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Sample records for commercial ni-cr-mo alloys

  1. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Commercial Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2004-11-09

    Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum alloys (Ni-Cr-Mo) are highly resistant to general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Cr acts as a beneficial element under oxidizing acidic conditions and Mo under reducing conditions. All three elements (Ni, Cr and Mo) act synergistically to provide resistance to EAC in environments such as hot concentrated chloride solutions. Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may suffer EAC in environments such as hot caustic solutions, hot wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions and in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) applications. Not all the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have the same susceptibility to cracking in the mentioned environments. Most of the available data regarding EAC is for the oldest Ni-Cr-Mo alloys such as N10276 and N06625.

  2. Electrochemical Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Lister; R. E. Mizia; H. Tian

    2005-10-01

    The waste package site recommendation design specified a boron-containing stainless steel, Neutronit 976/978, for fabrication of the internal baskets that will be used as a corrosion-resistant neutron-absorbing material. Recent corrosion test results gave higher-than-expected corrosion rates for this material. The material callout for these components has been changed to a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ASTM-B 932-04, UNS N06464) that is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. This report discusses the results of initial corrosion testing of this material in simulated in-package environments that could contact the fuel baskets after breach of the waste package outer barrier. The corrosion test matrix was executed using the potentiodynamic and potentiostatic electrochemical test techniques. The alloy performance shows low rates of general corrosion after initial removal of a gadolinium-rich second phase that intersects the surface. The high halide-containing test solutions exhibited greater tendencies toward initiation of crevice corrosion.

  3. MODELING OF NI-CR-MO BASED ALLOYS: PART II - KINETICS

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Liu, Z

    2006-07-07

    The CALPHAD approach is applied to kinetic studies of phase transformations and aging of prototypes of Ni-Cr-Mo-based alloys selected for waste disposal canisters in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Based on a previous study on alloy stability for several candidate alloys, the thermodynamic driving forces together with a newly developed mobility database have been used to analyze diffusion-controlled transformations in these Ni-based alloys. Results on precipitation of the Ni{sub 2}Cr-ordered phase in Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and of the complex P- and {delta}-phases in a surrogate of Alloy 22 are presented, and the output from the modeling are compared with experimental data on aging.

  4. Localized Corrosion of a Neutron Absorbing Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Mizia; T. E. Lister; P. J. Pinhero; T. L. Trowbridge

    2005-04-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has developed a new nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium structural alloy for storage and long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The new alloy will be used for SNF storage container inserts for nuclear criticality control. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This alloy must be resistant to localized corrosion when exposed to postulated Yucca Mountain in-package chemistries. The corrosion resistance properties of three experimental heats of this alloy are presented. The alloys performance are be compared to Alloy 22 and borated stainless steel. The results show that initially the new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is less resistant to corrosion as compared to another Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (Alloy 22); but when the secondary phase that contains gadolinium (gadolinide) is dissolved, the alloy surface becomes passive. The focus of this work is to qualify these gadolinium containing materials for ASME code qualification and acceptance in the Yucca Mountain Repository.

  5. Experimental procedure for crevice corrosion studies of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys in natural seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, F. J.; Lucas, K. E.; Hogan, E. A.

    2002-03-01

    An experimental procedure intended for crevice corrosion studies on Ni-Cr-Mo alloys is demonstrated. In this procedure a potentiostatic control of crevice corrosion specimens is applied to an immersible crevice cell design that uses a fluoroelastomer gasket crevice former. The procedure is demonstrated for a crevice susceptibility study on Alloy 625 in elevated temperature natural seawater, where crevice corrosion initiation and propagation are shown to be influenced by the electrochemical potential. Potentiostatic current monitoring establishes the crevice initiation time and rate of propagation, while post-mortem inspections confirm the extent of crevice damage.

  6. KINETICS OF CATHODIC REDUCTION OF OXYGEN ON NI-CR-MO-W ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2006-04-06

    Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloys (C-group alloys) are well known as materials with very high Corrosion resistance in very aggressive environments, an asset that has motivated the selection of Alloy 22 as a waste package material in the Yucca Mountain Project for the long-term geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive wastes. The aim of this project is to elucidate the corrosion performance of Alloy 22 under aggressive conditions and to provide a conceptual understanding and parameter data base that could act as a basis for modeling the corrosion performance of waste packages under Yucca Mountain conditions. A key issue in any corrosion process is whether or not the kinetics of the cathodic reactions involved can support a damaging rate of anodic metal (alloy) dissolution. Under Yucca Mountain conditions the primary oxidant available to drive corrosion (most likely in the form of crevice, or under-deposit, corrosion) will be oxygen. Here, we present results on the kinetics of oxygen reduction at the Alloy 22/solution interface.

  7. The effects of sulfate reducing bacteria on stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo alloy weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, T.A.; Taylor, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Previous research in this laboratory demonstrated a direct correlation between alloy composition and corrosion susceptibility of stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo alloy weldments exposed to lake water augmented with sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). It was shown that lake water containing an active SRB population reduced the polarization resistance (R{sub p}) on all alloys studied including those with 9% Mo. In addition, preliminary evidence indicated that edge preparation and weld heat input were also important parameters in determining corrosion performance. This prior research, however, looked at ``doctored`` weldments in which the thermal oxide in the heat affected zone was removed. The objectives of the research presented here are to further confirm these observations using as-received welds. The materials examined (listed in increasing alloy content) are 1/4 inch thick plates of 316L, 317L, AL6XN (6% Mo), alloy 625 clad steel, alloy 625, and alloy 686. Materials were welded using the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process in an argon purged environment. In addition, 317L was welded in air to test oxide effects. All samples were prepared for welding by grinding to a V-edge, except the 625 clad steel samples which were prepared using a J-edge. Electrochemical performance of welded samples was monitored in four glass cells which could each allow exposure of 8 samples to the same environment. Two cells contained lake water inoculated with SRS, and two cells contained sterilized lake water. The open circuit potential (E{sub oc}) and R{sub p} was used to correlate corrosion susceptibility and bacterial activity with alloy composition and welding parameters.

  8. Preselection of Ni-Cr(-Mo) alloys as potential canister materials for vitrified high active nuclear waste by electrochemical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bort, H.; Wolf, I.; Leistikow, S.

    1987-07-01

    Several Ni-Cr(-Mo) alloys (Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, Sanicro 28, Incoloy 825, Inconel 690) were tested by electrochemical methods to characterize their corrosion behavior in chloride containing solutions at various temperatures and pH-values in respect to their application as canister materials for final radioactive waste storage. Especially, Hastelloy C4 was tested by potentiodynamic, potentiostatic and galvanostic measurements. As electrolytes H 2SO 4 solutions were used, as parameters temperature, chloride content and pH-value were varied. All tested alloys showed a clearly limited resistance against pitting corrosion phenomena; under severe conditions even crevice corrosion phenomena were observed. The best corrosion behavior, however, is shown by Hastelloy C4, which has the lowest passivation current density of all tested alloys and the largest potential region with protection against local corrosion phenomena.

  9. The Influence of Composition upon Surface Degradation and Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys in Wet Hydrofluoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, P; Meck, N S; Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    At concentrations below 60%, wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) is extremely corrosive to steels, stainless steels and reactive metals, such as titanium, zirconium, and tantalum. In fact, only a few metallic materials will withstand wet HF at temperatures above ambient. Among these are the nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) and nickel-chromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys. Previous work has shown that, even with these materials, there are complicating factors. For example, under certain conditions, internal attack and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are possible with the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and the Ni-Cu materials can suffer intergranular attack when exposed to wet HF vapors. The purpose of this work was to study further the response of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to HF, in particular their external corrosion rates, susceptibility to internal attack and susceptibility to HF-induced SCC, as a function of alloy composition. As a side experiment, one of the alloys was tested in two microstructural conditions, i.e. solution annealed (the usual condition for materials of this type) and long-range ordered (this being a means of strengthening the alloy in question). The study of external corrosion rates over wide ranges of concentration and temperature revealed a strong beneficial influence of molybdenum content. However, tungsten, which is used as a partial replacement for molybdenum in some Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, appears to render the alloys more prone to internal attack. With regard to HF-induced SCC of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, this study suggests that only certain alloys (i.e., those containing tungsten) exhibit classical SCC. It was also discovered that high external corrosion rates inhibit HF-induced SCC, presumably due to rapid progression of the external attack front. With regard to the effects of long-range ordering, these were only evident at the highest test temperatures, where the ordered structure exhibited much higher external corrosion rates than the annealed structure.

  10. Thermal stability and microstructural changes of some Ni-Cr-Mo alloys as detected by corrosion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, M.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1998-12-31

    Wrought Ni-Cr-Mo alloys of the C-family show a sensitivity to intercrystalline attack especially after exposure in the temperature range of 650 C to 950 C. Nevertheless, microstructural changes due to precipitation of intermetallic phases can occur up to a temperature level of 1050 C and this can affect the localized corrosion resistance. Thermal stability of wrought Alloy C-276 is a lot lower in comparison to Alloy 59. Sensitized at 870 C for only 1 hour, Alloy C-276 fails in the ASTM-G 28 B test due to rapid intercrystalline penetration and pitting whereas Alloy 59 can be aged up to 3 hours without any increase of the corrosion rate or any pitting attack. The same ranking applies during polythermal cooling cycles. Alloy C-276 requires a cooling rate of 150 C/min. between the solution annealing temperature and 600 C to avoid any sensitization whereas for Alloy 59 a relative slow cooling rate of 25 C/min. is acceptable. The critical pitting temperature of Alloy 59 when tested in the Green Death solution had been determined to be > 125 C. The temperature was not lowered during aging up to 3 hours at 1050 C or if a cooling speed of 25 C/min. was applied. However, cooling rates of 50 C/min. or less reduced the critical pitting temperature of Alloy C-276 from 115 C in the solution annealed and water quenched condition to only 105 C.

  11. Comparison of Crevice Corrosion of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal and Crystalline Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, X; Ha, H; Payer, J H

    2008-07-24

    The crevice corrosion behaviors of an Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloy (SAM1651) and a Ni-Cr-Mo crystalline alloy (C-22) were studied in 4M NaCl at 100 C with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential tests. The corrosion damage morphologies, corrosion products and the compositions of corroded surfaces of these two alloys were studied with optical 3D reconstruction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). It was found that the Fe-based bulk metallic glass (amorphous alloy) SAM1651 had a more positive breakdown potential and repassivation potential than crystalline alloy C-22 in cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests and required a more positive oxidizing potential to initiate crevice corrosion in constant potential test. Once crevice corrosion initiated, the corrosion propagation of C-22 was more localized near the crevice border compared to SAM1651, and SAM1651 repassivated more readily than C-22. The EDS results indicated that the corrosion products of both alloys contained high amount of O and were enriched in Mo and Cr. The AES results indicated that a Cr-rich oxide passive film was formed on the surfaces of both alloys, and both alloys were corroded congruently.

  12. Designing components for water treatment units for radioactive waste liquids in a modern NiCrMo-alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheiner, R.; Solomon, R.; Jahudka, M.; Ettere, J.

    1998-12-31

    Since the late 60`s, a uranium mine in eastern Europe (DIAMO) has used the In-Situ Leaching (ISL) method along with traditional underground mining. Over the years the acid solutions and leaching products have spread into a large volume of underground water and it is necessary to clean up this contaminated water. The make-up-process for the water purification requires highly alloyed materials for the equipment. In 1994 the operator awarded a US company a contract to clean up the acidic solutions and to produce a pure salt product using a system of evaporators, crystallizers and recrystallizers. In an attempt to simulate real plant conditions, test procedures were set up with the original mother liquor and its concentrate solution to qualify the optimum alloy for the given components. A NiCrMo-alloy (Alloy 31) was specified as part of the evaporator body on the Basis of corrosion and cost aspects. It has been reported that there is no visible appearance of corrosion on any part of equipment which has been fabricated from Alloy 31.

  13. Comparative Study on the Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal, Borated Stainless Steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tiangan; Day, Daniel; Hailey, Phillip; Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloy Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} was compared to borated stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy on their corrosion resistance in various high-concentration chloride solutions. The melt-spun ribbon of this iron-based amorphous alloy have demonstrated a better corrosion resistance than the bulk borated stainless steel and the bulk Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy, in high-concentration chloride brines at temperatures 90 deg. C or higher. (authors)

  14. Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welding Evaluation Activities on a Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy for Nuclear Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, F; Punshon, C; Dorsch, T; Fielding, P; Richard, D; Yang, N; Hill, M; DeWald, A; Rebak, R; Day, S; Wong, L; Torres, S; McGregor, M; Hackel, L; Chen, H-L; Rankin, J

    2003-09-11

    The current waste package design for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada, USA, employs gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in fabricating the waste packages. While GTAW is widely used in industry for many applications, it requires multiple weld passes. By comparison, single-pass welding methods inherently use lower heat input than multi-pass welding methods which results in lower levels of weld distortion and also narrower regions of residual stresses at the weld TWI Ltd. has developed a Reduced Pressure Electron Beam (RPEB) welding process which allows EB welding in a reduced pressure environment ({le} 1 mbar). As it is a single-pass welding technique, use of RPEB welding could (1) achieve a comparable or better materials performance and (2) lead to potential cost savings in the waste package manufacturing as compared to GTAW. Results will be presented on the initial evaluation of the RPEB welding on a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (a candidate alloy for the Yucca Mountain waste packages) in the areas of (a) design and manufacturing simplifications, (b) material performance and (c) weld reliability.

  15. Fractal study of Ni Cr Mo alloy for dental applications: effect of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Ali

    2003-12-01

    Different Ni-based alloys with various compositions were prepared by varying the amounts of beryllium. Effect of the amount of beryllium added to the alloy on its corrosion in an electrolyte solution of artificial saliva was investigated. Fractal dimension was used as a quantitative factor for surface analysis of the alloys before and after storage in the artificial salvia. The fractal dimensions of the electrode surfaces were determined by means of the most reliable method in this context viz. time dependency of the diffusion-limited current for a system involving "diffusion towards electrode surface". The results showed that increase of the beryllium amount in the alloy composition significantly increases the alloy corrosion. It is accompanied by increase of the fractal dimension and roughness of the electrode surface, whereas a smooth and shiny surface is required for dentures. From the methodology point of view, the approach utilized for fractal analysis of the alloy surfaces (Au-masking of metallic surfaces) is a novel and efficient method for study of denture surfaces. Generally, this approach is of interest for corrosion studies of different metals and alloys, particularly where changes in surface structure have a significant importance.

  16. Modeling of Crevice Corrosion Stability of a NiCrMo Alloy and Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    F.J. Presuel-Moreno; F. Bocher; J.R. Scully; R.G. Kelly

    2006-05-19

    Damage of structural significance from crevice corrosion of corrosion resistant alloys requires that at least a portion of the creviced area remain active over a sufficiently long period. Stifling results shen the aggressive chemistry required inside the crevice to keep the material depassivated, i.e., actively corroding, cannot be maintained. This loss of critical chemistry occurs when the rate of mass transport out of the crevice exceeds the rate of dissolution and subsequent hydrolysis of metal ions inside the crevice. For the treatment considered here, the mass transport conditions are constant for a given geometry and potential. What then controls the stability of the internal chemistry is the interaction between the electrochemical kinetics at the interface and the crevice chemistry composition. This work focuses on the parameters that control the stability of crevice corrosion by modeling the evolution of the chemical and electrochemical conditions within a crevice open only at one end (e.g. the mouth) in which the entire crevice is initially filled with the Critical Chemistry Solution (CCS) or filled with chemistries slightly less or more aggressive than the CCS. The crevice mouth is in contact with a weak acid solution (pH 3) that provides the boundary conditions at the crevice mouth. The potential at the mouth was held constant at +0.1 V{sub sce} in most instances with selected cases held at 0.0 V{sub sce}. The material selected was Ni-22Cr-6Mo alloy. The electrochemical kinetics at the pH values of interest have been recently characterized via potentiodynamic polarization. Figure 1 shows the polarization curves for Ni-22Cr-6Mo samples tested at room temperature in various HCl solutions. These data were used in all calculations. That is as the pH changed, a new polarization curve was applied to the position in the crevice. E, pH was calculated at each position and from this data, current at each position was determined. The effects of the crevice gap and

  17. Characterization of air-formed surface oxide film on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (MP35N) and its change in Hanks' solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Akiko; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Katayama, Keiichi; Hanawa, Takao; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2012-05-01

    The air-formed surface oxide films used for stents were characterized to determine their composition and chemical state on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy. The change of the films in Hanks' solution was used to estimate the reconstruction of the film in the human body. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the composition of the film and substrate, as well as the film's thickness. The surface oxide film on the Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (when mechanically polished) consists of oxide species of cobalt, nickel, chromium, and molybdenum, contains a large amount of OH-, and has a thickness of approximately 2.5 nm. Cations exist in the oxide as Co2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, Mo4+, Mo5+, and Mo6+. Chromium is enriched and cobalt and nickel are depleted in the oxide; however, nickel is enriched and cobalt is depleted in the substrate alloy just under the surface oxide film. Concentration of chromium was low and that of nickel was high at small take-off angles. This indicates that distribution of chromium is greater in the inner layer, but nickel is distributed more in the outer layer of the surface oxide film. During immersion in Hanks' solution, cobalt and nickel dissolved, and the film composition changed to mostly chromium oxide (Cr3+), along with small amounts of cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum oxides, and calcium phosphate containing magnesium, potassium, and carbonate. After immersion in Hanks' solution, the thickness of the surface layer containing calcium phosphate increased to more than 4 nm, while the amount of OH- increased. The amount of cobalt and nickel in the surface oxide film and in the substrate alloy just below the oxide decreased during immersion.

  18. Effect of the environment and alloy composition on the electrochemical behavior of Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J R; Szmodis, A W; Anderson, K L; Orme, C A

    2004-01-05

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is the candidate material for the corrosion resistant, outer barrier of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste containers. One of the potential corrosion degradation modes of the container is uniform or passive corrosion. Therefore it is of importance to understand the stability of the oxide film, which will control the passive corrosion rate of Alloy 22. Many variables such as temperature, composition and pH of the electrolyte, applied potential, and microstructure and composition of the base metal would determine the thickness and composition of the oxide film. The purpose of this research work was to use electrochemical and surface analysis techniques to explore the influence of solution pH and applied potential on the characteristics of the oxide film formed on Alloy 22 and two experimental alloys containing differing amounts of chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo). Results confirm that bulk metal composition is fundamental to the passive behavior and potential breakdown of the studied alloys. In these preliminary results, welded and non-welded Alloy 22 did not show differences in their anodic behavior.

  19. Coupled Multi-Electrode Investigation of Crevice Corrosion of 316 Stainless Steel and NiCrMo Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    F. Bocher; F.J. Presuel-Moreno; J.R. Scully

    2006-06-08

    Crevice corrosion is currently mostly studied using either one of two techniques depending on the information desired. The first method involves two multicrevice formers or washers fastened on both sides of a sample plate. This technique provides exposure information regarding the severity of crevice corrosion (depth, position, frequency of attack) but delivers little or no electrochemical information. The second method involves the potentiodynamic or potentiostatic study of an uncreviced sample in a model crevice solution or under a crevice former in aggressive solution where crevice corrosion may initiate and propagate and global current is recorded. However, crevice corrosion initiation and propagation behavior is highly dependent on exact position in the crevice over time. The distance from the crevice mouth will affect the solution composition, the pH, the ohmic potential drop and the true potential in the crevice. Coupled multi-electrode arrays (MEA) were used to study crevice corrosion in order to take in account spatial and temporal evolution of electrochemistry simultaneously. Scaling laws were used to rescale the crevice geometry while keeping the corrosion electrochemical properties equivalent to that of a natural crevice at a smaller length scale. one of the advantages was to be able to use commercial alloys available as wires electrode and, in the case of MEA, to spread the crevice corrosion over many individual electrodes so each one of them will have a near homogeneous electrochemical behavior. The initial step was to obtain anodic polarization curves for the relevant material in acid chloride solution which simulated the crevice electrolyte. using the software Crevicer{trademark}, the potential distribution inside the crevice as a function of the distance from the crevice mouth was determined for various crevice gaps and applied potentials, assuming constant chemistry throughout the crevice. The crevice corrosion initiation location x{sub crit} is

  20. Interdiffusion in Ni/CrMo Composition-Modulated Films

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Saw, C K

    2003-02-18

    The measurement of diffusivity at low temperature in the Ni-CrMo alloy system, relative to the melt point, is accomplished through the use of a composition-modulated structure. The composition-modulated structure consists of numerous pairs of alternating Ni and Cr-Mo layers that are each just a few nanometers thick. A direct assessment of alloy stability is made possible through measurement of the atomic diffusion between these layers that occurs during anneal treatments. X ray diffraction under the Bragg condition in the {theta}/2{theta} mode is the method used to quantify the changes that occur in the short-range order, i.e. the artificial composition fluctuation. The relative intensities of satellite reflections about the Bragg peaks are monitored as a function of the time at temperature. The decay rate of the artificial composition fluctuation of Ni with Cr-Mo is analyzed using the microscopic theory of diffusion to quantify a macroscopic diffusion coefficient D as 1.52 x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2} {center_dot} sec{sup -1} for Ni{sub 2}(Cr,Mo) at 760 K.

  1. Corrosion and degradation of a polyurethane/Co-Ni-Cr-Mo pacemaker lead

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, P.; Fraker, A.C.

    1987-12-01

    An investigation to study changes in the metal surfaces and the polyurethane insulation of heart pacemaker leads under controlled in vitro conditions was conducted. A polyurethane (Pellethane 2363-80A)/Co-Ni-Cr-Mo (MP35N) wire lead was exposed in Hanks' physiological saline solution for 14 months and then analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy dispersive analysis, and small angle x-ray scattering. Results showed that some leakage of solution into the lead had occurred and changes were present on both the metal and the polyurethane surfaces.

  2. The Kinetics of Metadynamic Recrystallization in a Ni-Cr-Mo-Based Superalloy Hastelloy C-276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Liwen; Shen, Wenfei; Liu, Cuiru; Xia, Yingnan

    2016-02-01

    The metadynamic recrystallization (MDRX) behavior of a typical Ni-Cr-Mo-based superalloy Hastelloy C-276 was investigated using two-stage isothermal compression tests on a Gleeble thermal-mechanical simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C, the strain rate range of 0.1-5.0 s-1, the strains of 0.32, 0.45, and 0.6 at the first stage of compression, and the interval times of 0.5-30 s. The results show that the microstructure and the stress-strain relation of the studied superalloy vary during the interruption period due to the occurrence of MDRX. The MDRX softening fraction and recrystallized grain size increase rapidly with the increasing of interval time, deformation temperature, and strain rate. The effect of strain at the first stage of compression on MDRX is less pronounced. The kinetics of MDRX softening was established based on the flow stress curves, and the apparent activation energy of MDRX of Hastelloy C-276 is evaluated as 241 kJ/mol.

  3. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, L.; Samajdar, I.; Tak, Manish; Doherty, Roger D.; Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (CrxCy)-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr3C2 and Cr7C3, the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr7C3. Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr7C3 with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr7C3 is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ2) of the Cr7C3 dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  4. Restoration of Obliterated Numbers on 40NiCrMo4 Steel by Etching Method: Metallurgical and Statistical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Annalisa; Merlin, Mattia; Soffritti, Chiara; Garagnani, Gian L

    2016-01-01

    The restoration of obliterated serial numbers is a problem of common occurrence in the forensic field. Among several restoration techniques, chemical etching is the most frequently used. The present research is aimed at studying the restoration of serial numbers, stamped on 40NiCrMo4 steel plates, by means of chemical etching. Microstructural characterization was firstly carried out to study the plastically deformed regions surrounding the marks. The obliteration was performed by controlled removals of material at increasing depths of erasure, and five etching reagents were considered to analyze their sensitivity and effectiveness. Experimental results revealed that Fry's reagent was the most sensitive, able to restore erased marks up to 60 μm under the depth of the imprint. The reagent comprising 25 mL HNO3 and 75 mL H2O provided good results, recovering the major numbers of characters. A descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to study the operator's influence on the recovered marks' identification.

  5. The Effect of Dilution on Microsegregation in AWS ER NiCrMo-14 Alloy Welding Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miná, Émerson Mendonça; da Silva, Yuri Cruz; Dille, Jean; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho

    2016-10-01

    Dilution and microsegregation are phenomena inherent to claddings, which, in turn, directly affect their main properties. This study evaluated microsegregation in the fusion zone with different dilution levels. The overlays were welded by the TIG cold wire feed process. Dilution was calculated from the geometric characteristics of the claddings and from the conservation of mass equation using chemical composition measurements. Microsegregation was calculated using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements of the dendrites and the chemical composition of the fusion zone. The dilution of the claddings was increased by reducing the wire feed rate. Fe showed potential to be incorporated into the solid phase (k > 1), and this increased with the increase of dilution. Mo, in turn, was segregated into the liquid phase (k < 1) and also increased with the increase of dilution. However, Cr and W showed a slight decrease in their partition coefficients (k) with the increase of dilution.

  6. Nanoscale Cellular Structures at Phase Boundaries of Ni-Cr-Al-Ti and Ni-Cr-Mo-Al-Ti Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Dunand, David C.

    2015-06-01

    The microstructural evolution of Ni-20 pct Cr wires was studied during pack cementation where Al and Ti, with and without prior cementation with Mo, are deposited to the surface of the Ni-Cr wires and subsequently homogenized in their volumes. Mo deposition promotes the formation of Kirkendall pores and subsequent co-deposition of Al and Ti creates a triple-layered diffusional coating on the wire surface. Subsequent homogenization drives the alloying element to distribute evenly in the wires which upon further heat treatment exhibit the γ + γ' superalloy structure. Unexpectedly, formation of cellular structures is observed at some of the boundaries between primary γ' grains and γ matrix grains. Based on additional features ( i.e., ordered but not perfectly periodic structure, confinement at γ + γ' phase boundaries as a cellular film with ~100 nm width, as well as lack of topologically close-packed phases), and considering that similar, but much larger, microstructures were reported in commercial superalloys, it is concluded that the present cellular structure solidified as a thin film, composed of eutectic γ + γ' and from which the γ' phase was subsequently etched, which was created by incipient melting of a region near the phase boundary with high solute segregation.

  7. Nickel-based Gadolinium Alloy for Neutron Adsorption Application in Ram Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg Wachs; James Sterbentz; William Hurt; P. E. McConnell; C. V. Robino; F. Tovesson; T. S. Hill

    2007-10-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy and chromium-nickel (Cr-Ni) stainless steel, modified by the addition of boron. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the materials at specific gadolinium and boron dopant levels. The Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is envisioned to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). For these transmission experiments, test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy and 1.16 wt% boron in stainless steel. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using total neutron cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium and boron elements and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy and borated stainless steel test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the size and distribution of the gadolinium in both the hot-top (as-cast) and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd converted to plate was not a discriminator related to neutron absorption. Moreover, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF VII) total neutron cross section data were accurate.

  8. Influence of alloying elements on the chlorination behavior of nickel- and iron-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, U.; Kloewer, J.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1996-11-01

    A wide range of commercial heat-resistant alloys has been tested in a H{sub 2} + 10% HCl environment at 550 C, 650 C, 680 C, 750 C and 850 C. The tests were carried out using a 24 h cycle with a total test time of up to 1,056 H. Weight change was determined, and the average value for three specimens per alloy and temperature plotted versus time, followed by a metallographic examination of the depth of corrosion. By a statistical evaluation of the data generated, it was possible to describe the weight change and penetration depth of all the alloys under examination as a function of the concentration of their main alloying elements and test temperature. According to these results, alloying elements nickel and molybdenum have a beneficial influence on chlorination resistance, whereas silicon and titanium are detrimental. Increased temperature always resulted in enhance corrosion. Only Ni, Ni-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Mo alloys show acceptable resistance for temperatures up to 850 C.

  9. Observations on the oxidation of Mn-modified Ni-base Haynes 230 alloy under SOFC exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2005-07-01

    The commercial Ni-base Haynes 230 alloy (Ni-Cr-Mo-W-Mn) was modified with two increased levels of Mn (1 and 2 wt per cent) and evaluated for its oxidation resistance under simulated SOFC interconnect exposure conditions. Oxidation rate, oxide morphology, oxide conductivity and thermal expansion were measured and compared with commercial Haynes 230. It was observed that additions of higher levels of Mn to the bulk alloy facilitated the formation of a bi-layered oxide scale that was comprised of an outer M3O4 (M=Mn, Cr, Ni) spinel-rich layer at the oxide – gas interface over a Cr2O3-rich sub-layer at the metal – oxide interface. The modified alloys showed higher oxidation rates and the formation of thicker oxide scales compared to the base alloy. The formation of a spinel-rich top layer improved the scale conductivity, especially during the early stages of the oxidation, but the higher scale growth rate resulted in an increase in the area-specific electrical resistance over time. Due to their face-centered cubic crystal structure, both commercial and modified alloys demonstrated a coefficient of thermal expansion that was higher than that of typical anode-supported and electrolyte-supported SOFCs.

  10. High specialty stainless steels and nickel alloys for FGD dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Herda, W.R.; Rockel, M.B.; Grossmann, G.K.; Starke, K.

    1997-08-01

    Because of process design and construction, FGD installations normally have bypass ducts, which necessitates use of dampers. Due to corrosion from acid dew resulting from interaction of hot acidic flue gases and colder outside environments, carbon steel cannot be used as construction material under these specific conditions. In the past, commercial stainless steels have suffered by pitting and crevice corrosion and occasionally failed by stress corrosion cracking. Only high alloy specialty super-austenitic stainless steels with 6.5% Mo should be used and considered for this application. Experience in Germany and Europe has shown that with regard to safety and life cycle cost analysis as well as providing a long time warranty, a new specialty stainless steel, alloy 31--UNS N08031--(31 Ni, 27 Cr, 6.5 Mo, 0.2 N) has proven to be the best and most economical choice. Hundreds of tons in forms of sheet, rod and bar, as well as strip (for damper seals) have been used and installed in many FGD installations throughout Europe. Under extremely corrosive conditions, the new advanced Ni-Cr-Mo alloy 59--UNS N06059--(59 Ni, 23 Cr, 16 Mo) should be used. This paper describes qualification and workability of these alloys as pertains to damper applications. Some case histories are also provided.

  11. Recent experience with alloy 59-UNS N06059 (DIN No. 2.4605) in waste incineration plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Herda, W.R.; Roemer, W.

    1995-12-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany currently produces approximately 300 million tons of waste per year, which can be broadly characterized as follows: Waste from the producing sector -- approx. 121 million tons per year; Toxic and hazardous waste -- approx. 3 million tons per year; Building debris and waste -- approx. 131 million tons per year; Sewage sludge (dry weight) -- approx. 4 million tons per year; Miscellaneous urban waste (municipal and commercial waste, street refuse, market waste) -- approx. 41 million tons per year and commercial waste, street refuse, market waste. With waste landfill capacities reaching the exhaustion point and the land for further expansion becoming ever more scarce and expensive, it is essential to find another way of managing this problem. The cleanest and most viable technical solution available is thermal waste treatment using new environment friendly plants. This paper briefly discusses the objectives of thermal waste treatment, the current German laws and corrosion resistance characteristics and case histories of one of the newest and advanced alloys of the Ni-Cr-Mo family, Alloy 59-UNS N06059-(DIN No. 2.4605). Some economic analysis via cost comparisons is also presented.

  12. Surface Modification of Oilfield Alloys by Ultrasonic Impact Peening: UNS N07718, N07716, G41400, and S17400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Virendra; Marya, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic impact peening (UIP) is a severe plastic deformation process to induce localized surface hardening combined with compressive residual stresses which therefore extends the useful life of mechanical parts. In this investigation, UIP has been applied to four widespread alloys in use in the oilfields. These include two premium NiCrMo alloys, UNS N07718 (718) and UNS N07716 (625 Plus®), both characterized by satisfactory oilfield performance but lacking hardness and abrasive wear resistance, and two relatively low-cost alloys, UNS G41400 (4140) and UNS S17400 (17-4PH), both limited by their corrosion fatigue. To promote comparisons and determine important alloy parameters for successful UIP, all four alloys were carefully selected so that their respective yield strengths were within relative proximity (~780 to ~910 MPa), and then ultrasonically impact peened under identical conditions. Among major findings from microstructural examinations, micro-hardness indentations, and residual stress measurements, surface topological changes (roughness), alloy microstructural evolution (depth and extent of strain hardening, including mechanical twinning in the NiCrMo alloys), and compressive residual stresses were found to be well correlated. Among all four alloys, the NiCrMo alloys, in particular UNS N07716 was found to be best suited for UIP. This is explained by its FCC austenitic microstructure, relatively low stacking-fault energy (prone to mechanical twinning), and in practical terms high yield strength and high tensile-to-yield strength ratio, both related to its excellent plastic flow behavior under ultrasonic rates of plastic deformation.

  13. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  14. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  15. Survey of degradation modes of four nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1991-03-01

    This report examines the degradation modes of four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys under conditions relevant to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The materials considered are Alloys C-276, C-4, C-22, and 625 because they have desirable characteristics for the conceptual design (CD) of the high-level radioactive-waste containers presented in the YMP Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The types of degradation covered in this report are general corrosion; localized corrosion, including pitting and crevice corrosion; stress corrosion cracking in chloride environments; hydrogen embrittlement (HE); and undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability. Topics not specifically addressed are welding concerns and microbiological corrosion. The four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have excellent corrosion resistance in chloride environments such as seawater as well as in more aggressive environments. They have significantly better corrosion resistance than the six materials considered for the CD waste container in the YMP SCP. (Those six materials are Types 304L and 3161L stainless steels, Alloy 825, unalloyed copper, Cu(70)-Ni(30), and 7% aluminum bronze.) In seawater, the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have negligible general corrosion rates and show little evidence of localized corrosion. The four base materials of these alloys are expected to have nearly indistinguishable corrosion resistance in the YMP environments. The strength requirements of the SCP-CD waste container are met by these materials in the annealed condition; in this condition, they are highly resistant to HE. Historically, HE has been noted when these materials have been strengthened (cold-worked) and used in sour gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) well service -- conditions that are not expected for the YMP. Metallurgical phase stability may be a concern under conditions favoring (1) the formation of intermetallics and carbides, and (2) microstructural ordering.

  16. Studies on the influence of Be content on the corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of Ni-25Cr-10Mo alloys.

    PubMed

    Geis-Gerstorfer, J; Pässler, K

    1993-05-01

    The influence of Be content on the corrosion behavior and strength of dental alloys was examined using experimental Ni-25Cr-10Mo-xBe alloys with graduated Be contents of 0, 0.6, 1.1, 1.6, and 2.1 wt.%. It became evident that the corrosion resistance is reduced even by a 0.6 wt.% Be content. Strength increases by 51% with increasing Be content, while ductility is reduced by 84%. The results revealed that, from the stand-point of corrosion resistance, Be-free Ni-Cr-Mo alloys should be preferred in clinical use.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVANCED GADOLINIUM NEUTRON ABSORBER ALLOY BY MEANS OF NEUTRON TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg W. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the alloy at specific gadolinium dopant levels. The new alloy is to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched DOE SNF. For the transmission experiments, alloy test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using only radiative capture cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium poison and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the alloy test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the gadolinium was dispersed fairly uniformly in the alloy and the ENDF VII radiative capture cross section data were accurate.

  18. Use of a new 16% moly alloy for weld surfacing in sour environments

    SciTech Connect

    Maligas, M.N.; Vicic, J.C.; Agarwal, D.C.; Koehler, M.

    1994-12-31

    Special low iron Ni-Cr-Mo alloy 625 as a weld overlay material on low alloy steel for well head applications has been successfully used and continues to be used in the sour corrosive environments of the oil/gas industry. The presence of high chlorides, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide combined with high pressures and temperatures necessitated the use of an alloy with a Pitting Resisting Equivalent as defined by PRE = % Cr + 3.3 {times} % (Mo) of at least 50 or greater. However, in certain sour environments and higher temperatures, alloy 625 reaches its limits and failures have been reported from the field. Another alternative for significantly extending the window of operation and provide better reliability and versatility is offered by a new high chromium, high molybdenum and a very high PRE alloy of the Ni-Cr-Mo family, known as alloy 59 (UNS N06059). This paper presents the initial test results of a preliminary research program conducted on alloy 59 as a better weld overlay material.

  19. Erosion/corrosion behavior of commercial high temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1995-12-31

    The erosion/corrosion behavior of five commercial high temperature materials (alloy 800H, AISI 314, alloy AC66, alloy 45-TM, alloy 625) was investigated in synthetic waste incineration atmosphere using silica sand as erosive particles. It was found that the erosion/corrosion behavior depended sensitively on the particle velocity. As long as the velocity was low (880 m/h) corrosion attack occurred mainly by chlorination. Consequently materials with a high resistance to chlorine-containing atmospheres like alloys 45-TM and 625 showed the lowest corrosion rates. If the particle velocity was increased to 1660 m/h, material wastage by erosion dominated.

  20. The Estimation of Localized Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Based Dental Alloys Using Electrochemical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareci, Daniel; Chelariu, Romeu; Iacoban, Sorin; Munteanu, Corneliu; Bolat, Georgiana; Sutiman, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the electrochemical behavior of the five non-precious Ni-based dental casting alloys in acidified artificial saliva. For comparison, nickel was also investigated. In order to study the localized corrosion resistance, the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations were made after the CCP tests. The Ni-Cr alloys with chromium (14-18%) contents were susceptible to localized corrosion. The Ni-Cr-Mo alloy with contents of chromium (≈13%) and molybdenum (9%) presents a dangerous breakdown, but have a zero corrosion potential so that the difference between them is around 650 mV. The Ni-Cr-Mo alloys with higher chromium (22-25%) and molybdenum (9-11%) contents had a much larger passive range in the polarization curve and were immune to pitting corrosion. Pitting resistance equivalent (PRE) of about ≈54 could provide the Ni-based alloy with a good pitting corrosion resistance.

  1. Swelling of several commercial alloys following high fluence neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.W.; Peterson, D.T.; Zimmerschied, M.K.; Bates, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Swelling values have been determined for a set of commercial alloys irradiated to a peak fluence of 17.8 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) over the temperature range of 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys studied fall into three classes: the ferritic alloys AISI 430F, AISI 416, EM-12, H-11 and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo; the superalloys Inconel 718 and Inconel X-750; and the refractory alloys TZM and Nb-1 Zr. After irradiation to a peak fluence approaching goal exposures envisioned for advanced fusion reactor first walls, all of the alloys display swelling resistance far superior to cold worked AISI 316. Of the three alloy classes examined the swelling resistance of the ferritics is the least sensitive to composition.

  2. Influence of the Environment on the General Corrosion Rate of Alloy 22 (N06022)

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Crook, P

    2004-04-19

    Nickel (Ni) can dissolve a large amount of alloying elements while still maintaining its desirable austenitic microstructure. The resulting alloys are generally divided in families depending on the type of alloying elements they contain. Each one of these families is aimed to specific applications. Corrosive environments in industrial applications are generally divided for example in reducing acids, oxidizing acids, contaminated acids, caustic environments, oxidizing salts, etc. Depending on the application and the environment (electrolyte composition and temperature) several or single alloys may be recommended to fabricate components. The Nichromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) series contains a balanced selection of beneficial alloying elements so it can handle a variety of aggressive environments. By design, Alloy 22 or N06022 is one of the most versatile corrosion resistant nickel alloys since it has an outstanding corrosion resistance both in reducing and oxidizing conditions.

  3. Investigation on corrosion and wear behaviors of nanoparticles reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun; Xu, Zhong

    2008-04-01

    In order to investigate the role of amorphous SiO 2 particles in corrosion and wear resistance of Ni-based metal matrix composite alloying layer, the amorphous nano-SiO 2 particles reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layer has been prepared by double glow plasma alloying on AISI 316L stainless steel surface, where Ni/amorphous nano-SiO 2 was firstly predeposited by brush plating. The composition and microstructure of the nano-SiO 2 particles reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layer were analyzed by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The results indicated that the composite alloying layer consisted of γ-phase and amorphous nano-SiO 2 particles, and under alloying temperature (1000 °C) condition, the nano-SiO 2 particles were uniformly distributed in the alloying layer and still kept the amorphous structure. The corrosion resistance of composite alloying layer was investigated by an electrochemical method in 3.5%NaCl solution. Compared with single alloying layer, the amorphous nano-SiO 2 particles slightly decreased the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu alloying layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the passive films formed on the composite alloying consisted of Cr 2O 3, MoO 3, SiO 2 and metallic Ni and Mo. The dry wear test results showed that the composite alloying layer had excellent friction-reduced property, and the wear weight loss of composite alloying layer was less than 60% of that of Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu alloying layer.

  4. Performance evaluation of several commercial alloys in a reducing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.

    Several commercial alloys including Ebrite, Crofer 22 APU, Haynes 230 and Haynes 242, which are candidates for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect materials, were isothermally and cyclically oxidized at 900 °C in the reducing atmosphere of Ar + 5 vol.% H 2 + 3 vol.% H 2O corresponding to the SOFC anode environment. Results indicate that these alloys exhibited good scale spallation resistance with the Ni-base alloys possessing better oxidation resistance over the Fe-base alloys. Both Mn-Cr spinel and Cr 2O 3 were formed in the oxide scales of these alloys. For Crofer 22 APU and Haynes 242, a continuous protective MnO and Mn-Cr spinel layer formed outside on the inner layer of Cr 2O 3. The increase in scale ASR after longer-term thermal exposure in the reducing environment was relatively slower for the Ni-base alloys than for the Fe-base alloys.

  5. Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

    2005-10-01

    Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt

  6. Development of Commercial Applications of a FAPY Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, VK

    2001-08-24

    The Fe-16 at. (8.5 wt) % Al alloy, known as FAPY, has been identified as a superior material for heating element applications. However, while the 15-lb heats melted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) could be processed into wire, the large heat melted at Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) could not be processed under commercial processing conditions. The primary objective of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to demonstrate that wire of the FAPY alloy could be produced under commercial conditions from air-induction-melted (AIM) heats. The specific aspects of this CRADA included: (1) Melting 15-lb heats by AIM or vacuum-induction melting (VIM) at ORNL. (2) Development of detailed processing steps including warm drawing and annealing temperature and time during cold-drawing steps. (3) Melting of 1400-lb heats at Hoskins by the Exo-Melt{trademark} process and their chemical analysis and microstructural characterization. (4) Development of tensile properties of sections of ingots from the large heats in the ascast, hot-worked, and hot- and cold-worked conditions. (5) Microstructural characterization of cast and wrought structures and the fractured specimens. (6) Successful demonstration of processing of AIM heats at Hoskins to heating element wire. The aspects of this CRADA listed above have demonstrated that the FAPY alloy of the desired composition can be commercially produced by AIM by the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process. Furthermore, it also demonstrated that the wire processing steps developed for 15-lb heats at ORNL can be successfully applied to the production of wire from the large AIM heats.

