...

  15. 49 CFR 223.8 - Additional requirements for passenger equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for passenger equipment. 223.8 Section 223.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SAFETY GLAZING STANDARDS-LOCOMOTIVES, PASSENGER...

  16. 78 FR 66201 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to revise its test procedure for residential water heaters and certain commercial water heaters established under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. This rulemaking will fulfill DOE's statutory obligation for residential and certain commercial water heaters to review its test procedure for covered products and equipment at least once every seven years. In addition, this rulemaking will satisfy DOE's statutory obligation to develop a uniform efficiency descriptor for residential and commercial water heaters. The proposed test method would apply the same efficiency descriptor to all residential and certain commercial water heaters, and it would extend coverage to eliminate certain gaps in the current residential test procedure, update the simulated-use-test draw pattern, and update the water delivery temperature requirement. DOE is also announcing a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues presented in this test procedure rulemaking.

  17. 76 FR 37678 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Proposed Determination of Commercial and Industrial Fans... Energy (DOE) proposes to determine that commercial and industrial fans, blowers, and fume hoods meet the... pumps and certain other industrial equipment to conserve the energy resources of the nation. DATES: DOE...

  18. Interaction Between the Pipeline and Additional Equipment for Trenchless Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, V. S.; Temirbaev, R. M.; Toropov, E. S.; Toropov, S. Yu

    2016-10-01

    In this article the authors defined the limits of applicability of the pipeline pusher as additional equipment for pipeline construction when using trenchless methods. In this case, the pushing force is applied to the free end of the pipeline section located on the day surface. The authors obtained analytical dependences for determining the stress-strain state of the pushed pipeline when using the pusher in a particular case. In addition, they identified values of axial pushing force that are considered dangerous, because they can cause pipeline dropping down from the roller supports during pipeline pullback.

  19. 78 FR 12251 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC55 Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for Commercial and Industrial Fans and Blowers AGENCY... industrial fan and blower equipment published on February 1, 2013, is extended to May 2, 2013. DATES: The...

  20. 75 FR 67637 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Framework Document...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AC28 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Framework Document for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... certain commercial and industrial electric motors. The comment period is extended to November 24, 2010...

  1. 78 FR 55889 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE). EPCA also requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether more-stringent, amended standards would be technologically feasible and economically justified, and would save a significant amount of energy. In this notice, DOE proposes amended energy conservation standards for commercial refrigeration equipment. The notice also announces a public meeting to receive comment on these proposed standards and associated analyses and results.

  2. Report From BPTCS Project Team On Evaluation Of Additive Manufacturing For Pressure Retaining Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.

    2016-09-22

    ASME is evaluating the use of additive manufacturing (AM) for the construction of pressure equipment. The information in this report assesses available AM technologies for direct metal fabrication of pressure equipment. Background information is included in the report to provide context for those not experienced in AM technology. Only commercially available technologies for direct metal fabrication are addressed in the report because these AM methods are the only viable approaches for the construction of pressure equipment. Metal AM technologies can produce near-net shape parts by using multiple layers of material from a three dimensional (3D) design model of the geometry. Additive manufacturing of metal components was developed from polymer based rapid prototyping or 3D printing. At the current maturity level, AM application for pressure equipment has the potential to reduce delivery times and costs for complex shapes. AM will also lead to a reduction in the use of high cost materials, since parts can be created with corrosion resistant layers of high alloy material and structural layers of lower cost materials.

  3. Evaluation of commercial stability additives in middle distillate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Waynick, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    Ten commercial distillate stability additives were evaluated to determine their effect on the stability and chemistry of two distillate fuels. The two fuels were light catalytic cycle oil (LOCO) and a diesel fuel blend containing 15% of the same LOCO. Additives were evaluated for their ability to improve stability as measured by three test procedures. Also, their effect on fuel composition was measured. All additives were essentially sulfur-free nitrogen-containing compounds. Most of the nitrogen in each additive was basic nitrogen. Additive effectiveness did not correlate with total or basic nitrogen content. Additives that were blends of stabilizer, dispersant, and metal deactivator did not show a clear performance improvement when compared to additives of a simpler composition. The most cost-effective additive in improving stability was N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine, with only one other additive giving comparable performance. One additive decreased stability. All additives were found to inhibit the formation of SMORS, species reputed to be sediment precursors. Also, all additives promoted increased levels of phenalenones that were formed in aged LCCO. The effect on SMORS and phenalenones are consistent with current theories of distillate instability chemistry.

  4. Commercial cooking equipment improvement. Volume 4. Effects of ventilation on equipment performance. Final report Jul 1982-Feb 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, R.L.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the effects of normal ventilation and excess ventilation on the thermal efficiency of commercial cooking equipment installed under ventilation hoods. It specifically discusses work with heavy-duty open top and hot top ranges and deep fat fryers. It was determined that the canopy-style hood significantly reduces the efficiency of gas-fired equipment with open burners or closed burners with high back shelves. Gas-fired and electric deep fat fryer efficiencies were not affected by the air flow under the canopy-style hood but the efficiency of an immersion tube type fryer with a direct connected ventilation system was significantly reduced. It was also determined that equipment and ventilation system configuration and usage are important to equipment efficiency.

  5. Recommendations For The Safe Design, Operation And Use Of Commercial Sun Tanning Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, E. A.

    1982-02-01

    HSE Guidance Notes are being prepared to give recommendations to the designers, manufacturers, operators and users of commercial sun tanning equipment on the various health and safety aspects associated with the safe construction, siting and use of such equipment. Medically prescribed ultraviolet treatments are excluded from the guidance.

  6. Screening Analysis for EPACT-Covered Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Sriram; Armstrong, Peter R.; Belzer, David B.; Gaines, Suzanne C.; Hadley, Donald L.; Katipumula, S.; Smith, David L.; Winiarski, David W.

    2000-04-25

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) establishes that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulate efficiency levels of certain categories of commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equip-ment. EPACT establishes the initial minimum efficiency levels for products falling under these categories, based on ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 requirements. EPCA states that, if ASHRAE amends Standard 90.1-1989 efficiency levels, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in the amended Standard 90.1 and that it can establish higher efficiency levels if they would result in significant additional energy savings. Standard 90.1-1999 increases minimum efficiency levels for some of the equipment categories covered by EPCA 92. DOE conducted a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential for EPACT-covered products meet and exceeding these levels. This paper describes the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis.

  7. 78 FR 26544 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC55 Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for Commercial and Industrial Fans and Blowers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Extension of...

  8. 78 FR 26711 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AC65 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Showerheads, Faucets, Water Closets, Urinals and Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  9. Modeling of Energy Management Systems for Commercial Parks with Thermodynamic Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanshan, Shi; Yu, Zhang; Liuyang, Fan; Tian, Luo

    2017-05-01

    Commercial park energy management systems (CPEMS) can reasonably plan appliances’ schedule of commercial tenants (CT) and lower their electricity purchasing cost. However, in the existing models, thermodynamic equipment like air conditioners and water heaters are not precise enough, failing to reflect the actual operating characteristics of the equipment. This paper presents an energy management system model including thermodynamic equipment. By coordinating the electricity consumption schedule of multiple CTs, CPEMS can reduce CTs’ electricity purchase costs. In the demonstration example, electricity purchase costs of CTs are reduced and operators of CPEMS gain profit, proving the feasibility of the model.

  10. Lubricant additives, friend or foe: What the equipment design engineer needs to know

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, H.P.; Zantopulos, H.

    1995-10-01

    Lubricant formulations and lubricant additives have been slanted heavily toward protecting gear concentrated contacts from galling and wear. Much of the performance differentiation of these lubricants has been dependent on highly accelerated standardized laboratory testing. The area of contact fatigue has played a less important role in shaping lubricant formulations, but new test results for several commercially available gear lubricants suggest this area warrants a closer examination. The performance effects of fully and partially additized lubricants were studied using standard bearing industry rolling contact fatigue and wear testing procedures for tapered roller bearings. These test results indicate significant detrimental effects to wear, and fatigue life performance can occur with some additized lubricant formulations. Observations of functional surfaces, before and after testing, are made and examined for several lubricant formulations. The implications of these findings for equipment applications are discussed, and suggestions are made for ways to minimize or avoid potential detrimental performance effects. 10 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Digital video recording in trauma surgery using commercially available equipment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although videos of surgical procedures are useful as an educational tool, the recording of trauma surgeries in emergency situations is difficult. We describe an inexpensive and practical shooting method using a commercially available head-mounted video camera. Methods We used a ContourHD 1080p Helmet Camera (Contour Inc., Seattle, Washington, USA.). This small, self-contained video camera and recording system was originally designed for easy videography of outdoor sports by participants. Results We were able to easily make high-quality video recordings of our trauma surgeries, including an emergency room thoracotomy for chest stab wounds and a crush laparoptomy for a severe liver injury. Conclusion There are currently many options for recording surgery in the field, but the recording device and system should be chosen according to the surgical situation. We consider the use of a helmet-mounted, self-contained high-definition video camera-recorder to be an inexpensive, quick, and easy method for recording trauma surgeries. PMID:23578301

  12. The LSLE echocardiograph - Commercial hardware aboard Spacelab. [Life Sciences Laboratory Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Life Sciences Laboratory Equipment Echocardiograph, a commercial 77020AC Ultrasound Imaging System modified to meet NASA's spacecraft standards, is described. The assembly consists of four models: display and control, scanner, scan converter, and physioamplifiers. Four separate processors communicate over an IEE-488 bus, and the system has more than 6000 individual components on 35 printed circuit cards. Three levels of self test are provided: a short test during power up, a basic test initiated by a front panel switch, and interactive tests for specific routines. Default mode operation further enhances reliability. Modifications of the original system include the replacement of ac power supplies with dc to dc converters, a slide-out keyboard (to prevent accidental operation), Teflon insulated wire, and additional shielding for the ultrasound transducer cable.

  13. Condensate disposal from high-efficiency commercial heating equipment. Topical report, August-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    Contemporary and possible future heating equipment available for use in commercial and industrial applications was reviewed. The literature was searched for information on the condensate produced by high-efficiency gas-fired equipment, its generation rate, composition, disposal techniques, and effect on various drain materials. Manufacturers installation instructions for condensing residential equipment were also reviewed for applicability to commercial and industrial sized equipment. Those instructions varied significantly regarding their detail on condensate issues. That review was used as a basis for the preparation of suggested commercial condensate-disposal recommendations. More detail needs to be presented in commercial equipment installation instructions so that installers, operators and service personnel fully appreciate the complexity and capabilities of condensing equipment to insure a long and troublefree service life. The literature review also indicated that researchers in the U.S. and Europe found that condensate does not significantly effect the materials typically used in or the service life of sanitary drain systems, and that plastics such as PVC should last indefinitely when used for condensate disposal.

  14. [Properties of commercial licorice extracts used as a food additive].

    PubMed

    Iida, Kenji; Uematsu, Yoko; Suzuki, Kumi; Yasuno, Tetsuko; Hirata, Keiko; Ito, Kouichi

    2007-08-01

    Properties of eight commercial licorice extracts used as a food additive (sweetener, listed in the List of Existing Food Additives in the Japanese Food Sanitation Law) were surveyed. Residue on ignition ranged from 0.3 to 12.4%, and pH ranged from 4.1 to 6.8, amount of glycyrrhizin, which is the major component in licorice extract, ranged from 10.9 to 77.4%, sodium ranged from 0.1 to 1.2%, potassium ranged from 0.3 to 5.0%, and ammonium nitrogen ranged from 0.03 to 2.5%. These results indicated that various products were distributed on the market. Differences in the manufacturing process may contribute to the variations of product properties.

  15. 10 CFR 431.408 - Preemption of State regulations for covered equipment other than electric motors and commercial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... other than electric motors and commercial heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and water heating... regulations for covered equipment other than electric motors and commercial heating, ventilating, air... equipment other than an electric motor or commercial HVAC and WH product. Any such regulation that...

  16. 10 CFR 431.408 - Preemption of State regulations for covered equipment other than electric motors and commercial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... other than electric motors and commercial heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and water heating... regulations for covered equipment other than electric motors and commercial heating, ventilating, air... equipment other than an electric motor or commercial HVAC and WH product. Any such regulation that...

  17. Analysis of commercial equipment and instrumentation for Spacelab payloads. Volume 3: Design analysis and trade studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of each selected equipment item, and suitability and cost analyses were documented by equipment item. Tradeoffs of alternative specification requirements are presented which include possible relaxation of vibration, material control, fungus and corrosion requirements for experiment equipment. An additional tradeoff was performed to determine whether it is cost effective to modify experiment equipment to be compatible with a 28-volt dc power source rather than the conventional 110-volt ac source. Programmatic analysis data are given which were used as the basis for the extension of results from the analyses of specific equipment items to the entire spacelab experiment program.

  18. Catalytic converters for exhaust emission control of commercial equipment powered by internal combustion engines.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, J G

    1975-01-01

    The development of PTX, monolithic catalytic exhaust purifiers, is outlined, and their first use for exhaust emissions control of commercial equipment is described. The main use of PTX converters is on forklift trucks. The purification achievable with PTX-equipped fork-lift trucks under various operational conditions is discussed, and examples from the field are given. During more than ten years of operation, no adverse health effects have been reported, and PTX-equipped internal combustion engines appear safe for use in confined areas. PMID:50933

  19. Screening analysis for EPACT-covered commercial HVAC and water-heating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    S Somasundaram; PR Armstrong; DB Belzer; SC Gaines; DL Hadley; S Katipumula; DL Smith; DW Winiarski

    2000-05-25

    EPCA requirements state that if the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) amends efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90.1-1989, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in amended Standard 90.1. However, DOE can establish higher efficiency levels if it can show through clear and convincing evidence that a higher efficiency level, that is technologically feasible and economically justified, would produce significant additional energy savings. On October 29, 1999, ASHRAE approved the amended Standard 90.1, which increases the minimum efficiency levels for some of the commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment covered by EPCA 92. DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential of the efficiency levels listed in Standard 90.1-1999. The analysis estimates the annual national energy consumption and the potential for energy savings that would result if the EPACT-covered products were required to meet these efficiency levels. The analysis also estimates additional energy-savings potential for the EPACT-covered products if they were to exceed the efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90-1-1999. In addition, a simple life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was performed for some alternative efficiency levels. This paper will describe the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis. The magnitude of HVAC and SWH loads imposed on equipment depends on the building's physical and operational characteristics and prevailing climatic conditions. To address this variation in energy use, coil loads for 7 representative building types at 11 climate locations were estimated based on a whole-building simulation.

  20. Energy Savings Potential and Opportunities for High-Efficiency Electric Motors in Residential and Commercial Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Goetzler, William; Sutherland, Timothy; Reis, Callie

    2013-12-04

    This report describes the current state of motor technology and estimates opportunities for energy savings through application of more advanced technologies in a variety of residential and commercial end uses. The objectives of this report were to characterize the state and type of motor technologies used in residential and commercial appliances and equipment and to identify opportunities to reduce the energy consumption of electric motor-driven systems in the residential and commercial sectors through the use of advanced motor technologies. After analyzing the technical savings potential offered by motor upgrades and variable speed technologies, recommended actions are presented.

  1. 10 CFR 429.43 - Commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ensure that— (i) Any represented value of energy consumption or other measure of energy usage of a basic... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. 429.43 Section 429.43 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION,...

  2. 10 CFR 429.43 - Commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ensure that— (i) Any represented value of energy consumption or other measure of energy usage of a basic... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. 429.43 Section 429.43 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION,...

  3. 10 CFR 429.43 - Commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of energy consumption or other measure of energy usage of a basic model for which consumers would... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. 429.43 Section 429.43 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION,...

  4. 78 FR 79419 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Effect...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... microwave oven standby and off modes, metal halide lighting fixtures, commercial refrigeration equipment... and released to the public in May 2013 by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). OMB has issued... coolers and freezers, metal halide lighting fixtures, and furnace fans. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  5. 78 FR 48821 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... submission of comments by August 12, 2013. Thereafter, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), on behalf... Part 430 RIN 1904-AD04 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Proposed Determination of Computers as a Covered Consumer Product AGENCY: Office...

  6. 49 CFR 390.17 - Additional equipment and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 390.17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS; GENERAL General Requirements and Information § 390.17 Additional...

  7. Accessing space: A catalogue of process, equipment and resources for commercial users, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A catalogue is presented which is intended for commercial developers who are considering, or who have in progress, a project involving the microgravity environment of space or remote sensing of the Earth. An orientation is given to commercial space activities along with a current inventory of equipment, apparatus, carriers, vehicles, resources, and services available from NASA, other government agencies and U.S. industry. The information describes the array of resources that commercial users should consider when planning ground or space based developments. Many items listed have flown in space or been tested in labs and aboard aircraft and can be reused, revitalized, or adapted to suit specific requirements. New commercial ventures are encouraged to exploit existing inventory and expertise to the greatest extent possible.

  8. Accessing space: A catalogue of process, equipment and resources for commercial users, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A catalogue is presented which is intended for commercial developers who are considering, or who have in progress, a project involving the microgravity environment of space or remote sensing of the Earth. An orientation is given to commercial space activities along with a current inventory of equipment, apparatus, carriers, vehicles, resources, and services available from NASA, other government agencies and U.S. industry. The information describes the array of resources that commercial users should consider when planning ground or space based developments. Many items listed have flown in space or been tested in labs and aboard aircraft and can be reused, revitalized, or adapted to suit specific requirements. New commercial ventures are encouraged to exploit existing inventory and expertise to the greatest extent possible.

  9. Principles of commercially available pretreatment and feeding equipment for baled biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, T.; Hummelshoej, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    During the last 15 years, there has been a growing interest in utilizing waste biomass for energy production in Denmark. Since 1990, it has been unlawful to burn surplus straw on open land. Before the year 2000, it is intended to utilize most of the 2--3 million tons of surplus straw as an energy resource. The type of plants that were built in the beginning were combustion plants for district heating. The feeding equipment for these plants has been developed to an acceptable standard. Later, combustion plants for combined heat and power production based on a steam turbine were introduced. This type of plant demands a much greater continuity in the fuel flow, and the consequences of minor discontinuities are to be dropped from the grid. Gasification and pyrolysis demands a high sealing ability of the feeding equipment, because of the explosive and poisonous gas in the plant and a need for a very high continuity in the fuel feed. The first plants were built with the equipment and experiences from the farming industries, which have a long tradition in working with biomass-handling. The experiences gained with this type of equipment were not very promising, and in the early eighties, a more industrial type of biomass-handling equipment was developed. This paper presents the principles of the heavy-duty biomass pretreatment and feeding equipment that was commercially available in Denmark in May, 1993.

  10. 19 CFR 10.36 - Commercial travelers' samples; professional equipment and tools of trade; theatrical effects and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... equipment and tools of trade; theatrical effects and other articles. 10.36 Section 10.36 Customs Duties U.S... Commercial travelers' samples; professional equipment and tools of trade; theatrical effects and other... special CBP invoice, and professional equipment, tools of trade, and repair components for such...

  11. Meteorological Data Quality from Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Sensors on Commercial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. H.; Pietras, J.; Heppner, P.; Evans, J. D.; Wang, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Mobile Platform Environmental Data (MoPED) system acquires real-time data on weather conditions from commercial fleet providers and provides them to the National Weather Service (NWS) for use in operations and numerical models. The MoPED system assesses the quality of these data by comparing them to observations from airport weather stations when the mobile platforms are in sufficiently close proximity (in space and time). We have devised a set of quality control algorithms that are applied to vehicle observation datasets to qualify them for dissemination to NWS. Commercial vehicles participating in MoPED have a third-party suite of sensors for ambient air temperature, relative humidity, light level, precipitation intensity, atmospheric pressure, ozone, and road temperature. In addition, some vehicles also generate meteorological data from sensors built into the vehicles themselves (original equipment manufacturer (OEM) sensors) which conform to the SAE J1939 standard for onboard vehicle networking. These sensors, known as OEM J-data sensors, measure numerous parameters associated with emissions control and engine performance - including ambient air temperature and atmospheric pressure. Time-tagged and transmitted to the MoPED system, these OEM J-data measurements can be a tremendous source of weather data for NWS if they can be extracted and communicated in real-time from the vehicles. We are working with a commercial fleet (who have OEM J-data available) to determine suitability of these data for NWS. To ensure the overall quality of the data, we have developed a methodology for assessing the suitability of classes of vehicles and sensors for inclusion in the MoPED dissemination, for the continued assessment of individual vehicles once their class has been accepted into MoPED, and for identifying corrective measures (such as adjusting measurements to correct for individual sensor offsets). A byproduct of that methodology is a multi-component model for sources

  12. Characterization of changes in commercial building structure, equipment, and occupants: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.; Miller, N.E.; Pratt, R.G.

    1990-12-01

    Changes in commercial building structure, equipment, and occupants result in changes in building energy use. The frequency and magnitude of those changes have substantial implications for conservation programs and resource planning. For example, changes may shorten the useful lifetime of a conservation measure as well as impact the savings from that measure. This report summarizes the frequency of changes in a commercial building sample that was end-use metered under the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP). The sample includes offices, dry good retails, groceries, restaurants, warehouses, schools, and hotels. Two years of metered data, site visit records, and audit data were examined for evidence of building changes. The observed changes were then classified into 12 categories, which included business type, equipment, remodel, vacancy, and operating schedule. The analysis characterized changes in terms of frequency of types of change; relationship to building vintage and floor area; and variation by building type. The analysis also examined the energy impacts of various changes. The analysis determined that the rate of change in commercial buildings is high--50% of the buildings experienced one type of change during the 2 years for which monitoring data were examined. Equipment changes were found to be most frequent in offices and retail stores. Larger, older office buildings tend to experience a wider variety of changes more frequently than the smaller, newer buildings. Key findings and observations are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides the underlying motivation and objectives. In Section 4, the methodology used is documented, including the commercial building sample and the data sources used. Included are the definitions of change events and the overall approach taken. Results are analyzed in Section 5, with additional technical details in Appendixes. 2 refs., 46 figs., 22 tabs. (JF)

  13. Not-In-Kind Technologies for Residential and Commercial Unitary Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.K.

    2001-01-11

    This project was initiated by the Department of Energy in response to a request from the HVAC industry for consolidated information about alternative heating and cooling cycles and for objective comparisons of those cycles in space conditioning applications. Twenty-seven different heat pumping technologies are compared on energy use and operating costs using consistent operating conditions and assumptions about component efficiencies for all of them. This report provides a concise summary of the underlying principals of each technology, its advantages and disadvantages, obstacles to commercial development, and economic feasibility. Both positive and negative results in this study are valuable; the fact that many of the cycles investigated are not attractive for space conditioning avoids any additional investment of time or resources in evaluating them for this application. In other cases, negative results in terms of the cost of materials or in cycle efficiencies identify where significant progress needs to be made in order for a cycle to become commercially attractive. Specific conclusions are listed for many of the technologies being promoted as alternatives to electrically-driven vapor compression heat pumps using fluorocarbon refrigerants. Although reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps using hydrocarbons have similar energy use to conventional electric-driven heat pumps, there are no significant energy savings due to the minor differences in estimated steady-state performance; higher costs would be required to accommodate the use of a flammable refrigerant. Magnetic and compressor-driven metal hydride heat pumps may be able to achieve efficiencies comparable to reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps, but they are likely to have much higher life cycle costs because of high costs for materials and peripheral equipment. Both thermoacoustic and thermionic heat pumps could have lower life cycle costs than conventional electric heat pumps because of reduced equipment and

  14. Modifying a Commercial Centrifuge to Reduce Electromagnetic Interference and Evaluating Functionality of Ultrasound Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greening, Gage J.

    2016-01-01

    The Project Management and Engineering Branch (SF4) supports the Human Health and Performance Directorate (HH&P) and is responsible for developing and supporting human systems hardware for the International Space Station (ISS). When a principal investigator's (PI) medical research project on the ISS is accepted, SF4 develops the necessary hardware and software to transport to the ISS. The two projects I primarily worked on were the centrifuge and ultrasound projects. Centrifuge: One concern with spacecraft such as the ISS is electromagnetic interference (EMI) from onboard equipment, typically from radio waves (frequencies of 3 kHz to 300 GHz), which can negatively affect nearby circuitry. Standard commercial centrifuges produce EMI above safety limits, so my task was to help reduce EMI production from this equipment. Two centrifuges were tested: one unmodified as a control and one modified. To reduce EMI below safety limits, one centrifuge was modified to become a Faraday shield, in which significant electrical contact was made between all regions of the centrifuge housing. This included removing non-conductive paint, applying conductive fabric to the lid and foam sealer, adding a 10,000 µF decoupling capacitor across the power supply, and adding copper adhesive-mount gaskets to the housing interior. EMI testing of both centrifuges was performed in the EMI/EMC Control Test and Measurement Facility. EMI for both centrifuges was below safety limits for frequencies between 10 MHz and 15 GHz (pass); however, between 14 kHz and 10 MHz, EMI for the unmodified centrifuge exceeded safety limits (fail) as expected. Alternatively, for the modified centrifuge with the Faraday shield, EMI was below the safely limit of 55 dBµV/m for electromagnetic frequencies between 14 kHz and 10 MHz. This result indicates our modifications were successful. The successful EMI test allowed us to communicate with the vendor what modifications they needed to make to their commercial unit to

  15. 77 FR 10291 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ...In this final rule, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its test procedure for commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE), incorporating changes that will take effect 30 days after the final rule is published in the Federal Register. These changes will be mandatory for equipment testing to demonstrate compliance with the amended energy standards (Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0003). The amendments to the test procedure adopted in this final rule include updating references to industry test procedures to their current versions, incorporating methods to evaluate the energy impacts resulting from the use of night curtains and lighting occupancy sensors and controls, and allowing testing of certain commercial refrigeration equipment at the lowest temperature at which it is able to operate, referred to as its lowest application product temperature. In response to comments received in response to the relevant November 2010 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR), and to minimize the testing burden on manufacturers, DOE is also incorporating provisions to allow manufacturers to test at the rating temperatures and ambient conditions required by NSF International (founded in 1944 as the National Sanitation Foundation, now referred to simply as NSF) for food safety testing.

  16. Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

    1990-07-01

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Stability of nonfouling electroless nickel-polytetrafluoroethylene coatings after exposure to commercial dairy equipment sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-09-01

    Application of nonfouling coatings on thermal processing equipment can improve operational efficiency. However, to enable effective commercial translation, a need exists for more comprehensive studies on the stability of nonfouling coatings after exposure to different sanitizers. In the current study, the influence of different commercial dairy equipment sanitizers on the nonfouling properties of stainless steel modified with electroless Ni-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coatings was determined. Surface properties, such as dynamic contact angle, surface energy, surface morphology, and elemental composition, were measured before and after the coupons were exposed to the sanitizers for 168 cleaning cycles. The fouling behavior of Ni-PTFE-modified stainless steel coupons after exposure was also evaluated by processing raw milk on a self-fabricated benchtop-scale plate heat exchanger. The results indicated that peroxide sanitizer had only minor effect on the Ni-PTFE-modified stainless steel surface, whereas chlorine- and iodine-based sanitizers influenced the surface properties drastically. The coupons after 168 cycles of exposure to peroxide sanitizer accumulated the least amount of fouling material (4.44±0.24mg/cm(2)) compared with the coupons exposed to the other 3 sanitizers. These observations indicated that the Ni-PTFE nonfouling coating retained antifouling properties after 168 cycles of exposure to peroxide-based sanitizer, supporting their potential application as nonfouling coatings for stainless steel dairy processing equipment.

  18. Potential benefits of using commercial simulators to test equipment control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.; Wysor, W.

    1997-09-01

    Motivation is given for a technique to more thoroughly test semiconductor equipment control systems. A description is given of a simulator-based control system testing technique. Potential benefits that could be realized by using this technique in the semiconductor industry as well as benefits documented by using this technique in other industries are described. Specific requirements for using the technique in the semiconductor industry are outlined. A summary of a survey of nine commercial simulation systems is given. Finally, the outcome of the survey is compared with the requirements for using the technique.

  19. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must be...

  20. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must be...

  1. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must be...

  2. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must be...

  3. 78 FR 49202 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ...\\ the California Energy Commission (CEC) appliance database,\\9\\ and additional industry and manufacturer... ). \\9\\ See California Energy Commission: Appliance Database (Available at: http://www.appliances.energy...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 RIN 1904-AD01 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and...