  7. Corrosion performance of a nickel-molybdenum-chromium alloy: Effects of aging, alloying elements, and electrolyte composition

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R.B.; Srivastava, S.K.

    1999-04-01

    General and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy were assessed in the mill-annealed and aged conditions. Performance of this Ni-25% Mo-8% Cr alloy (alloy 242 [proposed UNS N10242]) was compared to the performance of a Ni-Mo alloy (alloy B-3 [UNS N10675]) and a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (C-2000 [UNS N06200]). Results showed the general corrosion rate of alloy 242 in reducing acids was slightly higher than that of alloy B-3. However, in mildly oxidizing conditions, the corrosion rate of alloy 242 was lower than that of alloy B-3. Effects of electrolyte and alloy composition on the general corrosion rate were studied. After aging at 650 C (1,200 F) for 24 h, the corrosion rate of alloy 242 increased slightly, particularly in strongly reducing conditions. Alloy 242 was resistant to SCC but was prone to hydrogen-induced cracking, especially in the aged condition.

  8. Reliable fabrication with alloy 59 hot roll-clad plates in a major FGD-project

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheiner, R.; Herda, W.; Schupp, N.

    1996-08-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) units require large components to accommodate the flow volumes and short contact times between raw gas and absorbent which are typical of these processes. For over two decades, increasing use has been made of nickel base alloys to protect flue gas ducts, absorbers, chimneys and internals against corrosion attack. In order to take advantage of their excellent corrosion resistance while keeping investment costs low, these NiCrMo-materials are frequently used in the form of a cladding applied in thin layers on the carbon steel structural load-bearing component. In view of the thin corrosion protection layer, the quality of the welded joint on the nickel alloy side assumes critical importance. This paper describes the development of tests and welding procedures for hot roll-clad plates used in large FGD components in a modern lignite-fired 3,500 MW power plant in Germany.

  9. A weldability study of Haynes Alloy No 242

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Headley, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The weldability of Haynes {reg sign} Alloy No. 242 {trademark}, a new alloy derived from the Ni-Mo-Cr system, was investigated. Susceptibility to fusion zone hot cracking was determined by Varestraint testing, and hot ductility was characterized by Gleeble testing. Solidification phase transformation data was recorded with differential thermal analysis (DTA). Weld microstructures were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), analytical electron microscopy (AEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The results of this study indicate that this alloy has better hot cracking resistance than high strength nickel base superalloy 718; however, it has lower resistance than other alloys derived from the Ni-Cr-Mo ternary such as the Hastelloy alloys B2, C-4, C-22, C-276, and W. Segregation patterns in weld microstructures agree well with established information concerning this family of alloys. Prediction of solidification products with the Ni-Mo-Cr phase diagram based on a chemical equivalence was unsuccessful due to the higher carbon content of this alloy which favors the formation of M{sub 6}C. Solidification in Alloy 242 terminates with the formation of two eutectic-like constituents: (1) a M{sub 6}C/austenite eutectic, and (2) a second eutectic with austenite and an undetermined phase. This latter phase has a composition similar to the M{sub 6}C phase, but with a different crystal structure (cubic, ao = 6.6 {Angstrom}). 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. High temperature corrosion behavior of commercial high temperature alloys under deposits of alkali salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosive deposits containing high amounts of alkali sulphates, chlorides and/or carbonates are encountered by heat exchanger tubes in a variety of industrial processes. Due to their low melting point the alkali salts can cause basic or acidic dissolution of the subjacent material, which results in rapid wastage of the tube. In order to select appropriate materials for application in heat recovery systems eight commercial high temperature materials (alloy 800H, Alloy 31, Alloy AC66, alloy 45-TM, Alloy 625, Alloy 59 and Alloy C-4) were investigated in sulphate, sulphate/chloride and sulphate/chloride/carbonate salt mixtures. The temperature range was between 550 and 750 C. In agreement with field tests the corrosion attack was high for most of the alloys tested with the corrosion rate depending sensitively on salt composition, test temperature and alloy composition. High molybdenum contents were found to be detrimental. Chromium did not effect the corrosion behavior significantly, whereas silicon had a beneficial effect on the corrosion resistance in molten alkali salts.

  11. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  12. Development and commercialization status of Fe{sub 3}Al-based intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-06-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-based intermetallic alloys offer unique benefits of excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance, limited by poor room-temperature (RT) ductility and low high-temperature strength. Recent understanding of environmental effects on RT ductility of these alloys has led to progress toward taking commercial advantage of Fe{sub 3}Al-based materials. Cause of low ductility appears to be related to hydrogen formed from reaction with moisture. The environmental effect has been reduced in these intermetallic alloys by two methods. The first deals with producing a more hydrogen-resistant microstructure through thermomechanical processing, and the second dealed with compositional modification. The alloys showing reduced environmental effect have been melted and processed by many different methods. Laboratory and commercial heats have been characterized. Tests have been conducted in both air and controlled environments to quantify environmental effects on these properties. These materials were also tested for aqueous corrosion and resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Oxidation and sulfidation data were generated and effects of minor alloying elements on were also investigated. Several applications have been identified for the newly developed iron aluminides. Commercialization status of these alloys is described.

  13. Alloy B-10, a new nickel-based alloy for strong chloride-containing, highly acidic and oxygen-deficient environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, M.; Kirchheiner, R.; Stenner, F.

    1998-12-31

    Alloy B-10 is a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy, recently developed for highly acidic but oxygen-deficient environments in the chemical process and environmental protection industries. The new nickel-based alloy with nominally (wt. %) 62 Ni, 24 MO, 8 Cr and 6 Fe, exhibits excellent corrosion resistance in intermediate concentrations of sulfuric acid, as well as in hydrochloric acid, even with additions of small amounts of oxidizing agents. In a simulated Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) environment of sulfuric acid of pH 1 with additions of 7% chloride and 0.01% fluoride, and also containing 15% gypsum the new alloy demonstrated high crevice corrosion resistance at 100 C, whereas a common Ni-Cr-Mo alloy of the C-type suffers crevice corrosion under the same conditions. This new alloy can easily be welded without filler or using matching filler. Good practical experience has been gained with Alloy B-10 in a district heating power station as a tube sheet and bottom wall liner for a glass tube heat exchanger working at 130 C with condensing 70% sulfuric acid.

  14. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bingtao Li

    2003-08-05

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  15. Effect of commercial mouthwashes on the corrosion resistance of Ti-10Mo experimental alloy.

    PubMed

    Alves Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini; Alves, Ana Paula Rosifini; Codaro, Eduardo Norberto; Dutra, Conceição Aparecida Matsumoto

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of three commercial mouthwashes on the corrosion resistance of Ti-10Mo experimental alloy. Experiments were made at 37.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C in a conventional three-compartment double wall glass cell containing commercial mouthwashes. Three mouthwashes with different active ingredients were tested: (I) 0.05% sodium fluoride + 0.03% triclosan; (II) 0.5 g/l cetylpyridinium chloride + 0.05% sodium fluoride; (III) 0.12% chlorohexidine digluconate. The assessment of the individual effect of active ingredients was studied by using 0.05% sodium fluoride. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) was used as control. Microstructures from Ti-10Mo experimental alloy and CP Ti were also evaluated using optical microscopy. Ti-10Mo as-cast alloy shows the typical rapidly cooled dendrites microstructure (beta phase) while CP Ti has exhibited a metastable martensitic microstructure. Electrochemical behavior of dental materials here studied was more affected by mouthwash type than by Ti alloy composition or microstructure. In both alloys passivation phenomenon was observed. This process may be mainly related to Ti oxides or other Ti species present in spontaneously formed film. Small differences in passive current densities values may be connected with changes in film porosity and thickness. Protective characteristics of this passive film are lower in 0.05% sodium fluoride + 0.03% triclosan mouthwash than in the other two mouthwashes tested. PMID:17200826

  16. Corrosion behavior of experimental and commercial nickel-base alloys in HCl and HCl containing Fe3+

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    The effects of ferric ions on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of a series of Ni-based alloys in 20% HCl at 30ºC were investigated. The alloys studied were those prepared by the Albany Research Center (ARC), alloys J5, J12, J13, and those sold commercially, alloys 22, 242, 276, and 2000. Tests included mass loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and linear polarization.

  17. Characterization by thermoelectric power of a commercial aluminum-iron-silicon alloy (8011) during isothermal precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Luiggi A., N.J.

    1998-11-01

    The author has characterized a commercial 8011 (Al-Fe-Si) alloy by studying samples under different initial states of strain hardening and iron and silicon supersaturation using thermoelectric power as a measurement technique. Isothermal kinetics of precipitation are obtained in the temperature range between 225 C and 600 C. He has determined the atom fraction precipitated for each microstructural condition, identifying the dominant alloying additions and evaluating the typical parameters of the precipitated phases, such as, for example, the apparent activation energy. Finally, he determined the time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams. These results prove that iron is the alloying addition that controls the precipitation kinetics of the 8011 alloy in the temperature range studied.

  18. Microstructure of a commercial W-1% La2O3 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Xu, Zhiqiang; Cui, Kai; Yu, Jie

    2014-12-01

    W-1% La2O3 alloy is considered as the most promising material for plasma-facing components of fusion reactors. The microstructure of a commercial W-1% La2O3 alloy was investigated using optical and transmission electron microscopes. The microstructure of pure tungsten can be improved significantly by fabrication of W-1% La2O3 alloys. W-1% La2O3 alloys can be produced with no porosities and cracks, and with various oxide phases dispersed in alloy matrix. La2O3 with different crystal structures, La6W2O15, WO2, WO3 and W3O8 phases were identified in as-forged W-1% La2O3 alloy. Long strip-like La2O3 has a very large size, whereas spherical La6W2O15, navicular WO3, hexagonal W3O8 and short rod-like La2O3 are smaller particles. Most identified phases have a heterogeneous distribution. Forging leads to a more dispersive distribution of large-sized La2O3 particles but not of fine WO3 particles compared with rolling. The mechanical properties of the alloys are also discussed.

  19. Subtask 12F1: Effect of neutron irradiation on swelling of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of vanadium-base alloys. Swelling behavior and microstructural evolution of V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti, and V-Ti-Si alloys were investigated after irradiation at 420-600{degrees}C up to 114 dpa. The alloys exhibited swelling maxima between 30 and 80 dpa and swelling decreased on irradiation to higher dpa. This is in contrast to the monotonically increasing swelling of binary alloys that contain Fe, Ni, Cr, Mo, W, and Si. Precipitation of dense Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} promotes good resistance to swelling of the Ti-containing alloys, and it was concluded that Ti of >3 wt.% and 400-1000 wppm Si are necessary to effectively suppress swelling. Swelling was minimal in V-4Cr-4Ti, identified as the most promising alloy based on good mechanical properties and superior resistance to irradiation embrittlement. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Development of low temperature superplasticity in commercial 5083 Al-Mg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, I.C.; Huang, J.C.

    1999-02-19

    Superplastic forming has been one of the forming techniques for aircraft industry. In developing superplastic aircraft-used aluminum alloys, two successful means have been applied. One was to modify the alloys by adding extra amounts of particle-forming elements, such as the case of Al-Cu base Supral 150 with 0.5 wt% of Zr added (Al-6wt%Cu-0.5%Zr). The other was to process the commercial alloys by a series of thermomechanical treatments (TMTs), such as the efforts made for the Al-Zn-Mg base 7075 and Al-Li base 8090 alloys. There have been numerous efforts in processing aluminum materials to exhibit high rate superplasticity (HRSP) and/or low temperature superplasticity (LTSP). Based on the current development situation, this study is intended to process the low-priced commercial 5083 alloys using simple TMTs so as to develop LTSP at temperatures below 300 C and with superplastic elongations in excess of 200%.

  1. Fabrication of structural components from commercial aluminum alloys using superplastic forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, S. J.; Bales, T. T.; Shinn, J. M.; James, W. F.

    1990-01-01

    SPF technology was used to fabricate structural components from the 7475 Al and 8090 Al-Li commercial alloys. Gas-pressurization cycles were established for SPF three-hat stiffener configurations on the basis of uniaxial data and component-geometry considerations. It is established that higher forming rates than the optimum strain rates selected from the uniaxial data for each alloy could be used in the later stages of forming without reducing SPF components' dimensional conformity. Cavitation was precluded through the use of back pressure during forming.

  2. Laboratory galling tests of several commercial cobalt-free weld hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Buck, R.F.; Wilson, W.L.

    1997-04-01

    Since the mechanical properties of most wear materials are generally insufficient for structural applications, hardfacing alloys have been traditionally weld deposited to provide a wear resistance surface for a base material. An important attribute of a hardfacing alloy that is subjected to high load sliding contact is the resistance to adhesive (galling) damage. Although Co-base hardfacing alloys generally possess excellent galling wear resistance, there is interest in developing cobalt-free replacement hardfacings to reduce radiation exposure costs. A laboratory galling test has been developed for weld hardfacing deposits that is a modification of the standardized ASTM G98-91 galling test procedure. The procedure for testing a weld hardfacing deposit on a softer base metal using a button-on-block configuration is described. The contact stresses for the initiation of adhesive galling damage were measured to rank the galling resistance of several commercial Fe-base, Ni-base and Co-base hardfacing alloys. Although the galling resistance of the Fe-base alloys was generally superior to the Ni-base alloys, neither system approached the excellent galling resistance of the Co-base alloys. Microstructure examinations were used to understand the micro-mechanisms for the initiation and propagation of galling damage. A physical model for the initiation and propagation of adhesive wear is used to explain the lower galling resistance for the Ni-base hardfacings and to understand the influence of composition on the galling resistance of Ni-base alloys. The composition of some Ni base hardfacings was modified in a controlled manner to quantify the influence of specific elements on the galling resistance.

  3. Carbon treated commercial aluminium alloys as anodes for aluminium-air batteries in sodium chloride electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Herranz, D.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2016-09-01

    An easy treatment based in carbon layer deposition into aluminium alloys is presented to enhance the performance of Al-air primary batteries with neutral pH electrolyte. The jellification of aluminate in the anode surface is described and avoided by the carbon covering. Treated commercial Al alloys namely Al1085 and Al7475 are tested as anodes achieving specific capacities above 1.2 Ah g-1vs 0.5 Ah g-1 without carbon covering. The influence of the binder proportion in the treatment as well as different carbonaceous materials, Carbon Black, Graphene and Pyrolytic Graphite are evaluated as candidates for the covering. Current densities of 1-10 mA cm-2 are measured and the influence of the alloy explored. A final battery design of 4 cells in series is presented for discharges with a voltage plateau of 2 V and 1 Wh g-1 energy density.

  4. Thermal fatigue resistance of NASA WAZ-20 alloy with three commercial coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Screening tests using three commercial coatings (Jocoat, HI-15, and RT-1A) on the nickel-base alloy NASA WAZ-20 were performed by cyclic exposure in a Mach 1 burner facility. These tests showed Jocoated WAZ-20 to have the best cracking resistance. The thermal fatigue resistance of Jocoated WAZ-20 in both the random polycrystalline and directionally solidified polycrystalline forms relative to that of other superalloys was then evaluated in a fluidized-bed facility. This investigation showed that Jocoated random polycrystalline WAZ-20 ranked approximately in midrange in thermal fatigue life. The thermal fatigue life of directionally solidified Jocoated WAZ-20 was shorter than that of other directionally solidified alloys but still longer than that of all alloys in the random polycrystalline form.

  5. Fracture toughness testing and toughening mechanisms of some commercial cobalt-free hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1998-04-27

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited to provide a wear resistant surface for structural base materials. Commercial low cobalt hardfacing alloys are being evaluated to reduce plant activation levels. Since hardfacing alloys typically must be resistant to cracking to assure adequate in service performance, fracture toughness is a critical material property. Fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) measurements of Fe base, Ni-base, and Co-base hardfacing were performed in accordance with ASTM E399-90 procedure in an effort to identify a tough cobalt-free alternative. Reduced scatter in K{sub IC} data was observed for the Fe base hardfacing, and the 95% lower bound K{sub IC} values were generally higher than the Ni-base Hardfacing alloys. Preliminary crack growth data obtained during precracking indicate that the Ni-base hardfacing possess better fatigue crack growth resistance. However, none of the Fe-base or Ni-base hardfacing have K{sub IC} values that are comparable to the reference Co-base hard facing. The test specimens were machined from thick (0.5 inches) weld deposits, and the microstructures of the test specimens are compared with the more prototypic, thinner deposits. Microstructural and fractographic examinations are used to characterize the fracture mechanisms and delineate the operative toughening mechanisms. Crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms are shown to be relevant for most of the commercial hardfacing.

  6. Performance of commercial aluminium alloys as anodes in gelled electrolyte aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2015-12-01

    The evaluation of commercial aluminium alloys, namely, Al2024, Al7475 and Al1085, for Al-air batteries is performed. Pure Al cladded Al2024 and Al7475 are also evaluated. Current rates from 0.8 mA cm-2 to 8.6 mA cm-2 are measured in a gel Al-air cell composed of the commercial alloy sample, a commercial air-cathode and an easily synthesizable gelled alkaline electrolyte. The influence of the alloying elements and the addition to the electrolyte of ZnO and ZnCl2, as corrosion inhibitors is studied and analysed via EDX/SEM. Specific capacities of up to 426 mAh/g are obtained with notably flat potential discharges of 1.3-1.4 V. The competition between self-corrosion and oxidation reactions is also discussed, as well as the influence of the current applied on that process. Al7475 is determined to have the best behaviour as anode in Al-air primary batteries, and cladding process is found to be an extra protection against corrosion at low current discharges. Conversely, Al1085 provided worse results because of an unfavourable metallic composition.

  7. Electrochemical comparison and biological performance of a new CoCrNbMoZr alloy with commercial CoCrMo alloy.

    PubMed

    Andrei, M; Galateanu, B; Hudita, A; Costache, M; Osiceanu, P; Calderon Moreno, J M; Drob, S I; Demetrescu, I

    2016-02-01

    A new CoCrNbMoZr alloy, with Nb and Zr content is characterized from the point of view of surface features, corrosion resistance and biological performance in order to be proposed as dental restorative material. Its properties are discussed in comparison with commercial Heraenium CE alloy based on Co, Cr and Mo as well. The microstructure of both alloys was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The composition and thickness of the alloy native passive films were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface characteristics were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle techniques. The quantity of ions released from alloys in artificial saliva was evaluated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) measurements. The electrochemical stability was studied in artificial Carter-Brugirard saliva, performing open circuit potentials, polarization resistances and corrosion currents and rates. The biological performance of the new alloy was tested in vitro in terms of human adipose stem cells (hASCs) morphology, viability and proliferation status. The new alloy is very resistant to the attack of the aggressive ions from the artificial saliva. The surface properties, the roughness and wettabiliy sustain the cell behavior. The comparison of the new alloy behavior with that of existing commercial CoCrMo alloy showed the superior properties of the new metallic biomaterial. PMID:26652383

  8. Electrochemical comparison and biological performance of a new CoCrNbMoZr alloy with commercial CoCrMo alloy.

    PubMed

    Andrei, M; Galateanu, B; Hudita, A; Costache, M; Osiceanu, P; Calderon Moreno, J M; Drob, S I; Demetrescu, I

    2016-02-01

    A new CoCrNbMoZr alloy, with Nb and Zr content is characterized from the point of view of surface features, corrosion resistance and biological performance in order to be proposed as dental restorative material. Its properties are discussed in comparison with commercial Heraenium CE alloy based on Co, Cr and Mo as well. The microstructure of both alloys was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The composition and thickness of the alloy native passive films were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface characteristics were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle techniques. The quantity of ions released from alloys in artificial saliva was evaluated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) measurements. The electrochemical stability was studied in artificial Carter-Brugirard saliva, performing open circuit potentials, polarization resistances and corrosion currents and rates. The biological performance of the new alloy was tested in vitro in terms of human adipose stem cells (hASCs) morphology, viability and proliferation status. The new alloy is very resistant to the attack of the aggressive ions from the artificial saliva. The surface properties, the roughness and wettabiliy sustain the cell behavior. The comparison of the new alloy behavior with that of existing commercial CoCrMo alloy showed the superior properties of the new metallic biomaterial.

  9. Behavior of Dental/Implant Alloys in Commercial Mouthwash Solution Studied by Electrochemical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareci, Daniel; Strugaru, Sorin Iacob; Iacoban, Sorin; Bolat, Georgiana; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the electrochemical behavior of the various dental materials: Paliag (Ag-Pd based), Wiron 99 (Ni-Cr based), Cp-Ti (commercial pure titanium), and experimental Ti12Mo5Ta alloy in commercial mouthwash solution with 500 ppm F- (Oral B®) and compares it with the behavior of the same dental materials in artificial saliva. Linear potentiodynamic polarization (LPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are the electrochemical procedures of investigation. The passivation of all dental samples in artificial saliva and mouthwash solution occurred spontaneously at open circuit potential. The corrosion current density of all tested dental materials in mouthwash solution were low (1-2 μA/cm2). The results suggest a non-predominant fluoride effect on the passive layer formed on all samples at open circuit potential. No passivation could be established with Paliag alloy when polarized in mouthwash solution. The EIS results confirm that all dental sample exhibit passivity in mouthwash solution at open circuit potential (polarization resistance was around 5 × 105 Ω cm2). For Paliag alloy after LPP in mouthwash solution the protectiveness passive layer was no more present. The corrosion resistances of four dental materials in mouthwash solution are in the following order: Ti12Mo5Ta > Cp-Ti > Wiron 99 > Paliag.

  10. Final Report for the Study on S-Implanted Alloy 22 in 1 M NaCl Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, Charles F.; Baer, Donald R.; Jones, R. H.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of high levels of S in the near-surface region on the passivity of Alloy 22, a corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, in deaerated 1 M NaCl solution. Near-surface concentrations of S up to 2 at.% were achieved in Alloy 22 test specimens by implanting them with S. The S-implanted samples were then evaluated in short-term electrochemical tests in the salt solution and subsequently analyzed with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for film thickness and composition. Specimens tested included non-implanted and annealed Alloy 22 samples, samples implanted with S, and “blanks” implanted with Ar as an ion that would simulate the “damage” of S implantation without the chemical effect. A sample of S-implanted Alloy 22 was also exposed to solution for 29 days and analyzed for evidence of S accumulation at the surface over longer times.

  11. Cryogenic toughness of commercial aluminum-lithium alloys: Role of delamination toughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, K. T.; Yu, Weikang; Ritchie, R. O.

    1989-03-01

    Mechanisms influencing the plane-strain fracture toughness behavior of commercial aluminum-lithium alloys at cryogenic temperatures are investigated as a function of microstructure and plate orientation. It is confirmed that certain alloys show a marked increase in tensile ductility and toughness with decrease in temperature, although such behavior is not found in the short-transverse orientations, or for all alloys and aging conditions. Specifically at lower temperatures, the majority of Al-Li alloys, namely 2090-T8E41, 8091-T8X, 8090-T8X, and 2091-T351, show a significant increase in fracture toughness in the in-plane orientations (L-T, T-L), without any apparent change in fracture mode. Such behavior is attributed primarily to loss of through-thickness constraint resulting from enhanced short-transverse delamination (termed crack-divider delamination toughening), consistent with observed reductions in plane-strain ductility and short-transverse (S-L, S-T) toughness. Conversely, in underaged microstructures of 8091, 8090, and peak-aged 2091, a decrease in toughness with decreasing temperature is found for both L-T and S-L orientations, behavior, which is associated conversely with a fracture-mode change from ductile void coalescence to brittle transgranular shear and integranular delamination at lower temperatures.

  12. Corrosion Analysis of an Experimental Noble Alloy on Commercially Pure Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bortagaray, Manuel Alberto; Ibañez, Claudio Arturo Antonio; Ibañez, Maria Constanza; Ibañez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the Noble Bond® Argen® alloy was electrochemically suitable for the manufacturing of prosthetic superstructures over commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) implants. Also, the electrolytic corrosion effects over three types of materials used on prosthetic suprastructures that were coupled with titanium implants were analysed: Noble Bond® (Argen®), Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®), and commercially pure titanium. Materials and Methods: 15 samples were studied, consisting in 1 abutment and one c.p. titanium implant each. They were divided into three groups, namely: Control group: five c.p Titanium abutments (B&W®), Test group 1: five Noble Bond® (Argen®) cast abutments and, Test group 2: five Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®) abutments. In order to observe the corrosion effects, the surface topography was imaged using a confocal microscope. Thus, three metric parameters (Sa: Arithmetical mean height of the surface. Sp: Maximum height of peaks. Sv: Maximum height of valleys.), were measured at three different areas: abutment neck, implant neck and implant body. The samples were immersed in artificial saliva for 3 months, after which the procedure was repeated. The metric parameters were compared by statistical analysis. Results: The analysis of the Sa at the level of the implant neck, abutment neck and implant body, showed no statistically significant differences on combining c.p. Ti implants with the three studied alloys. The Sp showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. The Sv showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. Conclusion: The effects of electrogalvanic corrosion on each of the materials used when they were in contact with c.p. Ti showed no statistically significant differences. PMID:27733875

  13. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Ma, L. M.; Li, Y. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  14. Investigation of several commercial aluminide coatings for carburization protection of a nickel-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, G.Y.

    1980-06-01

    Four commercial aluminide coatings applied to Hastelloy Alloy X were investigated with respect to their carburization resistance in a carburizing impure helium environment. The test gas was helium with 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/, and < 1.0 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O. The uncoated specimens exposed to this test environment at 900/sup 0/C (1650/sup 0/F) for 1000 and 2000 h exhibited significant carburization. All four coatings provided good protection against carburization of the substrate Hastelloy Alloy X, presumably due to the formation of an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide scale on the coating surface during the high-temperature corrosion exposure. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide is believed to be an effective barrier to carbon transport. Aluminide coatings applied to Hastelloy Alloy X exhibited a tendency for forming Kirkendall diffusion voids (or pores) in the diffusion zone during long-term high-temperature exposures (e.g., 900/sup 0/C (1650/sup 0/F) for 1000 h). Chromium addition during aluminizing, which resulted in a high chromium content in the coating, appears to be effective in preventing the pore formation during subsequent long-term high-temperature exposures.

  15. Microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Tamura, T.; Omura, N.; Murakami, Y.; Tada, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines the microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique (EMV) as a function of vibration frequency, f. The microstructure evolution reveals that at the low frequency of f = 62.5 Hz, the solidified microstructure is coarse and with the increase of vibration frequency to f = 500 Hz, the grain size becomes the finest and further increase of frequency to f = 2000 Hz results in coarsening of microstructures. The refinement mechanism is clarified when considering the significant difference in electrical resistivities of the solid and the liquid in mushy zone, in which both phases coexist and subject to vibration. The frequency-dependent refinement behaviour is revealed when the displacement of the mobile solid and sluggish liquid is taken into account during solidification. In contrast to 3xxx aluminium alloys, no giant compounds have been discerned in the present 7xxx alloy regardless of the solidification condition. The formation of crystalline twin is briefly discussed when considering the vibration condition.

  16. In vitro evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of a commercial titanium alloy for dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Jos, Angeles; Cameán, Ana M; Pato-Mourelo, Jesús; Segura-Egea, Juan J

    2010-09-30

    Titanium and its alloys have many applications in dentistry, being used in orthodontics, endodontics, prosthetics and implantology. But the use in the biomedical field depends on its biocompatibility, as the Council Directive 93/42/EEC of 14 June 1993 concerning medical devices has established. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of a commercial titanium/aluminium/vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) developed by an innovative sand-blast process with aluminium oxide, and nitric-acid passivation. This procedure created a material with an average surface roughness of 1.73±0.16μm with applications in dental implants. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) procedures 7405:2008 and 10993-5:2009 were used to perform the cytotoxicity tests, and bacterial and cell-mutation assays to evaluate genotoxicity. The results show that this titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in any of the tests performed. It can be concluded that this new Ti-6Al-4V material with the roughness characteristics specified shows good biocompatibility and can be considered of choice in dental implantology.

  17. Mixed mode fatigue crack growth in the commercial Al-Li alloys, 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, I.; Gregson, P.J. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1994-05-15

    Crystallographic fatigue crack propagation along planar slip bands has been recognized to occur over a particularly wide range of conditions in Al-Li alloys due to the presence of coherent, shearable [delta][prime] (Al[sub 3]Li) precipitates, in conjunction with the strong underlying crystallographic texture often developed in these materials during secondary processing. Such Stage 1 propagation typically produces a highly tortuous crack path during conventional mode 1 fatigue testing. While the net crack growth direction remains parallel to the nominal mode 1 direction, crack tortuosity has been generally recognized as beneficial to fatigue resistance, as both local mixed mode crack-tip loading conditions and roughness induced closure may significantly reduce the driving force for crack extension (i.e. crack shielding'' occurs). Recent investigations of commercial Al-Li plate in the damage tolerant condition have however shown that co-planar Stage 1 crack propagation along preferred [111]-plane orientations may give rise to sustained macroscopic crack deviation from the nominal mode 1 growth direction. Such crack growth raises a number of important questions with regard to conventional, nominally mode 1 based structure lifting and fatigue testing methods when applied to these materials. Work has therefore been carried out to characterized fatigue crack growth during sustained co-planar Stage 1 propagation in a commercial Al-Li alloy, with particular reference to mixed mode loading conditions.

  18. Part A - low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum alloys. Part B - commercial-scale melting and processing of FAPY alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R.; Hall, F.; Valykeo, J.

    1996-06-01

    The FAPY is a Fe-16 at. % Al alloy of nominal composition. The aluminum content of the alloy is such that it remains single phase ({alpha}) without the formation of an ordered phase (DO{sub 3}). The alloy has good oxidation resistance at temperatures up to 1000{degrees}C and has shown significantly superior performance as heating elements as compared to the commonly used nickel-based alloy, Nichrome. Although wire for the heating elements has been fabricated from small (15-1b) laboratory heats, for its commercial applications, the wire needs to be producible from large (1200 to 1500-1b) air-melted heats. The purpose of this study was to produce commercial size heats and investigate their mechanical properties and microstructure in the as-cast, hot-worked, and cold-worked conditions. The results of this study are expected to provide: (1) insight into processing steps for large heats into wire under commercial conditions, and (2) the mechanical properties data on commercial size heats in various product forms.

  19. Analysis of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Ni-Cr-Fe-Nb alloy 718 is a widely used material in elevated- temperature applications. Currently, it is approved by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code only as a bolting material for elevated-temperature nuclear service. This report presents analyses of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718 toward the development of allowable stress levels for this material in general elevated-temperature nuclear service. Available data came from 14 heats of bar, plate, and forging material over the temperature range from 538 to 704{degrees}C. The longest rupture time encompassed by the data was almost 87,000 h. Generalized regression analyses were performed to yield an analytical expression for rupture life as a function of stress and temperature. Heat-to-heat variations were accounted for by lot-centering'' the data. Effects of different solution heat treatment temperatures (T{sub s}) were accounted for by normalizing the creep stresses to the data for T{sub s} = 954{degrees}C. Thus, the results are strictly applicable only for material with this solution treatment. Time and strain to tertiary creep were predicted as functions of rupture life. Creep strain-time data were represented by normalization to the time and strain to tertiary creep and development of master creep curves.'' The results allow estimation of time-dependent allowable stress per American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code Class N-47, and the creep strain-time relationships can be used to develop isochronous stress-strain curves. 29 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Elevated-temperature tensile properties of three heats of commercially heat-treated Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1980-03-01

    Three heats of commercially heat-treated alloy 718 were tensile tested over the temperature range from room temperature to 816{degree}C and at nominal strain rates from 6.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 6.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}/s. We examined data for yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, total elongation, and reduction in area and also inspected tensile stress-strain behavior. Yield and ultimate tensile strengths for commercially heat-treated alloy 718 decrease very gradually with temperature from room temperature up to about 600{degree}C for a strain rate of 6.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}/s or to about 700{degree}C for a strain rate of 6.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}/s. Above these temperatures the strength drops off fairly rapidly. Reduction in area and total elongation data show minimum around 700{degree}C, with each ductility measure falling to 10% or less at the minimum. This minimum is more pranced and occurs at lower temperatures as strain rate decreases. Up to about 600{degree}C the ductility is typically around 30%. As the temperature reaches 816{degree}C the ductility again increases to perhaps 60%. The uniform elongation (plastic strain at peak load) decreases only slightly with temperature to about 500{degree}C then drops off rapidly and monotonically with temperature, reaching values less than 1% at 816{degree}C. At the highest test temperatures the load maximum may result, not from necking of the specimen, but from overaging of the precipitation-hardened microstructure. Stress-strain curves showed serrated deformations in the temperature range from 316 to 649{degree}C, although they occur only for the faster strain rates at the supper end of this temperature range. The serrations can be quite large, involving load drops of perhaps 40 to 80 MPa. The serrations typically begin within the first 2% of deformation and continue until fracture, although exceptions were noted. 16 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. 3D microband boundary alignments and transitions in a cold rolled commercial purity aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    George, C.; Soe, B.; King, K.; Quadir, M.Z.; Ferry, M.; Bassman, L.

    2013-05-15

    In the study of microband formation during plastic deformation of face centered cubic metals and alloys, two theories have been proposed regarding the orientations of their boundaries: (i) they are aligned parallel to crystallographic planes associated with dislocation glide (i.e. (111) planes in FCC metals), or (ii) they are aligned in accordance with the macroscopic stress state generated during deformation. In this study, high resolution 3D electron backscatter diffraction (3D EBSD) was used to investigate the morphology and crystallographic nature of microband boundaries within a 19 × 9 × 8.6 μm volume of a deformed grain in commercial purity aluminum cold rolled to 22% reduction. It was found that microband boundaries correspond to both theories of orientation. Additionally, a single surface may contain both crystallographic and non-crystallographic alignments. Misorientations across boundaries in the regions of microband triple junctions have been identified for both boundary alignments. - Highlights: ► Reconstruction of a 3D volume of crystallographic orientations from EBSD data ► Subgrain features accurately reconstructed using specially designed strategies. ► Microband boundaries contain crystallographic and non-crystallographic alignments. ► Boundaries form by crystallographic process but rotate to non-crystallographic.

  2. Threshold Stress Creep Behavior of Alloy 617 at Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Benz; L.J. Carroll; J.K. Wright; R.N. Wright; T. Lillo

    2014-06-01

    Creep of Alloy 617, a solid solution Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, was studied in the temperature range of 1023 K to 1273 K (750 °C to 1000 °C). Typical power-law creep behavior with a stress exponent of approximately 5 is observed at temperatures from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C). Creep at 1023 K (750 °C), however, exhibits threshold stress behavior coinciding with the temperature at which a low volume fraction of ordered coherent y' precipitates forms. The threshold stress is determined experimentally to be around 70 MPa at 1023 K (750 °C) and is verified to be near zero at 1173 K (900 °C)—temperatures directly correlating to the formation and dissolution of y' precipitates, respectively. The y' precipitates provide an obstacle to continued dislocation motion and result in the presence of a threshold stress. TEM analysis of specimens crept at 1023 K (750 °C) to various strains, and modeling of stresses necessary for y' precipitate dislocation bypass, suggests that the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates is the controlling factor for continued deformation at the end of primary creep and into the tertiary creep regime. As creep deformation proceeds at an applied stress of 121 MPa and the precipitates coarsen, the stress required for Orowan bowing is reached and this mechanism becomes active. At the minimum creep rate at an applied stress of 145 MPa, the finer precipitate size results in higher Orowan bowing stresses and the creep deformation is dominated by the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates.

  3. Localized Corrosion of Alloy 22 -Fabrication Effects-

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2005-11-05

    general and localized corrosion behavior both in the wrought and annealed condition and in the as-welded condition. The specimens for testing were mostly prepared from flat plates of material. It was important to determine if the process of fabricating a full diameter Alloy 22 container will affect the corrosion performance of this alloy. Specimens were prepared directly from a fabricated container and tested for corrosion resistance. Results show that both the anodic corrosion behavior and the localized corrosion resistance of specimens prepared from a welded fabricated container were the same as from flat welded plates. That is, rolling and welding plates using industrial practices do not hinder the corrosion resistant of Alloy 22. (3) Effect of Black Annealing Oxide Scale: The resistance of Alloy 22 to localized corrosion, mainly crevice corrosion, has been extensively investigated in the last few years. This was done mostly using freshly polished specimens. At this time it was important to address the effect an oxide film or scale that forms during the high temperature annealing process or solution heat treatment (SHT) and its subsequent water quenching. Electrochemical tests such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) have been carried out to determine the repassivation potential for localized corrosion and to assess the mode of attack on the specimens. Tests have been carried out in parallel using mill annealed (MA) specimens free from oxide on the surface. The comparative testing was carried out in six different electrolyte solutions at temperatures ranging from 60 to 100 C. Results show that the repassivation potential of the specimens containing the black anneal oxide film on the surface was practically the same as the repassivation potential for oxide-free specimens. (4) Heat-to-Heat Variability--Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo Plates with varying heat chemistry: The ASTM standard B 575 provides the range of the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo

  4. A Probabilistic Performance Assessment Model for General Corrosion of Alloy 22 for High Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Container

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Lee; H. A. Elayat

    2003-12-11

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is the candidate material for the corrosion barrier of the double-wall waste package (WP) for the disposal of high-Gel nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. A probabilistic temperature-dependent general corrosion model for the WP outer barrier (WPOB) was developed based on the 5-year weight-loss measurements of Alloy 22 crevice samples. The 5-year corrosion rate distribution is represented by a Weibull distribution, with scale factors = 8.88, shape factor b = 1.62, and location factor l = 0. The temperature-dependence of the general corrosion rate was modeled using an Arrhenius relation. An activation energy of 25.91 {+-} 2.46 kJ/mol was determined from the corrosion rates obtained from the short-term polarization resistance data for Alloy 22 specimens tested for a wide range of sample configurations, metallurgical conditions, and exposure conditions (temperature and water chemistry). Analysis of the data from the current study and the literature indicates that the activation energies of general corrosion rate of highly corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloys including Alloy 22 are similar and do not change significantly, as the general corrosion rate decreases with the exposure time. The 5-year corrosion rates were conservatively selected for extrapolation over the repository time scale. Because of very low general corrosion rates of the WPOB for the conditions expected in the proposed repository, the WP performance will not be limited by general corrosion for the repository regulatory time period. The current conservative approach for the constant (time-independent) general corrosion rate at a given temperature provides an additional confidence for the general corrosion model.

  5. The influence of nickel layer thickness on microhardness and hydrogen sorption rate of commercially pure titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudiiarov, V. N.; Kashkarov, E. B.; Syrtanov, M. S.; Yugova, I. S.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of nickel coating thickness on microhardness and hydrogen sorption rate by commercially pure titanium alloy was established in this work. Coating deposition was carried out by magnetron sputtering method with prior ion cleaning of surface. It was shown that increase of sputtering time from 10 to 50 minutes leads to increase coating thickness from 56 to 3.78 μm. It was established that increase of nickel coating thickness leads to increase of microhardness at loads less than 0.5 kg. Microhardness values for all samples are not significantly different at loads 1 kg. Hydrogen content in titanium alloy with nickel layer deposited at 10 and 20 minutes exceeds concentration in initial samples on one order of magnitude. Further increasing of deposition time of nickel coating leads to decreasing of hydrogen concentration in samples due to coating delamination in process of hydrogenation.

  6. Aerospace Patented High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Used in Commercial Industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA structural materials engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama developed a high-strength aluminum alloy for aerospace applications with higher strength and wear-resistance at elevated temperatures. The alloy is a solution to reduce costs of aluminum engine pistons and lower engine emissions for the automobile industry. The Boats and Outboard Engines Division at Bombardier Recreational Products of Sturtevant, Wisconsin is using the alloy for pistons in its Evinrude E-Tec outboard, 40-90 horsepower, engine line. The alloy pistons make the outboard motor quieter and cleaner, while improving fuel mileage and increasing engine durability. The engines comply with California Air resources Board emissions standards, some of the most stringent in the United States. (photo credit: Bombardiier Recreational Products)

  7. Advanced characterization study of commercial conversion and electrocoating structures on magnesium alloys AZ31B and ZE10A

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Michael P.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Song, Guang -Ling; Kitchen, Kris; Davis, Bruce; Thompson, J. K.; Unocic, K. A.; Elsentriecy, H. H.

    2016-03-31

    The local metal-coating interface microstructure and chemistry formed on commercial magnesium alloys Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B) and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A, ZEK100 type) were analyzed as-chemical conversion coated with a commercial hexafluoro-titanate/zirconate type + organic polymer based treatment (Bonderite® 5200) and a commercial hexafluoro-zirconate type + trivalent chromium Cr3 + type treatment (Surtec® 650), and after the same conversion coatings followed by electrocoating with an epoxy based coating, Cathoguard® 525. Characterization techniques included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cross-section scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Corrosion behavior was assessed in room temperature saturated aqueous Mg(OH)2 solution with 1 wt.% NaCl. Themore » goal of the effort was to assess the degree to which substrate alloy additions become enriched in the conversion coating, and how the conversion coating was impacted by subsequent electrocoating. Key findings included the enrichment of Al from AZ31B and Zr from ZE10A, respectively, into the conversion coating, with moderate corrosion resistance benefits for AZ31B when Al was incorporated. Varying degrees of increased porosity and modification of the initial conversion coating chemistry at the metal-coating interface were observed after electrocoating. These changes were postulated to result in degraded electrocoating protectiveness. As a result, these observations highlight the challenges of coating Mg, and the need to tailor electrocoating in light of potential degradation of the initial as-conversion coated Mg alloy surface.« less

  8. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  9. Enhancement and Commercialization of the Alloy Selection System for Elevated Temperatures - ASSET

    SciTech Connect

    Randy C. John

    2005-11-05

    A corrosion engineering information system was created to manage, correlate and predict corrosion of alloys and also to use thermochemical calculations to predict the occurrence of dominant corrosion mechanisms in hot gases found in many different chemical processes and other related industrial processes.

  10. New multicomponent solder alloys of low melting pointfor low-cost commercial electronic assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ganainy, G. S.; Sakr, M. S.

    2003-09-01

    The requirements of the telecommunications, automobile, electronics and aircraft industries for non-toxic solders with melting points close to that of near-eutectic Pb-Sn alloys has led to the development of new Sn-Zn-In solder alloys. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) shows melting points of 198, 195, 190 and 185 +/- 2 °C for the alloys Sn-9Zn, Sn-9Zn-2In, Sn-9Zn-4In and Sn-9Zn-6In, respectively. An equation that fits the data relating the melting point to the In content in the solders is derived. The X-ray diffraction patterns are analyzed to determine the phases that exist in each solder. The stress-strain curves are studied in the temperature range from 90 to 130 °C for all the solders except for those that contain 4 wt% of In, where the temperature range continues to 150 °C. The work-hardening parameters, y (the yield stress), f (the fracture stress), and the parabolic work-hardening coefficient X, increase with increasing indium content in the solders at all working temperatures. They decrease with increasing working temperature for each solder, and show two relaxation stages only for the Sn-9Zn-4In solder around a temperature of 120 °C. (

  11. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-08-24

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In this paper, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. Also, the cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  12. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-11-01

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In the present work, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. The cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  13. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    DOE PAGES

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-08-24

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In this paper, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lackmore » of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. Also, the cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.« less

  14. Evaluation of commercially available coating techniques for application of thermographic phosphor to nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Bridges, M.J.; Harris, L.A.

    1986-04-01

    Remote temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence of phosphors has been established for temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1200/sup 0/C. This remote surface thermometry requires that the phosphors be firmly bonded to the surface of interest. The intent of this paper is to take a quick look at several bonding techniques used to bond the thermographic phosphor yttrium oxide doped with europium (Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/:Eu) to nickel-based alloy. The evaluation of the samples were performed after the samples had been subjected to extreme heat and, in some cases, mechanically deformed.

  15. Alloy Selection for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2015-12-01

    As a consequence of the March 2011 events at the Fukushima site, the U.S. congress asked the Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate efforts on the development of nuclear fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. The new fuels had to maintain or improve the performance of current UO2-zirconium alloy rods during normal operation conditions and tolerate the loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period than the current system. DOE is funding cost-shared research to investigate the behavior of advanced steels both under normal operation conditions in high-temperature water [ e.g., 561 K (288 °C)] and under accident conditions for reaction with superheated steam. Current results show that, under accident conditions, the advanced ferritic steels (1) have orders of magnitude lower reactivity with steam, (2) would generate less hydrogen and heat than the current zirconium alloys, (3) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking under normal operation conditions, and (4) have low general corrosion in water at 561 K (288 °C).

  16. The Passive Film on Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C A

    2005-09-09

    metal components (e.g., Ni, Cr, Mo, W) form distinct oxides, each of which may be stable under somewhat different environmental conditions. For one set of conditions, the oxide layer may be dominated by one or more of these metals, for another, by a different set. Furthermore, the oxide ''layer'' itself may consist of sub-layers of different composition. The purpose of this report is to characterize the oxide layer obtained from Alloy 22 over a range of environmental conditions and to demonstrate that the oxide shows passive behavior. Section 2 provides background information and theoretical predictions describing the role of pH and applied potential in oxide formation and stability. It includes a review of pertinent data on similar alloys. Section 3 presents data characterizing the oxide over a range applied potential and pH. Section 4 evaluates the oxide obtained from Alloy 22 samples aged for time periods extending from one month to over five years. Section 5 presents data showing that the oxide growth rate is logarithmic in time. Section 6 discusses the stability of the oxide as determined by short-term electrochemical tests. Section 7 describes the oxide scale that forms due to thermal processing (solution annealing and in air). Taken together, the various sections in this report present an understanding of the oxide layer obtained using a variety of methodologies, techniques, and testing conditions. An Appendix provides additional information regarding surface analysis techniques and electrochemical testing.

  17. Softening Behavior of Hardness and Surface Fatigue of Rolling-Sliding Contact in the Case of Developed Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redda, Daniel Tilahun; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Deng, Gang

    To get high performance, downsizing and weight saving of the power transmission systems, the improvement of machine elements has been required. In this study, case-carburized gear materials for a high load-carrying capacity were developed. Low-alloyed steels with 1%Cr-0.2%Mo, 1%Cr-0.2%Mo-1%Si and 1%Cr-0.2%Mo-2%Ni (Cr-Mo steel, Cr-Mo-Si steel and Cr-Mo-Ni steel) were melted in a hypoxia vacuum. Test rollers were made of the developed steels, and they were carburized (Type A and Type B), hardened and tempered. Heating retention tests were carried out to investigate the softening behavior of hardness at high heating temperatures in the case of the developed steels. Roller tests were conducted under the rolling-sliding contact and high-load conditions to study the surface fatigue of the developed steels. From the obtained test results, it was found that the softening behavior of surface hardness at high temperatures in the cases of Cr-Mo-Si steel (Type A) and Cr-Mo-Ni steel (Type B) is lower than that in the cases of Cr-Mo steel (Type A) and Cr-Mo steel (Type B). In the cases of Cr-Mo-Si steel (A) and Cr-Mo-Ni steel (B), micro- and small-pitting area ratios are smaller and large-pitting life is longer than those in the cases of Cr-Mo steel(A) and Cr-Mo steel(B) under the same carburizing treatment method and high-load conditions. Furthermore, the relationship between the softening behavior of surface hardness on the heating pattern and the surface fatigue on the rolling-sliding contact of the developed alloy steels was clarified.

  18. Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2014-07-01

    The Mg98.5Gd1Zn0.5 alloy produced by a powder metallurgy route was studied and compared with the same alloy produced by extrusion of ingots. Atomized powders were cold compacted and extruded at 623 K and 673 K (350 °C and 400 °C). The microstructure of extruded materials was characterized by α-Mg grains, and Mg3Gd and 14H-LPSO particles located at grain boundaries. Grain size decreased from 6.8 μm in the extruded ingot, down to 1.6 μm for powders extruded at 623 K (350 °C). Grain refinement resulted in an increase in mechanical properties at room and high temperatures. Moreover, at high temperatures the PM alloy showed superplasticity at high strain rates, with elongations to failure up to 700 pct.

  19. A Novel Processing Approach for Additive Manufacturing of Commercial Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher E.; Bourell, David; Watt, Trevor; Cohen, Julien

    Aluminum 6061 is of great commercial interest due to its ubiquitous use in manufacturing, advantageous mechanical properties, and its successful certification in aerospace applications. However, as an off-eutectic with accompanying large freezing range, attempts to process the material by additive manufacturing have resulted in part cracking and diminished mechanical properties. A unique approach using mixed powders is presented to process this historically difficult-to-process material. Expansion of this combined-powder approach to other materials systems not typically compatible with additive manufacturing is possible. Dense parts without solidification cracking have been produced by the SLM process, as verified using SEM and EDS. An overview of this approach is presented along with test results using an Al-Si mixture.

  20. Color tone and interfacial microstructure of white oxide layer on commercially pure Ti and Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura-Fujiwara, Eri; Mizushima, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yoshimi; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the relationships among oxidation condition, color tone, and the cross-sectional microstructure of the oxide layer on commercially pure (CP) Ti and Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.3O were investigated. “White metals” are ideal metallic materials having a white color with sufficient strength and ductility like a metal. Such materials have long been sought for in dentistry. We have found that the specific biomedical Ti alloys, such as CP Ti, Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.3O, and Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr, form a bright yellowish-white oxide layer after a particular oxidation heat treatment. The brightness L* and yellowness +b* of the oxide layer on CP Ti and Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.3O increased with heating time and temperature. Microstructural observations indicated that the oxide layer on Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr and Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.3O was dense and firm, whereas a piecrust-like layer was formed on CP Ti. The results obtained in this study suggest that oxide layer coating on Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.3O is an excellent technique for dental applications.

  1. Enhanced glass-forming ability of FeCoBSiNb bulk glassy alloys prepared using commercial raw materials through the optimization of Nb content

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Ying; Shen Baolong; Kimura, Hisamichi; Makino, Akihiro; Inoue, Akihisa

    2010-05-15

    We optimized the alloy compositions by modifying the Nb content in [(Fe{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}){sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}]{sub 100-x}Nb{sub x}(x=3.6-4.4) alloy system. As a result, it was found that the Nb content of 4.3 at. % was effective for approaching alloy to a eutectic point. By copper mold casting, [(Fe{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}){sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}]{sub 95.7}Nb{sub 4.3} bulk glassy alloy rods with diameters up to 4 mm were successfully synthesized even using commercial raw materials. These glassy alloys exhibit a rather high saturation magnetization of 0.77 T and low coercive force of 2.5 A/m.

  2. Localized Corrosion of Alloy 22 -Fabrication Effects-FY05 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-06

    general and localized corrosion behavior both in the wrought and annealed condition and in the as-welded condition. The specimens for testing were mostly prepared from flat plates of material. It was important to determine if the process of fabricating a full diameter Alloy 22 container will affect the corrosion performance of this alloy. Specimens were prepared directly from a fabricated container and tested for corrosion resistance. Results show that both the anodic corrosion behavior and the localized corrosion resistance of specimens prepared from a welded fabricated container were the same as from flat welded plates. That is, rolling and welding plates using industrial practices do not hinder the corrosion resistant of Alloy 22. (3) Effect of Black Annealing Oxide Scale--The resistance of Alloy 22 to localized corrosion, mainly crevice corrosion, has been extensively investigated in the last few years. This was done mostly using freshly polished specimens. At this time it was important to address the effect an oxide film or scale that forms during the high temperature annealing process or solution heat treatment (SHT) and its subsequent water quenching. Electrochemical tests such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) have been carried out to determine the repassivation potential for localized corrosion and to assess the mode of attack on the specimens. Tests have been carried out in parallel using mill annealed (MA) specimens free from oxide on the surface. The comparative testing was carried out in six different electrolyte solutions at temperatures ranging from 60 to 100 C. Results show that the repassivation potential of the specimens containing the black anneal oxide film on the surface was practically the same as the repassivation potential for oxide-free specimens. (4) Heat-to-Heat Variability--Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo Plates with varying heat chemistry: The ASTM standard B 575 provides the range of the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo

  3. Effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile and creep properties of commercially heat-treated alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    Alloy 718 is a structure material widely used in elevated-temperature applications. In particular, it was extensively used in the design of the upper internal system and control rod drive line of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Its popularity is due to several excellent behavioral features, including high creep and creep-rupture strength, good oxidation resistance, and exceptional high-cycle fatigue strength. However, alloy 718 is extremely complex, and its microstructure can be significantly modified by thermal treatment. The stability of the alloy in long-term elevated-temperature service is therefore a substantial concern in any such application. This report presents tensile and creep data obtained on three heats of alloy 718 after thermal aging for up to 27,000 h from 593 to 76{degree}C. Implications of these results in terms of long-term stability of the alloy are discussed. 5 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. On the effect of β phase on the microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded commercial brass alloys

    PubMed Central

    Heidarzadeh, Akbar; Saeid, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Conventional fusion welding of brass (Cu–Zn) alloys has some difficulties such as evaporation of Zn, toxic behavior of Zn vapor, solidification cracking, distortion, and oxidation [1], [2], [3]. Fortunately, friction stir welding (FSW) has been proved to be a good candidate for joining the brass alloys, which can overcome the fusion welding short comes [4], [5], [6], [7]. The data presented here relates to FSW of the single and double phase brass alloys. The data is the microstructure and mechanical properties of the base metals and joints. PMID:26793745

  5. On the effect of β phase on the microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded commercial brass alloys.

    PubMed

    Heidarzadeh, Akbar; Saeid, Tohid

    2015-12-01

    Conventional fusion welding of brass (Cu-Zn) alloys has some difficulties such as evaporation of Zn, toxic behavior of Zn vapor, solidification cracking, distortion, and oxidation [1], [2], [3]. Fortunately, friction stir welding (FSW) has been proved to be a good candidate for joining the brass alloys, which can overcome the fusion welding short comes [4], [5], [6], [7]. The data presented here relates to FSW of the single and double phase brass alloys. The data is the microstructure and mechanical properties of the base metals and joints.

  6. Comparison of isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of twenty-five commercial sheet alloys at 1150 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The cyclic and isothermal oxidation resistance of 25 high-temperature Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base sheet alloys after 100 hours in air at 1150 C was compared. The alloys were evaluated in terms of their oxidation, scaling, and vaporization rates and their tendency for scale spallation. These values were used to develop an oxidation rating parameter based on effective thickness change, as calculated from a mass balance. The calculated thicknesses generally agreed with the measured values, including grain boundary oxidation, to within a factor of 3. Oxidation behavior was related to composition, particularly Cr and Al content.

  7. The workability of commercial and experimental 0.6 pct carbon low alloy steels in the temperature range of 650 °C to 870 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszewski, T.; McQueen, H. J.; Machmeier, P. M.

    1994-04-01

    The torsional strength and ductility of commercial AlSI 4063 steel along with four 0.6 pct carbon, low alloy experimental steel compositions were determined with temperature. These parameters were then related to the workability of the steels. The influence of initial lamellar or spheroidal microstructures, as well as of vacuum or air-melt practices, were studied in the deformation temperature range of 650 °C to 870 °C and strain-rate range of 0.71 to 2.13 s-1 The experimental steels showed increased ductility and lower peak flow stresses over the entire temperature range when compared to the commercial alloy. Lamellar microstructures resulted in higher maximum flow stresses and subsequent work softening in the ferritic regime. Initial carbide morphology did not influence the maximum flow stresses in the austenitic range. Improved ductility of the experimental steels over the entire working temperatures could possibly be attributed to the combination of a reduced amount of oxides and sulfides, reduced particleto-matrix decohesion, improved grain-boundary cohesion, or the ability to annihilate or heal microcracks which may form during deformation. Constitutive equations were developed for the ferritic and austenitic conditions with both spheroidized and lamellar carbides.

  8. Investigation of the Stability and 1.0 MeV Proton Radiation Resistance of Commercially Produced Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Alloy Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below 1E14 sq cm fluences above 1E14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed In dark I-V measurements. The current mechanism were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  9. Investigation of the stability and 1.0 MeV proton radiation resistance of commercially produced hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, K.R. II; Walters, M.R.; Woodyard, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2); fluences above 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2) require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  10. Investigation of the stability and 1.0 MeV proton radiation resistance of commercially produced hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters or fluences below 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2); fluences above 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2) require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  11. Effect of argon purity on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture mode of commercially pure (cp) Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys for ceramometal dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bauer, José; Cella, Suelen; Pinto, Marcelo M; Filho, Leonardo E Rodrigues; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2009-12-01

    Provision of an inert gas atmosphere with high-purity argon gas is recommended for preventing titanium castings from contamination although the effects of the level of argon purity on the mechanical properties and the clinical performance of Ti castings have not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of argon purity on the mechanical properties and microstructure of commercially pure (cp) Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The castings were made using either high-purity and/or industrial argon gas. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), proportional limit (PL), elongation (EL) and microhardness (VHN) at different depths were evaluated. The microstructure of the alloys was also revealed and the fracture mode was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The data from the mechanical tests and hardness were subjected to a two-and three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). The mean values of mechanical properties were not affected by the argon gas purity. Higher UTS, PL and VHN, and lower EL were observed for Ti-6Al-4V. The microhardness was not influenced by the argon gas purity. The industrial argon gas can be used to cast cp Ti and Ti-6Al-4V.

  12. Properties and durability of the passive films on a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy and an iron-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharkya, Pallavi

    Alloy 22, a Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloy, and SAM1651, an Fe-Cr-Mo-B-Y-C bulk metallic glass are highly corrosion-resistant alloys. The high corrosion resistance of these alloys is due to the formation of tenacious oxide films on their surfaces. This study examines the reformation behavior of the passive films as a function of the corrosion resistance of the alloys and the corrosivity of the environment. The main tasks of this study were (i) to determine the chemical durability of passive films on these highly corrosion-resistant alloys in aggressive environments, (ii) to investigate the durability after mechanically damaging the passive films either locally or over the entire surface area and to study the reformation kinetics, (iii) to compare the durability of the passive films of the aforementioned highly corrosion resistant alloys with an alloy of intermediate corrosion resistance, AL6XN, and an alloy of less corrosion resistance, 316L SS, (iv) to examine the evolution of the electronic properties of the passive films on alloy 22 and SAM1651 under different environmental conditions such as concentrated chloride solution, acidic solution, temperature, potential and oxyanions, and (v) to develop an understanding of the relationship between the passive films' composition, electronic and electrochemical properties and the performance. A combination of techniques was utilized to meet the above mentioned objectives. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) was used to determine the electrochemical parameters such as freely corroding, breakdown and repassivation potentials. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the electronic properties such as impedance, thickness and capacitance of the passive films. Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis was used to determine the type and the density of the defects in the passive films. The mechanical durability and reformation kinetics of the passive films was investigated using a scratch-repassivation method. The quality

  13. An analysis of microband orientation in a commercial purity aluminium alloy subjected to forward and reverse torsion using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD).

    PubMed

    Lopez-Pedrosa, M; Wynne, B P; Rainforth, W M

    2006-05-01

    High-resolution electron backscatter diffraction has been used to study the effects of strain reversal on the evolution of microbands in commercial purity aluminium alloy AA1200. Deformation was carried out using two equal steps of forward/forward or forward/reverse torsion at a temperature of 300 degrees C and strain rate of 1 s(-1) to a total equivalent tensile strain of 0.5. In both cases, microbands were found in the majority of grains examined with many having microband walls with more than one orientation. For the forward/forward condition, the microband clusters were centred around -20 degrees and +45 degrees to the equivalent tensile stress axis, whereas for material subjected to a strain reversal, the clusters were at -65 degrees and -45 degrees . There was no evidence of microbands that were formed in the forward deformation step in the reversed material, which would suggest that a strain of 0.25 is sufficient to dissolve any microstructure history generated by the first step. Furthermore, the microbands within the strain-reversed material had a reduction in misorientation compared with the lineally strained material, suggesting that these microbands only formed at the onset of the second deformation step. This confirms that microband formation is complex and sensitive to strain path; however, it is still unclear to what extent microband formation is dependent on strain path history compared with the instantaneous deformation mode. PMID:16774518

  14. Commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) versus titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) materials as bone anchored implants - Is one truly better than the other?

    PubMed

    Shah, Furqan A; Trobos, Margarita; Thomsen, Peter; Palmquist, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and titanium alloys (typically Ti6Al4V) display excellent corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Although the chemical composition and topography are considered important, the mechanical properties of the material and the loading conditions in the host have, conventionally, influenced material selection for different clinical applications: predominantly Ti6Al4V in orthopaedics while cp-Ti in dentistry. This paper attempts to address three important questions: (i) To what extent do the surface properties differ when cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V materials are manufactured with the same processing technique?, (ii) Does bone tissue respond differently to the two materials, and (iii) Do bacteria responsible for causing biomaterial-associated infections respond differently to the two materials? It is concluded that: (i) Machined cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V exhibit similar surface morphology, topography, phase composition and chemistry, (ii) Under experimental conditions, cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V demonstrate similar osseointegration and biomechanical anchorage, and (iii) Experiments in vitro fail to disclose differences between cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V to harbour Staphylococcus epidermidis growth. No clinical comparative studies exist which could determine if long-term, clinical differences exist between the two types of bulk materials. It is debatable whether cp-Ti or Ti6Al4V exhibit superiority over the other, and further comparative studies, particularly in a clinical setting, are required. PMID:26952502

  15. Commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) versus titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) materials as bone anchored implants - Is one truly better than the other?

    PubMed

    Shah, Furqan A; Trobos, Margarita; Thomsen, Peter; Palmquist, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and titanium alloys (typically Ti6Al4V) display excellent corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Although the chemical composition and topography are considered important, the mechanical properties of the material and the loading conditions in the host have, conventionally, influenced material selection for different clinical applications: predominantly Ti6Al4V in orthopaedics while cp-Ti in dentistry. This paper attempts to address three important questions: (i) To what extent do the surface properties differ when cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V materials are manufactured with the same processing technique?, (ii) Does bone tissue respond differently to the two materials, and (iii) Do bacteria responsible for causing biomaterial-associated infections respond differently to the two materials? It is concluded that: (i) Machined cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V exhibit similar surface morphology, topography, phase composition and chemistry, (ii) Under experimental conditions, cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V demonstrate similar osseointegration and biomechanical anchorage, and (iii) Experiments in vitro fail to disclose differences between cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V to harbour Staphylococcus epidermidis growth. No clinical comparative studies exist which could determine if long-term, clinical differences exist between the two types of bulk materials. It is debatable whether cp-Ti or Ti6Al4V exhibit superiority over the other, and further comparative studies, particularly in a clinical setting, are required.

  16. Formation of TiO2 layers on commercially pure Ti and Ti-Mo and Ti-Nb alloys by two-step thermal oxidation and their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sado, Shota; Ueda, Takatoshi; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki

    2015-12-01

    Anatase-containing TiO2 layers were formed on commercially pure (CP) Ti and Ti-25mass%Mo (Ti-25Mo) and Ti-25mass%Nb (Ti-25Nb) alloys by two-step thermal oxidation. The first-step treatment was conducted in an Ar-1%CO atmosphere at 1073 K for 3.6 ks, and the second-step treatment was conducted in air at 673-1073 K for 10.8 ks. The second-step temperature range for anatase formation was wider in the Ti alloys than in CP Ti. Photo-induced superhydrophilicity under UV irradiation was observed for the TiO2 layers with anatase fractions ≥0.6 on CP Ti and the Ti-25Mo alloy, and with anatase fractions ≥0.18 on the Ti-25Nb alloy. The TiO2 layers on the Ti-25Nb alloy exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity in the low anatase fraction region, which is considered to be caused by the incorporation of 1-3 at% Nb into the TiO2 layers. The rate constant of methylene blue degradation showed maxima at anatase fractions of 0.6-0.9.

  17. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-08-15

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  18. Commercialization of nickel and iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1996-12-31

    Metallurgists are taught that intermetallics are brittle phases and should be avoided in alloys of commercial interest. This education is so deeply rooted that irrespective of significant advances made in ductilization of aluminides,the road to their acceptance commercialization is extremely difficult. This paper identifies the requirements for commercialization of any new alloys and reports the activities carried out to commercialize Ni and Fe aluminides. The paper also identifies areas which meet the current commercialization requirements and areas needing additional effort.

  19. Corrosion of Stainless-Steel Tubing in a Spacecraft Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; MacDowell, Louis G.; Curran, Joe; Calle, Luz Maria; Hodge, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    This is a report of exposure of various metal tubing to oceanfront launch environments. The objective is to examine various types of corrosion-resistant tubing for Space Shuttle launch sites. The metals were stainless steels (austenitic, low-carbon, Mo-alloy, superaustenitic, duplex, and superferritic), Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, Ni-Mo-Cr-Fe-W alloy, and austenitic Ni-base superalloy.

  20. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial-purity aluminum by the direct-reduction process. Third annual technical report, 1980 January 1-1980 December 31

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Progress on the program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a pilot-sized Direct Reduction Process for producing aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloy is reported for Phase C. Progress is reported on reduction including the following tasks: supply burden material; burden beneficiation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot modifications; reactor scale-up design; calculating heat and mass balance; processing mathematical modeling; effects of process variables; information on supportive analytical, phase identification, and mechanical engineering data. Progress on alloy purification is reported in the following tasks: pilot unit installation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot unit modifications; and supportive mechanical engineering. Progress on purification to commercial grade aluminum is reported on: pilot unit installation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot unit modifications; support pilot operations; and supportive expended man-hours. Plans for Phase D are noted. (MCW)

  1. Some observations of the influence of δ-ferrite content on the hardness, galling resistance, and fracture toughness of selected commercially available iron-based hardfacing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-11-01

    Iron-based weld hardfacing deposits are used to provide a wear-resistant surface for a structural base material. Iron-based hardfacing alloys that are resistant to corrosion in oxygenated aqueous environments contain high levels of chromium and carbon, which results in a dendritic microstructure with a high volume fraction of interdendrite carbides which provide the needed wear resistance. The ferrite content of the dendrites depends on the nickel content and base composition of the iron-based hardfacing alloy. The amount of ferrite in the dendrites is shown to have a significant influence on the hardness and galling wear resistance, as determined using ASTM G98 methods. Fracture-toughness ( K IC) testing in accordance with ASTM E399 methods was used to quantify the damage tolerance of various iron-based hardfacing alloys. Fractographic and microstructure examinations were used to determine the influence of microstructure on the wear resistance and fracture toughness of the iron-based hardfacing alloys. A crack-bridging toughening model was shown to describe the influence of ferrite content on the fracture toughness. A higher ferrite content in the dendrites of an iron-based hardfacing alloy reduces the tendency for plastic stretching and necking of the dendrites, which results in improved wear resistance, high hardness, and lower fracture-toughness values. A NOREM 02 hardfacing alloy has the most-optimum ferrite content, which results in the most-desired balance of galling resistance and high K IC values.

  2. Effect of surface preparation on the bond strength of heat-polymerized denture base resin to commercially pure titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bond durability of heat-polymerized denture base resin to cast CP Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The alloy specimens were divided into five groups: 1) airborne-particle abraded with 50 µm alumina (SAND), 2) Rocatec tribochemical silica coating system (RO), 3) air-abraded followed by application of Epricord Opaque Primer (EP), 4) air-abraded followed by application of Super Bond C&B liquid (SB), 5) air-abraded followed by application of Alloy Primer (AL). Heat-polymerized denture resin was applied to the bonding area and polymerized according to the manufacturer's instructions. The halves of all specimens were thermocycled up to 10,000 cycles. Before thermocycling SB and AL showed significantly higher shear bond strengths than SAND, RO, EP for both metals. The shear bond strength of AL group after thermocycling was significantly higher than that of the other groups. PMID:21383520

  3. Effect of shot peening and grain refinement on the fatigue life and strength of commercially pure Al and two of its alloys: Al-2024-T3 and Al-7075-T6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qandil, A.; Zaid, Adnan I. O.

    2016-08-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used materials in automobile, aircraft and space craft industries due to their high strength- to- weight ratio and corrosion resistance beside their other useful properties. They are the second materials in use after steel alloys. Most of the failures in parts of aircrafts and space vehicles are mainly caused by fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. In this paper, the effect of shot peening on the fatigue life of commercially pure aluminumand two of its alloys namely:Al-2024 and Al-7075-T6 is presented and discussed. Furthermore, the effect of addition of vanadium to Al and Al grain refined by Ti and Ti+Bon Its fatigue life and strengthis also presented and discussed using scanning electron microscope, SEM. It was that shot peening and the addition of V toAl and Al onAl grain refined by Ti and Ti+B have resulted in enhancement of the fatigue life and strength. Ffinally, the effect of shot peening on the surface quality of the peened parts is also presented and discussed.

  4. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial purity aluminum by the direct reduction process. First interim technical report, Phase D, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.J.

    1981-04-01

    Operation of the bench AF-reactor on burden with all reducing carbon exterior to the ore pellet resulted in low metal alloy product yields and prematurely terminated runs, indicating the need for intimate contact between alumina and carbon to produce oxycarbide liquid prior to reaction with solid silicon carbide. Carbon solubility tests made on 60Al-40Si alloys at 2200/sup 0/C in graphite crucibles indicated continued reaction to form SiC for one hour. Efficiency of reduction to SiC ranged from 68 to 100%. The A-C two-electrode submerged arc reactor pilot, SAR-II, was successfully operated on both alumina-clay-coke and alumina-silicon carbide-coke (from the VSR prereduction) burdens. Metal alloy was produced and tapped in each of four runs. The pilot crystallizer was operated to evalute the two-stage (stop and go) crystallization technique on obtaining high yields of Al in Al-Si eutectic, with a limit of 1.0% Fe and 0.1% Ti in the alloy product. 18 figures, 19 tables. (DLC)

  5. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  6. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  7. Transient oxidation of multiphase Ni-Cr base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, G.; Meraner, M.; Farrell, P.

    1988-06-01

    Four commercially available Ni-Cr-based alloys used with porcelain enamels were studied. Major alloying elements were Al, Be, Si, B, Nb, and Mo. All alloys were multiphase. During heat treatments simulating enameling conditions, phase changes occurred in most alloys and were detected using hardness testing, differential thermal analysis (DTA), and microscopy. Oxidation of these alloys at 1000/degrees/C for 10 min produced an oxide layer consisting principally of chromium oxide, but the oxide morphology varied with each alloy depending on the alloy microstructure. Controlling alloy microstructure while keeping the overall composition unchanged may be a means of preventing wrinkled poorly adherent scales from forming.

  8. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  9. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  10. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial purity aluminum by the direct reduction process. Third interim technical report, Phase C for the period 1980 July 1-1980 September 30

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    Pilot reactor VSR-3 operation in the third quarter was directed to tapping molten alloy product. Modifications to the hearth region included a tapping furnace to maintain taphole temperature, a graphite ring filter to separate carbides from matal and an alumina liner to eliminate carbiding from reaction of alloy with the graphite hearth walls. Tapping was not successful, however, due to high alloy viscosity from a large concentration of carbides. Three runs were made on the pilot crystallizer to determine the effects of alloy composition, cooling rate, tamping rate, remelt temperature and rate on eutectic Al-Si yield.

  11. Stress corrosion of high strength aluminum alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. H.; Brummer, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out to examine the relationship of the observed chemical and mechanical properties of Al-Cu and Al-Zn-Mg alloys to the stress corrosion mechanisms which dominate in each case. Two high purity alloys and analogous commercial alloys were selected. Fundamental differences between the behavior of Al-Cu and of Al-Zn-Mg alloys were observed. These differences in the corrosion behavior of the two types of alloys are augmented by substantial differences in their mechanical behavior. The relative cleavage energy of the grain boundaries is of particular importance.

  12. Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

  13. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  14. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Nickel Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R

    2004-07-12

    Nickel can dissolve a large amount of alloying elements while still maintaining its austenitic structure. That is, nickel based alloys can be tailored for specific applications. The family of nickel alloys is large, from high temperature alloys (HTA) to corrosion resistant alloys (CRA). In general, CRA are less susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) than stainless steels. The environments where nickel alloys suffer EAC are limited and generally avoidable by design. These environments include wet hydrofluoric acid and hot concentrated alkalis. Not all nickel alloys are equally susceptible to cracking in these environments. For example, commercially pure nickel is less susceptible to EAC in hot concentrated alkalis than nickel alloyed with chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo). The susceptibility of nickel alloys to EAC is discussed by family of alloys.

  15. Nickel-base alloys combat corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Herda, W.

    1995-06-01

    The modern chemical process industry must increase production efficiency to remain competitive. Manufacturers typically meet this challenge by utilizing higher temperatures and pressures, and more-corrosive catalysts. At the same time, the industry has to solve the technical and commercial problems resulting from rigid environmental regulations. To overcome these obstacles, new alloys having higher levels of corrosion resistance have been developed. These materials are based on increased understanding of the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys, especially the role of alloying elements. Results of many studies have led to innovations in nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys containing both high and low amounts of nickel. Higher molybdenum and chromium contents, together with nitrogen additions, have opened up an entirely new class of alloys having unique properties. In addition, a new chromium-base, fully wrought super stainless steel shows excellent promise in solving many corrosion problems. These newer alloys have the ability to combat uniform corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress-corrosion cracking in the harsh halogenic environment of the chemical process industry. This article briefly lists some of the major highlights and corrosion data on recent nickel-chromium-molybdenum and nickel-molybdenum alloys, and the development of a chromium-base, wrought super-austenitic alloy known as Nicrofer 3033 (Alloy 33). Some comparisons with existing alloys are presented, along with a few commercial applications.

  16. [The bonding mechanisms of base metals for metal-ceramic crown microstructure analysis of bonding agent and gold bond between porcelain and base metals].

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Hsu, C S

    1996-06-01

    The use of base metal alloys for porcelain fused to a metal crown and bridges has increased recently because of lower price, high hardness, high tensile strength and high elastic modulus. The addition of beryllium to base metal alloys increased fluidity and improved casting fitness. Beryllium also controlled surface oxidation and bonding strength. The bonding agent and gold bonding agent also affected the bonding strength between porcelain and metal alloys. Four commercially available ceramic base alloys were studied (two alloys contained beryllium element, another two did not). The purpose of this investigation was to study the microstructure between porcelain matrix, bonding agent and alloy matrix interfaces. A scanning electron micro-probe analyzer and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were used to study the distribution of elements (Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, O, Si, Sn, Al) in four base alloys. The following results were obtained: 1. The thickness of the oxidized layer of Rexillium III alloy and Unitbond alloy (contained beryllium) was thinner than Unibond alloy and Wiron 88 alloy (no beryllium). 2. The thickness of the oxidized layer of alloys in air (10 minutes and 30 minutes) was thinner in Unitbond (2.45 microns and 3.80 microns) and thicker in Wiron 88 (4.39 microns and 5.96 microns). 3. The thickness of the oxidized layer occurring for a duration of ten minutes (in vaccum) showed that the Rexillium III alloy was the thinnest (1.93 microns), and Wiron 88 alloy was the thickest (2.30 microns). But in thirty minutes (vacuum), Unitbond alloy was the thinnest (3.37 microns), and Wiron 88 alloy was the thickest (5.51 microns). 4. The intensity of Cr elements was increased obviously near the interface between Unitbond alloy, Wiron 88 alloy (no beryllium) and oxidized layer, but the intensity of Ni and Mo elements was slightly increased. The intensity of Cr element was not increased markedly between Rexillium III alloy, Unitbond alloy (beryllium) and oxidized

  17. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    electron microscope. The corrosion rate of the nonequilibrium sputtered alloys, as determined by polarization resistance, is significantly reduced compared to the most corrosion resistant commercial magnesium alloys. The open circuit potentials of the sputter deposited alloys are significantly more noble compared to commercial, equilibrium phase magnesium alloys. Galvanic corrosion susceptibility has also been considerably reduced. Nonequilibrium magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys have been shown to achieve passivity autonomously by alteration of the composition chemistry of the surface oxide/hydroxide layer. Self-healing properties are also evident, as corrosion propagation can be arrested after initial pitting of the material. A clear relationship exists between the corrosion resistance of sputter vapor deposited magnesium alloys and the amount of ion bombardment incurred by the alloy during deposition. Argon pressure, the distance between the source and the substrate, and alloy morphology play important roles in determining the ability of the alloy to develop a passive film. Thermal effects, both during and after alloy deposition, alter the stress state of the alloys, precipitation of second phases, and the mechanical stability of the passive film. An optimal thermal treatment has been developed in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys. The significance of the results includes the acquisition of electrochemical data for these novel materials, as well as expanding the utilization of magnesium alloys by the improvement in their corrosion resistance. The magnesium alloys developed in this work are more corrosion resistant than any commercial magnesium alloy. Structural components comprised of these alloys would therefore exhibit unprecedented corrosion performance. Coatings of these alloys on magnesium components would provide a corrosion resistant yet galvanically-compatible coating. The broad impact of these contributions is

  18. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    electron microscope. The corrosion rate of the nonequilibrium sputtered alloys, as determined by polarization resistance, is significantly reduced compared to the most corrosion resistant commercial magnesium alloys. The open circuit potentials of the sputter deposited alloys are significantly more noble compared to commercial, equilibrium phase magnesium alloys. Galvanic corrosion susceptibility has also been considerably reduced. Nonequilibrium magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys have been shown to achieve passivity autonomously by alteration of the composition chemistry of the surface oxide/hydroxide layer. Self-healing properties are also evident, as corrosion propagation can be arrested after initial pitting of the material. A clear relationship exists between the corrosion resistance of sputter vapor deposited magnesium alloys and the amount of ion bombardment incurred by the alloy during deposition. Argon pressure, the distance between the source and the substrate, and alloy morphology play important roles in determining the ability of the alloy to develop a passive film. Thermal effects, both during and after alloy deposition, alter the stress state of the alloys, precipitation of second phases, and the mechanical stability of the passive film. An optimal thermal treatment has been developed in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys. The significance of the results includes the acquisition of electrochemical data for these novel materials, as well as expanding the utilization of magnesium alloys by the improvement in their corrosion resistance. The magnesium alloys developed in this work are more corrosion resistant than any commercial magnesium alloy. Structural components comprised of these alloys would therefore exhibit unprecedented corrosion performance. Coatings of these alloys on magnesium components would provide a corrosion resistant yet galvanically-compatible coating. The broad impact of these contributions is

  19. Commercial Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Phil McAlister delivers a presentation by the Commercial Crew (CC) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to...

  20. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  1. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  2. Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  3. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  4. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  5. Nonswelling alloy

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  6. Wetting behavior of alternative solder alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Recent economic and environmental issues have stimulated interest in solder alloys other than the traditional Sn-Pb eutectic or near eutectic composition. Preliminary evaluations suggest that several of these alloys approach the baseline properties (wetting, mechanical, thermal, and electrical) of the Sn-Pb solders. Final alloy acceptance will require major revisions to existing industrial and military soldering specifications. Bulk alloy and solder joint properties are consequently being investigated to validate their producibility and reliability. The work reported in this paper examines the wetting behavior of several of the more promising commercial alloys on copper substrates. Solder wettability was determined by the meniscometer and wetting balance techniques. The wetting results suggest that several of the alternative solders would satisfy pretinning and surface mount soldering applications. Their use on plated through hole technology might be more difficult since the alloys generally did not spread or flow as well as the 60Sn-40Pb solder.

  7. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J; Jones, D; Lian, T; Martin, S; Rivera, A

    1999-12-10

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5-6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS NO4400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS NO6022 Ni-Cr- MO-W alloy, UN's NO6625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30400 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 umyr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni. Key words: MIC, container materials, YM bacteria, de-alloying, Ni-depletion, Cr-depletion, polarization resistance, anodic polarization,

  8. Contraction of aluminum alloys during and after solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.; Suyitno; Mooney, J. F.

    2004-04-01

    A technique for measuring the linear contraction during and after solidification of aluminum alloys was improved and used for examination of binary and commercial alloys. The effect of experimental parameters, e.g., the length of the mold and the melt level, on the contraction was studied. The correlation between the compositional dependences of the linear contraction in the solidification range and the hot tearing susceptibility was shown for binary Al-Cu and Al-Mg alloys and used for the estimation of hot tearing susceptibility of 6XXX series alloys with copper. The linear thermal contraction coefficients for binary and commercial alloys showed complex behavior at subsolidus temperatures. The technique allows estimation of the contraction coefficient of commercial alloys in a wide range of temperatures and could be helpful for computer simulations of geometrical distortions during directchill (DC) casting.

  9. Commercial Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is a curriculum framework for a program in commercial fishing to be taught in Florida secondary and postsecondary institutions. This outline covers the major concepts/content of the program, which is designed to prepare students for employment in occupations with titles such as net fishers, pot fishers, line fishers, shrimp boat…

  10. Commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Togai, Masaki

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on commercial applications of fuzzy logic in Japan are presented. Topics covered include: suitable application area of fuzzy theory; characteristics of fuzzy control; fuzzy closed-loop controller; Mitsubishi heavy air conditioner; predictive fuzzy control; the Sendai subway system; automatic transmission; fuzzy logic-based command system for antilock braking system; fuzzy feed-forward controller; and fuzzy auto-tuning system.

  11. Commercial Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Thomas

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in commercial art at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and science…

  12. Titanium Alloys and Processing for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, William D.; Bird, R. Keith; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1996-01-01

    Commercially available titanium alloys as well as emerging titanium alloys with limited or no production experience are being considered for a variety of applications to high speed commercial aircraft structures. A number of government and industry programs are underway to improve the performance of promising alloys by chemistry and/or processing modifications and to identify appropriate alloys and processes for specific aircraft structural applications. This paper discusses some of the results on the effects of heat treatment, service temperatures from - 54 C to +177 C, and selected processing on the mechanical properties of several candidate beta and alpha-beta titanium alloys. Included are beta alloys Timetal 21S, LCB, Beta C, Beta CEZ, and Ti-10-2-3 and alpha-beta alloys Ti-62222, Ti-6242S, Timetal 550, Ti-62S, SP-700, and Corona-X. The emphasis is on properties of rolled sheet product form and on the superplastic properties and processing of the materials.

  13. Fabric cutting application of FeAl-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Blue, C.A.; Sklad, S.P.; Deevi, S.C.; Shih, H.R.

    1998-11-01

    Four intermetallic-based alloys were evaluated for cutting blade applications. These alloys included Fe{sub 3}Al-based (FAS-II and FA-129), FeAl-based (PM-60), and Ni{sub 3}Al-based (IC-50). These alloys were of interest because of their much higher work-hardening rates than the conventionally used carbon and stainless steels. The FeAl-based PM-60 alloy was of further interest because of its hardening possibility through retention of vacancies. The vacancy retention treatment is much simpler than the heat treatments used for hardening of steel blades. Blades of four intermetallic alloys and commercially used M2 tool steel blades were evaluated under identical conditions to cut two-ply heavy paper. Comparative results under identical conditions revealed that the FeAl-based alloy PM-60 outperformed the other intermetallic alloys and was equal to or somewhat better than the commercially used M2 tool steel.

  14. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  15. Determination of hydrogen permeability in commercial and modified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The results of hydrogen permeability measurements on several iron- and cobalt-base alloys as well as on two long-ranged ordered alloys over the range of 705 to 870 C (1300 to 1600 F) are summarized. The test alloys included wrought alloys N-155, IN 800, A-286, 19-9DL, and 19-9DL modifications with aluminum, niobium, and misch metal. In addition, XF-818, CRM-6D, SA-F11, and HS-31 were evaluated. Two wrought long-range ordered alloys, Ni3Al and (Fe,Ni)3(V,Al) were also evaluated. All tests were conducted at 20.7 MPa pressure in either pure and/or 1% CO2-doped H2 for test periods as long as 133 h. Detailed analyses were conducted to determine the relative permeability rankings of these alloys and the effect of doping, exit surface oxidation, specimen design variations, and test duration on permeability coefficient, and permeation activation energies were determined. The two long-range ordered alloys had the lowest permeability coefficients in pure H2 when compared with the eight commercial alloys and their modifications. With CO2 doping, significant decrease in permeability was observed in commercial alloys--no doped tests were conducted with the long-range ordered alloys.

  16. Weldability of Fe3Al based iron aluminide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharia, T.; Maziasz, P. J.; David, S. A.; McKamey, C. G.

    An investigation was carried out to determine the weldability of Fe3Al type alloys. Sigmajig tests of a commercial heat of FA-129 alloy indicate that hot-cracking may not be a problem for this alloy. Additionally, several new Fe3Al based iron aluminides were evaluated for weldability. The preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that some of these alloys have comparable or better weldability than FA-129 based iron-aluminides. For the first time, successful welds, without hot or cold cracking, were made on 13 mm (0.5 in.) thick plates from a commercial heat of FA-129 using the proper choice of welding conditions and parameters.

  17. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  18. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  19. Tarnish evaluation of gold-based dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Corso, P P; German, R M; Simmons, H D

    1985-05-01

    Three commercial gold dental alloys and three ternary (Au-Ag-Cu) alloys of constant nobility were subjected to a standardized test battery for tarnish. The tests included sodium sulfide and artificial saliva solutions, both at 37 degrees C, in sealed containers. Quantitative measurements of tarnish were made from the alloy color change during a three-day exposure. Alloy nobility is a relatively important factor in determining tarnish resistance; however, microstructure can have a negative effect on tarnish resistance. Alloys with a two-phase microstructure produce microgalvanic conditions which lead to either silver chloride or silver sulfide tarnish products. A solution heat treatment improves tarnish resistance by eliminating microstructural inhomogeneities.