  4. 5 CFR 2429.22 - Additional time after service by mail or commercial delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 2429.22 Additional time after service by mail or commercial delivery... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional time after service by mail or commercial delivery. 2429.22 Section 2429.22 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY...

  5. 5 CFR 2429.22 - Additional time after service by mail or commercial delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional time after service by mail or... REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 2429.22 Additional time after service by mail or commercial delivery... such party by mail or commercial delivery, 5 days shall be added to the prescribed period:...

  6. 5 CFR 2429.22 - Additional time after service by mail or commercial delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional time after service by mail or... REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 2429.22 Additional time after service by mail or commercial delivery... such party by mail or commercial delivery, 5 days shall be added to the prescribed period:...

  7. The FY1992 survey on commercialization of Stirling engine utilization equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    Problems on commercialization of Stirling engine heat pumps (SEHP) and the solution are studied. The Stirling engine is a small and fixed engine having a 30-40% thermal efficiency and a 1-100 kW output. It is a closed recipro type external combustion engine with non-condensable gas like helium as working fluid. Its theoretical efficiency agrees with that of the Carnot's cycle. This is because the Stirling engine is often called a dream engine. However, the Stirling engine is legally restricted from a viewpoint of ensuring safety because high pressure gas as working fluid is sealed into the Stirling engine. It is feared that this point will be a condition that restricts spread/promotion of the equipment which uses the engine. Therefore, by guidance of MITI and support of organizations/enterprises concerned, a committee was started in 1992FY and studied the safety of the Stirling engine and the related legal systems.

  8. 14 CFR 1260.67 - Equipment and other property under grants with commercial firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... printing equipment, motor vehicles, and automatic data processing equipment. If the Recipient requests an... (including equipment, title to which has been transferred to the Government prior to completion of the...

  9. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Commercial Lawn Equipment (Spanish version); Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Powering commercial lawn equipment with alternative fuels or advanced engine technology is an effective way to reduce U.S. dependence on petroleum, reduce harmful emissions, and lessen the environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. Numerous alternative fuel and fuel-efficient advanced technology mowers are available. Owners turn to these mowers because they may save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and demonstrate their commitment to sustainability.

  10. 76 FR 56125 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy... rulemaking for direct heating equipment is extended to October 14, 2011. ] DATES: DOE will accept comments, data, and information regarding the notice of proposed rulemaking for direct heating equipment...

  11. Introduction to Commercial Cooking Equipment. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 4.1. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 4: Equipment Handling, Operation and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the workings of and equipment found in commercial kitchens. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on each of the following…

  12. Introduction to Commercial Cooking Equipment. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 4.1. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 4: Equipment Handling, Operation and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the workings of and equipment found in commercial kitchens. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on each of the following…

  13. [The real-world effectiveness of personal protective equipment and additional risks for workers' health].

    PubMed

    Denisov, É I; Morozova, T V; Adeninskaia, E E; Kur'erov, N N

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of personal protective equipment (PPE) of hearing, respiratory organs and hands is considered. It is shown that real effect of PPE is twice lower than declared by supplier; this presumes some derating system. The aspects of discomfort and additional risks are analyzed. The hygienic and physiologic evaluation of PPE is required along with elaboration of an official document (OSH standard or sanitary regulation) on selection, personal fit, organization of use and individual training of workers and their motivation.

  14. Efficacy of commercial microwave equipment for eradication of pine wood nematodes and cerambycid larvae infesting red pine

    Treesearch

    Mary R. Fleming; John J. Janowiak; Jeffrey D. Kimmel; John M. Halbrendt; Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Kelli Hoover

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of using commercial 2.45-GHz microwave equipment to kill cerambycid larvae and pinewood nematodes(PWN) [Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner and Buhrer) Nickle] infesting lumber was investigated. Research goals were to test a system of separating green material into moisture content(MC)ranges and to determine the feasibility of using...

  15. 10 CFR 431.408 - Preemption of State regulations for covered equipment other than electric motors and commercial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... products. 431.408 Section 431.408 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM... commercial clothes washers), or other requirement with respect to the energy efficiency, energy use, or water... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preemption of State regulations for covered equipment...

  16. 10 CFR 431.408 - Preemption of State regulations for covered equipment other than electric motors and commercial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... products. 431.408 Section 431.408 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM... commercial clothes washers), or other requirement with respect to the energy efficiency, energy use, or water... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preemption of State regulations for covered equipment...

  17. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and installations..., mechanical transport, structures, and installations. Except as specifically provided and subject to existing... equipment, mechanical transport, aircraft, motorboats, installations, or structures may be used to meet the...

  18. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and installations..., mechanical transport, structures, and installations. Except as specifically provided and subject to existing... equipment, mechanical transport, aircraft, motorboats, installations, or structures may be used to meet the...

  19. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and installations..., mechanical transport, structures, and installations. Except as specifically provided and subject to existing... equipment, mechanical transport, aircraft, motorboats, installations, or structures may be used to meet the...

  20. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and installations..., mechanical transport, structures, and installations. Except as specifically provided and subject to existing... equipment, mechanical transport, aircraft, motorboats, installations, or structures may be used to meet the...

  1. 14 CFR 119.36 - Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... manner prescribed by the Administrator to the Flight Standards District Office in whose area the... debt (explain); (iii) Additional working capital (explain); (iv) Operating losses other than...— (i) Sale of property or flight equipment (explain); (ii) New debt (explain); (iii) New equity...

  2. 75 FR 22581 - Energy Conservation Program for Commercial Equipment: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Commercial Package Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Test Procedures AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... existing DOE test procedure applicable to commercial package central air conditioners and heat pumps. The... existing DOE commercial package air conditioner and heat pump test procedures for its VRV-WIII...

  3. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  4. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  5. 76 FR 34914 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    .... Proposed Definition(s) IV. Evaluation of Set-Top Boxes and Network Equipment as a Covered Product Subject.... Proposed Definition(s) DOE proposes to add a definition for ``Set-top Boxes and Network Equipment'' in the... standard that may arise from today's proposed determination. There currently is no statutory definition of...

  6. 75 FR 59657 - Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION... commercial and industrial electric motors under section 342(b) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act..._standards/commercial/electric_motors.html . For information on obtaining a copy of the framework...

  7. Design and adaptation of miniaturized electrochemical devices integrating carbon nanotube-based sensors to commercial CE equipment.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Alberto Sánchez; Moreno, Mónica; Bermejo, Esperanza; Angeles Lorenzo, M; Zapardiel, Antonio; Chicharro, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    The design of new electrochemical devices integrating carbon nanotube sensors and their adaptation to commercial CE equipments are described. One of these designs was made for using commercial screen-printed electrodes, whereas the second was projected for coupling commercial glassy carbon electrodes. The electrochemical characterization of these devices revealed that their hydrodynamic behaviour is strongly influenced by the electrode modification with multi-wall carbon nanotubes that provided faster and/or more sensitive signals. The analytical applicability of these devices was illustrated for the CZE separation of chlorinated phenols and the MEKC separation of endocrine disruptors, where the use of carbon nanotube sensors has proved to be advantageous when compared with unmodified ones, with good electrocatalytic properties combined with acceptable background currents and a remarkable resistance to passivation.

  8. 78 FR 14024 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Equipment: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... terminal air conditioners and heat pumps. This document corrects the date of the public meeting....

  9. Accessing space: A catalogue of process, equipment and resources for commercial users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This catalogue, produced by NASA's Office of Commercial Programs, provides a broad source of information for the commercial developer interested in the areas of microgravity research and remote sensing. Methods for accessing space for research are reviewed including the shuttle, expendable launch vehicles, suborbital sounding rockets, experimental aircraft, and drop towers and other ground-based facilities. Procedures for using these vehicles and facilities are described along with funding options to pay for their use. Experiment apparatus and carriers for microgravity research are also described. A separate directory of resources and services is also included which contains a listing of transportation products and services, a listing of businesses and industries which provide space-related services and products, and a listing of the NASA and CCDS (Center for the Commercial Development of Space) points of contact.

  10. Blade Testing Equipment Development and Commercialization: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-346

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, D.; Hughes, S.

    2013-04-01

    Blade testing is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. NREL?s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Colorado is the only blade test facility in the U.S. capable of performing full-scale static and fatigue testing of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbine blades. Rapid growth in wind turbine size over the past two decades has outstripped the size capacity of the NWTC blade test facility leaving the U.S. wind industry without a suitable means of testing blades for large land-based and offshore turbines. This CRADA will develop and commercialize testing technologies and test equipment, including scaling up, value engineering, and testing of equipment to be used at blade testing facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  11. 77 FR 49701 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... to estimating the FFC energy and emission impacts of alternative energy conservation standards levels... / Friday, August 17, 2012 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 430 and 431 RIN 1904-AC24 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Compliance Statement for Certain Commercial Equipment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Appendix A to Subpart T of Part 431 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY... Compliance Statement under 10 CFR Part 431 (Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial... determination, and in determining the energy efficiency, energy use, or water use that is set forth in...

  13. 76 FR 51281 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... costs (derived from retail energy prices) paid directly by energy users. As a result of a change to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 RIN 1904-AC24 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and...

  14. 75 FR 71596 - Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... occupancy sensors, and allow testing of certain commercial refrigerators at their lowest application product... Application Product Temperature. IV. Regulatory Review A. Review Under Executive Order 12866 B. Review Under... designed for a pull-down or holding temperature application. (42 U.S.C. 6313(c)(2)-(3)) EPCA also requires...

  15. 76 FR 34685 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Decision and Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...) above with cooling capacities above 300,000 Btu/h according to the test procedures for central air... of Energy Commercial Package Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Test Procedures AGENCY: Office of Energy... package air-source central air conditioners and heat pumps. The waiver is specific to the Daikin VRV...

  16. 75 FR 41845 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Decision and Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Sanyo variable capacity ECO-i (commercial) multi-split heat pumps. As a condition of this waiver, Sanyo must use the alternate test procedure set forth in this notice to test and rate its ECO-i multi-split... pump test procedures for its ECO-i multi-split products. The waiver requires Sanyo use the alternate...

  17. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 35.5 Section 35.5 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDERNESS PRESERVATION AND MANAGEMENT General... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commercial enterprises, roads, motor...

  18. Vacuum infusion equipment design and the influence of reinforcement layers addition to the resin infusion time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, A. H.; Setyarso, G.

    2016-11-01

    The characteristic of composite material is greatly influenced by the manufacture method of composite. The conventional method that has been used such as hand lay-up and spray up are simple and easy to apply but the composite tend to have a void in it because of the air trapped during the manufacture process. Vacuum infusion is one of the modern composite manufacture process which can replace the conventional method. The problem of this method happens when the resin infusion time become longer due to the addition of reinforcement layers. When the resin infusion time is longer than the resin's gel time, the resin will become gel and not able to flow into the mold. In order to overcome this problem, a study that observe the influence of reinforcement layers addition to the resin infusion time is needed. In this study, vacuum infusion equipment for composite materials manufacturing process that are designed consists of: 1×1m glass as the mold, 1L PVC tube for the resin container, 1L glass tube for the resin trap, and ‘A HP vacuum pump with 7 CFM vacuum speed. The resin that is used in this study is unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) and the fiber used as reinforcement is fiber glass. It is observed that the more number of reinforcement layers the longer resin infusion time will be. The resin infusion time (in seconds) from two until six layers respectively for the area of 15×20cm are: 88, 115, 145, 174, 196; for the area of 15×25cm are: 119, 142, 168, 198, 235; and for the area of 15×35cm are: 181, 203, 235, 263, 303. The maximum reinforcement layers that can be accommodated for each 15×20cm, 15×25cm, and 15×35cm area are respectively 31 layers, 29 layers, and 25 layers.

  19. Identification of Problems Hindering Logistics Support of Commercial- Off-The-Shelf Computer Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    accelerating technology taking place in the computer industry . Market-Based Pricing. Because the Air Force is buying the COTS equipment "off-the-shelf...supporting, participating, and using commands. b. Visit Air Force and Private industry to get their perspective, approaches, and procedures on both effective...teams to collect data from industry , acquirers, and users/supporters. The industry team collected data from The Bank of Boston, Commonwealth of

  20. Data Center IT Equipment Energy Assessment Tools: Current State of Commercial Tools, Proposal for a Future Set of Assessment Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Ben D.

    2012-06-30

    This research project, which was conducted during the Summer and Fall of 2011, investigated some commercially available assessment tools with a focus on IT equipment to see if such tools could round out the DC Pro tool suite. In this research, the assessment capabilities of the various tools were compiled to help make “non-biased” information available to the public. This research should not be considered to be exhaustive on all existing vendor tools although a number of vendors were contacted. Large IT equipment OEM’s like IBM and Dell provide their proprietary internal automated software which does not work on any other IT equipment. However, found two companies with products that showed promise in performing automated assessments for IT equipment from different OEM vendors. This report documents the research and provides a list of software products reviewed, contacts and websites, product details, discussions with specific companies, a set of recommendations, and next steps. As a result of this research, a simple 3-level approach to an IT assessment tool is proposed along with an example of an assessment using a simple IT equipment data collection tool (Level 1, spreadsheet). The tool has been reviewed with the Green Grid and LBNL staff. The initial feedback has been positive although further refinement to the tool will be necessary. Proposed next steps include a field trial of at least two vendors’ software in two different data centers with an objective to prove the concept, ascertain the extent of energy and computational assessment, ease of installation and opportunities for continuous improvement. Based on the discussions, field trials (or case studies) are proposed with two vendors – JouleX (expected to be completed in 2012) and Sentilla.

  1. R and D opportunities for commercial HVAC (heating, air conditioning, and ventilation) equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.A.; Zaloudek, F.R.

    1987-03-01

    The overall objective of this project is to identify and characterize generic HVAC equipment research that will provide the best investment opportunities for DOE R and D funds. The prerequisites of a DOE research program include research efforts that are potentially significant in energy conservation impact and that are cost-effective, long-term, and high risk. These prerequisites form the basic guidelines for the R and D opportunities assessed. The assessment excludes the R and D areas that have potential or current private sector sponsors. Finally, R and D areas which are included in DOE programs generally are not addressed.

  2. Validation of commercial luminometry swabs for total bacteria and coliform counts in colostrum-feeding equipment.

    PubMed

    Renaud, D L; Kelton, D F; LeBlanc, S J; Haley, D B; Jalbert, A B; Duffield, T F

    2017-09-13

    A sufficient quantity and quality of colostrum must be fed quickly to the newborn calf while minimizing bacterial contamination. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence swabs offer a potential rapid on-farm alternative to assess bacterial contamination of colostrum. The objective of this study was to validate the Hygiena (Camarillo, CA) AquaSnap Total (AS), SuperSnap (SS), PRO-Clean (PC), and MicroSnap Coliform (MS) swabs as well as visual hygiene assessment for detection of elevated bacterial counts in or on colostrum-feeding equipment. From April to October 2016, 18 esophageal tube feeders, 49 nipple bottles, and 6 pails from 52 dairy farms in Ontario were evaluated for cleanliness. Following visual hygiene assessment, sterile physiological saline (15 mL) was poured into each piece of equipment, mixed for 2 min to ensure total surface coverage, and poured into a sterile collection container through the feeding end. The fluid was split into equal aliquots, with one being evaluated by conventional culture and the other evaluated using the luminometry swabs. Nonparametric receiver operator curves were used to compare the test performance of the luminescence reading (relative light units; RLU) from each type of swab to conventional bacterial culture. The area under the curve comparing the AS swab to total bacterial count (cut point >100,000 cfu/mL) was 0.89, and using a cut point of 631 RLU correctly classified 84% of samples with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 77%. The area under the curve comparing the MS swab to total coliform count (cut point >10,000 cfu/mL) was 0.85, and using a cut point of 44 RLU correctly classified 89% of samples with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 90%. Visual hygiene assessment, PC and SS swabs were not reliable indicators for feeding equipment cleanliness. The results suggest that the AS and MS swabs can be used as an alternative to traditional laboratory bacterial counts to evaluate cleanliness of colostrum

  3. The EPA National Fuels Surveillance Network. I. Trace constituents in gasoline and commercial gasoline fuel additives.

    PubMed Central

    Jungers, R H; Lee, R E; von Lehmden, D J

    1975-01-01

    A National Fuels Surveillance Network has been established to collect gasoline and other fuels through the 10 regional offices of the Environmental Protection Agency. Physical, chemical, and trace element analytical determinations are made on the collected fuel samples to detect components which may present an air pollution hazard or poison exhaust catalytic control devices. A summary of trace elemental constituents in over 50 gasoline samples and 18 commercially marketed consumer purchased gasoline additives is presented. Quantities of Mn, Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu, Fe, Sb, B, Mg, Pb, and S were found in most regular and premium gasoline. Environmental implications of trace constituents in gasoline are discussed. PMID:1157783

  4. Design of an Eye Limiting Resolution Visual System Using Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Barbara T.; Giovannetti, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine if a flight simulator with an eye-limiting resolution out-the-window (OTW) visual system could be built using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology and used to evaluate the visual performance of Air Force pilots in an operations context. Results of this study demonstrate that an eye limiting OTW visual system can be built using COTS technology. Further, a series of operationally-based tasks linked to clinical vision tests can be used within the synthetic environment to demonstrate a correlation and quantify the level of correlation between vision and operational aviation performance.

  5. A Novel Processing Approach for Additive Manufacturing of Commercial Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher E.; Bourell, David; Watt, Trevor; Cohen, Julien

    Aluminum 6061 is of great commercial interest due to its ubiquitous use in manufacturing, advantageous mechanical properties, and its successful certification in aerospace applications. However, as an off-eutectic with accompanying large freezing range, attempts to process the material by additive manufacturing have resulted in part cracking and diminished mechanical properties. A unique approach using mixed powders is presented to process this historically difficult-to-process material. Expansion of this combined-powder approach to other materials systems not typically compatible with additive manufacturing is possible. Dense parts without solidification cracking have been produced by the SLM process, as verified using SEM and EDS. An overview of this approach is presented along with test results using an Al-Si mixture.

  6. Application of electron beam equipment based on a plasma cathode gun in additive technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galchenko, N. K.; Kolesnikova, K. A.; Semenov, G. V.; Rau, A. G.; Raskoshniy, S. Y.; Bezzubko, A. V.; Dampilon, B. V.; Sorokova, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    The paper discusses the application of electron beam equipment based on a plasma cathode gun for three-dimensional surface modification of metals and alloys. The effect of substrate surface preparation on the adhesion strength of gas thermal coatings has been investigated.

  7. 76 FR 18428 - Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... percent quality) produced by a continuous type ice maker. This is the inverse of the ice hardness factor... manufacturers do not have control of the energy efficiency of the remote compressor rack. In addition, the...

  8. Effect of commercial mineral-based additives on composting and compost quality.

    PubMed

    Himanen, M; Hänninen, K

    2009-08-01

    The effectiveness of two commercial additives meant to improve the composting process was studied in a laboratory-scale experiment. Improver A (sulphates and oxides of iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc mixed with clay) and B (mixture of calcium hydroxide, peroxide, and oxide) were added to source-separated biowaste:peat mixture (1:1, v/v) in proportions recommended by the producers. The composting process (T, emissions of CO(2), NH(3), and CH(4)) and the quality of the compost (pH, conductivity, C/N ratio, water-soluble NH(4)-N and NO(3)-N, water- and NaOH-soluble low-weight carboxylic acids, nutrients, heavy metals and phytotoxicity to Lepidium sarivum) were monitored during one year. Compared with the control, the addition of improver B increased pH by two units, led to an earlier elimination of water-soluble ammonia, an increase in nitrates, a 10-fold increase in concentrations of acetic acid, and shortened phytotoxicity period by half; as negative aspect it led to volatilization of ammonia. The addition of improver A led to a longer thermophilic stage by one week and lower concentrations of low-weight carboxylic acids (both water- and NaOH-extractable) with formic and acetic of similar amounts, however, most of the aspects claimed by the improver's producer were not confirmed in this trial.

  9. 77 FR 31742 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ...In this notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to update its test procedures for showerheads, faucets, water closets, and urinals. Specifically, DOE proposes to incorporate by reference the American Society of Mechanical Engineers/American National Standards Institute (ASME/ANSI) Standard A112.18.1-2011 test procedure for faucets and showerheads, which would replace the 1996 version currently referenced by DOE in its test procedure. DOE also proposes to incorporate by reference ASME/ANSI Standard A112.19.2-2008 procedure for water closets and urinals, which would replace the 1995 version currently referenced by DOE in its test procedure. These updates fulfill DOE's obligation under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) to review its test procedures for covered products at least once every 7 years and either amend the applicable test procedures or publish a determination in the Federal Register not to amend them. DOE also expects that incorporation of the updated procedures will bring DOE's testing requirements more closely in line with current industry practices, reduce the burden associated with testing and reporting test results for these products, and improve the accuracy of test results. For commercial prerinse spray valves, DOE has preliminarily determined that no changes are needed to the existing DOE test procedure in order to accurately measure the water consumption of these products, and proposes to retain the existing procedure without change. However, since the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) reapproved this standard in 2009 as F2324-03 (2009), DOE is proposing to incorporate by reference this most recent version. This action would also satisfy the EPCA requirement for DOE to review the test procedures for these products at least once every 7 years. This notice also announces a public meeting to receive comments on these proposed amendments to the test procedures.

  10. Department of Defense: Additional Actions Needed to Improve Financial Management of Military Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Internal Controls Over the U.S. Special Operations Command Military Equipment Baseline Valuation Effort, D-2008- 103 (Arlington, Va.: June 13, 2008...Support System-Army (GCSS- Army), and Logistics Modernization Program ( LMP )—thus resulting in the need for manual reconciliations and reduced...risk. Further, as stated above, the Army’s ERPs—GFEBS, GCSS- Army, and LMP —may experience interoperability problems because of the lack of common

  11. Keeping our waterways safe by equipping commercial vessels with appropriate sensor suites to enable pervasive surveillance of coastal and inland waterborne commercial traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Terry; Lavoie, James

    2010-04-01

    The US has over 58,000 miles of ocean shoreline, over 5500 hundred miles of Great Lakes shoreline, and over 3,500,000 miles of river and small lake shoreline. These waterways are critical to the nation's strategic, economic and societal well being. These assets must be protected from potential terrorist attacks. It is a daunting task for an open society to protect such a large and distributed area while still preserving the freedoms for its citizens to enjoy the natural beauty of our waterways. The US has a well developed fleet of merchant tugs and barges that engage in day to day commercial activity around the coasts, rivers and lakes of the country. This paper will discuss the notion of developing a nationwide mobile sensor network by equipping these barges and tugs with sensor suites that would feed data into a common operations' center. The data will be displayed to the first responder community and the vessel operators via data streams from Rite-View (a robust 3D modeling and simulation tool).

  12. Effect of additives in photocatalytic degradation of commercial azo dye Lanaset Sun Yellow 180.

    PubMed

    Araña, J; Zerbani, D; Herrera Melián, J A; Garzón Sousa, D; González Díaz, O; Doña Rodríguez, J M

    2013-04-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the commercial dye Lanaset Sun Yellow 180 was studied in the presence and absence of the different additives used in the dye's formulation. The experiments were performed with Degussa P25 as received and doped with Fe (Fe-TiO2) and a new catalyst synthesized by our research group (ECT-1023). The best efficiency was achieved with Fe-TiO2. With this catalyst, the formation of a photoactive complex was observed between the dye and Fe atoms of the catalyst surface that accelerated degradation. FTIR studies revealed that the complex was formed by interaction between the dye's carbonyl groups and the atoms of the metal. In mixtures of the dye containing citric acid or acetate, degradation was notably inhibited with the catalysts Fe-TiO2 and ECT-1023 because of the formation of carboxylates on their surface. This inhibitory effect was neutralized when all the additives were present in the solution. Toxicity analyses indicated that intermediates were not toxic. Thus, the photocatalytic methods seem to be optimal for the decolourization of wastewaters containing this dye.

  13. Thermal and Tribological Properties of Jatropha Oil as Additive in Commercial Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.; Lara-Hernández, G.; Nieto-Camacho, F.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Contreras-Gallegos, E.; Torres, M. Vite; Flores-Cuautle, J. J. A.

    2017-04-01

    The recent use that has been given to bio-oil as an additive, in a commercial engine oil, raises the necessity to study its physical properties. The present study is aimed to obtain thermal properties of blends made with Jatropha-Curcas L. Oil, Crude, and Refined, at different concentrations using SAE40W oil (EO) as a lubricant base. By using photothermal techniques, thermal effusivity and diffusivity were obtained. The obtained results show that thermal effusivity increases from 455 Ws^{1/2}{\\cdot }m^{-2}{\\cdot }K^{-1} to 520 Ws^{1/2}{\\cdot }m^{-2}{\\cdot }K^{-1} as the percentage of additive increases as well, whereas thermal diffusivity values range from 7× 10^{-8}m2{\\cdot }s^{-1} to 10× 10^{-8}m2{\\cdot }s^{-1}. In the present study, four balls test was used in order to obtain friction coefficient and wear scar values for studied samples, the obtained results point out that in general refined Jatropha-Curcas L. oil presents smaller wear scars than the crude one.

  14. Proper Use and Care of Miscellaneous Equipment. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 4.2. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 4: Equipment Handling, Operation, and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the proper use and care of various pieces of commercial cooking equipment. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on each of the…

  15. Bismuth Infusion of ABS Enables Additive Manufacturing of Complex Radiological Phantoms and Shielding Equipment.

    PubMed

    Ceh, Justin; Youd, Tom; Mastrovich, Zach; Peterson, Cody; Khan, Sarah; Sasser, Todd A; Sander, Ian M; Doney, Justin; Turner, Clark; Leevy, W Matthew

    2017-02-24

    Radiopacity is a critical property of materials that are used for a range of radiological applications, including the development of phantom devices that emulate the radiodensity of native tissues and the production of protective equipment for personnel handling radioactive materials. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a fabrication platform that is well suited to creating complex anatomical replicas or custom labware to accomplish these radiological purposes. We created and tested multiple ABS (Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) filaments infused with varied concentrations of bismuth (1.2-2.7 g/cm³), a radiopaque metal that is compatible with plastic infusion, to address the poor gamma radiation attenuation of many mainstream 3D printing materials. X-ray computed tomography (CT) experiments of these filaments indicated that a density of 1.2 g/cm³ of bismuth-infused ABS emulates bone radiopacity during X-ray CT imaging on preclinical and clinical scanners. ABS-bismuth filaments along with ABS were 3D printed to create an embedded human nasocranial anatomical phantom that mimicked radiological properties of native bone and soft tissue. Increasing the bismuth content in the filaments to 2.7 g/cm³ created a stable material that could attenuate 50% of (99m)Technetium gamma emission when printed with a 2.0 mm wall thickness. A shielded test tube rack was printed to attenuate source radiation as a protective measure for lab personnel. We demonstrated the utility of novel filaments to serve multiple radiological purposes, including the creation of anthropomorphic phantoms and safety labware, by tuning the level of radiation attenuation through material customization.

  16. Bismuth Infusion of ABS Enables Additive Manufacturing of Complex Radiological Phantoms and Shielding Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Ceh, Justin; Youd, Tom; Mastrovich, Zach; Peterson, Cody; Khan, Sarah; Sasser, Todd A.; Sander, Ian M.; Doney, Justin; Turner, Clark; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Radiopacity is a critical property of materials that are used for a range of radiological applications, including the development of phantom devices that emulate the radiodensity of native tissues and the production of protective equipment for personnel handling radioactive materials. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a fabrication platform that is well suited to creating complex anatomical replicas or custom labware to accomplish these radiological purposes. We created and tested multiple ABS (Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) filaments infused with varied concentrations of bismuth (1.2–2.7 g/cm3), a radiopaque metal that is compatible with plastic infusion, to address the poor gamma radiation attenuation of many mainstream 3D printing materials. X-ray computed tomography (CT) experiments of these filaments indicated that a density of 1.2 g/cm3 of bismuth-infused ABS emulates bone radiopacity during X-ray CT imaging on preclinical and clinical scanners. ABS-bismuth filaments along with ABS were 3D printed to create an embedded human nasocranial anatomical phantom that mimicked radiological properties of native bone and soft tissue. Increasing the bismuth content in the filaments to 2.7 g/cm3 created a stable material that could attenuate 50% of 99mTechnetium gamma emission when printed with a 2.0 mm wall thickness. A shielded test tube rack was printed to attenuate source radiation as a protective measure for lab personnel. We demonstrated the utility of novel filaments to serve multiple radiological purposes, including the creation of anthropomorphic phantoms and safety labware, by tuning the level of radiation attenuation through material customization. PMID:28245589

  17. Special report. Upgrading security: hospitals opt for new equipment; new approaches; heavy investments in additional patient, employee protection.

    PubMed

    1994-07-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are taking steps to prevent the violence that plagues both urban and rural areas from spilling over into their emergency rooms and nursing units. Four facilities--Duke Medical University Center, Durham, NC; Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; Ingalls Hospital, Harvey, IL; and University Medical Center, Las Vegas, NV--have recently installed new equipment or implemented innovative security procedures in an effort to better protect patients and employees. Although the price tag for additional protection is often high, officials at the hospitals agree that providing a safe environment is worth the investment.

  18. Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeill, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Letschert, Virginie; Ke, Jing; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-06-07

    China is now the world's largest producer and consumer of household appliances and commercial equipment. To address the growth of electricity use of the appliances, China has implemented a series of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for 30 appliances, and voluntary energy efficiency label for 40 products. Further, in 2005, China started a mandatory energy information label that covers 19 products to date. However, the impact of these standard and labeling programs and their savings potential has not been evaluated on a consistent basis. This research involved modeling to estimate the energy saving and CO{sub 2} emission reduction potential of the appliances standard and labeling program for products for which standards are currently in place, or under development and those proposed for development in 2010. Two scenarios that have been developed differ primarily in the pace and stringency of MEPS development. The 'Continued Improvement Scenario' (CIS) reflects the likely pace of post-2009 MEPS revisions, and the likely improvement at each revision step considering the technical limitation of the technology. The 'Best Practice Scenario' (BPS) examined the potential of an achievement of international best practice MEPS in 2014. This paper concludes that under the 'CIS' of regularly scheduled MEPS revisions to 2030, cumulative electricity consumption could be reduced by 9503 TWh, and annual CO{sub 2} emissions would be 16% lower than in the frozen efficiency scenario. Under a 'BPS' scenario for a subset of products, cumulative electricity savings would be 5450 TWh and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reduction would be 35% lower than in the frozen scenario.

  19. 14 CFR 119.36 - Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements for commercial operators. 119.36 Section 119.36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... be employed in a management position described in §§ 119.65 and 119.69, as applicable. (iii) The name... interest. (ii) The name and address of each person employed or who will be employed in a management...

  20. Achieving 'excellent' indoor air quality in commercial offices equipped with air-handling unit--respirable suspended particulate.

    PubMed

    Lam, K S; Chan, F S; Fung, W Y; Lui, B S S; Lau, L W L

    2006-04-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of achieving ultra low respirable suspended particulates (RSP) in commercial offices without major modification of existing ventilation systems by enhancing the particulates removal efficiency of existing central ventilation systems. Four types of filters which include pre-filters, cartridge filters, bag filters and high efficiency particulates air (HEPA) filters were tested in a commercial building in Causeway Bay. The results show that an RSP objective of <20 microg/m3 could be met by removing RSP from both the return air and outdoor air supply simultaneously. This level of performance is classed as 'excellent' by the Hong Kong Government, Environmental Protection Department. Filters with efficiency that exceed 80% placed both in the return air and outdoor air were sufficient to meet the objective. It is not necessary to install HEPA filters to achieve the 'excellent' class. The outdoor air filter has great influence on the steady state indoor RSP concentration while the effective cleaning rate is governed by the return air filter. Higher efficiency filters increased the static drop but the volume flow of the air fan was not affected significantly. The additional cost incurred was <5% of the existing operation cost. This paper reports a field study of RSP control for an indoor office environment. The results are directly applicable to building service engineering in the design of ventilation systems using air-handling units. Field observations indicated that indoor RSP in an office environment could be suppressed below 20 microg/m3 within 1 h by the simultaneous filtration of outdoor air and return air. Outdoor air filtration has a great influence on the steady state indoor concentration and return air filtration governs the cleaning rate. It is believed that the results of this study could be extended to the cleaning of other indoor pollutants such as volatile organic compounds.

  1. Testing and commercialization of byproduct dibasic acids as buffer additives for limestone flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Mobley, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Pilot plant (0.1 MW) tests and utility boiler full scale demonstration (194 MW) of byproduct organic dibasic acids (DBA) as buffer additives to limestone scrubbers have shown performance improvements equivalent to those achieved by the addition of pure adipic acid. Both SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency and limestone utilization increased, and no significant operating problems were observed with three of the four DBA tested. Chemical and biological evaluations of scrubber samples taken during the DBA testing indicated no detectable toxicity or mutagenicity, and no significant environmental impact is expected as a result of DBA addition. Economic estimates indicate that substitution of DBA for pure adipic acid as a buffer additive will result in additive cost savings of 30% or greater.

  2. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your...

  3. Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Letschert, Virginie; Ke, Jing

    2011-04-01

    China has implemented a series of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for over 30 appliances, voluntary energy efficiency label for 40 products and a mandatory energy information label that covers 19 products to date. However, the impact of these programs and their savings potential has not been evaluated on a consistent basis. This paper uses modeling to estimate the energy saving and CO{sub 2} emission reduction potential of the appliances standard and labeling program for products for which standards are currently in place, under development or those proposed for development in 2010 under three scenarios that differ in the pace and stringency of MEPS development. In addition to a baseline 'Frozen Efficiency' scenario at 2009 MEPS level, the 'Continued Improvement Scenario' (CIS) reflects the likely pace of post-2009 MEPS revisions, and the likely improvement at each revision step. The 'Best Practice Scenario' (BPS) examined the potential of an achievement of international best practice efficiency in broad commercial use today in 2014. This paper concludes that under 'CIS', cumulative electricity consumption could be reduced by 9503 TWh, and annual CO{sub 2} emissions of energy used for all 37 products would be 16% lower than in the frozen efficiency scenario. Under a 'BPS' scenario for a subset of products, cumulative electricity savings would be 5450 TWh and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reduction of energy used for 11 appliances would be 35% lower.

  4. 19 CFR 10.36 - Commercial travelers' samples; professional equipment and tools of trade; theatrical effects and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... equipment or tools imported in his baggage for his own use by a nonresident sojourning temporarily in the... sojourning temporarily in the United States on a baggage declaration under bond without surety or cash...

  5. Recycling of used commercial phosphate-bonded investments with additional mono-ammonium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zutai; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    Industrial waste is on the increase, resulting in severe environmental contamination. Against this background, this study sought to investigate the possibility of recycling used phosphate-bonded investments. Commercial phosphate-bonded investment was mixed and heated according to manufacturer's instructions, then powdered with a ball mill machine to be used as recycled investment (Code: R). Mono-ammonium phosphate (NH4H2PO4) of 2, 5, 8, 11, and 14 g were added to 100 g of R because of residual MgO, and coded as Ra, Rb, Rc, Rd, and Re respectively. Investment properties were then examined. Particle size of R was 50.66 microm and close to the original investment. It was found that more NH4H2PO4 led to larger setting expansion, smaller thermal expansion, and lower fired strength. The data of Re in these three aspects were 1.42 +/- 0.09%, 0.78 +/- 0.21%, and 8.85 +/- 0.88 MPa respectively, and differences against the original investment were significant. Ra showed significantly longer setting time than other investments. Based on the results of this study, we concluded that it was possible to set used phosphate-bonded investments by adding NH4H2PO4; in particular, Rd showed suitable expansion and acceptable mechanical properties.

  6. Growth of Douglas-fir near equipment trails used for commercial thinning in the Oregon Coast Range.

    Treesearch

    Richard E. Miller; Jim Smith; Paul W. Adams; Harry W. Anderson

    2007-01-01

    Soil disturbance is a visually apparent result of using heavy equipment to harvest trees. Subsequent consequences for growth of remaining trees, however, are variable and seldom quantified. We measured tree growth 7 and 11 years after thinning of trees in four stands of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii(...

  7. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for...

  8. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for...

  9. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for...

  10. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for Permit to Drill (APD...

  11. Al2O3 Nanoparticle Addition to Commercial Magnesium Alloys: Multiple Beneficial Effects

    PubMed Central

    Paramsothy, Muralidharan; Chan, Jimmy; Kwok, Richard; Gupta, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects of Al2O3 nanoparticle addition to cast magnesium based systems (followed by extrusion) were investigated, constituting either: (a) enhanced strength; or (b) simultaneously enhanced strength and ductility of the corresponding magnesium alloys. AZ31 and ZK60A nanocomposites containing Al2O3 nanoparticle reinforcement were each fabricated using solidification processing followed by hot extrusion. Compared to monolithic AZ31 (tension levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited higher yield strength (0.2% tensile yield strength (TYS)), ultimate strength (UTS), failure strain and work of fracture (WOF) (+19%, +21%, +113% and +162%, respectively). Compared to monolithic AZ31 (compression levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited higher yield strength (0.2% compressive yield strength (CYS)) and ultimate strength (UCS), lower failure strain and higher WOF (+5%, +5%, −4% and +11%, respectively). Compared to monolithic ZK60A (tension levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited lower 0.2% TYS and higher UTS, failure strain and WOF (−4%, +13%, +170% and +200%, respectively). Compared to monolithic ZK60A (compression levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited lower 0.2% CYS and higher UCS, failure strain and WOF (−10%, +7%, +15% and +26%, respectively). The capability of Al2O3 nanoparticles to enhance the properties of cast magnesium alloys in a way never seen before with micron length scale reinforcements is clearly demonstrated.

  12. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is a joint military activity and the U.S. Department of Defense?s (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization?s overall sustainability plan and objectives.

  13. Medicare program; establishing additional Medicare durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) supplier enrollment safeguards. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-08-27

    This final rule will clarify, expand, and add to the existing enrollment requirements that Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Supplies (DMEPOS) suppliers must meet to establish and maintain billing privileges in the Medicare program.

  14. Technical and economic evaluation of organic acid addition to a commercial FGD system. Final report, August 1983-December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    The report summarizes the results of organic acid addition tests at a commercial FGD system. The tests were conducted at San Miguel Electric Cooperative's 410 MW lignite-fired Unit 1, outside Jourdanton, TX. During the program, several organic acid mixtures were tested over a range of operating conditions to determine if the use of organic acids would allow San Miguel to reduce FGD system operating costs. Based on the test results, a cost analysis indicated that the use of organic acid addition at San Miguel will result in a first-year cost savings of over $600,000. In terms of cumulative net present worth, the estimated savings over a 15-year period will be $7.2 million in 1984 dollars.

  15. Investigation of the causes for the occurrence of residues of the anticoccidial feed additive nicarbazin in commercial poultry.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, M; Capurro, E; Danaher, M; Campbell, K; Elliott, C T

    2007-09-01

    Investigations were undertaken to identify causes for the occurrence of high levels of the zootechnical feed additive nicarbazin in broiler liver at slaughter. The first investigation on 32 commercial broiler flocks involved sampling and analysis for nicarbazin (as dinitrocarbanilide, DNC) in liver from birds during a 3-10-day period after withdrawal of nicarbazin from their feed and before commercial slaughter. DNC residues in liver samples of broilers scheduled as being withdrawn from nicarbazin for > or =6 days ranged from 20 to >1600 microg kg(-1) (the specified withdrawal period for nicarbazin is 5 days and the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) maximum residue limit (MRL) is 200 microg kg(-1) liver). Further on-farm investigations on 12 of these flocks, selected on the basis of the feeding system in use and the levels of DNC residues determined in liver, identified issues in feed management contributing to elevated residues in broiler liver. A significant correlation (0.81, p < 0.01, n = 10) between DNC residues in liver samples and in feed samples from the feeding pans was observed. The second investigation on 12 commercial broiler flocks involved sampling and analysis for DNC in liver samples and feed samples from feeding pans and from the feed mill at the three thinnings of birds for commercial slaughter. In the case of one flock, a clear relationship between nicarbazin in feed from the feed mill (10.5 mg kg(-1) DNC), in feed from the feeding pans (6.6 mg kg(-1) DNC) and in liver (583 microg kg(-1) DNC) at first thinning (9 days scheduled withdrawal from nicarbazin) was observed. Such a clear relationship was not observed in other cases, particularly at second and third thinnings, pointing to re-exposure of birds to nicarbazin late in the flock production cycle, probably from the litter. Guidelines outlining best farm practice to eliminate nicarbazin residues in poultry have been published in booklet and poster format for broiler producers

  16. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  17. Novel methodology to perform sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)-based multiple-breath wash-in and washout in infants using current commercially available equipment.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, P M; Robinson, P D; Lindblad, A; Oberli, D

    2016-11-01

    Multiple-breath inert gas washout (MBW) is ideally suited for early detection and monitoring of serious lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis, in infants and young children. Validated commercial options for the MBW technique are limited, and suitability of nitrogen (N2)-based MBW is of concern given the detrimental effect of exposure to pure O2 on infant breathing pattern. We propose novel methodology using commercially available N2 MBW equipment to facilitate 4% sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) multiple-breath inert gas wash-in and washout suitable for the infant age range. CO2, O2, and sidestream molar mass sensor signals were used to accurately calculate SF6 concentrations. An improved dynamic method for synchronization of gas and respiratory flow was developed to take into account variations in sidestream sample flow during MBW measurement. In vitro validation of triplicate functional residual capacity (FRC) assessments was undertaken under dry ambient conditions using lung models ranging from 90 to 267 ml, with tidal volumes of 28-79 ml, and respiratory rates 20-60 per minute. The relative mean (SD, 95% confidence interval) error of triplicate FRC determinations by washout was -0.26 (1.84, -3.86 to +3.35)% and by wash-in was 0.57 (2.66, -4.66 to +5.79)%. The standard deviations [mean (SD)] of percentage error among FRC triplicates were 1.40 (1.14) and 1.38 (1.32) for washout and wash-in, respectively. The novel methodology presented achieved FRC accuracy as outlined by current MBW consensus recommendations (95% of measurements within 5% accuracy). Further clinical evaluation is required, but this new technique, using existing commercially available equipment, has exciting potential for research and clinical use.

  18. Effect of addition of commercial grape seed tannins on phenolic composition, chromatic characteristics, and antioxidant activity of red wine.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana C; Spranger, Maria I; Zhao, Yuqing; Leandro, Maria C; Sun, Baoshan

    2010-11-24

    The effect of addition of grape seed tannins on the phenolic composition, chromatic characteristics, and antioxidant activity of red wine was studied. Two highly pure commercial grape seed tannins (GSE100 and GSE300) were selected, and their phenolic compositions were determined. Two types of red wines were made with Castelão/Tinta Miúda (3/2, w/w) grapevine varieties by fermentation on skin using two different maceration times, which correspond to the wines rich and poor in polyphenols, respectively. Each of these wines was used for experimentation with the addition of GSE100 and GSE300 before and immediately after alcoholic fermentation. Phenolic composition, chromatic characteristics, and antioxidant activity of the finished red wines were analyzed by HPLC-DAD, CIElab 76 convention, and DPPH radical test, respectively. The results showed that the addition of grape seed tannins had obvious effects of increasing color intensity and antioxidant activity only in the wines poor in polyphenols. Although GSE300 contained much higher amounts of di- and trimer procyanidins and a lower amount of polymeric proanthocyanidins, it provided effects of increasing the color intensity and antioxidant activity of the wines poor in polyphenols similar to those of GSE100. Furthermore, GSE100 released more gallic acid to wines than GSE300, although no gallic acid was detected in GSE100. Tannins added after alcoholic fermentation had a better effect on phenolic composition of red wine than tannins added before alcoholic fermentation.

  19. Afghanistan Drawdown Preparations: DOD Decision Makers Need Additional Analyses to Determine Costs and Benefits of Returning Excess Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-19

    Major end items are equipment that is important to operational readiness such as aircraft; boats; motorized wheeled , tracked, and towed vehicles...Process (cont.) Loader , Scoop Type (July 2012 Playbook, p. 292) There are155 Marine Corps Scoop Type Loaders in Afghanistan, all of which are... loaders are determined to be excess when the disposition instructions are issued, the transportation cost for the return of these loaders could range

  20. Air Force and Interior Can Benefit from Additional Guidance When Deciding Whether to Lease or Purchase Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-07

    according to contracting officials. In most cases , contract files did not contain basic information to make lease or purchase decisions, such as the length...decisions, as discussed in the FAR, but could not identify any case when a federal agency had requested this assistance and do not have current...whether to lease or purchase equipment based on a case -by- case evaluation of comparative costs and other factors, including, at a minimum, the (1

  1. An Additional Approach to Model Current Followers and Amplifiers with Electronically Controllable Parameters from Commercially Available ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotner, R.; Kartci, A.; Jerabek, J.; Herencsar, N.; Dostal, T.; Vrba, K.

    2012-12-01

    Several behavioral models of current active elements for experimental purposes are introduced in this paper. These models are based on commercially available devices. They are suitable for experimental tests of current- and mixed-mode filters, oscillators, and other circuits (employing current-mode active elements) frequently used in analog signal processing without necessity of onchip fabrication of proper active element. Several methods of electronic control of intrinsic resistance in the proposed behavioral models are discussed. All predictions and theoretical assumptions are supported by simulations and experiments. This contribution helps to find a cheaper and more effective way to preliminary laboratory tests without expensive on-chip fabrication of special active elements.

  2. Education Demonstration Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, A.; Lee, R. L.

    2003-10-01

    The General Atomics fusion education program ``Scientist in the Classroom" (SIC) now in its sixth year, uses scientists and engineers to present plasma as a state of matter to students in the classroom. Using hands-on equipment, students see how magnets, gas pressure changes, and different gases are turned into plasmas. A piston, sealed volume, and vacuum chamber illuminate ideal gas laws. Liquid nitrogen is used to explore thermodynamic temperature effects and changes in states of matter. Light bulbs are excited with a Tesla coil to ionize gases, thus becoming an inexpensive plasma devices and a plasma tube shows magnetic interactions with plasma. The demonstration equipment used in this program is built with simple designs and common commercial equipment keeping in mind a teacher's tight budget. The SIC program ( ˜25 school presentations per year) has become very popular and has acquired an enthusiastic group of regular teacher clientele requesting repeat visits. In addition, three very popular and successful ``Build-It" days, sponsored by the General Atomics Fusion Education Outreach Program, enables teachers to build and keep in their classroom some of this equipment. The demonstration devices will be presented along with their ``build-it" details.

  3. Effect of NaCl Addition on Rheological Behaviors of Commercial Gum-Based Food Thickener Used for Dysphagia Diets

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Moon; Yoo, Whachun; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2015-01-01

    Rheological properties of thickened fluids used for consumption by people with dysphagia (swallowing difficulty) are very sensitive to several factors, such as thickener type, temperature, pH, sugar, protein, and NaCl. In this study, steady and dynamic rheological properties of thickened water samples mixed with five commercial xanthan gum-based food thickeners (A~E) were studied in the presence of NaCl at different concentrations (0.3%, 0.6%, 0.9%, and 1.2%). The magnitudes of apparent viscosity (ηa,50), consistency index (K), yield stress (σoc), and dynamic moduli (G′ and G″) showed significant differences in rheological behaviors between thickened samples with various NaCl concentrations. Dynamic moduli values of all thickened samples, except for samples with thickener C, were much higher than those of the control (0% NaCl). All rheological parameter values (K, G′, and G″) in a thickener A were much higher than those in other thickeners. These results suggest that rheological properties of thickened samples containing NaCl are strongly affected by xanthan gum-NaCl interaction and depended on the type of thickener. PMID:26176002

  4. The effect of a commercial starter culture addition on the ripening of an artisanal goat's cheese (Cameros cheese).

    PubMed

    Olarte, C; Sanz, S; Gonzalez-Fandos, E; Torre, P

    2000-03-01

    The evolution of physicochemical parameters, and the most important microbial groups, were determined for the following three batches of 'Cameros' goat's milk cheese during ripening: Batch R elaborated with raw milk, Batch RS elaborated with raw milk and with the addition of a starter culture, and Batch PS elaborated with pasteurized milk and with the addition of the same culture. No differences in total solids (TS) or in the content of NaCl, fat and total nitrogen (expressed as percentages of TS) were found during the ripening. The pH, fat acidity and non-protein nitrogen (NPN, expressed as a percentage of TN) showed significant differences between the batches. The inoculated batches showed the fastest drop in pH at the beginning of the ripening period, but the cheeses of Batch R showed a higher degree of lipolysis and proteolysis. The addition of a starter influenced the microbiological quality of the cheeses. Differences in the counts of Enterobacteriaceae and faecal coliforms were found between Batches R and RS after 15 days. Staphylococcus aureus increased in number during the early period of ripening and attained a population above 6 log cfu g-1 in Batch R in the period from 5 to 10 days. However, enterotoxins were not detected in this Batch. Batch R showed lower values of lactic acid bacteria at the beginning of the ripening period, but no significant differences were found between batches in the period from 5 to 15 days of ripening. At the beginning of the ripening, Lactococcus was the main lactic acid bacteria, with L. lactis lactis being predominant. After 15 days, the lactic acid bacteria counts decreased in the three batches, especially in the cheeses of Batch PS (only 2.2 log cfu g-1 was found at 60 days), as lactococci (the only lactic acid bacteria present in Batch PS) are incapable of growing under the conditions found in cheeses at the end of their ripening period. At this time, Lactobacillus was the predominant genus in Batches R and RS, with L

  5. Influence of commercial and residual sorbents and silicates as additives on the stabilisation/solidification of organic and inorganic industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Coz, A; Andrés, A; Soriano, S; Viguri, J R; Ruiz, M C; Irabien, J A

    2009-05-30

    An environmental problem of the foundry activities is the management of industrial waste generated in different processes. The foundry sludge from gas wet cleaning treatment that contains organic and inorganic compounds and a high content of water is an interesting example. Due to their characteristics, they can be managed using different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) technologies prior to land disposal. The purpose of this work is to study S/S formulations in order to improve the control of the mobility of the pollutants and the ecotoxicity of the samples. Different mixtures of cement or lime as binders and additives (foundry sand, silica fume, sodium silicate, silicic acid, activated carbon and black carbon) have been used in order to reduce the mobility of the chemical and ecotoxicological regulated parameters and to compare the results for commercial and residual additives. The best results have been obtained with sorbents (activated carbon and black carbon) or sodium silicate. The results of the foundry sand ash as additive can conclude that it can be used as replacement in the cement products. However, silica fume in the samples with lime and siliceous resin sand as additives gives products that do not fulfil the regulated limits. Finally, some linear expressions between the chemical parameters and the quantity of material used in the samples have been obtained.

  6. Effects of nitrogen catabolite repression and di-ammonium phosphate addition during wine fermentation by a commercial strain of S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Deed, Nathan K; van Vuuren, Hennie J J; Gardner, Richard C

    2011-03-01

    Two deletion mutants expected to be defective in nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) were constructed in a commercial wine yeast background M2: a ure2 mutant and a dal80 gzf3 double mutant. Wild-type and both mutant strains were fermented in Sauvignon Blanc grape juice with and without addition of di-ammonium phosphate (DAP). The dal80 gzf3 double mutant exhibited a long fermentative lag phase, which was offset by DAP addition (corresponding to 300 mg/L of N). Neither the NCR mutations nor DAP addition affected the content of volatile thiols in the final wine. Microarray analyses of transcripts in the wild-type and dal80 gzf3 double-mutant strains were performed after 2% and 70% sugars were fermented. Of 80 genes previously identified as NCR-regulated, only 13 were upregulated during fermentation of the dal80 gzf3 double-mutant strain in grape juice. Following DAP addition, 34 of the known NCR genes were downregulated, including 17 that were downregulated even in the NCR mutant strain. The results demonstrate an unexpected complexity of the NCR response that may reflect differences between strains of yeast or differences in gene regulation during alcoholic fermentation compared with standard aerobic growth.

  7. Grain Refinement Efficiency in Commercial-Purity Aluminum Influenced by the Addition of Al-4Ti Master Alloys with Varying TiAl₃ Particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhua; He, Jiansheng; Tang, Qi; Wang, Tao; Chen, Jing

    2016-10-26

    A series of Al-4Ti master alloys with various TiAl₃ particles were prepared via pouring the pure aluminum added with K₂TiF₆ or sponge titanium into three different molds made of graphite, copper, and sand. The microstructure and morphology of TiAl₃ particles were characterized and analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The microstructure of TiAl₃ particles in Al-4Ti master alloys and their grain refinement efficiency in commercial-purity aluminum were investigated in this study. Results show that there were three different morphologies of TiAl₃ particles in Al-4Ti master alloys: petal-like structures, blocky structures, and flaky structures. The Al-4Ti master alloy with blocky TiAl₃ particles had better and more stable grain refinement efficiency than the master alloys with petal-like and flaky TiAl₃ particles. The average grain size of the refined commercial-purity aluminum always hereditarily followed the size of the original TiAl₃ particles. In addition, the grain refinement efficiency of Al-4Ti master alloys with the same morphology, size, and distribution of TiAl₃ particles prepared through different processes was almost identical.

  8. Grain Refinement Efficiency in Commercial-Purity Aluminum Influenced by the Addition of Al-4Ti Master Alloys with Varying TiAl3 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianhua; He, Jiansheng; Tang, Qi; Wang, Tao; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    A series of Al-4Ti master alloys with various TiAl3 particles were prepared via pouring the pure aluminum added with K2TiF6 or sponge titanium into three different molds made of graphite, copper, and sand. The microstructure and morphology of TiAl3 particles were characterized and analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The microstructure of TiAl3 particles in Al-4Ti master alloys and their grain refinement efficiency in commercial-purity aluminum were investigated in this study. Results show that there were three different morphologies of TiAl3 particles in Al-4Ti master alloys: petal-like structures, blocky structures, and flaky structures. The Al-4Ti master alloy with blocky TiAl3 particles had better and more stable grain refinement efficiency than the master alloys with petal-like and flaky TiAl3 particles. The average grain size of the refined commercial-purity aluminum always hereditarily followed the size of the original TiAl3 particles. In addition, the grain refinement efficiency of Al-4Ti master alloys with the same morphology, size, and distribution of TiAl3 particles prepared through different processes was almost identical. PMID:28773987

  9. A Commercial Conducting Polymer as Both Binder and Conductive Additive for Silicon Nanoparticle-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Negative Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Thomas M; Park, Sang-Hoon; King, Paul J; Zhang, Chuanfang John; McEvoy, Niall; Berner, Nina C; Daly, Dermot; Shmeliov, Aleksey; Khan, Umar; Duesberg, Georg; Nicolosi, Valeria; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2016-03-22

    This work describes silicon nanoparticle-based lithium-ion battery negative electrodes where multiple nonactive electrode additives (usually carbon black and an inert polymer binder) are replaced with a single conductive binder, in this case, the conducting polymer PSS. While enabling the production of well-mixed slurry-cast electrodes with high silicon content (up to 95 wt %), this combination eliminates the well-known occurrence of capacity losses due to physical separation of the silicon and traditional inorganic conductive additives during repeated lithiation/delithiation processes. Using an in situ secondary doping treatment of the PSS with small quantities of formic acid, electrodes containing 80 wt % SiNPs can be prepared with electrical conductivity as high as 4.2 S/cm. Even at the relatively high areal loading of 1 mg/cm(2), this system demonstrated a first cycle lithiation capacity of 3685 mA·h/g (based on the SiNP mass) and a first cycle efficiency of ∼78%. After 100 repeated cycles at 1 A/g this electrode was still able to store an impressive 1950 mA·h/g normalized to Si mass (∼75% capacity retention), corresponding to 1542 mA·h/g when the capacity is normalized by the total electrode mass. At the maximum electrode thickness studied (∼1.5 mg/cm(2)), a high areal capacity of 3 mA·h/cm(2) was achieved. Importantly, these electrodes are based on commercially available components and are produced by the standard slurry coating methods required for large-scale electrode production. Hence, the results presented here are highly relevant for the realization of commercial LiB negative electrodes that surpass the performance of current graphite-based negative electrode systems.