  20. Tensile and creep properties of titanium-vanadium, titanium-molybdenum, and titanium-niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and creep properties of experimental beta-titanium alloys were determined. Titanium-vanadium alloys had substantially greater tensile and creep strength than the titanium-niobium and titanium-molybdenum alloys tested. Specific tensile strengths of several titanium-vanadium-aluminum-silicon alloys were equivalent or superior to those of commercial titanium alloys to temperatures of 650 C. The Ti-50V-3Al-1Si alloy had the best balance of tensile strength, creep strength, and metallurgical stability. Its 500 C creep strength was far superior to that of a widely used commercial titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, and almost equivalent to that of newly developed commercial titanium alloys.

  1. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys-Development of AL-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloy (2139)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Alex; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report supplement in presentation format describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to continue the development of the silver bearing alloy now registered as aluminum alloy 2139 by the Aluminum Association. Two commercial scale ingots were processed into nominal plate gauges of two, four and six inches, and were extensively characterized in terms of metallurgical and crystallographic structure, and resulting mechanical properties. This report includes comparisons of the property combinations for this alloy and 2XXX and 7XXX alloys more widely used in high performance applications. Alloy 2139 shows dramatic improvement in all combinations of properties, moreover, the properties of this alloy are retained in all gauge thicknesses, contrary to typical reductions observed in thicker gauges of the other alloys in the comparison. The advancements achieved in this study are expected to result in rapid, widespread use of this alloy in a broad range of ground based, aircraft, and spacecraft applications.

  2. Commercial Capaciflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A capacitive proximity/tactile sensor with unique performance capabilities ('capaciflector' or capacitive reflector) is being developed by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for use on robots and payloads in space in the interests of safety, efficiency, and ease of operation. Specifically, this sensor will permit robots and their attached payloads to avoid collisions in space with humans and other objects and to dock these payloads in a cluttered environment. The sensor is simple, robust, and inexpensive to manufacture with obvious and recognized commercial possibilities. Accordingly, NASA/GSFC, in conjunction with industry, is embarking on an effort to 'spin' this technology off into the private sector. This effort includes prototypes aimed at commercial applications. The principles of operation of these prototypes are described along with hardware, software, modelling, and test results. The hardware description includes both the physical sensor in terms of a flexible printed circuit board and the electronic circuitry. The software description will include filtering and detection techniques. The modelling will involve finite element electric field analysis and will underline techniques used for design optimization.

  3. Development and evaluation of advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.; King, J.F.; Bolling, E.

    1990-01-01

    Research was performed on advanced austenitic alloys for tubing in heat recovery systems. Evaluations addressed the need to optimize strength, fabricability, and surface protection for specific environments and temperatures. Alloys studied included advanced lean austenitic stainless steels and higher chromium alloys to 760{degree}C, nickel-chromium-iron aluminides at temperature to 760{degree}C, and Ni--Cr alloys with capability for service to 1000{degree}C. Coordinated research was performed at a number of universities and industrial research facilities. Evaluation of the lean stainless steels focused on MC-forming alloys and a family of modified 316 stainless steels. Work nearing completion revealed that many of the alloy design criteria for the lean stainless steels could be met. With the judicious selection of thermal-mechanical processing, data indicated that high strength and ductility could be achieved in both base metal and weldments. Fabrication requirements needed to produce optimum performance called for high solution treating temperatures and small levels of cold or warm work. Evaluations of high chromium stainless steels and modifications of alloy 800H were encouraging, and good properties were observed for temperatures to 760{degree}C. Work on the alloys and claddings for service to 1000{degree}C was begun on two commercial alloys of nearest in PBFC hot gas cleanup systems. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Recent advances and developments in refractory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-11-01

    Refractory metal alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Ta, and Nb (Cb) find applications in a wide range of aerospace applications because of their high melting points and high-temperature strength. This paper, presents recent progress in understanding and applications of these alloys. Recent studies to improve the oxidation and mechanical behavior of refractory metal alloys, and particularly Nb alloys, are also discussed. Some Re structures, for extremely high temperature applications (> 2000C), made by CVD and P/M processes, are also illustrated. Interesting work on the development of new W alloys (W-HfC-X) and the characterization of some commercial refractory metals, e.g., K-doped W, TZM, and Nb-1%Zr, continues. Finally, recent developments in high temperature composites reinforced with refractory metal filaments, and refractory metal-based intermetallics, e.g., Nb{sub 3}Al, Nb{sub 2}Be{sub 17}, and MoSi{sub 2}, are briefly described.

  5. Initial cytotoxicity of novel titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Lockwood, P E; Wataha, J C; Okabe, T

    2007-11-01

    We assessed the biological response to several novel titanium alloys that have promising physical properties for biomedical applications. Four commercial titanium alloys [Super-TIX(R) 800, Super-TIX(R) 51AF, TIMETAL(R) 21SRx, and Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM grade 5)] and three experimental titanium alloys [Ti-13Cr-3Cu, Ti-1.5Si and Ti-1.5Si-5Cu] were tested. Specimens (n = 6; 5.0 x 5.0 x 3.0 mm(3)) were cast in a centrifugal casting machine using a MgO-based investment and polished to 600 grit, removing 250 mum from each surface. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti: ASTM grade 2) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) were used as positive controls. The specimens were cleaned and disinfected, and then each cleaned specimen was placed in direct contact with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts for 72 h. The cytotoxicity [succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity] of the extracts was assessed using the MTT method. Cytotoxicity of the metals tested was not statistically different compared to the CP Ti and Teflon controls (p > 0.05). These novel titanium alloys pose cytotoxic risks no greater than many other commonly used alloys, including commercially pure titanium. The promising short-term biocompatibility of these Ti alloys is probably due to their excellent corrosion resistance under static conditions, even in biological environments.

  6. Electric melting methods for developing special alloys for radio electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaulov, N. P.

    2012-06-01

    Possible methods for electric melting of special alloys intended for the production of metal alloy cathodes for electronic microwave devices are considered. The process of production of Pt-Ba and Pd-Ba alloys in a laboratory vacuum arc furnace is described, and the results of controlling the produced cathode materials are presented. This process has been put into operation on a commercial scale.

  7. Microstructure Development and Characteristics of Semisolid Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Merton Flemings; srinath Viswanathan

    2001-05-15

    A drop forge viscometer was employed to investigate the flow behavior under very rapid compression rates of A357, A356 diluted with pure aluminum and Al-4.5%Cu alloys. The A357 alloys were of commercial origin (MHD and SIMA) and the rheocast, modified A356 and Al-4.5Cu alloys were produced by a process developed at the solidification laboratory of MIT.

  8. An investigation of the initiation stage of hot corrosion in Ni-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. T.; Meier, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The commercial nickel base alloy, IN-738, and high purity laboratory alloys were prepared to simulate the effects of the major elements in IN-738. Results indicate that the initiation of hot corrosion attack of IN-738 and other similar alloys is the result of local penetration of molten salt through the protective oxide scale.

  9. Metallography of Aluminum and Its Alloys : Use of Electrolytic Polishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquet, Pierre A

    1955-01-01

    Recent methods are described for electropolishing aluminum and aluminum alloys. Numerous references are included of electrolytic micrographic investigations carried out during the period 1948 to 1952. A detailed description of a commercial electrolytic polishing unit, suitable for micrographic examination of aluminum and its alloys, is included.

  10. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  11. Commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The near term (one to five year) needs of domestic and foreign commercial suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals for electromagnetically separated stable isotopes are assessed. Only isotopes purchased to make products for sale and profit are considered. Radiopharmaceuticals produced from enriched stable isotopes supplied by the Calutron facility at ORNL are used in about 600,000 medical procedures each year in the United States. A temporary or permanent disruption of the supply of stable isotopes to the domestic radiopharmaceutical industry could curtail, if not eliminate, the use of such diagnostic procedures as the thallium heart scan, the gallium cancer scan, the gallium abscess scan, and the low radiation dose thyroid scan. An alternative source of enriched stable isotopes exist in the USSR. Alternative starting materials could, in theory, eventually be developed for both the thallium and gallium scans. The development of a new technology for these purposes, however, would take at least five years and would be expensive. Hence, any disruption of the supply of enriched isotopes from ORNL and the resulting unavailability of critical nuclear medicine procedures would have a dramatic negative effect on the level of health care in the United States.

  12. Longitudinal shear behavior of several oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    Two commercial oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, MA-753 and MA-754, and three experimental ODS alloys, MA-757E, MA-755E, and MA-6000E, were tested in shear at 760 C. Comparisons were made with other turbine blade and vane alloys. All of the ODS alloys exhibited less shear strength than directionally solidified Mar-M 200 = Hf or then conventionally cast B-1900. The strongest ODS alloy tested, MA-755E, was comparable in both shear and tensile strength to the lamellar directionally solidified eutectic alloy gamma/gamma prime - delta. Substantial improvements in shear resistance were found for all alloys tested when the geometry of the specimen was changed from one generating a transverse tensile stress in the shear area to one generating a transverse compressive stress. Finally, 760 C shear strength as a fraction of tensile strength was found to increase linearly with the log of the transverse tensile ductility.

  13. Discoloration of titanium alloy in acidic saline solutions with peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare corrosion behavior in several titanium alloys with immersion in acidulated saline solutions containing hydrogen peroxide. Seven types of titanium alloy were immersed in saline solutions with varying levels of pH and hydrogen peroxide content, and resulting differences in color and release of metallic elements determined in each alloy. Some alloys were characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy. Ti-55Ni alloy showed a high level of dissolution and difference in color. With immersion in solution containing hydrogen peroxide at pH 4, the other alloys showed a marked difference in color but a low level of dissolution. The formation of a thick oxide film was observed in commercially pure titanium showing discoloration. The results suggest that discoloration in titanium alloys immersed in hydrogen peroxide-containing acidulated solutions is caused by an increase in the thickness of this oxide film, whereas discoloration of Ti-55Ni is caused by corrosion. PMID:23370866

  14. Corrosion Testing of Ni Alloy HVOF Coatings in High Temperature Environments for Biomass Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the corrosion behavior of Ni alloy coatings deposited by high velocity oxyfuel spraying, and representative boiler substrate alloys in simulated high temperature biomass combustion conditions. Four commercially available oxidation resistant Ni alloy coating materials were selected: NiCrBSiFe, alloy 718, alloy 625, and alloy C-276. These were sprayed onto P91 substrates using a JP5000 spray system. The corrosion performance of the coatings varied when tested at ~525, 625, and 725 °C in K2SO4-KCl mixture and gaseous HCl-H2O-O2 containing environments. Alloy 625, NiCrBSiFe, and alloy 718 coatings performed better than alloy C-276 coating at 725 °C, which had very little corrosion resistance resulting in degradation similar to uncoated P91. Alloy 625 coatings provided good protection from corrosion at 725 °C, with the performance being comparable to wrought alloy 625, with significantly less attack of the substrate than uncoated P91. Alloy 625 performs best of these coating materials, with an overall ranking at 725 °C as follows: alloy 625 > NiCrBSiFe > alloy 718 ≫ alloy C-276. Although alloy C-276 coatings performed poorly in the corrosion test environment at 725 °C, at lower temperatures (i.e., below the eutectic temperature of the salt mixture) it outperformed the other coating types studied.

  15. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  16. Comparison of the Fatigue Behavior of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Ellis, David

    2006-01-01

    This presentation is about the development of advanced copper alloys with high thermal conductivity, good creep strength, and adequate fatigue strength for rocket engine applications. It also focuses on the commercial availability of the advanced alloy-GRCop-84 developed at NASA-GRC. The presentation's conclusions are that GRCop-84 has equivalent or better isothermal fatigue lives compared to other commercially available copper alloys, that GRCop-84 can be fabricated in various forms with minimal change in the fatigue lives, that it is equivalent in sothermal, fatigue to AMZIRC at moderate temperatures, and that Narloy-Z is equivalent in fatigue capabilities to GRCop-84 at 400C and below.

  17. Development of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; McKamey, C.G.

    1997-12-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200 C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The main areas being addressed are: (a) alloy processing to achieve the desired alloy grain size and shape, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to semi-commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. The recent studies have focused on mechanically-alloyed powder from a commercial alloy vendor. These starting alloy powders were very clean in terms of oxygen content compared to ORNL-produced powders, but contained similar levels of carbon picked up during the milling process. The specific environment used in milling the powder appears to exert a considerable influence on the post-consolidation recrystallization behavior of the alloy. A milling environment which produced powder particles having a high surface carbon content resulted in a consolidated alloy which readily recrystallized, whereas powder with a low surface carbon level after milling resulted in no recrystallization even at 1380 C. A feature of these alloys was the appearance of voids or porosity after the recrystallization anneal, as had been found with ORNL-produced alloys. Adjustment of the recrystallization parameters did not reveal any range of conditions where recrystallization could be accomplished without the formation of voids. Initial creep tests of specimens of the recrystallized alloys indicated a significant increase in creep strength compared to cast or wrought Fe{sub 3}Al, but the specimens failed prematurely by a mechanism that involved brittle fracture of one of the two grains in the test cross section, followed by ductile fracture of the remaining grain. The reasons for this behavior are not yet understood. The

  18. Commercial use of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.; Brown, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the scientific and commercial aspects of Materials Processing in the Space program. The elimination of gravity driven convection in molten materials can preclude undesirable stirring and mixing during crystal growth, and improve the casting of alloys and composites, chemical reactions, and the separation of biological materials. The elimination of hydrostatic pressure will allow alloy heat-treatment without distortion and growth of heavy crystals, such as thorium oxide, and containerless processing of liquids and molten materials. On the other hand, more sophisticated process control and diagnostic methods in sample preparation and temperature control must be developed, concluding that space made products of commercial interest are likely to be low volume, high value items.

  19. Metal dusting and carburization resistance of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.; Grabke, H.J.; Mueller-Lorenz, E.M.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1997-08-01

    Severe material failures caused by so-called metal dusting have been reported during recent years. The reason for these failures were strongly carburizing CO-H{sub 2} gas mixtures such as encountered in chemical plants for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, methanol, ammonia etc. as well as in plants for the reduction of iron ores. The carburization behavior of nine commercial nickel-base alloys and four iron-nickel-chromium alloys was investigated at 650 C in a carburizing H{sub 2}-CO-H{sub 2}O-gas with a carbon activity of a{sub c} {much_gt} 1. The iron-nickel-chromium alloys suffered severe metal dusting after a very short test period. Nickel base alloys were generally less susceptible to metal dusting than iron-base alloys. However, their corrosion behavior was found to depend sensitively on the chromium concentration of the respective alloys. Alloys like alloy 600H, with a chromium concentration of only 16%, suffered wastage rates which were similar to those of the more resistant iron-base alloys. Nickel-base alloys with chromium concentrations of 25% and above, on the other hand, showed no significant evidence of metal dusting even after 10,000 hours of exposure. It was found that these alloys are protected against metal dusting by the formation of a dense, self-healing chromia scale, which prevents the penetration of carbon into the base metal.

  20. Fatigue - corrosion of endoprosthesis titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cornet, A; Muster, D; Jaeger, J H

    1979-01-01

    Commercial total hip prostheses often show certain metallurgical faults (porosities, coarse grains, growth dendrites, carbide networks). In order to investigate more accurately the role played by these different parameters in prostheses failure we performed a large number of systematic corrosion, fatigue and fatigue - corrosion tests on these materials and on commercial total hip prostheses. Ultimate strengthes seem to be reached for cast cobalt alloys, whereas titanium alloys, such as Ta 6 V, present very high fatigue limit under corrosion. Thus, rotative bending fatigue - corrosion tests in biological environment provide values about 50 DaN/mm2. This value, is nevertheless appreciably higher than those obtained with stellites and stainless steel. Titanium alloys, because of their mechanical performances, their weak Young's modulus (11000 DaN/mm2) and their relative lightness (4.5. g/cm3), which are associated with a good biocompatibility, seem very promising for permanent implants realisation.

  1. Aluminum-lithium alloys in helicopters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.F.

    1997-10-01

    Aluminium-lithium alloys are widely applied on the EH101 helicopter, designed and built jointly by GKN Westland Helicopters of England and Agusta S.p.A. of Italy. With the exception of the powder metallurgy alloy AA 5091, all the current commercially available aluminum-lithium alloys are produced by direct-chill casting, and require a precipitation-aging heat treatment to achieve the required properties. In aluminum-lithium alloys containing greater than 1.3% (by weight) of lithium, the intermetallic phase {delta}{prime}-Al{sub 3}Li precipitates upon natural or artificial aging, but the associated strengthening effect is insufficient to meet the medium or high strength levels usually required (the damage tolerant temper in AA 8090 is an exception).

  2. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  3. Bond strength of binary titanium alloys to porcelain.

    PubMed

    Yoda, M; Konno, T; Takada, Y; Iijima, K; Griggs, J; Okuno, O; Kimura, K; Okabe, T

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between porcelain and experimental cast titanium alloys. Eleven binary titanium alloys were examined: Ti-Cr (15, 20, 25 wt%), Ti-Pd (15, 20, 25 wt%), Ti-Ag (10, 15, 20 wt%), and Ti-Cu (5, 10 wt%). As controls, the bond strengths for commercially pure titanium (KS-50, Kobelco, Japan) and a high noble gold alloy (KIK, Ishifuku, Japan) were also examined. Castings were made using a centrifugal casting unit (Ticast Super R, Selec Co., Japan). Commercial porcelain for titanium (TITAN, Noritake, Japan) was applied to cast specimens. The bond strengths were evaluated using a three-point bend test according to ISO 9693. Since the elastic modulus value is needed to evaluate the bond strength, the modulus was measured for each alloy using a three-point bend test. Results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/S-N-K test (alpha = 0.05). Although the elastic moduli of the Ti-Pd alloys were significantly lower than those of other alloys (p = 0.0001), there was a significant difference in bond strength only between the Ti-25Pd and Ti-15Ag alloys (p = 0.009). The strengths determined for all the experimental alloys ranged from 29.4 to 37.2MPa, which are above the minimum value required by the ISO specification (25 MPa).

  4. Processing studies of powder metallurgically-produced high temperature alloys (Processing studies of oxide dispersed alloys for service above 1000/sup 0/ C). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, N.J.; Smith, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the use of homogeneous, fine, R.S. powders of Nickel-base Superalloy IN-100 (a commercial jet engine blade alloy), converted to very fine flake and blended with Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, will produce an extremely stable alloy with outstanding creep and stress rupture properties from about 950 to at least 1100/sup 0/C. The RS OD IN-100 alloy has comparable properties to those reported for the MA-6000 alloy developed by Benjamin et al, but offers a cheaper, faster, much more reproducible product. An operating temperature advantage of 150 to 200/sup 0/C appears attainable for the RS OD IN-100 alloy over that for the commercial precision cast alloy of the same basic composition.

  5. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  6. Effectivity of fluoride treatment on hydrogen and corrosion product generation in temporal implants for different magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Javier; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; Marco, Iñigo; Hurtado, Iñaki; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2013-12-01

    The increasing interest on magnesium alloys relies on their biocompatibility, bioabsorbility and especially on their mechanical properties. Due to these characteristics, magnesium alloys are becoming a promising solution to be used, as temporary implants. However, magnesium alloys must overcome their poor corrosion resistance. This article analyses the corrosion behaviour in phosphate-buffered saline solution of three commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B, WE43 and ZM21) as well as the influence of fluoride treatment on their corrosion behaviour. It is shown that the corrosion rate of all the alloys is decreased by fluoride treatment. However, fluoride treatment affects each alloy differently.

  7. Mechanical behaviour of pressed and sintered titanium alloys obtained from master alloy addition powders.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, L; Esteban, P G; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2012-11-01

    The fabrication of the workhorse Ti-6Al-4V alloy and of the Ti-3Al-2.5V alloy was studied considering the master alloy addition variant of the blending elemental approach conventionally used for titanium powder metallurgy. The powders were characterised by means thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction and shaped by means of uniaxial pressing. The microstructural evolution with the sintering temperature (900-1400 °C) was evaluated by SEM and EDS was used to study the composition. XRD patterns as well as the density by Archimedes method were also obtained. The results indicate that master alloy addition is a suitable way to fabricate well developed titanium alloy but also to produce alloy with the desired composition, not available commercially. Density of 4.3 g/cm³ can be obtained where a temperature higher than 1200 °C is needed for the complete diffusion of the alloying elements. Flexural properties comparable to those specified for wrought Ti-6Al-4V medical devices are, generally, obtained.

  8. Controllable galvanic synthesis of triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes for efficient electrocatalytic methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Luo, Zhimin; Fan, Zhanxi; Yu, Sijia; Chen, Junze; Liao, Yusen; Xue, Can

    2015-06-01

    Triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes were successfully synthesized through galvanic replacement by using Ag nanoprisms as sacrificial templates. The ridge thickness of the Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes could be readily tuned by adjusting the amount of the Pd source during the reaction. These obtained triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity for the methanol oxidation reaction as compared with the commercial Pd/C catalyst due to the alloyed Ag-Pd composition as well as the hollow-framed structures. This work would be highly impactful in the rational design of future bimetallic alloy nanostructures with high catalytic activity for fuel cell systems.

  9. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  10. Characterization of the sodium corrosion behavior of commercial austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Keeton, A.R.; Witkowski, R.E.; Anantatmula, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    During the course of an on-going evaluation of austenitic alloys for potential liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel pin cladding application, a series of commercial alloys was selected for study. The data obtained led to the recognition of an underlying pattern of behavior and enabled the prediction of surface chemistry changes. The changes in surface topographical development from alloy to alloy are shown and the important role played by the element molybdenum in this development is indicated. The presentation also illustrates how a total damage equation was evolved to encompass all aspects of weight loss and metal/sodium interactions: wall thinning ferrite layer formation and intergranular attack. The total damage equation represents a significant departure from the classical description of sodium corrosion in which weight loss is simply translated into wall thinning.

  11. Material options for a commercial fusion reactor first wall

    SciTech Connect

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of various materials for use as first walls in high-power-density commercial fusion reactors. Operating limits for each material were obtained based on a number of criteria, including maximum allowable structural temperatures, critical heat flux, ultimate tensile strength, and design-allowable stress. The results with water as a coolant indicate that a modified alloy similar to HT-9 may be a suitable candidate for low- and medium-power-density reactor first walls with neutron loads of up to 6 MW/m/sup 2/. A vanadium or copper alloy must be used for high-power-density reactors. The neutron wall load limit for vanadium alloys is about 14 MW/sup 2/, provided a suitable coating material is chosen. The extremely limited data base for radiation effects hinders any quantitative assessment of the limits for copper alloys.

  12. Surface modification by alkali and heat treatments in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baek-Hee; Do Kim, Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Hwan Lee, Kyu

    2002-09-01

    Pure titanium and titanium alloys are normally used for orthopedic and dental prostheses. Nevertheless, their chemical, biological, and mechanical properties still can be improved by the development of new preparation technologies. This has been the limiting factor for these metals to show low affinity to living bone. The purpose of this study is to improve the bone-bonding ability between titanium alloys and living bone through a chemically activated process and a thermally activated one. Two kinds of titanium alloys, a newly designed Ti-In-Nb-Ta alloy and a commercially available Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy, were used in this study. In this study, surface modification of the titanium alloys by alkali and heat treatments (AHT), alkali treated in 5.0M NaOH solution, and heat treated in vacuum furnace at 600 degrees C, is reported. After AHT, the effects of the AHT on the bone integration property were evaluated in vitro. Surface morphologies of AHT were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical compositional surface changes were investigated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Titanium alloys with surface modification by AHT showed improved bioactive behavior, and the Ti-In-Nb-Ta alloy had better bioactivity than the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy in vitro.

  13. High Temperature Irradiation Effects in Selected Generation IV Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T; Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Generation IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, irradiation and testing were carried out to address the issue of high temperature irradiation effects with selected current and potential candidate metallic alloys. The materials tested were (1) a high-nickel iron-base alloy (Alloy 800H); (2) a nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617); (3) two advanced nano-structured ferritic alloys (designated 14YWT and 14WT); and (4) a commercial ferritic-martensitic steel (annealed 9Cr-1MoV). Small tensile specimens were irradiated in rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at temperatures from about 550 to 700 C and to irradiation doses in the range 1.2 to 1.6 dpa. The Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 exhibited significant hardening after irradiation at 580 C; some hardening occurred at 660 C as well, but the 800H showed extremely low tensile elongations when tested at 700 C. Notably, the grain boundary engineered 800H exhibited even greater hardening at 580 C and retained a high amount of ductility. Irradiation effects on the two nano-structured ferritic alloys and the annealed 9Cr-1MoV were relatively slight at this low dose.

  14. Alloy NASA-HR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Mitchell, Michael

    2005-01-01

    NASA-HR-1 is a high-strength Fe-Ni-base superalloy that resists high-pressure hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE), oxidation, and corrosion. Originally derived from JBK-75, NASA-HR-1 has exceptional HEE resistance that can be attributed to its gamma-matrix and eta-free (Ni3Ti) grain boundaries. The chemistry was formulated using a design approach capable of accounting for the simultaneous effects of several alloy additions. This approach included: (1) Systematically modifying gamma-matrix compositions based on JBK-75; (2) Increasing gamma (Ni3(Al,Ti)) volume fraction and adding gamma-matrix strengthening elements to obtain higher strength; and (3) Obtaining precipitate-free grain boundaries. The most outstanding attribute of NASA-HR-1 is its ability to resist HEE while showing much improved strength. NASA-HR-1 has approximately 25% higher yield strength than JXK-75 and exhibits tensile elongation of more than 20% with no ductility loss in a hydrogen environment at 5 ksi, an achievement unparalleled by any other commercially available alloy. Its Cr and Ni contents provide exceptional resistance to environments that promote oxidation and corrosion. Microstructural stability was maintained by improved solid solubility of the gamma-matrix, along with the addition of alloying elements to retard eta (Ni3Ti) precipitation. NASA-HR-1 represents a new system that greatly extends the compositional ranges of existing HEE-resistant Fe-Ni-base superalloys.

  15. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  16. [Comparative analysis of 3D data accuracy of single tooth and full dental arch captured by different intraoral and laboratory digital impression systems].

    PubMed

    Parunov, V A; Yurkovets, P V; Lebedenko, I Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine changes in physical and mechanical properties of dental alloys depending of the initial composition at re-casting. Russianc precious alloys: Plagodent (AuPtPd) and Palladent (PdAu) and base alloys: Vitiriy-N (NiCrMo) and Vitiriy-C (CoCrMo) were used as study samples, which were divided in three groups: a primary casting from the granules; 50% of re-casting; 100% of re-casting. We investigated the yield strength in bending, coefficient of thermal expansion and hardness. Changing in the composition of the alloys has led to changes of all physical and mechanical properties. PMID:27636767

  17. [Comparative analysis of 3D data accuracy of single tooth and full dental arch captured by different intraoral and laboratory digital impression systems].

    PubMed

    Parunov, V A; Yurkovets, P V; Lebedenko, I Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine changes in physical and mechanical properties of dental alloys depending of the initial composition at re-casting. Russianc precious alloys: Plagodent (AuPtPd) and Palladent (PdAu) and base alloys: Vitiriy-N (NiCrMo) and Vitiriy-C (CoCrMo) were used as study samples, which were divided in three groups: a primary casting from the granules; 50% of re-casting; 100% of re-casting. We investigated the yield strength in bending, coefficient of thermal expansion and hardness. Changing in the composition of the alloys has led to changes of all physical and mechanical properties.

  18. Superplastic forming of INCONEL alloy 718SPF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gaylord D.; Yates, Daniel H.

    The hot gas path temperatures of most aircraft turbine components exceed the temperature limits of aluminum- and titanium-based alloys presently used for superplastic forming (SPF). Because of the clear design and cost benefits associated with SPE the need for an alloy with a substantially higher temperature capability is evident. This paper demonstrates that INCONEL alloy 718SPF meets this challenge. The SPF parameters of temperature, flow stress, and strain rate are presented as well as the elongations to failure. Post-SPF tensile properties are compared to the original sheet values in both the as-processed and as-processed plus heat treated condition. The degree of cavitation is assessed as a function of percent engineering strain at typical commercial strain rates and the role of cavitation growth by diffusion is indicated.

  19. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  20. Cellular response of titanium and its alloys as implants.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Rahul; Bhola, Shaily M; Mishra, Brajendra; Ayers, Reed; Olson, David L; Ohno, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The cellular response of osteocytes to commercially pure titanium (α) and its alloys (α + β and β) has been tested in a culture media, and the results have been supplemented by analyses from various techniques such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP-AES) analysis, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), metallography, and electrochemical measurements. These results have been correlated with respect to the presence of various alloying elements in these alloys to qualify them for human application. The newer β alloys have been examined for their potential use as implants. These results serve as a preliminary baseline to characterize the best alloy system for a comprehensive long-term investigation.

  1. Thermo-Mechanical Processing Parameters for the INCONEL ALLOY 740

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, G.M.; Smith, G.

    2007-11-19

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Special Metals Corporation (SMC) to determine the mechanical property response of the IN740 alloy to help establish thermo-mechanical processing parameters for the use of this alloy in supercritical and ultra-critical boiler tubes with the potential for other end uses. SMC had developed an alloy, commercially known as INCONEL alloy 740, which exhibited various beneficial physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. As part of SMC's on-going efforts to optimize this alloy for targeted boiler applications there was a need to develop an understanding of the thermo-mechanical response of the material, characterize the resulting microstructure from this processing, and possibly, utilize models to develop the appropriate processing scheme for this product.

  2. Commercialism in Experiential Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Steve

    1987-01-01

    Examines perceived threat of commercialism on the ethical foundation of the experiential education movement. Contends that relationship between humanistic values often espoused by experiential educators need not be in conflict with a commercial, profit-oriented perspective. (NEC)

  3. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  4. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  5. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  6. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  7. Simulating the corrosion of zirconium alloys in the water coolant of VVER reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Motkova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    A model for predicting the corrosion of cladding zirconium alloys depending on their composition and operating conditions is proposed. Laws of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics of the reactions through which the multicomponent zirconium alloy is oxidized in the reactor coolant constitute the physicochemical heart of the model. The developed version of the model is verified against the results obtained from tests of fuel rod claddings made of commercial-grade and experimental zirconium alloys carried out by different researchers under autoclave and reactor conditions. It is shown that the proposed model adequately describes the corrosion of alloys in coolants used at nuclear power stations. It is determined that, owing to boiling of coolant and its acidification in a VVER-1200 reactor, Zr-1% Nb alloys with additions of iron and oxygen must be more resistant to corrosion than the commercial-grade alloy E110.

  8. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An expanded role for the U.S. private sector in America's space future has emerged as a key national objective, and NASA's Office of Commercial Programs is providing a focus for action. The Office supports new high technology commercial space ventures, the commercial application of existing aeronautics and space technology, and expanded commercial access to available NASA capabilities and services. The progress NASA has made in carrying out its new assignment is highlighted.

  9. Commercial Banking Industry Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright Horizons Children's Centers, Cambridge, MA.

    Work and family programs are becoming increasingly important in the commercial banking industry. The objective of this survey was to collect information and prepare a commercial banking industry profile on work and family programs. Fifty-nine top American commercial banks from the Fortune 500 list were invited to participate. Twenty-two…

  10. Commercialism in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kirstin

    2001-01-01

    This document gives voice to concerns raised by critics and supporters of commercialism in schools and provides brief descriptions of several important resources on this topic. "Commercial Activities in School" (U.S. General Accounting Office) reports on the nature and frequency of commercial activities in public schools, as well as the laws and…

  11. COMMERCIAL FOODS, MATHEMATICS - I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DORNFIELD, BLANCHE E.

    THE UNDERSTANDING AND MASTERY OF FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS IS A NECESSARY PART OF COMMERCIAL FOODS WORK. THIS STUDENT HANDBOOK WAS DESIGNED TO ACCOMPANY A COMMERCIAL FOODS COURSE AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FOR STUDENTS WITH APPROPRIATE APTITUDES AND COMMERCIAL FOOD SERVICE GOALS. THE MATERIAL, TESTED IN VARIOUS INTERESTED CLASSROOMS, WAS PREPARED BY…

  12. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  13. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  14. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  15. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  16. NASA's commercial space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will review the goals, status and progress of NASA's commercial space development program administered by the Office of Commercial Programs (OCP). The technologies and flight programs underway by NASA's Centers for Commercial Development (CCDS), NASA's field centers, and the NASA/Industry Joint Endeavor Programs will be summarized. A summary of completed and upcoming commercial payload activities on Shuttle, suborbital rockets, and orbital ELV's will be provided. The new commercial infrastructure and transportation initiatives will be discussed including the Wake Shield Facility, Consort and Joust suborbital rocket programs, the COMET orbital and recovery program, and the Commercial Middeck Accommodation Module Program with Spacehab Inc. Finally, the Commercial Space Station Freedom Program planned by OCP will be reviewed.

  17. High Performance Commercial Fenestration Framing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Manteghi; Sneh Kumar; Joshua Early; Bhaskar Adusumalli

    2010-01-31

    A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy is to have a zero energy commercial building by the year 2025. Windows have a major influence on the energy performance of the building envelope as they control over 55% of building energy load, and represent one important area where technologies can be developed to save energy. Aluminum framing systems are used in over 80% of commercial fenestration products (i.e. windows, curtain walls, store fronts, etc.). Aluminum framing systems are often required in commercial buildings because of their inherent good structural properties and long service life, which is required from commercial and architectural frames. At the same time, they are lightweight and durable, requiring very little maintenance, and offer design flexibility. An additional benefit of aluminum framing systems is their relatively low cost and easy manufacturability. Aluminum, being an easily recyclable material, also offers sustainable features. However, from energy efficiency point of view, aluminum frames have lower thermal performance due to the very high thermal conductivity of aluminum. Fenestration systems constructed of aluminum alloys therefore have lower performance in terms of being effective barrier to energy transfer (heat loss or gain). Despite the lower energy performance, aluminum is the choice material for commercial framing systems and dominates the commercial/architectural fenestration market because of the reasons mentioned above. In addition, there is no other cost effective and energy efficient replacement material available to take place of aluminum in the commercial/architectural market. Hence it is imperative to improve the performance of aluminum framing system to improve the energy performance of commercial fenestration system and in turn reduce the energy consumption of commercial building and achieve zero energy building by 2025. The objective of this project was to develop high performance, energy efficient commercial

  18. Effects of Temperature on the Hardness and Wear Resistance of High-Tungsten Stellite Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Wu, X. J.; Kapoor, Samit; Yao, M. X.; Collier, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    In this research, two new Stellite alloys containing high tungsten are developed for wear resistance application owing to the distinct beneficial effects of tungsten in Stellite alloys. The microstructures of these alloys are analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an EDAX energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy system and X-ray diffraction spectrum. The micro-hardness and wear resistance of the alloys at room temperature and at elevated temperatures are investigated utilizing a Microhardness Tester Unit, with a Hot Stage, and a Hot Pin-on-Disk Tribometer, respectively. The wear test results of these alloys are compared with those of commercial wear-resistant Stellite 3 and Stellite 12. The worn surfaces of the specimens are analyzed using SEM/EDX to explore the wear mechanisms of these alloys with temperature change. The variations of hardness and wear resistance of these alloys with temperature are studied and discussed.

  19. Formation and Stability of Equiatomic and Nonequiatomic Nanocrystalline CuNiCoZnAlTi High-Entropy Alloys by Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varalakshmi, S.; Kamaraj, M.; Murty, B. S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanocrystalline equiatomic high-entropy alloys (HEAs) have been synthesized by mechanical alloying in the Cu-Ni-Co-Zn-Al-Ti system from the binary CuNi alloy to the hexanary CuNiCoZnAlTi alloy. An attempt also has been made to find the influence of nonequiatomic compositions on the HEA formation by varying the Cu content up to 50 at. pct (Cu x NiCoZnAlTi; x = 0, 8.33, 33.33, 49.98 at. pct). The phase formation and stability of mechanically alloyed powder at an elevated temperature (1073 K [800 °C] for 1 hour) were studied. The nanocrystalline equiatomic Cu-Ni-Co-Zn-Al-Ti alloys have a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure up to quinary compositions and have a body-centered cubic (bcc) structure in a hexanary alloy. In nonequiatomic alloys, bcc is the dominating phase in the alloys containing 0 and 8.33 at. pct of Cu, and the fcc phase was observed in alloys with 33.33 and 49.98 at. pct of Cu. The Vicker’s bulk hardness and compressive strength of the equiatomic nanocrystalline hexanary CuNiCoZnAlTi HEA after hot isostatic pressing is 8.79 GPa, and the compressive strength is 2.76 GPa. The hardness of these HEAs is higher than most commercial hard facing alloys ( e.g., Stellite, which is 4.94 GPa).

  20. World commercial aircraft accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of all accidents world-wide involving aircraft in commercial service which resulted in the loss of the airframe or one or more fatality, or both. This information has been gathered in order to present a complete inventory of commercial aircraft accidents. Events involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, hijackings, suicides, and industrial ground accidents are included within this list. Included are: accidents involving world commercial jet aircraft, world commercial turboprop aircraft, world commercial pistonprop aircraft with four or more engines and world commercial pistonprop aircraft with two or three engines from 1946 to 1992. Each accident is presented with information in the following categories: date of the accident, airline and its flight numbers, type of flight, type of aircraft, aircraft registration number, construction number/manufacturers serial number, aircraft damage, accident flight phase, accident location, number of fatalities, number of occupants, cause, remarks, or description (brief) of the accident, and finally references used. The sixth chapter presents a summary of the world commercial aircraft accidents by major aircraft class (e.g. jet, turboprop, and pistonprop) and by flight phase. The seventh chapter presents several special studies including a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types with 100 or more fatalities in order of decreasing number of fatalities, a list of collision accidents involving commercial aircrafts, and a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, and hijackings.

  1. Multi-functional magnesium alloys containing interstitial oxygen atoms.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Choi, H J; Kang, S W; Shin, S E; Choi, G S; Bae, D H

    2016-03-15

    A new class of magnesium alloys has been developed by dissolving large amounts of oxygen atoms into a magnesium lattice (Mg-O alloys). The oxygen atoms are supplied by decomposing titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a magnesium melt at 720 °C; the titanium is then completely separated out from the magnesium melt after solidification. The dissolved oxygen atoms are located at the octahedral sites of magnesium, which expand the magnesium lattice. These alloys possess ionic and metallic bonding characteristics, providing outstanding mechanical and functional properties. A Mg-O-Al casting alloy made in this fashion shows superior mechanical performance, chemical resistance to corrosion, and thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a similar Mg-O-Zn wrought alloy shows high elongation to failure (>50%) at room temperature, because the alloy plastically deforms with only multiple slips in the sub-micrometer grains (<300 nm) surrounding the larger grains (~15 μm). The metal/non-metal interstitial alloys are expected to open a new paradigm in commercial alloy design.

  2. Multi-functional magnesium alloys containing interstitial oxygen atoms

    PubMed Central

    Kang, H.; Choi, H. J.; Kang, S. W.; Shin, S. E.; Choi, G. S.; Bae, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of magnesium alloys has been developed by dissolving large amounts of oxygen atoms into a magnesium lattice (Mg-O alloys). The oxygen atoms are supplied by decomposing titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a magnesium melt at 720 °C; the titanium is then completely separated out from the magnesium melt after solidification. The dissolved oxygen atoms are located at the octahedral sites of magnesium, which expand the magnesium lattice. These alloys possess ionic and metallic bonding characteristics, providing outstanding mechanical and functional properties. A Mg-O-Al casting alloy made in this fashion shows superior mechanical performance, chemical resistance to corrosion, and thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a similar Mg-O-Zn wrought alloy shows high elongation to failure (>50%) at room temperature, because the alloy plastically deforms with only multiple slips in the sub-micrometer grains (<300 nm) surrounding the larger grains (~15 μm). The metal/non-metal interstitial alloys are expected to open a new paradigm in commercial alloy design. PMID:26976372

  3. Multi-functional magnesium alloys containing interstitial oxygen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.; Choi, H. J.; Kang, S. W.; Shin, S. E.; Choi, G. S.; Bae, D. H.

    2016-03-01

    A new class of magnesium alloys has been developed by dissolving large amounts of oxygen atoms into a magnesium lattice (Mg-O alloys). The oxygen atoms are supplied by decomposing titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a magnesium melt at 720 °C the titanium is then completely separated out from the magnesium melt after solidification. The dissolved oxygen atoms are located at the octahedral sites of magnesium, which expand the magnesium lattice. These alloys possess ionic and metallic bonding characteristics, providing outstanding mechanical and functional properties. A Mg-O-Al casting alloy made in this fashion shows superior mechanical performance, chemical resistance to corrosion, and thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a similar Mg-O-Zn wrought alloy shows high elongation to failure (>50%) at room temperature, because the alloy plastically deforms with only multiple slips in the sub-micrometer grains (<300 nm) surrounding the larger grains (~15 μm). The metal/non-metal interstitial alloys are expected to open a new paradigm in commercial alloy design.

  4. Alloying of aluminum-beryllium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova, L. V.; Ilyushin, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The existing phase diagrams of Al-Be- X alloys, where X is an alloying element, are analyzed. Element X is noted to poorly dissolve in both aluminum and beryllium. It is shown that the absence of intermetallic compounds in the Al-Be system affects the phase equilibria in an Al-Be- X system. Possible phase equilibria involving phases based on aluminum, beryllium, and intermetallic compounds are proposed, and the types of strengthening of Al-Be alloys by an addition of a third element are classified.

  5. Effect of alloying elements on the corrosion behaviour of copper-nickel alloys in a marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Abulmaali M. Y.