  10. Gene cloning and characterization of a thermostable phytase from Bacillus subtilis US417 and assessment of its potential as a feed additive in comparison with a commercial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Ameny; Chouayekh, Hichem; Ben Farhat, Mounira; Bouchaala, Kameleddine; Bejar, Samir

    2008-10-01

    An extracellular phytase from Bacillus subtilis US417 (PHY US417) was purified and characterized. The purified enzyme of 41 kDa was calcium-dependent and optimally active at pH 7.5 and 55 degrees C. The thermal stability of PHY US417 was drastically improved by calcium. Indeed, it recovered 77% of its original activity after denaturation for 10 min at 75 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM CaCl2, while it retained only 22% of activity when incubated for 10 min at 60 degrees C without calcium. In addition, PHY US417 was found to be highly specific for phytate and exhibited pH stability similar to Phyzyme, a commercial phytase with optimal activity at pH 5.5 and 60 degrees C. The phytase gene was cloned by PCR from Bacillus subtilis US417. Sequence analysis of the encoded polypeptide revealed one residue difference from PhyC of Bacillus subtilis VTTE-68013 (substitution of arginine in position 257 by proline in PHY US417) which was reported to exhibit lower thermostability especially in the absence of calcium. With its neutral pH optimum as well as its great pH and thermal stability, the PHY US417 enzyme presumed to be predominantly active in the intestine has a high potential for use as feed additive.

  11. Potentiation of the effect of a commercial animal feed additive mixed with different probiotic yeast strains on the adsorption of aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Valeria; Dogi, Cecilia; Pereyra, Carina Maricel; Fernández Juri, Maria G; Köhler, Pablo; Rosa, Carlos A R; Dalcero, Ana Maria; Cavaglieri, Lilia Reneé

    2015-01-01

    This study potentiates the adsorbent effect for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) of a commercial additive (CA) of animal feed, containing inactive lysate of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, active enzymes, adsorbents and a selenium-amino acid complex, when the additive was mixed separately with three S. cerevisiae strains. Levels of AFB1 of 20 and 50 ng g(-1) were used to determine the binding capacity of different concentrations of CA alone and in the presence of yeast strains, as well as toxin desorption, under gastrointestinal conditions. The viability of yeasts in the presence of CA was evaluated. The results show that the CA did not affect the viability of the yeast strains assayed. CA alone showed a low percentage adsorption. At 20 and at 50 ng g(-1), CA was highly efficient in adsorbing AFB1 when combined with RC016 and RC012 strains respectively. Desorption of AFB1 by CA alone and in combination with the yeasts increased with increasing levels of CA. The results demonstrate the improvement of CA in AFB1 adsorption once it is mixed with live yeasts.

  12. Partitioning of dietary energy of chickens fed maize- or wheat-based diets with and without a commercial blend of phytogenic feed additives.

    PubMed

    Pirgozliev, V; Beccaccia, A; Rose, S P; Bravo, D

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a standardized mixture of a commercial blend of phytogenic feed additives containing 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum on utilization of dietary energy and performance in broiler chickens. Four experimental diets were offered to the birds from 7 to 21 d of age. These included 2 basal control diets based on either wheat or maize that contained 215 g CP/kg and 12.13 MJ/kg ME and another 2 diets using the basal control diets supplemented with the plant extracts combination at 100 mg/kg diet. Each diet was fed to 16 individually penned birds following randomization. Dietary plant extracts improved feed intake and weight gain (P < 0.05) and slightly (P < 0.1) improved feed efficiency of birds fed the maize-based diet. Supplementary plant extracts did not change dietary ME (P > 0.05) but improved (P < 0.05) dietary NE by reducing the heat increment (P < 0.05) per kilogram feed intake. Feeding phytogenics improved (P < 0.05) total carcass energy retention and the efficiency of dietary ME for carcass energy retention. The number of interactions between type of diet and supplementary phytogenic feed additive suggest that the chemical composition and the energy to protein ratio of the diet may influence the efficiency of phytogenics when fed to chickens. The experiment showed that although supplementary phytogenic additives did not affect dietary ME, they caused a significant improvement in the utilization of dietary energy for carcass energy retention but this did not always relate to growth performance.

  13. Proposed testing protocols for commercial kitchen ventilation research

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, J.S. )

    1991-03-01

    Commercial kitchen ventilation systems significantly impact energy use and peak energy demand in foodservice establishments. However, the amount of ventilation exhaust required by different building codes and standards varies widely. Moreover, there is no industry-wide accepted testing procedure that quantifies and verifies exhaust capture and addresses the various types of cooking equipment used in commercial kitchens. This report provides a review of some requirements and practices which are currently in use. Proposals aimed at developing a more uniform approach to ventilation are discussed, including proposals for cooking and ventilation test protocols. Information obtained through a literature search and solicitation of information from cooking appliance and ventilation equipment manufacturers supports the conclusion that additional research and testing is needed to develop methods to establish ventilation requirements of commercial cooking equipment. Based on information gathered, and a meeting with industry representatives, draft test protocols were developed. The proposed protocols call for separate testing of cooking equipment and exhaust hoods. Tests of cooking equipment would be intended to characterize the effluent produced by specific equipment and cooking processes, and to facilitate equipment categorization with respect to cooking surface temperature and effluent generation rates. Using this information on cooking equipment, ventilation hoods would be tested to develop test procedures to determine ventilation requirements for specific hood and cooking equipment combinations. 12 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. Additives for immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional separation of particulate material: comparison between commercial and new synthetic detergents.

    PubMed

    Gianazza, E; Rabilloud, T; Quaglia, L; Caccia, P; Astrua-Testori, S; Osio, L; Grazioli, G; Righetti, P G

    1987-09-01

    We describe the synthesis of two detergents, L and A15, whose performances as solubilizing agents and as additives in the first-dimension step of a two-dimensional separation are compared with those of some commercial compounds, i.e., Nonidet P-40, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]propanesulfonate(Chaps), and sulfobetaine, on three membrane protein preparations: rat RBC ghosts, beef kidney microvilli, and spinach thylakoids. L is 3-]3-dodecylamidoprophylcbdimethylammonio propane-1-sulfonate; owing to the substitution of a dodecylamido for the dodecyl residue of SB 3-12, the concentration of urea compatible with 2% detergent increases from 4.5 M for the parent molecule up to 7 M. With all three biological samples on which the panel of different detergents has been tested in parallel, L + urea scores as the most effective solubilization medium. On red blood cells a notable qualitative difference is observed with the selective extraction by L as well as by N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylammonio-3-propanesulfonate of a major protein (pI = ca. 5.5, Mr = ca. 100,000). A15 is derived from a tertiary amine, with one alkylic substituent (either C11 or C13) and two poly(ethylene oxide) tails (totaling 15 ethoxy residues), which is reacted with propane sultone. Approximately 30% of the product corresponds to the N-adduct and is a truly zwitterionic detergent, while 60% is an O-derivative and still contains a titratable amino group (with a pK of 7.2). A15 can thus be used for isoelectric focusing on immobilized pH gradients, as in this work, but would not be compatible with carrier ampholyte isoelectric focusing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. 46 CFR 197.460 - Diving equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving equipment. 197.460 Section 197.460 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.460 Diving equipment. The diving supervisor shall insure that the diving equipment designated for...

  16. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-01-22

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta

  17. Equipment for drilling miniature holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L K

    1981-04-01

    Miniature holes are produced on 16 different types of mechanical drilling equipment. Each equipment type has significant advantages for a specific type of part. The basic capabilities vary greatly between equipment types. Some produce very precise holes and others produce very high volumes of commercial tolerance holes. At the present time machines are available for mechanicaly drilling up to 100,000 miniature holes per hour. Lasers currently are drilling as many as 15,000,000 ultra-miniature holes per hour.

  18. Commercial Activities in Schools: Use of Student Data Is Limited and Additional Dissemination of Guidance Could Help Districts Develop Policies. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-04-810.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined (1) the extent to which, since 2000, states have enacted and proposed statutes and regulations to govern commercial activities in schools; (2) the extent to which districts have developed policies implementing amended provisions of the Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) in the No Child Left Behind Act on the use of…

  19. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems.

  20. Superhydrophobic powder additives to enhance chemical agent resistant coating systems for military equipment for the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) Corrosion Prevention and Control (CPAC) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Haynes, James A.

    2015-07-01

    The primary goal of the CPAC program at ORNL was to explore the feasibility of introducing various silica-based superhydrophobic (SH) powder additives as a way to improve the corrosion resistance of US Department of Defense (DOD) military-grade chemical agent resistant coating (CARC) systems. ORNL had previously developed and patented several SH technologies of interest to the USMC, and one of the objectives of this program was to identify methods to incorporate these technologies into the USMC’s corrosion-resistance strategy. This report discusses findings of the CPAC and their application.

  1. Electricity used by office equipment and network equipment in the U.S.: Detailed report and appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Kaoru; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.; Piette, Mary Ann; Ting, Michael; Meier, Alan K.

    2001-02-01

    In spite of the recent explosive growth in the use of office and network equipment, there has been no recent study that estimates in detail how much electricity is consumed by that equipment in the United States. In this study, we examined energy use by office equipment and network equipment at the end of 1999. We classified office equipment into 11 types; for each type we estimated annual energy consumption for residential, commercial, and industrial use by combining estimates of stock, power requirements, usage, and saturation of power management. We also classified network equipment into six types and estimated the annual energy consumption for each type. We found that total direct power use by office and network equipment is about 74 TWh per year, which is about 2% of total electricity use in the U.S. When electricity used by telecommunications equipment and electronics manufacturing is included, that figure rises to 3% of all electricity use (Koomey 2000). More than 70% of the 74 TWh/year is dedicated to office equipment for commercial use. We also found that power management currently saves 23 TWh/year, and complete saturation and proper functioning of power management would achieve additional savings of 17 TWh/year. Furthermore, complete saturation of night shutdown for equipment not required to operate at night would reduce power use by an additional 7 TWh/year. Finally, we compared our current estimater with our 1995 forecast for 1999. We found that the total difference between our current estimate and the previous forecast is less than 15% and identified the factors that led to inaccuracies in the previous forecast. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis of the uncertainties in our current forecast and identified the data sets that have the largest impact on our current estimate of energy use.

  2. 75 FR 41102 - Energy Conservation Program: Re-Opening of the Public Comment Period for Commercial Refrigeration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Commercial Refrigeration Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... the availability of the framework document for commercial refrigeration equipment and provide notice... for submitting comments on the framework document for commercial refrigeration equipment is to be...

  3. 10 CFR 431.405 - Exported equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exported equipment. 431.405 Section 431.405 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 431.405 Exported equipment. Under Sections 330 and 345 of the Act, this...

  4. 10 CFR 431.404 - Imported equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Imported equipment. 431.404 Section 431.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 431.404 Imported equipment. (a) Under sections 331 and 345 of the Act,...

  5. 10 CFR 431.404 - Imported equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Imported equipment. 431.404 Section 431.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 431.404 Imported equipment. (a) Under sections 331 and 345 of the Act,...

  6. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diver's equipment. 197.346 Section 197.346 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.346 Diver's equipment. (a) Each diver...

  7. 10 CFR 431.405 - Exported equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exported equipment. 431.405 Section 431.405 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 431.405 Exported equipment. Under Sections 330 and 345 of the Act, this Part...

  8. Commercialization of Nanotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    NATO LECTURES M. Meyyappan Commercialization of Nanotechnology Abstract Nanotechnology is an enabling technology and as such, will have an...years), medium term (10 years) and long term (> 15 years) prospects. In addition, the challenges currently being faced to commercialize nanotechnology...will be discussed in detail. A summary outlining efforts across the world in terms of commercialization , startup activities, participation of major

  9. Prioritizing equipment for replacement.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Mike

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that clinical engineers take the lead in formulating evaluation processes to recommend equipment replacement. Their skill, knowledge, and experience, combined with access to equipment databases, make them a logical choice. Based on ideas from Fennigkoh's scheme, elements such as age, vendor support, accumulated maintenance cost, and function/risk were used.6 Other more subjective criteria such as cost benefits and efficacy of newer technology were not used. The element of downtime was also omitted due to the data element not being available. The resulting Periop Master Equipment List and its rationale was presented to the Perioperative Services Program Council. They deemed the criteria to be robust and provided overwhelming acceptance of the list. It was quickly put to use to estimate required capital funding, justify items already thought to need replacement, and identify high-priority ranked items for replacement. Incorporating prioritization criteria into an existing equipment database would be ideal. Some commercially available systems do have the basic elements of this. Maintaining replacement data can be labor-intensive regardless of the method used. There is usually little time to perform the tasks necessary for prioritizing equipment. However, where appropriate, a clinical engineering department might be able to conduct such an exercise as shown in the following case study.

  10. Effects of hydrocolloid addition and high pressure processing on the rheological properties and microstructure of a commercial ostrich meat product "Yor" (Thai sausage).

    PubMed

    Chattong, Utaiwan; Apichartsrangkoon, Arunee; Bell, Alan E

    2007-07-01

    "Yor" is a traditional sausage like product widely consumed in Thailand. Its textures are usually set by steaming, in this experiment ultra-high pressure was used to modify the product. Three types of hydrocolloid; carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), locust bean gum (LBG) and xanthan gum, were added to minced ostrich meat batter at concentration of 0-1% and subjected to high pressure 600MPa, 50°C, 40min. The treated samples were analysed for storage (G') and loss (G″) moduli by dynamic oscillatory testing as well as creep compliance for control stress measurement. Their microstructures using confocal microscopy were also examined. Hydrocolloid addition caused a significant (P<0.05) decrease in both the G' and G″ moduli. However the loss tangent of all samples remained unchanged. Addition of hydrocolloids led to decreases in the gel network formation but appears to function as surfactant materials during the initial mixing stage as shown by the microstructure. Confocal microscopy suggested that the size of the fat droplets decreased with gum addition. The fat droplets were smallest on the addition of xanthan gum and increased in the order CMC, LBG and no added gum, respectively. Creep parameters of ostrich yors with four levels of xanthan gum addition (0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00% and 1.25%) showed an increase in the instantaneous compliance (J(0)), the retarded compliance (J(1)) and retardation time (λ(1)) but a decrease in the viscosity (η(0)) with increasing levels of addition. The results also suggested that the larger deformations used during creep testing might be more helpful in assessing the mechanical properties of the product than the small deformations used in oscillatory rheology.

  11. Solar Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  12. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  13. Telescope Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Renaissance Telescope for high resolution and visual astronomy has five 82-degree Field Tele-Vue Nagler Eyepieces, some of the accessories that contribute to high image quality. Telescopes and eyepieces are representative of a family of optical equipment manufactured by Tele-Vue Optics, Inc.

  14. Commercial lumber

    Treesearch

    Kent A. McDonald; David E. Kretschmann

    1999-01-01

    In a broad sense, commercial lumber is any lumber that is bought or sold in the normal channels of commerce. Commercial lumber may be found in a variety of forms, species, and types, and in various commercial establishments, both wholesale and retail. Most commercial lumber is graded by standardized rules that make purchasing more or less uniform throughout the country...

  15. A comparison of the photocatalytic activity between commercial and synthesized mesoporous and nanocrystalline titanium dioxide for 4-nitrophenol degradation: Effect of phase composition, particle size, and addition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Piera; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Donzello, Maria Pia; Fierro, Giuseppe; Moretti, Giuliano

    2015-12-01

    The photodegradation of 4-nitrophenol in aqueous solution was studied by using titania-based photocatalysts, in particular standard commercial titania samples (anatase and rutile, Hunstmann; P25 and Aeroxide VP P90, Evonik) and a mesoporous and nanocrystalline titania synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. A comparison between the commercial products and our preparations made evident a different particle size and phase composition. Moreover, in order to investigate a possible synergism between TiO2 and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), further two samples were purposely synthesized by adding to the reaction mixture used for the catalyst preparation a small amount of single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Among the investigated solids, the nanocrystalline titania resulted to be the most active photocatalysts. The less active solids were rutile and mesoporous titania. The addition of a small amount of MWCNTs further increased the photoactivity of the nanocrystalline titania.

  16. Dairy Equipment Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lake To Lake Dairy Cooperative, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, operates four plants in Wisconsin for processing milk, butter and cheese products from its 1,300 member farms. The large co-op was able to realize substantial savings by using NASA information for improved efficiency in plant maintenance. Under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a handbook consolidating information about commercially available lubricants. The handbook details chemical and physical properties, applications, specifications, test procedures and test data for liquid and solid lubricants. Lake To Lake's plant engineer used the handbook to effect savings in maintenance labor and materials costs by reducing the number of lubricants used on certain equipment. Strict U.S. Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration regulations preclude lubrication changes n production equipment, but the co-op's maintenance chief was able to eliminate seven types of lubricants for ancillary equipment, such as compressors and high pressure pumps. Handbook data enabled him to select comparable but les expensive lubricants in the materials consolidation process, and simplified lubrication schedules and procedures. The handbook is in continuing use as a reference source when a new item of equipment is purchased.

  17. The effects of deoxynivalenol-contaminated corn dried distillers grains with solubles in nursery pig diets and potential for mitigation by commercially available feed additives.

    PubMed

    Frobose, H L; Fruge, E D; Tokach, M D; Hansen, E L; DeRouchey, J M; Dritz, S S; Goodband, R D; Nelssen, J L

    2015-03-01

    Four experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) from naturally contaminated dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) and the efficacy of feed additives in nursery pig diets. In Exp. 1, 180 pigs (10.3 ± 0.2 kg BW) were fed 1 of 5 diets for 21 d. Diets were 1) Positive Control (PC; < 0.5 mg/kg DON), 2) Negative Control (NC; 4 mg/kg DON), 3) NC + 0.10% Biofix (Biomin Inc., Herzogenburg, Austria), 4) NC + 0.15% Cel-can (VAST Inc., Mason City, IA) and 0.50% bentonite clay, and 5) NC + 0.25% Defusion Plus (Cargill Animal Nutrition, Minneapolis, MN). Pigs fed the NC diet had poorer ( < 0.01) ADG than those fed the PC. Pigs fed Defusion Plus had improved ( < 0.03) ADG over those fed NC, whereas pigs fed Biofix or Cel-can with bentonite clay had reduced ADG ( < 0.01) compared with those fed PC. In Exp. 2, 340 pigs (11.7 ± 0.1 kg BW) were fed 1 of 8 diets for 21 d. Diets were 1) PC (< 0.5 mg/kg DON), 2) Low NC (1.5 mg/kg DON), 3) Low NC + 0.15% Biofix, 4) Low NC + 0.30% Biofix, 5) High NC (3.0 mg/kg DON), 6) High NC + 0.30% Biofix, 7) High NC + 0.45% Biofix, and 8) Diet 7 with 5% added water. Increasing the DON level reduced (linear; < 0.05) ADG, ADFI, and pig BW, and Biofix did not improve performance. In Exp. 3, 1,008 pigs (12.5 ± 0.3 kg BW) were fed 6 treatments for 24 d. Diets were 1) PC ( < 0.5 mg/kg DON), 2) NC (3 mg/kg DON), 3) NC + 0.25% Defusion, 4) NC + 0.50% Defusion, 5) Diet 3 with supplemental nutrients, and 6) Diet 5, pelleted. Pigs fed the NC had decreased ( < 0.01) ADG and ADFI, but adding Defusion improved (linear; < 0.04) ADG and ADFI over pigs fed NC. Pelleting improved ( < 0.01) both ADG and G:F, resulting in ADG above PC pigs. In Exp. 4, 980 pigs (12.0 ± 0.3 kg BW) were fed 1 of 7 diets in a 28-d trial in a 2 × 3 + 1 factorial arrangement. The 7 treatments were based on 3 diets fed in meal or pellet form: 1) PC (< 0.5 mg/kg DON), 2) NC (3 mg/kg DON), and 3) NC + 0.25% Defusion. Treatment 7 was Diet 3 with

  18. Equipping tomorrow's fire manager

    Treesearch

    Christopher A. Dicus

    2008-01-01

    Fire managers are challenged with an ever-increasing array of both responsibilities and critics. As in the past, fire managers must master the elements of fire behavior and ecology using the latest technologies. In addition, today’s managers must be equipped with the skills necessary to understand and liaise with a burgeoning group of vocal stakeholders while also...

  19. Rescue Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lifeshear cutter, a rescue tool for freeing accident victims from wreckage, was developed under the Clinton Administration's Technology Reinvestment Program. Prior cutting equipment was cumbersome and expensive; the new cutter is 50 percent lighter and 70 percent cheaper. The cutter is pyrotechnically-actuated, using a miniature version of the power cartridges used for separation devices on the Space Shuttle and other NASA spacecraft. Hi-Shear Technology Corporation developed the cutter with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and input from the City of Torrance (California) Fire Department.

  20. 46 CFR 197.454 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.454 First aid and treatment equipment. The diving supervisor shall ensure that medical...

  1. Equipment Management Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Equipment Management Manual (NHB 4200.1) is issued pursuant to Section 203(c)(1) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, as amended (42 USC 2473), and sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for the acquisition, management, and use of NASA-owned equipment. This revision is effective upon receipt. This is a controlled manual, issued in loose-leaf form, and revised through page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution.

  2. Solar-Radiation Measuring Equipment and Glossary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. A.; Patel, A. M.; Greenbaum, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    1976 listing of commercially available solar-radiation measuring equipment is presented in 50-page report. Sensor type, response time, cost data, and comments concerning specifications and intended usage are listed for 145 instruments from 38 manufactures.

  3. Embedding international benchmarks of proficiency in English in undergraduate nursing programmes: challenges and strategies in equipping culturally and linguistically diverse students with English as an additional language for nursing in Australia.

    PubMed

    Glew, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    To meet the expected shortfalls in the number of registered nurses throughout the coming decade Australian universities have been recruiting an increasing number of students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) backgrounds. Given that international and domestic students who use English as an additional language (EAL) complement the number of native English speaking nursing students, they represent a valuable nurse education investment. Although university programmes are in a position to meet the education and learning needs of native English speaking nursing students, they can experience considerable challenges in effectively equipping EAL students with the English and academic language skills for nursing studies and registration in Australia. However, success in a nursing programme and in preparing for nurse registration can require EAL students to achieve substantial literacy skills in English and academic language through their engagement with these tertiary learning contexts. This paper discusses the education implications for nursing programmes and EAL students of developing literacy skills through pre-registration nursing studies to meet the English language skills standard for nurse registration and presents intervention strategies for nursing programmes that aim to build EAL student capacity in using academic English.

  4. Initiatives to Improve Quality of Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing leadership in an international effort linking government and industry resources to speed adoption of additive manufactured (AM) parts. Participants include government agencies (NASA, USAF, NIST, FAA), industry (commercial aerospace, NDE manufacturers, AM equipment manufacturers), standards organizations and academia. NASA is also partnering with its international space exploration organizations such as ESA and JAXA. NDT is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  5. GUIDES TO POLLUTION PREVENTION: THE MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT REPAIR INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial mechanical equipment repair services are covered under SIC 76 and include activities such as repair of boilers, commercial appliances, lawn mowers, refrigerator and air conditioners, electric motors, generators and transformers, among others. This quide describes the ...

  6. GUIDES TO POLLUTION PREVENTION: THE MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT REPAIR INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial mechanical equipment repair services are covered under SIC 76 and include activities such as repair of boilers, commercial appliances, lawn mowers, refrigerator and air conditioners, electric motors, generators and transformers, among others. This quide describes the ...

  7. Welding equipment for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhanibekov, V. A.; Zagrebel'Nyi, A. A.; Garvish, S. S.; Stesin, V. V.; Sheliagin, V. D.; Iurchenko, N. N.; Markov, A. V.

    A survey is presented of representative Soviet-period equipment for welding, brazing, coating, and cutting operations that are to be conducted in EVA and other microgravity/vacuum conditions by cosmonauts. Power-supply and process information-processing units are essential components of the 'Isparitel', 'Yantar', and hand-held 'Uri' equipment discussed; in addition, these welding equipment designs strove to achieve the greatest possible lightness, compactness, and energy efficiency. Accounts are given of cosmonaut EVA operational experience with the welding equipment presented.

  8. 20 CFR 435.34 - Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post... replacement equipment subject to the approval of SSA. (f) The recipient's property management standards for...) Equipment records must be maintained accurately and must include the following information: (i) A...

  9. 15 CFR 14.34 - Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL.... (3) A physical inventory of equipment shall be taken and the results reconciled with the equipment... difference. The recipient shall, in connection with the inventory, verify the existence, current...

  10. 20 CFR 435.34 - Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post... Government must be identified to indicate Federal ownership. (3) A physical inventory of equipment must be... the inventory, verify the existence, current utilization, and continued need for the equipment. (4)...

  11. BIODIESEL BLENDS IN SPACE HEATING EQUIPMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.

    2001-12-01

    Biodiesel is a diesel-like fuel that is derived from processing vegetable oils from various sources, such as soy oil, rapeseed or canola oil, and also waste vegetable oils resulting from cooking use. Brookhaven National laboratory initiated an evaluation of the performance of blends of biodiesel and home heating oil in space heating applications under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This report is a result of this work performed in the laboratory. A number of blends of varying amounts of a biodiesel in home heating fuel were tested in both a residential heating system and a commercial size boiler. The results demonstrate that blends of biodiesel and heating oil can be used with few or no modifications to the equipment or operating practices in space heating. The results also showed that there were environmental benefits from the biodiesel addition in terms of reductions in smoke and in Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). The latter result was particularly surprising and of course welcome, in view of the previous results in diesel engines where no changes had been seen. Residential size combustion equipment is presently not subject to NOx regulation. If reductions in NOx similar to those observed here hold up in larger size (commercial and industrial) boilers, a significant increase in the use of biodiesel-like fuel blends could become possible.

  12. The influence of experiential learning on medical equipment adoption in general practices.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Jane; Roper, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The benefits of the availability and use of medical equipment for medical outcomes are understood by physicians and policymakers alike. However, there is limited understanding of the decision-making processes involved in adopting and using new technologies in health care organisations. Our study focuses on the adoption of medical equipment in Irish general practices which are marked by considerable autonomy in terms of commercial practice and the range of medical services they provide. We examine the adoption of six items of medical equipment taking into account commercial, informational and experiential stimuli. Our analysis is based on primary survey data collected from a sample of 601 general practices in Ireland on practice characteristics and medical equipment use. We use a multivariate Probit to identify commonalities in the determinants of the adoption. Many factors, such as GP and practice characteristics, influence medical equipment adoption. In addition, we find significant and consistent evidence of the influence of learning-by-using effects on the adoption of medical equipment in a general practice setting. Knowledge generated by experiential or applied learning can have commercial, organisational and health care provision benefits in small health care organisations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Emergency medical equipment on board German airliners.

    PubMed

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Neuhaus, Christopher; Wetsch, Wolfgang A; Spelten, Oliver; Picker, Susanne; Böttiger, Bernd W; Gathof, Birgit S

    2014-01-01

    Medical emergencies often occur on commercial airline flights, but valid data on their causes and consequences are rare. Therefore, it is unclear what emergency medical equipment is necessary. Although a minimum standard for medical equipment is defined in regulations, additional material is not standardized and may vary significantly between different airlines. German airlines operating aircrafts with more than 30 seats were selected and interviewed with a 5-page written questionnaire between August 2011 and January 2012. Besides pre-packed and required emergency medical material, drugs, medical devices, and equipment lists were queried. If no reply was received, airlines were contacted another three times by e-mail and/or phone. Descriptive analysis was used for data presentation and interpretation. From a total of 73 German airlines, 58 were excluded from analysis (eg, those not providing passenger transport). Fifteen airlines were contacted and data of 13 airlines were available for analysis (two airlines did not participate). A first aid kit was available on all airlines. Seven airlines reported having a doctor's kit, and another four provided an "emergency medical kit." Four airlines provided an automated external defibrillator (AED)/electrocardiogram (ECG). While six airlines reported providing anesthesia drugs, a laryngoscope, and endotracheal tubes, another four airlines did not provide even a resuscitator bag. One airline did not provide any material for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although the minimal material required according to European aviation regulations is provided by all airlines for medical emergencies, there are significant differences in the provision of additional material. The equipment on most airlines is not sufficient for the treatment of specific emergencies according to published medical guidelines (eg, for CPR or acute myocardial infarction). © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  14. ERC commercialization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MW power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full-sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MW Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

  15. ERC commercialization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MR power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full- sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, and (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MR Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

  16. Recognition and Use of Kitchen Tools and Utensils. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 4.4. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 4: Equipment Handling, Operation, and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with common tools and utensils used in commercial kitchens. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on various kitchen tools (cutting,…

  17. Recognition and Use of Kitchen Tools and Utensils. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 4.4. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 4: Equipment Handling, Operation, and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with common tools and utensils used in commercial kitchens. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on various kitchen tools (cutting,…

  18. Space Heaters, Computers, Cell Phone Chargers: How Plugged In AreCommercial Buildings?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie; Brown, Richard; Busch, John; Pinckard, Margaret; Roberson, Judy

    2007-02-28

    Evidenceof electric plug loads in commercial buildings isvisible everyday: space heaters, portable fans, and the IT technician'stwo monitors connected to one PC. The Energy Information Administrationestimates that office and miscellaneous equipment together will consume2.18 quads in 2006, nearly 50 percent of U.S. commercial electricity use.Although the importance of commercial plug loads is documented, its verynature (diverse product types, products not installed when buildinginitially constructed, and products often hidden in closets) makes itdifficult to accurately count and categorize the end use.We auditedsixteen buildings in three cities (San Francisco, Atlanta, Pittsburgh)including office, medical and education building types. We inventoriedthe number and types of office and miscellaneous electric equipment aswell as estimated total energy consumption due to these product types. Intotal, we audited approximately 4,000 units of office equipment and 6,000units of miscellaneous equipment and covered a diverse range of productsranging from electric pencil sharpeners with a unit energy consumption(UEC) of 1 kWh/yr to a kiln with a UEC of 7,000 kWh/yr. Our paperpresents a summary of the density and type of plug load equipment foundas well as the estimated total energy consumption of the equipment.Additionally, we present equipment trends observed and provide insightsto how policy makers can target energy efficiency for this growing enduse.

  19. 75 FR 62639 - Air Ambulance and Commercial Helicopter Operations, Part 91 Helicopter Operations, and Part 135...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ...This proposed rule addresses air ambulance and commercial helicopter operations, part 91 helicopter operations, and load manifest requirements for all part 135 aircraft. From 2002 to 2008, there has been an increase in fatal helicopter air ambulance accidents. To address these safety concerns, the FAA is proposing to implement operational procedures and require additional equipment on board......

  20. Aquatic Equipment Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ruth

    Equipment usually used in water exercise programs is designed for variety, intensity, and program necessity. This guide discusses aquatic equipment under the following headings: (1) equipment design; (2) equipment principles; (3) precautions and contraindications; (4) population contraindications; and (5) choosing equipment. Equipment is used…

  1. Office equipment energy use and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, M.A.; Eto, J.H.; Harris, J.P.

    1991-09-01

    Office information technologies are using an increasing amount of energy in commercial buildings. During recent forecasting hearings in California, the office equipment end use has been a major source of differences among forecasts of commercial sector energy use. Not only are there major differences in forecasted load growth resulting from the energy use of office equipment, but there are also differences in interpretations of historical and base-year estimates. Understanding office equipment energy use is particularly important because office equipment is widely believed to be the fastest growing electrical end use in the fastest growing sector. This report describes the development and application of a spreadsheet to estimate current and future energy use by office equipment. We define the term office equipment'' to mean information processing technologies used in buildings. The seven categories of office equipment relate to categories found in our analysis of utility surveys and industry sales reports. These seven categories of equipment are examined for eleven types of commercial buildings.

  2. Office equipment energy use and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, M.A.; Eto, J.H.; Harris, J.P.

    1991-09-01

    Office information technologies are using an increasing amount of energy in commercial buildings. During recent forecasting hearings in California, the office equipment end use has been a major source of differences among forecasts of commercial sector energy use. Not only are there major differences in forecasted load growth resulting from the energy use of office equipment, but there are also differences in interpretations of historical and base-year estimates. Understanding office equipment energy use is particularly important because office equipment is widely believed to be the fastest growing electrical end use in the fastest growing sector. This report describes the development and application of a spreadsheet to estimate current and future energy use by office equipment. We define the term ``office equipment`` to mean information processing technologies used in buildings. The seven categories of office equipment relate to categories found in our analysis of utility surveys and industry sales reports. These seven categories of equipment are examined for eleven types of commercial buildings.

  3. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  4. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  5. Facility overview for commercial application of selected Rocky Flats facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this Facility Overview is to support the Rocky Flats Local Impacts Initiative`s Request for Interest, to solicit interest from commercial corporations for utilizing buildings 865 and 883, and the equipment contained within each building, for a commercial venture. In the following sections, this document describes the Rocky Flats Site, the buildings available for lease, the equipment within these buildings, the site services available to a tenant, the human resources available to support operations in buildings 865 and 883, and the environmental condition of the buildings and property. In addition, a brief description is provided of the work performed to date to explore the potential products that might be manufactured in Buildings 865 and 883, and the markets for these products.

  6. After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-05-27

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small

  7. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  8. Commercial Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Phil McAlister delivers a presentation by the Commercial Crew (CC) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to...

  9. Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  10. Commercial Discount Rate Estimation for Efficiency Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2016-04-13

    Underlying each of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) federal appliance and equipment standards are a set of complex analyses of the projected costs and benefits of regulation. Any new or amended standard must be designed to achieve significant additional energy conservation, provided that it is technologically feasible and economically justified (42 U.S.C. 6295(o)(2)(A)). A proposed standard is considered economically justified when its benefits exceed its burdens, as represented by the projected net present value of costs and benefits. DOE performs multiple analyses to evaluate the balance of costs and benefits of commercial appliance and equipment e efficiency standards, at the national and individual building or business level, each framed to capture different nuances of the complex impact of standards on the commercial end user population. The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis models the combined impact of appliance first cost and operating cost changes on a representative commercial building sample in order to identify the fraction of customers achieving LCC savings or incurring net cost at the considered efficiency levels.1 Thus, the choice of commercial discount rate value(s) used to calculate the present value of energy cost savings within the Life-Cycle Cost model implicitly plays a key role in estimating the economic impact of potential standard levels.2 This report is intended to provide a more in-depth discussion of the commercial discount rate estimation process than can be readily included in standard rulemaking Technical Support Documents (TSDs).

  11. 46 CFR 117.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life... PASSENGERS LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Ring Life Buoys and Life Jackets § 117.72 Personal flotation... persons working near or over the water. (d) Commercial hybrid personal flotation devices (PFD) approved...

  12. 10 CFR 431.174 - Additional requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. 431.174 Section 431.174 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Provisions for...

  13. 46 CFR 105.30-5 - Grounding of electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grounding of electrical equipment. 105.30-5 Section 105... VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Electrical Requirements § 105.30-5 Grounding of electrical equipment. (a) All electrical equipment shall be grounded to the vessel's common...

  14. 46 CFR 105.30-5 - Grounding of electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grounding of electrical equipment. 105.30-5 Section 105... VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Electrical Requirements § 105.30-5 Grounding of electrical equipment. (a) All electrical equipment shall be grounded to the vessel's common...

  15. 46 CFR 28.70 - Approved equipment and material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved equipment and material. 28.70 Section 28.70 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS General Provisions § 28.70 Approved equipment and material. (a) Equipment and...

  16. 46 CFR 105.30-5 - Grounding of electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grounding of electrical equipment. 105.30-5 Section 105... VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Electrical Requirements § 105.30-5 Grounding of electrical equipment. (a) All electrical equipment shall be grounded to the vessel's...

  17. 46 CFR 105.30-5 - Grounding of electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Grounding of electrical equipment. 105.30-5 Section 105... VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Electrical Requirements § 105.30-5 Grounding of electrical equipment. (a) All electrical equipment shall be grounded to the vessel's...

  18. 46 CFR 105.30-5 - Grounding of electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Grounding of electrical equipment. 105.30-5 Section 105... VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Electrical Requirements § 105.30-5 Grounding of electrical equipment. (a) All electrical equipment shall be grounded to the vessel's...

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence manipulates part of a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. Lawrence is a new addition to the mission crew. The STS-114 crew is at KSC to take part in crew equipment and orbiter familiarization.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-30

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence manipulates part of a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. Lawrence is a new addition to the mission crew. The STS-114 crew is at KSC to take part in crew equipment and orbiter familiarization.

  20. Personal protective equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000447.htm Personal protective equipment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Personal protective equipment is special equipment you wear to create a ...

  1. 77 FR 72763 - Energy Conservation Program: Certification of Commercial and Industrial HVAC, Refrigeration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Commercial and Industrial HVAC, Refrigeration and Water Heating Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency... certification regulations for certain commercial and industrial equipment covered under the Energy Policy and... commercial and industrial equipment \\1\\ stated that, for a variety of reasons, they would be unable to meet...

  2. Commercial tanning salons and melanoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Hoel, David G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There have been many case-control studies of melanoma and the use of indoor tanning equipment. A recent meta analysis of 8 credible studies in North America estimated an overall significant odds ratio of 1.23. Three of these 8 studies also reported separately on commercial use and home use of indoor tanning equipment. For home use the overall odds ratio was a significant 1.53 while for commercial use there was a non significant 1.05.

  3. 10 CFR 429.46 - Commercial clothes washers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Commercial clothes washers. 429.46 Section 429.46 Energy... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.46 Commercial clothes washers. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to commercial...

  4. 10 CFR 431.82 - Definitions concerning commercial packaged boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial packaged boilers. 431.82... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Packaged Boilers § 431.82 Definitions concerning commercial packaged boilers. The following definitions apply for purposes of this subpart E, and of subparts A and...

  5. Improvements to lawn and garden equipment emissions estimates for Baltimore, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Reid, Stephen B; Pollard, Erin K; Sullivan, Dana Coe; Shaw, Stephanie L

    2010-12-01

    Lawn and garden equipment are a significant source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other pollutants in suburban and urban areas. Emission estimates for this source category are typically prepared using default equipment populations and activity data contained in emissions models such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) NONROAD model or the California Air Resources Board's (CARB) OFFROAD model. Although such default data may represent national or state averages, these data are unlikely to reflect regional or local differences in equipment usage patterns because of variations in climate, lot sizes, and other variables. To assess potential errors in lawn and garden equipment emission estimates produced by the NONROAD model and to demonstrate methods that can be used by local planning agencies to improve those emission estimates, this study used bottom-up data collection techniques in the Baltimore metropolitan area to develop local equipment population, activity, and temporal data for lawn and garden equipment in the area. Results of this study show that emission estimates of VOCs, particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) for the Baltimore area that are based on local data collected through surveys of residential and commercial lawn and garden equipment users are 24-56% lower than estimates produced using NONROAD default data, largely because of a difference in equipment populations for high-usage commercial applications. Survey-derived emission estimates of PM and VOCs are 24 and 26% lower than NONROAD default estimates, respectively, whereas survey-derived emission estimates for CO, CO2, and NO(x) are more than 40% lower than NONROAD default estimates. In addition, study results show that the temporal allocation factors applied to residential lawn and garden equipment in the NONROAD model underestimated weekend activity levels by 30% compared with survey-derived temporal

  6. Commercial Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is a curriculum framework for a program in commercial fishing to be taught in Florida secondary and postsecondary institutions. This outline covers the major concepts/content of the program, which is designed to prepare students for employment in occupations with titles such as net fishers, pot fishers, line fishers, shrimp boat…

  7. Commercial Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is a curriculum framework for a program in commercial fishing to be taught in Florida secondary and postsecondary institutions. This outline covers the major concepts/content of the program, which is designed to prepare students for employment in occupations with titles such as net fishers, pot fishers, line fishers, shrimp boat…

  8. Commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Togai, Masaki

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on commercial applications of fuzzy logic in Japan are presented. Topics covered include: suitable application area of fuzzy theory; characteristics of fuzzy control; fuzzy closed-loop controller; Mitsubishi heavy air conditioner; predictive fuzzy control; the Sendai subway system; automatic transmission; fuzzy logic-based command system for antilock braking system; fuzzy feed-forward controller; and fuzzy auto-tuning system.

  9. STS-30 MS Cleave monitors fluids experiment apparatus (FEA) equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Mission Specialist (MS) Mary L. Cleave monitors fluids experiment apparatus (FEA) equipment and conducts materials science experiments on Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, middeck. FEA equipment is in configuration for 'Floating Zone Crystal Growth and Purification' experiment. Cleave looks up from portable laptop computer with FEA-2, 35mm camera, and 8mm video camcorder positioned above her in aft locker location. Cleave, wearing polo shirt and light blue flight coveralls, uses knee board note pad to make additional notations. Rockwell International (RI) through its Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California, is engaged in a joint endeavor agreement (JEA) with NASA's Office of Commercial Programs in the field for floating zone crystal growth research.

  10. Field power measurements of imaging equipment

    SciTech Connect

    McWhinney, Marla; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Roberson, Judy; Nordman, Bruce; Busch, John

    2004-05-14

    According to the U.S. Department of Energy, electricity use by non-PC commercial office equipment is growing at an annual rate of nearly 5 percent (AEO 2003). To help address this growth in consumption, U.S. EPA periodically updates its ENERGY STAR specifications as products and markets change. This report presents background research conducted to help EPA update the ENERGY STAR specification for imaging equipment, which covers printers, fax machines, copiers, scanners, and multifunction devices (MFDs). We first estimated the market impact of the current ENERGY STAR imaging specification, finding over 90 percent of the current market complies with the specification. We then analyzed a sample of typical new imaging products, including 11 faxes, 57 printers and 19 copiers/MFD. For these devices we metered power levels in the most common modes: active/ready/sleep/off, and recorded features that would most likely affect energy consumption. Our metering indicates that for many products and speed bins, current models consume substantially less power than the current specification. We also found that for all product categories, power consumption varied most considerably across technology (i.e. inkjet vs. laser). Although inkjet printers consumed less energy than laser printers in active, ready and sleep-mode, they consumed more power on average while off, mostly due to the use of external power supplies. Based on these findings, we developed strategies for the ENERGY STAR program to achieve additional energy reductions. Finally, we present an assessment of manufacturer's ENERGY STAR labeling practices.

  11. Equipment. Out of order.

    PubMed

    Connolly, C

    2000-08-17

    The NHS has underinvested in equipment for more than 20 years. Most hospitals have inadequate equipment inventories. More than half the anaesthetic machines in use are more than five years old and should be replaced. Almost a fifth of the equipment used in cancer treatment is obsolete. Current accounting systems act as a disincentive to replacing old equipment.

  12. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, CB

    2002-05-06

    Boiler owners and operators who need additional generating capacity face a number of legal, political, environmental, economic, and technical challenges. Their key to success requires selection of an adequately sized low-emission boiler and combustion equipment that can be operated in compliance with emission standards established by state and federal regulatory agencies. Recognizing that many issues are involved in making informed selection decisions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsored efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a guide for use in choosing low-emission boilers and combustion equipment. To ensure that the guide covers a broad range of technical and regulatory issues of particular interest to the commercial boiler industry, the guide was developed in cooperation with the American Boiler Manufacturers Association (ABMA), the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussions about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. Although information in the guide is primarily applicable to new ICI boilers, it may also apply to existing boiler installations.

  13. Commercial Magneto-Rheological Fluid Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J. D.; Catanzarite, D. M.; St. Clair, K. A.

    Controllable magnetorheological (MR) fluid devices have reached the stage where they are in commercial production. Such devices are finding application in a variety of real world situations ranging from active vibration control to aerobic exercise equipment. Examples of several, commercial MR fluid devices are described and the comparative ability of MR and ER fluids to meet the needs of practical devices is discussed.

  14. 32 CFR 705.13 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commercial advertising. 705.13 Section 705.13... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.13 Commercial advertising. (a) The Navy... personnel, facilities, equipment or supplies for advertising purposes must be referred to the Chief...

  15. 32 CFR 705.13 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commercial advertising. 705.13 Section 705.13... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.13 Commercial advertising. (a) The Navy... personnel, facilities, equipment or supplies for advertising purposes must be referred to the Chief...

  16. 32 CFR 705.13 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commercial advertising. 705.13 Section 705.13... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.13 Commercial advertising. (a) The Navy... personnel, facilities, equipment or supplies for advertising purposes must be referred to the Chief...

  17. 32 CFR 705.13 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commercial advertising. 705.13 Section 705.13... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.13 Commercial advertising. (a) The Navy... personnel, facilities, equipment or supplies for advertising purposes must be referred to the Chief...

  18. 10 CFR 431.62 - Definitions concerning commercial refrigerators, freezers and refrigerator-freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Refrigerators... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Commercial refrigerator, freezer, and refrigerator... compressors, refrigerant condensers, condenser fans and motors, and factory supplied accessories....

  19. 10 CFR 431.62 - Definitions concerning commercial refrigerators, freezers and refrigerator-freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Refrigerators... functional (or hydraulic) characteristics that affect energy consumption, energy efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Commercial refrigerator, freezer, and refrigerator-freezer...

  20. 10 CFR 431.62 - Definitions concerning commercial refrigerators, freezers and refrigerator-freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Refrigerators... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Commercial refrigerator, freezer, and refrigerator... consists of 1 or more refrigerant compressors, refrigerant condensers, condenser fans and motors,...

  1. Characterization of commercial building appliances. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.F.; Teagan, P.W.; Dieckmann, J.T.

    1993-08-01

    This study focuses on ``other`` end-uses category. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of energy end-use functions other than HVAC and lighting for commercial buildings, and to identify general avenues and approaches for energy use reduction. Specific energy consuming technologies addressed include non-HVAC and lighting technologies in commercial buildings with significant energy use to warrant detailed analyses. The end-uses include office equipment, refrigeration, water heating, cooking, vending machines, water coolers, laundry equipment and electronics other than office equipment. The building types include offices, retail, restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels/motels, grocery stores, and warehouses.

  2. 77 FR 2355 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ...- Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 10 / Tuesday... Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... standards for several classes of commercial heating, air-conditioning, and water-heating equipment. Pursuant...

  3. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Prerinse Spray... resolution of the test instrumentation. Round off calculations to the same number of significant digits...

  4. NAFTA opportunities: Electrical equipment and power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides significant commercial opportunities in Mexico and Canada for the United States electric equipment and power generation industries, through increased goods and services exports to the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) and through new U.S. investment in electricity generation facilities in Mexico. Canada and Mexico are the United States' two largest export markets for electrical equipment with exports of $1.53 billion and $1.51 billion, respectively, in 1992. Canadian and Mexican markets represent approximately 47 percent of total U.S. exports of electric equipment. The report presents an economic analysis of the section.

  5. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey - Office Buildings

    EIA Publications

    2010-01-01

    Provides an in-depth look at this building type as reported in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings are the most common type of commercial building and they consumed more than 17% of all energy in the commercial buildings sector in 2003. This special report provides characteristics and energy consumption data by type of office building (e.g. administrative office, government office, medical office) and information on some of the types of equipment found in office buildings: heating and cooling equipment, computers, servers, printers, and photocopiers.

  6. Nuclear fuel post-irradiation examination equipment package

    SciTech Connect

    DeCooman, W.J.; Spellman, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Hot cell capabilities in the U.S. are being reviewed and revived to meet today's demand for fuel reliability, tomorrow's demands for higher burnup fuel and future demand for fuel recycling. Fuel reliability, zero tolerance for failure, is more than an industry buzz. It is becoming a requirement to meet the rapidly escalating demands for the impending renaissance of nuclear power generation, fuel development, and management of new waste forms that will need to be dealt with from programs such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Fuel performance data is required to license fuel for higher burnup; to verify recycled fuel performance, such as MOX, for wide-scale use in commercial reactors; and, possibly, to license fuel for a new generation of fast reactors. Additionally, fuel isotopic analysis and recycling technologies will be critical factors in the goal to eventually close the fuel cycle. This focus on fuel reliability coupled with the renewed interest in recycling puts a major spotlight on existing hot cell capabilities in the U.S. and their ability to provide the baseline analysis to achieve a closed fuel cycle. Hot cell examination equipment is necessary to determine the characteristics and performance of irradiated materials that are subjected to nuclear reactor environments. The equipment within the hot cells is typically operated via master-slave manipulators and is typically manually operated. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is modernizing their hot cell nuclear fuel examination equipment, installing automated examination equipment and data gathering capabilities. Currently, the equipment has the capability to perform fuel rod visual examinations, length and diametrical measurements, eddy current examination, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas collection and void fraction measurement, and fuel rod segmentation. The used fuel postirradiation examination equipment was designed to examine full-length fuel rods for both Boiling Water

  7. Emergency medical kits on board commercial aircraft: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sand, Michael; Gambichler, Thilo; Sand, Daniel; Thrandorf, Christina; Altmeyer, Peter; Bechara, Falk G

    2010-11-01

    In cases of critical medical situations on board commercial aircraft, access to emergency medical kits can be lifesaving. Thus, this comparative study investigated acute care medication and equipment supplied in emergency medical kits on board both low-cost carriers and full-service carriers. Thirty-two European airlines (sixteen low-cost carriers and sixteen full-service-carriers) were asked to provide anonymous data on the contents of their emergency medical kits. All emergency medical equipment and medication carried on board were subject to a descriptive analysis with regards to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards for emergency medical kits, as well as variation and differences between low-cost carriers and full-service carriers. A total of twelve airlines (seven full-service carriers and five low-cost carriers) participated in this study. None complied with ICAO standards. Emergency medical kits from both full-service carriers and low-cost carriers exhibited a high degree of variability. Two European low-cost carriers were assessed as being insufficiently equipped for a medical emergency requiring acute care. This study demonstrates the high degree of variability in the contents of emergency medical kits. Additionally, some airlines were equipped insufficiently for a critical medical situation on board their aircraft. Frequent checks of national authorities and further evaluation of acute care equipment are required to prepare for potentially life-threatening critical conditions occurring in special environments, such as in airplane during flight. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Commercial Capaciflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1991-12-01

    A capacitive proximity/tactile sensor with unique performance capabilities ('capaciflector' or capacitive reflector) is being developed by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for use on robots and payloads in space in the interests of safety, efficiency, and ease of operation. Specifically, this sensor will permit robots and their attached payloads to avoid collisions in space with humans and other objects and to dock these payloads in a cluttered environment. The sensor is simple, robust, and inexpensive to manufacture with obvious and recognized commercial possibilities. Accordingly, NASA/GSFC, in conjunction with industry, is embarking on an effort to 'spin' this technology off into the private sector. This effort includes prototypes aimed at commercial applications. The principles of operation of these prototypes are described along with hardware, software, modelling, and test results. The hardware description includes both the physical sensor in terms of a flexible printed circuit board and the electronic circuitry. The software description will include filtering and detection techniques. The modelling will involve finite element electric field analysis and will underline techniques used for design optimization.

  9. Commercial Capaciflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A capacitive proximity/tactile sensor with unique performance capabilities ('capaciflector' or capacitive reflector) is being developed by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for use on robots and payloads in space in the interests of safety, efficiency, and ease of operation. Specifically, this sensor will permit robots and their attached payloads to avoid collisions in space with humans and other objects and to dock these payloads in a cluttered environment. The sensor is simple, robust, and inexpensive to manufacture with obvious and recognized commercial possibilities. Accordingly, NASA/GSFC, in conjunction with industry, is embarking on an effort to 'spin' this technology off into the private sector. This effort includes prototypes aimed at commercial applications. The principles of operation of these prototypes are described along with hardware, software, modelling, and test results. The hardware description includes both the physical sensor in terms of a flexible printed circuit board and the electronic circuitry. The software description will include filtering and detection techniques. The modelling will involve finite element electric field analysis and will underline techniques used for design optimization.

  10. Patient Transport via Commercial Airlines

    PubMed Central

    Macnab, Andrew John

    1992-01-01

    Because the frequency of patient transport from one hospital to another is increasing and the popularity of air travel continues to rise, physicians should be aware of the procedures for patient transport by commercial airlines. Major airlines in Canada have experienced personnel and established procedures that facilitate the transportation of patients with special medical needs. By working with the airline medical health officers and using up-to-date equipment, physicians can achieve safe, cost-effective transport of appropriate patients via commercial aircraft. PMID:21221401

  11. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  12. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  13. Streamline Your Equipment Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMeen, George R.

    1976-01-01

    To facilitate the distribution of audiovisual equipment Moorhead State University in Moorhead, Minnesota, has established audiovisual equipment control centers in various departments throughout the university. The audiovisual center then relays information among faculty concerning the location and condition of equipment. (JY)

  14. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  15. Equipment costs rise moderately

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.

    1996-10-07

    The paper presents data on costs for the five equipment items which make up the Nelson-Farrar cost index. Equipment includes pumps and compressors, electrical machinery, engines, instruments, and heat exchangers. Data are also presented on refining costs, broken down into the following categories: operating costs, operating labor cost, construction labor cost, and equipment and materials.

  16. Commercialization of NESSUS: Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Millwater, Harry R.

    1991-01-01

    A plan was initiated in 1988 to commercialize the Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress (NESSUS) probabilistic structural analysis software. The goal of the on-going commercialization effort is to begin the transfer of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Method (PSAM) developed technology into industry and to develop additional funding resources in the general area of structural reliability. The commercialization effort is summarized. The SwRI NESSUS Software System is a general purpose probabilistic finite element computer program using state of the art methods for predicting stochastic structural response due to random loads, material properties, part geometry, and boundary conditions. NESSUS can be used to assess structural reliability, to compute probability of failure, to rank the input random variables by importance, and to provide a more cost effective design than traditional methods. The goal is to develop a general probabilistic structural analysis methodology to assist in the certification of critical components in the next generation Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  17. Decontamination and Decommisioning Equipment Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Scott

    1994-08-26

    DDETS is Relational Data Base Management System (RDBMS) which incorporates 1-D (code 39) and 2-D (PDF417) bar codes into its equipment tracking capabilities. DDETS is compatible with the Reportable Excess Automated Property System (REAPS), and has add, edit, delete and query capabilities for tracking equipment being decontaminated and decommissioned. In addition, bar code technology is utilized in the inventory tracking and shipping of equipment.

  18. Equipment qualification (EQ): Risk scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; Clark, J.; Medford, G.T.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the EQ--Risk Scoping Study was to use probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques (1) to assess the impact of electrical equipment environmental qualification or lack thereof on reactor risk and its uncertainties, and (2) to identify any analyses or testing that may be necessary to reduce the risk or its uncertainties stemming from lack of qualification of equipment important to safety. To achieve these objectives, PRA techniques and insights were employed to identify equipment that must function in accident-induced harsh environments and whose failure would be risk significant. Several components from the resultant list were then selected for more detailed analyses. Accident scenarios and environments, which PRAs suggest are risk significant, were determined for each selected equipment operation. For these accident conditions, both equipment qualification research and test experiences were examined to determine whether equipment accident reliability might differ substantially from the reliability values based on normal operation conditions employed in past PRA analyses. Note, accident reliability information is generally unavailable. Where significant differences were considered probable, parametric risk achievement analyses were used to assess the potential risk impact of the equipment failures. In addition, those equipment qualification practices and outstanding research issues that potentially could impact the accident equipment reliability were noted. This information, when combined with perspectives regarding potential equipment risk impact, provided a basis for assessing the potential risk importance of various EQ practices and issues. Additional discussion regarding the study's approach, conclusions, and recommendations is provided. 54 refs., 9 figs., 33 tabs.

  19. 49 CFR 392.8 - Emergency equipment, inspection and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 392.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.8 Emergency equipment, inspection and use. No...

  20. 49 CFR 392.8 - Emergency equipment, inspection and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 392.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.8 Emergency equipment, inspection and use. No...

  1. 49 CFR 392.8 - Emergency equipment, inspection and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 392.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.8 Emergency equipment, inspection and use. No...

  2. Laptop image transmission equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocenter, Michael M.

    1991-12-01

    Imagery and other visual information have become a critical element in planning and performing modern military operations. The effectiveness of this imagery information is often directly tied to the time it takes to get from the collector of this imagery to the user of the imagery. Hard copy distribution of annotated imagery to the tactical commander is hampered by the lack of effective communications paths, and the tactical use of hand held imagery is restricted by the lack of film processing facilities. The military has begun to rely on electronic imagery and digital communications technology for answers, with some success. The new obstacles created by applied electronic imagery are interoperability standards and effective use of communications bandwidth in a tactical environment. New technological developments in computer hardware/software have changed this situation by allowing for the gathering, dissemination, and transfer of near-real-time information to various intelligence audiences at any location. The Naval Air Development Center (NAVAIRDEVCEN) has coupled commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology with National Image Transmission Formats (NITF) Standards to develop a Secondary Imagery Dissemination System (SIDS) package that is designed to meet the flexibility challenge of the tactical military environment. This tailorable SIDS package is called Laptop Image Transmission Equipment (LITE). The LITE system is an extension of the Navy's existing Fleet Imagery Support Terminal (FIST) into the man-portable tactical environment. As such, LITE development is focused on developing flexible imagery input (from sources such as filmless cameras) and connectivity to tactical communications paths and ruggedization/miniaturization issues. The LITE system, in prototype form, has already found application through operational use in special operations, counter narcotics operations, and classic air/ground/sea military operations. This paper provides an overview of the

  3. Commercialization of nickel and iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1996-12-31

    Metallurgists are taught that intermetallics are brittle phases and should be avoided in alloys of commercial interest. This education is so deeply rooted that irrespective of significant advances made in ductilization of aluminides,the road to their acceptance commercialization is extremely difficult. This paper identifies the requirements for commercialization of any new alloys and reports the activities carried out to commercialize Ni and Fe aluminides. The paper also identifies areas which meet the current commercialization requirements and areas needing additional effort.