    Copper-nickel alloys have been used in many applications in marine environments, because of excellent corrosion and biofouling resistance. In this study, the effect of alloying elements (including iron, aluminum, chromium, cobalt, titanium, molybdenum, indium, and vanadium) on the corrosion behaviour of 90 w% copper-10 w% nickel alloys in sea water are investigated. Experiments were performed at 298 K on a commercial copper-nickel alloy C70600 to serve as a reference point for the synthetic alloys. New copper-nickel alloys were prepared in an induction furnace, in an argon/7% vol. hydrogen atmosphere in cylindrical boron nitride crucibles. They were then homogenized at 950°C for 10 hours in the same protective atmosphere. The electrochemical behaviour was investigated by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), cyclic polarization (CP), cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel extrapolation (TE) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion product that formed on the surface was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The electrochemical behaviour of commercial alloy C70600 depends on the amount of sulphate in the solution. Increasing the amount of sulphate to more than 400 ppm in the electrolyte limits the ability of the passive film to protect the alloy. The behaviour of the commercial alloy in sea water was similar to that in a 2260 ppm sulphate artificial saline solution but was not exactly the same. The passive film formed on the surface was uniform in thickness and consisted of more than one layer. The passive film consisted mainly of chlorides in solutions with no sulphate. The presence of sulphate in the corrosive solutions produces a passive layer containing mainly chlorides with some sulphides (FeS, NiS, and CuS). The electrochemical behaviour of the synthetic Cu-Ni-Fe alloys

  6. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  7. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

  8. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  9. Comparative In Vitro Study of Ti-12V-9Sn Shape Memory Alloy with C.P. Ti and Ti-12V Alloy for Potential Biomedical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, K. J.; Wang, B. L.; Zhou, F. Y.; Lin, W. J.; Li, L.; Lin, J. P.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2012-12-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrochemical behavior of Ti-12V-9Sn shape memory alloy were investigated, with commercial pure titanium (C.P. Ti) and Ti-12V alloy as controls. The metastable β phase was partially retained and α″ martensite phase was obtained in Ti-12V-9Sn alloy, whereas only martensitic phases (α' and α″) existed in Ti-12V alloy at room temperature. Ti-12V-9Sn alloy exhibited a good combination of strength and elongation, which showed a "double yield" feature, along with a complete shape recovery strain of 4%. The electrochemical measurements indicated that all of the experimental samples exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the artificial saliva with and without 0.2% NaF, among which Ti-12V-9Sn alloy possessed the lowest corrosion current density in both kinds of simulated body fluids.

  10. Manufacture and engine test of advanced oxide dispersion strengthened alloy turbine vanes. [for space shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide-Dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-Cr-Al alloy systems were exploited for turbine engine vanes which would be used for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Available commercial and developmental advanced ODS alloys were evaluated, and three were selected based on established vane property goals and manufacturing criteria. The selected alloys were evaluated in an engine test. Candidate alloys were screened by strength, thermal fatigue resistance, oxidation and sulfidation resistance. The Ni-16Cr (3 to 5)Al-ThO2 system was identified as having attractive high temperature oxidation resistance. Subsequent work also indicated exceptional sulfidation resistance for these alloys.

  11. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  12. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  13. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  14. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  15. Macrosegregation in aluminum alloy ingot cast by the semicontinuous direct chill method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, H.; Granger, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of the semicontinuous DC casting method is developed to predict the positive segregation observed at the subsurface and the negative segregation commonly found at the center of large commercial-size aluminum alloy ingot. Qualitative analysis of commercial-size aluminum alloy semicontinuous cast direct chill (DC) ingot is carried out. In the analysis, both positive segregation in the ingot subsurface and negative segregation at the center of the ingot are examined. Ingot subsurface macrosegregation is investigated by considering steady state casting of a circular cross-section binary alloy ingot. Nonequilibrium solidification is assumed with no solid diffusion, constant equilibrium partition ratio, and constant solid density.

  16. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  17. Applications of high-temperature powder metal aluminum alloys to small gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millan, P. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A program aimed at the development of advanced powder-metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys for high-temperature applications up to 650 F using the concepts of rapid solidification and mechanical alloying is discussed. In particular, application of rapidly solidified PM aluminum alloys to centrifugal compressor impellers, currently used in auxiliary power units for both military and commercial aircraft and potentially for advanced automotive gas turbine engines, is examined. It is shown that substitution of high-temperature aluminum for titanium alloy impellers operating in the 360-650 F range provides significant savings in material and machining costs and results in reduced component weight, and consequently, reduced rotating group inertia requirements.

  18. Electrochemical Impedance Analysis of β-TITANIUM Alloys as Implants in Ringers Lactate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhola, Rahul; Bhola, Shaily M.; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.

    2010-02-01

    Commercially pure titanium and two β-titanium alloys, TNZT and TMZF, have been characterized using various electrochemical techniques for their corrosion behavior in Ringers lactate solution. The variation of corrosion potential and solution pH with time has been discussed. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy has been used to fit the results into a circuit model. The stability of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys has been correlated with impedance phase angles. Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization has been used to compute the corrosion parameters for the alloys. TMZF is found to be a better β-alloy as compared to TNZT.

  19. Measurement of the density of liquid aluminum-319 alloy by an x-ray attenuation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Gallegos, G.F.

    1994-11-01

    This study was made for assisting in casting simulations. A relatively simple apparatus was constructed for measuring the density of Al-based alloys in the solid and liquid states up to 900 C. One of the more important physical properties of a casting alloy, solidification shrinkage, was measured for a commercial Al alloy (Al-319). It was found that while the thermal expansion of Al-319 in both solid and liquid phases is similar to that of pure Al, the density of the liquid alloy is lower than estimated by averaging the atomic volumes of the pure liquid components. The densities were measured by x-ray attenuation.

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDANCE ANALYSIS OF beta-TITANIUM ALLOYS AS IMPLANTS IN RINGERS LACTATE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bhola, Rahul; Bhola, Shaily M.; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.

    2010-02-22

    Commercially pure titanium and two beta-titanium alloys, TNZT and TMZF, have been characterized using various electrochemical techniques for their corrosion behavior in Ringers lactate solution. The variation of corrosion potential and solution pH with time has been discussed. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy has been used to fit the results into a circuit model. The stability of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys has been correlated with impedance phase angles. Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization has been used to compute the corrosion parameters for the alloys. TMZF is found to be a better beta-alloy as compared to TNZT.

  1. Evaluation of Sc-Bearing Aluminum Alloy C557 for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Dicus, Dennis L.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of the Al-Mg-Sc alloy C557 was evaluated to assess its potential for a broad range of aerospace applications, including airframe and launch vehicle structures. Of specific interest were mechanical properties at anticipated service temperatures and thermal stability of the alloy. Performance was compared with conventional airframe aluminum alloys and with other emerging aluminum alloys developed for specific service environments. Mechanical properties and metallurgical structure were evaluated for commercially rolled sheet in the as-received H116 condition and after thermal exposures at 107 C. Metallurgical analyses were performed to de.ne grain morphology and texture, strengthening precipitates, and to assess the effect of thermal exposure.

  2. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  3. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  4. Characteristics of aluminum alloy microplastic deformation in different structural states

    SciTech Connect

    Seregin, G.V.; Efimenko, L.L.; Leonov, M.V.

    1995-07-01

    The solution to the problem of improving the mechanical properties (including cyclic strength) of structural materials is largely dependent on our knowledge of the laws governing the development of microplastic deformations in them. The effect of heat and mechanical treatment on the elastoplastic properties and fatigue resistance of the commercial aluminum alloys AK4-1 and D16 is analyzed.

  5. Corrosion of copper, nickel, and gold dental casting alloys: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B I; Lucas, L C; Lemons, J E

    1989-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercially available copper, nickel, and gold alloys for dental castings was investigated. The alloys investigated included: three copper alloys (76-87Cu, 6-11A1, 0-12Zn, 1-5Ni, 0-4Fe, 0.5-1.2Mn), two nickel alloys (68-78Ni, 12-16Cr, 4-14Mo, 0-1.7Be), and one gold alloy (77Au, 14Ag, 8Cu, 1Pd). Anodic and cathodic polarization curves, long-term immersion tests in saline and artificial saliva solutions, and dog crown studies were conducted to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo corrosion characteristics of the alloys. All evaluations conducted demonstrated that the copper alloys were highly susceptible to corrosion attack. High corrosion currents were observed in the in vitro tests, and SEM of the alloys specimens showed significantly altered surfaces. The anodic polarization curves predicted that the beryllium-containing nickel alloy should be susceptible to localized corrosion and SEM revealed an etched surface with corrosion of certain microstructural features. No significant corrosion was predicted or observed for the non-beryllium nickel alloy and the gold alloy. The in vitro corrosion evaluations predicted the in vivo corrosion behavior for the alloys. Since the three copper alloys and the beryllium-containing nickel alloy demonstrated significant corrosion under the tested conditions, the use of these alloys for restorative procedures is questionable due to the release of significant levels of selected ions to the oral cavity.

  6. Cobalt-chromium-titanium alloy for removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Iwama, C Y; Preston, J D

    1997-01-01

    Pure elemental titanium was alloyed with cobalt and chromium in dilutions of 4%, 5%, and 6% to evaluate the suitability of the resulting alloy for removable partial denture frameworks. The physical properties of the Co-Cr-Ti alloy were compared to the properties of a commercial pure titanium and Vitallium. Clasp replicas were cast in Co-Cr-Ti and Vitallium and subjected to cyclic deflection. Representative specimens from the fatigue failure tests were then evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and analyzed for elemental content. The 5% titanium dilution of cobalt-chromium proved to have the best physical properties and was used for comparison with the pure titanium and Vitallium. The Co-Cr-5% Ti had significantly better physical properties than pure titanium and a greater flexure fatigue limit than the Vitallium alloy.

  7. Tensile and toughness assessment of the procured advanced alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-09-11

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance by 2024 in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments

  8. Commercial considerations for immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    The underlying drivers of scientific processes have been rapidly evolving, but the ever-present need for research funding is typically foremost amongst these. Successful laboratories are embracing this reality by making certain that their projects have commercial value right from the beginning of the project conception. Which factors to be considered for commercial success need to be well thought out and incorporated into a project plan with similar levels of detail as would be the technical elements. Specific examples of commercial outcomes in the field of Immunoproteomics are exemplified in this discussion. PMID:23963949

  9. Commercial Biomedical Experiments Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. The biomedical experiments CIBX-2 payload is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the stars program. Here, Astronaut Story Musgrave activates the CMIX-5 (Commercial MDA ITA experiment) payload in the Space Shuttle mid deck during the STS-80 mission in 1996 which is similar to CIBX-2. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  10. Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny C. Servo, Ph.D.

    2004-07-12

    In order to fulfill the objective of Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR), the Department of Energy funds an initiative referred to as the Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP). The over-arching purpose of the CAP is to facilitate transition of the SBIR-funded technology to Phase III defined as private sector investment or receipt of non-sbir dollars to further the commercialization of the technology. Phase III also includes increased sales. This report summarizes the stages involved in the implementation of the Commercialization Assistance Program, a program which has been most successful in fulfilling its objectives.

  11. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  12. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  13. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  14. Nickel base coating alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A. (Inventor); Lowell, C. E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Zirconium is added to a Ni-30 Al (beta) intermetallic alloy in the range of 0.05 w/o to 0.25 w/o. This addition is made during melting or by using metal powders. The addition of zirconium improves the cyclic oxidation resistance of the alloys at temperatures above 1100 C.

  15. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-01-01

    An alloy is presented for use as a reactor fuel. The binary alloy consists essentially of from about 5 to 90 atomic per cent cerium and the balance being plutonium. A complete phase diagram for the cerium--plutonium system is given.

  16. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  17. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  18. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  19. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  20. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  1. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA-sponsored and assisted commercial space activities of 1989 are presented. Industrial R and D in space, centers for the commercial development of space, and new cooperative agreements are addressed in the U.S. private sector in space section. In the building U.S. competitiveness through technology section, the following topics are presented: (1) technology utilization as a national priority; (2) an exploration of benefits; and (3) honoring Apollo-Era spinoffs. International and domestic R and D trends, and the space sector are discussed in the section on selected economic indicators. Other subjects included in this report are: (1) small business innovation; (2) budget highlights and trends; (3) commercial programs management; and (4) the commercial programs advisory committee.

  2. Studies of Corrosion Resistant Materials Being Considered for High-Level Nuclear Waste Containment in Yucca Mountain Relevant Environments

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; Ilevbare, G.; Estill, J.; Rebak, R.

    2001-12-09

    Containment of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified forms of high level nuclear waste require use of materials that are highly corrosion resistant to all of the anticipated environmental scenarios that can occur in a geological repository. Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. A range of water compositions that may contact the outer barrier is under consideration, and a testing program is underway to characterize the forms of corrosion and to quantify the corrosion rates. Results from the testing support models for long term prediction of the performance of the container. Results obtained to date indicate a very low general corrosion rate for Alloy 22 and very high resistance to all forms of localized and environmentally assisted cracking in environments tested to date.

  3. Effect of recasting on the oxidation layer of a palladium-silver porcelain alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.M.; Razzoog, M.E.; Lang, B.R.

    1988-04-01

    The oxidation zone of a commercial palladium-silver porcelain alloy was compared after repeated casting with and without the addition of new alloy. The intensity of palladium, silver, tin, indium, and O K-alpha near the oxidation zone was analyzed with XMA. The intensity curves of tin, silver, and oxygen increased progressively through each generation despite the addition of new alloy. The thickness of the oxidation zone and the microporosities at the internal oxidation zone increased through each generation without the addition of new alloy. Although the findings indicated that the oxidation zone was favorably formed by adding new alloy, 50% by weight, for four generations, the silver and metallic oxides of the oxidation zone increased through each generation. The reuse of the palladium-silver porcelain alloy remains questionable.

  4. Beta titanium alloys in the 80's; Proceedings of the Symposium, Atlanta, GA, March 8, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, R.R.; Rosenberg, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the use of beta-Ti in the SR-71 aircraft, the microstructure and properties of beta-Ti alloys, the effects of hydrogen, heat treatment, and omega-phase formation on beta-Ti, the primary processing of beta- and near-beta-Ti alloys, the processing window for grain size control in metastable beta-Ti, grain growth in beta III-Ti, the processing and properties of Ti-17 alloy for aircraft and turbine applications, the isothermal forging of beta- and near-beta-Ti alloys, the torsional properties of beta-Ti in automotive suspension springs, and the martensitic Transage Ti alloys. Also covered are Ti-Nb superconductors, and property compilations for such commercial and developmental beta-Ti alloys as beta-III, Ti-15-3, Ti-17, Transage 134, and cast and wrought Transage 175.

  5. Effects of Zn-In-Sn elements on the electric properties of magnesium alloy anode materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhan; Ju, Dongying; Zhao, Hongyang; Hu, Xiaodong

    2011-06-01

    A new magnesium alloy anode is based on an environmentally friendly electrode that contains none of mercury, lead and chromate, but it can enhance the electric properties of alloy significantly. Magnesium alloy adding eco-friendly elements Zn-In-Sn which was developed by orthogonal design were obtained by two casting methods. The effect of additive elements on performance of electrode material was studied. The effects of elements addition and casting method on electric properties and corrosive properties of Mg-Zn-In-Sn alloys were investigated by using electrochemical measurements, corrosive tests and observation of surface structure. The results show that Mg-Zn-In-Sn alloy anode has higher electromotive force and more stable work potential than that commercial magnesium alloy AZ91. It is suitable for anode material of magnesium battery for its small hydrogen evolution, less self-corrosion rate and easy to shed corrosive offspring off.

  6. Technology Commercialization Program 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

  7. Welding technology. [technology transfer of NASA developments to commercial organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Welding processes which have been developed during NASA space program activities are discussed. The subjects considered are: (1) welding with an electron gun, (2) technology of welding special alloys, and (3) welding shop techniques and equipment. The material presented is part of the combined efforts of NASA and the Small Business Administration to provide technology transfer of space-related developments to the benefit of commercial organizations.

  8. ERC commercialization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MW power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full-sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MW Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

  9. Development and quality assessments of commercial heat production of ATF FeCrAl tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-01

    Development and quality assessment of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl tube production with commercial manufacturers were conducted. The manufacturing partners include Sophisticated Alloys, Inc. (SAI), Butler, PA for FeCrAl alloy casting via vacuum induction melting, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for extrusion process to prepare the master bars/tubes to be tube-drawn, and Rhenium Alloys, Inc. (RAI), North Ridgeville, OH, for tube-drawing process. The masters bars have also been provided to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) who works with Century Tubes, Inc., (CTI), San Diego, CA, as parallel tube production effort under the current program.

  10. Shear bond strength between titanium alloys and composite resin: sandblasting versus fluoride-gel treatment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bum-Soon; Heo, Seok-Mo; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Cheol-We

    2003-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoride gel treatment on the bond strength between titanium alloys and composite resin, and the effect of NaF solution on the bond strength of titanium alloys. Five titanium alloys and one Co-Cr-Mo alloy were tested. Surface of the alloys were treated with three different methods; SiC polishing paper (No. 2000), sandblasting (50-microm Al2O3), and commercially available acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F-=1.23%, pH 3.0). After treatment, surfaces of alloy were analyzed by SEM/EDXA. A cylindrical gelatin capsule was filled with a light-curable composite resin. The composite resin capsule was placed on the alloy surface after the application of bonding agent, and the composite resin was light cured for 30 s in four different directions. Shear bond strength was measured with the use of an Instron. Fluoride gel did not affect the surface properties of Co-Cr-Mo alloy and Ni-Ti alloy, but other titanium alloys were strongly affected. Alloys treated with the fluoride gel showed similar bond strengths to the alloys treated with sandblasting. Shear bond strength did not show a significant difference (p<0.05) regardless of treatment time (5, 10, and 20 min) of fluoride gel. After the ultrasonic cleaning subsequent to the fluoride-gel treatment, residues of fluoride ion or any other titanium-fluoride complexes were not detected. NaF solution did not reduce the shear bond strength of titanium alloys. To enhance the bond strength of composite resin to titanium alloys, fluoride-gel treatment may be used as an alternative technique to the sandblasting treatment.

  11. THORIUM-SILICON-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.G.

    1959-02-10

    Th, Si, anol Bt alloys where Be and Si are each present in anmounts between 0.1 and 3.5% by weight and the total weight per cent of the minor alloying elements is between 1.5 and 4.5% are discussed. These ternary alloys show increased hardness and greater resistant to aqueous corrosion than is found in pure Th, Th-Si alloys, or Th-Be alloys.

  12. A Novel Surface Treatment for Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowther, S. E.; Park, C.; SaintClair, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    High-speed commercial aircraft require a surface treatment for titanium (Ti) alloy that is both environmentally safe and durable under the conditions of supersonic flight. A number of pretreatment procedures for Ti alloy requiring multi-stages have been developed to produce a stable surface. Among the stages are, degreasing, mechanical abrasion, chemical etching, and electrochemical anodizing. These treatments exhibit significant variations in their long-term stability, and the benefits of each step in these processes still remain unclear. In addition, chromium compounds are often used in many chemical treatments and these materials are detrimental to the environment. Recently, a chromium-free surface treatment for Ti alloy has been reported, though not designed for high temperature applications. In the present study, a simple surface treatment process developed at NASA/LaRC is reported, offering a high performance surface for a variety of applications. This novel surface treatment for Ti alloy is conventionally achieved by forming oxides on the surface with a two-step chemical process without mechanical abrasion. This acid-followed-by-base treatment was designed to be cost effective and relatively safe to use in a commercial application. In addition, it is chromium-free, and has been successfully used with a sol-gel coating to afford a strong adhesive bond after exposure to hot-wet environments. Phenylethynyl containing adhesives were used to evaluate this surface treatment with sol-gel solutions made of novel imide silanes developed at NASA/LaRC. Oxide layers developed by this process were controlled by immersion time and temperature and solution concentration. The morphology and chemical composition of the oxide layers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Bond strengths made with this new treatment were evaluated using single lap shear tests.

  13. Biocompatibility of Ti-alloys for long-term implantation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hady Gepreel, Mohamed; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2013-04-01

    The design of new low-cost Ti-alloys with high biocompatibility for implant applications, using ubiquitous alloying elements in order to establish the strategic method for suppressing utilization of rare metals, is a challenge. To meet the demands of longer human life and implantation in younger patients, the development of novel metallic alloys for biomedical applications is aiming at providing structural materials with excellent chemical, mechanical and biological biocompatibility. It is, therefore, likely that the next generation of structural materials for replacing hard human tissue would be of those Ti-alloys that do not contain any of the cytotoxic elements, elements suspected of causing neurological disorders or elements that have allergic effect. Among the other mechanical properties, the low Young's modulus alloys have been given a special attention recently, in order to avoid the occurrence of stress shielding after implantation. Therefore, many Ti-alloys were developed consisting of biocompatible elements such as Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Ta, and showed excellent mechanical properties including low Young's modulus. However, a recent attention was directed towards the development of low cost-alloys that have a minimum amount of the high melting point and high cost rare-earth elements such as Ta, Nb, Mo, and W. This comes with substituting these metals with the common low cost, low melting point and biocompatible metals such as Fe, Mn, Sn, and Si, while keeping excellent mechanical properties without deterioration. Therefore, the investigation of mechanical and biological biocompatibility of those low-cost Ti-alloys is highly recommended now lead towards commercial alloys with excellent biocompatibility for long-term implantation. PMID:23507261

  14. Biocompatibility of Ti-alloys for long-term implantation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hady Gepreel, Mohamed; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2013-04-01

    The design of new low-cost Ti-alloys with high biocompatibility for implant applications, using ubiquitous alloying elements in order to establish the strategic method for suppressing utilization of rare metals, is a challenge. To meet the demands of longer human life and implantation in younger patients, the development of novel metallic alloys for biomedical applications is aiming at providing structural materials with excellent chemical, mechanical and biological biocompatibility. It is, therefore, likely that the next generation of structural materials for replacing hard human tissue would be of those Ti-alloys that do not contain any of the cytotoxic elements, elements suspected of causing neurological disorders or elements that have allergic effect. Among the other mechanical properties, the low Young's modulus alloys have been given a special attention recently, in order to avoid the occurrence of stress shielding after implantation. Therefore, many Ti-alloys were developed consisting of biocompatible elements such as Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Ta, and showed excellent mechanical properties including low Young's modulus. However, a recent attention was directed towards the development of low cost-alloys that have a minimum amount of the high melting point and high cost rare-earth elements such as Ta, Nb, Mo, and W. This comes with substituting these metals with the common low cost, low melting point and biocompatible metals such as Fe, Mn, Sn, and Si, while keeping excellent mechanical properties without deterioration. Therefore, the investigation of mechanical and biological biocompatibility of those low-cost Ti-alloys is highly recommended now lead towards commercial alloys with excellent biocompatibility for long-term implantation.

  15. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  16. Utilizing various test methods to study the stress corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to aluminum-lithium alloys because of rather substantial specific-strength and specific-stiffness advantages offered over commercial 2000and 7000-series aluminum alloys. An obstacle to Al-Li alloy development has been inherent limited ductility. In order to obtain a more refined microstructure, powder metallurgy (P/M) has been employed in alloy development programs. As stress corrosion (SC) of high-strength aluminum alloys has been a major problem in the aircraft industry, the possibility of an employment of Al-Li alloys has been considered, taking into account a use of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Attention is given to a research program concerned with the evaluation of the relative SC resistance of two P/M processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. The behavior of the alloys, with and without an addition of magnesium, was studied with the aid of three test methods. The susceptibility to SC was found to depend on the microstructure of the alloys.

  17. The effect of repeated porcelain firings on corrosion resistance of different dental alloys

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Ismail; Polat, Serdar; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Dalkiz, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of repeated porcelain firing process on the corrosion rates of the dental alloys. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cr-Co, Cr-Ni and Pd-Ag alloys were used for this study. Each metal supported porcelain consisted of 30 specimens of 10 for 7, 9 and 11 firing each. Disc-shaped specimens 10 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness were formed by melting alloys with a propane-oxygen flame and casted with a centrifuge casting machine and then with the porcelain veneer fired onto the metal alloys. Corrosion tests were performed in quintuplicate for each alloy (after repeated porcelain firing) in Fusayama artificial saliva solution (pH = 5) in a low thermal-expansion borosilicate glass cell. Tamhane and Sheffe test was used to compare corrosion differences in the results after repeated firings and among 7, 9 and 11 firing for each alloy. The probability level for statistical significance was set at α=0.05. RESULTS The corrosion resistance was higher (30 mV), in case of 7 times firing (Commercial). On the other hand, it was lower in case of 11 times firing (5 mV) (P<.05). CONCLUSION Repeated firings decreased corrosion resistance of Pd-Ag, Cr-Co and Cr-Ni alloys. The Pd-Ag alloy exhibited little corrosion in in vitro tests. The Cr-Ni alloy exhibited higher corrosion resistance than Cr-Co alloys in in vitro tests. PMID:23507983

  18. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  19. Commercialization of animal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Faber, D C; Molina, J A; Ohlrichs, C L; Vander Zwaag, D F; Ferré, L B

    2003-01-01

    Commercialization of animal biotechnology is a wide-ranging topic for discussion. In this paper, we will attempt to review embryo transfer (ET) and related technologies that relate to food-producing mammals. A brief review of the history of advances in biotechnology will provide a glimpse to present and future applications. Commercialization of animal biotechnology is presently taking two pathways. The first application involves the use of animals for biomedical purposes. Very few companies have developed all of the core competencies and intellectual properties to complete the bridge from lab bench to product. The second pathway of application is for the production of animals used for food. Artificial insemination (AI), embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization (IVF), cloning, transgenics, and genomics all are components of the toolbox for present and future applications. Individually, these are powerful tools capable of providing significant improvements in productivity. Combinations of these technologies coupled with information systems and data analysis, will provide even more significant change in the next decade. Any strategies for the commercial application of animal biotechnology must include a careful review of regulatory and social concerns. Careful review of industry infrastructure is also important. Our colleagues in plant biotechnology have helped highlight some of these pitfalls and provide us with a retrospective review. In summary, today we have core competencies that provide a wealth of opportunities for the members of this society, commercial companies, producers, and the general population. Successful commercialization will benefit all of the above stakeholders. PMID:12499024

  20. Commercial Biomedical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Valerie Cassanto of ITA checks the Canadian Protein Crystallization Experiment (CAPE) carried by STS-86 to Mir in 1997. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  1. Commercial Fisheries Surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fabrizio, Mary C.; Richards, R. Anne; Murphy, Brian R.; Willis, David W.

    1996-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe methods for sampling commercial fisheries and identify factors affecting the design of sampling plans. When sampled properly, commercial fisheries can provide important information on the response of aquatic organisms to exploitation; such information can be used by management agencies to develop regulations for ensuring long-term production of the resource and long-term economic benefit. Fishery statistics are typically used to estimate abundance, mortality, recruitment, growth, and other vital characterisitcs of populations. Fishery statistics can also be used to study changes in fish community composition resulting from differential exploitation of species.

  2. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  3. Alloy Selection System

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    Software will Predict Corrosion Rates to Improve Productivity in the Chemical Industry. Many aspects of equipment design and operation are influenced by the choice of the alloys used to fabricate process equipment.

  4. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-01

    Pu-U-Fe and Pu-U-Co alloys suitable for use as fuel elements tn fast breeder reactors are described. The advantages of these alloys are ease of fabrication without microcracks, good corrosion restatance, and good resistance to radiation damage. These advantages are secured by limitation of the zeta phase of plutonium in favor of a tetragonal crystal structure of the U/sub 6/Mn type.

  5. Sample preparation of metal alloys by electric discharge machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electric discharge machining was investigated as a noncontaminating method of comminuting alloys for subsequent chemical analysis. Particulate dispersions in water were produced from bulk alloys at a rate of about 5 mg/min by using a commercially available machining instrument. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by results obtained when acidified dispersions were substituted for true acid solutions in an established spectrochemical method. The analysis results were not significantly different for the two sample forms. Particle size measurements and preliminary results from other spectrochemical methods which require direct aspiration of liquid into flame or plasma sources are reported.

  6. Commercialization of multijunction a-Si modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. E.; Arya, R. R.; Chen, L.-F.; Oswald, R.; Newton, J.; Rajan, K.; Romero, R.; Willing, F.; Yang, L.

    1997-02-01

    Solarex has just completed building a plant in James City County, Virginia that has the capacity to produce 10 MW per year of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules. The plant will start commercial production of 8.6 ft2 tandem modules in early 1997. The tandem device structure consists of two stacked p-i-n junctions, a front junction containing amorphous silicon and a back junction containing an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. All amorphous silicon alloys are deposited using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and the large-area monolithic modules are interconnected using computerized laser scribing coupled with a machine vision system. The principle products will be monolithic modules (26″×48″) with nominal stabilized power ratings of 56, 50 and 43 peak watts. All modules will be fabricated using a glass-EVA-glass encapsulation to ensure long-term reliability. These products are expected to be widely used in both remote and grid-tied applications.

  7. Effect of a metal alloy fuel catalyst on bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ruma; Koerting, Claudia; Suib, Steven L; Best, Michael H; Berlin, Alvin J

    2005-11-01

    Many microorganisms have been demonstrated to utilize petroleum fuel products to fulfill their nutritional requirement for carbon. As a result, the ability of these microbes to degrade fuel has both a deleterious affect as well as beneficial applications. This study focused on the undesired ability of bacteria to grow on fuel and the potential for some metal alloys to inhibit this biodegradation. The objective of this study was to review the pattern of growth of two reference strains of petroleum-degrading bacteria, Pseudomonas oleovorans and Rhodococcus rhodocrous, in a specific hydrocarbon environment in the presence of a commercially available alloy. The alloy formulated and supplied by Advanced Power Systems International Inc. (APSI) is sold for fuel reformulation and other purposes. The components of the alloy used in the study were antimony, tin, lead, and mercury formulated as pellets. Surface characterization also showed the presence of tin oxide and lead amalgam phases. Hydrocarbon used for the study was primarily 87-octane gasoline. The growth of the bacteria in the water and mineral-supplemented gasoline mixture over 6-8 weeks was monitored by the viable plate count method. While an initial increase in bacteria occurred in the first week, overall bacterial growth was found to be suppressed in the presence of the alloy. Results also indicate that the alloy surface characteristics that convey the catalytic activity may also contribute to the observed antibacterial activity. PMID:16262333

  8. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-02-21

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang.

  9. A shape-memory alloy for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duerig, T.W.; Albrecht, J.; Gessinger, G.H.

    1982-12-01

    An alloy based on the Cu-Al-Ni ternary system has been developed at the research center of Brown, Boveri and Co., Baden, Switzerland, which provides a fully reversible (two-way) shape memory effect at significantly higher temperatures than those afforded by commercial memory alloys such as NiTi and Cu-Zn-Al. The higher temperature capability of this alloy could open new fields for the application of the shape memory effect, particularly in thermal switching and protection devices. After suitable deformation and processing, a shape change is observed while heating the alloy through the temperature interval from 175 to 190/sup 0/C. This shape change can be completely reversed during subsequent cooling from 155 to 125/sup 0/C. The magnitude of the reversible strain produced by this alloy is 1.5%; somewhat higher strains can be achieved if lower memory temperatures can be accepted, and conversely, better high temperature capabilities can be achieved by accepting smaller reversible strains. The memory effects in this alloy have been found to be unaffected by short overheatings to temperatures as high as 300/sup 0/C.

  10. New Ni-free superelastic alloy for orthodontic applications.

    PubMed

    Arciniegas, M; Manero, J M; Espinar, E; Llamas, J M; Barrera, J M; Gil, F J

    2013-08-01

    A potential new Ni-free Ti alloy for biomedical applications was assessed in order to investigate the superelastic behavior, corrosion resistance and the biocompatibility. The alloy studied was Ti19.1Nb8.8Zr. The chemical composition was determined by X-ray microanalysis, the thermoelastic martensitic transformation was characterized by high sensitivity calorimeter. The critical stresses were determined by electromechanical testing machine and the corrosion behavior was analyzed by potentiostatic equipment in artificial saliva immersion at 37°C. The results were compared with six different NiTi orthodontic archwire brands. The biocompatibility was studied by means of cultures of MG63 cells. Ni-free Ti alloy exhibits thermoelastic martensitic transformation with Ms=45°C. The phase present at 37°C was austenite which under stress can induce martensite. The stress-strain curves show a superelastic effect with physiological critical stress (low and continuous) and a minimal lost of the recovery around 150 mechanical cycles. The corrosion resistance improves the values obtained by different NiTi alloys avoiding the problem of the Ni adverse reactions caused by Ni ion release. Cell culture results showed that adhered cell number in new substrate was comparable to that obtained in a commercially pure Ti grade II or beta-titanium alloy evaluated in the same conditions. Consequently, the new alloy presents an excellent in-vitro response.

  11. Disk Alloy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tim; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack

    2001-01-01

    The advanced powder metallurgy disk alloy ME3 was designed using statistical screening and optimization of composition and processing variables in the NASA HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 "Fin large disks. Scaled-up disks of this alloy were produced at the conclusion of this program to demonstrate these properties in realistic disk shapes. The objective of the UEET disk program was to assess the mechanical properties of these ME3 disks as functions of temperature, in order to estimate the maximum temperature capabilities of this advanced alloy. Scaled-up disks processed in the HSR/EPM Compressor / Turbine Disk program were sectioned, machined into specimens, and tested in tensile, creep, fatigue, and fatigue crack growth tests by NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with General Electric Engine Company and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines. Additional sub-scale disks and blanks were processed and tested to explore the effects of several processing variations on mechanical properties. Scaled-up disks of an advanced regional disk alloy, Alloy 10, were used to evaluate dual microstructure heat treatments. This allowed demonstration of an improved balance of properties in disks with higher strength and fatigue resistance in the bores and higher creep and dwell fatigue crack growth resistance in the rims. Results indicate the baseline ME3 alloy and process has 1300 to 1350 O F temperature capabilities, dependent on detailed disk and engine design property requirements. Chemistry and process enhancements show promise for further increasing temperature capabilities.

  12. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  13. Commercial Carpentry: Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Donald W.; Penner, Wayman R.

    This manual contains instructional materials which measure student performance on commercial carpentry behavioral objectives; criterion-referenced evaluation instruments are also included. Each of the manual's eleven sections consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional unit includes behavioral objectives, suggested activities…

  14. Commercial Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Earth Observation Commercial Applications Program (EOCAP) at Stennis Space Center, Applied Analysis, Inc. developed a new tool for analyzing remotely sensed data. The Applied Analysis Spectral Analytical Process (AASAP) detects or classifies objects smaller than a pixel and removes the background. This significantly enhances the discrimination among surface features in imagery. ERDAS, Inc. offers the system as a modular addition to its ERDAS IMAGINE software package for remote sensing applications. EOCAP is a government/industry cooperative program designed to encourage commercial applications of remote sensing. Projects can run three years or more and funding is shared by NASA and the private sector participant. Through the Earth Observation Commercial Applications Program (EOCAP), Ocean and Coastal Environmental Sensing (OCENS) developed SeaStation for marine users. SeaStation is a low-cost, portable, shipboard satellite groundstation integrated with vessel catch and product monitoring software. Linked to the Global Positioning System, SeaStation provides real time relationships between vessel position and data such as sea surface temperature, weather conditions and ice edge location. This allows the user to increase fishing productivity and improve vessel safety. EOCAP is a government/industry cooperative program designed to encourage commercial applications of remote sensing. Projects can run three years or more and funding is shared by NASA and the private sector participant.

  15. Commercial Baking. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Nancy

    A project filmed three commercial baking videotapes for use by secondary and adult students in food service programs. The three topics were basic dinner rolls, bread making, and hard breads and rolls. Quick-rise dough recipes were developed, written down, and explained for use with the videotapes. A pretest, posttest, and student guide were…

  16. Commercial Crew Medical Ops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbaugh, Randall; Cole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Provide commercial partners with: center insight into NASA spaceflight medical experience center; information relative to both nominal and emergency care of the astronaut crew at landing site center; a basis for developing and sharing expertise in space medical factors associated with returning crew.

  17. Commercial applications of telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natiello, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    Telemedicine Systems Corporation was established in 1976 and is a private commercial supplier of telemedicine systems. These systems are various combinations of communications and diagnostic technology, designed to allow the delivery of health care services to remote facilities. The technology and the health care services are paid for by the remote facilities, such as prisons.

  18. Commercializing Biological Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeLeu, K. L.; Young, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the only commercial establishment involved in biological control in Australia. The wasp Aphitis melinus, which parasitizes the insect Red Scale, is bred in large numbers and released in the citrus groves where Red Scale is causing damage to the fruit. (JR)

  19. Lunar Commercial Mining Logistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, Walter P.; Citron, Bob; Taylor, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Innovative commercial logistics is required for supporting lunar resource recovery operations and assisting larger consortiums in lunar mining, base operations, camp consumables and the future commercial sales of propellant over the next 50 years. To assist in lowering overall development costs, ``reuse'' innovation is suggested in reusing modified LTS in-space hardware for use on the moon's surface, developing product lines for recovered gases, regolith construction materials, surface logistics services, and other services as they evolve, (Kistler, Citron and Taylor, 2005) Surface logistics architecture is designed to have sustainable growth over 50 years, financed by private sector partners and capable of cargo transportation in both directions in support of lunar development and resource recovery development. The author's perspective on the importance of logistics is based on five years experience at remote sites on Earth, where remote base supply chain logistics didn't always work, (Taylor, 1975a). The planning and control of the flow of goods and materials to and from the moon's surface may be the most complicated logistics challenges yet to be attempted. Affordability is tied to the innovation and ingenuity used to keep the transportation and surface operations costs as low as practical. Eleven innovations are proposed and discussed by an entrepreneurial commercial space startup team that has had success in introducing commercial space innovation and reducing the cost of space operations in the past. This logistics architecture offers NASA and other exploring nations a commercial alternative for non-essential cargo. Five transportation technologies and eleven surface innovations create the logistics transportation system discussed.

  20. Progress toward a tungsten alloy wire/high temperature alloy composite turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, F. J.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A tungsten alloy wire reinforced high temperature alloy composite is being developed for potential application as a hollow turbine blade for advanced rocket engine turbopumps. The W-24Re-HfC alloy wire used for these composite blades provides an excellent balance of strength and wire ductility. Preliminary fabrication, specimen design, and characterization studies were conducted by using commercially available W218 tungsten wire in place of the W-24Re-Hfc wire. Subsequently, two-ply, 50 vol pct composite panels using the W-24Re-HfC wire were fabricated. Tensile tests and metallographic studies were performed to determine the material viability. Tensile strengths of a Waspaloy matrix composite at 870 C were 90 pct of the value expected from rule-of-mixtures calculations. During processing of this Waspaloy matrix composite, a brittle phase was formed at the wire/matrix interface. Circumferential wire cracks were found in this phase. Wire coating and process evaluation efforts were performed in an attempt to solve the reaction problem. Although problems were encountered in this study, wire reinforced high temperature alloy composites continue to show promise for turbopump turbine blade material improvement.

  1. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-01-28

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that there is a correlation between the alloying energy of an alloy, and the diffusion barriers of the minority component. Alloys with a negative alloying energy may show improved long term stability, despite the fact that there is typically a greater thermodynamic driving force towards dissolution of the solute metal over alloying. In addition to Pt, we find that this trend also appears to hold for alloys based on Al and Pd. PMID:26750475

  2. Oxidation of zirconium alloys in 2.5 kPa water vapor for tritium readiness.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-11-01

    A more reactive liner material is needed for use as liner and cruciform material in tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBAR) in commercial light water nuclear reactors (CLWR). The function of these components is to convert any water that is released from the Li-6 enriched lithium aluminate breeder material to oxide and hydrogen that can be gettered, thus minimizing the permeation of tritium into the reactor coolant. Fourteen zirconium alloys were exposed to 2.5 kPa water vapor in a helium stream at 300 C over a period of up to 35 days. Experimental alloys with aluminum, yttrium, vanadium, titanium, and scandium, some of which also included ternaries with nickel, were included along with a high nitrogen impurity alloy and the commercial alloy Zircaloy-2. They displayed a reactivity range of almost 500, with Zircaloy-2 being the least reactive.

  3. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weele, S. )

    1991-08-01

    Fireside corrosion, caused by liquid alkali-iron trisulfates, has been an obstacle to higher steam temperatures and to efficient utilization of high-sulfur coals. Tests simulating the environment in the superheater bank of a pulverized-coal-fired boiler were conducted on several promising new alloys and claddings. Alloys were exposed to a variety of synthetic ash and simulated flue gas compositions at 650 and 700{degrees}C for times ranging up to 800 hours. Included in the testing program were new high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, modified commercial alloys, lean stainless steels (modified Type 316) clad with high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, and intermetallic aluminides. Thickness loss measurements indicated that resistance to attach improved with increasing chromium level. Silicon and aluminum were also helpful in resisting attack, while molybdenum was detrimental to the resistance of the alloys to attack. Three different attack modes were observed on the alloys tested. Alloys with low resistance to attack exhibited uniform wastage, while pitting was observed in more resistant alloys. In addition to surface fluxing by molten alkali-iron trisulfates, subsurface sulfur penetration and intergranular attack also occurred.

  4. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weele, S.

    1991-08-01

    Fireside corrosion, caused by liquid alkali-iron trisulfates, has been an obstacle to higher steam temperatures and to efficient utilization of high-sulfur coals. Tests simulating the environment in the superheater bank of a pulverized-coal-fired boiler were conducted on several promising new alloys and claddings. Alloys were exposed to a variety of synthetic ash and simulated flue gas compositions at 650 and 700{degrees}C for times ranging up to 800 hours. Included in the testing program were new high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, modified commercial alloys, lean stainless steels (modified Type 316) clad with high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, and intermetallic aluminides. Thickness loss measurements indicated that resistance to attach improved with increasing chromium level. Silicon and aluminum were also helpful in resisting attack, while molybdenum was detrimental to the resistance of the alloys to attack. Three different attack modes were observed on the alloys tested. Alloys with low resistance to attack exhibited uniform wastage, while pitting was observed in more resistant alloys. In addition to surface fluxing by molten alkali-iron trisulfates, subsurface sulfur penetration and intergranular attack also occurred.

  5. Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

  6. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  7. Commercial cooking equipment improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    A program to improve the efficiency of gas-fired commercial cooking equipment has focused on deep-fat fryers and the oven, open-top, hot-top, and fry-top sections of ranges. A newly developed infrared deep-fat fryer provided to be 25% more efficient than conventional units. Using the direct-fired forced-convection approach in an oven reduced the fuel consumed during baking by 55%. A range open-top burner system with an experimental power burner consumed 33% less fuel and time than conventional models. Preliminary modifications to heavy-duty hot-top and fry-top sections demonstrated fuel savings of 43% and 30%, respectively. More R and D is planned to incorporate manufacturer suggestions resulting in more complete experimental models that will aid in commercializing these improved appliances.

  8. Commercial jet transport crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widmayer, E.; Brende, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a study to identify areas of research and approaches that may result in improved occupant survivability and crashworthiness of transport aircraft are given. The study defines areas of structural crashworthiness for transport aircraft which might form the basis for a research program. A 10-year research and development program to improve the structural impact resistance of general aviation and commercial jet transport aircraft is planned. As part of this program parallel studies were conducted to review the accident experience of commercial transport aircraft, assess the accident performance of structural components and the status of impact resistance technology, and recommend areas of research and development for that 10-year plan. The results of that study are also given.