  4. The Maintenance Costs of Aging Aircraft: Insights from Commercial Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    9 Ramsey, French, and Sperry (1998) Used Commercial Data to Estimate KC...French and Sperry (Boeing) 1998 + Multiple Air Force and Commercial Programmed depot maintenance (PDM) man- hours Panel Francis and Shaw...in on-equipment2 workloads over approxi- mately the same period of time. Ramsey, French, and Sperry (1998) Used Commercial Data to Estimate KC-135

  5. 10 CFR 431.152 - Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers. 431.152 Section 431.152 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Clothers Washers § 431.152 Definitions concerning...

  6. 10 CFR 431.152 - Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers. 431.152 Section 431.152 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Clothers Washers § 431.152 Definitions concerning...

  7. Expanding Horizons in Commercial Recreation for Disabled People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, John A.

    Based on a presentation given at the 1974 National Conference on Commercial Recreation for Disabled People, the paper examines the role of commercial recreation in the lives of the handicapped. Examples of commercial recreation enterprises are listed for equipment, goods and products; recreation centers, services, and schools; entertainment;…

  8. Commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The near term (one to five year) needs of domestic and foreign commercial suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals for electromagnetically separated stable isotopes are assessed. Only isotopes purchased to make products for sale and profit are considered. Radiopharmaceuticals produced from enriched stable isotopes supplied by the Calutron facility at ORNL are used in about 600,000 medical procedures each year in the United States. A temporary or permanent disruption of the supply of stable isotopes to the domestic radiopharmaceutical industry could curtail, if not eliminate, the use of such diagnostic procedures as the thallium heart scan, the gallium cancer scan, the gallium abscess scan, and the low radiation dose thyroid scan. An alternative source of enriched stable isotopes exist in the USSR. Alternative starting materials could, in theory, eventually be developed for both the thallium and gallium scans. The development of a new technology for these purposes, however, would take at least five years and would be expensive. Hence, any disruption of the supply of enriched isotopes from ORNL and the resulting unavailability of critical nuclear medicine procedures would have a dramatic negative effect on the level of health care in the United States.

  9. Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Requirements for Military and Commercial Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    53 2. RE101: Radiated Emissions– Magnetic Field ...54 3. RE102: Radiated Emissions–Electric Field ....................................54 4. RS101: Radiated Susceptibility– Magnetic ...52 Table 14. Radiated Emissions– Magnetic Field Comparison. ..........................................54 Table 15

  10. 10 CFR 431.132 - Definitions concerning automatic commercial ice makers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions concerning automatic commercial ice makers... CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Automatic Commercial Ice Makers § 431.132 Definitions concerning automatic commercial ice makers. Automatic commercial ice maker means a factory-made assembly (not...

  11. 10 CFR 431.132 - Definitions concerning automatic commercial ice makers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning automatic commercial ice makers... CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Automatic Commercial Ice Makers § 431.132 Definitions concerning automatic commercial ice makers. Automatic commercial ice maker means a factory-made assembly (not...

  12. Three equipment concepts for the Fusion Engineering Device

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.; Masson, L.S.; Watts, K.D.; Grant, N.R.; Kuban, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Maintenance equipment which is needed to remotely handle fusion device components is being conceptually developed for the Fusion Engineering Design Center. This will test the assumption that these equipment needs can be satisfied by present technology. In addition, the development of equipment conceptual designs will allow for cost estimates which have a much higher degree of certainty. Accurate equipment costs will be useful for assessments which trade off gains in availability as a function of increased investments in maintenance equipment.

  13. 10 CFR 434.517 - HVAC systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false HVAC systems and equipment. 434.517 Section 434.517 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.517 HVAC systems and equipment. 517...

  14. 10 CFR 434.517 - HVAC systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false HVAC systems and equipment. 434.517 Section 434.517 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.517 HVAC systems and equipment. 517.1...

  15. 10 CFR 434.517 - HVAC systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false HVAC systems and equipment. 434.517 Section 434.517 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.517 HVAC systems and equipment. 517...

  16. 46 CFR 28.135 - Lifesaving equipment markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifesaving equipment markings. 28.135 Section 28.135 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.135 Lifesaving equipment markings. (a) Except...

  17. 10 CFR 434.403 - Building mechanical systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Building mechanical systems and equipment. 434.403 Section 434.403 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Design Requirements-Electric Systems and Equipment...

  18. 10 CFR 434.403 - Building mechanical systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Building mechanical systems and equipment. 434.403 Section 434.403 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Design Requirements-Electric Systems and Equipment...

  19. 10 CFR 434.403 - Building mechanical systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Building mechanical systems and equipment. 434.403 Section 434.403 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Design Requirements-Electric Systems and Equipment...

  20. 25 CFR 242.10 - Fishing equipment limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fishing equipment limitations. 242.10 Section 242.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMERCIAL FISHING ON RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION § 242.10 Fishing equipment limitations. (a) Any variety of fish may be taken by...

  1. 25 CFR 242.10 - Fishing equipment limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fishing equipment limitations. 242.10 Section 242.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMERCIAL FISHING ON RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION § 242.10 Fishing equipment limitations. (a) Any variety of fish may be taken by...

  2. 25 CFR 242.10 - Fishing equipment limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fishing equipment limitations. 242.10 Section 242.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMERCIAL FISHING ON RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION § 242.10 Fishing equipment limitations. (a) Any variety of fish may be taken by...

  3. 25 CFR 242.10 - Fishing equipment limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Fishing equipment limitations. 242.10 Section 242.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMERCIAL FISHING ON RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION § 242.10 Fishing equipment limitations. (a) Any variety of fish may be taken by...

  4. 25 CFR 242.10 - Fishing equipment limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fishing equipment limitations. 242.10 Section 242.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMERCIAL FISHING ON RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION § 242.10 Fishing equipment limitations. (a) Any variety of fish may be taken by...

  5. 10 CFR 434.105 - Materials and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Materials and equipment. 434.105 Section 434.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Administration and Enforcement-General § 434.105 Materials and equipment....

  6. 10 CFR 434.105 - Materials and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Materials and equipment. 434.105 Section 434.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Administration and Enforcement-General § 434.105 Materials and equipment....

  7. 10 CFR 434.105 - Materials and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Materials and equipment. 434.105 Section 434.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Administration and Enforcement-General § 434.105 Materials and equipment....

  8. 10 CFR 434.105 - Materials and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Materials and equipment. 434.105 Section 434.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Administration and Enforcement-General § 434.105 Materials and equipment. 105.1...

  9. 10 CFR 434.105 - Materials and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Materials and equipment. 434.105 Section 434.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Administration and Enforcement-General § 434.105 Materials and equipment....

  10. MPRS (URBOT) commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccimaro, Donny; Baker, William; Hamilton, Ian; Heikkila, Leif; Renick, Joel

    2003-09-01

    The Man Portable Robotic System (MPRS) project objective was to build and deliver hardened robotic systems to the U.S. Army"s 10 Mountain Division in Fort Drum, New York. The system, specifically designed for tunnel and sewer reconnaissance, was equipped with visual and audio sensors that allowed the Army engineers to detect trip wires and booby traps before personnel entered a potentially hostile environment. The MPRS system has shown to be useful in government and military supported field exercises, but the system has yet to reach the hands of civilian users. Potential users in Law Enforcement and Border Patrol have shown a strong interest in the system, but robotic costs were thought to be prohibitive for law enforcement budgets. Through the Center for Commercialization of Advanced Technology (CCAT) program, an attempt will be made to commercialize the MPRS. This included a detailed market analysis performed to verify the market viability of the technologies. Hence, the first step in this phase is to fully define the marketability of proposed technologies in terms of actual market size, pricing and cost factors, competitive risks and/or advantages, and other key factors used to develop marketing and business plans.

  11. Equipment management user's handbook for property custodians

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Equipment Management User's Handbook for Property Custodians is issued as an instructional guide for personnel designated as property custodians and technical personnel involved in the acquisition, management, and use of NASA-owned equipment. This handbook provides general information and basic operational procedures for processing equipment transactions through the agency-wide NASA Equipment Management System (NEMS). Each NASA installation must prepare supplementary instructions for local requirements beyond the scope of NASA-wide policies and procedures contained herein, or as specified for local implementation in NHB 4200.1, 'NASA Equipment Management Manual.' NHB 4200.1 sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for the acquisition, management, and use of NASA-owned equipment. This handbook is a controlled document, issued in loose-leaf form and revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution.

  12. Are South African Speech-Language Therapists adequately equipped to assess English Additional Language (EAL) speakers who are from an indigenous linguistic and cultural background? A profile and exploration of the current situation.

    PubMed

    Mdladlo, Thandeka; Flack, Penelope; Joubert, Robin

    2016-03-18

    This article presents the results of a survey conducted on Speech-Language Therapists (SLTs) regarding current practices in the assessment of English Additional Language (EAL) speakers in South Africa. It forms part of the rationale for a broader (PhD) study that critiques the use of assessment instruments on EAL speakers from an indigenous linguistic and cultural background. This article discusses an aspect of the broader research and presents the background, method, findings, discussion and implications of the survey. The results of this survey highlight the challenges of human and material resources to, and the dominance of English in, the profession in South Africa. The findings contribute to understanding critical factors for acquiring reliable and valid assessment results with diverse populations, particularly the implications from a cultural and linguistic perspective.

  13. RETRIEVAL EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Steinhoff

    1997-08-25

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) retrieval from the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. There are no quality assurance requirements or QA controls in this document. Retrieval under normal conditions is accomplished with the same fleet of equipment as is used for emplacement. Descriptions of equipment used for retrieval under normal conditions is found in Emplacement Equipment Descriptions, DI: BCAF00000-01717-5705-00002 (a document in progress). Equipment used for retrieval under abnormal conditions is addressed in this document and consists of the following: (1) Inclined Plane Hauler; (2) Bottom Lift Transporter; (3) Load Haul Dump (LHD) Loader; (4) Heavy Duty Forklift for Emplacement Drifts; (5) Covered Shuttle Car; (6) Multipurpose Vehicle; and (7) Scaler.

  14. Imaging Sensor Flight and Test Equipment Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freestone, Kathleen; Simeone, Louis; Robertson, Byran; Frankford, Maytha; Trice, David; Wallace, Kevin; Wilkerson, DeLisa

    2007-01-01

    The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is one of the components onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, and was designed to detect and locate lightning over the tropics. The LIS flight code was developed to run on a single onboard digital signal processor, and has operated the LIS instrument since 1997 when the TRMM satellite was launched. The software provides controller functions to the LIS Real-Time Event Processor (RTEP) and onboard heaters, collects the lightning event data from the RTEP, compresses and formats the data for downlink to the satellite, collects housekeeping data and formats the data for downlink to the satellite, provides command processing and interface to the spacecraft communications and data bus, and provides watchdog functions for error detection. The Special Test Equipment (STE) software was designed to operate specific test equipment used to support the LIS hardware through development, calibration, qualification, and integration with the TRMM spacecraft. The STE software provides the capability to control instrument activation, commanding (including both data formatting and user interfacing), data collection, decompression, and display and image simulation. The LIS STE code was developed for the DOS operating system in the C programming language. Because of the many unique data formats implemented by the flight instrument, the STE software was required to comprehend the same formats, and translate them for the test operator. The hardware interfaces to the LIS instrument using both commercial and custom computer boards, requiring that the STE code integrate this variety into a working system. In addition, the requirement to provide RTEP test capability dictated the need to provide simulations of background image data with short-duration lightning transients superimposed. This led to the development of unique code used to control the location, intensity, and variation above background for simulated lightning strikes

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the STS-114 crew look over Shuttle equipment in the Orbiter Processing Facility. In the foreground is Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence, who is a new addition to the crew. Behind her are (left to right) Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Andy Thomas and Stephen Robinson. At the rear is Glenda Laws, EVA Task Leader, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. The STS-114 crew is at KSC to take part in crew equipment and orbiter familiarization.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-30

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the STS-114 crew look over Shuttle equipment in the Orbiter Processing Facility. In the foreground is Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence, who is a new addition to the crew. Behind her are (left to right) Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Andy Thomas and Stephen Robinson. At the rear is Glenda Laws, EVA Task Leader, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. The STS-114 crew is at KSC to take part in crew equipment and orbiter familiarization.

  16. Commercial Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Earth Observation Commercial Applications Program (EOCAP) at Stennis Space Center, Applied Analysis, Inc. developed a new tool for analyzing remotely sensed data. The Applied Analysis Spectral Analytical Process (AASAP) detects or classifies objects smaller than a pixel and removes the background. This significantly enhances the discrimination among surface features in imagery. ERDAS, Inc. offers the system as a modular addition to its ERDAS IMAGINE software package for remote sensing applications. EOCAP is a government/industry cooperative program designed to encourage commercial applications of remote sensing. Projects can run three years or more and funding is shared by NASA and the private sector participant. Through the Earth Observation Commercial Applications Program (EOCAP), Ocean and Coastal Environmental Sensing (OCENS) developed SeaStation for marine users. SeaStation is a low-cost, portable, shipboard satellite groundstation integrated with vessel catch and product monitoring software. Linked to the Global Positioning System, SeaStation provides real time relationships between vessel position and data such as sea surface temperature, weather conditions and ice edge location. This allows the user to increase fishing productivity and improve vessel safety. EOCAP is a government/industry cooperative program designed to encourage commercial applications of remote sensing. Projects can run three years or more and funding is shared by NASA and the private sector participant.

  17. Efficacy, safety, Low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering, and calculated 10-year cardiovascular risk reduction of alirocumab and evolocumab in addition to maximal tolerated cholesterol lowering therapy: a post-commercialization study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth; Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Min, Sarah; Mahida, Chris; Schlam, Ilana; Rothschild, Matan; Huda, Ali; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-23

    Efficacy and safety of proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, alirocumab (ALI) and evolocumab (EVO) have previously been evaluated through controlled clinical trials with selective patient groups. Post-commercially, in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) and/or cardiovascular disease (CVD) with suboptimal LDL cholesterol (LDLC) lowering on maximal tolerated cholesterol lowering therapy, we assessed efficacy and safety of ALI and EVO. Post-commercially, we started 25 patients on ALI 75 mg, 15 on ALI 150 mg, and 32 on EVO 140 mg bi-weekly added to entry LDLC lowering regimen, with follow-up for a median 24 weeks. History, physical exam, demographics, and adverse event data were collected. Changes in LDLC and AHA and NIH calculated 10-year CVD risks were assessed on ALI and EVO. Of 72 patients, 25 had HeFH only, 25 CVD only, 22 had both, median age was 65 years, 63% females, 38% males, 86% Caucasian, 11% African-Americans, 17% diabetics, 63% on anti-hypertensives, and 7% smokers. At entry, 30 (42%) were on a statin and 42 (58%) could not tolerate any statins. At 24-weeks, median LDLC decreased on ALI 75 mg from 117 to 62 mg/dL (-54%), on ALI 150 mg from 175 to 57 mg/dL (-63%), and on EVO 140 mg from 165 to 69 mg/dL (-63%), p <0.0001 for all. Absolute and percent LDLC reduction did not differ (p >.05) between ALI 150 and EVO 140 mg, but were less on ALI 75 mg vs ALI 150 mg and EVO 140 mg (p <.05). Percent reductions in 10-year CVD risks by AHA and NIH calculators, respectively were ALI 75 mg -22 and -44%, ALI 150 mg -31 and -50%, and EVO 140 mg -29 and -56%, p ≤.002 for all. The three most common adverse events included flu-like myositis 10%, respiratory tract symptoms 8%, and injection site reaction 6%. In patients with HeFH and/or CVD, LDLC was lowered by 63% on EVO and ALI 150 mg, and 54% on ALI 75 mg. Adverse events were minimal and tolerable. ALI and EVO represent paradigm shifts

  18. Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on engineer equipment mechanics is designed to advance the professional competence of privates through sergeants as equipment mechanics, Military Occupation Specialty 1341, and is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include…

  19. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents several new products and equipment for teaching college science courses such as laser optics bench, portable digital thermometer, solar energy furnaces and blackboard optics kit. A description of all equipment or products, cost, and addresses of manufacturers are also included. (HM)

  20. Adaptive Recreational Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Designed for teachers interested in therapeutic recreation, the document lists sources of adaptive recreational equipment and their homemade counterparts. Brief descriptions for ordering or constructing recreational equipment for the visually impaired, poorly coordinated, physically impaired, and mentally retarded are given. Specific adaptations…

  1. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents several new products and equipment for teaching college science courses such as laser optics bench, portable digital thermometer, solar energy furnaces and blackboard optics kit. A description of all equipment or products, cost, and addresses of manufacturers are also included. (HM)

  2. Equipment Operator 1 & C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Program Development Center, Pensacola, FL.

    The Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course (RTM/NRCC) form a self-study package to assist Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief in fulfilling the requirements of their rating. (Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief direct and coordinate efforts of individuals and crews in construction, earthmoving, roadbuilding, quarrying, and…

  3. Test Equipment Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    1 1 Terminology. .. .................. .. . .... 1 Importance . ........... .............. 1- 3 Report Organization. .. ................... 1...the composite of ETE (limited to manual test equipment only, including both general and special purpose), ATE, and TPSs. IMPORTANCE The need for...aviation weapon systems, is the Support Equipment Recommendation Data ( SERD ). The prime contractor for the weapon system usually prepares the SERD and

  4. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  5. Shipboard Electronic Equipments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of major electronic equipments on board ships are presented in this text prepared for naval officers in general. Basic radio principles are discussed in connection with various types of transmitters, receivers, antennas, couplers, transfer panels, remote-control units, frequency standard equipments, teletypewriters, and facsimile…

  6. AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT STANDARDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PATTERSON, PIERCE E.; AND OTHERS

    RECOMMENDED STANDARDS FOR AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT WERE PRESENTED SEPARATELY FOR GRADES KINDERGARTEN THROUGH SIX, AND FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EQUIPMENT CONSIDERED WAS THE FOLLOWING--CLASSROOM LIGHT CONTROL, MOTION PICTURE PROJECTOR WITH MOBILE STAND AND SPARE REELS, COMBINATION 2 INCH X 2 INCH SLIDE AND FILMSTRIP…

  7. Equipment Operator 1 & C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Program Development Center, Pensacola, FL.

    The Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course (RTM/NRCC) form a self-study package to assist Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief in fulfilling the requirements of their rating. (Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief direct and coordinate efforts of individuals and crews in construction, earthmoving, roadbuilding, quarrying, and…

  8. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  9. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15

    -controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASAT’s manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  10. Prospects of the use of sodium tetrafluoroaluminate as a correcting additive to electrolyte in aluminum baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedykh, B. I.; Tupitsyn, A. A.; Nozhko, S. I.; Gorkovenko, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    The disadvantages of the use of aluminum trifluoride as a correcting additive to the commercial electrolytes of aluminum production are discussed. In pot rooms equipped with electrolysis cells having self-calcinating anodes and a dry gas cleaning system, sodium tetrafluoroaluminate can be a challenging alternative for aluminum trifluoride. In the range of acid electrolytes, sodium tetrafluoroaluminate is the dominating component of a melt and gaseous phase.

  11. Spare-parts replacement and the commercial grade issues at Connecticut Yankee

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, E.M.; Scott, D.J.; Maret, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee was designed and built according to code B31.1 of the American National Standards Institute for pressure piping and began commercial operations in 1968, 2 yr prior to 10CFR50 Appendix B of the Code of Federal Regulations. Therefore, at the time of commercial operation, the entire plant, except for several major primary plant components, met the current criteria for commercial grade items (CGIs). When spare parts were needed, 10CFR50 Appendix B and 10CFR21 requirements had to be backfitted onto suppliers who had not agreed to these requirements when supplying the original equipment. The problem of identifying original equipment manufacturers that would or would not accept these additional requirements was compounded at Connecticut Yankee by three related problems that also became apparent at approximately the same time: (1) The accuracy of the material, equipment, parts list (Q-list) was being questioned. (2) The use of existing spare parts bought without additional current quality assurance requirements and the adequacy of the existing inventory to support plant operations were being questioned. (3) The general industry concerns over use of GCIs in safety-related applications needed to be resolved. Connecticut Yankee management recognized the need to address each of these problems. Three specific actions were taken: (1) A Q-list upgrade program was funded. (2) A spare parts bill of materials (BOM) project was funded. (3) Connecticut Yankee's engineering department dedicated several engineers to address procurement issues and specifically to develop a CGI program.

  12. Accidents associated with equipment.

    PubMed

    Heath, M L

    1984-01-01

    Serious accidents in which the possibility of equipment-related hazards are raised have been reported to the Scientific and Technical Branch of the Department of Health and Social Security. The author has examined anonymous summaries of 23 such reports of events which occurred over a 5-year period. The principle cause of catastrophe in seventeen of the incidents was user error involving disconnexion or misconnexion. Faulty systems of equipment management combined in some cases with inadequate pre-anaesthetic checking of apparatus were responsible for the other instances. Appropriate systems of equipment management and checking together with meticulous basic clinical monitoring are recommended as the best safeguards in anaesthetic practice.

  13. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  14. Children's misadventures with golfing equipment.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Andrea J; Cameron, Peter A; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe injuries sustained by children less than 15 years of age associated with golfing equipment resulting in presentation to an emergency department. These findings can then be used to highlight potential injury prevention strategies. Retrospective analysis of data from the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset was performed. Golf-related injury cases were identified for the period April 1997 - December 2002. Cases where the text description of the injury event included the word "golf" were extracted for analysis. Text narratives of all cases were reviewed and cases occurring during golf play or practice or at a golf course were excluded from the analysis. There were 309 presentations to an emergency department for treatment of an injury caused by golfing equipment in children less than 15 years of age. The majority of presentations were male (71.5%) and children aged 5-9 years presented most commonly (53.1%). Head injuries were the most common reason for presentation (84.4%), with open wounds being the most common type of injury (68.5%). Being struck by an object (96.8%) was the most frequent cause of injury. Whilst relatively uncommon, golf equipment injuries to children could be prevented by attention to community safety and awareness of correct storage of golfing equipment. In addition, education of children regarding the safe handling and use of golf equipment could be useful. This could help reduce the number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions, thereby contributing to the reduction of costs associated with injury.

  15. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of... must have adequate fire protection facilities. If fire pumps are a part of these facilities, their...) Each compressor unit in a compressor station must have a shutdown or alarm device that operates in the...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 125 - Additional Emergency Equipment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Pt. 125, App. A...-carrying landplane emergency exit (other than over-the-wing) that is more that 6 feet from the ground with... which the application for the type certificate was filed after that date, it must meet the...

  17. 14 CFR 121.310 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... emergency exit (other than over-the-wing) that is more than 6 feet from the ground with the airplane on the... application for the type certificate was filed after that date, it must meet the requirements under which the airplane was type certificated. An assisting means that deploys automatically must be armed during...

  18. 14 CFR 135.178 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Aircraft and... landplane emergency exit (other than over-the-wing) that is more than 6 feet from the ground, with the... which the application for the type certificate was filed after that date, it must meet the...

  19. 14 CFR 121.310 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplanes, no sign may continue to be used if its luminescence (brightness) decreases to below 100... which the airplane was type certificated. On these airplanes, no sign may continue to be used if its.... On these airplanes, no sign may continue to be used if its luminescence (brightness) decreases...

  20. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 125 - Additional Emergency Equipment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplanes, no sign may continue to be used if its luminescence (brightness) decreases to below 100... airplane was type certificated. On these airplanes, no sign may continue to be used if its luminescence... illumination, when measured at 40-inch intervals at seat armrest height, on the centerline of the...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1045 - Additional equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and collision avoidance system as required by § 121.356 of this chapter as applicable to the aircraft.... (4) A traffic alert and collision avoidance system as required by § 135.180 of this chapter...

  2. 14 CFR 121.310 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., takeoffs, and landings. However, if the Administrator finds that the design of the exit makes compliance... finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed deviation...-candles; and (3) For airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958, after November 26, 1986, include...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 125 - Additional Emergency Equipment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exit makes compliance impractical, the Administrator may grant a deviation from the requirement of... Administrator finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed... passenger aisle, is at least 0.05 foot-candles. (d) Emergency light operation. Except for lights forming...

  4. 14 CFR 121.310 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., takeoffs, and landings. However, if the Administrator finds that the design of the exit makes compliance... finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed deviation...-candles; and (3) For airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958, after November 26, 1986, include...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 125 - Additional Emergency Equipment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exit makes compliance impractical, the Administrator may grant a deviation from the requirement of... Administrator finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed... passenger aisle, is at least 0.05 foot-candles. (d) Emergency light operation. Except for lights forming...

  6. 14 CFR 135.178 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirement of automatic deployment if he finds that the design of the exit makes compliance impractical, if... finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed deviation... aisle, is at least 0.05 foot-candles; and (3) For airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958...

  7. 14 CFR 135.178 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirement of automatic deployment if he finds that the design of the exit makes compliance impractical, if... finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed deviation... aisle, is at least 0.05 foot-candles; and (3) For airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 125 - Additional Emergency Equipment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exit makes compliance impractical, the Administrator may grant a deviation from the requirement of... Administrator finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed... passenger aisle, is at least 0.05 foot-candles. (d) Emergency light operation. Except for lights forming...

  9. 14 CFR 135.178 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirement of automatic deployment if he finds that the design of the exit makes compliance impractical, if... finds that special circumstances exist that make compliance impractical and that the proposed deviation... aisle, is at least 0.05 foot-candles; and (3) For airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958...

  10. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... must have adequate fire protection facilities. If fire pumps are a part of these facilities, their..., other than an electrical induction or synchronous motor, must have an automatic device to shut down the... compressor station must have vent slots or holes in the baffles of each compartment to prevent gas from...

  11. 14 CFR 121.310 - Additional emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... emergency exit (other than over-the-wing) that is more than 6 feet from the ground with the airplane on the... passenger aisle. There must be a locating sign— (i) Above the aisle near each over-the-wing passenger... passage way between individual passenger areas, or leading to a Type I or Type II emergency exit, must be...

  12. Functional design criteria W-367, 222-S ancillary equipment addition

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-02-21

    This paper reviews the designs and performance of tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A large number of tubular cells of the porous support tube type have been electrically tested, some to times over 50,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. Since 1984, successfully larger electrical generators utilizing these cells have been built and operated; a 20 kW integrated SOFC system operated for 7064 hours during 1993-1994. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular cells by eliminating porous support tube and increasing active length are described, and plans to utilize such air electrode supported cells in future SOFC systems are discussed.

  13. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOEpatents

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  14. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews new science equipment and products for the laboratory. Includes hand-held calculators, fiberglass fume hoods, motorized microtomy, disposable mouse cages, and electric timers. Describes 11 products total. Provides manufacturer name, address, and price. (MA)

  15. Selecting Library Furniture & Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media & Methods, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Offers suggestions for selecting school library furniture and equipment. Describes various models of computer workstations; reading tables and chairs; and shelving. Sidebar lists names and addresses of library furniture manufactures and distributors. (AEF)

  16. Leasing versus buying equipment.

    PubMed

    Grossman, R

    1983-01-01

    For the upgrading of equipment that is necessary in radiologic practice, leasing is more convenient and less expensive than buying. Changes in tax laws, embodied in the Economic Recovery Act of 1981, have increased tax benefits of this arrangement.

  17. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews new science equipment and products for the laboratory. Includes hand-held calculators, fiberglass fume hoods, motorized microtomy, disposable mouse cages, and electric timers. Describes 11 products total. Provides manufacturer name, address, and price. (MA)

  18. Transitioning to Low-GWP Alternatives in Commercial Refrigeration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides information on low-GWP alternatives in newly manufactured commercial refrigeration equipment. It discusses HFC alternatives, market trends, challenges to market entry for alternatives, and potential solutions.