  9. Utilization of Copper Alloys for Marine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, Andrew

    copper alloys is investigated through a series of uniaxial tension tests on virgin and weathered (after one-year deployment in the ocean) specimens. The changes in mechanical properties are quantified in terms of differences in Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, ultimate strength, and ultimate strain. The obtained stress-strain data is used for numerical modeling of the mechanical behavior of chain-link nets. The simulations are compared with the experimental data on stiffness and strength of the nets. The available information on seawater performance of copper alloys (corrosion, biofouling, mechanics) and copper alloy nets (hydrodynamics) is used to develop engineering procedures for marine aquaculture fish cage systems with copper alloy netting. The design, analysis, and fabrication procedures are illustrated on a commercial size gravity-type offshore fish cage deployed in the Pacific Ocean near Isla Italia (Patagonia, Chile). The funding for this work was provided by the International Copper Association. This work was also supported through two UNH Fellowships: CEPS UNH Graduate Fellowship to Outstanding PhD Program Applicants and Dissertation Year Fellowship.

  10. Effects of V Addition on Microstructure and Hardness of Fe-C-B-Ni-V Hardfacing Alloys Cast on Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovatti, L.; Lemke, J. N.; Emami, A.; Stejskal, O.; Vedani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fe-based hardfacing alloys containing high volume fraction of hard phases are a suitable material to be deposited as wear resistant thick coatings. In the case of alloys containing high amount of interstitial alloying elements, a key factor affecting the performance is dilution with the substrate induced by the coating process. The present research was focused on the analysis of V-bearing Fe-based alloys after calibrated carbon and vanadium additions (in the range from 3 to 5 wt.%) to a commercial Fe-C-B-Ni hardfacing alloy. Vanadium carbides with a petal-like morphology were observed in the high-V hypereutectic alloys allowing to reach hardness values above 700 HV. The solidification range shifted to higher temperatures with increasing amount of vanadium addition and in the case of hypereutectic alloys, the gap remains close to that of the original alloy. In the last step of the research, the microstructural evolution after dilution was analyzed by casting the V-rich alloys on a steel substrate. The dilution, caused by the alloying element diffusion and the local melting of the substrate, modified the microstructure and the hardness for a relevant volume fraction of the hardfacing alloys. In particular, the drop of interstitial elements induced the transition from the hypereutectic to the hypoeutectic microstructure and the formation of near-spherical V-rich carbides. Even after dilution, the hardness of the new alloys remained higher than that measured in the original Fe-C-B-Ni alloy.

  11. Wear and friction properties of experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Serhii; Datskevich, Oleg; Kulak, Leonid; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-11-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their higher biocompatibility in comparison to other metallic biomaterials. However, they commonly contain aluminum and vanadium, whose ions may be detrimental to the nervous system. Furthermore, they suffer from poor wear resistance, which limits their applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tribological performance of experimental Ti-1.25Si-5Zr, Ti-2.5Si-5Zr, Ti-6Si-5Zr and Ti-2.5Si-5Zr-0.2Pd alloys as compared to that of control Ti-6Al-4V, CoCr F75 and CoCr F799 alloys. Friction and wear tests were performed using a standard ball-on-disc rig in serum solution at ambient temperature with Si3N4-balls as counterparts. The alloys microstructure and hardness were investigated using optical microscopy, XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Vickers indentation. The coefficients of friction of the experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys were generally lower than the commercial ones with Ti-6Si-5Zr presenting the lowest value (approx. 0.1). Their wear rates were found to be 2-7 times lower than that of the commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy, but still higher than those of the CoCr alloys. SEM analysis of worn surfaces showed that abrasion was the predominant wear mechanism for all studied materials. Wear and friction were influenced by the formation and stability of transfer layers, and while commercial Ti-6Al-4V as well as the experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys demonstrated extensive material transfer to the ceramic counterparts, the CoCr alloys did not show such material transfer.

  12. Creep Behavior of a New Cast Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, John P; Maziasz, Philip J; Evans, Neal D; Pollard, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    A new cast austenitic alloy, CF8C-Plus, has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Caterpillar for a wide range of high temperature applications including diesel exhaust components and turbine casings. The creep strength of the CF8C-Plus steel is much greater than that of the standard cast CF8C stainless steel and is comparable to the highest strength wrought commercial austenitic stainless steels and alloys, such as NF709. The creep properties of CF8C-Plus are discussed in terms of the alloy design methodology and the evaluation of some long-term creep tested specimens (over 20,000 hours). Microcharacterization shows that the excellent creep strength is due mainly to the precipitation of very fine nano-scale and stable MC carbides, without the formation of deleterious intermetallic phases.

  13. The history of development of molybdenum alloys for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Wittenauer, J.P.

    1993-02-01

    Molybdenum was first isolated as an element in 1893 and found initial commercial application as a filament support for incandescent lamps in 1910. The advent of arc melting practice in the 1940s led to an increase in availability of Mo sheet, bar, and plate products. Alloy development programs were heavily supported starting in the 1950s and several key alloys emerged over the next twenty years that remain in use to the present time such as Mo-TZM, unalloyed Mo, and Mo-Re. In recent years, improved understanding of the role of oxygen and carbide distributions at grain boundaries have led to increased reliability and use of Mo in aerospace products. Current developmental programs in areas of propulsion and energy conversion will ensure the prominent position of Mo as a high-temperature structural material. This paper highlights some of these key developments in the evolution of Mo alloys.

  14. The unexpected role of metal nanoparticles and nanonetworks in alloy degradation.

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z.; Natesan, K.; Cai, Z.; Darling, S. B.

    2008-08-01

    Oxide scale, which is essential to protect structural alloys from high-temperature degradation such as oxidation, carburization and metal dusting, is usually considered to consist simply of oxide phases. Here, we report on a nanobeam X-ray and magnetic force microscopy investigation that reveals that the oxide scale actually consists of a mixture of oxide materials and metal nanoparticles. The metal nanoparticles self-assemble into nanonetworks, forming continuous channels for carbon transport through the oxide scales. To avoid the formation of these metallic particles in the oxide scale, alloys must develop a scale without spinel phase. We have designed a novel alloy that has been tested in a high-carbon-activity environment. Our results show that the incubation time for carbon transport through the oxide scale of the new alloy is more than an order of magnitude longer compared with commercial alloys with similar chromium content.

  15. Precipitation-Strengthened, High-Temperature, High-Force Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Draper, Susan L.; Nathal, Michael V.; Crombie, Edwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are an enabling component in the development of compact, lightweight, durable, high-force actuation systems particularly for use where hydraulics or electrical motors are not practical. However, commercial shape memory alloys based on NiTi are only suitable for applications near room temperature, due to their relatively low transformation temperatures, while many potential applications require higher temperature capability. Consequently, a family of (Ni,Pt)(sub 1-x)Ti(sub x) shape memory alloys with Ti concentrations ranging from about 15 to 25 at.% have been developed for applications in which there are requirements for SMA actuators to exert high forces at operating temperatures higher than those of conventional binary NiTi SMAs. These alloys can be heat treated in the range of 500 C to produce a series of fine precipitate phases that increase the strength of alloy while maintaining a high transformation temperature, even in Ti-lean compositions.

  16. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  17. Overview of the multifaceted activities towards development and deployment of nuclear-grade FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Pint, Bruce A; Terrani, Kurt A

    2016-01-01

    A large effort is underway under the leadership of US DOE Fuel Cycle R&D program to develop advanced FeCrAl alloys as accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding to replace Zr-based alloys in light water reactors. The primary motivation is the excellent oxidation resistance of these alloys in high-temperature steam environments right up to their melting point (roughly three orders of magnitude slower oxidation kinetics than zirconium). A multifaceted effort is ongoing to rapidly advance FeCrAl alloys as a mature ATF concept. The activities span the broad spectrum of alloy development, environmental testing (high-temperature high-pressure water and elevated temperature steam), detailed mechanical characterization, material property database development, neutron irradiation, thin tube production, and multiple integral fuel test campaigns. Instead of off-the-shelf commercial alloys that might not prove optimal for the LWR fuel cladding application, a large amount of effort has been placed on the alloy development to identify the most optimum composition and microstructure for this application. The development program is targeting a cladding that offers performance comparable to or better than modern Zr-based alloys under normal operating and off-normal conditions. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the systematic effort to advance nuclear-grade FeCrAl alloys as an ATF cladding in commercial LWRs.

  18. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  19. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  20. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  1. Shear bond strength between autopolymerizing acrylic resin and Co-Cr alloy using different primers.

    PubMed

    Sanohkan, Sasiwimol; Urapepon, Somchai; Harnirattisai, Choltacha; Sirisinha, Chakrit; Sunintaboon, Panya

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the shear bond strength between cobalt chromium alloy and autopolymerizing acrylic resin using experimental primers containing 5, 10, and 15 wt% of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic anhydride or 1, 2, and 3 wt% of 3-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane comparison to 5 commercial primers (ML primers, Alloy primer, Metal/Zirconia primer, Monobond S, and Monobond plus). Sixty alloy specimens were sandblasted and treated with each primer before bonded with an acrylic resin. The control group was not primed. The shear bond strengths were tested and statistically compared. Specimens treated with commercial primers significantly increased the shear bond strength of acrylic resin to cobalt chromium alloy (p<0.05). The highest shear bond strength was found in the Alloy primer group. Among experimental group, using 10 wt% of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic anhydride -or 2 wt% of 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane enhanced highest shear bond strength. The experimental and commercial primers in this study all improved bonding of acrylic resin to cobalt chromium alloy.

  2. The coupled effect of grain size and solute on work hardening of Cu-Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkam, A.; Sinclair, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    A modified grain size-dependent model developed to capture the combined effects of solute and grain size on the work hardening behaviour of fine-grained Cu-Ni alloys is provided. This work builds on a recent model that attributes the grain size-dependent work hardening of fine-grained Cu to backstresses. In the case of Cu-Ni alloys, unlike commercially pure Cu, a grain size-dependent separation between the Kocks-Mecking curves develops, this being explained here based on an extra contribution from geometrically necessary dislocations in the solid solution alloy. This is corroborated by strain-rate sensitivity experiments.

  3. Evaluation of alloys and coatings for use in automobile thermal reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Oldrieve, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Several candidate alloys and coatings were evaluated for use in automobile thermal reactors. Full-size reactors of the candidate materials were evaluated in cyclic engine dynamometer tests with a peak temperature of 1040 C (1900 F). Two developmental ferritic-iron alloys, GE-1541 and NASA-18T, exhibited the best overall performance by lasting at least 60 percent of the life of test engine. Four of the alloys evaluated warrant consideration for reactor use. They are GE-1541, Armco 18 SR, NASA-18T, and Inconel 601. None of the commercial coating substrate combinations evaluated warrant consideration for reactor use.

  4. An evaluation of alloys and coatings for use in automobile thermal reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Oldrieve, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Several candidate alloys and coatings were evaluated for use in automobile thermal reactors. Full-size reactors of the candidate materials were analyzed in cyclic engine dynamometer tests with peak temperature of 1900 F (1040 C). Two developmental ferritic iron alloys GE1541 and NASA-18T - exhibited the best overall performance lasting at least 60% of the life of the test engine. Four of the alloys evaluated warrant consideration for reactor use. They include GE1541, Armco 18 SR, NASA-18T, and Inconel 601. None of the commercial coating substrate combinations evaluated warrant consideration for reactor use.-

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several compounds with Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between Fe-19.8Cr-4.8Al (weight percent), which is the base composition for the commercial superalloy MA956, and several carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, and silicides was analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. The effect of addition of minor alloying elements, such as Ti, Y, and Y2O3, to the Fe-Cr-Al alloy on chemical compatibility between the alloy and various compounds was also analyzed. Several chemically compatible compounds that can be potential reinforcement materials and/or interface coating materials for Fe-Cr-Al based composites were identified.

  6. Slag remelt purification of irradiated vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Gorman, P.K.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes theoretical and scoping experimental efforts to investigate the decontamination potential of a slag remelting process for decontaminating irradiated vanadium alloys. Theoretical calculations, using a commercial thermochemical computer code HSC Chemistry, determined the potential slag compositions and slag-vanadium alloy ratios. The experiment determined the removal characteristics of four surrogate transmutation isotopes (Ca, Y - to simulate Sc, Mn, and Ar) from a V-5Ti-5Cr alloy with calcium fluoride slag. An electroslag remelt furnace was used in the experiment to melt and react the constituents. The process achieved about a 90 percent removal of calcium and over 99 percent removal of yttrium. Analyses indicate that about 40 percent of the manganese may have been removed. Argon analyses indicates that 99.3% of the argon was released from the vanadium alloy in the first melt increasing to 99.7% during the second melt. Powder metallurgy techniques were used to incorporate surrogate transmutation products in the vanadium. A powder mixture was prepared with the following composition: 90 wt % vanadium, 4.7 wt % titanium, 4.7 wt % chromium, 0.35 wt % manganese, 0.35 wt % CaO, and 0.35 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This mixture was packed into 2.54 cm diameter stainless steel tubes. Argon was introduced into the powder mixture by evacuating and backfilling the stainless steel containers to a pressure of 20 kPa (0.2 atm). The tubes were hot isostatically pressed at 207 MPa (2000 atm) and 1473 K to consolidate the metal. An electroslag remelt furnace (crucible dimensions: 5.1 cm diameter by 15.2 cm length) was used to process the vanadium electrodes. Chemical analyses were performed on samples extracted from the slags and ingots. Ingot analyses results are shown below. Values are shown in percent removal of the four targeted elements of the initial compositions.

  7. Triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms: rational synthesis with high-efficiency for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Luo, Zhimin; Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Xiao; Tan, Chaoliang; Li, Hai; Zhang, Hua; Xue, Can

    2014-09-01

    We report the generation of triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms through a rationally designed synthetic strategy based on silver nanoprisms as sacrificial templates. The galvanic replacement between Ag nanoprisms and H2PdCl4 along with co-reduction of Ag+/Pd2+ is responsible for the formation of final prismatic Ag-Pd alloy nanostructures. Significantly, these Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared with the commercial Pd/C catalyst. Such a high catalytic activity is attributed to not only the alloyed Ag-Pd composition but also the dominant {111} facets of the triangular Ag-Pd nanoprisms. This work demonstrates the rational design of bimetallic alloy nanostructures with control of selective crystal facets that are critical to achieve high catalytic activity for fuel cell systems.We report the generation of triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms through a rationally designed synthetic strategy based on silver nanoprisms as sacrificial templates. The galvanic replacement between Ag nanoprisms and H2PdCl4 along with co-reduction of Ag+/Pd2+ is responsible for the formation of final prismatic Ag-Pd alloy nanostructures. Significantly, these Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared with the commercial Pd/C catalyst. Such a high catalytic activity is attributed to not only the alloyed Ag-Pd composition but also the dominant {111} facets of the triangular Ag-Pd nanoprisms. This work demonstrates the rational design of bimetallic alloy nanostructures with control of selective crystal facets that are critical to achieve high catalytic activity for fuel cell systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03600j

  8. Polyhedral Palladium–Silver Alloy Nanocrystals as Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalysts for the Formic Acid Oxidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Yu; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Polyhedral noble–metal nanocrystals have received much attention and wide applications as electrical and optical devices as well as catalysts. In this work, a straightforward and effective hydrothermal route for the controllable synthesis of the high-quality Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons with uniform size is presented. The morphology, composition and structure of the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are fully characterized by the various physical techniques, demonstrating the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are highly alloying. The formation/growth mechanisms of the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are explored and discussed based on the experimental observations and discussions. As a preliminary electrochemical application, the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are applied in the formic acid oxidation reaction, which shows higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pd black due to the “synergistic effects” between Pd and Ag atoms. PMID:26329555

  9. Polyhedral Palladium-Silver Alloy Nanocrystals as Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalysts for the Formic Acid Oxidation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Yu; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2015-09-01

    Polyhedral noble-metal nanocrystals have received much attention and wide applications as electrical and optical devices as well as catalysts. In this work, a straightforward and effective hydrothermal route for the controllable synthesis of the high-quality Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons with uniform size is presented. The morphology, composition and structure of the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are fully characterized by the various physical techniques, demonstrating the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are highly alloying. The formation/growth mechanisms of the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are explored and discussed based on the experimental observations and discussions. As a preliminary electrochemical application, the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are applied in the formic acid oxidation reaction, which shows higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pd black due to the “synergistic effects” between Pd and Ag atoms.

  10. Evaluation of alloys for fuel cell heat exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. A.; Vonk, S. J.

    1981-04-01

    The results are presented of an investigation to evaluate the behavior of commercial stainless steels, superalloys, and aluminide coatings in both clean (sulfur-free) and raw (1% H2S) gas representative of the Texaco slagging gasifier atmosphere are 1400 to 18000 F (1033 to 12550 K). The goal was to determine which, if any, of these materials is suitable for use in a high temperature heat exchanger operating on intermediate Btu coal gasification atmospheres. It has been found that none of the commercially available alloys or coatings are suitable for use in the raw (1% H2S) gas, even at temperatures as low as 14000 F (10330 K). Materials that are resistant to attack either have a limited life ( 5000 h) or cannot be fabricated as large size heat exchanger components. It is concluded that structural high temperature alloys must be coated for use in the raw gas and that the best coating or cladding materials are Ni-46Cr (IN671 type alloy) and MCrAl with 25 to 40% Cr and 30 to 40% Al (where M is Ni, Co, or Fe or some combination thereof). Heat exchanger components can be clad with Ni-46Cr but the alloy must be modified to improve its reliability and performance in coal conversion atmospheres.

  11. Metallurgy and deformation of electron beam welded similar titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasang, T.; Sabol, J. C.; Misiolek, W. Z.; Mitchell, R.; Short, A. B.; Littlefair, G.

    2012-04-01

    Butt welded joins were produced between commercially pure titanium and various titanium alloys using an electron beam welding technique. The materials used represent commercially pure grade, α-β alloy and β alloy. They were CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) and Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553), respectively. Grains were largest in the FZs of the different weldments, decreasing in size towards the heat affected zones (HAZs) and base metals. Hardness measurements taken across the traverse cross-sections of the weldments were constant from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal for CP Ti/CP Ti and Ti64/Ti64 welds, while the FZ of Ti5553/Ti5553 had a lower hardness compared with the base metal. During tensile testing the CP Ti/CP Ti weldments fractured at the base metal, whereas both the Ti64/Ti64 and Ti5553/Ti5553 broke at the weld zones. Fracture surface analysis suggested microvoid coalescence as the failure mechanism. The compositional analysis showed a relatively uniform distribution of solute elements from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal. CP Ti has always been known for its excellent weldability, Ti64 has good weldability and, preliminary results indicated that Ti5553 alloy is also weldable.

  12. Controlled Directional Solidification of Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Comparison Between Samples Processed on Earth and in the Microgravity Environment Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Tewari, Surendra N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the international "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys" (MICAST) program is given. Directional solidification processing of metals and alloys is described, and why experiments conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are expected to promote our understanding of this commercially relevant practice. Microstructural differences observed when comparing the aluminum - 7 wt% silicon alloys directionally solidified on Earth to those aboard the ISS are presented and discussed.

  13. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  14. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  15. Accelerating Commercial Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Visiting Investigator Program (VIP) at Stennis Space Center, Community Coffee was able to use satellites to forecast coffee crops in Guatemala. Using satellite imagery, the company can produce detailed maps that separate coffee cropland from wild vegetation and show information on the health of specific crops. The data can control coffee prices and eventually may be used to optimize application of fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation. This would result in maximal crop yields, minimal pollution and lower production costs. VIP is a mechanism involving NASA funding designed to accelerate the growth of commercial remote sensing by promoting general awareness and basic training in the technology.

  16. Commercialization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny C Servo, Ph D

    2008-02-15

    The Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP) is offered to Phase II awardees of the Department of Energy's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. The purpose of this program is to increase both the likelihood and speed of technology transition to Phase III of technologies which DOE has funded. This program has been offered to DOE SBIR firms since 1990 and has resulted in significant and well documented return on investment. This final report decribes the results of the CAP that was offered to participants during the last cycle.

  17. Work function of binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ryusuke; Matsumura, Katsunori; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Toyo

    2001-01-01

    By utilizing the field emission method, we have studied the composition dependence of work function in NiCu and PtRh alloys. In PtRh alloys, we find that the work function falls below the linear interpolation, in agreement with the experimental results on AgAu alloys [Fain and McDavid, Phys. Rev. B 9 (1974) 5099]. On the other hand, the work function of NiCu alloys is found to show little systematic deviation from the linear interpolation. The observed negative deviation in PtRh alloys is not compatible with a simple theoretical prediction based on the electronic density of states.

  18. Accelerating advanced-materials commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maine, Elicia; Seegopaul, Purnesh

    2016-05-01

    Long commercialization times, high capital costs and sustained uncertainty deter investment in innovation for advanced materials. With appropriate strategies, technology and market uncertainties can be reduced, and the commercialization of advanced materials accelerated.

  19. Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003

    EIA Publications

    2008-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States.

  20. Internal nitridation of nickel-base alloys. Part 2: Behavior of quaternary Ni-Cr-Al-Ti alloys and computer-based description

    SciTech Connect

    Krupp, U.; Christ, H.J.

    1999-10-01

    Whereas in Part 1 of this study the process of internal nitridation was described for binary and ternary alloys within the Ni-Cr-Al-Ti system, this part focuses on quaternary Ni-Cr-Al-Ti alloys, which are similar to commercial Ni-base alloys used in high-temperature applications regarding their chemical compositions. These alloys can simultaneously form two different nitride-precipitation zones consisting of TiN and AlN. In order to quantify the nitridation process, thermogravimetric measurements in an oxygen-free nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range 800--1100 C were carried out and supplemented by extensive microstructural studies. While single-nitride internal nitridation can easily be described by Wagner`s theory of internal oxidation, modeling of the more complex internal-precipitation reactions that involves more than one nitride requires a numerical treatment of both the diffusion and the thermochemical processes in the alloy. For this purpose, a computer simulation was developed in which the commercial thermodynamic software ChemApp is combined with a finite-difference diffusion calculation. It was shown that this calculation technique can be applied successfully to quantitatively describe the internal-nitridation process of the Ni-Cr-Al-Ti model alloys used in this study.

  1. MPRS (URBOT) commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccimaro, Donny; Baker, William; Hamilton, Ian; Heikkila, Leif; Renick, Joel

    2003-09-01

    The Man Portable Robotic System (MPRS) project objective was to build and deliver hardened robotic systems to the U.S. Army"s 10 Mountain Division in Fort Drum, New York. The system, specifically designed for tunnel and sewer reconnaissance, was equipped with visual and audio sensors that allowed the Army engineers to detect trip wires and booby traps before personnel entered a potentially hostile environment. The MPRS system has shown to be useful in government and military supported field exercises, but the system has yet to reach the hands of civilian users. Potential users in Law Enforcement and Border Patrol have shown a strong interest in the system, but robotic costs were thought to be prohibitive for law enforcement budgets. Through the Center for Commercialization of Advanced Technology (CCAT) program, an attempt will be made to commercialize the MPRS. This included a detailed market analysis performed to verify the market viability of the technologies. Hence, the first step in this phase is to fully define the marketability of proposed technologies in terms of actual market size, pricing and cost factors, competitive risks and/or advantages, and other key factors used to develop marketing and business plans.

  2. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Commercial Driver Medical Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Gary; Hanowski, Richard J.; Kales, Stefanos N.; Porter, Richard J.; Hegmann, Kurt T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess relationships between body mass index (BMI) and comorbid conditions within a large sample of truck drivers. Methods: Commercial driver medical examination data from 88,246 commercial drivers between 2005 and 2012 were analyzed for associations between BMI, medical disorders, and driver certification. Results: Most drivers were obese (53.3%, BMI >30.0 kg/m2) and morbidly obese (26.6%, BMI >35.0 kg/m2), higher than prior reports. Obese drivers were less likely to be certified for 2 years and more likely to report heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, nervous disorders, sleep disorders, and chronic low back pain (all P < 0.0001). There are relationships between multiple potentially disqualifying conditions and increasing obesity (P < 0.0001). Morbid obesity prevalence increased 8.9% and prevalence of three or more multiple conditions increased fourfold between 2005 and 2012. Conclusions: Obesity is related to multiple medical factors as well as increasing numbers of conditions that limit driving certification. PMID:25710607

  4. Aerocapacitor commercialization plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-12

    The purpose of the Power-One Aerocapacitor Commercialization Plan is to communicate to members of management and to all employees the overall objectives of the corporation. Power-One, Inc., has participated in a US Federal Government Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}: the project is a group effort, with Lawrence Livermore National Labs, GenCorp/Aerojet, PolyStor Corp. (a start-up company), and Power-One forming the consortium. The expected resulting technology is the {open_quotes}Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}, which possesses much higher performance levels than the usual capacitors on the market today. Power-One hopes to incorporate the Aerocapacitor into some of its products, hence enhancing their performance, as well as market privately-labeled aerocapacitors through its distribution channels. This document describes the details of Power-One`s plan to bring to market and commercialize the Aerocapacitor and Aerocapacitor-based products. This plan was formulated while Power-One was part of the Oerocap project. It has since pulled out of this project. What is presented in this plan is the work which was developed prior to the business decision to terminate this work.

  5. The use of β titanium alloys in the aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, R. R.; Briggs, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    Beta titanium alloys have been available since the 1950s (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Mo or B120VCA), but significant applications of these alloys, beyond the SR-71 Blackbird, have been slow in coming. The next significant usage of a β alloy did not occur until the mid-1980s on the B-1B bomber. This aircraft used Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn sheet due to its capability for strip rolling, improved formability, and higher strength than Ti-6Al-4V. The next major usage was on a commercial aircraft, the Boeing 777, which made extensive use of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al high-strength forgings. Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn environmental control system ducting, castings, and springs were also used, along with Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (β-C) springs. Beta-21S was also introduced for high-temperature usage. More recent work at Boeing has focused on the development of Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr, a high-strength alloy that can be used at higher strength than Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and is much more robust; it has a much wider, or friendlier, processing window. This, along with additional studies at Boeing, and from within the aerospace industry in general will be discussed in detail, summarizing applications and the rationale for the selection of this alloy system for aerospace applications.

  6. Inhibited Aluminization of an ODS FeCr Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Pint, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for fusion energy applications both for compatibility with liquid Pb-Li and to form an alumina layer that acts as a tritium permeation barrier. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are a structural material candidate for commercial reactor concepts expected to operate above 600 C. Aluminizing was conducted in a laboratory scale chemical vapor deposition reactor using accepted conditions for coating Fe- and Ni-base alloys. However, the measured mass gains on the current batch of ODS Fe-14Cr were extremely low compared to other conventional and ODS alloys. After aluminizing at two different Al activities at 900 C and at 1100 C, characterization showed that the ODS Fe-14Cr specimens formed a dense, primarily AlN layer that prevented Al uptake. This alloy batch contained a higher (> 5000 ppma) N content than the other alloys coated and this is the most likely reason for the inhibited aluminization. Other factors such as the high O content, small ({approx} 140 nm) grain size and Y-Ti oxide nano-clusters in ODS Fe-14Cr also could have contributed to the observed behavior. Examples of typical aluminide coatings formed on conventional and ODS Fe- and Ni-base alloys are shown for comparison.

  7. Interfacial oxidations of pure titanium and titanium alloys with investments.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Watanabe, T; Mizutani, N; Fukui, H; Hasegawa, J; Nakamura, H

    2000-12-01

    External oxides of a commercially pure titanium (cpTi), Ti6Al4V alloy, and an experimental beta-type titanium alloy (Ti 53.4 wt%, Nb 29 wt%, Ta 13 wt%, and Zr 4.6 wt%) were characterized after heating to 600, 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C in contact with three types of investments (alumina cement, magnesia cement, and phosphate-bonded) in air. XRD studies demonstrated that MgO, Li2TiO3 and/or Li2Ti3O7 were formed through reactions with the metal and the constituents in the magnesia cement-investment after heating to 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C. Except for these conditions, TiO2 (rutile) was only formed on cpTi. For titanium alloys, the other components apart from Ti also formed simple and complex oxides such as Al2O3 and Al2TiO5 on Ti6Al4V, and Zr0.25Ti0.75Nb2O7 on the beta-type titanium alloy. However, no oxides containing V or Ta were formed. These results suggest that the constituents of titanium alloys reacted with the investment oxides and atmospheric oxygen to form external oxides due to the free energy of oxide formation and the concentration of each element on the metal surface.

  8. Development of Superelastic Effect in Ferrous Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Scott

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) with high levels of superelasticity are used where there is a need for the application of large levels of force, or high damping. Current commercially available SMAs require expensive fabrication and lack sufficient ductility for many applications. There is a need for a superelastic material with better properties and easier processing. Y. Tanaka et al. have developed a novel iron based shape memory alloy, NCATB. This alloy still requires complex thermomechanical processing, and does not utilize lessons learned in optimizing Nitinol. To develop the properties of this alloy, it was synthesized in lab from its constituent elements, and thermomechanically processed. Samples were prepared for analysis using conventional metallographic techniques, and investigated with light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mechanical testing. The recrystallization following cold rolling, as well as aging heat treatments, were determined to be critical to increasing the hardness of the NCATB. Overall, smaller grains and longer aging times increased the hardness. The as-cast microstructure exhibits significant tantalum segregation along the dendrite boundaries. Incomplete homogenization of the as-cast microstructure leads to a propensity for a Tarich phase to form along subsequent recrystallized grain boundaries. This phase lead to alloy embrittlement, preventing the NCATB as processed from having the desired superelasticity. An additional high temperature thermomechanical treatment following casting solutionized the tantalum from the dendrite boundaries, and further improved the NCATB hardenability.

  9. Alloyed coatings for dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wermuth, F. R.; Stetson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for applying several diffusion barriers to TD-Ni and TD-NiCr. Barrier coated specimens of both substrates were clad with Ni-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Al alloys and diffusion annealed in argon. Measurement of the aluminum distribution after annealing showed that, of the readily applicable diffusion barriers, a slurry applied tungsten barrier most effectively inhibited the diffusion of aluminum from the Ni-Cr-Al clad into the TD-alloy substrates. No barrier effectively limited interdiffusion of the Fe-Cr-Al clad with the substrates. A duplex process was then developed for applying Ni-Cr-Al coating compositions to the tungsten barrier coated substrates. A Ni-(16 to 32)Cr-3Si modifier was applied by slurry spraying and firing in vacuum, and was then aluminized by a fusion slurry process. Cyclic oxidation tests at 2300 F resulted in early coating failure due to inadequate edge coverage and areas of coating porosity. EMP analysis showed that oxidation had consumed 70 to 80 percent of the aluminum in the coating in less than 50 hours.

  10. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  11. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  12. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  13. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1997-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute {alpha} grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase ({alpha} and {beta}) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase {alpha} and near-{alpha} (Ti Gr 12) alloys.

  14. The commercialization of migration.

    PubMed

    Abrera-mangahas, M A

    1989-01-01

    International migration is not new to the Philippines. In the recent outflow of contract workers to the Middle East, there is a shift from individual and family initiated migrations to the more organized, highly commercial variety. While profit-taking intermediaries have played some role in the past, the increase in the number and influence of these intermediaries has altered the story of migration decision-making. In 1975, the signing of the bilateral labor agreement between the governments of Iran and the Philippines signalled the rising demand for Filipino contract workers. From 1970 to 1975, the number of Asian migrant workers in the Gulf countries rose from about 120,000 to 370,000. These figures rose dramatically to 3.3 million in 1985. The growing share of organized and commercialized migration has altered migration decision making. Primarily, intermediaries are able to broaden access to foreign job and high wage opportunities. Commercialization effectively raises the transaction costs for contract migration. Studies on recruitment costs and fees show that self-solicited foreign employment costs less than employment obtained through recruitment agents and intermediaries. The difference in the 2 prices is due, not only to overhead costs of intermediation, but more importantly to the rent exacted by agents from having job information and placement rights. In the Philippines in October 1987 the average placement fee was P8000, greatly exceeding the mandated maximum fee level of P5000. This average is understated because the computation includes the 17% who do not pay any fees. The widespread and popular view of recruitment intermediaries is negative, dominated by images of abuses and victims. Private intermediaries and the government bureaucracy need each other. Intermediaries need government; their consistent demand for incentives and protection is indicative. On the other hand, government expands its supervision of control of overseas employment via the

  15. Tribological characteristics of aluminum alloys against steel lubricated by ammonium and imidazolium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M; Truhan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Sliding friction and wear characteristics of aluminum alloys against AISI 52100 steel lubricated by ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at both room and elevated temperatures. The tested aluminum alloys include a commercially pure aluminum Al 1100, a wrought alloy Al 6061-T6511, and a cast alloy Al 319-T6. The lubricating performance of two ILs with the same anion, one ammonium-based [C8H17]3NH.Tf2N and one imidazolium-based C10mim.Tf2N, were compared each other and benchmarked against that of a conventional fully-formulated engine oil. Significant friction (up to 35%) and wear (up to 55%) reductions were achieved by the ammonium IL when lubricating the three aluminum alloys compared to the engine oil. The imidazolium IL performed better than the oil but not as well as the ammonium IL for Al 1100 and 319 alloys. However, accelerated wear was unexpectedly observed for Al 6061 alloy when lubricated by C10mim.Tf2N. Surface chemical analyses implied complex tribochemical reactions between the aluminum surfaces and ILs during the wear testing, which has been demonstrated either beneficial by forming a protective boundary film or detrimental by causing severe tribo-corrosion. The effects of the IL cation structure, aluminum alloy composition, and tribo-testing condition on the friction and wear results have been discussed.

  16. Characteristics of a multicomponent Nb-Ti-Al alloy via industrial-scale practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Loria, E.A.

    1997-05-01

    Within the spectrum of advanced intermetallic materials, an alloy containing 44Nb-35Ti-6Al-5Cr-8V-1W-0.5Mo-0.3Hf (at. %) was investigated in the industrial-scale produced condition. The alloy was tensile tested in air from room temperature to 1,000 C and in vacuum at 750 and 850 C. Results of this study have shown that the alloy can be commercially produced and has adequate ductility for its secondary processing even at an oxygen level of 1,160 wppm. The alloy has room temperature ductility of 16% and superplastic elongation of 244% at 1,000 C. This alloy shows low intermediate temperature (600--850 C) ductility when tested in air. The vacuum testing revealed that the low ductility is associated within oxygen embrittlement phenomenon. It is expected that such an embrittlement can be taken care of by an oxidation resistant coating. The alloy also possesses superior strength to similar alloys in this class. Results of this investigation suggest a strong potential for consideration of this alloy to exceed the useful temperature range of nickel-base superalloys.

  17. High-temperature corrosion of metallic alloys in an oxidizing atmosphere containing NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.

    1989-02-01

    A particular heat-exchanger application involved metallic alloys exposed to flue gases of an aluminum remelt furnace. Because the flue gases might contain NaCl and other halides, the corrosion behavior of the alloys was to be investigated. Planned direct exposure of candidate alloys to the flue gases, however, was not conducted because of premature termination of the project. Complementary laboratory testing was conducted on seven commercially available alloys and two nickel aluminides. These materials were exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere containing 0.06 wt % NaCl for 1100 h at 1000/degree/C. Most of the alloy exhibited grain-boundary attack, which resulted in complete oxidation of enveloped grains. The alloys Incoloy MA-956, Incoloy 800, Inconel 625, Inconel 601, Hastelloy X, Haynes 188, and nickel aluminide IC-50 were substantially more corroded than Alloy 214 and nickel aluminide IC-221. The latter two alloys, therefore, would probably be superior to the others in application involving flue gases containing NaCl. Strength fabricability, and weldability, which are briefly discussed, would also affect selection of materials. 8 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Thermophysical Properties of Alloy 617 from 25°C to 1000°C

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Rabin; R. N. Wright; W. D. Swank

    2013-09-01

    Key thermophysical properties needed for the successful design and use of Alloy 617 in steam generator and heat exchanger applications have been measured experimentally, and results are compared with literature values and results obtained from some other commercial Ni–Cr alloys and model materials. Specifically, the thermal diffusivity, thermal expansion coefficient, and specific heat capacity have been measured for Alloy 617 over a range of temperatures, allowing calculation of thermal conductivity up to 1000 degrees C. It has been found that the thermal conductivity of Alloy 617 exhibits significant deviation from monotonic behavior in the temperature range from 600 degrees C to 850 degrees C, the temperatures of interest for most heat transfer applications. The non-linear behavior appears to result primarily from short-range order/disorder phenomena known to occur in the Ni–Cr system. Similar deviation from monotonic behavior was observed in the solid solution Ni–Cr-W Alloy 230, and lesser deviations were observed in iron based Alloy 800H and an austenitic stainless steel. Measured thermophysical property data are provided for four different heats of Alloy 617, and it is shown that property variations between the four different heats are not significant. Measurements were also obtained from Alloy 617 that was aged for up to 2000 h at 750 degrees C, and it was found that this aging treatment does not significantly influence the thermophysical properties.

  19. Commercial Data Mining Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingyu; Segall, Richard S.

    This chapter discusses selected commercial software for data mining, supercomputing data mining, text mining, and web mining. The selected software are compared with their features and also applied to available data sets. The software for data mining are SAS Enterprise Miner, Megaputer PolyAnalyst 5.0, PASW (formerly SPSS Clementine), IBM Intelligent Miner, and BioDiscovery GeneSight. The software for supercomputing are Avizo by Visualization Science Group and JMP Genomics from SAS Institute. The software for text mining are SAS Text Miner and Megaputer PolyAnalyst 5.0. The software for web mining are Megaputer PolyAnalyst and SPSS Clementine . Background on related literature and software are presented. Screen shots of each of the selected software are presented, as are conclusions and future directions.

  20. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  1. Fatigue Life of Cast Titanium Alloys Under Simulated Denture Framework Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Mari; Chan, Kwai S.; Hummel, Susan K.; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the hypothesis that the mechanical properties and fatigue behavior of removable partial dentures (RPD) made from cast titanium alloys can be improved by alloying with low-cost, low-melting elements such as Cu, Al, and Fe using commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V as controls. RPD specimens in the form of rest-shaped, clasp, rectangular-shaped specimens and round-bar tensile specimens were cast using an experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy, Ti-5Al-1Fe, and Ti-1Fe in an Al2O3-based investment with a centrifugal-casting machine. The mechanical properties of the alloys were determined by performing tensile tests under a controlled displacement rate. The fatigue life of the RPD specimens was tested by the three-point bending in an MTS testing machine under a cyclic displacement of 0.5 mm. Fatigue tests were performed at 10 Hz at ambient temperature until the specimens failed into two pieces. The tensile data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05) and the fatigue life data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (α = 0.05). The experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy showed a significantly higher average fatigue life than that of either CP-Ti or Ti-5Al-1Fe alloy ( p < 0.05). SEM fractography showed that the fatigue cracks initiated from surface grains, surface pores, or hard particles in surface grains instead of the internal casting pores. Among the alloys tested, the Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy exhibited favorable results in fabricating dental appliances with an excellent fatigue behavior compared with other commercial alloys.

  2. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  3. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  4. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    -base alloys, stainless steels and copper-nickel alloys and (2) the effects of heat treatment on localized corrosion. Excellent agreement with experimental data has been obtained for alloys in various environments, including acids, bases, oxidizing species, inorganic inhibitors, etc. Further, a probabilistic model has been established for predicting the long-term damage due to localized corrosion on the basis of short-term inspection results. This methodology is applicable to pitting, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Finally, a comprehensive model has been developed for predicting sensitization of Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-W-N alloys and its effect on localized corrosion. As a vehicle for the commercialization of this technology, OLI Systems has developed the Corrosion Analyzer, a software tool that is already used by many companies in the chemical process industry. In process design, the Corrosion Analyzer provides the industry with (1) reliable prediction of the tendency of base alloys for localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and (2) understanding of how to select alloys for corrosive environments. In process operations, the software will help to predict the remaining useful life of equipment based on limited input data. Thus, users will also be able to identify process changes, corrosion inhibition strategies, and other control options before costly shutdowns, energy waste, and environmental releases occur. With the Corrosion Analyzer, various corrosion mitigation measures can be realistically tested in a virtual laboratory.

  5. Alternate alloying for environmental resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; Banerji, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The 35 papers contained in this collection detail efforts being made toward achieving environmental resistance of alloys and conserved usage of strategic and critical materials. An in-depth look is taken at the roles played by various alloying elements in providing desired microstructures, properties, and influences upon environmental attack. Also presented are applications and performances of alternate alloys in aqueous and high temperature gaseous and molten salt environments. The book is broken down into five key sections covering: 1) philosophies and status of programs designing alloys for resistance to various environmental and microstructural stability of some of these alloys systems, 2) applications in hot corrosion and sulfidizing environments, 3) applications in oxidizing conditions, 4) corrosion resistance in aqueous environments, and 5) other properties, such as physical and mechanical, which are necessary to evaluate overall alloy performance.

  6. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  7. TERNARY ALLOY-CONTAINING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Waber, J.T.

    1960-02-23

    Ternary alloys of uranium and plutonium containing as the third element either molybdenum or zirconium are reported. Such alloys are particularly useful as reactor fuels in fast breeder reactors. The alloy contains from 2 to 25 at.% of molybdenum or zirconium, the balance being a combination of uranium and plutonium in the ratio of from 1 to 9 atoms of uranlum for each atom of plutonium. These alloys are prepared by melting the constituent elements, treating them at an elevated temperature for homogenization, and cooling them to room temperature, the rate of cooling varying with the oomposition and the desired phase structure. The preferred embodiment contains 12 to 25 at.% of molybdenum and is treated by quenching to obtain a body centered cubic crystal structure. The most important advantage of these alloys over prior binary alloys of both plutonium and uranium is the lack of cracking during casting and their ready machinability.

  8. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  9. Microstructural characterization of commercial hot-pressed boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, J.H.; Engel, R. )

    1988-09-01

    Microstructural characterization of commercially hot-pressed boron nitride (BN) using SEM and mercury porosimetry are described. Commercial material consits of varying amounts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (2% to 9%) and fine porosity (2% to 7%) within a bonded three-dimensional network of BN particles. The platelike BN particle morphology, which forms an aggregate by bonding along particle edges, is displayed. A layered structure present within individual BN particles is shown to consist of fine porous layers (<30 nm in thickness), which separate BN regions (100 to 200 nm in thickness) in the plane of the platelets. Size and dispersion of the pores and the continuous B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase are estimated with mercury porosimetry and with SEM after leaching and filling with a liquid bismuth-tin (Bi-Sn) alloy.

  10. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  11. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  12. Titanium-tantalum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, J.D.; Bingert, J.F.; Dunn, P.S.; Butt, D.P.; Margevicius, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    Research has been underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory for several years to develop an alloy capable of containing toxic materials in the event of a fire involving a nuclear weapon. Due to their high melting point, good oxidation resistance, and low solubility in molten plutonium, alloys based on the Ti-Ta binary system have been developed for this purpose. The course of the alloy development to-date, along with processing and property data, are presented in this overview.

  13. Structural characteristics and elevated temperature mechanical properties of AJ62 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kubásek, J. Vojtěch, D.; Martínek, M.

    2013-12-15

    Structure and mechanical properties of the novel casting AJ62 (Mg–6Al–2Sr) alloy developed for elevated temperature applications were studied. The AJ62 alloy was compared to commercial casting AZ91 (Mg–9Al–1Zn) and WE43 (Mg–4Y–3RE) alloys. The structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometry. Mechanical properties were characterized by Viskers hardness measurements in the as-cast state and after a long-term heat treatment at 250 °C/150 hours. Compressive mechanical tests were also carried out both at room and elevated temperatures. Compressive creep tests were conducted at a temperature of 250 °C and compressive stresses of 60, 100 and 140 MPa. The structure of the AJ62 alloy consisted of primary α-Mg dendrites and interdendritic nework of the Al{sub 4}Sr and massive Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 13}Sr phases. By increasing the cooling rate during solidification from 10 and 120 K/s the average dendrite arm thickness decreased from 18 to 5 μm and the total volume fraction of the interdendritic phases from 20% to 30%. Both factors slightly increased hardness and compressive strength. The room temperature compressive strength and hardness of the alloy solidified at 30 K/s were 298 MPa and 50 HV 5, i.e. similar to those of the as-cast WE43 alloy and lower than those of the AZ91 alloy. At 250 °C the compressive strength of the AJ62 alloy decreased by 50 MPa, whereas those of the AZ91 and WE43 alloys by 100 and 20 MPa, respectively. The creep rate of the AJ62 alloy was higher than that of the WE43 alloy, but significantly lower in comparison with the AZ91 alloy. Different thermal stabilities of the alloys were discussed and related to structural changes during elevated temperature expositions. - Highlights: • Small effect of cooling rate on the compressive strength and hardness of AJ 62 • A bit lower compressive strength of AJ 62 compared to AZ91 at room temperature • Higher resistance of the AJ 62

  14. Commercial users panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Joseph S.; Flatau, Carl; Hodge, David C.; Hollis, Ralph; Leach, Eugene F.; Gilbert, Ray; Cleland, John; Leifer, Larry; Naser, Joseph; Schmuter, Samson D.

    1987-01-01

    The discussions of motives and requirements for telerobotics application demonstrated that, in many cases, lack of progress was a result not of limited opportunities but of inadequate mechanisms and resources for promoting opportunities. Support for this conclusion came from Telerobotics, Inc., one of the few companies devoted primarily to telerobot systems. They have produced units for such diverse applications as nuclear fusion research, particle accelerators, cryogenics, firefighting, marine biology/undersea systems and nuclear mobile robotics. Mr. Flatau offered evidence that telerobotics research is only rarely supported by the private sector and that it often presents a difficult market. Questions on the mechanisms contained within the NASA technology transfer process for promoting commercial opportunities were fielded by Ray Gilbert and Tom Walters. A few points deserve emphasis: (1) NASA/industry technology transfer occurs in both directions and NASA recognizes the opportunity to learn a great deal from industry in the fields of automation and robotics; (2) promotion of technology transfer projects takes a demand side approach, with requests to industry for specific problem identification. NASA then proposes possible solutions; and (3) comittment ofmotivated and technically qualified people on each end of a technology transfer is essential.

  15. Commercial aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerz, Thomas; Holzäpfel, Frank; Darracq, Denis

    2002-04-01

    This paper discusses the problem of wake vortices shed by commercial aircraft. It presents a consolidated European view on the current status of knowledge of the nature and characteristics of aircraft wakes and of technical and operational procedures of minimizing and predicting the vortex strength and avoiding wake encounters. Methodological aspects of data evaluation and interpretation, like the description of wake ages, the characterization of wake vortices, and the proper evaluation of wake data from measurement and simulation, are addressed in the first part. In the second part an inventory of our knowledge is given on vortex characterization and control, prediction and monitoring of vortex decay, vortex detection and warning, vortex encounter models, and wake-vortex safety assessment. Each section is concluded by a list of questions and required actions which may help to guide further research activities. The primary objective of the joint international efforts in wake-vortex research is to avoid potentially hazardous wake encounters for aircraft. Shortened aircraft separations under appropriate meteorological conditions, whilst keeping or even increasing the safety level, is the ultimate goal. Reduced time delays on the tactical side and increased airport capacities on the strategic side will be the benefits of these ambitious ventures for the air transportation industry and services.

  16. Advanced commercial tokamak study

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.E.; Keeton, D.C.; Brown, T.G.; Bussell, G.T.

    1985-12-01

    Advanced commercial tokamak studies were performed by the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) as a participant in the Tokamak Power Systems Studies (TPSS) project coordinated by the Office of Fusion Energy. The FEDC studies addressed the issues of tokamak reactor cost, size, and complexity. A scoping study model was developed to determine the effect of beta on tokamak economics, and it was found that a competitive cost of electricity could be achieved at a beta of 10 to 15%. The implications of operating at a beta of up to 25% were also addressed. It was found that the economics of fusion, like those of fission, improve as unit size increases. However, small units were found to be competitive as elements of a multiplex plant, provided that unit cost and maintenance time reductions are realized for the small units. The modular tokamak configuration combined several new approaches to develop a less complex and lower cost reactor. The modular design combines the toroidal field coil with the reactor structure, locates the primary vacuum boundary at the reactor cell wall, and uses a vertical assembly and maintenance approach. 12 refs., 19 figs.

  17. High Cycle Fatigue Crack Initiation Study of Case Blade Alloy Rene 125

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantzos, P.; Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.; Telesman, J.; Dickerson, P.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to investigate and document the high cycle fatigue crack initiation characteristics of blade alloy Rene 125 as cast by three commercially available processes. This alloy is typically used in turbine blade applications. It is currently being considered as a candidate alloy for high T3 compressor airfoil applications. This effort is part of NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program which aims to develop improved capabilities for the next generation subsonic gas turbine engine for commercial carriers. Wrought alloys, which are customarily used for airfoils in the compressor, cannot meet the property goals at the higher compressor exit temperatures that would be required for advanced ultra-high bypass engines. As a result cast alloys are currently being considered for such applications. Traditional blade materials such as Rene 125 have the high temperature capabilities required for such applications. However, the implementation of cast alloys in compressor airfoil applications where airfoils are typically much thinner does raise some issues of concern such as thin wall castability, casting cleaningness, and susceptibility to high-cycle fatigue (HCF) loading.

  18. Potential High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys Identified in the Ti(Ni,Pt) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Garg, Anita; Nathal, Michael V.

    2004-01-01

    "Shape memory" is a unique property of certain alloys that, when deformed (within certain strain limits) at low temperatures, will remember and recover to their original predeformed shape upon heating. It occurs when an alloy is deformed in the low-temperature martensitic phase and is then heated above its transformation temperature back to an austenitic state. As the material passes through this solid-state phase transformation on heating, it also recovers its original shape. This behavior is widely exploited, near room temperature, in commercially available NiTi alloys for connectors, couplings, valves, actuators, stents, and other medical and dental devices. In addition, there are limitless applications in the aerospace, automotive, chemical processing, and many other industries for materials that exhibit this type of shape-memory behavior at higher temperatures. But for high temperatures, there are currently no commercial shape-memory alloys. Although there are significant challenges to the development of high-temperature shape-memory alloys, at the NASA Glenn Research Center we have identified a series of alloy compositions in the Ti-Ni-Pt system that show great promise as potential high-temperature shape-memory materials.

  19. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  20. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  1. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  2. Electroplating and corrosion behavior of tin-zinc alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai

    Due to the toxicity of cadmium and its electroplating processes, a replacement to this widely used coating is desired. Electroplated tin-zinc alloy is a good candidate. In this thesis the electroplating of tin-zinc alloy and its corrosion behavior have been studied. Tin-zinc alloy was plated from a commercial, neutral, non-cyanide and non-toxic bath. To get an alloy deposit with a composition of 70%Sn-30%Zn, a plating current density of 5 mA/cm2 should be applied. When plating without agitation, the consumption of the H+ ions by the accompanying hydrogen evolution reaction on the cathode surface caused a local pH increase and then the formation of a hydroxide layer on the outer surface. This can be prevented by agitating the solution with nitrogen gas bubbling during plating. The alloy deposit is a fine mixture of pure zinc and tin phases. The plating current efficiency was calculated to be 71% at the plating current density of 5 mA/cm2. The tin-zinc electrodeposits have both a sacrificial property provided by zinc and a barrier property provided by tin. The open circuit potential (OCP) of the alloy coating is very close to that of zinc, so it acts as a sacrificial anode and provides a cathodic protection to the steel substrate. On the other hand, the anodic polarization current density keeps very small before the potential reaches the OCP of tin. This is because the presence of the tin on the surface forms a barrier layer which retarded the dissolution of zinc and enhanced the durability of the alloy deposit. The OCP of the tin-zinc alloys increases with corrosion duration. It is perhaps due to an IR-drop mechanism. As zinc dissolves into the solution, cavities appear on the surface. Further zinc dissolution only occurs at the bottom of the pores, while the hydrogen evolution reaction mainly occurs on the outer surface. The separation of the anodic and cathodic sites causes an IR drop. An equivalent circuit is devised and the values of the circuit elements are

  3. Development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel alloys for potential use as interconnects in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2004-11-01

    This paper deals with the development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel-base superalloys for potential use as interconnects for SOFC. Ni-Mo-Cr alloys were formulated with CTE on the order of 12.5 to 13.5 x10-6/°C. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and reduced to sheet via a combination of hot and cold working. Dilatometry was used to measure CTE of the alloys. Oxidation behavior of the alloys at 800°C in dry and moist air is reported. The results are compared to results for Haynes 230 (a commercial Ni-base superalloy) and for Crofer 22APU (a commercial ferritic stainless steel designed specifically for use as an SOFC interconnect).

  4. Commercial Art I and Commercial Art II: An Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    A teacher's guide for two sequential one-year commercial art courses for high school students is presented. Commercial Art I contains three units: visual communication, product design, and environmental design. Students study visual communication by analyzing advertising techniques, practicing fundamental drawing and layout techniques, creating…

  5. Fundamentals of Commercial Art. Module 1. Commercial Art. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Diane; Tadrick, Christine

    This module is the first of five in the Commercial Art series. The curriculum guide is designed for competency-based teaching and testing. Within this module on fundamentals of commercial art are six instructional units. A cross-reference table reveals how the instructional components of the module relate to Missouri competencies. Each unit…

  6. Molecular engineering of polymer alloys: A final report of results obtained on CRADA No. 1078

    SciTech Connect

    Curro, J.G.; Schweizer, K.S.; Honeycutt, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made in the past three years on CRADA No. 1078, Molecular Engineering of Polymer Alloys. The thrust of this CRADA was to start with the basic ideas of PRISM theory and develop it to the point where it could be applied to modeling of polymer alloys. In this program, BIOSYM, Sandia and the University of Illinois worked jointly to develop the theoretical techniques and numerical formalisms necessary to implement the theoretical ideas into commercial software aimed at molecular engineering of polymer alloys. This CRADA focused on developing the techniques required to make the transition from theory to practice. These techniques were then used by BIOSYM to incorporate PRISM theory and other new developments into their commercial software.

  7. Infrared processing of magnesium wrought alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Horton Jr, Joe A; Blue, Craig A; Muth, T; Bowles, Amanda L; Agnew, Sean R

    2005-01-01

    High density infrared (HDI) processing of magnesium alloy sheet allows rapid heat up and cool down and may facilitate a continuous cast/roll process, thereby reducing costs. In a previous study, a plasma arc lamp resulted in an anneal in seconds that compared well to a normal 1 h 500 C anneal. The current study on AZ31 used a bank of quartz infrared lamps both in a lab setting and in a demonstration test at a commercial facility (Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.). Typical reheats and anneals between rolling passes required 2 to 5 minutes for rolling 6 mm sheet down to 1 mm. Tensile tests showed comparable results to normal processing. The near surface microstructure was similar to the center of the sheets. No gross progressive or cumulative effect on mechanical properties was observed from pass to pass. Good surface quality with minimal edge cracking was produced.

  8. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  9. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  10. The Elastic Constants for Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, R L; Hartmann, E C

    1945-01-01

    There are several constants which have been devised as numerical representations of the behavior of metals under the action of loadings which stress the metal within the range of elastic action. Some of these constants, such as Young's modulus of elasticity in tension and compression, shearing modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio, are regularly used in engineering calculations. Precise tests and experience indicate that these elastic constants are practically unaffected by many of the factors which influence the other mechanical properties of materials and that a few careful determinations under properly controlled conditions are more useful and reliable than many determinations made under less favorable conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to outline the methods employed by the Aluminum Research Laboratories for the determination of some of these elastic constants, to list the values that have been determined for some of the wrought aluminum alloys, and to indicate the variations in the values that may be expected for some of the commercial products of these alloys.

  11. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Belyea, Dustin D; Lucas, M S; Michel, E; Horwath, J; Miller, Casey W

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based "high entropy alloys" in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants. PMID:26507636

  12. Proceedings: EPRI MRP Alloy 600 Industry Workshop: June 12-14, 2001, Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Recent instances of significant cracking in Alloy 82/182 welds have occurred in commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants, including (1) cracking found in the hot leg nozzle weld at the V. C. Summer Nuclear Station and at a foreign plant, and (2) circumferential cracking found in the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles at Oconee Nuclear Station.

  13. Radiation Effects in Refractory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, Steven J.; Wiffen, F. W.

    2004-02-01

    In order to achieve the required low reactor mass per unit electrical power for space reactors, refractory alloys are essential due to their high operating temperature capability that in turn enables high thermal conversion efficiencies. One of the key issues associated with refractory alloys is their performance in a neutron irradiation environment. The available radiation effects data are reviewed for alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Nb and Ta. The largest database is associated with Mo alloys, whereas Re, W and Ta alloys have the least available information. Particular attention is focused on Nb-1Zr, which is a proposed cladding and structural material for the reactor in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project. All of the refractory alloys exhibit qualitatively similar temperature-dependent behavior. At low temperatures up to ~0.3TM, where TM is the melting temperature, the dominant effect of radiation is to produce pronounced radiation hardening and concomitant loss of ductility. The radiation hardening also causes a dramatic decrease in the fracture toughness of the refractory alloys. These low temperature radiation effects occur at relatively low damage levels of ~0.1 displacement per atom, dpa (~2×1024 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV). As a consequence, operation at low temperatures in the presence of neutron irradiation must be avoided for all refractory alloys. At intermediate temperatures (0.3 to 0.6 TM), void swelling and irradiation creep are the dominant effects of irradiation. The amount of volumetric swelling associated with void formation in refractory alloys is generally within engineering design limits (<5%) even for high neutron exposures (>>10 dpa). Very little experimental data exist on irradiation creep of refractory alloys, but data for other body centered cubic alloys suggest that the irradiation creep will produce negligible deformation for near-term space reactor applications.

  14. (abstract) Studies on AB(sub 5) Metal Hydride Alloys with Sn Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.; Stefano, S. Di; Halpert, G.; Witham, C.; Fultz, B.

    1994-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in alkaline rechargeable cells is becoming increasingly popular, due to several advantages offered by the metal hydrides over conventional anode materials (such as Zn, Cd) in terms of specific energy environmental cycle life and compatibility. Besides, the similarities in the cell voltage pressure characteristics, and charge control methods of the Ni-MH cells to the commonly used Ni-Cd point to a projected take over of 25% of the Ni-Cd market for consumer electronics by the Ni-MH cells in the next couple of years. Two classes of metal hydrides alloys based on rare earth metals (AB(sub 5)) and titanium (AB(sub 2)) are being currently developed at various laboratories. AB(sub 2) alloys exhibit higher specific energy than the AB(sub 5) alloys but the state of the art commercial Ni-MH cells are predominately manufactured using AB(sub 5) alloys.

  15. Performance of aluminide coatings applied on alloy CF8C plus at 800 C

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Deepak; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Shyam, Amit; Haynes, James A; Pint, Bruce A; Armstrong, Beth L; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    The cost effective, austenitic stainless steel CF8C plus is an attractive alloy for massive cast structures such as steam turbine casings. The microstructure stability and creep strength of this alloy are better than commercial high-performance heat-resistant steels such as NF709 and Super 304H, and are comparable to the Ni-based superalloy Inconel 617. The oxidation resistance of the alloy in atmosphere rich in water vapor is however insufficient at T>800 C, and the use of diffusion aluminide coatings is considered for potential high temperature applications. The thermal stability and protectiveness of coatings applied on the CF8C plus substrate by pack cementation and slurry process were investigated in air + 10% H2O environment at 800 C. Further, the coating effect on the fatigue life of the alloy was assessed via low-cycle-fatigue experiments.

  16. Effects of pH on the electrochemical behaviour of titanium alloys for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Souza, Maria E P; Lima, Lonetá; Lima, Carmo R P; Zavaglia, Cecília A C; Freire, Célia M A

    2009-02-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of two commercial titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4 V (ASTM F136) and Ti-13Nb-13Zr (ASTM F1713) was investigated in Ringer physiological solution at two pH values (5.5 and 7.0). The corrosion properties were examined by using electrochemical techniques: Potentiodynamic anodic polarization, cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical corrosion properties of both alloys at different conditions were measured in terms of corrosion potential (E (corr)), corrosion current density (i (corr)) and passivation current density (i (pass)). Equivalent electrical circuits were used to modulate EIS data, in order to characterize alloys surface and better understanding the pH effect on the interface alloy/solution.

  17. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3 was a function of the concentration of NO3- ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4 showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local coverage of the alloy microstructure resulting from steam containing with KMnO4 and HNO3.

  18. A low-cost hierarchical nanostructured beta-titanium alloy with high strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaraj, Arun; Joshi, Vineet V.; Srivastava, Ankit; Manandhar, Sandeep; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodymyr A.; Lavender, Curt

    2016-04-01

    Lightweighting of automobiles by use of novel low-cost, high strength-to-weight ratio structural materials can reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and in turn CO2 emission. Working towards this goal we achieved high strength in a low cost β-titanium alloy, Ti-1Al-8V-5Fe (Ti185), by hierarchical nanostructure consisting of homogenous distribution of micron-scale and nanoscale α-phase precipitates within the β-phase matrix. The sequence of phase transformation leading to this hierarchical nanostructure is explored using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Our results suggest that the high number density of nanoscale α-phase precipitates in the β-phase matrix is due to ω assisted nucleation of α resulting in high tensile strength, greater than any current commercial titanium alloy. Thus hierarchical nanostructured Ti185 serves as an excellent candidate for replacing costlier titanium alloys and other structural alloys for cost-effective lightweighting applications.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr alloy used as dental implant material.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Alexander E; Molotnikov, Andrey; Lapovok, Rimma; Zeller, Rolf; Berner, Simon; Habersetzer, Philippe; Dalla Torre, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Zr alloys have recently started to receive a considerable amount of attention as promising materials for dental applications. This work compares mechanical properties of a new Ti-15Zr alloy to those of commercially pure titanium Grade4 in two surface conditions - machined and modified by sand-blasting and etching (SLA). As a result of significantly smaller grain size in the initial condition (1-2µm), the strength of Ti-15Zr alloy was found to be 10-15% higher than that of Grade4 titanium without reduction in the tensile elongation or compromising the fracture toughness. The fatigue endurance limit of the alloy was increased by around 30% (560MPa vs. 435MPa and 500MPa vs. 380MPa for machined and SLA-treated surfaces, respectively). Additional implant fatigue tests showed enhanced fatigue performance of Ti-15Zr over Ti-Grade4.

  20. Exploratory corrosion tests on alloys in molten salts at 900/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, R.T.; Thomas, T.M.; Lai, G.Y.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory corrosion tests were conducted on 16 commercial alloys in carbonate, chloride, and hydroxide molten salts at 900/sup 0/C for up to three weeks. Corrosion information, including weight change, observations of the coupons, metallographic examination, and evaluation of the corrosion product by SEM, was obtained on the coupons exposed to these salts. These tests indicated that a number of the alloys showed significant resistance to metal loss in the carbonate molten salt with corrosion rates on the order of several millimeters per year. The corrosion product is an interpenetrating structure of metal from the more noble alloy ingredients and of an oxide made up of the reaction between melt components and oxidizable metals from the alloy.

  1. Influence of plastic deformation and prolonged ageing time on microstructure of a Haynes 242 alloy.

    PubMed

    Dymek, S; Wróbel, M; Dollar, M; Blicharski, M

    2006-10-01

    The material used in this study was a commercial HAYNES alloy 242 with a nominal composition of Ni-25% Mo-8% Cr (in wt.%). In the standard heat treatment, the 242 alloy is annealed at a temperature between 1065 and 1095 degrees C and then water quenched. The ageing treatment is carried out at 650 degrees C for 24 h in order to develop the long-range-order strengthening. The alloy in the conventionally aged condition was additionally cold rolled to 50% reduction in thickness and subsequently subjected to prolonged ageing at 650 degrees C for 4000 h. The enhanced diffusion resulted in the decomposition of the Ni(2)(Mo,Cr) metastable phase into the stable Ni(3)Mo-based phase. The presence of the new stable phase increased the yield and tensile strengths but deteriorated the ductility of the alloy at both room and 650 degrees C temperatures. PMID:17100898

  2. Microtexture and Nanoindentation Study of Delamination Cracking in Al-Cu-Li-X Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooks, R.; Domack, M. S.; Wagner, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial Al-Li alloys have strength and weight advantages over non-Li aluminum alloys. The fracture behavior of these alloys is unusual and has limited their use. The fracture mode, described as delamination, is intergranular, along the broad grain boundaries parallel to the rolling plane of the plate. Microtexture analyses have shown that delaminations occur along boundaries with greater than 30 misorientation. However, it was observed that relatively few of the high angle boundaries exhibited this behavior. Some grains of the retained deformation texture show high internal misorientation, which is a measure of stored strain energy. Delamination tends to occur between these grains and adjacent, recrystallized grains. Nanoindentation studies indicate a higher hardness for the high internal misorientation grains. These results suggest that the delamination could be reduced by processing the alloys to minimize grain-to-grain property disparities.

  3. Structural concept trends for commercial supersonic cruise aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakat, I. F.; Davis, G. W.; Saelman, B.

    1980-01-01

    Structural concept trends for future commercial supersonic transport aircraft are considered. Highlights, including the more important design conditions and requirements, of two studies are discussed. Knowledge of these design parameters, as determined through studies involving the application of flexible mathematical models, enabled inclusion of aeroelastic considerations in the structural-material concepts evaluation. The design trends and weight data of the previous contractual study of Mach 2.7 cruise aircraft were used as the basis for incorporating advanced materials and manufacturing approaches to the airframe for reduced weight and cost. Structural studies of design concepts employing advanced aluminum alloys, advanced composites, and advanced titanium alloy and manufacturing techniques are compared for a Mach 2.0 arrow-wing configuration concept. Appraisals of the impact of these new materials and manufacturing concepts to the airframe design are shown and compared. The research and development to validate the potential sources of weight and cost reduction identified as necessary to attain a viable advanced commercial supersonic transport are discussed.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured palladium-based alloy electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Arindam

    Low temperature fuel cells like proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are expected to play a crucial role in the future hydrogen economy, especially for transportation applications. These electrochemical devices offer significantly higher efficiency compared to conventional heat engines. However, use of exotic and expensive platinum as the electrocatalyst poses serious problems for commercial viability. In this regard, there is an urgent need to develop low-platinum or non-platinum electrocatalysts with electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) superior or comparable to that of platinum. This dissertation first investigates non-platinum, palladium-based alloy electrocatalysts for ORR. Particularly, Pd-M (M = Mo and W) alloys are synthesized by a novel thermal decomposition of organo-metallic precursors. The carbon-supported Pd-M (M = Mo, W) electrocatalyts are then heat treated up to 900°C in H2 atmosphere and investigated for their phase behavior. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements reveal that the alloying of Pd with Mo or W significantly enhances the catalytic activity for ORR as well as the stability (durability) of the electrocatalysts. Additionally, both the alloy systems exhibit high tolerance to methanol, which is particularly advantageous for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The dissertation then focuses on one-pot synthesis of carbon-supported multi-metallic Pt-Pd-Co nanoalloys by a rapid microwave-assisted solvothermal (MW-ST) method. The multi-metallic alloy compositions synthesized by the MW-ST method show much higher catalytic activity for ORR compared to their counterparts synthesized by the conventional borohydride reduction method. Additionally, a series of Pt encapsulated Pd-Co nanoparticle electrocatalysts are synthesized by the MW-ST method and characterized to understand their phase behavior, surface composition, and electrocatalytic activity for ORR. Finally, the dissertation

  5. Getting smarter about commercialization opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Pamela; McMakin, Andrea H.; Arnold, Todd

    2005-08-31

    The Disruptive Market Research method, pioneered by Dr. Pam Henderson of Meridian Strategies, helps technology developers make better commercialization decisions and find industry parters. More than 120 entrepreneurial organizations, ranging from the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to Fortune 500 firms, have used the method to evaluate the commercial potential of new products and to shape business strategies.

  6. Space Station commercial user development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The commercial utilization of the space station is investigated. The interest of nonaerospace firms in the use of the space station is determined. The user requirements are compared to the space station's capabilities and a feasibility analysis of a commercial firm acting as an intermediary between NASA and the private sector to reduce costs is presented.

  7. Lessons learned: The commercialization process

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, B.A.; Gritzo, R.E.; Garcia, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    One successful component of a commercialization strategy includes the implementation of an industrial outreach workshop. This workshop is designed to select an industrial partner with the skills necessary to successfully commercialize a federally-funded, laboratory developed technology. These workshops provide efficiency and effectiveness and, in addition, ensure that all prospective partners receive equal access to the same quality and quantity of information.

  8. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2003-07-08

    Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

  9. In Vitro Degradation Behavior of Ternary Mg-Zn-Se and Mg-Zn-Cu Alloys as Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Persaud-Sharma, Dharam; Budiansky, Noah

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn-Se and Mg-Zn-Cu alloys was investigated to evaluate their corrosion behavior related to use as implantable biomaterials. The corrosion behavior of these alloys and a commercially available Mg-Zn alloy were examined using static solution electrochemical testing, dynamic solution gravimetric testing, ion leaching testing, and microscopic evaluation. Fluctuations in the pH of the Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) used for the gravimetric and ion leaching immersion testing were also recorded over the 30-day duration to assess whether the media conditions induced by the alloy degradation would permit for cellular survival. Weight loss experimentation and electrochemical tests revealed the Mg-Zn-Cu alloy to have the greatest corrosion rate. PMID:24465245

  10. Commercial researcher perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delucas, Larry

    Protein crystallography--a research tool used to study the structure of the complex building blocks of living systems--has a lot to gain from space-based research. In order to know how a protein works in the human body, researchers must understand its molecular structure. Researchers have identified 150,000 different proteins in the body, but they now know the structure of less than a third of them. The only viable technique for analyzing the structure of these proteins is x-ray diffraction of the proteins in their crystal form. The better the quality of a protein crystal, the more useful it is to researchers who are trying to delineate its structure. The microgravity environment of space allows protein crystals to grow nearly undisturbed by convection and other gravity-driven forces that cause flaws to form in them on the ground. In space, lack of convection enables protein crystals to grow more slowly than they do on Earth, and the slower a protein crystal grows, the fewer flaws it will have. Protein crystal growth experiments have already flown on 14 Space Shuttle missions. This year's USML-1 Spacelab mission included protein crystal growth experiments conducted for commercial researchers. The results of protein crystal experiments flown thus far have been larger crystals with more uniform morphologies. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (A NASA-cosponsored CCDS) currently builds flight hardware to meet researchers' needs and handles sample loading and retrieval for flight experiments. Protein crystallography enables 'rational drug design': the development of drugs that bind only with the target protein and, hence, do not cause side effects. For example, pharmaceutical companies presently are interested in developing drugs that can inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), a protein that plays a role in auto-immune diseases. To continue these kinds of investigations, researchers need a constant supply of protein crystals that are as free of flaws

  11. 150 Passenger Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucovsky, Adrian; Romli, Fairuz I.; Rupp, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    It has been projected that the need for a short-range mid-sized, aircraft is increasing. The future strategy to decrease long-haul flights will increase the demand for short-haul flights. Since passengers prefer to meet their destinations quickly, airlines will increase the frequency of flights, which will reduce the passenger load on the aircraft. If a point-to-point flight is not possible, passengers will prefer only a one-stop short connecting flight to their final destination. A 150-passenger aircraft is an ideal vehicle for these situations. It is mid-sized aircraft and has a range of 3000 nautical miles. This type of aircraft would market U.S. domestic flights or inter-European flight routes. The objective of the design of the 150-passenger aircraft is to minimize fuel consumption. The configuration of the aircraft must be optimized. This aircraft must meet CO2 and NOx emissions standards with minimal acquisition price and operating costs. This report contains all the work that has been performed for the completion of the design of a 150 passenger commercial aircraft. The methodology used is the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) developed at Georgia Tech Aerospace Systems Design laboratory (ASDL). This is an eight-step conceptual design process to evaluate the probability of meeting the design constraints. This methodology also allows for the evaluation of new technologies to be implemented into the design. The TIES process begins with defining the problem with a need established and a market targeted. With the customer requirements set and the target values established, a baseline concept is created. Next, the design space is explored to determine the feasibility and viability of the baseline aircraft configuration. If the design is neither feasible nor viable, new technologies can be implemented to open up the feasible design space and allow for a plausible solution. After the new technologies are identified, they must be evaluated

  12. Commercial researcher perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Protein crystallography--a research tool used to study the structure of the complex building blocks of living systems--has a lot to gain from space-based research. In order to know how a protein works in the human body, researchers must understand its molecular structure. Researchers have identified 150,000 different proteins in the body, but they now know the structure of less than a third of them. The only viable technique for analyzing the structure of these proteins is x-ray diffraction of the proteins in their crystal form. The better the quality of a protein crystal, the more useful it is to researchers who are trying to delineate its structure. The microgravity environment of space allows protein crystals to grow nearly undisturbed by convection and other gravity-driven forces that cause flaws to form in them on the ground. In space, lack of convection enables protein crystals to grow more slowly than they do on Earth, and the slower a protein crystal grows, the fewer flaws it will have. Protein crystal growth experiments have already flown on 14 Space Shuttle missions. This year's USML-1 Spacelab mission included protein crystal growth experiments conducted for commercial researchers. The results of protein crystal experiments flown thus far have been larger crystals with more uniform morphologies. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (A NASA-cosponsored CCDS) currently builds flight hardware to meet researchers' needs and handles sample loading and retrieval for flight experiments. Protein crystallography enables 'rational drug design': the development of drugs that bind only with the target protein and, hence, do not cause side effects. For example, pharmaceutical companies presently are interested in developing drugs that can inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), a protein that plays a role in auto-immune diseases. To continue these kinds of investigations, researchers need a constant supply of protein crystals that are as free of flaws

  13. Mechanical and electrochemical characterisation of new Ti-Mo-Nb-Zr alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Nnamchi, Paul S; Obayi, C S; Todd, Iain; Rainforth, M W

    2016-07-01

    The development and characterisation of new metallic biomaterials that contain non-toxic and non-allergic elements but possess low elastic modulus and low biodegradation rates, has become a topic of serious investigation in orthopaedic implant application. The lowering of elastic modulus and improving of corrosion resistance can be achieved by specific chemical alloying and super-elasticity effects, associated with a stress-induced phase transformation from the BCC metastable beta phase to the orthorhombic α″ martensite. Using this framework, this paper focuses on the effect of Nb and/or Zr micro-additions on the elastic modulus/yield strength balance and discusses microstructure, and the mechanical and electrochemical behaviour of four new β-Ti-8Mo-xNb-xZr (x=2-5) alloys, using tensile tests, X-ray diffraction, SEM characterisation, ultrasound technique and potentiodynamic polarisation methods. The results reveal that the alloys exhibit a pronounced microstructural sensitivity response, with alloying elements and excellent agreement between β-stability and high mechanical strength, with increasing Nb additions. Although all the alloys possess excellent corrosion resistance and low Young׳s modulus, Ti-8Mo-4Nb-2Zr alloy, which consists of β+α'' phases, exhibits a low Young modulus of 35GPa, which is lower than those of the commercial alloys already used in biomedical implantation. The significant corrosion resistance, nontoxicity and better mechanical compatibility are properties pertinent to preventing stress shielding and bone resorption in orthopaedic implant applications. PMID:26773649

  14. Mechanical and electrochemical characterisation of new Ti-Mo-Nb-Zr alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Nnamchi, Paul S; Obayi, C S; Todd, Iain; Rainforth, M W

    2016-07-01

    The development and characterisation of new metallic biomaterials that contain non-toxic and non-allergic elements but possess low elastic modulus and low biodegradation rates, has become a topic of serious investigation in orthopaedic implant application. The lowering of elastic modulus and improving of corrosion resistance can be achieved by specific chemical alloying and super-elasticity effects, associated with a stress-induced phase transformation from the BCC metastable beta phase to the orthorhombic α″ martensite. Using this framework, this paper focuses on the effect of Nb and/or Zr micro-additions on the elastic modulus/yield strength balance and discusses microstructure, and the mechanical and electrochemical behaviour of four new β-Ti-8Mo-xNb-xZr (x=2-5) alloys, using tensile tests, X-ray diffraction, SEM characterisation, ultrasound technique and potentiodynamic polarisation methods. The results reveal that the alloys exhibit a pronounced microstructural sensitivity response, with alloying elements and excellent agreement between β-stability and high mechanical strength, with increasing Nb additions. Although all the alloys possess excellent corrosion resistance and low Young׳s modulus, Ti-8Mo-4Nb-2Zr alloy, which consists of β+α'' phases, exhibits a low Young modulus of 35GPa, which is lower than those of the commercial alloys already used in biomedical implantation. The significant corrosion resistance, nontoxicity and better mechanical compatibility are properties pertinent to preventing stress shielding and bone resorption in orthopaedic implant applications.

  15. Corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with Cu.

    PubMed

    Koike, Marie; Cai, Zhuo; Oda, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Toru

    2005-05-01

    It has recently been found that alloying with copper improved the inherently poor grindability and wear resistance of titanium. This study characterized the corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with copper. Alloys (0.9 or 3.5 mass % Cu) were cast with the use of a magnesia-based investment in a centrifugal casting machine. Three specimen surfaces were tested: ground, sandblasted, and as cast. Commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V served as controls. Open-circuit potential measurement, linear polarization, and potentiodynamic cathodic polarization were performed in aerated (air + 10% CO(2)) modified Tani-Zucchi synthetic saliva at 37 degrees C. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization was conducted in the same medium deaerated by N(2) + 10% CO(2). Polarization resistance (R(p)), Tafel slopes, and corrosion current density (I(corr)) were determined. A passive region occurred for the alloy specimens with ground and sandblasted surfaces, as for CP Ti. However, no passivation was observed on the as-cast alloys or on CP Ti. There were significant differences among all metals tested for R(p) and I(corr) and significantly higher R(p) and lower I(corr) values for CP Ti compared to Ti-6Al-4V or the alloys with Cu. Alloying up to 3.5 mass % Cu to Ti-6Al-4V did not change the corrosion behavior. Specimens with ground or sandblasted surfaces were superior to specimens with as-cast surfaces. PMID:15744719

  16. Monolithic Cu-Cr-Nb Alloys for High Temperature, High Heat Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Locci, Ivan E.; Michal, Gary M.; Humphrey, Derek M.

    1999-01-01

    Work during the prior four years of this grant has resulted in significant advances in the development of Cu-8 Cr4 Nb and related Cu-Cr-Nb alloys. The alloys are nearing commercial use in the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) where they are candidate materials for the thrust cell liners of the aerospike engines being developed by Rocketdyne. During the fifth and final year of the grant, it is proposed to complete development of the design level database of mechanical and thermophysical properties and transfer it to NASA Glenn Research Center and Rocketdyne. The database development work will be divided into three main areas: Thermophysical Database Augmentation, Mechanical Testing and Metallography and Fractography. In addition to the database development, work will continue that is focussed on the production of alternatives to the powder metallurgy alloys currently used. Exploration of alternative alloys will be aimed at both the development of lower cost materials and higher performance materials. A key element of this effort will be the use of Thermo-Calc software to survey the solubility behavior of a wide range of alloying elements in a copper matrix. The ultimate goals would be to define suitable alloy compositions and processing routes to produce thin sheets of the material at either a lower cost, or, with improved mechanical and thermal properties compared to the current Cu-Cr-Nb powder metallurgy alloys.

  17. Properties of aluminum alloys: Tensile, creep, and fatigue data at high and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Based on work by Alcoa Laboratories over several years, this book compiles more than 300 tables listing typical average properties of a wide range of aluminum alloys. Contents include: Typical Mechanical Properties of Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys at Various Temperatures--tensile properties at subzero temperatures at temperature after various holding times at the test temperature, and at room temperature after exposure at various temperatures for various holding times; creep rupture strengths for various times at various temperatures; stresses required to generate various amounts of creep in various lengths of time; rotating-beam fatigue strengths; modulus of elasticity as a function of temperature; Fatigue Data--fatigue strength of wrought aluminum alloys, axial stress fatigue strength of wrought aluminum alloys (at various stress ratios, smooth and notched specimens), average fatigue strength for aluminum and aluminum alloy flat sheet specimens (under complete reversed flexure), cantilever-beam fatigue test results of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures and following stabilization at the test temperature. The properties in this book are typical values--expected average values for representative lots produced using commercial processes and that meet industry standards, whose room temperature properties correspond to published typical values for the alloys.

  18. Analysis of SMA Hybrid Composite Structures using Commercial Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2004-01-01

    A thermomechanical model for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators and SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures has been recently implemented in the commercial finite element codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model may be easily implemented in any code that has the capability for analysis of laminated composite structures with temperature dependent material properties. The model is also relatively easy to use and requires input of only fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model is presented, followed by discussion of implementation and usage in the commercial codes. Results are presented from static and dynamic analysis of SMAHC beams of two types; a beam clamped at each end and a cantilevered beam. Nonlinear static (post-buckling) and random response analyses are demonstrated for the first specimen. Static deflection (shape) control is demonstrated for the cantilevered beam. Approaches for modeling SMAHC material systems with embedded SMA in ribbon and small round wire product forms are demonstrated and compared. The results from the commercial codes are compared to those from a research code as validation of the commercial implementations; excellent correlation is achieved in all cases.

  19. Analysis of SMA hybrid composite structures using commercial codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2004-07-01

    A thermomechanical model for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators and SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures has been recently implemented in the commercial finite element codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model may be easily implemented in any code that has the capability for analysis of laminated composite structures with temperature dependent material properties. The model is also relatively easy to use and requires input of only fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model is presented, followed by discussion of implementation and usage in the commercial codes. Results are presented from static and dynamic analysis of SMAHC beams of two types; a beam clamped at each end and a cantilevered beam. Nonlinear static (post-buckling) and random response analyses are demonstrated for the first specimen. Static deflection (shape) control is demonstrated for the cantilevered beam. Approaches for modeling SMAHC material systems with embedded SMA in ribbon and small round wire product forms are demonstrated and compared. The results from the commercial codes are compared to those from a research code as validation of the commercial implementations; excellent correlation is achieved in all cases.

  20. Temporarily alloying titanium to facilitate friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  1. Tailoring Fe-Base Alloys for Intermediate Temperature SOFC Interconnect Application

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Zhu; M.P. Brady; H.U. Anderson

    2007-12-31

    -Ni-Co alloys as precursor to synthesize a protective spinel layer on commercial ferritic steels has been initiated to facilitate the utilization of the Cr-free spinel as a surface seal to block Cr evaporation. It is suggested that low-cost Fe-Ni-Co alloy coating on commercial ferritic steels might be the best approach to completely eliminate the Cr poisoning problem in SOFC stacks, while maintaining the relatively low overall cost of the interconnect component.

  2. NASA's approach to space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, Isaac T., IV

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Office of Commercial Programs fosters private participation in commercially oriented space projects. Five Centers for the Commercial Development of Space encourage new ideas and perform research which may yield commercial processes and products for space ventures. Joint agreements allow companies who present ideas to NASA and provide flight hardware access to a free launch and return from orbit. The experimenters furnish NASA with sufficient data to demonstrate the significance of the results. Ground-based tests are arranged for smaller companies to test the feasibility of concepts before committing to the costs of developing hardware. Joint studies of mutual interest are performed by NASA and private sector researchers, and two companies have signed agreements for a series of flights in which launch costs are stretched out to meet projected income. Although Shuttle flights went on hold following the Challenger disaster, extensive work continues on the preparation of commercial research payloads that will fly when Shuttle flights resume.

  3. Directional Solidification of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellawell, A.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling at certain rates produced fibrous composite structures. Alloy samples melted in alumina or graphite crucibles under argon and then chillcast into 33-mm-diameter rods or sucked directly into 3-mm-bore alumina or silica tubes. Alloying not automatic with immiscible components of different densities and widely different melting points.

  4. Directional Solidification Of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhindaw, B. K.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Singh, A. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions promoting formation of aligned fibers sought. Report describes experiments in directional solidification of Cu/Pb and Bi/Ga monotectic alloys. Study motivated by need to understand physical mechanism governing formation of rodlike or fiberlike aligned structures in solidifying alloy and to determine process conditions favoring such structures.

  5. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  6. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  7. Developments in the Ni-Nb-Zr amorphous alloy membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, S.; Chandra, D.; Hirscher, M.; Dolan, M.; Isheim, D.; Wermer, J.; Viano, D.; Baricco, M.; Udovic, T. J.; Grant, D.; Palumbo, O.; Paolone, A.; Cantelli, R.

    2016-03-01

    Most of the global H2 production is derived from hydrocarbon-based fuels, and efficient H2/CO2 separation is necessary to deliver a high-purity H2 product. Hydrogen-selective alloy membranes are emerging as a viable alternative to traditional pressure swing adsorption processes as a means for H2/CO2 separation. These membranes can be formed from a wide range of alloys, and those based on Pd are the closest to commercial deployment. The high cost of Pd (USD ~31,000 kg-1) is driving the development of less-expensive alternatives, including inexpensive amorphous (Ni60Nb40)100- x Zr x alloys. Amorphous alloy membranes can be fabricated directly from the molten state into continuous ribbons via melt spinning and depending on the composition can exhibit relatively high hydrogen permeability between 473 and 673 K. Here we review recent developments in these low-cost membrane materials, especially with respect to permeation behavior, electrical transport properties, and understanding of local atomic order. To further understand the nature of these solids, atom probe tomography has been performed, revealing amorphous Nb-rich and Zr-rich clusters embedded in majority Ni matrix whose compositions deviated from the nominal overall composition of the membrane.

  8. Influence of noble metals alloying additions on the corrosion behaviour of titanium in a fluoride-containing environment.