  19. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002435.htm Food additives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Food additives are substances that become part of a food ...

  20. Equipment fragility data base. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, L.E.

    1983-01-10

    Part of the effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has been directed at generating a fragility data base for equipment used in control and safety systems in commercial nuclear power plants. Component fragility data have been compiled in various forms, depending on their content, intended use, and level of reduction. The data are stored in a relational data base on the LLNL CEC 7600 computers; this provides easy accessibility for LLNL computer users. This report describes the present structure of the data base and presents its contents through the use of tables. This report is a revision of an earlier one of the same name and numbers (NUREG/CR-2680) and (UCRL-53038). Additional data have been included and the presentation has been revised to enhance its usability.

  1. Commercialization of nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Hobson, David W

    2009-01-01

    The emerging and potential commercial applications of nanotechnologies clearly have great potential to significantly advance and even potentially revolutionize various aspects of medical practice and medical product development. Nanotechnology is already touching upon many aspects of medicine, including drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, clinical diagnostics, nanomedicines, and the use of nanomaterials in medical devices. This technology is already having an impact; many products are on the market and a growing number is in the pipeline. Momentum is steadily building for the successful development of additional nanotech products to diagnose and treat disease; the most active areas of product development are drug delivery and in vivo imaging. Nanotechnology is also addressing many unmet needs in the pharmaceutical industry, including the reformulation of drugs to improve their bioavailability or toxicity profiles. The advancement of medical nanotechnology is expected to advance over at least three different generations or phases, beginning with the introduction of simple nanoparticulate and nanostructural improvements to current product and process types, then eventually moving on to nanoproducts and nanodevices that are limited only by the imagination and limits of the technology itself. This review looks at some recent developments in the commercialization of nanotechnology for various medical applications as well as general trends in the industry, and explores the nanotechnology industry that is involved in developing medical products and procedures with a view toward technology commercialization.

  2. Automatic Test Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-28

    Search Terms Automatic Test Equipment Frequency Analyzers Oscilloscopes Pulse Analyzers Signal Generators "Etc." Third Level Search Guided...VAST Building Block Equipment RF Test Point Control Switch Digital Multimeter Frequency and Time Interval Meter Digital Word Generator Delay...Generator RF Amplifier, 95 Hz-2 GHz RF Amplifier, 2-4 GHz RF Amplifier, 4-8 GHz RF Amplifier, 8-12.2 GHz Signal Generator, 0.1 Hz-50 kHz

  3. Layered Thermal Insulation Systems for Industrial and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2015-01-01

    From the high performance arena of cryogenic equipment, several different layered thermal insulation systems have been developed for industrial and commercial applications. In addition to the proven areas in cold-work applications for piping and tanks, the new Layered Composite Insulation for Extreme Environments (LCX) has potential for broader industrial use as well as for commercial applications. The LCX technology provides a unique combination of thermal, mechanical, and weathering performance capability that is both cost-effective and enabling. Industry applications may include, for example, liquid nitrogen (LN2) systems for food processing, liquefied natural gas (LNG) systems for transportation or power, and chilled water cooling facilities. Example commercial applications may include commercial residential building construction, hot water piping, HVAC systems, refrigerated trucks, cold chain shipping containers, and a various consumer products. The LCX system is highly tailorable to the end-use application and can be pre-fabricated or field assembled as needed. Product forms of LCX include rigid sheets, semi-flexible sheets, cylindrical clam-shells, removable covers, or flexible strips for wrapping. With increasing system control and reliability requirements as well as demands for higher energy efficiencies, thermal insulation in harsh environments is a growing challenge. The LCX technology grew out of solving problems in the insulation of mechanically complex cryogenic systems that must operate in outdoor, humid conditions. Insulation for cold work includes equipment for everything from liquid helium to chilled water. And in the middle are systems for LNG, LN2, liquid oxygen (LO2), liquid hydrogen (LH2) that must operate in the ambient environment. Different LCX systems have been demonstrated for sub-ambient conditions but are capable of moderately high temperature applications as well.

  4. Commercial Pesticides Applicator Manual: Agriculture - Plant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzwater, W. D.; And Others

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the agriculture-plant pest control category. The text discusses identification and control of insects, diseases, nematodes, and weeds of agricultural crops. Proper use of application equipment and safety…

  5. Commercial Pesticides Applicator Manual: Agriculture - Plant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzwater, W. D.; And Others

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the agriculture-plant pest control category. The text discusses identification and control of insects, diseases, nematodes, and weeds of agricultural crops. Proper use of application equipment and safety…

  6. Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

    1999-12-01

    According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct

  7. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  8. Listing of Food Service Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    A comprehensive listing of food service equipment including--(1) companies authorized to use the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, and (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF standards including soda fountains, spray-type dishwashers, dishwashing equipment, cooking equipment, commerical cooking and warming equipment, freezers,…

  9. STOCKROOM ("STORES") AT USAIR MAINTENANCE HANGAR, SHOWING TEST EQUIPMENT SHELVES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STOCKROOM ("STORES") AT USAIR MAINTENANCE HANGAR, SHOWING TEST EQUIPMENT SHELVES (R) "BLACK BOX" NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT ("ROTABLES'-L) IN ADDITION TO FURNISHING MECHANICS TEST EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS, ROTABLES AND REPAIRABLE OR EXPENDABLE PARTS, THE COMPUTERIZED STORES OPERATION ALSO PROVIDES IN-FLIGHT AND CABIN SUPPLIES. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  10. 47 CFR 18.211 - Multiple listing of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... same or essentially the same equipment will be marketed under more than one FCC Identifier, equipment authorization must be requested on an FCC Form 731 for each FCC Identifier. (b) If equipment authorization for additional FCC Identifiers is requested in the initial application, a statement shall be included...

  11. The Commercial Challenges Of Pacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanden Brink, John A.

    1984-08-01

    The increasing use of digital imaging techniques create a need for improved methods of digital processing, communication and archiving. However, the commercial opportunity is dependent on the resolution of a number of issues. These issues include proof that digital processes are more cost effective than present techniques, implementation of information system support in the imaging activity, implementation of industry standards, conversion of analog images to digital formats, definition of clinical needs, the implications of the purchase decision and technology requirements. In spite of these obstacles, a market is emerging, served by new and existing companies, that may become a $500 million market (U.S.) by 1990 for equipment and supplies.

  12. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  13. Medical equipment libraries: implementation, experience and user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Keay, S; McCarthy, J P; Carey-Smith, B E

    2015-01-01

    The hospital-wide pooling and sharing of certain types of medical equipment can lead to both significant improvements in patient safety and financial advantages when compared with a department or ward-level equipment ownership system. In September 2003, a Medical Equipment Loan Service (MELS) was established, focusing initially on infusion pumps. The aims and expected benefits included; improving availability of equipment for both patients and clinical users, managing and reducing clinical risk, reducing equipment diversity, improving equipment management and reducing the overall cost of equipment provision. A user survey was carried out in 2005 and repeated in 2011. The results showed wide and continued satisfaction with the service. The process and difficulties of establishing the service and its development to include additional types of equipment are described. The benefits of managing medical equipment which is in widespread general use, through a MELS as part of a Clinical Engineering Department, are presented.

  14. Use of commercial manipulator to handle a nuclear weapon component

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.P.

    1994-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a manipulator workcell to load and unload nuclear weapon pit assemblies from a cart. To develop this workcell, PNL procured a commercially available manipulator, equipped it with force-sensing and vision equipment, and developed manipulator control software. Manipulator workcell development demonstrated that commercially available manipulator systems can successfully perform this task if the appropriate manipulator is selected and the manipulator workcell tooling and software are carefully designed.

  15. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection and protection equipment. Installation of fire detection and protection equipment in excess of that required by...

  16. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection and protection equipment. Installation of fire detection and protection equipment in excess of that required by...

  17. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection and protection equipment. Installation of fire detection and protection equipment in excess of that required by...

  18. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection and protection equipment. Installation of fire detection and protection equipment in excess of that required by...

  19. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection and protection equipment. Installation of fire detection and protection equipment in excess of that required by...

  20. 10 CFR 431.72 - Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. 431... CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces § 431.72 Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. The following definitions apply for purposes of this subpart D, and of...

  1. 10 CFR 431.72 - Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. 431... CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces § 431.72 Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 79598, Dec. 31, 2013. The...

  2. 10 CFR 431.72 - Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. 431... CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces § 431.72 Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. The following definitions apply for purposes of this subpart D, and of...

  3. 10 CFR 431.72 - Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. 431... CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces § 431.72 Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. The following definitions apply for purposes of this subpart D, and of...

  4. 10 CFR 431.72 - Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. 431... CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces § 431.72 Definitions concerning commercial warm air furnaces. The following definitions apply for purposes of this subpart D, and of...

  5. Microbiological test for sanitation of equipment in the food factory.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Microbiological sampling of utensils, tableware, and kitchen ware, in addition to equipment, permits objective evaluation of sanitation practices and procedures used for these items from food service operations.

  6. EPA’s Response Equipment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA maintains a variety of equipment to respond to hazardous substance emergencies such as releases or oil spills regardless of their nature, size, or location. This include ASPECT, PHILIS, Equipment Module (EM), and personal protective equipment.

  7. About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Equipment for Infection Control Questions About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Print Q1. How do manufacturers ensure personal protective equipment (PPE) is safe and effective? A1. To help ...

  8. STS ancillary equipment study. User reference book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plough, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A record of what is currently known about STS ancillary equipment is presented in this user-oriented design so that a potential user may evaluate whether he could use the described ancillary equipment or if he would need to design and fabricate a payload-unique item. References that the user can use to obtain additional details and requirements to aid in his evaluation and decision are included.

  9. 10 CFR 431.106 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than commercial heat pump water... PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers... of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than...

  10. 10 CFR 431.106 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than commercial heat pump water... PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers... of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than...

  11. Release of gentamicin sulphate from a modified commercial bone cement. Effect of (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) comonomer and poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) additive on release mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Frutos, P; Diez-Peña, E; Frutos, G; Barrales-Rienda, J M

    2002-09-01

    The influence of the (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (HEMA) monomer addition as a comonomer to the cement liquid component and of a polymer, poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) to the solid component of a standard CMW-1 bone cement on gentamicin sulphate (GS) on its drug release properties have been studied. The addition of HEMA modifies the habit of the delivery curves. The incorporation of PVP into the cement matrix, apparently, did not very much modify the shape of the HEMA modified cement release curves, but led to a remarkable increase of the maximum amount of GS released. This effect was proportional to the PVP concentration incorporated. From the matrix composition and SEM data, a model based on the morphology of the matrix has been proposed. The cumulative amount of GS released by each slab Mt is most adequately fitted and represented by the equation Mt = c + at 1/2 + b[1 - exp(-nt)], which corroborates that the release occurs according to the model proposed. by means of three discrete mechanisms, namely: (i) a short-term initial elution due to the imperfections in the poly(methyl methacrylate) covering of the most external GS beads, burst effect by the buffer solution; (ii) followed by a fracture by stress cracking in an active media of the coated GS beads located on the external surface of the matrix where water molecules enter to dissolve GS molecules releasing them into the buffer solution by a diffusion-controlled process; and (iii) a third process in which the buffer solution penetrates into the internal voids and cracks creating a series of channels in a labyrinthic structure, which may facilitate the access of water molecules to the plastic-coated GS beads within the bulk matrix. This third process is enhanced by the incorporation of PVP beads as dissolved molecules within the matrix. This water-soluble additive is leachable, generating a highly porous structure in the cement. This HEMA and PVP modified cement may be used as a drug delivery system to

  12. Generic seismic ruggedness of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, K.L. )

    1991-08-01

    This report updates the results of a program with the overall objective of demonstrating the generic seismic adequacy of as much nuclear power plant equipment as possible by means of collecting and evaluating existing seismic qualification test data. These data are then used to construct ruggedness'' spectra below which equipment in operating plants designed to earlier earthquake criteria would be generically adequate. This document is an EPRI Tier 1 Report. The report gives the methodology for the collection and evaluation of data which are used to construct a Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectrum (GERs) for each equipment class considered. The GERS for each equipment class are included in an EPRI Tier 2 Report with the same title. Associated with each GERS are inclusion rules, cautions, and checklists for field screening of in-place equipment for GERS applicability. A GERS provides a measure of equipment seismic resistance based on available test data. As such, a GERS may also be used to judge the seismic adequacy of similar new or replacement equipment or to estimate the seismic margin of equipment re-evaluated with respect to earthquake levels greater than considered to date, resulting in fifteen finalized GERS. GERS for relays (included in the original version of this report) are now covered in a separate report (NP-7147). In addition to the presentation of GERS, the Tier 2 report addresses the applicability of GERS to equipment of older vintage, methods for estimating amplification factors for evaluating devices installed in cabinets and enclosures, and how seismic test data from related studies relate to the GERS approach. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Radiotherapy equipment--purchase or lease?

    PubMed

    Nisbet, A; Ward, A

    2001-08-01

    Against a background of increasing demand for radiotherapy equipment, this study was undertaken to investigate options for equipment procurement, in particular to compare purchase with lease. The perceived advantages of lease are that equipment can be acquired within budget and cashflow constraints, with relatively low amounts of cash leaving the NHS in the first year, avoiding the necessity of capitalizing the equipment and providing protection against the risk of obsolescence associated with high technology equipment. The perceived disadvantages of leasing are that the Trust does not own the equipment, leasing can be more expensive in revenue terms, the tender process is extended and there may be lease conditions to be met, which may be costly and/or restrictive. There are also a number of technical considerations involved in the leasing of radiotherapy equipment that influence the financial analysis and practical operation of the radiotherapy service. The technical considerations include servicing and planned preventative maintenance, upgrades, spare parts, subsequent purchase of "add ons", modification of equipment, research and development work, commencement of the lease period, return of equipment at the end of the lease period and negotiations at the end of the lease period. A study from Raigmore Hospital, Inverness is described, which involves the procurement of new, state-of-the-art radiotherapy equipment. This provides an overview of the procurement process, including a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of leasing, with the figures from the financial analysis presented and explained. In addition, a detailed description is given of the technical considerations to be taken into account in the financial analysis and negotiation of any lease contract.

  14. German mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The German mining equipment industry developed to supply machines and services to the local mining industry, i.e., coal, lignite, salt, potash, ore mining, industrial minerals, and quarrying. The sophistication and reliability of its technology also won it worldwide export markets -- which is just as well since former major domestic mining sectors such as coal and potash have declined precipitously, and others such as ore mining have all but disappeared. Today, German mining equipment suppliers focus strongly on export sales, and formerly unique German mining technologies such as continuous mining with bucket wheel excavators and conveyors for open pits, or plowing of underground coal longwalls are widely used abroad. The status of the German mining equipment industry is reviewed.

  15. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  16. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  17. ISS and STS Commercial Off-the-Shelf Router Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancie, William D.; Bell, Terry L.; Shell, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the results of testing performed with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) routers and Internet Protocols (IPs) to determine if COTS equipment and IP could be utilized to upgrade NASA's current Space Transportation System (STS), the Shuttle, and the International Space Station communication infrastructure. Testing was performed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) personnel within the Electronic Systems Test Laboratory (ESTE) with cooperation from the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Qualification and Utilization of Electronic System Technology (QUEST) personnel. The ESTE testing occurred between November 1 and 9, 2000. Additional testing was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center in a laboratory environment with equipment configured to emulate the STS. This report documents those tests and includes detailed test procedures, equipment interface requirements, test configurations and test results. The tests showed that a COTS router and standard Transmission Control Protocols and Internet Protocols (TCP/IP) could be used for both the Shuttle and the Space Station if near-error-free radio links are provided.

  18. Compressor Selection and Equipment Sizing for Cold Climate Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Abdelaziz, Omar; Rice, C Keith

    2014-01-01

    In order to limit heating capacity degradation at -25 C (-13 F) ambient to 25%, compared to the nominal rating point capacity at 8.3 C (47 F), an extensive array of design and sizing options were investigated, based on fundamental equipment system modeling and building energy simulation. Sixteen equipment design options were evaluated in one commercial building and one residential building, respectively in seven cities. The energy simulation results were compared to three baseline cases: 100% electric resistance heating, a 9.6 HSPF single-speed heat pump unit, and 90% AFUE gas heating system. The general recommendation is that variable-speed compressors and tandem compressors, sized such that their rated heating capacity at a low speed matching the building design cooling load, are able to achieve the capacity goal at low ambient temperatures by over-speeding, for example, a home with a 3.0 ton design cooling load, a tandem heat pump could meet this cooling load running a single compressor, while running both compressors to meet heating load at low ambient temperatures in a cold climate. Energy savings and electric resistance heat reductions vary with building types, energy codes and climate zones. Oversizing a heat pump can result in larger energy saving in a less energy efficient building and colder regions due to reducing electric resistance heating. However, in a more energy-efficient building or for buildings in warmer climates, one has to consider balance between reduction of resistance heat and addition of cyclic loss.

  19. Commercial Crew Development Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program is designed to stimulate efforts within the private sector that will aid in the development and demonstration of safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation capabilities. With the goal of delivery cargo and eventually crew to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and the International Space Station (ISS) the program is designed to foster the development of new spacecraft and launch vehicles in the commercial sector. Through Space Act Agreements (SAAs) in 2011 NASA provided $50M of funding to four partners; Blue Origin, The Boeing Company, Sierra Nevada Corporation, and SpaceX. Additional, NASA has signed two unfunded SAAs with ATK and United Space Alliance. This paper will give a brief summary of these SAAs. Additionally, a brief overview will be provided of the released version of the Commercial Crew Development Program plans and requirements documents.

  20. Engineer Equipment Chief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by engineer equipment chiefs. Addressed in the five individual units of the course are the following topics: construction management (planning, scheduling, and supervision);…

  1. Engineer Equipment Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by engineer equipment operators. Addressed in the seven individual units of the course are the following topics: introduction to Military Occupation Specialty (MOS) 1345…

  2. Basic Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by basic engineer equipment mechanics. Addressed in the four individual units of the course are the following topics: mechanics and their tools (mechanics, hand tools, and power…

  3. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents information about equipment and new products such as the melting point instrument and TV-microscope coupler which are helpful in college science teaching. Descriptions of each product, how it operates, its prices, and address for ordering are presented. (HM)

  4. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents information about equipment and new products such as the melting point instrument and TV-microscope coupler which are helpful in college science teaching. Descriptions of each product, how it operates, its prices, and address for ordering are presented. (HM)

  5. Homemade Innovative Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, L. Roger, Comp.

    Sponsored by the Title III Elementary and Secondary Education Act Project "Discovery Outdoor Education", this guide is a collection of inexpensive, innovative, homemade equipment and devices for physical activities. Although designed for the impaired, disabled, and handicapped, these materials are adaptable to and applicable for groups…

  6. Lennox - Student Training Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox Industries, Inc., Marshalltown, IA.

    Presents a series of demonstration units designed by Lennox Industries for the purpose of training students to become familiar with Lennox mechanical equipment. Demonstrators are designed to present technical information in a clear simplified manner thus reducing frustration for the beginning trainee. The following demonstrators are available--(1)…

  7. Total equipment parts configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, J.; Panzani, F.

    1989-01-01

    Florida Power Lights's (FP L's) Turkey Point units were built prior to the establishment of American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Sec. III requirements. Since that time, FP L has voluntarily committed to procuring some spare and replacement parts in compliance with the ordering requirements of ASME Sec. III. New subsystems were designed according to ASME Sec. III requirements. In 1978, 10CFR21 of the Code of Federal Regulations was federally mandated. Environmental qualification concerns and the Three Mile Island incident further complicated the stocking and ordering of spare and replacement parts. Turkey Point assembled a team of quality assurance, quality control, and engineering people and obtained permission to directly access the store department computer so that catalog descriptions could be quickly made available for use by the plant. The total equipment parts configuration (TEPC) system was designed and developed under the direction of the procurement document review team at the Turkey Point nuclear plant. The system is a network of related computer data bases that identifies the equipment at the plant. The equipment (or components that make up a piece of equipment) is identified by a tag/component code system. Each component is further broken down by the manufacturer's parts list or bill of material. A description of the data available to the user, the ways these data can be accessed and displayed, and a description of the data bases and their relation to each other are summarized in this paper.

  8. Lennox - Student Training Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox Industries, Inc., Marshalltown, IA.

    Presents a series of demonstration units designed by Lennox Industries for the purpose of training students to become familiar with Lennox mechanical equipment. Demonstrators are designed to present technical information in a clear simplified manner thus reducing frustration for the beginning trainee. The following demonstrators are available--(1)…

  9. STDN ranging equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Final results of the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) Ranging Equipment program are summarized. Basic design concepts and final design approaches are described. Theoretical analyses which define requirements and support the design approaches are presented. Design verification criteria are delineated and verification test results are specified.

  10. Commercial Product Activation Using RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) would be used for commercial product activation, according to a proposal. What is new here is the concept of combining RFID with activation - more specifically, using RFID for activating commercial products (principally, electronic ones) and for performing such ancillary functions as tracking individual product units on production lines, tracking shipments, and updating inventories. According to the proposal, an RFID chip would be embedded in each product. The information encoded in the chip would include a unique number for identifying the product. An RFID reader at the point of sale would record the number of the product and would write digital information to the RFID chip for either immediate activation of the product or for later interrogation and processing. To be practical, an RFID product-activation system should satisfy a number of key requirements: the system should be designed to be integrable into the inventory-tracking and the data-processing and -communication infrastructures of businesses along the entire supply chain from manufacture to retail; the system should be resistant to sophisticated hacking; activation codes should be made sufficiently complexity to minimize the probability of activating stolen products; RFID activation equipment at points of sale must be capable to two-way RF communication for the purposes of reading information from, and writing information to, embedded RFID chips; the equipment at points of sale should be easily operable by sales clerks with little or no training; the point-of-sale equipment should verify activation and provide visible and/or audible signals indicating verification or lack thereof; and, the system should be able to handle millions of products per year with minimal human intervention, among other requirements.

  11. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  12. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  13. Vocational Education Equipment Standards. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document lists equipment and equipment-like supplies used in classrooms in nine vocational education programs in North Carolina. It was prepared to help local educational agencies assess the adequacy of their vocational education equipment; identify and plan for equipment purchases to meet the minimum requirements; and determine the…

  14. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  15. TidGen Power System Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, Christopher R.; McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-12-30

    ORPC Maine, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (collectively ORPC), submits this Final Technical Report for the TidGen® Power System Commercialization Project (Project), partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0003647). The Project was built and operated in compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pilot project license (P-12711) and other permits and approvals needed for the Project. This report documents the methodologies, activities and results of the various phases of the Project, including design, engineering, procurement, assembly, installation, operation, licensing, environmental monitoring, retrieval, maintenance and repair. The Project represents a significant achievement for the renewable energy portfolio of the U.S. in general, and for the U.S. marine hydrokinetic (MHK) industry in particular. The stated Project goal was to advance, demonstrate and accelerate deployment and commercialization of ORPC’s tidal-current based hydrokinetic power generation system, including the energy extraction and conversion technology, associated power electronics, and interconnection equipment capable of reliably delivering electricity to the domestic power grid. ORPC achieved this goal by designing, building and operating the TidGen® Power System in 2012 and becoming the first federally licensed hydrokinetic tidal energy project to deliver electricity to a power grid under a power purchase agreement in North America. Located in Cobscook Bay between Eastport and Lubec, Maine, the TidGen® Power System was connected to the Bangor Hydro Electric utility grid at an on-shore station in North Lubec on September 13, 2012. ORPC obtained a FERC pilot project license for the Project on February 12, 2012 and the first Maine Department of Environmental Protection General Permit issued for a tidal energy project on January 31, 2012. In addition, ORPC entered into a 20-year agreement with Bangor Hydro Electric

  16. Space Station Freedom attached payloads and commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furio, N.; Pyfer, B.; Smith, R. B., Jr.; Hunt, S. R.; Suddeth, D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom (SSF) attaches external payloads to its main truss structure via Attached Payload Accommodation Equipment (APAE); this equipment also provides access to such SSF resources as electrical power, command/control, and data handling. In orbit, APAE payloads are installed and maintained by a teleoperated robot or by an astronaut in EVA. Commercialization of EPAE will be accomplished by private companies concerned with the development of materials processing, earth resources and ocean resources monitoring, telecommunications, and industrial services. Attention is given to APAE user-integration activity.

  17. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  18. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  19. Electronic equipment vulnerability to fire released carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.; Mchatton, A. D.; Musselman, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    The vulnerability of electronic equipment to damage by carbon fibers released from burning aircraft type structural composite materials was investigated. Tests were conducted on commercially available stereo power amplifiers which showed that the equipment was damaged by fire released carbon fibers but not by the composite resin residue, soot and products of combustion of the fuel associated with burning the carbon fiber composites. Results indicate that the failure rates of the equipment exposed to the fire released fiber were consistent with predictions based on tests using virgin fibers.

  20. Orbiter based construction equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    Many orbiter based activities need equipment to hold a payload steady while it is being worked on. This work may be construction, updating, repair, services, check out, or refueling operations in preparation for return to Earth. The Handling and Positioning Aid (HPA) is intended for use as general purpose equipment. The HPA provides a wide choice of work station positions, both immediately above the orbiter cargo bay and beyond. It can act in a primary docking role and, if required, can assist actively in the berthing process. From an analysis of ten reference missions, it was determined that two types of HPA mobility are needed; a tilt table, which simply swings out of the cargo bay, pivoting about an athwartships y axis, and an articulated arm. Illustration of the aid are provided.

  1. Astronomical Equipment for Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobberley, Martin

    Telescopes - refractors and reflectors - are the main items of equipment used by almost every amateur astronomer. The purpose of astronomical telescopes is to collect and focus more light than the human eye can, forming an image that can be viewed, photographed, or analysed. Astronomical Equipment for Amateurs makes buying and using both telescopes and their ancillary instruments easy for astronomers of all abilities. It begins by looking at the advantages and disadvantages of the basic types of refractors, reflectors, mountings and accessories. Observation techniques are also included, along with the use of filters, (colour, anti-pollution and nebula), types of photography (piggy-back, prime focus and eyepiece projection), and also CCD imaging (including types of CCD camera and their advantages and disadvantages compared to photography). Martin Mobberley provides a fascinating insight into astronomical software.

  2. Equipment management in practice.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J A

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the setting up, funding and organization of an in-house equipment management service in the Bristol & Weston Health Authority. Existing resources were redeployed to form the present service. The range of equipment now maintained under the auspices of the Medical Physics Bioengineering Group has a capital value of 12 million pounds. All work is costed and a charge made to the client for whom work is carried out. A team of 27 medical physics technicians and three graduate engineers are maintained from this source of income. This method of funding is now making way for a system of job costing which will provide a basis for comparison with an outside service.

  3. ISS qualified thermal carrier equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuser, Mark S.; Vellinger, John C.; Jennings, Wm. M.

    2000-01-01

    Biotechnology is undergoing a period of rapid and sustained growth, a trend which is expected to continue as the general population ages and as new medical treatments and products are conceived. As pharmaceutical and biomedical companies continue to search for improved methods of production and, for answers to basic research questions, they will seek out new avenues of research. Space processing on the International Space Station (ISS) offers such an opportunity! Space is rapidly becoming an industrial laboratory for biotechnology research and processing. Space bioprocessing offers exciting possibilities for developing new pharmaceuticals and medical treatments, which can be used to benefit mankind on Earth. It also represents a new economic frontier for the private sector. For over eight years, the thermal carrier development team at SHOT has been working with government and commercial sector scientists who are conducting microgravity experiments that require thermal control. SHOT realized several years ago that the hardware currently being used for microgravity thermal control was becoming obsolete. It is likely that the government, academic, and industrial bioscience community members could utilize SHOT's hardware as a replacement to their current microgravity thermal carrier equipment. Moreover, SHOT is aware of several international scientists interested in utilizing our space qualified thermal carrier. SHOT's economic financing concept could be extremely beneficial to the international participant, while providing a source of geographic return for their particular region. Beginning in 2000, flight qualified thermal carriers are expected to be available to both the private and government sectors. .

  4. Advanced service equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mockovciak, J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Orbiter-based service equipment needs/usage are identified by considering a broad spectrum of on-orbit operational scenarios associated with three primary mission events: initial launch, revisits, and Earth return. Nominal and alternate modes of operation, contingency situations (as remote manipulator system inoperative), and Orbiter close proximity operations are included. Satellite classes considered are direct delivery and servicing of the orbiter, low Earth orbiter/propulsion, sorties and DOD, geosatellites, and planetary and other satellites.

  5. Equipment Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Tennessee Eastman uses NASTRAN to minimize lost production by pinpointing the causes of equipment failures and preventing recurrences. An example of the program's utility involves a large centrifugal fan which developed cracks during start-ups and shutdowns. This information prompted redesign of the fan. Tennessee Eastman has made extensive use of NASTRAN, both as failure analysis tool and as an aid in redesigning production hardware.

  6. Secure authenticated video equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Doren, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    In the verification technology arena, there is a pressing need for surveillance and monitoring equipment that produces authentic, verifiable records of observed activities. Such a record provides the inspecting party with confidence that observed activities occurred as recorded, without undetected tampering or spoofing having taken place. The secure authenticated video equipment (SAVE) system provides an authenticated series of video images of an observed activity. Being self-contained and portable, it can be installed as a stand-alone surveillance system or used in conjunction with existing monitoring equipment in a non-invasive manner. Security is provided by a tamper-proof camera enclosure containing a private, electronic authentication key. Video data is transferred communication link consisting of a coaxial cable, fiber-optic link or other similar media. A video review station, located remotely from the camera, receives, validates, displays and stores the incoming data. Video data is validated within the review station using a public key, a copy of which is held by authorized panics. This scheme allows the holder of the public key to verify the authenticity of the recorded video data but precludes undetectable modification of the data generated by the tamper-protected private authentication key.

  7. Design guidelines for remotely maintained equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, T.W.; Evans, J.H.; Peishel, F.L.; Schrock, S.L.; Smith, G.E.; Macdonald, D.

    1988-11-01

    The CFRP has pioneered and developed the concept of totally remote operation and maintenance of process equipment in spent fuel reprocessing, using force-reflecting master/slave servomanipulators, coupled with television viewing, to extend human capabilities effectively throughout an uninhabitable environment. This concept enhances safeguard control of nuclear materials, provides for low-exposure of personnel to radiation and reliable recovery from unplanned events, ensures high plant availability, and aids eventual decommissioning of the plant. The results of this experience have been organized in this document to enable designers to consider this technology, not only in spent fuel reprocessing, but among various other situations that may be hazardous to personnel. This document is an expanded and updated version of an earlier design guide that was specific to fuel reprocessing requirements. The guidelines identified in the present document suggest a general approach to the design of effective, reliable, safe, remotely operated and maintained facilities. This document may be used broadly to apply remotely maintained equipment in hostile environments based on proven techniques, equipment, and well-established practices. The concepts are particularly applicable to large plant facilities where economy of scale is important. The theme emphasizes utilization of ordinary commercial tools, equipment, and materials widely available. 5 refs., 51 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An expanded role for the U.S. private sector in America's space future has emerged as a key national objective, and NASA's Office of Commercial Programs is providing a focus for action. The Office supports new high technology commercial space ventures, the commercial application of existing aeronautics and space technology, and expanded commercial access to available NASA capabilities and services. The progress NASA has made in carrying out its new assignment is highlighted.

  9. [Supply of medical equipment in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A; Cruz, C; Faba, G; Sánchez, E; Hernández, B; Damián, T

    1992-01-01

    This article covers the report on Supply of Medical Equipment in Mexico, presented during the Second National Congress of Public Health. The results are part of an investigation that dealt with the general conditions that currently prevail in the production and distribution of medical equipment. The information was obtained by means of a survey applied to 208 companies that comprised the sample study. The facts indicate that of the companies that correspond to this industrial sector in Mexico, 3.8 per cent are manufacturers, 69.7 per cent distributors, 19.2 per cent manufacturer-distributors, and the remaining 7.2 per cent correspond to corrective and preventive maintenance. Also, these companies pose serious problems of external dependence with regard to production costs and the commercialization of products. Furthermore, it became evident that there is a substantial need for financial support to optimally satisfy the demands of various institutions in the country's health sector.

  10. Commercial Radio as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenbuhler, Eric W.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the day-to-day work routines of commercial radio with the principles of a theoretical communication model. Illuminates peculiarities of the conduct of communication by commercial radio. Discusses the application of theoretical models to the evaluation of practicing institutions. Offers assessments of commercial radio deriving from…

  11. Commercial Banking Industry Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright Horizons Children's Centers, Cambridge, MA.

    Work and family programs are becoming increasingly important in the commercial banking industry. The objective of this survey was to collect information and prepare a commercial banking industry profile on work and family programs. Fifty-nine top American commercial banks from the Fortune 500 list were invited to participate. Twenty-two…

  12. COMMERCIAL FOODS, MATHEMATICS - I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DORNFIELD, BLANCHE E.

    THE UNDERSTANDING AND MASTERY OF FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS IS A NECESSARY PART OF COMMERCIAL FOODS WORK. THIS STUDENT HANDBOOK WAS DESIGNED TO ACCOMPANY A COMMERCIAL FOODS COURSE AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FOR STUDENTS WITH APPROPRIATE APTITUDES AND COMMERCIAL FOOD SERVICE GOALS. THE MATERIAL, TESTED IN VARIOUS INTERESTED CLASSROOMS, WAS PREPARED BY…

  13. Cooperative commercial recycling programs for small business

    SciTech Connect

    Tennes, A.E.

    1996-08-01

    This paper summarizes a pilot commercial recycling program implemented in Illinois from June 1994 through June 1995. The Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County (SWANCC) was responsible for program development, implementation and education, solicitation of proposals and funding, and procurement of equipment. Despite poor program continuation response by merchants, the pilot was considered successful in diverting a significant amount of material from landfill and demonstrating that routing density, materials standardization, and container sharing can provide cost-effective commercial recycling. A similar program implemented by SWANCC is also described, which incorporates a committment from volunteer Environmental Control Commission members to actively encourage businesses to continue recycling.

  14. 12. VIEW OF REMOTELY OPERATED EQUIPMENT. OPERATORS VIEWED THE EQUIPMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF REMOTELY OPERATED EQUIPMENT. OPERATORS VIEWED THE EQUIPMENT THROUGH A WATER-FILLED WINDOW. (10/8/81) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 8. CONTROL AND EQUIPMENT ROOM INTERIOR. MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. CONTROL AND EQUIPMENT ROOM INTERIOR. MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM AT RIGHT AND ENTRANCE AT LEFT. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing Control Blockhouse, South of Sled Track at east end, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

  17. Microbiologic evaluation of commercial probiotics.

    PubMed

    Weese, J Scott

    2002-03-15

    To evaluate contents of commercial probiotic products marketed for veterinary or human administration. Microbiologic culture assay. 8 veterinary probiotics and 5 human probiotics. Quantitative bacteriologic culture was performed on all products, and isolates were identified via biochemical characteristics. Comparison of actual contents versus label claims was performed. Label descriptions of organisms and concentrations accurately described the actual contents of only 2 of 13 products. Five veterinary products did not specifically list their contents. Most products contained low concentrations of viable organisms. Five products did not contain 1 or more of the stated organisms, and 3 products contained additional species. Some products contained organisms with no reported probiotic effects; some of these organisms could be pathogens. Most commercial veterinary probiotic preparations are not accurately represented by label claims. Quality control appears to be poor for commercial veterinary probiotics.

  18. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Miscellaneous Equipment. Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes six units of instruction covering the small, specialized equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance…

  19. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Specialized Equipment. Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes 18 units of instruction covering the large equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives,…

  20. Getting Equipped and Staying Equipped, Part 2: Finding the Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordahl, Gregory; Orwig, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Suggests how school libraries can fund computer equipment; gain assistance from high-tech businesses; develop business partnerships and foundations; lease equipment; accept equipment donations; fund raise; build money into the budget; and communicate school needs with budget voters. Sidebars include leasing advice; resources for parent-teacher…

  1. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Specialized Equipment. Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes 18 units of instruction covering the large equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives,…

  2. Story of electromyography equipment.

    PubMed

    Ladegaard, Jørn

    2002-01-01

    It all started in 1950 with the introduction of the first commercially available electromyography (EMG) system. From 1950 to 1973 was the era of the analog EMG systems: EMG signals were recorded, and subsequent analyses were carried out manually on film or paper. From 1973 to 1982, the first modular digital EMG systems were introduced. Dedicated analysis modules were introduced, but detailed analysis was still done on paper. In 1982, the first system controlled by a microprocessor was introduced. From 1982 to 1993, many new ways of analyzing EMG signals and basic reporting features were implemented in the EMG systems. Since 1993, personal computer technology has been used in EMG systems. Standard software and hardware components are used to record, analyze, and document EMG examinations. Since 1950, many people have influenced the development of new features in commercial EMG systems. However, within the last 3 decades, Erik Stålberg has always been in the forefront and has shown ways of implementing new methods for analyzing EMG activity or nerve signals. The development of new commercial EMG systems has been dependent on the technology introduced to the market at that particular period of time. This article only refers to systems that have been sold or are now being sold worldwide. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Power requirements for commercial communications spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billerbeck, W. J.

    Historical data on commercial spacecraft power systems are presented and their power requirements to the growth of satellite communications channel usage are related. Some approaches for estimating future power requirements of this class of spacecraft through the year 2000 are proposed. The key technology drivers in satellite power systems are addressed. Several technological trends in such systems are described, focusing on the most useful areas for research and development of major subsystems, including solar arrays, energy storage, and power electronics equipment.

  4. Power requirements for commercial communications spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billerbeck, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Historical data on commercial spacecraft power systems are presented and their power requirements to the growth of satellite communications channel usage are related. Some approaches for estimating future power requirements of this class of spacecraft through the year 2000 are proposed. The key technology drivers in satellite power systems are addressed. Several technological trends in such systems are described, focusing on the most useful areas for research and development of major subsystems, including solar arrays, energy storage, and power electronics equipment.

  5. 40 CFR 799.2155 - Commercial hexane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceed the lower explosive limit of commercial hexane. (2) Exposure conditions. Animals shall be dosed... explosive limit of commercial hexane. (2) Administration of test substance. Animals shall be exposed to... in the parental (P) animals. In addition, the highest dose level should not exceed the lower...

  6. Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Explains the job of precision instrument and equipment repairers, who work on cameras, medical equipment, musical instruments, watches and clocks, and industrial measuring devices. Discusses duties, working conditions, employment and earnings, job outlook, and skills and training. (JOW)

  7. TELEMETRY EQUIPMENT WITH DIGITAL READING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Basic peculiarities of telemetry equipment with digital reading ; Elements of pulse technology applied in telemetry equipment with digital... reading ; Digital reading systems; Telemetry systems with digital reading . (Author)

  8. How to Use Equipment Therapeutically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowne, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Shares therapeutic and economic practices surrounding equipment used in New York's Higher Horizons adventure program of therapy for troubled youth. Encourages educators, therapists, and administrators to explore relationship between equipment selection, program goals, and clients. (NEC)

  9. Commercial aviation in-flight emergencies and the physician.

    PubMed

    Cocks, Robert; Liew, Michele

    2007-02-01

    Commercial aviation in-flight emergencies are relatively common, so it is likely that a doctor travelling frequently by air will receive a call for help at some stage in their career. These events are stressful, even for experienced physicians. The present paper reviews what is known about the incidence and types of in-flight emergencies that are likely to be encountered, the international regulations governing medical kits and drugs, and the liability, fitness and indemnity issues facing 'Good Samaritan' medical volunteers. The medical and aviation literature was searched, and information was collated from airlines and other sources regarding medical equipment available on board commercial aircraft. Figures for the incidence of significant in-flight emergencies are approximately 1 per 10-40 000 passengers, with one death occurring per 3-5 million passengers. Medically related diversion of an aircraft following an in-flight emergency may occur in up to 7-13% of cases, but passenger prescreening, online medical advice and on-board medical assistance from volunteers reduce this rate. Medical volunteers may find assisting with an in-flight emergency stressful, but should acknowledge that they play a vital role in successful outcomes. The medico-legal liability risk is extremely small, and various laws and industry indemnity practices offer additional protection to the volunteer. In addition, cabin crew receive training in a number of emergency skills, including automated defibrillation, and are one of several sources of help available to the medical volunteer, who is not expected to work alone.

  10. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  11. Leasecraft - A commercial space platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrowbridge, D. R.

    The Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) is the result of a NASA program concerned with the identification of new approaches to spacecraft design. A mandatory requirement regarding the MMS was flexibility to accommodatae a wide variety of payloads. MMS derived subsystems will provide a platform in low orbit for scientific, commercial, and government users on a leased or service contract basis. The payload may consist of scientific instruments, materials processing equipment, or remote sensors. Secondary payloads may be mounted in standard MMS module boxes. The platform forms a part of the 'Leasecraft' system, which was developed by an American aerospace company. Attention is given to the Leasecraft vehicle, details regarding the Leasecraft platform, and payload accommodations and Leasecraft missions.

  12. 10 CFR 434.404 - Building service systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Exception: When over 70% of the annual energy for heating is obtained from a site-recovered or site-solar... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Building service systems and equipment. 434.404 Section 434.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND...

  13. 10 CFR 434.404 - Building service systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Exception: When over 70% of the annual energy for heating is obtained from a site-recovered or site-solar... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Building service systems and equipment. 434.404 Section 434.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND...

  14. 10 CFR 434.404 - Building service systems and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Exception: When over 70% of the annual energy for heating is obtained from a site-recovered or site-solar... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Building service systems and equipment. 434.404 Section 434.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND...

  15. Equipment selection for recovering fiber from stripper harvested gin waste

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies have shown the quantity of recoverable fibers with the potential to be marketed as motes approaches 10 to 25 percent of gin trash by weight. As a result of these findings and practical experience from a commercial cotton gin, questions arose as to the best equipment setup needed to ...

  16. NIH Standard. Animal Care Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Office of Administrative Management.

    The National Institutes of Health standardized animal care equipment is presented in this catalog. Each piece of equipment is illustrated and described in terms of overall dimensions, construction, and general usage. A price list is included to estimate costs in budgeting, planning, and requisitioning animal care equipment. The standards and…

  17. Safety Equipment in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Willard A.S.

    1964-01-01

    Findings of two recent surveys on safety equipment in laboratory facilities are presented. The first survey was a pilot study of emergency shower and eye wash equipment. This study was followed by a more comprehensive random survey of safety equipment in 2,820 labs. Among other findings, the surveys indicate that many plants are underequipped, or…

  18. Protective Equipment In Amateur Sport

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Injuries in amateur sports can be markedly reduced if athletes can be persuaded to wear the proper equipment. Four major sports are reviewed, and an outline given of protective equipment for each, with a description of the commonest injuries for each sport. Fit and maintenance of equipment are stressed. PMID:20469059

  19. Decision Analysis for Equipment Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cilliers, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    Equipment selection during process design is a critical aspect of chemical engineering and requires engineering judgment and subjective analysis. When educating chemical engineering students in the selection of proprietary equipment during design, the focus is often on the types of equipment available and their operating characteristics. The…

  20. NASA's approach to the commercial use of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, I. T., IV

    1984-01-01

    NASA planning activities in the area of commercial development of space resources are reviewed. Examples of specific types of commercial space ventures are given, according to three different categories: new commercial high-technology ventures; new commercial application of existing space technology, and commercial ventures resulting from the transfer of existing space programs to the private sector. Basic objectives for reducing technical, financial and institutional risks for commercial space operations are considered. Attention is given to the cooperative working environment encouraged by Joint Endeavor Agreements (JEAs) and Technical Exchange Agreements (TEAs) between industrial organizations in the development of space systems. Benefits of the commercial development of space resources include the production of purer pharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancers, kidney diseases, and diabetes; and the development of ultra-pure semiconductor crystals for use in next generation electronic equipment.

  1. Space commercialization and power system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H., Jr.; Faymon, K. A.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of power and energy technologies important to the commercialization of space is discussed, stressing the significance of these technologies to space transportation systems, on-orbit services and on-orbit commercial production and processing ventures. Energy conversion systems examined include solar photovoltaic systems, solar thermal dynamic power systems, and nuclear power systems. Energy storage systems include electrochemical systems, inertial storage systems, and magnetic energy storage systems. In addition, power management and distribution systems used in space commercialization and NASA programs for the commercial development of space are discussed.

  2. 47 CFR 68.318 - Additional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions for Terminal Equipment Approval § 68.318 Additional... activation. Note to paragraph (b)(1): Emergency alarm dialers and dialers under external computer control are... proceeding to dial another number. (6) Network addressing signals shall be transmitted no earlier than: (i...

  3. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. 431.96 Section 431.96 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial... energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. (a) Scope. This section contains...

  4. 10 CFR 431.107 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters. 431.107 Section 431.107 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters... method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters....

  5. 10 CFR 431.107 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters. 431.107 Section 431.107 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters... method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters....

  6. 10 CFR 431.107 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters. 431.107 Section 431.107 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters... method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters....

  7. 10 CFR 431.107 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters. 431.107 Section 431.107 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters... method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters....

  8. Pyroshock testing: Effects of equipment simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, William O.

    2002-05-01

    It is critical to a spacecraft's mission success that flight equipment be properly qualified to its expected shock environment. Simulators of varying fidelity are often used to measure the shock levels during spacecraft shock tests. Pyroshock test data from a recent spacecraft separation test will be shown that illustrates how shock response spectra differ for avionics equipment simulators of both low and high fidelity. The effect of the simulator weight on the shock response will also be shown. Additionally, data showing the attenuation of pyroshock levels, including its reduction with distance and across joints will be discussed. This observed attenuation data generally supports the standard methodologies for predictions of shock attenuation.

  9. [Designing and manufacturing of medical equipment by OAO MNPK "Avionika"].

    PubMed

    Krasil'nikov, A A

    2004-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the activity of Research and Production Enterprise "Avionika", a leader in the field of designing and manufacturing of medical equipment. Technical data of medical suction units produced by the enterprise were comparatively analyzed versus those made by other manufacturers. Additionally, failures of suction equipment were analyzed and technical solutions enhancing the operational safety are suggested. Promising trends are defined for perfecting the discussed equipment type.

  10. CO2 heat pumps for commercial building applications with simultaneous heating and cooling demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharkar, Supriya

    Many commercial buildings, including data centers, hotels and hospitals, have a simultaneous heating and cooling demand depending on the season, occupation and auxiliary equipment. A data center on the Purdue University, West Lafayette campus is used as a case study. The electrical equipment in data centers produce heat, which must be removed to prevent the equipment temperature from rising to a certain level. With proper integration, this heat has the potential to be used as a cost-effective energy source for heating the building in which the data center resides or the near-by buildings. The proposed heat pump system utilizes carbon dioxide with global warming potential of 1, as the refrigerant. System simulations are carried out to determine the feasibility of the system for a 12-month period. In addition, energy, environmental and economic analyses are carried out to show the benefits of this alternative technology when compared to the conventional system currently installed in the facility. Primary energy savings of ~28% to ~61%, a payback period of 3 to 4.5 years and a decrease in the environmental impact value by ~36% makes this system an attractive option. The results are then extended to other commercial buildings.

  11. Evaluation of field dental equipment in a deployment environment.

    PubMed

    Charlton, David G; Ehrlich, A Dale; Ragain, James C; Lyles, Mark B; Roberts, Howard W

    2006-03-01

    Dental officers and technicians must have reliable, durable, well-performing field dental equipment to enable them to provide dental care to deployed troops in operational environments. Unfortunately, no organized program exists to test such equipment before its purchase and use in the field. This article presents the results of a project conducted by the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research and the Air Force Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service to evaluate commercially available field dental equipment through laboratory testing and clinical-user evaluations in theater. The purpose of this 2-year project was to identify the best-performing and most cost-effective field dental equipment for possible future procurement. Initial laboratory testing was performed at the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research, and the equipment was then shipped to Kuwait for in-theater environmental and clinical-user testing. A seven-member scientific team of military dental officers and technicians was deployed for 1 month to perform in-theater testing under regional environmental conditions and to coordinate clinical-user evaluations. The testing provided beneficial results by identifying equipment that performed properly and equipment that exhibited shortcomings serious enough to render it inadequate for operational use. It is recommended that the project serve as a model for future testing and evaluation of medical/dental equipment by all of the military services.

  12. Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-06-09

    Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the energy use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment energy use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total energy use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of energy use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate potential energy savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and energy use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.

  13. 10 CFR 431.262 - Definitions concerning commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial prerinse spray valves. 431.262 Section 431.262 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves § 431.262...

  14. 10 CFR 431.262 - Definitions concerning commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial prerinse spray valves. 431.262 Section 431.262 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves § 431.262...

  15. 10 CFR 429.51 - Commercial pre-rinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Commercial pre-rinse spray valves. 429.51 Section 429.51 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.51 Commercial pre-rinse spray...

  16. 10 CFR 429.51 - Commercial pre-rinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Commercial pre-rinse spray valves. 429.51 Section 429.51 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.51 Commercial pre-rinse spray...

  17. 10 CFR 429.51 - Commercial pre-rinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Commercial pre-rinse spray valves. 429.51 Section 429.51 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.51 Commercial pre-rinse spray...

  18. 46 CFR 160.077-13 - Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. 160.077-13..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hybrid Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices § 160.077-13 Materials—Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. (a) General. All commercial...

  19. 46 CFR 160.077-13 - Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. 160.077-13..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hybrid Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices § 160.077-13 Materials—Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. (a) General. All commercial...

  20. 46 CFR 160.077-13 - Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. 160.077-13..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hybrid Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices § 160.077-13 Materials—Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. (a) General. All commercial...

  1. 50 CFR 27.71 - Commercial filming and still photography and audio recording.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Commercial filming and still photography... Disturbing Violations: Filming, Photography, and Light and Sound Equipment § 27.71 Commercial filming and still photography and audio recording. (a) We authorize commercial filming and still photography...

  2. 10 CFR 431.62 - Definitions concerning commercial refrigerators, freezers and refrigerator-freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial refrigerators, freezers and refrigerator-freezers. 431.62 Section 431.62 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial...

  3. The History of Commercial Recreation and Its Role in the Provision of Family Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, E. Taylor

    Commercial recreation is the provision of facilities, equipment, and programs that satisfy public demand for activities during unobligated time and are profitable to the supplier. The term "commercial recreation" has been given a negative connotation in the field of recreation and leisure. This negative concept of commercial recreation…

  4. Cost-Benefit Analysis Methodology: Install Commercially Compliant Engines on National Security Exempted Vessels?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-05

    types. INTRODUCTION Commercial diesel engines on new and existing U.S. flagged or registered vessels (or equipment in general) must comply with... diesel , engine, fuels, emissions, national security exemption, NSE, commercial compliance 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...Marine diesel engine regulation tiers and implementation dates Table 2. Summary of commercial compliance certification and documentation

  5. The History of Commercial Recreation and Its Role in the Provision of Family Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, E. Taylor

    Commercial recreation is the provision of facilities, equipment, and programs that satisfy public demand for activities during unobligated time and are profitable to the supplier. The term "commercial recreation" has been given a negative connotation in the field of recreation and leisure. This negative concept of commercial recreation…

  6. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

  7. Regulating Commercial Telephone Solicitations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    also proposed that telephone subscribers be given the right to indicate if they do not want to receive commercial advertising calls , whether from...federal government should prohibit all commercial advertising calls. Advertisers have rights to free speech , and some consumers, I am told , don ’t...of the same arguments against giving subscribers the right to refuse commercial advertising calls that they made in 1965. They have stated that placing

  8. Commercialization of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, James T.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1988-01-01

    Space-commercialization activities are grouped into five categories: private sector development from existing technology for private sector use; pure privatization; private sector development for U.S. government use; private sector development from novel technology for private sector use; and, finally, full commercialization. The commercialization of space categories is defined, and the key issues in each are highlighted. A description of key NASA actions is included for each category. It is concluded that NASA and other government agency involvement is a common thread across the spectrum of space commercialization activities.

  9. Commercial aviation icing research requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koegeboehn, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    A short range and long range icing research program was proposed. A survey was made to various industry and goverment agencies to obtain their views of needs for commercial aviation ice protection. Through these responsed, other additional data, and Douglas Aircraft icing expertise; an assessment of the state-of-the-art of aircraft icing data and ice protection systems was made. The information was then used to formulate the icing research programs.

  10. Orbital construction support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Approximately 200 separate construction steps were defined for the three solar power satellite (SPS) concepts. Detailed construction scenarios were developed which describe the specific tasks to be accomplished, and identify general equipment requirements. The scenarios were used to perform a functional analysis, which resulted in the definition of 100 distinct SPS elements. These elements are the components, parts, subsystems, or assemblies upon which construction activities take place. The major SPS elements for each configuration are shown. For those elements, 300 functional requirements were identified in seven generic processes. Cumulatively, these processes encompass all functions required during SPS construction/assembly. Individually each process is defined such that it includes a specific type of activity. Each SPS element may involve activities relating to any or all of the generic processes. The processes are listed, and examples of the requirements defined for a typical element are given.

  11. Monitoring equipment temperature environments for license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, R.R.; McCumber, J.T.; Rainey, P.A.

    1991-06-01

    Yankee Atomic Electric Company instituted an Environmental Monitoring Program as part of its license renewal project for Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS). Since ambient environmental conditions can effect the operating life and reliability of electrical equipment, knowledge of the actual environmental conditions can provide additional assurance of equipment reliability and longevity. This information can then be used to form a basis for plant license renewal since it can provide a margin for demonstrating that essential components retain their capability to perform their intended safety functions. Temperature and radiation are the environmental conditions of prime concern for the reliability and longevity of most nuclear power plant electrical equipment. For Yankee Nuclear Power Station, several sources of environmental monitoring already existed, including radiation data from Health Physics surveys of all areas of concern. The focus of this paper, therefore, is on the collection of temperature data and on a one time infrared survey to identify localized hot spots. Yankee based its analysis on existing temperature data for inside the containment and temperature data for outside the containment collected by monitoring base line area temperatures using chart recorders for several months. The results showed that the majority of electrical equipment was subjected to temperatures much less than rated and that there were no areas identified with localized hot spots that would affect equipment life.

  12. 33 CFR 155.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 30,000 barrels, capable of... barrels, capable of being on scene within 6 hours of notification of a discharge. (c) Additional on-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 40,000 barrels capable of being on...

  13. 33 CFR 155.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 30,000 barrels, capable of... barrels, capable of being on scene within 6 hours of notification of a discharge. (c) Additional on-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 40,000 barrels capable of being on...

  14. 33 CFR 155.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 30,000 barrels, capable of... barrels, capable of being on scene within 6 hours of notification of a discharge. (c) Additional on-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 40,000 barrels capable of being on...

  15. 33 CFR 155.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 30,000 barrels, capable of... barrels, capable of being on scene within 6 hours of notification of a discharge. (c) Additional on-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 40,000 barrels capable of being on...

  16. 33 CFR 155.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 30,000 barrels, capable of... barrels, capable of being on scene within 6 hours of notification of a discharge. (c) Additional on-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery capacity of 40,000 barrels capable of being on...

  17. 33 CFR 154.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Operating in Prince William Sound, Alaska § 154.1130 Requirements for prepositioned response equipment. The..., located within Prince William Sound, in addition to that required by §§ 154.1035, 154.1045, or 154.1050: (a) On-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery rate of 30,000 barrels...

  18. 33 CFR 154.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Operating in Prince William Sound, Alaska § 154.1130 Requirements for prepositioned response equipment. The..., located within Prince William Sound, in addition to that required by §§ 154.1035, 154.1045, or 154.1050: (a) On-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery rate of 30,000 barrels...

  19. 33 CFR 154.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Operating in Prince William Sound, Alaska § 154.1130 Requirements for prepositioned response equipment. The..., located within Prince William Sound, in addition to that required by § 154.1035, § 154.1045, or § 154.1050: (a) On-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery rate of 30,000 barrels...

  20. 33 CFR 154.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Operating in Prince William Sound, Alaska § 154.1130 Requirements for prepositioned response equipment. The..., located within Prince William Sound, in addition to that required by §§ 154.1035, 154.1045, or 154.1050: (a) On-water recovery equipment with a minimum effective daily recovery rate of 30,000 barrels...