    PubMed

    Rosalbino, F; Delsante, S; Borzone, G; Scavino, G

    2012-05-01

    Titanium alloys exhibit excellent corrosion resistance in most aqueous media due to the formation of a stable oxide film, and some of these alloys (particularly Ti-6Al-7Nb) have been chosen for surgical and odontological implants for their resistance and biocompatibility. Treatment with fluorides (F(-)) is known to be the main method for preventing plaque formation and dental caries. Toothpastes, mouthwashes, and prophylactic gels can contain from 200 to 20,000 ppm F(-) and can affect the corrosion behaviour of titanium alloy devices present in the oral cavity. In this work, the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Ti-1M alloys (M = Ag, Au, Pd, Pt) was assessed in artificial saliva of pH = 3.0 containing 910 ppm F(-) (0.05 M NaF) through open circuit potential, E(OC), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The corrosion behaviour of the Ti-6Al-7Nb commercial alloy was also evaluated for comparison. E (OC) measurements show an active behaviour for all the titanium alloys in fluoridated acidified saliva due to the presence of significant concentrations of HF and HF(2) (-) species that dissolve the spontaneous air-formed oxide film giving rise to surface activation. However, an increase in stability of the passive oxide layer and consequently a decrease in surface activation is observed for the Ti-1M alloys. This behaviour is confirmed by EIS measurements. In fact, the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy exhibits lower impedance values as compared with Ti-1M alloys, the highest values being measured for the Ti-1Au alloy. The experimental results show that the corrosion resistance of the studied Ti-1M alloys is similar to or better than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy currently used as biomaterial, suggesting their potential for dental applications.

  9. Biocompatibility of fluoride-coated magnesium-calcium alloys with optimized degradation kinetics in a subcutaneous mouse model.

    PubMed

    Drynda, Andreas; Seibt, Juliane; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich Wilhelm; Peuster, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The principle of biodegradation has been considered for many years in the development of cardiovascular stents, especially for patients with congenital heart defects. A variety of materials have been examined with regard to their suitability for cardiovascular devices. Iron- and magnesium-based stents were investigated intensively during the last years. It has been shown, that iron, or iron based alloys have slow degradation kinetics whereas magnesium-based systems exhibit rapid degradation rates. Recently we have developed fluoride coated binary magnesium-calcium alloys with reduced degradation kinetics. These alloys exhibit good biocompatibility and no major adverse effects toward smooth muscle and endothelial cells in in vitro experiments. In this study, these alloys were investigated in a subcutaneous mouse model. Fluoride coated (fc) magnesium, as well as MgCa0.4%, MgCa0.6%, MgCa0.8%, MgCa1.0%, and a commercially available WE43 alloy were implanted in form of (fc) cylindrical plates into the subcutaneous tissue of NMRI mice. After a 3 and 6 months follow-up, the (fc) alloy plates were examined by histomorphometric techniques to assess their degradation rate in vivo. Our data indicate that all (fc) alloys showed a significant corrosion. For both time points the (fc) MgCa alloys showed a higher corrosion rate in comparison to the (fc) WE43 reference alloy. Significant adverse effects were not observed. Fluoride coating of magnesium-based alloys can be a suitable way to reduce degradation rates. However, the (fc) MgCa alloys did not exhibit decreased degradation kinetics in comparison to the (fc) WE43 alloy in a subcutaneous mouse model.

  10. Improvement of mechanical and biological properties of TiNi alloys by addition of Cu and Co to orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Phukaoluan, Aphinan; Khantachawana, Anak; Kaewtatip, Pongpan; Dechkunakorn, Surachai; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate improved performances of TiNi in order to promote tooth movement. Special attention was paid to the effect on the clinical properties of TiNi of adding Cu and Co to this alloy. Ti49.4Ni50.6, Ti49Ni46Cu5 and Ti50Ni47Co3 (at %) alloys were prepared. Specimens were cold-rolled at 30% reduction and heat-treated at 400°C for 60min. Then, the test results were compared with two types of commercial archwires. The findings showed that superelasticity properties were confirmed in the manufactured commercial alloys at mouth temperature. The difference of stress plateau in TiNi, TiNiCo and commercial wires B at 25°C changed significantly at various testing temperatures due to the combination of martensite and austenite phases. At certain temperatures the alloys exhibited zero recovery stress at 2% strain and consequently produced zero activation force for moving teeth. The corrosion test showed that the addition of Cu and Co to TiNi alloys generates an increase in corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current densities (Icorr). Finally, we observed that addition of Cu and Co improved cell viability. We conclude that addition of an appropriate amount of a third alloying element can help enhance the performances of TiNi orthodontic archwires. PMID:27520713

  11. Interphase boundary precipitation in liquid phase sintered W-Ni-Fe and W-Ni-Cu alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muddle, B.C.

    1984-06-01

    A serious potential of embrittlement in liquid-phase sintered, tungsten-based heavy alloys is related to the precipitation of a brittle third phase along tungsten-matrix interphase boundaries. The present investigation is concerned with the identification of the phase observed to form at the tungsten-matrix interphase within a commercial W-Ni-Fe alloy containing a weight fraction Ni:Fe of 1:1. A severely embrittled sample of a commercial W-4.5 wt pct Ni-4.5 wt pct Fe alloy and heat treated specimens of a W-7.2 wt pct Ni-2.4 wt pct Cu alloy were used in a study of interphase boundary precipitation. It was possible to identify the embrittling interphase boundary precipitate formed in commercial W-4.5 wt pct Ni-4.5 wt pct Fe alloy. The interphase boundary precipitation of an intermetallic phase in W-7.2 wt pct Ni-2.4 wt pct Cu alloy under controlled conditions of heat treatment could also be confirmed. 34 references.

  12. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  13. Equivalent crystal theory of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) is a new, semi-empirical approach to calculating the energetics of a solid with defects. The theory has successfully reproduced surface energies in metals and semiconductors. The theory of binary alloys to date, both with first-principles and semi-empirical models, has not been very successful in predicting the energetics of alloys. This procedure is used to predict the heats of formation, cohesive energy, and lattice parameter of binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt as functions of composition. The procedure accurately reproduces the heats of formation versus composition curves for a variety of binary alloys. The results are then compared with other approaches such as the embedded atom and lattice parameters of alloys from pure metal properties more accurately than Vegard's law is presented.

  14. Mo-Si alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  15. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  16. Thermomechanical treatment of alloys

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Paxton, Michael M.

    1983-01-01

    An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

  17. Aluminum alloy and associated anode and battery

    SciTech Connect

    Tarcy, G.P.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes an aluminum alloy. It comprises: eutectic amounts of at least two alloying elements selected from the group consisting of bismuth, cadmium, scandium, gallium, indium, lead, mercury, thallium, tin, and zinc with the balance being aluminum and the alloying elements being about 0.01 to 3.0 percent by weight of the alloy.

  18. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-09-30

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  19. Development of Combinatorial Methods for Alloy Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; Santella, Michael L

    2005-07-01

    The primary goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive methodology for designing and optimizing metallic alloys by combinatorial principles. Because conventional techniques for alloy preparation are unavoidably restrictive in the range of alloy composition that can be examined, combinatorial methods promise to significantly reduce the time, energy, and expense needed for alloy design. Combinatorial methods can be developed not only to optimize existing alloys, but to explore and develop new ones as well. The scientific approach involved fabricating an alloy specimen with a continuous distribution of binary and ternary alloy compositions across its surface--an ''alloy library''--and then using spatially resolved probing techniques to characterize its structure, composition, and relevant properties. The three specific objectives of the project were: (1) to devise means by which simple test specimens with a library of alloy compositions spanning the range interest can be produced; (2) to assess how well the properties of the combinatorial specimen reproduce those of the conventionally processed alloys; and (3) to devise screening tools which can be used to rapidly assess the important properties of the alloys. As proof of principle, the methodology was applied to the Fe-Ni-Cr ternary alloy system that constitutes many commercially important materials such as stainless steels and the H-series and C-series heat and corrosion resistant casting alloys. Three different techniques were developed for making alloy libraries: (1) vapor deposition of discrete thin films on an appropriate substrate and then alloying them together by solid-state diffusion; (2) co-deposition of the alloying elements from three separate magnetron sputtering sources onto an inert substrate; and (3) localized melting of thin films with a focused electron-beam welding system. Each of the techniques was found to have its own advantages and disadvantages. A new and very powerful technique for

  20. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    PubMed

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  1. This is Commercial Titan, Inc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rensselaer, F. L.; Slovikoski, R. D.; Abels, T. C.

    1989-10-01

    Out of a quarter-century heritage of eminently successful expendable launch vehicle history with the U.S government, a commercial launch services enterprise which challenges the corporation as well as the competition has been launched within the Martin Marietta Corporation. This paper is an inside look at the philosophy, structure, and success of the new subsidiary, Commercial Titan, Inc., which is taking on its U.S. and foreign rocket-making competitors to win a share of the international communication satellite market as well as the U.S. government commercial launch services market.

  2. Pilot production & commercialization of LAPPD™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minot, Michael J.; Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Craven, Christopher A.; O`Mahony, Aileen; Renaud, Joseph M.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Mane, Anil U.; Demarteau, Marcellinus W.; Wagner, Robert G.; McPhate, Jason B.; Helmut Siegmund, Oswald; Elagin, Andrey; Frisch, Henry J.; Northrop, Richard; Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a progress update on plans to establish pilot production and commercialization of Large Area (400 cm2) Picosecond Photodetector (LAPPD™). Steps being taken to commercialize this MCP and LAPPD™ technology and begin tile pilot production are presented including (1) the manufacture of 203 mm×203 mm borosilicate glass capillary arrays (GCAs), (2) optimization of MCP performance and creation of an ALD coating facility to manufacture MCPs and (3) design, construction and commissioning of UHV tile integration and sealing facility to produce LAPPDs. Taken together these plans provide a "pathway toward commercialization".

  3. Low temperature superplasticity in 8090 Al-Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, H.P.; Huang, J.C. )

    1993-05-01

    There have been a number of aluminum alloys which, after being subjected to appropriate thermomechanical treatments (TMTs), exhibit high strain-rate sensitive superplasticity while deformed at a temperature near 0.9T[sub m]. The current study was intended to develop a series of TMT process which will allow the 8090 Al-Li base alloy to have superplastic capability at temperatures below 450 C so as to suppress to a certain degree of the extensive grain growth and Li-loss; at temperature above 300 C so that the flow stress will not be too high to induce intensive cavitation; and in excess of 400% elongation, thus reaching the level for certain commercial applications, if possible.

  4. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1999-03-16

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  5. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  6. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1998-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  7. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1999-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  8. Evaluation of femtosecond LIBS for spectrochemical microanalysis of aluminium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cravetchi, Igor V; Taschuk, Mike T; Tsui, Ying Y; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2006-05-01

    The analytical performance of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for elemental microanalysis of aluminium alloys and for mapping precipitate distribution on the sample surface has been studied in detail. A Ti-sapphire laser system producing pulses of 130 fs at 800 nm was used to generate the laser-induced plasma. Multi-element microanalysis of commercially available aluminium alloys was performed in air at atmospheric pressure. Crater characteristics such as diameter and crater morphology were characterized by optical and scanning-electron microscopy. Scaling of plasma emission and limit of detection as a function of laser pulse energy was also investigated. Current experimental results are presented and are compared with previous nanosecond microLIBS measurements.

  9. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Fatigue of die cast zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2006-04-01

    The rotating bending fatigue limit of die cast zinc alloy 2, alloy 3, alloy 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined as a part of an on-going program by ILZRO into the mechanical properties of die cast zinc. The stress-life (S-N) curves of alloys 3, 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined previously. This presentation reports the results of the S-N curve for Alloy 2 and the calculated fatigue limits for all five alloys. During the previous stress-life testing, the samples were stopped at 10 million cycles and the fatigue limit for alloy 3, alloy 5, and AcuZinc 5 appeared to be higher and the fatigue limit for ZA-8 appeared to be lower than the values reported in the literature. This was further investigated in alloy 5 and ZA-8 by testing continuous cast bulk alloy 5 and ZA-8.

  11. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  12. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  13. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  14. New Amorphous Silicon Alloy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Mridula N.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been modified by alloying with Al, Ga and S respectively. The Al and Ga alloys are in effect quaternary alloys as they were fabricated in a carbon-rich discharge. The alloys were prepared by the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) method. This method has several advantages, the major one being the relatively low defect densities of the resulting materials. The PACVD system used to grow the alloy films was designed and constructed in the laboratory. It was first tested with known (a-Si:H and a-Si:As:H) materials. Thus, it was established that device quality alloy films could be grown with the home-made PACVD setup. The chemical composition of the alloys was characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The homogeneous nature of hydrogen distribution in the alloys was established by SIMS depth profile analysis. A quantitative analysis of the bulk elemental content was carried out by EPMA. The analysis indicated that the alloying element was incorporated in the films more efficiently at low input gas concentrations than at the higher concentrations. A topological model was proposed to explain the observed behavior. The optical energy gap of the alloys could be varied in the 0.90 to 1.92 eV range. The Al and Ga alloys were low band gap materials, whereas alloying with S had the effect of widening the energy gap. It was observed that although the Si-Al and Si-Ga alloys contained significant amounts of C and H, the magnitude of the energy gap was determined by the metallic component. The various trends in optical properties could be related to the binding characteristics of the respective alloy systems. A quantitative explanation of the results was provided by White's tight binding model. The dark conductivity-temperature dependence of the alloys was examined. A linear dependence was observed for the Al and Ga systems. Electronic conduction in

  15. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  16. Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Giacchi, J.V.; Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O.; Palacio, H.A.

    2011-01-15

    The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

  17. Commercialization in NASA Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene E.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with commercialization in NASA space operations are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) NASA's financial outlook; 2) Space operations; 3) Space operations technology; and 4) Strategies associated with these operations.

  18. The Seasat commercial demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandless, S. W.; Miller, B. P.; Montgomery, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The background and development of the Seasat commercial demonstration program are reviewed and the Seasat spacecraft and its sensors (altimeter, wind field scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer) are described. The satellite data distribution system allows for selected sets of data, reformatted or tailored to specific needs and geographical regions, to be available to commercial users. Products include sea level and upper atmospheric pressure, sea surface temperature, marine winds, significant wave heights, primary wave direction and period, and spectral wave data. The results of a set of retrospective case studies performed for the commercial demonstration program are described. These are in areas of application such as marine weather and ocean condition forecasting, offshore resource exploration and development, commercial fishing, and marine transportation.

  19. Commercialization of parabolic dish systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washom, B.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of recent federal tax and regulatory legislation on the commercialization of parabolic solar reflector technology is assessed. Specific areas in need of technical or economic improvement are noted.

  20. Commercialization of parabolic dish systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washom, B.

    1982-07-01

    The impact of recent federal tax and regulatory legislation on the commercialization of parabolic solar reflector technology is assessed. Specific areas in need of technical or economic improvement are noted.

  1. Commercial Crew Planning Status Forum

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA presents an overview of common themes captured from industry responses provided to NASA's Commercial Crew Initiative Request for Information (RFI) published on May 21, 2010. The forum includes...

  2. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  3. Mechanically Alloyed High Entropy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, G.; Adrian, M. M.; Csaki, I.; Popescu, C. A.; Mitrică, D.; Vasile, S.; Carcea, I.

    2016-08-01

    In the last years high entropy alloys have been investigated due to their high hardness, high temperature stability and unusual properties that make these alloys to have significant interest. In comparison with traditional alloys that are based on two or three major elements, this new generation alloys consists at least of 5 principal elements, with the concentration between 5 and 35 at.%. The present paper reports synthesis of high entropy alloys (HEA) and high entropy composites (HEC) synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA). The equiatomic AlCrFeNiMn matrix was used for creating the HEA matrix, starting from elemental powders and as reinforcing material for composites was used pure graphite. The mechanical alloying process was carried out at different duration, in a high energy planetary ball mill, under argon atmosphere. The elemental powders alloying began after '5 hours of milling and was complete after 40 hours. The mechanical alloyed matrix and composite was pressed and heat treated under argon protection. The elemental powers were investigated for physical - technological properties, and by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Phase pressing operation was realized with a hydraulic press and the applied pressure was progressive. The sintering process was carried out at 850°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the MA process resulted in solid solutions formation and also revealed body- centred cubic (BCC) and face-centred cubic (FCC) structures with average grain size around 40 nm. In addition, nanoscale particles were highlighted by scanning electron microscopy, as well as the homogeneity of the chemical composition of the matrix and composite that was confirmed by EDX microanalysis. It was noted that HEA matrix and HEA composites were processed with a high degree of compaction and with a quite large capacity of mixed powder densification (around 70%).

  4. Rethinking "Commercial" Surrogacy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Millbank, Jenni

    2015-09-01

    This article proposes reconsideration of laws prohibiting paid surrogacy in Australia in light of increasing transnational commercial surrogacy. The social science evidence base concerning domestic surrogacy in developed economies demonstrates that payment alone cannot be used to differentiate "good" surrogacy arrangements from "bad" ones. Compensated domestic surrogacy and the introduction of professional intermediaries and mechanisms such as advertising are proposed as a feasible harm-minimisation approach. I contend that Australia can learn from commercial surrogacy practices elsewhere, without replicating them. PMID:25015592

  5. Rethinking "Commercial" Surrogacy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Millbank, Jenni

    2015-09-01

    This article proposes reconsideration of laws prohibiting paid surrogacy in Australia in light of increasing transnational commercial surrogacy. The social science evidence base concerning domestic surrogacy in developed economies demonstrates that payment alone cannot be used to differentiate "good" surrogacy arrangements from "bad" ones. Compensated domestic surrogacy and the introduction of professional intermediaries and mechanisms such as advertising are proposed as a feasible harm-minimisation approach. I contend that Australia can learn from commercial surrogacy practices elsewhere, without replicating them.

  6. Ion irradiation testing and characterization of FeCrAl candidate alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderoglu, Osman; Aydogan, Eda; Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-10-29

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels. This effort involves development of fuel cladding materials that will be resistant to oxidizing environments for extended period of time such as loss of coolant accident. Ferritic FeCrAl alloys are among the promising candidates due to formation of a stable Al₂O₃ oxide scale. In addition to being oxidation resistant, these promising alloys need to be radiation tolerant under LWR conditions (maximum dose of 10-15 dpa at 250 – 350°C). Thus, in addition to a number of commercially available alloys, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys developed at ORNL were tested using high energy proton irradiations and subsequent characterization of irradiation hardening and damage microstructure. This report summarizes ion irradiation testing and characterization of three nuclear grade FeCrAl cladding materials developed at ORNL and four commercially available Kanthal series FeCrAl alloys in FY14 toward satisfying FCRD campaign goals.

  7. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy

    PubMed Central

    Dang, B.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, C. X.; Wang, H. T.; Liu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy. PMID:27502444

  8. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, B.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, C. X.; Wang, H. T.; Liu, F.

    2016-08-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy.

  9. INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 783: An oxidation-resistant, low expansion superalloy for gas turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, K.A.; Smith, J.S.; Smith, R.

    1998-04-01

    INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 783 is an oxidation-resistant low coefficient of thermal expansion (low CTE) superalloy developed for gas turbine applications. Turbine efficiency can be increased through the use of low-CTE shrouds and case components that maintain tight blade tip clearances at different turbine operating temperatures. To achieve low CTE, alloys based on Ni-Fe-Co compositions require Cr content be maintained at low levels. Added Cr lowers the Curie temperature and thereby increases thermal expansion rate over a wider temperature range. The necessary lack of Cr minimizes resistance to both general oxidation and stress-accelerated grain boundary oxygen enhanced cracking (SAGBO). Increased amounts of Al in alloys strengthened by {gamma}{prime} alone also promotes SAGBO. Alloy 783 is the culmination in the development of an alloy system with very high aluminum content that, in addition to forming {gamma}{prime}, causes {beta} aluminide phase precipitation in the austenitic matrix. It was discovered that this type of structure can be processed to resist both SAGBO and general oxidation, while providing low thermal expansion and useful mechanical properties up to 700 C. The high Al content also reduces density to 5% below that of superalloys such as INCONEL alloy 718. Key aspects of the alloy development are presented, including the assessment of SAGBO resistance by evaluating elevated temperature crack growth in air. The alloy, now commercially available, has been successfully fabricated and welded into gas turbine engine components.

  10. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Dang, B; Zhang, X; Chen, Y Z; Chen, C X; Wang, H T; Liu, F

    2016-01-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy. PMID:27502444

  11. Thermal Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Powders Used for Producing an Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, B.; Söyler, U.; Lohan, N. M.; Özkal, B.; Bujoreanu, L. G.; Chicet, D.; Munteanu, C.

    2012-11-01

    In order to produce shape memory rings for constrained-recovery pipe couplings, from Fe-14 Mn-6 Si-9 Cr-5 Ni (mass%) powders, the main technological steps were (i) mechanical alloying, (ii) sintering, (iii) hot rolling, (iv) hot-shape setting, and (v) thermomechanical training. The article generally describes, within its experimental-procedure section, the last four technological steps of this process the primary purpose of which has been to accurately control both chemical composition and the grain size of shape memory rings. Details of the results obtained in the first technological step, on raw powders employed both in an initial commercial state and in a mixture state of commercial and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders, which were subjected to several heating-cooling cycles have been reported and discussed. By means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), the thermal behaviors of the two sample powders have been analyzed. The effects of the heating-cooling cycles, on raw commercial powders and on 50% MA powders, respectively, were argued from the point of view of specific temperatures and heat variations, of elemental diffusion after thermal cycling and of crystallographic parameters, determined by DSC, SEM, and XRD, respectively.

  12. The role of time-dependent deformation in intergranular crack initiation of alloy 600 steam generator tubing material

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Lian, K.

    1998-03-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of two commercial alloy 600 conditions (600LT, 600HT) and controlled- purity Ni-18Cr-9Fe alloys (CDMA, CDTT) were investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests in primary water (0.01M LiOH+0.01M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) with 1 bar hydrogen overpressure at 360{degrees}C and 320{degrees}C. Heat treatments produced two types of microstructures in both commercial and controlled-purity alloys: one dominated by grain boundary carbides (600HT and CDTT) and one dominated by intragranular carbides (600LT and CDMA). CERT tests were conducted over a range of strain rates and at two temperatures with interruptions at specific strains to determine the crack depth distributions. Results show that in all samples, IGSCC was the dominant failure mode. For both the commercial alloy and the controlled-purity alloys, the microstructure with grain boundary carbides showed delayed crack initiation and shallower crack depths than did the intragranular carbide microstructure under all experimental conditions. This data indicates that a grain boundary carbide microstructure is more resistant to IGSCC than an intragranular carbide microstructure. Observations support both the film rupture/slip dissolution mechanism and enhanced localized plasticity. The advantage of these results over previous studies is that the different carbide distributions were obtained in the same commercial alloy using different heat treatments, and in the other case, in nearly identical controlled-purity alloys. Therefore, observations of the effects of carbide distribution on IGSCC can more confidently be attributed to the carbide distribution alone rather than other potentially significant differences in microstructure or composition.

  13. Alloy-Enhanced Fans Maintain Fresh Air in Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The Partnership for Next Generation Vehicles (PNGV) is not a NASA initiative to develop powerful new rockets and spacecraft, even though it may sound like one. PNGV was a partnership established by the Clinton administration between the Federal government and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research to develop technologies that improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions from cars and trucks. More than 20 Federal laboratories from the Departments of Commerce, Energy, Transportation, and Defense; the Environmental Protection Agency; the National Science Foundation; and NASA were all involved in PNGV, in addition to more than 350 automotive suppliers, universities, and small businesses. In support of this tremendous effort, Jonathan Lee, a materials engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center, worked with a major automobile manufacturer in 1995 to develop a strong aluminum alloy for high temperature applications. The aim was to use the alloy for manufacturing parts for an internal combustion engine, as well as for NASA s propulsion applications. When funding from PNGV ended, Marshall continued to support the alloy s development with help from NASA s Innovative Partnerships Program (now the Office of the Chief Technologist). Together with PoShou Chen, a scientist with Morgan Research Corporation, Lee invented a highstrength aluminum alloy called MSFC-398 that, when tested, was three to four times stronger than conventional aluminum alloys at high temperatures. By the late 1990s, Lee says, NASA s scientists had successfully developed and patented this technology, which has great potential applications not for just automotive, but also for aerospace, marine, and commercial applications

  14. Proof-of-Principle Measurements on Unirradiated Zirconium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2007-04-18

    The ability to determine fuel assembly burnup has important non-proliferation implications since proliferation activities involve either irradiating fuel assemblies to a much lower level of burnup than is normal in commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) practice, and/or irradiation of separate targets. Similarly, a method of determining burnup could be used to confirm declared operation for a reactor that is operating under IAEA safeguards. It is possible to determine fuel assembly burnup by measuring gamma radiation from specific fission products; however this technique is only useable after the fuel assembly has been out of the reactor for at least a year, and is not very useful after the assembly has been out of the reactor for 10 years or more. The use of isotope ratio measurements to measure the level of neutron exposure that material has received is well-known for graphite applications. The current project is an attempt to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be performed on zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers proof-of-principle measurements done on unirradiated zirconium alloys, these measurements show that: Titanium 48/Titanium 49 ratios can be measured in zirconium alloys using a Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) - enough Titanium was present in each of 6 samples tried to allow resolving the peaks associated with each isotope, and correction of interfering ions. The Ti 48/49 ratio measured in unirradiated zirconium alloy is, within a narrow error band, the same as that found in natural, unirradiated zirconium.

  15. Mechanical alloying of biocompatible Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-De Jesús, F; Bolarín-Miró, A M; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Cortés-Escobedo, C A; Betancourt-Cantera, J A

    2010-07-01

    We report on an alternative route for the synthesis of crystalline Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy, which could be used for surgical implants. Co, Cr and Mo elemental powders, mixed in an adequate weight relation according to ISO Standard 58342-4 (ISO, 1996), were used for the mechanical alloying (MA) of nano-structured Co-alloy. The process was carried out at room temperature in a shaker mixer mill using hardened steel balls and vials as milling media, with a 1:8 ball:powder weight ratio. Crystalline structure characterization of milled powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction in order to analyze the phase transformations as a function of milling time. The aim of this work was to evaluate the alloying mechanism involved in the mechanical alloying of Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy. The evolution of the phase transformations with milling time is reported for each mixture. Results showed that the resultant alloy is a Co-alpha solid solution, successfully obtained by mechanical alloying after a total of 10 h of milling time: first Cr and Mo are mechanically prealloyed for 7 h, and then Co is mixed in for 3 h. In addition, different methods of premixing were studied. The particle size of the powders is reduced with increasing milling time, reaching about 5 mum at 10 h; a longer time promotes the formation of aggregates. The morphology and crystal structure of milled powders as a function of milling time were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and XR diffraction. PMID:20364362

  16. Commercializing fuel cells: managing risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Peter B.

    Commercialization of fuel cells, like any other product, entails both financial and technical risks. Most of the fuel cell literature has focussed upon technical risks, however, the most significant risks during commercialization may well be associated with the financial funding requirements of this process. Successful commercialization requires an integrated management of these risks. Like any developing technology, fuel cells face the typical 'Catch-22' of commercialization: "to enter the market, the production costs must come down, however, to lower these costs, the cumulative production must be greatly increased, i.e. significant market penetration must occur". Unless explicit steps are taken to address this dilemma, fuel cell commercialization will remain slow and require large subsidies for market entry. To successfully address this commercialization dilemma, it is necessary to follow a market-driven commercialization strategy that identifies high-value entry markets while minimizing the financial and technical risks of market entry. The financial and technical risks of fuel cell commercialization are minimized, both for vendors and end-users, with the initial market entry of small-scale systems into high-value stationary applications. Small-scale systems, in the order of 1-40 kW, benefit from economies of production — as opposed to economies to scale — to attain rapid cost reductions from production learning and continuous technological innovation. These capital costs reductions will accelerate their commercialization through market pull as the fuel cell systems become progressively more viable, starting with various high-value stationary and, eventually, for high-volume mobile applications. To facilitate market penetration via market pull, fuel cell systems must meet market-derived economic and technical specifications and be compatible with existing market and fuels infrastructures. Compatibility with the fuels infrastructure is facilitated by a

  17. State of the Art in Beta Titanium Alloys for Airframe Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, James D.; Briggs, Robert D.; Boyer, Rodney R.; Tamirisakandala, Sesh; Russo, Patrick; Shchetnikov, Nikolay; Fanning, John C.

    2015-06-01

    Beta titanium alloys were recognized as a distinct materials class in the 1950s, and following the introduction of Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al in the early 1960s, intensive research occurred for decades thereafter. By the 1980s, dozens of compositions had been explored and sufficient work had been accomplished to warrant the first major conference in 1983. Metallurgists of the time recognized beta alloys as highly versatile and capable of remarkable property development at much lower component weights than steels, coupled with excellent corrosion resistance. Although alloys such as Ti-15V-3Al-3Sn-3Cr, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and Ti-3AI-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (Beta C) were commercialized into well-known airframe systems by the 1980s, Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al was largely discarded following extensive employment on the SR-71 Blackbird. The 1990s saw the implementation of specialty beta alloys such as Beta 21S and Alloy C, in large part for their chemical and oxidation resistance. It was also predicted that by the 1990s, cost would be the major limitation on expansion into new applications. This turned out to be true and is part of the reason for some stagnation in commercialization of new such compositions over the past two decades, despite a good understanding of the relationships among chemistry, processing, and performance and some very attractive offerings. Since then, only a single additional metastable beta alloy, Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr-0.5Fe, has been commercialized in aerospace, although low volumes of other chemistries have found a place in the biomedical implant market. This article examines the evolution of this important class of materials and the current status in airframe applications. It speculates on challenges for expanding their use.

  18. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  19. Osseointegration behavior of novel Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy for dental implants: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaona; Meng, Xing; Chu, Shunli; Xiang, Xingchen; Liu, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Jinghui; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants on mineral apposition rate and new BIC contact in rabbits. Twelve Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants were fabricated and placed into the right femur sites in six rabbits, and commercially pure titanium implants were used as controls in the left femur. Tetracycline and alizarin red were administered 3 weeks and 1 week before euthanization, respectively. At 4 weeks and 8 weeks after implantation, animals were euthanized, respectively. Surface characterization and implant-bone contact surface analysis were performed by using a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive X-ray detector. Mineral apposition rate was evaluated using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Toluidine blue staining was performed on undecalcified sections for histology and histomorphology evaluation. Scanning electron microscope and histomorphology observation revealed a direct contact between implants and bone of all groups. After a healing period of 4 weeks, Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants showed significantly higher mineral apposition rate compared to commercially pure titanium implants (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants and commercially pure titanium implants (P > 0.05) at 8 weeks. No significant difference of bone-to-implant contact was observed between Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants and commercially pure titanium implants implants after a healing period of 4 weeks and 8 weeks. This study showed that Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants could establish a close direct contact comparedto commercially pure titanium implants implants, improved mineral matrix apposition rate, and may someday be an alternative as a material for dental implants. PMID:27534399

  20. Electromagnetic Casting of Copper Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, D. E.; Lewis, B. G.; Renschen, P. D.

    1985-09-01

    Electromagnetic (EMC) casting technology has been successfully developed for copper base alloys. This casting technique eliminates the mold related defects normally encountered in direct chill (DC) mold casting, and provides castings with greatly improved hot workability.

  1. Magnesium Alloys and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainer, Karl U.

    1999-04-01

    In the recent years there has been a dramatic increase in research activity and also applications of magnesium alloys. The driving force is the growing demand by the automobile industry resulting from the pressure to reduce weight and hence to reduce the fuel consumption. The U.S. car industry incorporates the largest amount of magnesium at the present time. In Europe, Volkswagen had a history of using magnesium in the VW Beetle. Volkswagen, in common with other major car producers has initiated a major research and development programme for advanced magnesium materials. The main emphasis of this book is in the field of general physical metallurgy and alloy development refelcting the need to provide a wider range of alloys both casting and wrought alloys to meet the increasing demands of industry. Other topics are nevertheless well represented such as casting, recycling, joining, corrosion, and surface treatment.

  2. Tritium Production from Palladium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Thoma, D.J.; Teter, D.F.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1998-04-19

    A number of palladium alloys have been loaded with deuterium or hydrogen under low energy bombardment in a system that allows the continuous measurement of tritium. Long run times (up to 200 h) result in an integration of the tritium and this, coupled with the high intrinsic sensitivity of the system ({approximately}0.1 nCi/l), enables the significance of the tritium measurement to be many sigma (>10). We will show the difference in tritium generation rates between batches of palladium alloys (Rh, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Be, B, Li, Hf, Hg and Fe) of various concentrations to illustrate that tritium generation rate is dependent on alloy type as well as within a specific alloy, dependent on concentration.

  3. Technical Seminar "Shape Memory Alloys"

    NASA Video Gallery

    Shape memory alloys are a unique group of materials that remember their original shape and return to that shape after being strained. How could the aerospace, automotive, and energy exploration ind...

  4. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  5. Solidification study of some Ni- and Co-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanfils, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    An ongoing research program aims to characterize the solidification of several Ni- and Co-based commercial wrought type alloys. The techniques used and the data items sought are: (1) thermal analysis, liquidus, nonequilibrium solidus as a function of cooling rate, secondary reactions temperatures, incipient melting, progress of solidification as a function of temperature; (2) optical metallography, characteristic structures and secondary dendrite arm spacing as a function of cooling rate; (3) X-ray diffraction, identification of precipitates; and (4) SEM/EDAX, measure of microsegregation.

  6. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  7. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  8. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  9. Superplastic forming of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D.; Flower, H.L. )

    1994-04-01

    Inconel Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) is now available in a fine-grained, controlled composition modification that can be super-plastically formed. The new superplastic forming (SPF) capability allows the manufacture of large, complex, and detailed parts, which improves integrity by reducing the need for joining. Furthermore, it allows designers to fabricate components having higher strength, fatigue resistance, and temperature capability than parts made of aluminum or titanium alloys.

  10. Electrochemical design of mesoporous Pt-Ru alloy films with various compositions toward superior electrocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjing; Imura, Masataka; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Wang, Liang; Jeong, Hu Young; Yokoshima, Tokihiko; Terasaki, Osamu; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2012-10-01

    Mesoporous Pt-Ru alloy films with various compositions were synthesized by electrochemical plating in an aqueous surfactant solution. After the removal of surfactants, continuous mesoporous Pt-Ru alloy films possessing uniform mesopores with diameter about 7 nm were obtained. The Ru content in the films could be controlled from 0 to 13 at % by changing the precursor compositions. For all the films, the mesostructural periodicities and the mesopore sizes in the films were not changed. Due to the mesoporous structure and the doped Ru content, our mesoporous Pt-Ru films showed superior electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction in comparison with the commercially available Pt catalyst.

  11. The Effect of Continuous Weathering on Light Metal Alloys Used in Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutchler, Willard

    1939-01-01

    An investigation of the corrosion of light metal alloys used in aircraft was begun at the National Bureau of Standards in 1925 and has for its purpose causes of corrosion in aluminum-rich and magnesium-rich alloys together with the development of methods for its prevention. The results, obtained in an extensive series of laboratory and weather-exposure tests, reveal the relative durability of a number of commercially available materials and the extent to which the application of various surface coatings of oxide alone and with paint coatings afforded additional protection. The paper may be considered as a supplement to NACA report 490.

  12. Interdiffusion behavior of Pt-modified γ-Ni + γ'-Ni3Al alloys coupled to Ni-Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shigenari; Wang, Wen; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Gleeson, Brian

    2005-07-01

    The effect of platinum addition on the interdiffusion behavior of γ-Ni + γ'-Ni3Al alloys was studied by using diffusion couples comprised of a Ni-Al-Pt alloy mated to a Ni-Al, Ni-Al-Cr, or Ni-based commercial alloy. The commercial alloys studied were CMSX-4 and CMSX-10. Diffusion annealing was at 1150 °C for up to 100 hours. An Al-enriched γ'-layer often formed in the interdiffusion zone of a given couple during diffusion annealing due to the uphill diffusion of Al. This uphill diffusion was ascribed to Pt addition decreasing the chemical activity of aluminum in the γ + γ' alloys. For a given diffusion couple end member, the thickening kinetics of the γ' layer that formed increased with increasing Pt content in the Ni-Al-Pt γ + γ' alloy. The γ'-layer thickening kinetics in diffusion couples with Cr showed less of a dependence on Pt concentration. Inference of a negative effect of Pt and positive effect of Cr on the Al diffusion in this system enabled explanation of the observed interdiffusion behaviors. There was no or minimal formation of detrimental topologically close-packed (TCP) phases in the interdiffusion zone of the couples with CMSX-4 or CMSX-10. An overlay Pt-modified γ + γ' coating on CMSX-4 showed excellent oxidation resistance when exposed to air for 1000 hours at 1150 °C. Moreover, the Al content in the coating was maintained at a relatively high level due to Al replenishment from the CMSX-4 substrate.

  13. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  14. Microstructural changes to AlCu6Ni1 alloy after prolonged annealing at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Wierzbińska, M; Sieniawski, J

    2010-03-01

    This work presents results of microstructure examination of AlCu(6)Ni(1) aluminium alloy. The commercial AlCu(4)Ni(2)Mg(2) (M-309) alloy is widely used for elements of aircraft and automotive engines. Modification its chemical composition was aimed at improving the stability of mechanical properties of the alloy subjected to long-term exposure to high temperature. The alloy after standard T6 heat treatment (solution heat treated at 818 K/10 h/water quenched followed by ageing at 498 K/8 h/air cooled) was annealed for 150 h at elevated temperature of 573 K corresponding to the maximum value at which structural elements of jet piston engines made of aluminium alloys operate. It was found that applied heat treatment caused an increasing in the particles of hardening phase (theta'-Al(2)Cu) size. The significant growth of the length of theta'-Al(2)Cu precipitations was observed in particularly. Nevertheless, it did not strongly result in change of its shape - the 'crystallites' and 'rods' were still characteristic of hardening phase morphology. The phenomena of the growth of theta'-Al(2)Cu precipitates caused decreasing the mechanical properties of the alloy, what is the subject of further investigations by the authors.

  15. In vitro study on an antibacterial Ti-5Cu alloy for medical application.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zheng; Li, Mei; Liu, Rui; Ren, Ling; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Haobo; Zhao, Ying; Yang, Ke

    2016-05-01

    Health of human beings is subjected to severe threats from the spread of harmful bacteria and the implant-associated infection remains a serious problem in clinic. In this study, a copper-bearing antibacterial titanium alloy, Ti-5Cu, has been developed for dental and orthopedic implant applications. The microstructure, mechanical property, electrochemical corrosion behavior, in vitro antibacterial performance, cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility of the alloy are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the Ti-5Cu alloy which consists of α-phase matrix and intermetallic compound Ti2Cu not only possesses strong antibacterial activity against both E. coli and S. aureus, but also exhibits better mechanical properties than the commercial pure titanium. It is confirmed that the release of trace amount of Cu ions from the alloy plays an important role in killing bacteria. In spite of the ion release, Ti-5Cu alloy still reveals excellent corrosion resistance. Moreover, good cytocompatibility and superior hemocompatibility make Ti-5Cu alloy to be a potential solution that could prevent the peri-implant infection in dental and orthopaedic applications. PMID:26975748

  16. Titanium-35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Dennia Perez; de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Carvalho, Isabel Chaves Silva; Forte, Lilibeth Ferraz de Brito Penna; de Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia; Prado, Renata Falchete do; Santos, Dalcy Roberto Dos; Cairo, Carlos Alberto Alves; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium-niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti-35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti-35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti-35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti-35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. PMID:26249625

  17. Microstructural changes to AlCu6Ni1 alloy after prolonged annealing at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Wierzbińska, M; Sieniawski, J

    2010-03-01

    This work presents results of microstructure examination of AlCu(6)Ni(1) aluminium alloy. The commercial AlCu(4)Ni(2)Mg(2) (M-309) alloy is widely used for elements of aircraft and automotive engines. Modification its chemical composition was aimed at improving the stability of mechanical properties of the alloy subjected to long-term exposure to high temperature. The alloy after standard T6 heat treatment (solution heat treated at 818 K/10 h/water quenched followed by ageing at 498 K/8 h/air cooled) was annealed for 150 h at elevated temperature of 573 K corresponding to the maximum value at which structural elements of jet piston engines made of aluminium alloys operate. It was found that applied heat treatment caused an increasing in the particles of hardening phase (theta'-Al(2)Cu) size. The significant growth of the length of theta'-Al(2)Cu precipitations was observed in particularly. Nevertheless, it did not strongly result in change of its shape - the 'crystallites' and 'rods' were still characteristic of hardening phase morphology. The phenomena of the growth of theta'-Al(2)Cu precipitates caused decreasing the mechanical properties of the alloy, what is the subject of further investigations by the authors. PMID:20500428

  18. Direct visualization of β phase causing intergranular forms of corrosion in Al–Mg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Young-Ki Allen, Todd

    2013-06-15

    For a more effective examination of microstructure in Al–Mg alloys, a new etching solution has been developed; dissolved ammonium persulfate in water. It is demonstrated how β phase (Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2}) in Al–Mg alloys respond to this solution using samples of a binary Al–Mg alloy and a commercial 5083 aluminum alloy. Nanometer sized β phase is clearly visualized for the first time using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) instead of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is anticipated that direct and unambiguous visualization of β phase will greatly augment intergranular corrosion research in 5xxx series aluminum alloys. - Highlights: • Nanometer sized β phase in Al-10% Mg is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Nanometer sized β phase in wrought alloy 5083 is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Grain boundary decorating β phase and isolated sponge-like β phase are shown. • This phase is confirmed to be β phase using composition analysis.

  19. Subtask 12D5: Thermal creep properties of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to provide baseline data on the thermal creep properties of candidate vanadium base alloys. Vanadium-base alloys are promising candidate materials for application in fusion reactor structural components because of several important advantages. V-4Cr-4Ti has been identified as one of the most promising candidate alloys and was selected for comprehensive tests and examination. In the present investigation, thermal creep rates and stress-rupture life of V-4Cr-4Ti and V-10Cr-5Ti alloys were determined at 600{degrees}C. The impurity composition and microstructural characteristics of creep-tested specimens were analyzed and correlated with the measured creep properties. The results of these tests show that V-4Cr-4Ti, which contains impurity compositions typical of a commercially fabricated vanadium-based alloy, exhibits creep strength substantially superior to that of V-20Ti, HT-9, or Type 316 stainless steel. The V-10Cr-5Ti alloy exhibits creep strength somewhat higher than that of V-4Cr-4Ti. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Titanium-35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Dennia Perez; de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Carvalho, Isabel Chaves Silva; Forte, Lilibeth Ferraz de Brito Penna; de Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia; Prado, Renata Falchete do; Santos, Dalcy Roberto Dos; Cairo, Carlos Alberto Alves; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium-niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti-35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti-35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti-35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti-35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants.