Science.gov

Sample records for common content management

  1. Content Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisniewski, Jeff; Stenstrom, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a guide in acquiring content management system. They conducted a vendor survey that covers four areas: (1) general information about the product (including standards supported); (2) administration of the product; (3) functionality; and (4) contact information for readers who want to know more. A list of product…

  2. Content Documents Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, R.; Hochstadt, J.; Boelke J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Content Documents are created and managed under the System Software group with. Launch Control System (LCS) project. The System Software product group is lead by NASA Engineering Control and Data Systems branch (NEC3) at Kennedy Space Center. The team is working on creating Operating System Images (OSI) for different platforms (i.e. AIX, Linux, Solaris and Windows). Before the OSI can be created, the team must create a Content Document which provides the information of a workstation or server, with the list of all the software that is to be installed on it and also the set where the hardware belongs. This can be for example in the LDS, the ADS or the FR-l. The objective of this project is to create a User Interface Web application that can manage the information of the Content Documents, with all the correct validations and filters for administrator purposes. For this project we used one of the most excellent tools in agile development applications called Ruby on Rails. This tool helps pragmatic programmers develop Web applications with Rails framework and Ruby programming language. It is very amazing to see how a student can learn about OOP features with the Ruby language, manage the user interface with HTML and CSS, create associations and queries with gems, manage databases and run a server with MYSQL, run shell commands with command prompt and create Web frameworks with Rails. All of this in a real world project and in just fifteen weeks!

  3. Approaching Academic Digital Content Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital content management in higher education. Highlights include learning objects that make content more modular so it can be used in other courses or by other institutions; and a system at Ohio State University for content management that includes the creation of learner profiles. (LRW)

  4. Creating an Internal Content Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennema, Greg

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about an internal content management system that they have created at Calvin College. It is a hybrid of CMS and intranet that organizes Web site content and a variety of internal tools to help librarians complete their daily tasks. Hobbes is a Web-based tool that uses Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts written…

  5. Managing the wildlife tourism commons.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Lusseau, David

    2015-04-01

    The nonlethal effects of wildlife tourism can threaten the conservation status of targeted animal populations. In turn, such resource depletion can compromise the economic viability of the industry. Therefore, wildlife tourism exploits resources that can become common pool and that should be managed accordingly. We used a simulation approach to test whether different management regimes (tax, tax and subsidy, cap, cap and trade) could provide socioecologically sustainable solutions. Such schemes are sensitive to errors in estimated management targets. We determined the sensitivity of each scenario to various realistic uncertainties in management implementation and in our knowledge of the population. Scenarios where time quotas were enforced using a tax and subsidy approach, or they were traded between operators were more likely to be sustainable. Importantly, sustainability could be achieved even when operators were assumed to make simple rational economic decisions. We suggest that a combination of the two regimes might offer a robust solution, especially on a small spatial scale and under the control of a self-organized, operator-level institution. Our simulation platform could be parameterized to mimic local conditions and provide a test bed for experimenting different governance solutions in specific case studies. PMID:26214918

  6. Content and Workflow Management for Library Websites: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Holly, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Using database-driven web pages or web content management (WCM) systems to manage increasingly diverse web content and to streamline workflows is a commonly practiced solution recognized in libraries today. However, limited library web content management models and funding constraints prevent many libraries from purchasing commercially available…

  7. Management Techniques for New Teacher Education Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudisill, Alvin E.

    1978-01-01

    Reports some of the educational innovations and management techniques currently being utilized in the University of Northern Iowa's Department of Industrial Technology. These include new content classification elements, a common core program based on these elements, open-space laboratories, team teaching, differentiated staffing, and a variety of…

  8. Management of common sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J

    2013-08-15

    Sleep disorders are common and affect sleep quality and quantity, leading to increased morbidity. Patients with sleep disorders can be categorized as those who cannot sleep, those who will not sleep, those with excessive daytime sleepiness, and those with increased movements during sleep. Insomnia, defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep that results in daytime impairment, is diagnosed using history findings and treated with cognitive behavior therapy, with or without sleep hypnotics. Restless legs syndrome is characterized by an urge to move the legs that worsens with rest, is relieved by movement, and often occurs in the evening or at night. Restless legs syndrome is treated based on the frequency of symptoms. Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. It is diagnosed using a sleep log or actigraphy, followed by overnight polysomnography and a multiple sleep latency test. Narcolepsy is treated with stimulants, such as modafinil; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors; or gamma hydroxybutyric acid (sodium oxybate). Patients with snoring and witnessed apneas may have obstructive sleep apnea, which is diagnosed using overnight polysomnography. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most common and effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is characterized by increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep, resulting in the patient acting out dreams with possible harmful consequences. It is diagnosed based on history and polysomnography findings, and treated with environmental safety measures and melatonin or clonazepam. PMID:23944726

  9. Common crossroads in diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Valitutto, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of type 2 diabetes are reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Data suggest that effective management can reduce the risk for both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In treating patients with diabetes, physicians must be prepared not only to tailor the initial treatment to the individual and his or her disease severity but also to advance treatment as necessary and in step with disease progression. The majority of patients with diabetes are not at goal for glycated hemoglobin A1C, fasting plasma glucose, or postprandial plasma glucose levels. Although lifestyle changes based on improved diet and exercise practices are basic elements of therapy at every stage, pharmacologic therapy is usually necessary to achieve and maintain glycemic control. Oral antidiabetic agents may be effective early in the disease but, eventually, they are unable to compensate as the disease progresses. For patients unable to achieve glycemic control on 2 oral agents, current guidelines strongly urge clinicians to consider the initiation of insulin as opposed to adding a third oral agent. Recent research suggests that earlier initiation of insulin is more physiologic and may be more effective in preventing complications of diabetes. Newer, longer-lasting insulin analogs and the use of simplified treatment plans may overcome psychological resistance to insulin on the part of physicians and patients. This article summarizes the risks associated with uncontrolled fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, briefly reviews the various treatment options currently available for type 2 diabetes, presents case vignettes to illustrate crossroads encountered when advancing treatment, and offers guidance to the osteopathic physician on the selection of appropriate treatments for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:18279520

  10. Web Content Management Systems in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powel, Wayne; Gill, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Web site development practices of Gonzaga University, Spokane, Washington, and the content management systems that allow owners of information to control content while the university controls the look of the Web site. More than 150 content managers assume control of some portion of the Web site. (SLD)

  11. An Intelligent Content Discovery Technique for Health Portal Content Management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous content management of health information portals is a feature vital for its sustainability and widespread acceptance. Knowledge and experience of a domain expert is essential for content management in the health domain. The rate of generation of online health resources is exponential and thereby manual examination for relevance to a specific topic and audience is a formidable challenge for domain experts. Intelligent content discovery for effective content management is a less researched topic. An existing expert-endorsed content repository can provide the necessary leverage to automatically identify relevant resources and evaluate qualitative metrics. Objective This paper reports on the design research towards an intelligent technique for automated content discovery and ranking for health information portals. The proposed technique aims to improve efficiency of the current mostly manual process of portal content management by utilising an existing expert-endorsed content repository as a supporting base and a benchmark to evaluate the suitability of new content Methods A model for content management was established based on a field study of potential users. The proposed technique is integral to this content management model and executes in several phases (ie, query construction, content search, text analytics and fuzzy multi-criteria ranking). The construction of multi-dimensional search queries with input from Wordnet, the use of multi-word and single-word terms as representative semantics for text analytics and the use of fuzzy multi-criteria ranking for subjective evaluation of quality metrics are original contributions reported in this paper. Results The feasibility of the proposed technique was examined with experiments conducted on an actual health information portal, the BCKOnline portal. Both intermediary and final results generated by the technique are presented in the paper and these help to establish benefits of the technique and

  12. Applying Content Management to Automated Provenance Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Gibson, Tara D.; Stephan, Eric G.; Chin, George

    2008-04-10

    Workflows and data pipelines are becoming increasingly valuable in both computational and experimen-tal sciences. These automated systems are capable of generating significantly more data within the same amount of time than their manual counterparts. Automatically capturing and recording data prove-nance and annotation as part of these workflows is critical for data management, verification, and dis-semination. Our goal in addressing the provenance challenge was to develop and end-to-end system that demonstrates real-time capture, persistent content management, and ad-hoc searches of both provenance and metadata using open source software and standard protocols. We describe our prototype, which extends the Kepler workflow tools for the execution environment, the Scientific Annotation Middleware (SAM) content management software for data services, and an existing HTTP-based query protocol. Our implementation offers several unique capabilities, and through the use of standards, is able to pro-vide access to the provenance record to a variety of commonly available client tools.

  13. Common Dental Injury Management in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Young, Eliot J.; Macias, C. Roger; Stephens, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Context: Orofacial and dental trauma continues to be a commonly encountered issue for the sports medicine team. All sports have some risk for dental injury, but “contact sports” presumably incur more risk. Immediate evaluation and proper management of the most common injuries to dentition can result in saving or restoration of tooth structure. Despite the growing body of evidence, mouth guard use and dental protection have not paralleled the increase in sports participation. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search from 1960 through April 2012 was conducted, as well as a review of peer-reviewed online publications. Results: Common dental injuries in sports include tooth (crown) fractures; tooth intrusion, extrusion, and avulsion; and temporomandibular joint dislocation. Mouth guards help prevent most injuries and do not significantly affect ventilation or speech if fitted properly. Conclusion: A working knowledge of the presentation as well as management of commonly encountered dental trauma in sports is essential to the immediate care of an athlete and returning to play. Mouth guard use should be encouraged for athletes of all ages in those sports that incur significant risk. PMID:26131303

  14. Common cycling injuries. Management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Mellion, M B

    1991-01-01

    The increasing participation in the athletic forms of bicycling warrants expanded physician attention to the traumatic and overuse injuries experienced by cyclists. The modern bicycle consists of a frame with various components, including handlebars, brakes, wheels, pedals, and gears, in various configurations for the various modes of cycling. For high performance cycling the proper fit of the bicycle is critical. The most efficient method to provide an accurate fit is the Fitkit, but proper frame selection and adjustment can be made by following simple guidelines for frame size, seat height, fore and aft saddle position, saddle angle, reach and handlebar height. The human body functions most effectively in a narrow range of pedal resistance to effort. Riding at too much pedal resistance is a major cause of overuse problems in cyclists. Overuse injuries are lower using lower gear ratios at a higher cadence. Cycling injuries account for 500,000 visits per year to emergency rooms in the US. Over half the accidents involve motor vehicles, and road surface and mechanical problems with the bicycle are also common causes of accidents. Head injuries are common in cyclists and account for most of the fatal accidents. Despite good evidence of their effectiveness, victims with head injuries have rarely worn helmets. Contusions, sprains and fractures may occur throughout the body, most commonly to the hand, wrist, lower arm, shoulder, ankle and lower leg. The handlebar and seat have been implicated in a wide variety of abdominal and genital injuries. Abrasions, lacerations and bruises of the skin are the most common traumatic injuries. Trauma may be prevented or reduced by proper protective safety equipment and keeping the bike in top mechanical condition. Anticipation of the errors of others and practising and adopting specific riding strategies also help to prevent traumatic injuries. Management of overuse injuries in cycling generally involves mechanical adjustment as well

  15. 10 Budget-Savvy Content Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Facing an overall budget reduction of 10 percent, most colleges or universities would postpone investing in a Web content management system. However, for California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB), a large budget cut made Web content management even more important. CSUMB found an innovative way to purchase and implement a new Content…

  16. Home media server content management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrew A.; van Vliet, Harry

    2001-07-01

    With the advent of set-top boxes, the convergence of TV (broadcasting) and PC (Internet) is set to enter the home environment. Currently, a great deal of activity is occurring in developing standards (TV-Anytime Forum) and devices (TiVo) for local storage on Home Media Servers (HMS). These devices lie at the heart of convergence of the triad: communications/networks - content/media - computing/software. Besides massive storage capacity and being a communications 'gateway', the home media server is characterised by the ability to handle metadata and software that provides an easy to use on-screen interface and intelligent search/content handling facilities. In this paper, we describe a research prototype HMS that is being developed within the GigaCE project at the Telematica Instituut . Our prototype demonstrates advanced search and retrieval (video browsing), adaptive user profiling and an innovative 3D component of the Electronic Program Guide (EPG) which represents online presence. We discuss the use of MPEG-7 for representing metadata, the use of MPEG-21 working draft standards for content identification, description and rights expression, and the use of HMS peer-to-peer content distribution approaches. Finally, we outline explorative user behaviour experiments that aim to investigate the effectiveness of the prototype HMS during development.

  17. Content Management for a Content-Rich Website.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeysett, Nik

    Over the last year the J. Paul Getty Trust's Web presence has evolved from a group of disparate, independently maintained Web sites into a homogeneous consistently branded one. This transformation recently culminated with the implementation of a leading Content Management System (CMS). There were and are many process-changes and challenges in…

  18. MPEG-7: applications for managing content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Neil F.

    2001-11-01

    In a unique study carried out at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) entitled, How much information [1], the yearly production of new information generated throughout the world has been estimated to be between 1 and 2 exabytes, or 250MB for each man, woman, and child on the earth. Of this information, about 93% is in digital format. We are increasingly in danger of being swamped with this information growth and now more than ever, we need sophisticated tools to control, manage and index this content. MPEG-7, the standard for descriptions of multimedia content, is intended to be the solution to manage this explosion of content. This paper begins with some findings from the UCB study, a brief introduction to what MPEG-7 is and outlines typical MPEG-7 applications ranging from Content Browsers to Multimedia Authoring tools showing how MPEG-7 can be used to manage digital content.

  19. Content Integration: Creating a Scalable Common Platform for Information Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berenstein, Max; Katz, Demian

    2012-01-01

    Academic, government, and corporate librarians organize and leverage internal resources and content through institutional repositories and library catalogs. Getting more value and usage from the content they license is a key goal. However, the ever-growing amount of content and shifting user demands for new materials or features has made the…

  20. Multimedia content management in MPEG-21 framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John R.

    2002-07-01

    MPEG-21 is an emerging standard from MPEG that specifies a framework for transactions of multimedia content. MPEG-21 defines the fundamental concept known as a digital item, which is the unit of transaction in the multimedia framework. A digital item can be used to package content for such as a digital photograph, a video clip or movie, a musical recording with graphics and liner notes, a photo album, and so on. The packaging of the media resources, corresponding identifiers, and associated metadata is provided in the declaration of the digital item. The digital item declaration allows for more effective transaction, distribution, and management of multimedia content and corresponding metadata, rights expressions, variations of media resources. In this paper, we describe various challenges for multimedia content management in the MPEG-21 framework.

  1. MEDBase: A Tool for Managing Multimedia Content

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Robert C.; Greenes, Robert A.; Bergeron, Byran P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, together with improved electronic access to medical knowledge, have heightened interest within the medical education community concerning the creation of multimedia systems that are capable of providing students with integrated presentations that incorporate problem-specific, high-resolution video, graphics, sound, sequences, simulations, and text. The substantial effort required to author multimedia knowledge management applications has revealed a need to develop tools that support the organization, indexing, and sharing of content both within and across institutions. As part of our ongoing work in knowledge management, we have developed MEDBase, a prototype tool for organizing and indexing multimedia content.

  2. Reliability in Content Analysis: Some Common Misconceptions and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippendorff, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In a recent article in this journal, Lombard, Snyder-Duch, and Bracken (2002) surveyed 200 content analyses for their reporting of reliability tests, compared the virtues and drawbacks of five popular reliability measures, and proposed guidelines and standards for their use. Their discussion revealed that numerous misconceptions circulate in the…

  3. Managing Content in E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanza, Daisy; Engestrm, Yrj

    2005-01-01

    The use of e-learning environments to support teaching and learning has had great impact on the way content is developed and managed. In most cases, both teachers and students have had to re-adapt the way they prepare, access and engage with educational matter. The adjustment in human mechanisms for organising and interacting with educational…

  4. Data on arsenic and cadmium contents of some common mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Vetter, J

    1994-01-01

    The arsenic and cadmium contents of 88 samples of mushrooms were determined. The majority of samples have a very low (practically zero) arsenic level; however, significant accumulations were found in the Agaricus species and in Macrolepiota rhacodes (which is related to the Agaricaceae family) and in three Tricholomataceae species (Flammulina velutipes, Lepista nebularis and Clitocybe, inversa). The average cadmium content of all samples was 4.91 ppm (0.28-86 ppm) on a dry weight basis. The highest concentration (34.9 ppm) was found to be characteristic of genus Agaricus. The accumulation potential of genus Russula is lower, and it appears that this content is more characteristic in three sections (Ingratea, Heterophyllae and Xerampelinae), whereas the others have a low (normal) cadmium level. These data confirm that the accumulation ability is genetically coded, thus, only certain taxonomical groups of fungi play a toxicological role. Our data offer new information about the concentration of two toxic elements of particular mushroom species as well as in other taxonomic groups. These data are of great importance in view of toxicology, food chemistry and, partly, environmental protection. PMID:9237332

  5. Management of common postoperative complications: delirium.

    PubMed

    Javedan, Houman; Tulebaev, Samir

    2014-05-01

    Delirium is a common postoperative surgical complication associated with poor outcomes. The complexity of delirium demands that each patient be assessed individually and a tailored prevention and treatment regimen be put in place. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies are available to achieve this goal. PMID:24721366

  6. Astronomica: Intergating Astronomy Content and Course Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, C. D.

    2004-12-01

    At the University of Arizona, the www.astronomica.org web site serves 1200 students per semester with a wide array of astronomy content that is integrated into course management capabilities. In addition to articles, an image data bank, news stories, and a linked 1200-term glossary, there is a recommendation system and a natural language question and answer tool. The site is built on an XML architecture, which allows the delivery of content to handheld devices. Another part of the web site serves voiceXML to web-enabled cell phones. The goal is to increase the level of student engagement and serve different learning styles. The site and content are available for use by outside instructors.

  7. Sustainable Multilingual Communication: Managing Multilingual Content Using Free and Open Source Content Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Todd

    2011-01-01

    It is often too complicated or expensive for most educators, non-profits and individuals to create and maintain a multilingual Web site, because of the technological hurdles, and the logistics of working with content in different languages. But multilingual content management systems, combined with streamlined processes and inexpensive…

  8. Software Sharing Enables Smarter Content Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, NASA established a technology partnership with Xerox Corporation to develop high-tech knowledge management systems while providing new tools and applications that support the Vision for Space Exploration. In return, NASA provides research and development assistance to Xerox to progress its product line. The first result of the technology partnership was a new system called the NX Knowledge Network (based on Xerox DocuShare CPX). Created specifically for NASA's purposes, this system combines Netmark-practical database content management software created by the Intelligent Systems Division of NASA's Ames Research Center-with complementary software from Xerox's global research centers and DocuShare. NX Knowledge Network was tested at the NASA Astrobiology Institute, and is widely used for document management at Ames, Langley Research Center, within the Mission Operations Directorate at Johnson Space Center, and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for mission-related tasks.

  9. Content Management: If You Build It Right, They Will Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2006-01-01

    According to James Robertson, the managing director of Step Two Designs, a content management consultancy, "A content management system supports the creation, management, distribution, publishing, and discovery of corporate information. It covers the complete lifecycle of the pages of one's site, from providing simple tools to create the content,…

  10. A Socio-Technical Analysis of Web Content Management: "Content is King."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eschenfelder, Kristin

    2001-01-01

    Examines how ongoing content management needs and tasks affect organizations that maintain Web-based information systems (Web IS). Investigates how organizational context shapes content management practice and configuration of the underlying Web IS technology. Presents a model of the socio-technical context of Web IS content management. (AEF)

  11. The Pharmacologic Management of Common Lesions of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The oral ulcerations caused by aphtous lesions, herpetic lesions, candidiasis, ulcerative lichen planus, mucous membrane pemphigoid, and pemphigus vulgaris are managed in a step-up approach that can involve topical, intarlesional, and systemic pharmacologic management. This article reviews the common treatment agents, modalities, and dosages. The emphasis is on local pharmacologic therapies, yet systemic conditions that often present with such oral lesions are briefly reviewed, along with the appropriate management. PMID:27040292

  12. Genetic diversity and selection of genotypes to enhance Zn and Fe content in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important source of dietary protein and minerals worldwide. Genes conditioning variability for mineral contents are not clearly understood. Our ultimate goal is to identify genes conditioning genetic variation for Zn and Fe content. To establish mapping popu...

  13. 47 CFR 63.18 - Contents of applications for international common carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contents of applications for international... Extensions and Supplements § 63.18 Contents of applications for international common carriers. Except as... authorized (i.e., authorized to provide international switched services on a facilities basis); (e) One...

  14. 47 CFR 63.18 - Contents of applications for international common carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contents of applications for international... Extensions and Supplements § 63.18 Contents of applications for international common carriers. Except as... authorized (i.e., authorized to provide international switched services on a facilities basis); (e) One...

  15. 47 CFR 63.18 - Contents of applications for international common carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contents of applications for international... Extensions and Supplements § 63.18 Contents of applications for international common carriers. Except as... authorized (i.e., authorized to provide international switched services on a facilities basis); (e) One...

  16. 47 CFR 63.18 - Contents of applications for international common carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contents of applications for international... Extensions and Supplements § 63.18 Contents of applications for international common carriers. Except as... authorized (i.e., authorized to provide international switched services on a facilities basis); (e) One...

  17. Respiratory manifestations and management in children with Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Chetan; Hsu, Peter; van Asperen, Peter; Mehr, Sam

    2016-06-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is an antibody deficiency that usually presents in childhood with recurrent sino-pulmonary infections. Diagnostic delay is frequent and thus respiratory morbidity is common, ranging from recurrent suppurative bronchitis to bronchiectasis. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment, whilst prophylactic antibiotic therapy and muco-ciliary clearance are additional treatment options. This review examines the diagnosis and management of respiratory issues in children with CVID. PMID:26831679

  18. Content Management from Vendor Selection to Successful Rollout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Discusses content management software, which provides a platform for managing the creation, review, filtering, updating, distribution, and storage of structured and unstructured content. Topics include intranets and extranets; vendor selection; comparing vendor approaches; scoping studies; fees; project management; documentation; roll-out…

  19. Common dental and periodontal diseases: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Laudenbach, Joel M; Simon, Ziv

    2014-11-01

    Physicians may encounter patients with dental and periodontal diseases in the context of outpatient medical practice. It is important for physicians to be aware of common dental and periodontal conditions and be able to assess for the presence and severity of these diseases. This article reviews common dental and periodontal conditions, their cardinal signs and symptoms, outpatient-setting assessment techniques, as well as common methods of treatment. Physicians detecting gross abnormalities on clinical examination should refer the patient to a dentist for further evaluation and management. PMID:25443675

  20. Gene-centric content management system.

    PubMed

    Poverennaya, Ekaterina V; Bogolubova, Nadezhda A; Bylko, Nikolay N; Ponomarenko, Elena A; Lisitsa, Andrey V; Archakov, Alexander I

    2014-01-01

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) was started two years ago and the international consortia have elaborated a number of informational resources to harbor the HPP data. Selected informational resources are currently used to elaborate the HPP baseline metrics, which were introduced to estimate future contribution of HPP to the knowledge domain. We developed a Web-based tool Gene-centric Content Management System (GenoCMS) for comparing public resources to proprietary results by using the representation of proteins as color-coded catalog. Within our CMS, the features of protein-coding genes are uploaded from the public domain and then appended by additional features derived from original experimental workflows. We describe the heat-map/traffic light representation of our proteomic experiments as the background of data taken from NeXtProt, MS/MS repositories, the Human Protein Atlas and the RNAseqAtlas. The system presented at www.kb18.ru comprises a collaborative knowledge base for annotating the gene sets and disseminating these annotations through the Web. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23994227

  1. Surgical Management of Common Disorders of Feedlot Calves.

    PubMed

    Miesner, Matt D; Anderson, David E

    2015-11-01

    Procedures to improve animal and handler safety, shape production parameters, and directly address the prosperity of individuals in need of assistance are performed routinely. Techniques to accomplish these tasks have been described in many venues. Painful procedures are expected in feedlot practice. Assessing and managing pain and welfare for these procedures has strengthened significantly over the past decade to address increased public concerns and also to support the desires of the operators/managers to progress. Methods to perform common procedures are described, including evidence and techniques for managing the pain and distress while performing them. PMID:26210768

  2. Infertility and miscarriage: common pathways in manifestation and management.

    PubMed

    Agenor, Angena; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between miscarriage and fertility is complex. While most healthcare settings treat miscarriage as a problem of subfertility in assisted reproduction units, others believe that miscarriage occurs in super-fertile women. Infertile women undergoing assisted reproduction are at a greater risk of having a miscarriage especially at an advanced age compared with women conceiving naturally. Aberrant expression of immunological factors and chromosomal abnormalities underlie both infertility and miscarriage. Common risk factors include increased maternal age, obesity, smoking, alcohol, pre-existing medical conditions and anatomical abnormalities of the reproductive system. Management pathways of both conditions may be similar with pre-implantation genetic testing and assisted reproductive technology used in both conditions. This paper discusses the synergies and differences between the two conditions in terms of their epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, risk factors and management strategies. The two conditions are related as degrees of severity of reproductive failure with common pathways in manifestation and management. PMID:26238301

  3. Academic medicine and managed care: seeking common ground.

    PubMed

    LaRosa, J C; Whelton, P; Litwin, M S

    1999-05-01

    The authors report the highlights of a one-day symposium, "Academic Medicine and Managed Care: Seeking Common Ground," sponsored in early 1997 by Tulane University Medical Center. The meeting was held to foster better understanding of the gap between managed care organizations (MCOs) and academic health centers (AHCs) and to define their common ground. There were 62 participants, mainly executives froin AHCs and MCOs, plus government officials and policy researchers interested in the interface of academic medicine and managed care. The participants agreed that there are indeed some common areas in which the two types of organizations can develop programs and interests that serve the missions of both. These include (1) a commitment to high-quality health care, objectively measured by outcomes; (2) issues of "customer service"; (3) certain areas of research (e.g., examining outcomes of medical interventions; measuring cost and cost-effectiveness; measuring quality of care); and (4) preventive medicine, an area in which both AHCs and MCOs are still relatively weak. On the other hand, large elements of AHCs' basic missions of education and research are not seen by MCOs as areas for developing a common agenda. Participants agreed that AHCs must do their best to improve and demonstrate the quality of their care, address the challenges of the market (i.e., take "customer service" seriously), address the issue of how many specialists and how many generalists should be trained, and define the cost of each of their missions. On the other hand, managed care must acknowledge that the missions of AHCs greatly benefit patients and society. Participants agreed that all approaches to AHC-MCO interfaces must be flexible and local, that common ground does exist, and that understanding can grow between these two kinds of organizations if acrimonious exchanges are avoided and serious efforts are made to work together for solutions. PMID:10353278

  4. Content Management and the Future of Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yuhfen Diana; Liu, Mengxiong

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Internet-based electronic content management in digital libraries and considers the future of academic libraries. Topics include digital technologies; content management systems; standards; bandwidth; security and privacy concerns; legal matters, including copyrights and ownership; lifecycle; and multilingual access and interface. (LRW)

  5. 50 CFR 600.815 - Contents of Fishery Management Plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contents of Fishery Management Plans. 600.815 Section 600.815 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) § 600.815 Contents of...

  6. 49 CFR 237.33 - Content of bridge management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Content of bridge management programs. 237.33 Section 237.33 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Railroad Bridge Safety Assurance § 237.33 Content of bridge management...

  7. 49 CFR 237.33 - Content of bridge management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Content of bridge management programs. 237.33 Section 237.33 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Railroad Bridge Safety Assurance § 237.33 Content of bridge management...

  8. Carotenoids and total phenolic contents in plant foods commonly consumed in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun-Ae; Cho, Yoon-Suk; Chen, C-Y. Oliver; Tang, Guangwen; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Russell, Robert M.; Yoon, Sun; Lee-Kim, Yang Cha

    2012-01-01

    Phytochemicals are reported to provide various biological functions leading to the promotion of health as well as the reduced risk of chronic diseases. Fat-soluble plant pigments, carotenoids, are extensively studied micronutrient phytochemicals for their potential health benefits. It is noteworthy that specific carotenoids may be responsible for different protective effects against certain diseases. In addition, each carotenoid can be obtained from different types of plant foods. Considering the fact that the phytochemical content in foods can vary according to, but not limited to, the varieties and culture conditions, it is important to establish a database of phytochemicals in locally produced plant foods. Currently, information on individual carotenoid content in plant foods commonly consumed in Korea is lacking. As the first step to support the production and consumption of sustainable local plant foods, carotenoids and total phenolic contents of plant foods commonly consumed in Korea are presented and their potential biological functions are discussed in this review. PMID:23346297

  9. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  10. Tragedy of the Commons Fisheries Management Simulation Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothero, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of the "Fishing Game" is that students will understand some of the issues that occur when multiple stakeholders share, and profit from, common and finite resources. Garrett Hardin described this as "The Tragedy of the Commons." The global fisheries provide a timely example of the over-exploitation of a shared resource. The forests, our water supplies, and atmosphere are other examples of "commons" that we must manage effectively. The "Fishing Game" is loosely based on the "Fishbanks Game" of Dennis Meadows. The student plays against two virtual fishing companies in an effort to make as much money as possible, while exploring the management issues that arise when trying to sustain the fish population for future profits. The player selects each of four realistic management scenarios. These are 1) free for all, 2) limited fishing season, 3) marine reserves, and 4) catch shares. For each scenario the student makes decisions about how many ships to build and how many to send to each of two fishing areas. A simple population model works in the background to determine the catch and number of new fish that are added to the population through birth each year. The student sets the management parameters for each of the scenarios. A modeling tool is used to determine the optimum parameters for each management scenario. The player will quickly find that a single aggressive player whose profit motive trumps concern over the sustainability of the population will almost always win under all scenarios except the 4'th. When the season is limited, everybody fishes harder. With marine reserves, catches will drop, but the population will not disappear completely. Only catch shares sustain the population while providing reasonable long term profit for the fishing companies. For each management scenario, the player is asked a pre and a post play thought question. After all scenarios are played, the student can edit the post versions of the thought questions, plus several added

  11. Genetic variability for iron and zinc content in common bean lines and interaction with water availability.

    PubMed

    Pereira, H S; Del Peloso, M J; Bassinello, P Z; Guimarães, C M; Melo, L C; Faria, L C

    2014-01-01

    The common bean is an important source of iron and zinc in humans. Increases in the contents of these minerals can combat mineral deficiencies, but these contents are influenced by environmental conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the interaction between common bean lines and water availability on iron and zinc contents (CFe and CZn, respectively), identify superior lines with stable CFe and CZn, and test for a genetic relationship between CFe and CZn. Six crop trials were performed using a randomized block design with three replications. The trials were performed during the winter sowing period for three different combinations of year and site in Brazil. For each combination, 53 lines were evaluated across two parallel trials; one trial was irrigated according to the crop requirements, and the other trial operated under a water deficit. Interaction was detected between lines and environments, and between lines and water availability for CFe and CZn. However, some lines exhibited high CFe and CZn in both conditions. Lines G 6492 and G 6490 exhibited high mean values, stability, and adaptability for both minerals. Other lines exhibited high CFe (Xamego) or CZn (Bambuí and Iapar 65). A moderate genetic correlation (0.62) between CFe and CZn was detected. Water availability during the common bean cycle had an effect on CFe and CZn; however, lines with high CFe and CZn in different conditions of water availability and environment were detected. PMID:25177957

  12. Headache disorders: differentiating and managing the common subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Headache is an extremely common symptom and collectively headache disorders are among the most common of the nervous system disorders, with a prevalence of 48.9% in the general population.1 Headache affects people of all ages, races and socioeconomic status and is more common in women. Some headaches are extremely debilitating and have significant impact on an individual’s quality of life, imposing huge costs to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. Only a small proportion of headache disorders require specialist input. The vast majority can be effectively treated by a primary care physician or generalist with correct clinical diagnosis that requires no special investigation. Primary headache disorders – migraine, tension headache and cluster headache – constitute nearly 98% of all headaches; however, secondary headaches are important to recognise as they are serious and may be life threatening. This article provides an overview of the most common headache disorders and discusses the red flag symptoms that help identify serious causes that merit urgent specialist referral. The current pathway of headache care in the UK is discussed with a view to proposing a model that might fit well in the financially constrained National Health Service (NHS) and with new NHS reforms. The role of the national society, the British Association for the Study of Headache, and the patient organisations such as Migraine Trust in headache education to the professionals and the general public in shaping headache care in the UK is described. The article concludes by summarising evidence-based management of common headache diagnoses. PMID:26516483

  13. Diagnosis and management of common acquired bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Nicole; Sarode, Ravi

    2013-03-01

    Acquired bleeding disorders (ABD) are commonly encountered in both inpatient and outpatient settings. ABD can occur due to consumption, decreased synthesis, or inhibition of coagulation factors and platelets. Clinical presentation may vary, ranging from mild bruising to life-threatening hemorrhage. The location, frequency, severity, and provocation of bleeding provide insight into the cause of ABD. Obtaining a good medical, surgical, family, social, and medication history is a crucial step in determining the underlying etiology. Basic laboratory parameters, such as prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, platelet count, and D-dimer levels, aid in further elucidating the reason for bleeding. Optimal management depends on accurate interpretation of the history and laboratory values. Treatment options include administration of vitamin K; blood component transfusion, consisting of plasma, cryoprecipitate, and/or platelets; and blood derivatives, including single and multiple factor concentrates. These products should be used judiciously, due to potential infectious and noninfectious complications, including transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload. This article discusses the management of the more common causes of ABD. PMID:23390026

  14. Managing Content in a Matter of Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA software created to help scientists expeditiously search and organize their research documents is now aiding compliance personnel, law enforcement investigators, and the general public in their efforts to search, store, manage, and retrieve documents more efficiently. Developed at Ames Research Center, NETMARK software was designed to manipulate vast amounts of unstructured and semi-structured NASA documents. NETMARK is both a relational and object-oriented technology built on an Oracle enterprise-wide database. To ensure easy user access, Ames constructed NETMARK as a Web-enabled platform utilizing the latest in Internet technology. One of the significant benefits of the program was its ability to store and manage mission-critical data.

  15. Content Based Digital Music Management and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Xiao, Linxing

    This chapter will introduce the three research fields mentioned above. For each fields, we briefly review the attempts and take one of them as an example. Then we describe the mechanism, and the performance of each example to show the effectiveness of these techniques. And at last, we will show a music archive management system realized by us which utilizes the techniques described in this chapter.

  16. Challenges to natural process restoration: common dam removal management concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. J.; Tullos, D. D.; Bellmore, J. R.; Bountry, J.; Connolly, P. J.; Shafroth, P. B.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Practitioners must make dam removal decisions in spite of uncertainty about physical and ecological responses. This can result in implementing structural controls or other interventions at a site to avoid anticipated negative effects, sometimes even if a given concern is not warranted. We used a newly available dam removal science database and other information sources to explore seven frequently raised issues we call "Common Management Concerns" (CMCs), investigating their occurrence and the contributing biophysical controls. We describe these controls to enable managers to better assess if further analyses are warranted at their sites before interventions are planned and implemented. The CMCs addressed are: rate and degree of reservoir sediment erosion; drawdown impacts on local water infrastructure; excessive channel incision; downstream sediment aggradation; elevated turbidity; colonization of reservoir sediments by non-native plants; and expansion of invasive fish. The relative dearth of case studies available for many CMCs limited the generalizable conclusions we could draw about prevalence, but the available data and established understanding of relevant processes revealed important biophysical phenomena controlling the likelihood of CMC occurrence. To assess CMC risk, we recommend managers concurrently evaluate if site conditions suggest the ecosystem, infrastructure, or other human uses will be negatively affected if the biophysical phenomenon producing the CMC occurs. We show how many CMCs have one or more controls in common, facilitating the identification of multiple risks at a site, and demonstrate why CMC risks should be considered in the context of other important factors like watershed disturbance history, natural variability, and dam removal tradeoffs. Better understanding CMCs and how to evaluate them will enable practitioners to avoid unnecessary interventions and thus maximize opportunities for working with natural processes to restore river

  17. Can student health professionals accurately estimate alcohol content in commonly occurring drinks?

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Julia; Searle, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Correct identification of alcohol as a contributor to, or comorbidity of, many psychiatric diseases requires health professionals to be competent and confident to take an accurate alcohol history. Being able to estimate (or calculate) the alcohol content in commonly consumed drinks is a prerequisite for quantifying levels of alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to assess this ability in medical and nursing students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 891 medical and nursing students across different years of training was conducted. Students were asked the alcohol content of 10 different alcoholic drinks by seeing a slide of the drink (with picture, volume and percentage of alcohol by volume) for 30 s. Results: Overall, the mean number of correctly estimated drinks (out of the 10 tested) was 2.4, increasing to just over 3 if a 10% margin of error was used. Wine and premium strength beers were underestimated by over 50% of students. Those who drank alcohol themselves, or who were further on in their clinical training, did better on the task, but overall the levels remained low. Conclusions: Knowledge of, or the ability to work out, the alcohol content of commonly consumed drinks is poor, and further research is needed to understand the reasons for this and the impact this may have on the likelihood to undertake screening or initiate treatment. PMID:27536344

  18. The Library Web Site: Collaborative Content Creation and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Oakland University's Kresge Library first launched its Web site in 1996. The initial design and subsequent contributions were originally managed by a single Webmaster. In 2002, the library restructured its Web content creation and management to a distributed, collaborative method with the goal of increasing the amount, accuracy, and timeliness of…

  19. Content Management Middleware for the Support of Distributed Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsalapatas, Hariklia; Stav, John B.; Kalantzis, Christos

    2004-01-01

    eCMS is a web-based federated content management system for the support of distributed teaching based on an open, distributed middleware architecture for the publication, discovery, retrieval, and integration of educational material. The infrastructure supports the management of both standalone material and structured courses, as well as the…

  20. 49 CFR 237.33 - Content of bridge management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Railroad Bridge Safety Assurance § 237.33... spans, span lengths, and all other information necessary to provide for the management of bridge safety... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Content of bridge management programs....

  1. 49 CFR 237.33 - Content of bridge management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Railroad Bridge Safety Assurance § 237.33... spans, span lengths, and all other information necessary to provide for the management of bridge safety... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of bridge management programs....

  2. 49 CFR 237.33 - Content of bridge management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Railroad Bridge Safety Assurance § 237.33... spans, span lengths, and all other information necessary to provide for the management of bridge safety... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Content of bridge management programs....

  3. Imaging approaches to diagnosis and management of common ductal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ferris-James, Diana M; Iuanow, Elaine; Mehta, Tejas S; Shaheen, Rola M; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2012-01-01

    Ductal disease is an important, often overlooked, and poorly understood issue in breast imaging that results in delays in diagnosis and patient care. The differential diagnosis for an intraductal mass is broad and includes inspissated secretions, infection, hemorrhage, solitary or multiple papillomas, and malignancy. Each breast is composed of eight or more ductal systems, with most disease arising in the terminal ductal-lobular unit. Imaging evaluation of the ductal system usually entails a combination of mammography, galactography, ultrasonography (US), and in some cases magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The most common finding with all modalities is ductal dilatation with a focal or diffuse abnormality. Benign diseases of the ducts include duct ectasia, blocked ducts, inflammatory infiltrates, periductal mastitis, apocrine metaplasia, intraductal papillomas, and papillomatosis. Malignant diseases of the ducts include ductal carcinoma in situ, invasive ductal carcinoma, and Paget disease. Most commonly performed with US or MR imaging guidance, percutaneous biopsy methods are helpful in diagnosis and management of ductal findings. Because most findings are smaller than 1 cm, located within a duct, and thus sometimes not visible after a single pass, vacuum-assisted devices help improve the accuracy of sampling. PMID:22786991

  4. Preservice Secondary Teachers Perceptions of College-Level Mathematics Content Connections with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Travis A.

    2016-01-01

    Preservice Secondary Mathematics Teachers (PSMTs) were surveyed to identify if they could connect early-secondary mathematics content (Grades 7-9) in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) with mathematics content studied in content courses for certification in secondary teacher preparation programs. Respondents were asked to…

  5. Iodine content in bread, milk and the retention of inherent iodine in commonly used Indian recipes.

    PubMed

    Longvah, T; Toteja, G S; Upadhyay, A

    2013-01-15

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) is still a major public health problem and iodized salt remains the most effective means to control IDD in India. Few reports indicate that vegans have inadequate iodine intake while at the same time concerns are being raised on the implementation of universal salt iodization in the country. Therefore, we investigated the iodine content in bread, milk and commonly used Indian recipes prepared without iodized salt and the retention of inherent iodine therein. Results showed considerable iodine content in bread (25 μg/100g) and milk (303 μg/L) as a positive fallout of universal salt iodization. Iodine content in 38 vegetarian recipes prepared without iodized salt was very low (2.9 ± 2.4 μg/100g). Retention of inherent iodine (65.6 ± 15.4%) and iodine from iodized salt (76.7 ± 10.3%) in the same recipes was comparable. Thus, universal salt iodization programme remains the single most important source of dietary iodine for the Indian population. PMID:23122074

  6. Genetic potential of common bean progenies selected for crude fiber content obtained through different breeding methods.

    PubMed

    Júnior, V A P; Melo, P G S; Pereira, H S; Bassinello, P Z; Melo, L C

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal health is of great importance due to the increasing consumption of functional foods, especially those concern-ing diets rich in fiber content. The common bean has been valorized as a nutritious food due to its appreciable fiber content and the fact that it is consumed in many countries. The current study aimed to evaluate and compare the genetic potential of common bean progenies of the carioca group, developed through different breeding methods, for crude fiber content. The progenies originated through hybridization of two advanced strains, CNFC 7812 and CNFC 7829, up to the F7 generation using three breeding methods: bulk-population, bulk within F2 families, and single seed descent. Fifteen F8 progenies were evaluated in each method, as well as two check cultivars and both parents, us-ing a 7 x 7 simple lattice design, with experimental plots comprised of two 4-m long rows. Field trials were conducted in eleven environments encompassing four Brazilian states and three different sowing times during 2009 and 2010. Estimates of genetic parameters indicate differences among the breeding methods, which seem to be related to the different processes for sampling the advanced progenies inherent to each method, given that the trait in question is not subject to natural selection. Variability amongst progenies occurred within the three breeding methods and there was also a significant effect of environment on the progeny for all methods. Progenies developed by bulk-population attained the highest estimates of genetic parameters, had less interaction with the environment, and greater variability. PMID:26125775

  7. Quantitative analysis of nitrate and nitrite contents in vegetables commonly consumed in Delta State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Onyesom, I; Okoh, P N

    2006-11-01

    Plasma thiocyanate has been reported to be high among cassava-eating populations such as that in Nigeria because of the cyanide content of cassava. Thiocyanate, which is secreted into the stomach contents of animals, has been demonstrated to catalyse the formation of nitrosamines (potent carcinogens) in the stomach from secondary amines and nitrite. The main source of the nitrite precursor in this environment is vegetables, primarily eaten as the chief supplier of proteins. The present study attempts to analyse the levels of nitrate and nitrite in vegetables commonly grown and consumed in Delta State, Nigeria. The nitrate and nitrite contents in green vegetable (Amaranthus spp.), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), pumpkin (Telfaria occidentalis) and water leaf (Talinum triangulare) grown in different localities of the state were determined by standard analytical procedures. The results show that those vegetables grown in the industrialised urban centres of the state had higher nitrate (223 (SD 71) mg/kg dry weight; P<0.05) and nitrite (12.6 (SD 1.7) mg/kg dry weight; P>0.05) levels when compared with the same species (188 (SD 77) mg nitrate/kg dry weight and 10.9 (SD 1.1) mg nitrite/kg dry weight) cultivated in less industrialised suburbs. We conclude that frequent consumption of such vegetables whose nitrate and nitrite contents are high by cassava-eating individuals might put them at risk of developing stomach cancer and other possible results of nitrate and/or nitrite toxicity. In order to avoid an outbreak in our communities, appropriate agencies should monitor and regulate the release of chemicals into the environment. In the meantime, the cultivation and consumption of vegetables grown in industrialised areas of the state should be discouraged. PMID:17092380

  8. The Resilience Assessment Framework: a common indicator for land management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Annette; Metternicht, Graciela; O'Connell, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    At the Rio+20 conference in June 2013, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) reinforced their mutual interests in building linkages between biodiversity conservation, sustainable land management, and climate change mitigation and adaptation. The UNCCD sees building resilience of agro-ecosystems as a common interest that could strengthen linkages between the conventions and deliver synergies in progressing goals of each of the conventions. Furthermore, enhancing resilience of productive agro-ecosystems is fundamental to food security and sustainable development, and thus aligns with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Global Environment Facility (GEF) shares the interest of the conventions in building resilience in agro-ecosystems. Indicators of resilience are required for monitoring progress in these endeavors, application of a common indicator between the UNCCD, UNFCCC and CBD as a measure of both land-based adaptation and ecosystem resilience, could strengthen links between the conventions and increase attention to the broad benefits of improved land management. Consequently, the Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel (STAP) to the GEF commissioned the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) to produce a report reviewing the conceptual basis for resilience, and proposing an indicator approach that could meet the needs of the Conventions and the GEF for an indicator of agro-ecosystem resilience and land-based adaption. The paper presents a synthesis of scientific understanding of resilience in agro-ecosystems, reviews indicators that have been proposed, and, having concluded that none of the extant indicator approaches adequately assesses resilience of agro-ecosystems, proposes a new approach to the assessment of resilience. Recognizing that no single indicator of resilience is

  9. Management of common gastrointestinal disorders: quality criteria based on patients' views and practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Roger; Hunt, Claire; Stevens, Richard; Dalrymple, Jamie; Driscoll, Richard; Sleet, Sarah; Smith, Jonathan Blanchard

    2009-01-01

    Background Although gastrointestinal disorders are common in general practice, clinical guidelines are not always implemented, and few patient-generated quality criteria are available to guide management. Aim To develop quality criteria for the management of four common gastrointestinal disorders: coeliac disease, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. Design of study Qualitative study including thematic analysis of transcripts from patient focus groups and content analysis of published clinical practice guidelines. Emergent themes were synthesised by a consensus panel, into quality criteria for each condition. Setting Community-based practice in England, UK. Methods Fourteen focus groups were conducted (four for coeliac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease, and two for GORD) involving a total of 93 patients (64 females, 29 males; mean age 55.4 years). Quality criteria were based on patients' views and expectations, synthesised with an analysis of clinical practice guidelines. Results A chronic disease management model was developed for each condition. Key themes included improving the timeliness and accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, better provision of information for patients, including access to patient organisations, better communication with, and access to, secondary care providers, and structured follow-up and regular review, particularly for coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusion This study provides a model for the development of quality markers for chronic disease management in gastroenterology, which is likely to be applicable to other chronic conditions. PMID:19520018

  10. Relationship between total phenolic content, antioxidant potential, and antiglycation abilities of common culinary herbs and spices.

    PubMed

    Ramkissoon, Jugjeet S; Mahomoodally, Mohamad Fawzi; Ahmed, Nessar; Subratty, Anwar H

    2012-12-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts and oxidative stress contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant, and antiglycation properties of crude ethanolic extracts of 10 common culinary herbs and spices from Mauritius were investigated in vitro. Fluorescence at 370 nm/440 nm was used as an index of albumin glycation. Allium sativum had the highest TPC (3.1 mg GAE/mL), whereas Allium cepa L. showed the highest radical scavenging capacity (72%) and Zingiber officinale had the most potent ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP; 2.99 mg AAE/mL). In contrast, Thymus vulgaris and Petroselinum crispum had the most potent antiglycation activity with IC(50) values of 21.8 and 200 mg/mL, respectively. There was no significant correlation between TPC (r=0.001), FRAP (r=0.161), and the antiglycation activity (r=0.034) for the extracts studied. Therefore, the results showed that antiglycation properties of plant-derived extracts cannot always be attributed to their phenolic content or antioxidant potential. PMID:23134460

  11. Folate content and retention in commonly consumed vegetables in the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Prayna P P; Prasad, Surendra; Devi, Riteshma; Gopalan, Romila

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the effect of boiling and frying on the retention of folate in commonly consumed Fijian vegetables (drumstick leaves, taro leaves, bele leaves, amaranth leaves, fern/ota, okra and French bean). The folate content was determined by microbiological assay (Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus) and tri-enzyme (protease, α-amylase and chicken pancreas conjugase) extraction treatment. The folate loss varied among the vegetables from 10-64% on boiling while 1-36% on frying. The higher folate loss was observed during boiling. The folate content in the water derived after boiling different vegetables ranged from 11.9 ± 0.5 to 61.6 ± 2.5 μg/100mL. The folate loss on boiling was accounted for in the cooking water. The predominant way of folate loss on boiling was leaching rather than thermal degradation which makes boiling the better choice of cooking the studied vegetables for folate intake, provided the cooking water is consumed together with the vegetables. PMID:25842344

  12. Xanthophyll content of selected vegetables commonly consumed in the Philippines and the effect of boiling.

    PubMed

    Pasaporte, Melvin S; Rabaya, Friche Jay R; Toleco, Mitchellrey M; Flores, Dulce M

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify xanthophylls in selected vegetables commonly consumed in the Philippines and to investigate the effect of boiling on their availability. Thirteen vegetables were grouped into green-leafy and non-leafy. Results showed that fresh malunggay contains the highest amount of lutein (167.1±6.1 μg/g), neoxanthin (48.66±2.31 μg/g), and violaxanthin (37.86±1.76 μg/g) while mais has the highest zeaxanthin (269.1±11.8 μg/g). Statistically, there is no significant difference (p>0.1) in xanthophyll content between fresh leafy and non-leafy samples. However, 15-min boiling (100 °C) changed this, resulting in a significant difference (p<0.1) in xanthophyll content between the two groups. Boiling increased the availability of lutein and neoxanthin, while an opposite effect was observed for zeaxanthin and violaxanthin. Results also showed that consuming 20 g of cooked malunggay (Moringa oleifera) can provide 100% the recommended level of lutein (10 mg) for eye health, while 8 g of cooked mais (Zea mays) a day can provide a high enough level (2 mg) of zeaxanthin. PMID:24731311

  13. Study of arsenic content in mine groundwater commonly used for human consumption in Utah.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Z; Rauckyte, T; Zak, S; Praveen, P

    2008-02-01

    Of the various sources of arsenic released in to the environment, the presence of arsenic in water probably poses the greatest threat to human health. Arsenic is released in to the environment through water by dissolution of minerals and ores. Natural release is slow, but in some areas the concentration of arsenic in groundwater (commonly referred to as Acid Mine Drainage (or AMD)) is accelerated by mining activity. In fact the presence of arsenic may last a long time even after the mining activity has ceased. Hence it is imperative to study the quality of water (especially for those areas in the vicinity of mines) used for different purposes to identify an appropriate remediation technique for effective pollution control. In this paper, contents of arsenic and other metals in the water were quantified from three different sources: (1) groundwater from the mining tunnel (Judge tunnel), (2) drinking water, and (3) water used in the hydrant-flushed distribution system (Park City) in Utah (USA). The results showed the content of arsenic from the mining tunnel, after chlorination, and in tap water were below 10 microgl(-1). However, significant amounts of arsenic, lead, zinc, iron, manganese and antimony have been found in water samples taken from the distribution systems. In the consideration of the further use of mine groundwater for drinking purposes and the distribution system, Park City should regularly be maintained by a flushing program in the distribution system. PMID:18613620

  14. The communicative content of the common marmoset phee call during antiphonal calling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cory T.; Mandel, Katherine; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    Vocalizations are a dominant means of communication for numerous species, including nonhuman primates. These acoustic signals are encoded with a rich array of information available to signal receivers that can be used to guide species-typical behaviors. Here we examined the communicative content of common marmoset phee calls, the species-typical long distance contact call, during antiphonal calling. This call type has a relatively stereotyped acoustic structure, consisting of a series of long tonal pulses. Analyses revealed that calls could be reliably classified based on the individual identity and social group of the caller. Our analyses did not, however, correctly classify phee calls recorded under different social contexts, though differences were evident along individual acoustic parameters. Further tests of antiphonal calling interactions showed that spontaneously produced phee calls differ from antiphonal phee calls in their peak and end frequency, which may be functionally significant. Overall, this study shows that the marmoset phee call has a rich communicative content encoded in its acoustic structure available to conspecifics during antiphonal calling exchanges. PMID:20549761

  15. Operations Management Teaching: Establishing Content and Relevance to Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Desmond; Hill, Alex; Brown, Steve; Aktas, Emel; Kuula, Markku

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relevance to industry's needs of operations management (OM) teaching in higher education, by researching the content of OM modules delivered by UK academics and comparing the results of this research with the views of business practitioners having had first-hand experience of OM teaching on MBA programmes. To determine…

  16. Ethics Content in Strategic Management Textbooks: A Longitudinal Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Scott W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of ethics content in strategic management textbooks. The importance of ethical behavior within organizations has been highlighted in the past by organizations, such as Enron and WorldCom, and more recently by British Petroleum and Toyota. The data collected from two different editions of five…

  17. Classroom Behaviour Management Content in Australian Undergraduate Primary Teaching Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Sue; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The ability to differentiate classroom behaviour management (CBM) strategies is an important skill for novice teachers in increasingly diverse classrooms. Worldwide, little is known about the curriculum content offered to pre-service teachers in the area of CBM. This article reports the findings from the first nationwide survey of Australian…

  18. The Strategic Association between Enterprise Content Management and Decision Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alalwan, Jaffar Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    To deal with the increasing information overload and with the structured and unstructured data complexity, many organizations have implemented enterprise content management (ECM) systems. Published research on ECM so far is very limited and reports on ECM implementations have been scarce until recently (Tyrvainen et al. 2006). However, the little…

  19. Managing Content, Managing Change: Content Strategy is Vital for Effective Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Kim

    2013-01-01

    When a website has become a virtual storage closet rather than a place where useful, usable content is created, published, and organized, there is a problem. If audiences cannot quickly and easily find what they are looking for when they visit a website--and are not interested in what they find when they get there--they will get frustrated and…

  20. 78 FR 35940 - Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Content of Premarket... draft guidance document entitled ``Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity...

  1. A Study of the Content in Selected Textbooks for the Commonly Offered Basic Business Courses in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, L. Eugene

    The problem was a study of the content found in five commonly offered basic business courses in secondary schools to determine whether the subject matter in each course is sufficiently unique to justify the continued offering of the current series of courses or whether the content is so repetitious that further consideration of the consolidation…

  2. The integration of cartographic information into a content management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnari, Mario M.; Noviello, Carmine

    2006-01-01

    A corporate information system needs to be as accessible as library content, which implies to organize the content in a logical structure, categorizing it, and using the categories to add metadata to the information. Content Management System (CMS) are an emerging kind software component that manages content, usually making a large use of the web technologies, whose main goals are to allow easy creation, publishing and retrieval of content to fit business needs. The focus of this paper is to describe how we integrated "map" metaphor into a CMS. Where maps are symbolic information and rely on the use of a graphic sign language. A characteristic feature of maps is that their design has traditionally been constrained by the need to create one model of reality for a variety of purposes. The map's primary role as a communication medium involves the application of processes such as selection, classification, displacement, symbolization and graphic exaggeration. A model of the infrastructure is presented and the current prototype of the model is briefly discussed together the currently deployed environment for the cultural heritage information dissemination.

  3. Exploitation of Common Bean Flours with Low Antinutrient Content for Making Nutritionally Enhanced Biscuits

    PubMed Central

    Sparvoli, Francesca; Laureati, Monica; Pilu, Roberto; Pagliarini, Ella; Toschi, Ivan; Giuberti, Gianluca; Fortunati, Paola; Daminati, Maria G.; Cominelli, Eleonora; Bollini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of legumes is associated with a number of physiological and health benefits. Legume proteins complement very well those of cereals and are often used to produce gluten-free products. However, legume seeds often contain antinutritional compounds, such as phytate, galactooligosaccharides, phenolic compounds, lectins, enzyme inhibitors, whose presence could affect their nutritional value. Screening natural and induced biodiversity for useful traits, followed by breeding, is a way to remove undesirable components. We used the common bean cv. Lady Joy and the lpa1 mutant line, having different seed composition for absence/presence of lectins,α-amylase inhibitor, (α-AI) and phytic acid, to verify the advantage of their use to make biscuits with improved nutritional properties. We showed that use of unprocessed flour from normal beans (Taylor's Horticulture and Billò) must be avoided, since lectin activity is still present after baking, and demonstrated the advantage of using the cv. Lady Joy, lacking active lectins and having active α-AI. To assess the contribution of bean flour to biscuit quality traits, different formulations of composite flours (B12, B14, B22, B24, B29) were used in combinations with wheat (B14), maize (gluten-free B22 and B29), or with both (B12 and B24). These biscuits were nutritionally better than the control, having a better amino acid score, higher fiber amount, lower predicted glycemic index (pGI) and starch content. Replacement of cv. Lady Joy bean flour with that of lpa1, having a 90% reduction of phytic acid and devoid of α-AI, contributed to about a 50% reduction of phytic acid content. We also showed that baking did not fully inactivate α-AI, further contributing to lowering the pGI of the biscuits. Finally, data from a blind taste test using consumers indicated that the B14 biscuit was accepted by consumers and comparable in terms of liking to the control biscuit, although the acceptability of these products decreased

  4. Exploitation of Common Bean Flours with Low Antinutrient Content for Making Nutritionally Enhanced Biscuits.

    PubMed

    Sparvoli, Francesca; Laureati, Monica; Pilu, Roberto; Pagliarini, Ella; Toschi, Ivan; Giuberti, Gianluca; Fortunati, Paola; Daminati, Maria G; Cominelli, Eleonora; Bollini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of legumes is associated with a number of physiological and health benefits. Legume proteins complement very well those of cereals and are often used to produce gluten-free products. However, legume seeds often contain antinutritional compounds, such as phytate, galactooligosaccharides, phenolic compounds, lectins, enzyme inhibitors, whose presence could affect their nutritional value. Screening natural and induced biodiversity for useful traits, followed by breeding, is a way to remove undesirable components. We used the common bean cv. Lady Joy and the lpa1 mutant line, having different seed composition for absence/presence of lectins,α-amylase inhibitor, (α-AI) and phytic acid, to verify the advantage of their use to make biscuits with improved nutritional properties. We showed that use of unprocessed flour from normal beans (Taylor's Horticulture and Billò) must be avoided, since lectin activity is still present after baking, and demonstrated the advantage of using the cv. Lady Joy, lacking active lectins and having active α-AI. To assess the contribution of bean flour to biscuit quality traits, different formulations of composite flours (B12, B14, B22, B24, B29) were used in combinations with wheat (B14), maize (gluten-free B22 and B29), or with both (B12 and B24). These biscuits were nutritionally better than the control, having a better amino acid score, higher fiber amount, lower predicted glycemic index (pGI) and starch content. Replacement of cv. Lady Joy bean flour with that of lpa1, having a 90% reduction of phytic acid and devoid of α-AI, contributed to about a 50% reduction of phytic acid content. We also showed that baking did not fully inactivate α-AI, further contributing to lowering the pGI of the biscuits. Finally, data from a blind taste test using consumers indicated that the B14 biscuit was accepted by consumers and comparable in terms of liking to the control biscuit, although the acceptability of these products decreased

  5. Maxwell-Wagner relaxation in common minerals and a desert soil at low water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcone, Steven A.; Boitnott, Ginger E.

    2012-06-01

    water content may be necessary to help isolate these inclusions. For our common, low conductivity minerals, the MW contributions to attenuation rates are significant above 10 MHz, whereas they are significant above about 100 MHz for the more conductive minerals and soil.

  6. Genetic analysis of chromosomal loci affecting the content of insoluble glutenin in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huaibing; Wang, Zhaojun; Li, Da; Wu, Peipei; Dong, Zhengying; Rong, Chaowu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Li, Huili; Wang, Daowen; Zhang, Kunpu

    2015-09-20

    In common wheat, insoluble glutenin (IG) is an important fraction of flour glutenin macropolymers, and insoluble glutenin content (IGC) is positively associated with key end-use quality parameters. Here, we present a genetic analysis of the chromosomal loci affecting IGC with the data collected from 90 common wheat varieties cultivated in four environments. Statistical analysis showed that IGC was controlled mainly genetically and influenced by the environment. Among the major genetic components known to affect end-use quality, 1BL/1RS translocation had a significantly negative effect on IGC across all four environments. As to the different alleles of Glu-A1, -B1 and -D1 loci, Glu-A1a, Glu-B1b and Glu-D1d exhibited relatively strong positive effects on IGC in all environments. To identify new loci affecting IGC, association mapping with 1355 DArT markers was conducted. A total of 133 markers were found associated with IGC in two or more environments (P < 0.05), ten of which consistently affected IGC in all four environments. The phenotypic variance explained by the ten markers varied from 4.66% to 8.03%, and their elite alleles performed significantly better than the inferior counterparts in enhancing IGC. Among the ten markers, wPt-3743 and wPt-733835 reflected the action of Glu-D1, and wPt-664972 probably indicated the effect of Glu-A1. The other seven markers, forming three clusters on 2AL, 3BL or 7BL chromosome arms, represented newly identified genetic determinants of IGC. Our work provided novel insights into the genetic control of IGC, which may facilitate wheat end-use quality improvement through molecular breeding in the future. PMID:26408094

  7. MIRMAID: A Content Management System for Medical Image Analysis Research.

    PubMed

    Korfiatis, Panagiotis D; Kline, Timothy L; Blezek, Daniel J; Langer, Steve G; Ryan, William J; Erickson, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Today, a typical clinical study can involve thousands of participants, with imaging data acquired over several time points across multiple institutions. The additional associated information (metadata) accompanying these data can cause data management to be a study-hindering bottleneck. Consistent data management is crucial for large-scale modern clinical imaging research studies. If the study is to be used for regulatory submissions, such systems must be able to meet regulatory compliance requirements for systems that manage clinical image trials, including protecting patient privacy. Our aim was to develop a system to address these needs by leveraging the capabilities of an open-source content management system (CMS) that has a highly configurable workflow; has a single interface that can store, manage, and retrieve imaging-based studies; and can handle the requirement for data auditing and project management. We developed a Web-accessible CMS for medical images called Medical Imaging Research Management and Associated Information Database (MIRMAID). From its inception, MIRMAID was developed to be highly flexible and to meet the needs of diverse studies. It fulfills the need for a complete system for medical imaging research management. PMID:26284301

  8. Assessment of the arachidonic acid content in foods commonly consumed in the American diet.

    PubMed

    Taber, L; Chiu, C H; Whelan, J

    1998-12-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is an extremely important fatty acid involved in cell regulation. When provided in the diet, it is cogently incorporated in membrane phospholipids and enhances eicosanoid biosynthesis in vivo and in vitro; however, controversy exists as to the levels of AA in food and in the diet. This study determined the amount of AA in cooked and raw portions of beef (rib eye), chicken (breast and thigh), eggs, pork (loin), turkey (breast), and tuna; it compared these results to values published in Agriculture Handbook No. 8 (HB-8). The cooked portions were prepared as described in HB-8. With the exception of chicken thigh and tuna, the levels of AA (w/w) in the selected foods analyzed were significantly higher, in general, than those values published in HB-8. The greatest differences were observed in beef (raw and cooked), turkey breast (raw and cooked), and pork (cooked) where AA levels were twice that of the values in HB-8. In contrast, the AA and n-3 fatty acid contents in tuna were almost half the HB-8 values. The present data indicate that HB-8 tends to underreport the amounts of AA in a number of foods commonly consumed in the American diet, and new initiatives should be considered to validate and update the current database for fatty acid composition of foods. PMID:9930399

  9. Recent developments in the management of common childhood skin infections.

    PubMed

    Oranje, Arnold P; de Waard-van der Spek, Flora B

    2015-06-01

    A literature review and clinical commentary on diagnosis and treatment of common childhood bacterial, fungal and viral skin infections is presented including impetigo, folliculitis, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, tinea capitis, warts and molluscum contagiosum. PMID:25936745

  10. Application of Bayesian Classification to Content-Based Data Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Berrick, S.; Gopalan, A.; Hua, X.; Shen, S.; Smith, P.; Yang, K-Y.; Wheeler, K.; Curry, C.

    2004-01-01

    The high volume of Earth Observing System data has proven to be challenging to manage for data centers and users alike. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC), about 1 TB of new data are archived each day. Distribution to users is also about 1 TB/day. A substantial portion of this distribution is MODIS calibrated radiance data, which has a wide variety of uses. However, much of the data is not useful for a particular user's needs: for example, ocean color users typically need oceanic pixels that are free of cloud and sun-glint. The GES DAAC is using a simple Bayesian classification scheme to rapidly classify each pixel in the scene in order to support several experimental content-based data services for near-real-time MODIS calibrated radiance products (from Direct Readout stations). Content-based subsetting would allow distribution of, say, only clear pixels to the user if desired. Content-based subscriptions would distribute data to users only when they fit the user's usability criteria in their area of interest within the scene. Content-based cache management would retain more useful data on disk for easy online access. The classification may even be exploited in an automated quality assessment of the geolocation product. Though initially to be demonstrated at the GES DAAC, these techniques have applicability in other resource-limited environments, such as spaceborne data systems.

  11. Diagnostic and Management Approach to Common Sleep Disorders During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    The significance for maternal and fetal health of gestational Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Primary Insomnia, Restless Legs Syndrome, & Narcolepsy are summarized. The pathophysiology, signs, symptoms, and basic Sleep Medicine concepts that assist the obstetrician in suspecting these four conditions are described. Where appropriate, initial management options are also outlined. Referral guidelines to a Sleep Medicine specialist are included when further diagnostic, severity assessment, and management suggestions are needed. PMID:23563879

  12. The alpha-linolenic acid content of green vegetables commonly available in Australia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C; Li, D; Sinclair, A J

    2001-07-01

    Green vegetable consumption has long been considered to have health benefits mainly due to the vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (such as vitamin C, folate, antioxidants etc) contained in a vegetable-rich diet. Additionally, green vegetables are known to contain a relatively high proportion of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), primarily in the form of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3). However, there are no data available on the fatty acid composition and concentration of green vegetables commonly consumed in Australia. The present study determined the fatty acid content of 11 green vegetables that are commonly available in Australia. The total fatty acid concentrations of the vegetables under study ranged from 44 mg/100 g wet weight in Chinese cabbage to 372 mg/100 g in watercress. There were three PUFAs in all vegetables analyzed; these were 16:3n-3, 18:2n-6, and 18:3n-3 fatty acids. Sample vegetables contained significant quantities of 16:3n-3 and 18:3n-3, ranging from 23 to 225 mg/100 g. Watercress and mint contained the highest amounts of 16:3n-3 and 18:3n-3, and parsley had the highest amount of 18:2n-6 in both percentage composition and concentration. Mint had the highest concentration of 18:3n-3 with a value of 195 mg/100 g, while watercress contained the highest concentration of 16:3n-3 at 45 mg/100 g. All 11 green vegetables contained a high proportion of PUFAs, ranging from 59 to 72% of total fatty acids. The omega-3 PUFA composition ranged from 40 to 62% of total fatty acids. Monounsaturated fatty acid composition was less than 6% of total fatty acids. The proportion of saturated fatty acids ranged from 21% in watercress and mint to 32% of total fatty acids in Brussels sprouts. No eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids were detected in any of the samples. Consumption of green vegetables could contribute to 18:3n-3 PUFA intake, especially for vegetarian populations. PMID:11582857

  13. Antioxidant activity of commonly consumed plant foods of India: contribution of their phenolic content.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rita; Venkaiah, K; Anitha, P; Venu, L; Raghunath, M

    2007-06-01

    Antioxidants are important in protection against hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Polyphenols are potent antioxidants in plant foods, but their contribution to such protective effects is yet to be established. This study attempted to generate a database on the antioxidant activity (AOA) and phenolic content (PC) of some plant foods commonly consumed in India and to assess the contribution of the PC to their AOA. Plant foods belonging to different food groups such as cereals, legumes, oil seeds, oils, green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, spices, roots and tubers were analysed for AOA and PC. AOA was the highest in black pepper (0.43 mg food required for 50% inhibition of the coupled auto-oxidation of beta-carotene and linoleic acid in a mixture in vitro) and it had the highest PC (191 mg gallic acid equivalent/100 g food). The AOA (18.4 mg) as well as the PC (not detectable) were the lowest in sunflower oil. PC in oil seeds was higher than that in the oil, which could be due to the hydrophilic nature of phenolics and suggests the need for greater use of oil seeds than oils. A significant correlation was observed between the AOA and PC of the plant foods studied in general (r=-0.465), but the coefficient of correlation and determination were high only in spices (r=-0.86 and r2 =74%, respectively) and dehusked legumes (r=-0.65 and r2 = 42.2%, respectively). The results suggest that phenolics may contribute significantly to the AOA of some plant foods, such as spices and dehusked legumes. PMID:17566887

  14. In search of better management of potato common scab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common scab (CS) is an important disease and quality problem in potato crops worldwide. It degrades the appearance of the potato tubers and thereby the market value. Knowledge of CS has expanded considerably over recent years. This knowledge has enabled improved detection of the pathogens, increased...

  15. The search for integrated management of common scab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common scab (CS), caused by several species of Streptomyces, is a soil-borne bacterial disease of potato and other root and tuber crops. Frustratingly, CS severity is highly variable (and unpredictable) from year to year and location to location. Symptoms include superficial, raised, or pitted lesio...

  16. Multimedia content analysis, management and retrieval: trends and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjalic, Alan; Sebe, Nicu; Chang, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in computing, communications and storage technology have made multimedia data become prevalent. Multimedia has gained enormous potential in improving the processes in a wide range of fields, such as advertising and marketing, education and training, entertainment, medicine, surveillance, wearable computing, biometrics, and remote sensing. Rich content of multimedia data, built through the synergies of the information contained in different modalities, calls for new and innovative methods for modeling, processing, mining, organizing, and indexing of this data for effective and efficient searching, retrieval, delivery, management and sharing of multimedia content, as required by the applications in the abovementioned fields. The objective of this paper is to present our views on the trends that should be followed when developing such methods, to elaborate on the related research challenges, and to introduce the new conference, Multimedia Content Analysis, Management and Retrieval, as a premium venue for presenting and discussing these methods with the scientific community. Starting from 2006, the conference will be held annually as a part of the IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging event.

  17. Fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide and polyol content of foods commonly consumed by ethnic minority groups in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Prichard, Rebeca; Rossi, Megan; Muir, Jane; Yao, Ck; Whelan, Kevin; Lomer, Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Dietary restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) is an effective management approach for functional bowel disorders; however, its application is limited by the paucity of food composition data available for ethnic minority groups. The aim was to identify and measure the FODMAP content of these commonly consumed foods. According to their perceived importance to clinical practise, the top 20 ranked foods underwent FODMAP analysis using validated analytical techniques (total fructans, Megazyme hexokinase (HK) assay; all others, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light scattering detectors). Of the 20 foods analysed, five were identified as significant sources of at least one FODMAP. Fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides were the major FODMAPs in these foods, including channa dal (0.13 g/100 g; 0.36 g/100 g), fenugreek seeds (1.11 g/100 g; 1.27 g/100 g), guava (0.41 g/100 g; not detected), karela (not detected; 1.12 g/100 g) and tamarind (2.35 g/100 g; 0.02 g/100 g). Broadening the availability of FODMAP composition data will increase the cultural application of low FODMAP dietary advice. PMID:27002546

  18. Evidence-based management of common chronic lower extremity ulcers.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Nicholas A; Maderal, Andrea D; Vivas, Alejandra C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lower extremity ulcers are a significant burden on patients and health care systems worldwide. Although relatively common, these wounds can be difficult to treat and present a challenge to physicians. Treatment has often been based on anecdotal accounts; however, there is a growing emphasis on using evidence-based conclusions to guide clinical decisions. In this review article, the standard of care and adjuvant therapies of venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers are presented from an evidence-based perspective. PMID:23742279

  19. Fiber and nonstarch polysaccharide content and variation in common crops used in broiler diets.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2014-09-01

    The current paper reviews content and variation in fiber and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) of common crops used in broiler diets. The cereal grain is a complex structure, and its cell walls (CW) differ in their composition and hence properties. Arabinoxylan (AX), mixed linkage (1→3; 1→4)-β-glucan (β-glucan), cellulose, and the noncarbohydrate component lignin are the predominant polymers in cereals. They occur in different proportions depending on the species and tissue type. Rye, triticale, wheat, corn, and sorghum are all rich in AX, whereas barley and oats contain a high level of β-glucan. The AX from rye, wheat, and triticale and β-glucan from barley and oats are to a large extent soluble, whereas the solubility of AX found in corn and sorghum is lower than the other cereals. The ratio of arabinose to xylose gives a crude indication of the AX structure, which varies between the endosperm, the aleurone and the outer grain layers as well as between the same tissues from different grains. Varietal differences in AX structure of the endosperm are also identified. From the analysis of the released oligomers after hydrolysis with a specific (1→3,1→4)-β-d-glucan hydrolase, it is found that the ratio of trisaccharides (degree of polymerization 3) and tetrasaccharides (degree of polymerization 4) varies depending on the source, being higher in barley than in oats but lower than in wheat. The molecular weight of β-glucan is higher than that of AX, and both polymers contribute to the viscosity of the extract. However, because AX molecules are more resistant to degradation than β-glucan, the use of AX rich grains in broiler diets is usually more problematic than those containing high concentrations of β-glucan. The cereal coproducts (brans and hulls) are concentrated sources of cellulose, lignin, and insoluble AX, but β-glucan can also be present mainly in rye and wheat brans. The CW composition of seeds and grains of protein crops and feedstuffs are

  20. Endangered species management and ecosystem restoration: Finding the common ground

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casazza, Michael L.; Overton, Cory T.; Bui, Thuy-Vy D.; Hull, Joshua M.; Albertson, Joy D.; Bloom, Valary K.; Bobzien, Steven; McBroom, Jennifer; Latta, Marilyn; Olofson, Peggy; Rohmer, Tobias M.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.; Strong, Donald R.; Grijalva, Erik; Wood, Julian K.; Skalos, Shannon; Takekawa, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Management actions to protect endangered species and conserve ecosystem function may not always be in precise alignment. Efforts to recover the California Ridgway’s Rail (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus; hereafter, California rail), a federally and state-listed species, and restoration of tidal marsh ecosystems in the San Francisco Bay estuary provide a prime example of habitat restoration that has conflicted with species conservation. On the brink of extinction from habitat loss and degradation, and non-native predators in the 1990s, California rail populations responded positively to introduction of a non-native plant, Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora). California rail populations were in substantial decline when the non-native Spartina was initially introduced as part of efforts to recover tidal marshes. Subsequent hybridization with the native Pacific cordgrass (Spartina foliosa) boosted California rail populations by providing greater cover and increased habitat area. The hybrid cordgrass (S. alterniflora × S. foliosa) readily invaded tidal mudflats and channels, and both crowded out native tidal marsh plants and increased sediment accretion in the marsh plain. This resulted in modification of tidal marsh geomorphology, hydrology, productivity, and species composition. Our results show that denser California rail populations occur in invasive Spartina than in native Spartina in San Francisco Bay. Herbicide treatment between 2005 and 2012 removed invasive Spartina from open intertidal mud and preserved foraging habitat for shorebirds. However, removal of invasive Spartina caused substantial decreases in California rail populations. Unknown facets of California rail ecology, undesirable interim stages of tidal marsh restoration, and competing management objectives among stakeholders resulted in management planning for endangered species or ecosystem restoration that favored one goal over the other. We have examined this perceived conflict and propose

  1. 49 CFR 633.25 - Contents of a project management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contents of a project management plan. 633.25... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Plans § 633.25 Contents of a project management plan. At a minimum, a recipient's project management plan shall...

  2. 49 CFR 633.25 - Contents of a project management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contents of a project management plan. 633.25... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Plans § 633.25 Contents of a project management plan. At a minimum, a recipient's project management plan shall...

  3. 49 CFR 633.25 - Contents of a project management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contents of a project management plan. 633.25... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Plans § 633.25 Contents of a project management plan. At a minimum, a recipient's project management plan shall...

  4. 49 CFR 633.25 - Contents of a project management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contents of a project management plan. 633.25... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Plans § 633.25 Contents of a project management plan. At a minimum, a recipient's project management plan shall...

  5. 49 CFR 633.25 - Contents of a project management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contents of a project management plan. 633.25... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Plans § 633.25 Contents of a project management plan. At a minimum, a recipient's project management plan shall...

  6. Folkecology and commons management in the Maya Lowlands

    PubMed Central

    Atran, Scott; Medin, Douglas; Ross, Norbert; Lynch, Elizabeth; Coley, John; Ek’, Edilberto Ucan; Vapnarsky, Valentina

    1999-01-01

    Three groups living off the same rainforest habitat manifest strikingly distinct behaviors, cognitions, and social relationships relative to the forest. Only the area’s last native Maya reveal systematic awareness of ecological complexity involving animals, plants, and people and practices clearly favoring forest regeneration. Spanish-speaking immigrants prove closer to native Maya in thought, action, and social networking than do immigrant Maya. There is no overriding “local,” “Indian,” or “immigrant” relationship to the environment. Results indicate that exclusive concern with rational self-interest and institutional constraints do not sufficiently account for commons behavior and that cultural patterning of cognition and access to relevant information are significant predictors. Unlike traditional accounts of relations between culture, cognition, and behavior, the models offered are not synthetic interpretations of people’s thoughts and behaviors but are emergent cultural patterns derived statistically from measurements of individual cognitions and behaviors. PMID:10377461

  7. [Meningioma: management of the most common brain tumour].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Surbeck, Werner; Hader, Claudia; Putora, Paul Martin; Conen, Katrin; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2016-04-13

    Meningiomas are the most common primary brain tumours in adults and are therefore relevant for general practitioners. Most meningiomas are benign and neurosurgical resection offers the best chance of cure. However, complete resection is not achievable in many patients. This accounts for a relevant rate of tumour recurrences within 15 years of follow up. In atypical and anaplastic meningiomas of WHO grade II and III time to recurrence is dramatically shorter and these tumours need multimodal treatment strategies including postoperative radiotherapy. Various systemic treatments have occasionally been used as salvage therapy, but were essentially not effective. Only recently, Sunitinib, a small thyrosine kinase inhibitor as well as bevacizumab, a therapeutic antibody, have shown more promising results in highly pretreated, refractory meningioma patients. PMID:27078728

  8. Recognition and management of common ectoparasitic diseases in travelers.

    PubMed

    Davis, Rosie F; Johnston, Graham A; Sladden, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    This review article summarizes the ectoparasitic diseases likely to be seen by a Western dermatologist. The article aims to cover both endemic diseases and those likely to present in the returning traveler. Tungiasis is due to the gravid sand flea (Tunga penetrans) embedding into the stratum corneum of a human host. As the flea is a ground dweller, lesions are usually present on the feet and are classically periungual. The sand flea is eventually shed spontaneously but to reduce the infection risk, early surgical removal is recommended. Infestation by the Diptera species of fly causes myiasis, which may be primary, secondary, or accidental. The botfly (Dermatobia hominis) is one of the causes of primary myiasis covered in this article. Traditionally, botfly larvae are forced to partially emerge by occluding the breathing apparatus, following which manual extraction can occur. Alternatively, the larvae can be surgically removed. The common bed bug (Cimex lectularius) has experienced a resurgence over the past 10 years. Bites are typically arranged in clusters or a linear fashion and vary from urticated wheals to hemorrhagic blisters. Treatment is symptomatic with antihistamines and topical corticosteroids. In addition, bed bugs need to be eradicated from furniture and soft furnishings. Ticks are part of the Arachnid class of joint-legged animals and can transmit a variety of infections. This article briefly discusses Mediterranean spotted fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Lyme disease as well as describing tick avoidance measures. Scabies (Sarcoptes scabiei var hominis) is highly contagious and widely distributed around the world. It is common in the returning traveler and can require a high index of suspicion to diagnose. The treatment of choice in the US, UK, and Australia is permethrin 5% dermal cream, applied on two occasions, 1 week apart. PMID:19170405

  9. Optimal management of common acquired melanocytic nevi (moles): current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Kabir; Chakravarty, Payal; Goel, Khushbu

    2014-01-01

    Although common acquired melanocytic nevi are largely benign, they are probably one of the most common indications for cosmetic surgery encountered by dermatologists. With recent advances, noninvasive tools can largely determine the potential for malignancy, although they cannot supplant histology. Although surgical shave excision with its myriad modifications has been in vogue for decades, the lack of an adequate histological sample, the largely blind nature of the procedure, and the possibility of recurrence are persisting issues. Pigment-specific lasers were initially used in the Q-switched mode, which was based on the thermal relaxation time of the melanocyte (size 7 μm; 1 μsec), which is not the primary target in melanocytic nevus. The cluster of nevus cells (100 μm) probably lends itself to treatment with a millisecond laser rather than a nanosecond laser. Thus, normal mode pigment-specific lasers and pulsed ablative lasers (CO2/erbium [Er]:yttrium aluminum garnet [YAG]) are more suited to treat acquired melanocytic nevi. The complexities of treating this disorder can be overcome by following a structured approach by using lasers that achieve the appropriate depth to treat the three subtypes of nevi: junctional, compound, and dermal. Thus, junctional nevi respond to Q-switched/normal mode pigment lasers, where for the compound and dermal nevi, pulsed ablative laser (CO2/Er:YAG) may be needed. If surgical excision is employed, a wide margin and proper depth must be ensured, which is skill dependent. A lifelong follow-up for recurrence and melanoma is warranted in predisposed individuals, although melanoma is decidedly uncommon in most acquired melanocytic nevi, even though histological markers may be seen on evaluation. PMID:24672253

  10. Optimal management of common acquired melanocytic nevi (moles): current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Chakravarty, Payal; Goel, Khushbu

    2014-01-01

    Although common acquired melanocytic nevi are largely benign, they are probably one of the most common indications for cosmetic surgery encountered by dermatologists. With recent advances, noninvasive tools can largely determine the potential for malignancy, although they cannot supplant histology. Although surgical shave excision with its myriad modifications has been in vogue for decades, the lack of an adequate histological sample, the largely blind nature of the procedure, and the possibility of recurrence are persisting issues. Pigment-specific lasers were initially used in the Q-switched mode, which was based on the thermal relaxation time of the melanocyte (size 7 μm; 1 μsec), which is not the primary target in melanocytic nevus. The cluster of nevus cells (100 μm) probably lends itself to treatment with a millisecond laser rather than a nanosecond laser. Thus, normal mode pigment-specific lasers and pulsed ablative lasers (CO2/erbium [Er]:yttrium aluminum garnet [YAG]) are more suited to treat acquired melanocytic nevi. The complexities of treating this disorder can be overcome by following a structured approach by using lasers that achieve the appropriate depth to treat the three subtypes of nevi: junctional, compound, and dermal. Thus, junctional nevi respond to Q-switched/normal mode pigment lasers, where for the compound and dermal nevi, pulsed ablative laser (CO2/Er:YAG) may be needed. If surgical excision is employed, a wide margin and proper depth must be ensured, which is skill dependent. A lifelong follow-up for recurrence and melanoma is warranted in predisposed individuals, although melanoma is decidedly uncommon in most acquired melanocytic nevi, even though histological markers may be seen on evaluation. PMID:24672253

  11. Space station automation of common module power management and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W.; Jones, E.; Ashworth, B.; Riedesel, J.; Myers, C.; Freeman, K.; Steele, D.; Palmer, R.; Walsh, R.; Gohring, J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to automate a breadboard level Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) system which possesses many functional characteristics of a specified Space Station power system. The automation system was built upon 20 kHz ac source with redundancy of the power buses. There are two power distribution control units which furnish power to six load centers which in turn enable load circuits based upon a system generated schedule. The progress in building this specified autonomous system is described. Automation of Space Station Module PMAD was accomplished by segmenting the complete task in the following four independent tasks: (1) develop a detailed approach for PMAD automation; (2) define the software and hardware elements of automation; (3) develop the automation system for the PMAD breadboard; and (4) select an appropriate host processing environment.

  12. Phytochemical Content, Health Benefits, and Toxicology of Common Edible Flowers: A Review (2000-2015).

    PubMed

    Lu, Baiyi; Li, Maiquan; Yin, Ran

    2016-07-29

    Edible flowers contain numerous phytochemicals which contribute to their health benefits, and consumption of edible flowers has increased significantly in recent years. While many researchers have been conducted, no literature review of the health benefits of common edible flowers and their phytochemicals has been compiled. This review aimed to present the findings of research conducted from 2000 to 2015 on the species, traditional application, phytochemicals, health benefits, and the toxicology of common edible flowers. It was found in 15 species of common edible flowers that four flavonols, three flavones, four flavanols, three anthocyanins, three phenolic acids and their derivatives were common phytochemicals and they contributed to the health benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, and neuroprotective effect. Toxicology studies have been conducted to evaluate the safety of common edible flowers and provide information on their dosages and usages. PMID:26462418

  13. Mineral and heavy metal contents of the outer and inner tissues of commonly used fruits.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Harmankaya, Mustafa; Gezgin, Sait

    2012-01-01

    The rate of heavy metal pollution in some minor fruit samples growing at roadsides in Turkey were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The mineral contents of samples were found to be different depending on the several parts Citrus fruits. The highest minor and heavy metal levels for Citrus fruits were determined between 17.24 and 45.30 mg/kg boron, 2.08 and 15.05 mg/kg copper, 1.01 and 16.00 mg/kg iron and 2.35 and 9.87 mg/kg zinc. Boron content ranged from 16.54 mg/kg (Deveci pear inner pulp) to 89.89 mg/kg (Arjantin apple outer skin). The level of Fe ranged from 1.49 mg/kg (quince pulp) to 25.05 mg/kg (Ankara pear pulp). Cu content of fruits ranged between 2.52 mg/kg (Fuji apple skin) and 25.93 mg/kg quince skin). Zn content was found between 0.46 mg/kg (Golden apple pulp) and 14.34 mg/kg (quince skin). P contents ranged from 651 mg/kg (Golden apple pulp) to 1269 mg/kg (quince skin). Na was found between 500 mg/kg (Fuji apple skin) and 907 mg/kg (Arjantin apple skin). PMID:21409363

  14. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO.

    PubMed

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge-multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of "final" results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:26476368

  15. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K.; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J.; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge—multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of “final” results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:26476368

  16. Genotype x environment interaction and its implication in identification of common bean populations with high calcium content.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, S B; Abreu, A F B; Ramalho, M A P

    2016-01-01

    The common bean is a food with high mineral content. Of the various types of beans cultivated in Brazil, carioca type beans are the most consumed. The aim of this study was to identify promising common bean populations with an emphasis toward the selection of carioca type bean lines with high calcium content. We also aimed to verify whether and how the crop season and the genotype (parental line and hybrid populations) x crop season interaction affect calcium content. A group of 3 lines of good agronomic characteristics were crossed with a group of 4 lines with high calcium content in a 3 x 4 partial diallel design. Great variability was identified among both the parental lines and the hybrid populations derived from the diallel crosses among the parental lines. We found significant interactions between crop season and both parental line and hybrid population. In the diallel analysis, only the general combining ability was significant, explaining 89.4% of the sum of squares. The RP-1, CNF05, and Safira lines exhibited the greatest calcium contents and a positive GCA. RP-1 is a line that presents high calcium content, in addition to having carioca type beans and an upright plant with high yield. To further increase the calcium content of the RP-1 line, we suggest crossing it with the CNF05 and Safira lines. Although there was a hybrid population x crop season interaction, it was possible to identify populations that performed best in terms of calcium content in both crop seasons. PMID:27420963

  17. An Exploration of the Common Content Knowledge of High School Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansilal, Sarah; Brijlall, Deonarain; Mkhwanazi, Thokozani

    2014-01-01

    Many studies point to the problem of poor mathematics content knowledge of mathematics teachers in South Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' knowledge of the mathematics they are themselves teaching. Data was generated from the teachers' (n = 253) written responses to test that was a shortened form of a…

  18. Developing the Common Data Base for Management Information Systems: VI. Designing a Data Base for Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podell, Harold J.

    A subset of data base management techniques for the hardware/software functions necessary to support a management information system are discussed. Seven basic dimensions of data base design are: (1) data base life span, (2) logical record growth, (3) record content growth, (4) data set organization, (5) linkages, (6) design criteria and (7)…

  19. Alpha-linolenic acid content of commonly available nuts in Hangzhou.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo; Yao, Ting; Siriamornpun, Sirithon

    2006-01-01

    The total lipid content of eight species of nuts available in Hangzhou ranged from 49.5 g/100 g weight in Cannabis sativa to 75.4 g/100 g in walnut. The predominant content of lipid is triacylglycerol, ranging from 91.1% in Cannabis sativa to 98.4% in macadamia. There were two polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in all nuts analyzed; 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3. The content of 18:3n-3 ranging from 0.2% in almond to 15.2% in Cannabis sativa, 18:2n-6 ranged from 2.5% in macadamia to 61.6% in pine nut. The proportion of total PUFA in analyzed eight nut species ranging from 2.8% in macadamia to 71.7% in walnut (p < 0.001). Monounsaturated fatty acid composition ranged from 18.0% in Cannabis sativa to 82.6% in macadamia (p < 0.001). The proportion of saturated fatty acid ranged from 7.4% in filbert to 14.7% of total fatty acids in macadamia (p < 0.001). No C20 fatty acids were detected in any of the samples in the present study. The lipids content and fatty acid compositions in analyzed samples were varied between nut species. Cannabis sativa and walnut contained relatively high 18:3n-3, consumption of several these nuts each day can contribute to n-3 PUFA intake, especially for the vegetarian population. PMID:16711652

  20. Informational Text and the Common Core: A Content Analysis of Three Basal Reading Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts (CCSS-ELA) will have a significant impact on what teachers teach and what primary students are supposed to be able to do (Bomer & Maloch, 2011). By the end of fourth grade, reading instruction should be evenly balanced between literary text and informational text (NGA Center and CCSSO,…

  1. Common Core Standards, Professional Texts, and Diverse Learners: A Qualitative Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanoff, Elizabeth; LaDuke, Aja; Lindner, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This research study questioned the degree to which six professional texts guiding implementation of the Common Core Standards in reading address the needs of diverse learners. For the purposes of this research, diverse learners were specifically defined as above grade level readers, below grade level readers, and English learners. The researchers…

  2. Effect of selenium treatment on biomass production and mineral content in common bean varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mineral selenium is important to human health. The goal of the research was to evaluate common bean cultivars for their responses to and abilities to accumulate selenium. The experimental design was completely randomized and the treatments consisted of control (in modified Hoagland and Arnon's s...

  3. Variability of Total Below Ground Carbon Allocation amongst Common Agricultural Land Management Practices: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K. M.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wilson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Field measurements and numerical models are currently being used to estimate quantities of Total Belowground Carbon Allocation (TBCA) for three representative land uses, viz. corn, soybeans, and prairie bromegrass for CRP (Conservation Reserve Program) of an agricultural Iowa sub-watershed, located within the Clear Creek Watershed (CCW). Since it is difficult to measure TBCA directly, a mass balance approach has been implemented to estimate TBCA as follows: TBCA = FS + FE+ Δ(CS + CR + CL) - FA , where the term Fs denotes soil respiration; FE is the carbon content of the eroded/deposited soil; ΔCS, ΔCR, ΔCL denote the changes in carbon content of the mineral soil, plant roots, and litter layer, respectively; and FA is the above ground litter fall of dead plant material to the soil. The terms are hypothesized to have a huge impact on TBCA within agricultural settings due to intensive tillage practices, water-driven soil erosion/deposition, and high usage of fertilizer. To test our hypothesis, field measurements are being performed at the plot scale, replicating common agricultural land management practices. Soil respiration (FS) is being measured with an EGM-4 CO2 Gas Analyzer and SRC-1 Soil Respiration Chamber (PP Systems), soil moisture and temperature are recorded in the top 20 cm for each respective soil respiration measurement, and litter fall rates (FA) are acquired by collecting the residue in a calibrated pan. The change in carbon content of the soil (ΔCS), roots (ΔCR) and litter layer (ΔCL) are being analyzed by collecting soil samples throughout the life cycle of the plant. To determine the term FE for the three representative land management practices, a funnel collection system located at the plot outlet was used for collecting the eroded material after natural rainfall events. Field measurements of TBCA at the plot scale via the mass balance approach are used to calibrate the numerical agronomic process model DAYCENT, which simulates the daily

  4. Effect of atrazine and chlorpyrifos exposure on cytochrome P450 contents and enzyme activities in common carp gills.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Li, Ming; Liu, Ci; Qu, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Wen-Jun; Xing, Hou-Juan; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2013-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and atrazine (ATR) are the most widely used organophosphate insecticides and triazine herbicides, respectively, worldwide. This study aimed at investigating the effects of ATR, CPF and mixture on common carp gills following 40-d exposure and 40-d recovery experiments. Cytochrome P450 content, activities of aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND) and erythromycin N-demethylase (ERND) and the mRNA levels of the CYP1 family (CYP1A, CYP1B, and CYP1C) were determined. In total, 220 common carps were divided into eleven groups, and each group was treated with a specific concentration of ATR (4.28, 42.8 and 428 μg/L), CPF (1.16, 11.6 and 116 μg/L) or ATR-CPF mixture (1.13, 11.3 and 113 μg/L). The results showed that P450 content and activities of APND and ERND in fish exposed to ATR and mixture were significantly higher than those in the control group. After the 40-d recovery treatment (i.e., depuration), the P450 content and the activities of APND and ERND in fish decreased to the background levels. A similar tendency was also found in the mRNA levels of the CYP1 family (CYP1A, CYP1B, and CYP1C) in common carp gills. The CPF-treated fish showed no significant difference from the control groups, except for a significant CYP1C induction. These results indicated that CYP enzyme levels are induced by ATR but were only slightly affected by CPF in common carp gills. In addition, the ATR and CPF exposure showed an antagonistic effect on P450 enzymes in common carp gills. PMID:23702303

  5. Institutional Boundaries and Common-Pool Resource Management: A Comparative Analysis of Water Management Programs in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkila, Tanya

    2004-01-01

    Policymakers and academics often identify institutional boundaries as one of the factors that shape the capacity of jurisdictions to manage natural resources such as water, forests, and scenic lands. This article examines two key bodies of literature--common-pool resource management theory and local public economy theory--to explain how the…

  6. Fructan and free fructose content of common Australian vegetables and fruit.

    PubMed

    Muir, Jane G; Shepherd, Susan J; Rosella, Ourania; Rose, Rosemary; Barrett, Jacqueline S; Gibson, Peter R

    2007-08-01

    Fructans are not digested in the small intestines of humans. While many health benefits have been attributed to these carbohydrates, they can cause gastrointestinal symptoms in some individuals. We measured the total fructans in 60 vegetables and 43 fruits using the Megazyme fructan assay. Vegetables with the highest quantity of fructans included garlic, artichoke, shallots, leek bulb, and onions (range, 1.2-17.4 g/100 g fw). Fruits with low, but detectable, fructans included longon, white peach, persimmon, and melon (range, 0.21-0.46 g/100 g fw). The fructan assay was modified to provide an estimate of the average chain length (degree of polymerization) for high fructan vegetables. d-Fructose can also be malabsorbed in the small intestine of humans, so the d-fructose content in some foods was measured to supplement the current food tables. Research in this area will be facilitated through the availability of more comprehensive food composition data. PMID:17625872

  7. Resistant starch analysis of commonly consumed potatoes: Content varies by cooking method and service temperature but not by variety.

    PubMed

    Raatz, Susan K; Idso, Laura; Johnson, LuAnn K; Jackson, Matthew I; Combs, Gerald F

    2016-10-01

    Resistant starch (RS) has unique digestive and absorptive properties which may provide health benefits. We conducted a study to determine the contributions of cultivar, cooking method and service temperature on the RS contents of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). We hypothesized that the RS content would vary by variety, cooking method and service temperature. Potatoes of three common commercial varieties (Yukon Gold, Dark Red Norland, and Russet Burbank) were subjected to two methods of cooking (baking or boiling) and three service temperatures: hot (65°C), chilled (4°C) and reheated (4°C for 6d; reheated to 65°C) and analyzed the starch content by modification of a commercially available assay. Results showed that RS content (g/100g) varied by cooking method and service temperature but not variety. Baked potatoes had higher RS contents than boiled; chilled potatoes had more RS than either hot or reheated. These results may assist in dietary choices for reducing chronic disease risk. PMID:27132853

  8. Detailed requirements document for common software of shuttle program information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everette, J. M.; Bradfield, L. D.; Horton, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Common software was investigated as a method for minimizing development and maintenance cost of the shuttle program information management system (SPIMS) applications while reducing the time-frame of their development. Those requirements satisfying these criteria are presented along with the stand-alone modules which may be used directly by applications. The SPIMS applications operating on the CYBER 74 computer, are specialized information management systems which use System 2000 as a data base manager. Common software provides the features to support user interactions on a CRT terminal using form input and command response capabilities. These features are available as subroutines to the applications.

  9. Myo-inositol content of common foods: development of a high-myo-inositol diet.

    PubMed

    Clements, R S; Darnell, B

    1980-09-01

    Since virtually no information is available concerning the myo-inositol content of dietary constituents, we have measured the amount of this material present in 487 foods by gas-liquid chromatography. We observed that the greatest amounts of myo-inositol were present in fruits, beans, grains, and nuts. Fresh vegetables and fruits were found to contain more myo-inositol than did frozen, canned, or salt-free products. The data provided in this report were used to develop diets that contained varying, but known amounts of myo-inositol. The myo-inositol intake that could be provided by such diets ranged from 225 to 1500 mg/day per 1800 kcal and within this range the agreement between the calculated and measured amounts of this material was excellent (r = 0.98). Since abnormalities in the metabolism of myo-inositol have been speculated to play a role in the pathogenesis of the polyneuropathies associated with diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure, it is possible that the natural history of these neuropahties can be altered by modifying the amount of dietary myo-inositol that is ingested by patients with these diseases. PMID:7416064

  10. Antioxidant activities and anthocyanin content of fresh fruits of common fig (Ficus carica L.).

    PubMed

    Solomon, Anat; Golubowicz, Sara; Yablowicz, Zeev; Grossman, Shlomo; Bergman, Margalit; Gottlieb, Hugo E; Altman, Arie; Kerem, Zohar; Flaishman, Moshe A

    2006-10-01

    Fig fruit has been a typical component in the health-promoting Mediterranean diet for millennia. To study the potential health-promoting constituents of fig fruits, six commercial fig varieties differing in color (black, red, yellow, and green) were analyzed for total polyphenols, total flavonoids, antioxidant capacity, and amount and profile of anthocyanins. Using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC), various concentrations of anthocyanins but a similar profile was found in all varieties studied. Hydrolysis revealed cyanidin as the major aglycon. Proton and carbon NMR confirmed cyanidin-3-O-rhamnoglucoside (cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside; C3R) as the main anthocyanin in all fruits. Color appearance of fig extract correlated well with total polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and antioxidant capacity. Extracts of darker varieties showed higher contents of phytochemicals compared to lighter colored varieties. Fruit skins contributed most of the above phytochemicals and antioxidant activity compared to the fruit pulp. Antioxidant capacity correlated well with the amounts of polyphenols and anthocyanins (R2 = 0.985 and 0.992, respectively). In the dark-colored Mission and the red Brown-Turkey varieties, the anthocyanin fraction contributed 36 and 28% of the total antioxidant capacity, respectively. C3R contributed 92% of the total antioxidant capacity of the anthocyanin fraction. Fruits of the Mission variety contained the highest levels of polyphenols, flavonoids, and anthocyanins and exhibited the highest antioxidant capacity. PMID:17002444

  11. Maxwell Wagner Relaxation in Common Minerals and a Desert Soil at Low Water Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcone, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Maxwell-Wagner type dielectric permittivity relaxation in soils is caused by macro-dipolar inclusions, usually of grain size dimensions, and generally within a more dielectric matrix. We discuss laboratory measurements of the complex permittivity of quartz, feldspars, calcite, two forms of gypsum and a simple desert soil at 4-7 percent volumetric water content, and in which we interpret Maxwell-Wagner processes to have dominated. We used Fourier Transform time domain reflectometry, measured from 1 MHz to 6 GHz, and used small samples with grain sizes less than 53 microns. Using XRD and SEM, we found the soil contained quartz, gypsum and feldspars at 80, 10 and 10 percent by weight, respectively, with the gypsum appearing as crystallites and crustations on the quartz particles. All samples show low conductivity, and low-frequency dispersion. The montmorillonite, gypsum crystallites, and desert soil exhibit unusually strong and broad low-frequency dispersion, and strong attenuation rates above 100 MHz. The one-way attenuation rates of the soil exceed those of its constituents, are similar to that of montmorillonite, and exceed 100 dB/m by 1 GHz. Through modeling using the CRIM approach, we attribute all permittivity behavior to a combination of Maxwell-Wagner and free water relaxations, with the former dominant and able to contribute significantly to attenuation rates into the GHz range because of Cole-Cole broadened relaxation frequencies centered from 1-20 MHz, while the latter is centered at 20 GHz. The lack of sufficient surface area to support adsorbed water relaxation, the lack of salts, clay and magnetic minerals, and the inadequacy of measured conductivity values to explain the high loss further justify our Maxwell-Wagner interpretation. The polarized inclusions within the soil are likely to have been conductive wet gypsum particles, whereby films of water that coated the particles polarized. The source of the charge was likely to have been ions dissolved

  12. Feeding frequency and nutrient content of foods commonly consumed in the Iringa and Morogoro regions in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kinabo, J; Mnkeni, A P; Nyaruhucha, C N M; Msuya, J; Haug, Anna; Ishengoma, J

    2006-01-01

    Information on the nutrient content of foods commonly consumed (especially indigenous ones) in rural communities of Tanzania is limited. A study was conducted to determine the nutrient content of foods commonly consumed in the Iringa and Morogoro regions. A survey was carried out in six representative villages to identify the types of foods and to determine the frequency of their consumption. Representative samples of the raw foods were collected from local markets and brought to the laboratory for analyses. Determination of protein was done by the micro-Kjeldahl method, fat by Soxhlet extraction and moisture by an oven-drying method. The mineral content was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that there is a wide range of foods commonly consumed in the two regions, especially legumes and vegetables. The frequency of consumption depended mainly on the season, whereby during the dry season the frequency of consumption was two to three meals per day and in the rainy season was one to two meals per day. Foods rich in fats were nuts and oil seeds, while good sources of protein included legumes, nuts and oil seeds especially pumpkin seeds, which contained 34.36 g/100 g edible portion. Indigenous vegetables such as mnavu (Solunum nigrum), twangabilidiga, mlenda (Corchorusolitarus) and mkochwe were rich in iron and calcium, with values as high as 24.78 mg iron in twangalibidiga and 812.41 mg calcium/100 g edible portion in mkunungu. Magnesium was highest in mtosi (288.58 mg) and copper was highest in mkunungu (0.49 mg). Mkochwe contained the highest amount of manganese. This study shows that foods locally produced in these regions are rich in nutrients, especially micronutrients, and therefore if consumed in adequate amounts may help to prevent dietary-related disorders. PMID:16849110

  13. The most common patient complaints that the front office receives and how to manage them.

    PubMed

    Homisak, Lynn; Baum, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Every practice has issues with patients, and one of the most common contact points is between the patient and the receptionist. This contact point requires a receptionist capable of managing the patient and turning a negative into a positive. It also requires tact and diplomacy so that the patient is not embarrassed or placed on the defensive. This article will present 10 of the most common complaints that the receptionist is likely to receive and how to effectively manage and diffuse each of the issues. PMID:23167034

  14. Carotenoid content of commonly consumed herbs and assessment of their bioaccessibility using an in vitro digestion model.

    PubMed

    Daly, Trevor; Jiwan, Marvin A; O'Brien, Nora M; Aherne, S Aisling

    2010-06-01

    Herbs are a rich source of bioactive phytochemicals such as carotenoids, which are known to exert various positive biological effects. However, there is very limited information in the literature regarding the content and bioavailability of carotenoids from commonly consumed herbs. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were first, to determine the carotenoid content of eight herbs namely basil (Ocimum basilicum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), dill (Anethum graveolens), mint (Metha L.), parsley (Petroselinum crispum), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), sage (Salvia officinalis), and tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.); and second, to assess carotenoid bioaccessibility from these herbs using a simulated human in vitro digestion model. Carotenoid bioaccessibility is defined as the amount of carotenoids transferred to micelles after digestion when compared with the original amount present in the food. The content of individual carotenoids varied significantly among the herbs tested. Carotenoid bioaccessibility varied from 0 to 42.8%. Basil and coriander, and their respective micelles, contained the highest levels of beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and lutein + zeaxanthin. Our findings show that herbs are rich sources of carotenoids and that these foods can significantly contribute to the intake of bioaccessible carotenoids. PMID:20443063

  15. Laboratory Determined Sugar Content and Composition of Commercial Infant Formulas, Baby Foods and Common Grocery Items Targeted to Children.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ryan W; Goran, Michael I

    2015-07-01

    Excess added sugar consumption is tied to poor health outcomes in children. The sugar content of beverages and foods children are exposed to is mostly unknown, yet this information is imperative for understanding potential risks from overconsumption of sugars in early life. We determined actual sugar content by conducting a blinded laboratory analysis in infant formulas, breakfast cereals, packaged baked goods and yogurts. One hundred samples were sent to an independent laboratory for analysis via gas chromatography. Sugar content and composition was determined and total sugar was compared against nutrition labels. Of the 100 samples analyzed, 74% contained ≥20% of total calories per serving from added sugars. Nutrient label data underestimated or overestimated actual sugars and ~25% of all samples had actual total sugar values that were either <10% or >10% of labeled total sugar. Many products that are frequently marketed to and consumed by infants and young children contain sugars in amounts that differ from nutrition labels and often in excess of recommended daily levels. These findings provide further support for adding more comprehensive sugar labeling to food and beverage products, specifically those marketed to, or commonly consumed by, children. PMID:26193309

  16. Laboratory Determined Sugar Content and Composition of Commercial Infant Formulas, Baby Foods and Common Grocery Items Targeted to Children

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ryan W.; Goran, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Excess added sugar consumption is tied to poor health outcomes in children. The sugar content of beverages and foods children are exposed to is mostly unknown, yet this information is imperative for understanding potential risks from overconsumption of sugars in early life. We determined actual sugar content by conducting a blinded laboratory analysis in infant formulas, breakfast cereals, packaged baked goods and yogurts. One hundred samples were sent to an independent laboratory for analysis via gas chromatography. Sugar content and composition was determined and total sugar was compared against nutrition labels. Of the 100 samples analyzed, 74% contained ≥20% of total calories per serving from added sugars. Nutrient label data underestimated or overestimated actual sugars and ~25% of all samples had actual total sugar values that were either <10% or >10% of labeled total sugar. Many products that are frequently marketed to and consumed by infants and young children contain sugars in amounts that differ from nutrition labels and often in excess of recommended daily levels. These findings provide further support for adding more comprehensive sugar labeling to food and beverage products, specifically those marketed to, or commonly consumed by, children. PMID:26193309

  17. Business Ownership and Management. Arkansas Public School Course Content Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This course content guide was developed in accordance with the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools adopted by the Arkansas State Board of Education. The guide is offered as a framework upon which a curriculum can be built. Within the subject area and at each grade level, the content guide identifies skills at three instructional levels:…

  18. Sport & Fitness Management: Career Strategies and Professional Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Janet B., Ed.; Zanger, Beverly R. K., Ed.

    This textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of sport management. An introductory chapter gives the definition and direction of sport and fitness management. Part 1 describes sport and fitness management careers. The 12 chapters deal with the professional options: intercollegiate athletics, professional sport, facility…

  19. Technical Communications in OSS Content Management Systems: An Academic Institutional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cripps, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Single sourcing through a content management system (CMS) is altering technical communication practices in many organizations, including institutions of higher education. Open source software (OSS) solutions are currently among the most popular content management platforms adopted by colleges and universities in the United States and abroad. The…

  20. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T.; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A.; Avitabile, Jean E.; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B.

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART’s extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research. PMID:25717408

  1. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform.

    PubMed

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A; Avitabile, Jean E; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART's extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research. PMID:25717408

  2. [Infrastructure and contents of clinical data management plan].

    PubMed

    Shen, Tong; Xu, Lie-dong; Fu, Hai-jun; Liu, Yan; He, Jia; Chen, Ping-yan; Song, Yu-fei

    2015-11-01

    Establishment of quality management system (QMS) plays a critical role in the clinical data management (CDM). The objectives of CDM are to ensure the quality and integrity of the trial data. Thus, every stage or element that may impact the quality outcomes of clinical studies should be in the controlled manner, which is referred to the full life cycle of CDM associated with the data collection, handling and statistical analysis of trial data. Based on the QMS, this paper provides consensus on how to develop a compliant clinical data management plan (CDMP). According to the essential requirements of the CDM, the CDMP should encompass each process of data collection, data capture and cleaning, medical coding, data verification and reconciliation, database monitoring and management, external data transmission and integration, data documentation and data quality assurance and so on. Creating and following up data management plan in each designed data management steps, dynamically record systems used, actions taken, parties involved will build and confirm regulated data management processes, standard operational procedures and effective quality metrics in all data management activities. CDMP is one of most important data management documents that is the solid foundation for clinical data quality. PMID:26911029

  3. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species. PMID:25416794

  4. Working for the common good. Catholic healthcare's opportunity to shape values-based managed care.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D

    1997-01-01

    Managed care has come under fire lately, and states and the federal government have stepped in to regulate some plans' deficiencies. Some say regulation is not enough; managed care is morally flawed. But the evils of managed care are the result of letting it be shaped solely by market-driven forces rather than mission-driven values. In the Catholic tradition, healthcare is part of the common good. Viewed in this light, managed care becomes more than just a way to control costs. For managed care to serve the common good, we will have to collaborate with other providers that demonstrate a commitment to human life and dignity that is similar to our own. Such collaborations may force us to negotiate (without compromising) our values, but this gives us the opportunity to recognize a hierarchy of goods to be pursued and evils to be avoided. Through our involvement in managed care, we can help shape the greater culture, as well as the culture of healthcare. But we must prioritize our commitments according to values and principles grounded in the Catholic moral tradition. Without these values to guide us, Catholic healthcare will lose its identity and fade away. PMID:10165749

  5. A Practical Guide to Management of Common Pests in Schools. Integrated Pest Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    This 3-part manual is designed to assist school officials understand the principles of Integrated Pest Management and aid them in implementing those principles into a comprehensive pest control program in their facilities. Developed for Illinois, this guide can be applied in part or in total to other areas of the country. Part 1 explains what an…

  6. EFFECTS OF FORAGE MANAGEMENT ON PASTURE PRODUCTIVITY AND PHOSPHORUS CONTENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the current study were to determine the amounts of above- and below-ground plant biomass production, phosphorus (P) uptake by forage, and P concentration of cool-season grass forage as influenced by management and season. Five forage management treatments were evaluated over three...

  7. Contents and Techniques of Management Development Programs for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aplander, Guvenc G.; Gutmann, Jean E.

    1976-01-01

    Male and female executives were examined in terms of managerial style, perceived training needs, major job functions, and behavioral characteristics in three pilot programs focusing on management training for women. Held at the University of Maine, Orono, the programs adapted existing management education materials to female roles and viewpoints.…

  8. Leveraging Text Content for Management of Construction Project Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqady, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry is a knowledge intensive industry. Thousands of documents are generated by construction projects. Documents, as information carriers, must be managed effectively to ensure successful project management. The fact that a single project can produce thousands of documents and that a lot of the documents are generated in a…

  9. Potential health concerns of trace elements and mineral content in commonly consumed greenhouse vegetables in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Mohammad Reza; Rezaee-Ebrahim-Saraee, Khadijeh; Fard, Mehdi Rezvani; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to investigate the potential health concerns of trace elements and mineral content of commonly consumed greenhouse vegetables in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: Six kinds of greenhouse vegetables namely; Raphanus sativus (Radish), Cucumis sativus (Cucumber), Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato), green Capsicum annuum (Green bell pepper), yellow C. annuum (Yellow bell pepper), and red C. annuum (Red bell pepper) were collected from Isfahan greenhouses, between December 2012 and March 2013. The vegetables were analyzed in order to determine the concentrations of trace elements and trace minerals using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Results: The results of INAA showed that the concentrations of aluminum, bromine, cobalt, rubidium and strontium of these vegetables were varied from 7.2 to 28.4 mg/kg, 0.6–11.7 mg/kg, 0.1–0.5 mg/kg, 4.2–8.4 mg/kg, and 12.0–141.0 mg/kg, respectively. The trace mineral concentrations of As, Cr, Cs, Sc, Th, and U in all of the samples were less than the defined tolerable upper intake level. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that considering the measured trace elements and mineral content levels, Isfahan greenhouse vegetables do not impose any serious health harmful effects for individuals in the studied area due to their meal consumptions. PMID:26605243

  10. Carbon content of common airborne fungal species and fungal contribution to aerosol organic carbon in a subtropical city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jessica Y. W.; Chan, Chak K.; Lee, C.-T.; Lau, Arthur P. S.

    Interest in the role and contribution of fungi to atmospheric aerosols and processes grows in the past decade. Substantial data or information such as fungal mass or carbon loading to ambient aerosols is however still lacking. This study aimed to quantify the specific organic carbon content (OC per spore) of eleven fungal species commonly found airborne in the subtropics, and estimated their contribution to organic carbon in aerosols. The specific OC contents showed a size-dependent relationship ( r = 0.64, p < 0.05) and ranged from 3.6 to 201.0 pg carbon per spore or yeast cell, giving an average of 6.0 pg carbon per spore (RSD 51%) for spore or cell size less than 10 μm. In accounting for natural variations in the composition and abundance of fungal population, weighted-average carbon content for field samples was adopted using the laboratory determined specific OC values. An average of 5.97 pg carbon per spore (RSD 3.8%) was enumerated from 28 field samples collected at the university campus. The mean fungal OC concentration was 3.7, 6.0 and 9.7 ng m -3 in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. These corresponded to 0.1%, 1.2% and 0.2% of the total OC in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. In the study period, rain provided periods with low total OC but high fungal prevalence and fungi contributed 7-32% OC in PM 2.5-10 or 2.4-7.1% OC in PM 10. More extensive studies are deserved to better understand the spatial-, temporal- and episodic dependency on the fungal OC contribution to the atmospheric aerosols.

  11. Managing grain protein content by remote sensing in winter wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenjiang; Wang, Jihua; Song, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Chunjiang; Liu, Liangyun

    2007-10-01

    Advanced site-specific determination of grain protein content by remote sensing can provide opportunities to optimize the strategies for purchasing and pricing grain, and to maximize the grain output by adjusting field inputs. Field experiments were performed to study the relationship between grain quality indicators and foliar nitrogen concentration. Foliar nitrogen concentration at the anthesis stage is suggested to be significantly correlated with grain protein content, while spectral vegetation index is significantly correlated to foliar nitrogen concentration around the anthesis stage. Based on the relationships among nitrogen reflectance index (NRI), foliar nitrogen concentration, and grain protein content, a statistical evaluation model of grain protein content was developed. NRI proved to be able to evaluate foliar nitrogen concentration with a coefficient of determination of R2= 0.7302 in year 2002. The relationship between measured and remote sensing derived foliar nitrogen concentration had a coefficient of determination of R2=0.7279 in year 2003. The results mentioned above indicate that the inversion of foliar nitrogen concentration and the evaluation of grain protein content by NRI are surprisingly good.

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Common Respiratory Conditions: Classification, Evaluation and Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Fein, Daniel G; Zaidi, Ali N; Sulica, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to chronic respiratory disease and/or hypoxia is classified as World Health Organization (WHO) Group III pulmonary hypertension. The patients most commonly encountered in clinical practice with group III PH include those with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), diffuse parenchymal lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. The purpose of this review is to outline the variable clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in the most common pulmonary disease states and how a clinician may approach the management of these patients. PMID:27571110

  13. Common Myths and Evidence in the Management of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius fractures are the most common fracture treated by physicians, yet there are questions regarding their optimal management. Over 200 years have been spent discussing fracture patterns, biomechanics and treatment strategies regarding DRFs. But research has revealed many controversies regarding long-held beliefs. These “common myths” have been propagated and thought of as fact but in reality, are not based on the best-available evidence. This review article aims to illustrate some of the major controversies that have come to light regarding the management of DRFs. As we strive to provide optimal care in a world of evidence-based medicine, we must shift our thinking and accept that some of the ideas we have been indoctrinated with may be flawed heuristic approach. PMID:22554655

  14. Medical and health administration education in managed care: needs, content and readings.

    PubMed

    Ziegenfuss, J T; Weitekamp, M

    1996-01-01

    With both public and private reform initiatives moving toward managed care, curriculum designs are timely and useful to a diverse audience. This paper discusses the need for and design of education in managed care in medical schools and health services programs. The pressures for offering education regarding managed care are derived from interests of various actors of the health system e.g. regulators, purchasers, providers and consumers. The content of education in managed care is defined in seven areas: (1) managed care and health systems design-history and concepts; (2) environment and governmental policy; (3) models, products, services, outcomes and quality; (4) managed care economics and finance; (5) organization and strategic management; (6) legal issues; and (7) future designs/redesigns. Education in managed care is delivered by universities, professional associations and private training and development corporations. All can benefit from a dialogue on curricular content. PMID:10166710

  15. Common causes of dyspnoea in athletes: a practical approach for diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Zahra S.; Berwager, Jeffrey D.; Hegedus, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points “Dyspnoea” during exercise is a common complaint in seemingly otherwise healthy athletes, which may be associated with fatigue and underperformance. Because dyspnoea is an general term and may be caused by numerous factors, ranging from poor aerobic fitness to serious, potentially fatal respiratory and nonrespiratory pathologies, it is important for clinicians to obtain an appropriate case history and ask relevant exercise-specific questions to fully characterise the nature of the complaint so that a targeted diagnostic plan can be developed. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction are two common causes of dyspnoea in athletes, and both are regularly misdiagnosed and mismanaged due to poor adherence to available practice parameters. Aside from airway dysfunction, iron deficiency and anaemia, infectious disease, and musculoskeletal conditions are common problems in athletes which ultimately may lead to complaints of dyspnoea. Educational aims To inform readers of the common causes of dyspnoea encountered in athletes. To highlight that airway diseases, such as asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, are commonly misdiagnosed and mismanaged. To introduce readers to common nonairway causes of dyspnoea in athletes, including clinical features and general principles of diagnosis, and management. To emphasise the importance of a detailed case history and proper adherence to established protocols in evaluating and managing the dyspnoeic athlete. To provide readers with a general framework of appropriate questions that are useful for developing a targeted diagnostic plan for evaluating dyspnoeic athletes. Dyspnoea during exercise is a common chief complaint in athletes and active individuals. It is not uncommon for dyspnoeic athletes to be diagnosed with asthma, “exercise-induced asthma” or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction based on their symptoms, but this strategy regularly leads to misdiagnosis and

  16. Early experience using the Wallgraft in the management of distal microembolism from common iliac artery patholology.

    PubMed

    Kumins, Norman H; Owens, Erik L; Oglevie, Steven B; Ronaghi, Amir H; Bergan, John J; Tripathy, Uttam; Sparks, Steven R

    2002-03-01

    Blue toe syndrome commonly occurs as a result of aneurysmal or atherosclerotic disease in the iliac arteries. Surgery, angioplasty, or intraarterial stent placement are the most common treatment options but the optimal management has not been defined. Here we report managing distal microembolization from iliac artery atherosclerosis associated with aneurysmal dilation with the Wallgraft Endoprosthesis, a self-expanding metallic stent covered with Dacron. Three common iliac arteries in two patients were treated using this device. A 79-year-old male presented with unilateral symptoms and an 83-year-old female with bilateral disease. Arteriography demonstrated complex plaque at the aortic bifurcation associated with aneurysmal dilation of the distal common iliac artery in both patients. This complex disease was successfully covered using the Wallgraft Endoprosthesis. Postoperatively the patients received aspirin, their toe lesions healed, and neither has had a recurrence after 16 months. Covered stents offer the theoretic advantage of completely excluding the diseased segment, preventing the escape of thrombus or plaque debris, and covering aneurysmal dilation in the artery. PMID:11972249

  17. 50 CFR 600.815 - Contents of Fishery Management Plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Essential Fish Habitat (EFH... identification of EFH—(i) Overview. FMPs must describe and identify EFH in text that clearly states the habitats or habitat types determined to be EFH for each life stage of the managed species. FMPs should...

  18. Managing a subsidized predator population: Reducing common raven predation on desert tortoises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boarman, W.I.

    2003-01-01

    Human communities often are an inadvertent source of food, water, and other resources to native species of wildlife. Because these resources are more stable and predictable than those in a natural environment, animals that subsist on them are able to increase in numbers and expand their range, much to the detriment of their competitors and species they prey upon. In the Mojave Desert, common ravens (Corvus corax) have benefited from human-provided resources to increase in population size precipitously in recent years. This trend has caused concern because ravens prey on juvenile desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), a federally threatened species. In this paper, I discuss management strategies to reduce raven predation on desert tortoises. The recommendations fall into three categories: (1) managing raven populations by reducing access to anthropogenic resources; (2) removing offending ravens or other birds in specially targeted tortoise management zones; and (3) continuing research on raven ecology, raven behavior, and methods of reducing raven predation on tortoises. I also recommend approaching the problem within an adaptive management framework: management efforts should first be employed as scientific experiments - with replicates and controls - to yield an unbiased assessment of their effectiveness. Furthermore, these strategies should be implemented in concert with actions that reduce other causes of desert tortoise mortality to aid the long-term recovery of their populations. Overall, the approaches outlined in this paper are widely applicable to the management of subsidized predators, particularly where they present a threat to a declining species of prey.

  19. Common competencies for all healthcare managers: the Healthcare Leadership Alliance model.

    PubMed

    Stefl, Mary E

    2008-01-01

    Today's healthcare executives and leaders must have management talent sophisticated enough to match the increased complexity of the healthcare environment. Executives are expected to demonstrate measurable outcomes and effectiveness and to practice evidence-based management. At the same time, academic and professional programs are emphasizing the attainment of competencies related to workplace effectiveness. The shift to evidence-based management has led to numerous efforts to define the competencies most appropriate for healthcare. The Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA), a consortium of six major professional membership organizations, used the research from and experience with their individual credentialing processes to posit five competency domains common among all practicing healthcare managers: (1) communication and relationship management, (2) professionalism, (3) leadership, (4) knowledge of the healthcare system, and (5) business skills and knowledge. The HLA engaged in a formal process to delineate the knowledge, skills, and abilities within each domain and to determine which of these competencies were core or common among the membership of all HLA associations and which were specialty or specific to the members of one or more HLA organizations. This process produced 300 competency statements, which were then organized into the Competency Directory, a unique and interactive database that can be used for assessing individual and organizational competencies. Overall, this work helps to unify the field of healthcare management and provides a lexicon and a basis for collaboration among different types of healthcare executives. This article discusses the steps that the HLA followed. It also presents the HLA Competency Directory; its application and relevance to the practitioner and academic communities; and its strengths, limitations, and potential. PMID:19070332

  20. Learning Objects and Learning Content Management Systems in Engineering Education: Implications of New Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjoer, Ellen; Dopper, Sofia

    2006-01-01

    Learning objects and learning content management systems are considered to be "the next wave in engineering education". The results of experiments with these new trends in ICT in engineering education are described in this paper. The prospects were examined and the concepts of reusability of content for teachers and for personalized education…

  1. Analysis of Multi-Flight Common Routes for Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Kapil; Clymer, Alexis; Morando, Alex; Shih, Fu-Tai

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for creating common weather avoidance reroutes for multiple flights and the associated benefits analysis, which is an extension of the single flight advisories generated using the Dynamic Weather Routes (DWR) concept. These multiple flight advisories are implemented in the National Airspace System (NAS) Constraint Evaluation and Notification Tool (NASCENT), a nation-wide simulation environment to generate time- and fuel-saving alternate routes for flights during severe weather events. These single flight advisories are clustered together in the same Center by considering parameters such as a common return capture fix. The clustering helps propose routes called, Multi-Flight Common Routes (MFCR), that avoid weather and other airspace constraints, and save time and fuel. It is expected that these routes would also provide lower workload for traffic managers and controllers since a common route is found for several flights, and presumably the route clearances would be easier and faster. This study was based on 30-days in 2014 and 2015 each, which had most delays attributed to convective weather. The results indicate that many opportunities exist where individual flight routes can be clustered to fly along a common route to save a significant amount of time and fuel, and potentially reducing the amount of coordination needed.

  2. Managing predefined templates and macros for a departmental speech recognition system using common software.

    PubMed

    Sistrom, C L; Honeyman, J C; Mancuso, A; Quisling, R G

    2001-09-01

    The authors have developed a networked database system to create, store, and manage predefined radiology report definitions. This was prompted by complete departmental conversion to a computer speech recognition system (SRS) for clinical reporting. The software complements and extends the capabilities of the SRS, and 2 systems are integrated by means of a simple text file format and import/export functions within each program. This report describes the functional requirements, design considerations, and implementation details of the structured report management software. The database and its interface are designed to allow all radiologists and division managers to define and update template structures relevant to their practice areas. Two key conceptual extensions supported by the template management system are the addition of a template type construct and allowing individual radiologists to dynamically share common organ system or modality-specific templates. In addition, the template manager software enables specifying predefined report structures that can be triggered at the time of dictation from printed lists of barcodes. Initial experience using the program in a regional, multisite, academic radiology practice has been positive. PMID:11720335

  3. The Surgical Management of Concomitant Gallbladder and Common Bile Duct Stones.

    PubMed

    Darrien, J H; Connor, K; Janeczko, A; Casey, J J; Paterson-Brown, S

    2015-01-01

    Background. The management of choledocholithiasis has evolved from open common bile duct exploration (OCBDE) to therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) to laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE). Each entails a degree of difficulty. Aim. To review 5-year results of bile duct exploration in an UGI unit. Methods. Common bile duct explorations (CBDEs) performed between January 2008 and January 2013 were identified from a prospectively collected clinical audit system and results reviewed retrospectively. Results. 216 CBDEs were performed, 119 (55%) as an emergency and 52 (24%) following failed ERCP. Open CBDE (OCBDE) was performed primarily in 34/216 (16%) patients and attempted laparoscopically in 182 (84%). Fifty nine (32%) Laparoscopic CBDEs (LCBDEs) were converted to OCBDE. Of the remaining 123 LCBDEs, 51 (41%) primary choledochotomies and 72 (59%) primary transcystic CBDEs (TC-CBDEs) were performed. Forty nine (68%) TC-CBDEs were considered successful and 23 (32%) failed. Fifteen failed TC-CBDEs were converted to a successful laparoscopic choledochotomy. Ductal clearance was achieved in 187/216 (87%) patients and retained stones were identified in 20/123 (16%) LCBDEs. Complications occurred in 52/216 (24%) patients. There were 8/216 (4%) bile leaks requiring further intervention. Postoperative ERCP was carried out in 32/216 (15%) patients and 9/216 (4%) required relaparoscopy/laparotomy. No patient died. Conclusions. Successful management of choledocholithiasis requires a breadth of laparoscopic and endoscopic expertise. PMID:26420916

  4. The Surgical Management of Concomitant Gallbladder and Common Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    Darrien, J. H.; Connor, K.; Janeczko, A.; Casey, J. J.; Paterson-Brown, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The management of choledocholithiasis has evolved from open common bile duct exploration (OCBDE) to therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) to laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE). Each entails a degree of difficulty. Aim. To review 5-year results of bile duct exploration in an UGI unit. Methods. Common bile duct explorations (CBDEs) performed between January 2008 and January 2013 were identified from a prospectively collected clinical audit system and results reviewed retrospectively. Results. 216 CBDEs were performed, 119 (55%) as an emergency and 52 (24%) following failed ERCP. Open CBDE (OCBDE) was performed primarily in 34/216 (16%) patients and attempted laparoscopically in 182 (84%). Fifty nine (32%) Laparoscopic CBDEs (LCBDEs) were converted to OCBDE. Of the remaining 123 LCBDEs, 51 (41%) primary choledochotomies and 72 (59%) primary transcystic CBDEs (TC-CBDEs) were performed. Forty nine (68%) TC-CBDEs were considered successful and 23 (32%) failed. Fifteen failed TC-CBDEs were converted to a successful laparoscopic choledochotomy. Ductal clearance was achieved in 187/216 (87%) patients and retained stones were identified in 20/123 (16%) LCBDEs. Complications occurred in 52/216 (24%) patients. There were 8/216 (4%) bile leaks requiring further intervention. Postoperative ERCP was carried out in 32/216 (15%) patients and 9/216 (4%) required relaparoscopy/laparotomy. No patient died. Conclusions. Successful management of choledocholithiasis requires a breadth of laparoscopic and endoscopic expertise. PMID:26420916

  5. Two Complementary Personal Medication Management Applications Developed on a Common Platform: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin B; Siek, Katie A; Gordon, Jeffry S; Khan, Danish U; Haverhals, Leah M

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events are a major safety issue in ambulatory care. Improving medication self-management could reduce these adverse events. Researchers have developed medication applications for tethered personal health records (PHRs), but little has been reported about medication applications for interoperable PHRs. Objective Our objective was to develop two complementary personal health applications on a common PHR platform: one to assist children with complex health needs (MyMediHealth), and one to assist older adults in care transitions (Colorado Care Tablet). Methods The applications were developed using a user-centered design approach. The two applications shared a common PHR platform based on a service-oriented architecture. MyMediHealth employed Web and mobile phone user interfaces. Colorado Care Tablet employed a Web interface customized for a tablet PC. Results We created complementary medication management applications tailored to the needs of distinctly different user groups using common components. Challenges were addressed in multiple areas, including how to encode medication identities, how to incorporate knowledge bases for medication images and consumer health information, how to include supplementary dosing information, how to simplify user interfaces for older adults, and how to support mobile devices for children. Conclusions These prototypes demonstrate the utility of abstracting PHR data and services (the PHR platform) from applications that can be tailored to meet the needs of diverse patients. Based on the challenges we faced, we provide recommendations on the structure of publicly available knowledge resources and the use of mobile messaging systems for PHR applications. PMID:21749966

  6. Environmental Resource Management in Borderlands: Evolution from Competing Interests to Common Aversions

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Patrick Henry; Belec, John; Levy, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Great enthusiasm is attached to the emergence of cross-border regions (CBRs) as a new institutional arrangement for dealing with local cross-border environmental resource management and other issues that remain too distant from national capitals and/or too expensive to be addressed in the traditional topocratic manner requiring instead local adhocratic methods. This study briefly discusses the perceived value of CBRs and necessary and sufficient conditions for the successful and sustainable development of such places. Then, assuming that necessary conditions can be met, the study investigates an intriguing hypothesis concerning the catalyzing of sustainable consensus for cross-border resource management based on a game theoretical approach that employs the use of dilemma of common aversion rather than the more traditional dilemma of competing common interests. Using this lens to investigate a series of events on the Pacific northwestern Canadian-American border in a part of the Fraser Lowland, we look for evidence of the emergence of an active and sustainable CBR to address local trans-border resource management issues. Although our micro-level scale fails to conclusively demonstrate such evidence, it does demonstrate the value of using this approach and suggests a number of avenues for further research. PMID:26154660

  7. Environmental Resource Management in Borderlands: Evolution from Competing Interests to Common Aversions.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick Henry; Belec, John; Levy, Jason

    2015-07-01

    Great enthusiasm is attached to the emergence of cross-border regions (CBRs) as a new institutional arrangement for dealing with local cross-border environmental resource management and other issues that remain too distant from national capitals and/or too expensive to be addressed in the traditional topocratic manner requiring instead local adhocratic methods. This study briefly discusses the perceived value of CBRs and necessary and sufficient conditions for the successful and sustainable development of such places. Then, assuming that necessary conditions can be met, the study investigates an intriguing hypothesis concerning the catalyzing of sustainable consensus for cross-border resource management based on a game theoretical approach that employs the use of dilemma of common aversion rather than the more traditional dilemma of competing common interests. Using this lens to investigate a series of events on the Pacific northwestern Canadian-American border in a part of the Fraser Lowland, we look for evidence of the emergence of an active and sustainable CBR to address local trans-border resource management issues. Although our micro-level scale fails to conclusively demonstrate such evidence, it does demonstrate the value of using this approach and suggests a number of avenues for further research. PMID:26154660

  8. Environmental management master's programme in Kazakhstan: course structure and content.

    PubMed

    Druz, N N; Heaven, S; Istamkulov, M R; Tanton, T W

    2004-01-01

    The paper briefly considers changes in the higher education system in Kazahkstan since the break-up of the former Soviet Union. At that time master's programmes did not exist and there was no unified system for their introduction. The one-year environmental management course described was the first of its type and was set up with special permission from the Ministry of Education and Science, Republic of Kazakhstan to run on an experimental basis. The course differs significantly from other programmes and, under regulations introduced by the ministry in 2001, it is difficult to see how a broad-based programme aimed at introducing graduates from a variety of backgrounds to environmental issues could be achieved within a one-year period. The permission to run the course is periodically reviewed, however, and has been extended due to the excellent results. The course structure and the philosophy behind it are presented along with some of its history. The aim is not to produce specialists in any one area of environmental management, technology or engineering, but individuals with a broad foundation to build on as their professional careers progress. PMID:15193099

  9. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common framework for global marine data management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years marine research has become increasingly multidisciplinary in its approach with a corresponding rise in the demand for large quantities of high quality interoperable data as a result. This requirement for easily discoverable and readily available marine data is currently being addressed by a number of regional initiatives with projects such as SeaDataNet in Europe, Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) in the USA and the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) in Australia, having implemented local infrastructures to facilitate the exchange of standardised marine datasets. However, each of these systems has been developed to address local requirements and created in isolation from those in other regions.Multidisciplinary marine research on a global scale necessitates a common framework for marine data management which is based on existing data systems. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform project is seeking to address this requirement by bringing together selected regional marine e-infrastructures for the purposes of developing interoperability across them. By identifying the areas of commonality and incompatibility between these data infrastructures, and leveraging the development activities and expertise of these individual systems, three prototype interoperability solutions are being created which demonstrate the effective sharing of marine data and associated metadata across the participating regional data infrastructures as well as with other target international systems such as GEO, COPERNICUS etc.These interoperability solutions combined with agreed best practice and approved standards, form the basis of a common global approach to marine data management which can be adopted by the wider marine research community. To encourage implementation of these interoperability solutions by other regional marine data infrastructures an impact assessment is being conducted to determine both the technical and financial implications of deploying them

  10. Management of granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease in a patient with common variable immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pathria, Mohini; Urbine, Daniel; Zumberg, Marc Stuart; Guarderas, Juan

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented with longstanding cough and progressive dyspnoea. She underwent an extensive evaluation and was diagnosed with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) with granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease (GLILD). She was initially treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy, having declined intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. She also declined treatment with oral glucocorticoids. Over several months, she became increasingly symptomatic and developed increased pulmonary infiltrates, pleural effusions, mediastinal adenopathy, splenomegaly, pancytopenia and ascites. An interdisciplinary team composed of an immunologist, pulmonologist and haematologist deliberated over a therapeutic management approach. The patient received a recently reported immunotherapy regimen with azathioprine and rituximab. The therapy led to rapid improvement of her constitutional and respiratory symptoms, with clinical and radiographic improvement in her interstitial lung disease, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions and ascites. This case report reviews the literature surrounding the diagnosis and management of GLILD. PMID:27335365

  11. Managing the global commons decision making and conflict resolution in response to climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, S. ); Naegeli, W.; Lund, P. )

    1990-07-01

    A workshop was convened to develop a better understanding of decision-making matters concerning management of the global commons and to resolve conflicts in response to climate change. This workshop report does not provide a narrative of the proceedings. The workshop program is included, as are the abstracts of the papers that were presented. Only the introductory paper on social science research by William Riebsame and the closing summary by Richard Rockwell are reprinted here. This brief report focuses instead on the deliberations of the working groups that developed during the workshop. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Seed storage protein deficiency improves sulfur amino acid content in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): redirection of sulfur from gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Meghan; Chapman, Ralph; Beyaert, Ronald; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2008-07-23

    The contents of sulfur amino acids in seeds of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are suboptimal for nutrition. They accumulate large amounts of a gamma-glutamyl dipeptide of S-methyl-cysteine, a nonprotein amino acid that cannot substitute for methionine or cysteine in the diet. Protein accumulation and amino acid composition were characterized in three genetically related lines integrating a progressive deficiency in major seed storage proteins, phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin, and arcelin. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur contents were comparable among the three lines. The contents of S-methyl-cysteine and gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine were progressively reduced in the mutants. Sulfur was shifted predominantly to the protein cysteine pool, while total methionine was only slightly elevated. Methionine and cystine contents (mg per g protein) were increased by up to ca. 40%, to levels slightly above FAO guidelines on amino acid requirements for human nutrition. These findings may be useful to improve the nutritional quality of common bean. PMID:18588315

  13. Content and quality of websites supporting self-management of chronic breathlessness in advanced illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Tim; Disler, Rebecca; Hosie, Annmarie; Johnson, Miriam; Davidson, Patricia; Currow, David; Sumah, Anthony; Phillips, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Chronic breathlessness is a common, burdensome and distressing symptom in many advanced chronic illnesses. Self-management strategies are essential to optimise treatment, daily functioning and emotional coping. People with chronic illness commonly search the internet for advice on self-management. A review was undertaken in June 2015 to describe the content and quality of online advice on breathlessness self-management, to highlight under-served areas and to identify any unsafe content. Google was searched from Sydney, Australia, using the five most common search terms for breathlessness identified by Google Trends. We also hand-searched the websites of national associations. Websites were included if they were freely available in English and provided practical advice on self-management. Website quality was assessed using the American Medical Association Benchmarks. Readability was assessed using the Flesch-Kincaid grades, with grade 8 considered the maximum acceptable for enabling access. Ninety-one web pages from 44 websites met the inclusion criteria, including 14 national association websites not returned by Google searches. Most websites were generated in the USA (n=28, 64%) and focused on breathing techniques (n=38, 86%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=27, 61%). No websites were found to offer unsafe advice. Adherence to quality benchmarks ranged from 9% for disclosure to 77% for currency. Fifteen (54%) of 28 written websites required grade ⩾9 reading level. Future development should focus on advice and tools to support goal setting, problem solving and monitoring of breathlessness. National associations are encouraged to improve website visibility and comply with standards for quality and readability. PMID:27225898

  14. Content and quality of websites supporting self-management of chronic breathlessness in advanced illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Luckett, Tim; Disler, Rebecca; Hosie, Annmarie; Johnson, Miriam; Davidson, Patricia; Currow, David; Sumah, Anthony; Phillips, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Chronic breathlessness is a common, burdensome and distressing symptom in many advanced chronic illnesses. Self-management strategies are essential to optimise treatment, daily functioning and emotional coping. People with chronic illness commonly search the internet for advice on self-management. A review was undertaken in June 2015 to describe the content and quality of online advice on breathlessness self-management, to highlight under-served areas and to identify any unsafe content. Google was searched from Sydney, Australia, using the five most common search terms for breathlessness identified by Google Trends. We also hand-searched the websites of national associations. Websites were included if they were freely available in English and provided practical advice on self-management. Website quality was assessed using the American Medical Association Benchmarks. Readability was assessed using the Flesch–Kincaid grades, with grade 8 considered the maximum acceptable for enabling access. Ninety-one web pages from 44 websites met the inclusion criteria, including 14 national association websites not returned by Google searches. Most websites were generated in the USA (n=28, 64%) and focused on breathing techniques (n=38, 86%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=27, 61%). No websites were found to offer unsafe advice. Adherence to quality benchmarks ranged from 9% for disclosure to 77% for currency. Fifteen (54%) of 28 written websites required grade ⩾9 reading level. Future development should focus on advice and tools to support goal setting, problem solving and monitoring of breathlessness. National associations are encouraged to improve website visibility and comply with standards for quality and readability. PMID:27225898

  15. Role of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration in the management of choledocholithiasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-05-27

    Surgical fraternity has not yet arrived at any consensus for adequate treatment of choledocholithiasis. Sequential treatment in the form of pre-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is considered as optimal treatment till date. With refinements in technique and expertise in field of minimal access surgery, many centres in the world have started offering one stage management of choledocholithiasis by LC with laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE). Various modalities have been tried for entering into concurrent common bile duct (CBD) [transcystic (TC) vs transcholedochal (TD)], for confirming stone clearance (intraoperative cholangiogram vs choledochoscopy), and for closure of choledochotomy (T-tube vs biliary stent vs primary closure) during LCBDE. Both TC and TD approaches are safe and effective. TD stone extraction is involved with an increased risk of bile leaks and requires more expertise in intra-corporeal suturing and choledochoscopy. Choice depends on number of stones, size of stone, diameter of cystic duct and CBD. This review article was undertaken to evaluate the role of LCBDE for the management of choledocholithiasis. PMID:27231516

  16. Role of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration in the management of choledocholithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Surgical fraternity has not yet arrived at any consensus for adequate treatment of choledocholithiasis. Sequential treatment in the form of pre-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is considered as optimal treatment till date. With refinements in technique and expertise in field of minimal access surgery, many centres in the world have started offering one stage management of choledocholithiasis by LC with laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE). Various modalities have been tried for entering into concurrent common bile duct (CBD) [transcystic (TC) vs transcholedochal (TD)], for confirming stone clearance (intraoperative cholangiogram vs choledochoscopy), and for closure of choledochotomy (T-tube vs biliary stent vs primary closure) during LCBDE. Both TC and TD approaches are safe and effective. TD stone extraction is involved with an increased risk of bile leaks and requires more expertise in intra-corporeal suturing and choledochoscopy. Choice depends on number of stones, size of stone, diameter of cystic duct and CBD. This review article was undertaken to evaluate the role of LCBDE for the management of choledocholithiasis. PMID:27231516

  17. Resistant starch analysis of commonly consumed potatoes: Content varies by cooking method and service temperature but not by variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistant starch (RS) has properties which may provide health benefits. We conducted a study to determine the contributions of cultivar, cooking method and service temperature on the RS contents of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). We hypothesized that the RS content would vary by variety, cooking me...

  18. Possible land management uses of common cypress to reduce wildfire initiation risk: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, G; Hernando, C; Madrigal, J; Danti, R; Moya, J; Guijarro, M; Pecchioli, A; Moya, B

    2015-08-15

    Accurate determination of flammability is required in order to improve knowledge about vegetation fire risk. Study of the flammability of different plant species is essential for the Mediterranean area, where most ecosystems are adapted to natural fire but vulnerable to recurrent human-induced fires, which are the main cause of forest degradation. However, the methods used to evaluate vegetation flammability have not yet been standardized. Cupressus sempervirens is a native or naturalized forest tree species in the Mediterranean area that is able to tolerate prolonged drought and high temperatures. The aim of this study was to characterize the flammability of C. sempervirens var. horizontalis at particle level by using different bench-scale calorimetry techniques (mass loss calorimeter, epiradiator and oxygen bomb) to determine the main flammability descriptors (ignitability, sustainability, combustibility and consumability) in live crown and litter samples. Our findings indicate that this variety of cypress is relatively resistant to ignition because of the high ash content, the high critical heat flux, the high time to ignition displayed by both crown and litter samples and the ability of the leaves to maintain a high water content during the summer. We also discuss the possibility of exploiting some morphological, functional and ecological traits of the species to construct a barrier system (with selected varieties of cypress) as a promising complementary land management tool to reduce the fire spread and intensity in a Mediterranean context. PMID:26046989

  19. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common approach to marine data management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, H.; Schaap, D.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem level marine research necessitates that large amounts of interoperable data are readily available for use in a wide range of new and complex multidisciplinary applications. Significant amounts of marine data and information are available throughout the world due to the implementation of e-infrastructures at a regional level to manage and deliver this data to the end user. However, each of these initiatives has been developed to address specific regional requirements and independently of other regions. To establish a common framework for marine data management on a global scale that supports this ecosystem level approach to marine research there is a need to develop interoperability across these existing data infrastructures. To address these issues, the ODIP project is creating a co-ordination platform between a number of these existing regional e-infrastructures which include Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) in the USA, SeaDataNet and Geo-Seas in Europe, IMOS in Australia and the international IODE initiative. To demonstrate this co-ordinated approach several prototypes will be developed to test and evaluate potential interoperability solutions for solving the incompatibilities identified between the different regional data infrastructures. These prototypes will be used to underpin the development of a common approach to the management of marine data which can also be promoted to the wider marine research community with a view to expanding this framework to include other regional marine data infrastructures. To achieve these objectives relevant domain experts will come together at a series of workshops where areas of commonality between the regional infrastructures will be identified which can then be used as the foundation for the development of the prototype solutions. As a result six topics are currently being addressed by the ODIP project which have been identified and analysed during the first ODIP workshop. These topics are: use of controlled

  20. Japan Link Center (JaLC): link management and DOI assignment for Japanese electronic scholarly contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takafumi; Tsuchiya, Eri; Kubota, Soichi; Miyagawa, Yoshiyuki

    JST, cooperated with several national institutes, is currently developing “Japan Link Center”, which manages Japanese electronic scholarly contents (journal articles, books, dissertations etc.) in an integrated fashion using Digital Object Identifier (DOI). Japan Link Center will manage metadata and whereabouts information of the contents in the digital environment and provide domestic and international linking information, cite/cited information to activate dissemination of S&T information, furthermore, to strengthen transmission of S&T information from Japan. Japan Link Center is expected to be appointed as the 9th DOI registration agency (RA) in the world by the International DOI Foundation (IDF) this spring.

  1. A Comparison of Higher-Order Thinking between the Common Core State Standards and the 2009 New Jersey Content Standards in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sforza, Dario; Tienken, Christopher H.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2016-01-01

    The creators and supporters of the Common Core State Standards claim that the Standards require greater emphasis on higher-order thinking than previous state standards in mathematics and English language arts. We used a qualitative case study design with content analysis methods to test the claim. We compared the levels of thinking required by the…

  2. User self-governance in a complex policy design for managing water commons in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, Ashutosh; Itoh, Tadao; Kada, Ryohei; Abe, Takaki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Herath, Gamini

    2014-03-01

    Studies have typically emphasized one of three major policy alternatives-government (state) ownership, privatization, or user self-governance-to address overuse of “the commons” as a natural resource shared by many competing users. Studies tend to focus on each alternative separately. Government ownership or privatization is usually understood to undermine user self-governing institutional arrangements, while user self-governance has proved to be a very powerful policy alternative in managing the commons in many cases. An important research question arises as to whether a complex policy design can strengthen the competence of user self-governing institutional arrangements. This article defines a complex policy design as one that involves a mix of flexible policy alternatives rather than a rigid alternative to address overuse issues. Drawing on Japan's irrigation water management experience, this study demonstrates that when a complex policy design is tailored to facilitate user autonomy, it further strengthens user self-governance. The study provides scholars with insight into how self-governing institutional arrangements-which were primarily developed in the existing literature with the government's role assumed as absent or implicit-could be enhanced when the role is strategically explicit.

  3. XLearning Object Organization Behaviors in a Home-Made Learning Content Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpinar, Yavuzz; Simsek, Huseyin

    2006-01-01

    This study designed, implemented and evaluated a learning content management system to facilitate creating both standard based and free style learning objects. The system, BULeCoMas, also enabled users to tag learning objects with usage data and tools supported with components accommodated under a Global Activity Center, are Global Task Pool,…

  4. Korean Content Management in e-Higher Education: Here and Hereafter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Insook

    2006-01-01

    Current trends in the management of e-learning content in Korean higher education are reviewed, along with important issues for future development. South Korean technological infrastructure, among the most advanced in the world, provides the necessary conditions for e-learning to proliferate, but as e-learning in higher education approaches a…

  5. Rhetorical Savvy as Social Skill: Modeling Entrepreneur Identity Construction within Educational Content Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spartz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on one aspect of rhetorical training that writing instructors have an opportunity--if not an obligation--to inculcate (or at least introduce) in students studying to be entrepreneurs and taking their writing classes. Specifically, through the use of an open source Content Management System (CMS) (e.g., Drupal or Moodle),…

  6. Customized Content Delivery for Graduate Management Education: Application to Business Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Owen P., Jr.; Ko, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is bringing about a radical "rethink" regarding the delivery of graduate management education. Today, many students entering a residential MBA program do not possess an undergraduate degree in business. As a result, many business schools are increasingly turning to the Internet to provide "customized" instructional content to ensure…

  7. Resolving the Problem of Intelligent Learning Content in Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey-Lopez, Marta; Brusilovsky, Peter; Meccawy, Maram; Diaz-Redondo, Rebeca; Fernandez-Vilas, Ana; Ashman, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Current e-learning standardization initiatives have put much effort into easing interoperability between systems and the reusability of contents. For this to be possible, one of the most relevant areas is the definition of a run-time environment, which allows Learning Management Systems to launch, track and communicate with learning objects.…

  8. Educational Information Quantization for Improving Content Quality in Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybanov, Alexander Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    The article offers the educational information quantization method for improving content quality in Learning Management Systems. The paper considers questions concerning analysis of quality of quantized presentation of educational information, based on quantitative text parameters: average frequencies of parts of speech, used in the text; formal…

  9. Use of a Content Management System for Blended Learning: Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altun, Arif; Gulbahar, Yasemin; Madran, Orcun

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the development, implementation and evaluation phases of a content management system to be used in higher education settings in a blended learning environment. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, it is aimed to observe how pre-service teacher trainees interacted within the system when they are given the tool to…

  10. Tool-Use in a Content Management System: A Matter of Timing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lust, Griet; Vandewaetere, Mieke; Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Given the rising popularity of content management systems (CMSs) in higher education, we investigated how students use the available CMS tools, as well as whether the moment of using a CMS tool affects students' learning. This temporal dimension has been neglected in current research on CMS use. More insight into students' tool-use is…

  11. Open, Dynamic Content and e-Learning Management Infrastructure for Engineering and Natural Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stav, John B.; Tsalapatas, Hariklia

    2004-01-01

    NS-eCMS is developing an open web-based content management, communication, and collaboration eLearning platform that addresses the specialized requirements for distance education in natural sciences. The federated architecture enables straightforward development, exchange, and publication of material through open standards like XML/MathML. The…

  12. Simulated Soil Water Content Effects On Plant Nitrogen Uptake and Export for Watershed Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In watershed nutrient management for water quality assessment, it is important to understand the critical pathways of nutrient cycles and nutrient transport processes from lands to the receiving water bodies. Soil moisture content influences plant nitrogen uptake significantly. This paper discussed...

  13. Library Subject Guides: A Content Management Case Study at the Open University, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To share the experiences and challenges faced by the Open University Library (OUL) in developing a content management (CM) system for its subject guides. Design/methodology/approach: A summary of multi-format subject guide production at the OUL is provided to justify the decision to develop a new system for their production using a…

  14. Content-Based Management of Image Databases in the Internet Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleban, James Theodore

    2010-01-01

    The Internet Age has seen the emergence of richly annotated image data collections numbering in the billions of items. This work makes contributions in three primary areas which aid the management of this data: image representation, efficient retrieval, and annotation based on content and metadata. The contributions are as follows. First,…

  15. Common sole in the northern and central Adriatic Sea: Spatial management scenarios to rebuild the stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarcella, Giuseppe; Grati, Fabio; Raicevich, Saša; Russo, Tommaso; Gramolini, Roberto; Scott, Robert D.; Polidori, Piero; Domenichetti, Filippo; Bolognini, Luca; Giovanardi, Otello; Celić, Igor; Sabatini, Laura; Vrgoč, Nedo; Isajlović, Igor; Marčeta, Bojan; Fabi, Gianna

    2014-05-01

    The northern and central Adriatic Sea represents an important spawning and aggregation area for common sole (Solea solea) and provides for around 20% of the Mediterranean landings. In this area, this resource is mainly exploited with rapido trawl and set nets. The stock is not yet depleted and faces a situation of growth overfishing. The comparison between the spatial distribution by age of S. solea and the geographic patterns of the rapido trawl fishing effort evidenced an overlapping of this fishing activity with the area where juveniles concentrate (age groups 0-2). The majority of spawners inhabits specific offshore areas, here defined as ‘sole sanctuaries', where high concentrations of debris and benthic communities make difficult trawling with rapido. The aim of this study was to evaluate existing spatial management regimes and potential new spatial and temporal closures in the northern and central Adriatic Sea using a simple modelling tool. Two spatial simulations were carried out in order to verify the effectiveness of complementary methods for the management of fisheries: the ban of rapido trawling from October to December within 6 nautical miles and 9 nautical miles of the Italian coast. The focus of the simulation is that the effort of the rapido trawl is moved far from the coast during key sole recruitment periods, when the juveniles are moving from the inshore nursery area toward the offshore feeding grounds. The management scenarios showed that a change in selectivity would lead to a clear increase in the spawning stock biomass and an increase in landings of S. solea in the medium-term. The rapido trawl activity could be managed by using a different logic, bearing in mind that catches and incomes would increase with small changes in the spatial pattern of the fishing effort. The present study highlights the importance of taking into account spatial dimensions of fishing fleets and the possible interactions that can occur between fleets and target

  16. QTLs Regulating the Contents of Antioxidants, Phenolics, and Flavonoids in Soybean Seeds Share a Common Genomic Region

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man-Wah; Muñoz, Nacira B.; Wong, Chi-Fai; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Wong, Kwong-Sen; Wong, Johanna Wing-Hang; Qi, Xinpeng; Li, Kwan-Pok; Ng, Ming-Sin; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Soybean seeds are a rich source of phenolic compounds, especially isoflavonoids, which are important nutraceuticals. Our study using 14 wild- and 16 cultivated-soybean accessions shows that seeds from cultivated soybeans generally contain lower total antioxidants compared to their wild counterparts, likely an unintended consequence of domestication or human selection. Using a recombinant inbred population resulting from a wild and a cultivated soybean parent and a bin map approach, we have identified an overlapping genomic region containing major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the seed contents of total antioxidants, phenolics, and flavonoids. The QTL for seed antioxidant content contains 14 annotated genes based on the Williams 82 reference genome (Gmax1.01). None of these genes encodes functions that are related to the phenylpropanoid pathway of soybean. However, we found three putative Multidrug And Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter genes within this QTL and one adjacent to it (GmMATE1-4). Moreover, we have identified non-synonymous changes between GmMATE1 and GmMATE2, and that GmMATE3 encodes an antisense transcript that expresses in pods. Whether the polymorphisms in GmMATE proteins are major determinants of the antioxidant contents, or whether the antisense transcripts of GmMATE3 play important regulatory roles, awaits further functional investigations. PMID:27379137

  17. QTLs Regulating the Contents of Antioxidants, Phenolics, and Flavonoids in Soybean Seeds Share a Common Genomic Region.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Wah; Muñoz, Nacira B; Wong, Chi-Fai; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Wong, Kwong-Sen; Wong, Johanna Wing-Hang; Qi, Xinpeng; Li, Kwan-Pok; Ng, Ming-Sin; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Soybean seeds are a rich source of phenolic compounds, especially isoflavonoids, which are important nutraceuticals. Our study using 14 wild- and 16 cultivated-soybean accessions shows that seeds from cultivated soybeans generally contain lower total antioxidants compared to their wild counterparts, likely an unintended consequence of domestication or human selection. Using a recombinant inbred population resulting from a wild and a cultivated soybean parent and a bin map approach, we have identified an overlapping genomic region containing major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the seed contents of total antioxidants, phenolics, and flavonoids. The QTL for seed antioxidant content contains 14 annotated genes based on the Williams 82 reference genome (Gmax1.01). None of these genes encodes functions that are related to the phenylpropanoid pathway of soybean. However, we found three putative Multidrug And Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter genes within this QTL and one adjacent to it (GmMATE1-4). Moreover, we have identified non-synonymous changes between GmMATE1 and GmMATE2, and that GmMATE3 encodes an antisense transcript that expresses in pods. Whether the polymorphisms in GmMATE proteins are major determinants of the antioxidant contents, or whether the antisense transcripts of GmMATE3 play important regulatory roles, awaits further functional investigations. PMID:27379137

  18. Implementing the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: A Comparison of Current District Content in 41 States. Working Paper #32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogan, Leland; Schmidt, William; Houang, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in the spring of 2011 the Center for the Study of Curriculum at Michigan State University conducted a survey of school district curriculum directors/supervisors in the 41 states that had officially adopted the new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The Center's goal was to provide baseline information to inform and…

  19. Effect of steaming, blanching, and high temperature/high pressure processing on the amino Acid contents of commonly consumed korean vegetables and pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Yeon; Kim, Bo-Min; Kim, Jung-Bong; Shanmugavelan, Poovan; Kim, Heon-Woong; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Se-Na; Cho, Young-Sook; Choi, Han-Seok; Park, Ki-Moon

    2014-09-01

    In the present report, the effects of blanching, steaming, and high temperature/high pressure processing (HTHP) on the amino acid contents of commonly consumed Korean root vegetables, leaf vegetables, and pulses were evaluated using an Automatic Amino Acid Analyzer. The total amino acid content of the samples tested was between 3.38 g/100 g dry weight (DW) and 21.32 g/100 g DW in raw vegetables and between 29.36 g/100 g DW and 30.55 g/100 g DW in raw pulses. With HTHP, we observed significant decreases in the lysine and arginine contents of vegetables and the lysine, arginine, and cysteine contents of pulses. Moreover, the amino acid contents of blanched vegetables and steamed pulses were more similar than the amino acid contents of the HTHP vegetables and HTHP pulses. Interestingly, lysine, arginine, and cysteine were more sensitive to HTHP than the other amino acids. Partial Least Squares-Discriminate Analyses were also performed to discriminate the clusters and patterns of amino acids. PMID:25320720

  20. Effect of Steaming, Blanching, and High Temperature/High Pressure Processing on the Amino Acid Contents of Commonly Consumed Korean Vegetables and Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Yeon; Kim, Bo-Min; Kim, Jung-Bong; Shanmugavelan, Poovan; Kim, Heon-Woong; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Se-Na; Cho, Young-Sook; Choi, Han-Seok; Park, Ki-Moon

    2014-01-01

    In the present report, the effects of blanching, steaming, and high temperature/high pressure processing (HTHP) on the amino acid contents of commonly consumed Korean root vegetables, leaf vegetables, and pulses were evaluated using an Automatic Amino Acid Analyzer. The total amino acid content of the samples tested was between 3.38 g/100 g dry weight (DW) and 21.32 g/100 g DW in raw vegetables and between 29.36 g/100 g DW and 30.55 g/100 g DW in raw pulses. With HTHP, we observed significant decreases in the lysine and arginine contents of vegetables and the lysine, arginine, and cysteine contents of pulses. Moreover, the amino acid contents of blanched vegetables and steamed pulses were more similar than the amino acid contents of the HTHP vegetables and HTHP pulses. Interestingly, lysine, arginine, and cysteine were more sensitive to HTHP than the other amino acids. Partial Least Squares-Discriminate Analyses were also performed to discriminate the clusters and patterns of amino acids. PMID:25320720

  1. New aspects of anesthetic management in congenital heart disease “common arterial trunk”

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Ferasatkish, Rasoul

    2014-01-01

    Now-a-days truncus arteriosus has been known as “common arterial trunk” (CAT) and is an uncommon congenital cardiac defect presenting in about 1-3% congenital heart disease. Environmental and genetic factors effects on incidence of CAT and other conotruncal anomalies. The majority patients with CAT and 22q11 deletion have other anomalies such as hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus or parathyroid glands and immune deficits (T-cell deficiency), calcium metabolism disorder (hypocalcemia), palatal defects, learning and speech disorder, craniofacial anomalies, and neuropsychological abnormalities. CAT without surgical treatment frequently involves early severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or early death from heart failure and associated conditions. Therefore, without corrective surgical repair, most CAT patients die in the initial years of life. In numerous centers early surgical repair associated with superior than 80% long-standing survival. Anesthesiologist must be performs comprehensive preoperative evaluation of infants or neonates with this disorder. In CAT patient exactly hemodynamic monitoring and suitable techniques to regulate pulmonary vascular resistance and systemic vascular resistance and cardiac function are more important than the select of a special anesthetic drug. Therefore, anesthetic drugs should be carefully administrated and titrate and under monitoring. Management of CAT after surgical repair depends on the adequacy of treatment, cardiac function, level of PAH, and degree of bleeding. Inotropic support is frequently necessary after the cardiac ischemia associated to the surgical repair. Pulmonary vasodilator drugs were used to PAH treatment. PMID:25097611

  2. Dietary management during pregnancy, lactation and common childhood illnesses in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Piechulek, H; Aldana, J M; Engelsmann, B; Hasan, M N

    1999-06-01

    Data were collected on nutritional aspects of women in general and during special time frames such as pregnancy, lactation and common childhood illnesses (diarrhea, acute respiratory infections and measles) from rural areas in Bangladesh. A distinctive gender bias was evident regarding decision making and food allocation within the household. Inadequate feeding practices were observed during diarrhea with 22.2% of the mothers discontinuing breast-feeding. Breast-feeding and nutritional support were comparatively better during ARI and measles. When the children were ill, 97% of the mothers administered a special diet with a variety of food preferences, which were perceived to improve the symptoms of the respective illness. Maternal education influenced both the occurrence of diarrhea and the nutritional management of diarrhea and measles significantly. Therefore, community health education should focus on the importance of breast-feeding and continued nutritional support during illnesses. In order for this health education to be effective, traditional beliefs noted in this study have to be incorporated. PMID:10774699

  3. Statistical evaluation of fatty acid profile and cholesterol content in fish (common carp) lipids obtained by different sample preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Spiric, Aurelija; Trbovic, Dejana; Vranic, Danijela; Djinovic, Jasna; Petronijevic, Radivoj; Matekalo-Sverak, Vesna

    2010-07-01

    Studies performed on lipid extraction from animal and fish tissues do not provide information on its influence on fatty acid composition of the extracted lipids as well as on cholesterol content. Data presented in this paper indicate the impact of extraction procedures on fatty acid profile of fish lipids extracted by the modified Soxhlet and ASE (accelerated solvent extraction) procedure. Cholesterol was also determined by direct saponification method, too. Student's paired t-test used for comparison of the total fat content in carp fish population obtained by two extraction methods shows that differences between values of the total fat content determined by ASE and modified Soxhlet method are not statistically significant. Values obtained by three different methods (direct saponification, ASE and modified Soxhlet method), used for determination of cholesterol content in carp, were compared by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The obtained results show that modified Soxhlet method gives results which differ significantly from the results obtained by direct saponification and ASE method. However the results obtained by direct saponification and ASE method do not differ significantly from each other. The highest quantities for cholesterol (37.65 to 65.44 mg/100 g) in the analyzed fish muscle were obtained by applying direct saponification method, as less destructive one, followed by ASE (34.16 to 52.60 mg/100 g) and modified Soxhlet extraction method (10.73 to 30.83 mg/100 g). Modified Soxhlet method for extraction of fish lipids gives higher values for n-6 fatty acids than ASE method (t(paired)=3.22 t(c)=2.36), while there is no statistically significant difference in the n-3 content levels between the methods (t(paired)=1.31). The UNSFA/SFA ratio obtained by using modified Soxhlet method is also higher than the ratio obtained using ASE method (t(paired)=4.88 t(c)=2.36). Results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the highest positive impact to

  4. Management and protection of digital content with the flexible IPMP scheme: MPEG-21 IPMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhongyang; Shen, Shengmei; Ji, Ming; Senoh, Takanori

    2005-07-01

    To ensure secure digital content delivery, MPEG has dedicated significant effort to DRM (Digital Rights Management) issues. The IPMP (Intellectual Property Management and Protection) components, the fourth part of the new MPEG standard project-MPEG-21 (Multimedia Framework) is one of the most important parts of this standardization activity. It defines an interoperable framework for IPMP. Fairly soon after MPEG-4, with its IPMP hooks became an International Standard, MPEG decided to start a new project named "MPEG-4 IPMP Extensions" on more interoperable IPMP systems and tools. The project includes standardized ways of retrieving IPMP tools from remote locations, standardized messages exchanged among IPMP tools and the terminal. It also addresses authentication of IPMP tools, and has provisions for integrating Rights Expressions according to the Rights Data Dictionary and the Rights Expression Language. After MPEG-2/4 IPMP standardization work is finished, efforts are currently ongoing to define the similar mechanism for the management and protection of intellectual property in the various parts of the MPEG-21 standard currently under development. The present paper describes the technologies that are now included in MPEG-21 IPMP Components Committee Draft to effectively manage and protect the digital content with the flexible IPMP scheme, which specifies how protection is applied to Digital Items and facilitates the exchange of governed content declared by a standard constructor MPEG-21 DID (Digital Item Declaration) between MPEG-21 Peers.

  5. Daily Planet Redesign: eZ Publish Web Content Management Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutra, Jayne E.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the process of the redesign of the Daily . Planet news letter as a content management implementation project. This is a site that is an internal news site that acts as a communication vehicle for a large volume of content. The Objectives for the site redesign was: (1) Clean visual design, (2) Facilitation of publication processes, (3) More efficient maintenance mode, (4) Automated publishing to internal portal, (5) Better navigation through improved site IA, (6) Archiving and retrieval functionality, (7) Back to basics on fundamental business goals. The CM is a process not a software package

  6. Enacting the Common Script: Management Ideas at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the work of mid-level management at Finnish universities of applied sciences. Based on in-depth interviews with 15 line managers, this study investigates how the standardized management ideas of rational management and employee empowerment are used in the leadership of lecturers at these institutions. The findings indicate…

  7. Evaluation of need for ontologies to manage domain content for the Reportable Conditions Knowledge Management System

    PubMed Central

    Eilbeck, Karen L.; Lipstein, Julie; McGarvey, Sunanda; Staes, Catherine J.

    2014-01-01

    The Reportable Condition Knowledge Management System (RCKMS) is envisioned to be a single, comprehensive, authoritative, real-time portal to author, view and access computable information about reportable conditions. The system is designed for use by hospitals, laboratories, health information exchanges, and providers to meet public health reporting requirements. The RCKMS Knowledge Representation Workgroup was tasked to explore the need for ontologies to support RCKMS functionality. The workgroup reviewed relevant projects and defined criteria to evaluate candidate knowledge domain areas for ontology development. The use of ontologies is justified for this project to unify the semantics used to describe similar reportable events and concepts between different jurisdictions and over time, to aid data integration, and to manage large, unwieldy datasets that evolve, and are sometimes externally managed. PMID:25954354

  8. Safeguarding Copyrighted Contents: Digital Libraries and Intellectual Property Management. CWRU's Rights Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alrashid, Tareq M.; Barker, James A.; Christian, Brian S.; Cox, Steven C.; Rabne, Michael W.; Slotta, Elizabeth A.; Upthegrove, Luella R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes Case Western Reserve University's (CWRU's) digital library project that examines the networked delivery of full-text materials and high-quality images to provide students excellent supplemental instructional resources delivered directly to their dormitory rooms. Reviews intellectual property (IP) management requirements and describes…

  9. Feature-based watermarking for digital right management in content distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wensheng; Xie, Hua; Sagetong, Phoom

    2004-10-01

    More and more digital services provide capability of distributing digital content to end-users through high-band networks, such as satellite systems. In such systems, Digital Right Management has become more and more important and is encountering great challenges. Digital watermarking is proposed as a possible solution for the digital copyright tracking and enforcement. The nature of DRM systems puts high requirements on the watermark's robustness, uniqueness, easy detection, accurate retrieval and convenient management. We have developed a series of feature-based watermarking algorithms for digital video for satellite transmission. In this paper, we will first describe a general secure digital content distribution system model and the requirements of watermark as one mechanism of DRM in digital content distribution applications. Then we will present a few feature-based digital watermarking methods in detail which are integrated with a dynamic watermarking schema to protect the digital content in a dynamic environment. For example, a watermark which is embedded in the DFT feature domain is invariant to rotation, scale and translation. Our proposed DFT domain watermarking schemas in which exploit the magnitude property of the DFT feature domain will allow both robust and easy watermark tracking and detection in the case of copyright infringement using cameras or camcorders. This DFT feature-based watermarking algorithm is able to tolerate large angle rotation and there is no need to search for possible rotated angles, which reduces the complexity of the watermark detection process and allows fast retrieval and easy management. We will then present a wavelet feature-based watermark algorithm for dynamic watermark key updates and key management, and we will conclude the paper with the summary, pointing our future research directions.

  10. Reducing Patient Clinical Management Errors Using Structured Content and Electronic Nursing Handover.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; Sanchez, Paula; Zheng, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether an integrated nursing handover system-structured content and an electronic tool within the patient clinical information system with bedside delivery-would improve the quality of information delivered at nursing handover and reduce adverse patient outcomes. Using a pre/posttest evaluative design, improvements in the transfer of critical patient information and reductions in nursing clinical management incidents were demonstrated. No changes in falls or medication incident rates were identified. PMID:26796972

  11. Common Ground: An Investigation of Environmental Management Alcohol Prevention Initiatives in a College Community*

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Mark D.; DeJong, William; Fairlie, Anne M.; Lawson, Doreen; Lavigne, Andrea M.; Cohen, Fran

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article presents an evaluation of Common Ground, a media campaign-supported prevention program featuring increased enforcement, decreased alcohol access, and other environmental management initiatives targeting college student drinking. Method: Phase 1 of the media campaign addressed student resistance to environmentally focused prevention by reporting majority student support for alcohol policy and enforcement initiatives. Phase 2 informed students about state laws, university policies, and environmental initiatives. We conducted student telephone surveys, with samples stratified by gender and year in school, for 4 consecutive years at the intervention campus and 3 years at a comparison campus. We did a series of one-way between-subjects analyses of variance and analyses of covariance, followed by tests of linear trend and planned comparisons. Targeted outcomes included perceptions of enforcement and alcohol availability, alcohol use, and alcohol-impaired driving. We examined archived police reports for student incidents, primarily those resulting from loud parties. Results: There were increases at the intervention campus in students' awareness of formal alcohol-control efforts and perceptions of the alcohol environment, likelihood of apprehension for underage drinking, consequences for alcohol-impaired driving, and responsible alcohol service practices. There were decreases in the perceived likelihood of other students' negative behavior at off-campus parties. Police-reported incidents decreased over time; however, perceived consequences for off-campus parties decreased. No changes were observed for difficulty finding an off-campus party, self-reported alcohol use, or alcohol-impaired driving. Conclusions: The intervention successfully altered perceptions of alcohol enforcement, alcohol access, and the local alcohol environment. This study provides important preliminary information to researchers and practitioners engaged in collaborative

  12. The content of mutant EGFR DNA correlates with response to EGFR-TKIs in lung adenocarcinoma patients with common EGFR mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Yu-Ching; Fang, Yu-Hung; Hsieh, Meng-Jer; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to elucidate the association of the content of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with the treatment response to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and survival in patients with lung cancer. This retrospective cohort study included 77 lung adenocarcinoma patients with common EGFR mutations from December 2012 to February 2015. The content of mutant EGFR DNA in lung cancer tissues was determined using an Amplification Refractory Mutation System. The association of the amount of mutant EGFR DNA with treatment response, the clinical variables, and the progression-free survival (PFS) after EGFR-TKI therapy were evaluated. Using the amount of mutant EGR DNA above 4.77% as the cut-off value, the sensitivity to predict EGFR-TKI responder is 82.0% and the specificity is 75.0% (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.734, P = 0.003). The high content of mutant EGFR DNA is an independent factor associated with the response to EGFR-TKIs (odds ratio: 13.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.23–52.11, P = 0.0003). A significantly longer PFS was observed in the group with the high content of mutant EGFR DNA (26.3 months, 95% CI: 12.2–26.3) compared with the low content of mutant EGFR DNA groups (12.3 months, 95% CI: 5.7–14.8, P = 0.0155). A better predictive value of the content of mutant EGFR DNA was noted in patients with exon 19 deletions (AUC: 0.892, P < 0.0001) than exon 21 L858R mutations (AUC: 0.675, P = 0.0856). Our results show that the content of mutant EGFR DNA is associated with the clinical response to EGFR-TKIs, especially in patients with exon 19 deletions mutation. PMID:27368002

  13. Translation, adaptation and validation the contents of the Diabetes Medical Management Plan for the Brazilian context

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Heloísa de Carvalho; Chaves, Fernanda Figueredo; da Silva, Daniel Dutra Romualdo; Bosco, Adriana Aparecida; Gabriel, Beatriz Diniz; Reis, Ilka Afonso; Rodrigues, Júlia Santos Nunes; Pagano, Adriana Silvina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to translate, adapt and validate the contents of the Diabetes Medical Management Plan for the Brazilian context. This protocol was developed by the American Diabetes Association and guides the procedure of educators for the care of children and adolescents with diabetes in schools. Method: this methodological study was conducted in four stages: initial translation, synthesis of initial translation, back translation and content validation by an expert committee, composed of 94 specialists (29 applied linguists and 65 health professionals), for evaluation of the translated version through an online questionnaire. The concordance level of the judges was calculated based on the Content Validity Index. Data were exported into the R program for statistical analysis: Results: the evaluation of the instrument showed good concordance between the judges of the Health and Applied Linguistics areas, with a mean content validity index of 0.9 and 0.89, respectively, and slight variability of the index between groups (difference of less than 0.01). The items in the translated version, evaluated as unsatisfactory by the judges, were reformulated based on the considerations of the professionals of each group. Conclusion: a Brazilian version of Diabetes Medical Management Plan was constructed, called the Plano de Manejo do Diabetes na Escola. PMID:27508911

  14. The ATLAS Public Web Pages: Online Management of HEP External Communication Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, S.; Marcelloni, C.; Eli Phoboo, A.; Shaw, K.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Education and Outreach Group is in the process of migrating its public online content to a professionally designed set of web pages built on the Drupal [1] content management system. Development of the front-end design passed through several key stages, including audience surveys, stakeholder interviews, usage analytics, and a series of fast design iterations, called sprints. Implementation of the web site involves application of the html design using Drupal templates, refined development iterations, and the overall population of the site with content. We present the design and development processes and share the lessons learned along the way, including the results of the data-driven discovery studies. We also demonstrate the advantages of selecting a back-end supported by content management, with a focus on workflow. Finally, we discuss usage of the new public web pages to implement outreach strategy through implementation of clearly presented themes, consistent audience targeting and messaging, and the enforcement of a well-defined visual identity.

  15. Patient Education Self-Management During Surgical Recovery: Combining Mobile (iPad) and a Content Management System

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S. Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Fischer, Erin N.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and “just-in-time” education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods: Patients were provided with iPad® (Apple®, Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily “to do” list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. Results: A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. Conclusions: We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and “just-in-time” education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models. PMID:24443928

  16. Catechin contents of foods commonly consumed in The Netherlands. 2. Tea, wine, fruit juices, and chocolate milk.

    PubMed

    Arts, I C; van De Putte, B; Hollman, P C

    2000-05-01

    Catechins, compounds that belong to the flavonoid class, are potentially beneficial to human health. To enable an epidemiological evaluation of catechins, data on their contents in foods are required. HPLC with UV and fluorescence detection was used to determine the levels of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (+)-gallocatechin (GC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) in 8 types of black tea, 18 types of red and white wines, apple juice, grape juice, iced tea, beer, chocolate milk, and coffee. Tea infusions contained high levels of catechins (102-418 mg of total catechins/L), and tea was the only beverage that contained GC, EGC, ECg, and EGCg in addition to (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. Catechin concentrations were still substantial in red wine (27-96 mg/L), but low to negligible amounts were found in white wine, commercially available fruit juices, iced tea, and chocolate milk. Catechins were absent from beer and coffee. The data reported here provide a base for the epidemiological evaluation of the effect of catechins on the risk for chronic diseases. PMID:10820090

  17. Understanding the Effects of Users' Behaviors on Effectiveness of Different Exogenous Regulatory Common Pool Resource Management Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, K.; Dinar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tragedy of the commons is generally recognized as one of the possible destinies for common pool resources (CPRs). To avoid the tragedy of the commons and prolonging the life of CPRs, users may show different behavioral characteristics and use different rationales for CPR planning and management. Furthermore, regulators may adopt different strategies for sustainable management of CPRs. The effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous management institutions cannot be evaluated through conventional CPR models since they assume that either users base their behavior on individual rationality and adopt a selfish behavior (Nash behavior), or that the users seek the system's optimal solution without giving priority to their own interests. Therefore, conventional models fail to reliably predict the outcome of CPR problems in which parties may have a range of behavioral characteristics, putting them somewhere in between the two types of behaviors traditionally considered. This work examines the effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous CPR management institutions through a user-based model (as opposed to a system-based model). The new modeling framework allows for consideration of sensitivity of the results to different behavioral characteristics of interacting CPR users. The suggested modeling approach is applied to a benchmark groundwater management problem. Results indicate that some well-known exogenous management institutions (e.g. taxing) are ineffective in sustainable management of CPRs in most cases. Bankruptcy-based management can be helpful, but determination of the fair level of cutbacks remains challenging under this type of institution. Furthermore, some bankruptcy rules such as the Constrained Equal Award (CEA) method are more beneficial to wealthier users, failing to establish social justice. Quota-based and CPR status-based management perform as the most promising and robust regulatory exogenous institutions in prolonging the CPR's life and

  18. Common Elements for the Psychotherapeutic Management of Patients with Self Injurious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiavone, Francesca L.; Links, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Current research suggests that effective psychotherapies for Self Injurious Behavior (SIB) in the context of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) contain generic common elements which are responsible for their success. Because of the links between BPD, SIB, and child abuse, it is likely that these common elements can also be applied…

  19. Change Management at a Danish University: The Introduction of a Common Market for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundgaard, Helle

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the approach to the management of change taken by a Danish university when introducing a university-wide market for education and it explores the different positions taken by some of the central stakeholders in one of the faculties involved. I argue that neither the inadequacies of a popular management model nor insufficient…

  20. Developing a common framework for integrated solid waste management advances in Managua, Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Olley, Jane E; IJgosse, Jeroen; Rudin, Victoria; Alabaster, Graham

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the municipal solid waste management system in Managua, Nicaragua. It updates an initial profile developed by the authors for the 2010 UN-HABITAT publication Solid Waste Management in the World's Cities and applies the methodology developed in that publication. In recent years, the municipality of Managua has been the beneficiary of a range of international cooperation projects aimed at improving municipal solid waste management in the city. The article describes how these technical assistance and infrastructure investments have changed the municipal solid waste management panorama in the city and analyses the sustainability of these changes. The article concludes that by working closely with the municipal government, the UN-HABITAT project Strengthening Capacities for Solid Waste Management in Managua was able to unite these separate efforts and situate them within a strategic framework to guide the evolution of the municipal solid waste management system in the forthcoming years. The creation of this multi-stakeholder platform allowed for the implementation of joint activities and ensured coherence in the products generated by the different projects. This approach could be replicated in other cities and in other sectors with similar effect. Developing a long term vision was essential for the advancement of municipal solid waste management in the city. Nevertheless, plan implementation may still be undermined by the pressures of the short term municipal administrative government, which emphasize operational over strategic investment. PMID:25236614

  1. Content management systems and E-commerce: a comparative case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rasheed, Amal A.; El-Masri, Samir D.

    2011-12-01

    The need for CMS's to create and edit e-commerce websites has increased with the growing importance of e-commerce. In this paper, the various features essential for e-commerce CMS's are explored. The aim of the paper was to find the best CMS solution for e-commerce which includes the best of both CMS and store management. Accordingly, we conducted a study on three popular open source CMS's for e-commerce: VirtueMart from Joomla!, Ubercart from Drupal, and Magento. We took into account features like hosting and installation, performance, support/community, content management, add on modules and functional features. We concluded with improvements that could be made in order to alleviate problems.

  2. Apps for asthma self-management: a systematic assessment of content and tools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Apps have been enthusiastically adopted by the general public. They are increasingly recognized by policy-makers as a potential medium for supporting self-management of long-term conditions. We assessed the degree to which current smartphone and tablet apps for people with asthma offer content and tools of appropriate quality to support asthma self-management. Methods We adapted systematic review methodology to the assessment of apps. We identified English-language asthma apps for all ages through a systematic search of official app stores. We systematically assessed app content using criteria derived from international guidelines and systematic review of strategies for asthma self-management. We covered three domains: comprehensiveness of asthma information, consistency of advice with evidence and compliance with health information best practice principles. Results We identified 103 apps for asthma in English, of which 56 were sources of information about the condition and 47 provided tools for the management of asthma. No apps offered both types of functionality. Only three information apps approached our definition of comprehensiveness of information about asthma. No apps provided advice on lay management of acute asthma that included details of appropriate reliever medication use. In 32 of 72 instances, apps made unequivocal recommendations about strategies for asthma control or prophylaxis that were unsupported by current evidence. Although 90% of apps stated a clear purpose, compliance with other best practice principles for health information was variable. Contact details were located for 55%, funding source for 18% and confidentiality policy for 17%. Conclusions No apps for people with asthma combined reliable, comprehensive information about the condition with supportive tools for self-management. Healthcare professionals considering recommending apps to patients as part of asthma self-management should exercise caution, recognizing that some

  3. A content analysis of smartphone-based applications for hypertension management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nilay; Khunger, Monica; Gupta, Arjun; Garg, Neetika

    2015-02-01

    Smartphone-based medical applications (apps) can facilitate self-management of hypertension (HTN). The content and consumer interaction metrics of HTN-related apps are unknown. In this cross-sectional study to ascertain the content of medical apps designed for HTN management, we queried Google Play and Apple iTunes using the search terms "hypertension" and "high blood pressure." The top 107 apps were analyzed. Major app functionalities including tracking (for blood pressure [BP], pulse, weight, body mass index), medical device (to measure pulse or BP), general information on HTN, and medication adherence tools were recorded along with consumer engagement parameters. Data were collected from May 28 to May 30, 2014. A total of 72% of the apps had tracking function, 22% had tools to enhance medication adherence, 37% contained general information on HTN, and 8% contained information on Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. These data showed that a majority of apps for HTN are designed primarily for health management functions. However, 14% of Google Android apps could transform the smartphone into a medical device to measure BP. None of these apps employed the use of a BP cuff or had any documentation of validation against a gold standard. Only 3% of the apps were developed by healthcare agencies such as universities or professional organizations. In regression models. the medical device function was highly predictive of greater number of downloads (odds ratio, 97.08; P < .001) and positive consumer reviews (Incidence rate ratios, 1204.39; P < .001). A large majority of medical apps designed for HTN serve health management functions such as tracking blood pressure, weight, or body mass index. Consumers have a strong tendency to download and favorably rate apps that are advertised to measure blood pressure and heart rate, despite a lack of validation for these apps. There is a need for greater oversight in medical app development for HTN, especially

  4. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... 130 Waffle 80 g 47 Meat, fish and eggs Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Egg 50 g 27 Red meat 120 g 7 ... foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Quiche (cheese, eggs) 200 g 212 Omelette with cheese 120 g ...

  5. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Republic - Denmark - Dominican Republic - Ecuador - Egypt - Estonia - Finland - France - Georgia - Germany - Greece - Guatemala - Hong Kong - Hungary - Iceland - ... for food, environmental and occupational health and safety), France, 2013 3. Table de composition nutritionnelle Suisse, SSN ( ...

  6. "Categorizing the Categorizer": The Management of Racial Common Sense in Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I consider one mechanism by which racial categories, racial "common sense," and thus the social organization of race itself, are reproduced in interaction. I approach these issues by using an ethnomethodological, conversation analytic approach to analyze a range of practices employed by participants of a "race-training" workshop.…

  7. Designing, Leading and Managing the Transition to the Common Core: A Strategy Guidebook for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brentt; Vargo, Merrill

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core provides districts an opportunity to renew their focus on teaching and learning. But it also poses a number of design and implementation challenges for school districts. The "Leadership and Design Cycles" described in this guidebook offers an evidenced-based and structured process for leaders to design and implement…

  8. Language Educational Policy and Language Learning Quality Management: The "Common European Framework of Reference"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barenfanger, Olaf; Tschirner, Erwin

    2008-01-01

    The major goal of the Council of Europe to promote and facilitate communication and interaction among Europeans of different mother tongues has led to the development of the "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching, Assessment" (CEFR). Among other things, the CEFR is intended to help language professionals reflect…

  9. Expert searcher, teacher, content manager, and patient advocate: an exploratory study of clinical librarian roles

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maria C.; Maggio, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The research explored the roles of practicing clinical librarians embedded in a patient care team. Methods: Six clinical librarians from Canada and one from the United States were interviewed to elicit detailed descriptions of their clinical roles and responsibilities and the context in which these were performed. Results: Participants were embedded in a wide range of clinical service areas, working with a diverse complement of health professionals. As clinical librarians, participants wore many hats, including expert searcher, teacher, content manager, and patient advocate. Unique aspects of how these roles played out included a sense of urgency surrounding searching activities, the broad dissemination of responses to clinical questions, and leverage of the roles of expert searcher, teacher, and content manager to advocate for patients. Conclusions: Detailed role descriptions of clinical librarians embedded in patient care teams suggest possible new practices for existing clinical librarians, provide direction for training new librarians working in patient care environments, and raise awareness of the clinical librarian specialty among current and budding health information professionals. PMID:23405048

  10. Intelligent Data Management (IDM) for a Content-Based Image Retrieval System

    2002-10-08

    With the availability of low-cost, high-performance computers, memory, and disk storage media, image libraries and content-based image retrieval (CBIR) technologies are becoming more prevalent. CBIR refers to technologies and systems that index large digital image libraries using image content derived from visual characteristics of the image such as color, texture and structure. Although large repositories can be readily assembled, the efficiency of these systems to retrieve the most relevant imagery is still a function ofmore » capacity and long-term storage. Due to the rapid growth in the size of image libraries and the high potential for data redundancy, the Intelligent Data Management (IDM) method has been developed to achieve a reduction in redundancy (IDM) method has been developed to achieve a reduction in redundancy that facilities either: (1) the long-term storage of the most information-rich image content (i.e., maintaining the same DB capacity but keeping data for a longer period of time), or (2) a reduction in the size of the repository capacity which results in improved performance (i.e., storage and retrieval efficiency) and reduced time for indexing.« less

  11. Data interoperability and multimedia content management in e-Health systems.

    PubMed

    Masud, Mehedi; Hossain, M Shamim; Alamri, Atif

    2012-11-01

    E-Health systems provide a collaborative platform for sharing patients medical data typically stored in distributed autonomous healthcare data sources. Each autonomous source stores its medical and multimedia data without following any global structure. This causes heterogeneity in the underlying sources with respect to the data and storage structure. Therefore, a data interoperability mechanism is required for sharing the data among the heterogeneous sources. A proper metadata structure is also necessary to represent multimedia content in the sources to enable efficient query processing. Considering these needs, we present an interoperability solution for sharing data among heterogeneous data sources. We also propose a metadata management framework for medical multimedia con-tent including X-ray, ECG, MRI, and ultrasound images. The framework identifies features, generates and represents metadata, and produces identifiers for the medical multimedia content to facilitate efficient query processing. The framework has been tested with various user queries and the accuracy of the query results evaluated by means of precision, recall, and user feedback methods. The results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:22677322

  12. Intelligent Data Management (IDM) for a Content-Based Image Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect

    2002-10-08

    With the availability of low-cost, high-performance computers, memory, and disk storage media, image libraries and content-based image retrieval (CBIR) technologies are becoming more prevalent. CBIR refers to technologies and systems that index large digital image libraries using image content derived from visual characteristics of the image such as color, texture and structure. Although large repositories can be readily assembled, the efficiency of these systems to retrieve the most relevant imagery is still a function of capacity and long-term storage. Due to the rapid growth in the size of image libraries and the high potential for data redundancy, the Intelligent Data Management (IDM) method has been developed to achieve a reduction in redundancy (IDM) method has been developed to achieve a reduction in redundancy that facilities either: (1) the long-term storage of the most information-rich image content (i.e., maintaining the same DB capacity but keeping data for a longer period of time), or (2) a reduction in the size of the repository capacity which results in improved performance (i.e., storage and retrieval efficiency) and reduced time for indexing.

  13. Dynamic factor analysis of surface water management impacts on soil and bedrock water contents in Southern Florida Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisekka, I.; Migliaccio, K. W.; Muñoz-Carpena, R.; Schaffer, B.; Li, Y. C.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryAs part of the C111 spreader canal project, structural and operational modifications involving incremental raises in canal stage are planned along one of the major canals (i.e., C111) separating Everglades National Park and agricultural production areas to the east of the park. This study used Dynamic Factor Analysis (DFA) as an alternative tool to physically based models to explore the relationship between different hydrologic variables and the effect of proposed changes in surface water management on soil and bedrock water contents in south Florida. To achieve the goal, objectives were to: (1) use DFA to identify the most important factors affecting temporal variation in soil and bedrock water contents, (2) develop a simplified DFA based regression model for predicting soil and bedrock water contents as a function of canal stage and (3) assess the effect of the proposed incremental raises in canal stage on soil and bedrock water contents. DFA revealed that five common trends were the minimum required to describe unexplained variation in the 11 time series studied. Introducing canal stage, water table evaporation and net recharge resulted in lower Akaike information criterion (AIC) and higher Nash-Sutcliffe (Ceff) values. Results indicated that canal stage significantly (t > 2) drives temporal variation in soil and bedrock water contents, which was represented as scaled frequency while net surface recharge was significant in seven out of the 11 time series analyzed. The effect of water table evaporation was not significant at all sites. Results also indicated that the most important factor influencing temporal variation in soil and bedrock water contents in terms of regression coefficient magnitude was canal stage. Based on DFA results, a simple regression model was developed to predict soil and bedrock water contents at various elevations as a function of canal stage and net recharge. The performance of the simple model ranged from good (Ceff ranging from

  14. Crisis Management Plans in Higher Education: Commonalities, Attributes, and Perceived Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Mary Keane

    2012-01-01

    Crisis has remained as prevalent in our lives today as it ever has been, especially in this post-9/11 era. People handle all types of crises, whether personally, professionally or socially. Arguably, people's worldviews after the tragedies of September 11, 2001 have never been the same, including the way they manage and respond to crises.…

  15. Efficient Financial Management in Rural Schools: Common Problems and Solutions from the Field. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman-Freitas, Deborah

    Based on a recent nationwide survey of rural administrators, this digest reports on the financial problems of rural school districts and some possible strategies for improvement. Rural administrators reported the following financial management problems: (1) cash flow problems due to late receipt of state aid or taxes; (2) expenditures that are…

  16. Space station automation of common module power management and distribution, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, B.; Riedesel, J.; Myers, C.; Jakstas, L.; Smith, D.

    1990-01-01

    The new Space Station Module Power Management and Distribution System (SSM/PMAD) testbed automation system is described. The subjects discussed include testbed 120 volt dc star bus configuration and operation, SSM/PMAD automation system architecture, fault recovery and management expert system (FRAMES) rules english representation, the SSM/PMAD user interface, and the SSM/PMAD future direction. Several appendices are presented and include the following: SSM/PMAD interface user manual version 1.0, SSM/PMAD lowest level processor (LLP) reference, SSM/PMAD technical reference version 1.0, SSM/PMAD LLP visual control logic representation's (VCLR's), SSM/PMAD LLP/FRAMES interface control document (ICD) , and SSM/PMAD LLP switchgear interface controller (SIC) ICD.

  17. New and Common Perioperative Pain Management Techniques in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Optimal pain control in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is imperative for good rehabilitation and functional outcomes. However, despite technological advancements, surgeons continue to struggle with adequate pain management in their patients. Current modalities in use, such as patient-controlled analgesia, opioids, and epidural anesthetics, provide good pain relief but can be associated with side effects and serious complications. As a result, newer pain control modalities have been used to try to reduce the use of opioids while providing adequate pain relief. Currently, there are no clear guidelines or evidence for an optimum postoperative TKA analgesic regimen. Our aim was to evaluate the recent literature and provide a summary of the newer perioperative analgesic modalities. Evidence suggests that analgesics, such as newer oral medications, peripheral nerve blocks, and periarticular injections, may improve pain management, rehabilitation, and patient satisfaction, as well as reduce opioid consumption. The literature has also highlighted that a multimodal approach to pain management may provide the best results. However, determining which modalities provide superior pain control is still being extensively studied, and further research is needed. PMID:25892004

  18. Virtual management of radiology examinations in the virtual radiology environment using common object request broker architecture services.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K; Timboe, H L

    1999-05-01

    In the Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Medical Command is now embarking on an extremely exciting new project--creating a virtual radiology environment (VRE) for the management of radiology examinations. The business of radiology in the military is therefore being reengineered on several fronts by the VRE Project. In the VRE Project, a set of intelligent agent algorithms determine where examinations are to routed for reading bases on a knowledge base of the entire VRE. The set of algorithms, called the Meta-Manager, is hierarchical and uses object-based communications between medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and medical centers that have digital imaging network picture archiving and communications systems (DIN-PACS) networks. The communications is based on use of common object request broker architecture (CORBA) objects and services to send patient demographics and examination images from DIN-PACS networks in the MTFs to the DIN-PACS networks at the medical centers for diagnosis. The Meta-Manager is also responsible for updating the diagnosis at the originating MTF. CORBA services are used to perform secure message communications between DIN-PACS nodes in the VRE network. The Meta-Manager has a fail-safe architecture that allows the master Meta-Manager function to float to regional Meta-Manager sites in case of server failure. A prototype of the CORBA-based Meta-Manager is being developed by the University of Arizona's Computer Engineering Research Laboratory using the unified modeling language (UML) as a design tool. The prototype will implement the main functions described in the Meta-Manager design specification. The results of this project are expected to reengineer the process of radiology in the military and have extensions to commercial radiology environments. PMID:10342205

  19. Occurrence of bound 3-monochloropropan-1,2-diol content in commonly consumed foods in Hong Kong analysed by enzymatic hydrolysis and GC-MS detection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen W C; Chan, Benny T P; Chung, H Y; Xiao, Ying; Ho, Y Y

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of bound 3-monochloropropan-1,2-diol in foodstuffs commonly consumed in Hong Kong, China, by an enzymatic hydrolysis indirect method which proved to be free from interferences. A total of 290 samples were picked up randomly from the local market and analysed. About 73% of these samples were found to contain detectable amounts of bound 3-MCPD. Amongst the 73 food items, bound 3-MCPD was not detected in 13 food items, including extra virgin olive oil, beef ball/salami, beef flank, ham/Chinese ham, nuts, seeds, soy sauce, oyster sauce, butter, yoghurt, cream, cheese and milk. For those found to contain detectable bound 3-MCPD, the content ranged up to 2500 µg kg(-1). The highest mean bound 3-MCPD content among the 14 food groups was in biscuits (440 [50-860] µg kg(-1)), followed by fats and oils (390 [n.d.-2500] µg kg(-1)), snacks (270 [9-1000] µg kg(-1)), and Chinese pastry (270 [n.d.-1200] µg kg(-1)). Among the samples, the highest bound 3-MCPD content was in a grape seed oil (2500 µg kg(-1)), followed by a walnut flaky pastry (1200 µg kg(-1)) and a grilled corn (1000 µg kg(-1)). Basically, the results of this study agreed well with other published results in peer-reviewed journals, except for cheese, cream, ham, nuts and seeds. PMID:23819821

  20. Thrombocytopenia in common variable immunodeficiency patients – clinical course, management, and effect of immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Siedlar, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Szaflarska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency of humoral immunity with heterogeneous clinical features. Diagnosis of CVID is based on hypogammaglobulinaemia, low production of specific antibodies, and disorders of cellular immunity. The standard therapy includes replacement of specific antibodies with human immunoglobulin, prophylaxis, and symptomatic therapy of infections. High prevalence of autoimmunity is characteristic for CVID, most commonly: thrombocytopaenia and neutropaenia, celiac disease, and systemic autoimmune diseases. The study included seven children diagnosed with CVID and treated with immunoglobulin substitution from 2 to 12 years. Thrombocytopenia was diagnosed prior to CVID in four children, developed during immunoglobulin substitution in three children. In one boy with CVID and thrombocytopaenia, haemolytic anaemia occurred, so a diagnosis of Evans syndrome was established. Therapy of thrombocytopaenia previous to CVID included steroids and/or immunoglobulins in high dose, and azathioprine. In children with CVID on regular immunoglobulin substitution, episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia were associated with infections and were treated with high doses of immunoglobulins and steroids. In two patients only chronic thrombocytopaenia was noted. Splenectomy was necessary in one patient because of severe course of thrombocytopaenia. The results of the study indicated a supportive role of regular immunoglobulin substitution in patients with CVID and chronic thrombocytopaenia. However, regular substitution of immunoglobulins in CVID patients did not prevent the occurrence of autoimmune thrombocytopaenia episodes or exacerbations of chronic form. In episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia or exacerbations of chronic thrombocytopaenia, infusions of immunoglobulins in high dose are effective, despite previous regular substitution in the replacing dose. PMID:26155188

  1. Infiltration performance of engineered surfaces commonly used for distributed stormwater management.

    PubMed

    Valinski, N A; Chandler, D G

    2015-09-01

    Engineered porous media are commonly used in low impact development (LID) structures to mitigate excess stormwater in urban environments. Differences in infiltrability of these LID systems arise from the wide variety of materials used to create porous surfaces and subsequent maintenance, debris loading, and physical damage. In this study, the infiltration capacity of six common materials was tested by multiple replicate experiments with automated mini-disk infiltrometers. The tested materials included porous asphalt, porous concrete, porous brick pavers, flexible porous pavement, engineered soils, and native soils. Porous asphalt, large porous brick pavers, and curb cutout rain gardens showed the greatest infiltration rates. Most engineered porous pavements and soils performed better than the native silt loam soils. Infiltration performance was found to be related more to site design and environmental factors than material choice. Sediment trap zones in both pavements and engineered soil rain gardens were found to be beneficial to the whole site performance. Winter chloride application had a large negative impact on poured in place concrete, making it a poor choice for heavily salted areas. PMID:26140743

  2. Infiltration performance of engineered surfaces commonly used for distributed stormwater management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valinski, Nicholas A.

    Engineered porous media are commonly used in low impact development (LID) structures to mitigate excess stormwater in urban environments. Differences in infiltrability of these LID systems arise from the wide variety of materials used to create porous surfaces and subsequent maintenance, debris loading, and physical damage. In this study, infiltration capacity of six common materials was tested by multiple replicate experiments with automated mini-disk infiltrometers. The tested materials included porous asphalt, porous concrete, porous brick pavers, flexible porous pavement, engineered soils, and native soils. Porous asphalt, large porous brick pavers, and curb cutout rain gardens showed the greatest infiltration rates. Most engineered porous pavements and soils performed better than the native silt loam soils. Infiltration performance was found to be related more to site design and environmental factors than material choice. Sediment trap zones in both pavements and engineered soil rain gardens were found to be beneficial to the whole site performance. Winter chloride application had a large negative impact on poured in place concrete, making it a poor choice for heavily salted areas.

  3. Designing and managing public housing self-sufficiency programs: the Youngs Lake Commons Program.

    PubMed

    Kleit, Rachel Garshick

    2004-10-01

    This article evaluates an experimental public housing self-sufficiency program that encourages home ownership among low-income families. A quasi-experimental design, in combination with focus groups, records review, and key informant interviews, provides data to focus on four questions: (a) Do these programs simply accelerate move-outs for those who would have left without intervention? (b) Are program elements replicable given the importance of the local context in public housing move-outs? (c) How do housing authorities resolve tensions that arise between housing management and social service delivery? (d) What should housing authority response be to those who fail? PMID:15358903

  4. Qualitative content analysis of complementary topical therapies used to manage diabetic foot in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qamar, Ma'en Zaid; Wilson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    In order to alleviate diabetic foot problems, patients sometimes seek complementary therapies outside the professional context. This paper describes the use of complementary remedies as a topical treatment for diabetic foot ulcers among Jordanians. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse written responses of 68 patients with diabetes who have used complementary therapies to treat diabetic foot problems. These 68 persons represented a subgroup of the study population surveyed using a questionnaire, to the effect of investigating diabetic foot treatments provided in Jordan. Informants were recruited from eight healthcare facilities established in the southern part of Jordan plus from one hospital established in the Jordanian capital. The study was approved by the Boards of Ethics of the participating healthcare facilities. Content analysis yielded the category "Complementary Therapies Used", which included a range of household items (olive oil, sesame oil, honey, and vinegar), and also some indigenous Jordanian herbs (Wormwood, Myrrh, Caper, and Henna among others). The remedies were used either as a monotherapy or as mixtures, to the common goal of treating diabetic foot problems. Other interventions like Al-cowy were also sought from traditional healers. Educational campaigns are required to increase the awareness of patients and their families on possible hazards of unwise complementary therapy use. The decisions on the use of such therapies should be made in agreement with the attending healthcare professionals. PMID:23983379

  5. Physician clinical management strategies and reasoning: a cross-sectional survey using clinical vignettes of eight common medical admissions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physicians often select clinical management strategies not strongly supported by evidence or guidelines. Our objective was to examine the likelihood of selecting, and rationale for pursuing, clinical management strategies with more or less guideline support among physicians using clinical vignettes of eight common medical admissions. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey using clinical vignettes of attending physicians and housestaff at one internal medicine program in New York City. Each clinical vignette included a brief clinical scenario and a varying number of clinical management strategies: diagnostic tests, consultations, and treatments, some of which had strong evidence or guideline support (Level 1 strategies) while others had limited evidence or guideline support (Level 3 strategies). Likelihood of selecting a given management strategy was assessed using Likert scales and multiple response options were used to indicate rationale(s) for selections. Results Our sample included 79 physicians; 68 (86%) were younger than 40 years of age, 34 (43%) were female. There were 31 attending physicians (39%) and 48 housestaff (61%) and 39 (49%) had or planned to have primarily primary care internal medicine clinical responsibilities. Overall, physicians were more likely to select Level 1 strategies “always” or “most of the time” when compared with Level 3 strategies (82% vs. 43%; p < 0.001), with wide variation across the eight medical admissions. There were no differences between attending and housestaff physician likelihood of selecting Level 3 strategies (47% vs. 45%, p = 0.36). Supportive evidence and local practice patterns were the two most common rationales behind selections; supportive evidence was cited as the most common rationale for selecting Level 1 when compared with Level 3 strategies (63% versus 30%; p < 0.001), whereas ruling out other severe conditions was cited most often for Level 3 strategies. Conclusions For

  6. Inter-Institutional Variation in Management Decisions for Treatment of Four Common Cancers: A Multi-Institutional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Jane C.; Uno, Hajime; Taback, Nathan; Ting, Gladys; Cronin, Angel; D’Amico, Thomas A.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Background When clinical practice is governed by evidenced-based guidelines and there is consensus regarding their validity, practice variation should be minimal. Where evidence gaps exist, greater variation is expected. Objective To systematically assess inter-institutional variation in management decisions for 4 common cancers. Design Multi-institutional observational cohort study of cancer patients diagnosed between July 2006 through May 2011 and observed through December 31, 2011. Setting 18 cancer centers participating in the formulation of treatment guidelines and systematic outcomes assessment through the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Patients 25,589 patients with incident cancer of the breast, colorectum, lung, or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Measurements Inter-institutional variation for 171 binary management decisions with varying levels of supporting evidence. For each decision, variation was characterized by the median absolute deviation (MAD) of the center-specific proportions. Results Inter-institutional variation was high (MAD >10%) for 35/171 (20%) oncology management decisions. This included: 9/22 (41%) for NHL, 16/76 (21%) for breast, 7/47 (15%) for lung, and 3/26 (12%) for colorectal. Decisions involving imaging and/or diagnostic procedures accounted for 46% and chemotherapy regimen choice for 37% of high variance decisions. The evidence grade underpinning the 35 high variance decisions was level I for 0%, 2A for 49% and 2B/other for 51%. Limitations Physician identifiers were unavailable, and results may not generalize outside of major cancer centers. Conclusions The substantial variation in institutional practice manifest among cancer centers reveals a lack of consensus about optimal management for common clinical scenarios. For clinicians, awareness of management decisions with high variation should prompt attention to patient preferences. For health systems, high variation can be used to prioritize comparative effectiveness

  7. Exploring the Use of Enterprise Content Management Systems in Unification Types of Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izza Arshad, Noreen; Mehat, Mazlina; Ariff, Mohamed Imran Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to better understand how highly standardized and integrated businesses known as unification types of organizations use Enterprise Content Management Systems (ECMS) to support their business processes. Multiple case study approach was used to study the ways two unification organizations use their ECMS in their daily work practices. Arising from these case studies are insights into the differing ways in which ECMS is used to support businesses. Based on the comparisons of the two cases, this study proposed that unification organizations may use ECMS in four ways, for: (1) collaboration, (2) information sharing that supports a standardized process structure, (3) building custom workflows that support integrated and standardized processes, and (4) providing links and access to information systems. These findings may guide organizations that are highly standardized and integrated in fashion, to achieve their intended ECMS-use, to understand reasons for ECMS failures and underutilization and to exploit technologies investments.

  8. Reducing input data via image categorization to improve the speed of copyright content management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Watanabe, Eriko

    2015-02-01

    An optical correlator has the advantage of high data transfer speed and parallel operation. However, in copyright content management systems (CCMSs), the numerous video files that need to be downloaded from the Internet and input to the optical correlator constitute a bottleneck. This paper proposes an image categorization method for CCMSs that uses the difference in the color features between animation and live-action images to remove this bottleneck and increase the speed of CCMSs. The results of experiments conducted indicate that the proposed method achieves a live-action video true rejection rate of 86.7 % and an animation video false rejection rate of 13.3 %. This indicates that the proposed method can improve the overall speed of a CCMS more than twice the original speed.

  9. Survey of Common Practices among Oculofacial Surgeons in the Asia-Pacific Region: Management of Orbital Floor Blowout Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Victor; Chiam, Nathalie; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2014-01-01

    A web-based anonymous survey was performed to assess common practices of oculofacial surgeons in the management of traumatic orbital floor blowout fractures. A questionnaire which contained questions on several controversial topics in the management of orbital floor fractures was sent out via e-mail to 131 oculofacial surgeons in 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. A total response rate of 58.3% was achieved from May to December 2012. The preferred time for surgical intervention was within 2 weeks for adult patients, porous polyethylene implant was the most popular choice, and most surgeons preferred the transconjunctival approach. Postoperatively, diplopia was the most commonly encountered complication and most oculofacial surgeons reviewed their patients regularly for up to 12 months. We report the results of the first survey of oculofacial surgeons within the Asia-Pacific region on the management of orbital floor blowout fractures. Compared with previous surveys (from year 2000 to 2004), the duration to surgical intervention was comparable but there was a contrasting change in preferred surgical approach and choice of orbital implant. PMID:25136408

  10. Recurrent myelitis in common variable immunodeficiency successfully managed with high-dose subcutaneous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Pettinari, Lucia; Marinangeli, Lucia; Logullo, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Acute myelitis is an aetiologically heterogeneous inflammatory disorder of the spinal cord. We report on a 71-year-old woman with a recurrent cervical and thoracic myelitis who presented with a new relapse of the disease. Neuromyelitis optica was ruled out such as other possible causes of acute and/or recurrent myelopathy. Serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody responses were consistent with the diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). She was treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin. As a remission-maintaining drug, we decided to treat her with subcutaneous immunoglobulin (CSL Behring) at 0.2 g/kg/week at doses higher than usually employed in replacement therapy in CVID. At 3-year follow-up, the response to treatment was good. No relapses occurred. Our case suggests the effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in maintaining remission and in sparing prednisone in a woman with recurrent myelitis associated with CVID. PMID:22878981

  11. Recurrent myelitis in common variable immunodeficiency successfully managed with high-dose subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Pettinari, Lucia; Marinangeli, Lucia; Logullo, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Acute myelitis is an aetiologically heterogeneous inflammatory disorder of the spinal cord. We report on a 71-year-old woman with a recurrent cervical and thoracic myelitis who presented with a new relapse of the disease. Neuromyelitis optica was ruled out such as other possible causes of acute and/or recurrent myelopathy. Serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody responses were consistent with the diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). She was treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin. As a remission-maintaining drug, we decided to treat her with subcutaneous immunoglobulin (CSL Behring) at 0.2 g/kg/week at doses higher than usually employed in replacement therapy in CVID. At 3-year follow-up, the response to treatment was good. No relapses occurred. Our case suggests the effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in maintaining remission and in sparing prednisone in a woman with recurrent myelitis associated with CVID. PMID:22878981

  12. Endovascular management of ruptured common iliac mycotic aneurysm in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Aamir; Mooka, Busi; Clarke Moloney, Mary; Kavanagh, Eamon

    2013-01-01

    Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are a rare entity. The majority of cases are asymptomatic and often escape detection. Mortality rates after sudden rupture and emergent surgery for iliac artery aneurysm are very high. We report a case of a 56-year-old man who presented with right hip pain masquerading as septic arthritis or psoas abscess. CT showed ruptured right common iliac artery aneurysm with extensive active extravasation into psoas with a retroperitoneal haematoma. Aneurysm was repaired using an endovascular technique. Postoperative recovery was eventful with the patient experiencing severe back pain radiating down the leg accompanied with fever. CT showed persistent, right iliopsoas haematoma and pelvic haematoma with secondary hydronephrosis. Viral screen for hepatitis B, C and HIV returned positive. The patient was started on intravenous meropenem. Fever and pain settled. Repeated CT scan showed decrease in retroperitoneal pelvic haematoma. PMID:23917370

  13. Peristomal Skin Complications Are Common, Expensive, and Difficult to Manage: A Population Based Cost Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Søren; Lehur, Paul-Antoine; Moran, Brendan; Martins, Lina; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Background Peristomal skin complications (PSCs) are the most common post-operative complications following creation of a stoma. Living with a stoma is a challenge, not only for the patient and their carers, but also for society as a whole. Due to methodological problems of PSC assessment, the associated health-economic burden of medium to longterm complications has been poorly described. Aim The aim of the present study was to create a model to estimate treatment costs of PSCs using the standardized assessment Ostomy Skin Tool as a reference. The resultant model was applied to a real-life global data set of stoma patients (n = 3017) to determine the prevalence and financial burden of PSCs. Methods Eleven experienced stoma care nurses were interviewed to get a global understanding of a treatment algorithm that formed the basis of the cost analysis. The estimated costs were based on a seven week treatment period. PSC costs were estimated for five underlying diagnostic categories and three levels of severity. The estimated treatment costs of severe cases of PSCs were increased 2–5 fold for the different diagnostic categories of PSCs compared with mild cases. French unit costs were applied to the global data set. Results The estimated total average cost for a seven week treatment period (including appliances and accessories) was 263€ for those with PSCs (n = 1742) compared to 215€ for those without PSCs (n = 1172). A co-variance analysis showed that leakage level had a significant impact on PSC cost from ‘rarely/never’ to ‘always/often’ p<0.00001 and from ‘rarely/never’ to ‘sometimes’ p = 0.0115. Conclusion PSCs are common and troublesome and the consequences are substantial, both for the patient and from a health economic viewpoint. PSCs should be diagnosed and treated at an early stage to prevent long term, debilitating and expensive complications. PMID:22679479

  14. Managing the climate commons at the nexus of ecology, behaviour and economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoni, Alessandro; Levin, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Sustainably managing coupled ecological-economic systems requires not only an understanding of the environmental factors that affect them, but also knowledge of the interactions and feedback cycles that operate between resource dynamics and activities attributable to human intervention. The socioeconomic dynamics, in turn, call for an investigation of the behavioural drivers behind human action. We argue that a multidisciplinary approach is needed in order to tackle the increasingly pressing and intertwined environmental challenges faced by modern societies. Academic contributions to climate change policy have been constrained by methodological and terminological differences, so we discuss how programmes aimed at cross-disciplinary education and involvement in governance may help to unlock scholars' potential to propose new solutions.

  15. Trophic interactions of common elasmobranchs in deep-sea communities of the Gulf of Mexico revealed through stable isotope and stomach content analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Diana A.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Vaudo, Jeremy J.; Grubbs, R. Dean; Gastrich, Kirk; Castro, José I.

    2015-05-01

    Deep-water sharks are abundant and widely distributed in the northern and eastern Gulf of Mexico. As mid- and upper-level consumers that can range widely, sharks likely are important components of deep-sea communities and their trophic interactions may serve as system-wide baselines that could be used to monitor the overall health of these communities. We investigated the trophic interactions of deep-sea sharks using a combination of stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) and stomach content analyses. Two hundred thirty-two muscle samples were collected from elasmobranchs captured off the bottom at depths between 200 and 1100 m along the northern slope (NGS) and the west Florida slope (WFS) of the Gulf of Mexico during 2011 and 2012. Although we detected some spatial, temporal, and interspecific variation in apparent trophic positions based on stable isotopes, there was considerable isotopic overlap among species, between locations, and through time. Overall δ15N values in the NGS region were higher than in the WFS. The δ15N values also increased between April 2011 and 2012 in the NGS, but not the WFS, within Squalus cf. mitsukurii. We found that stable isotope values of S. cf. mitsukurii, the most commonly captured elasmobranch, varied between sample regions, through time, and also with sex and size. Stomach content analysis (n=105) suggested relatively similar diets at the level of broad taxonomic categories of prey among the taxa with sufficient sample sizes. We did not detect a relationship between body size and relative trophic levels inferred from δ15N, but patterns within several species suggest increasing trophic levels with increasing size. Both δ13C and δ15N values suggest a substantial degree of overlap among most deep-water shark species. This study provides the first characterization of the trophic interactions of deep-sea sharks in the Gulf of Mexico and establishes system baselines for future investigations.

  16. Managed and Supported Missions in the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Replacing the p.m. orbit & ground system (GS) of POES satellites, JPSS sensors will collect weather, ocean & climate data. JPSS's Common Ground System (CGS), made up of C3 & IDP parts and developed by Raytheon, now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transfers data between ground facilities, processes them into Environmental Data Records for NOAA's weather centers and evolves to support JPSS-1 in 2017. CGS processed S-NPP data creates many TBs/day across >2 dozen environmental data products (EDPs), doubling after JPSS launch. But CGS goes beyond this by providing data routing to other missions: GCOM-W1, Coriolis/Windsat, EOS, NSF's McMurdo Station, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, and POES & MetOp satellites. Each system orbits 14 times/day, downlinking data 1-2 times/orbit at up to 100s of MBs/sec, to support the creation of 10s of TBs of data/day across 100s of EDPs. CGS's flexible, multimission capabilities offer major chances for cost reduction & improved information integration across the missions. CGS gives a vital flexible-expandable-virtualized modern GS architecture. Using 5 global ground stations to receive S-NPP & JPSS-1 data, CGS links with high-bandwidth commercial fiber to rapidly move data to the IDP for EDP creation & delivery and leverages these networks to provide added support to more missions. CGS data latency will be < 80 minutes. JPSS CGS is a mature, tested solution for support to operational weather forecasting for civil, military and international partners and climate research. It features a flexible design handling order-of-magnitude increases in data over legacy systems and meets tough science accuracy needs. The Raytheon-built CGS gives the full GS capability, from design & development through operations & sustainment, facilitating future evolution to support more missions.

  17. Reliability of Fitness Tests Using Methods and Time Periods Common in Sport and Occupational Management

    PubMed Central

    Burnstein, Bryan D.; Steele, Russell J.; Shrier, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Context: Fitness testing is used frequently in many areas of physical activity, but the reliability of these measurements under real-world, practical conditions is unknown. Objective: To evaluate the reliability of specific fitness tests using the methods and time periods used in the context of real-world sport and occupational management. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Eighteen different Cirque du Soleil shows. Patients or Other Participants: Cirque du Soleil physical performers who completed 4 consecutive tests (6-month intervals) and were free of injury or illness at each session (n = 238 of 701 physical performers). Intervention(s): Performers completed 6 fitness tests on each assessment date: dynamic balance, Harvard step test, handgrip, vertical jump, pull-ups, and 60-second jump test. Main Outcome Measure(s): We calculated the intraclass coefficient (ICC) and limits of agreement between baseline and each time point and the ICC over all 4 time points combined. Results: Reliability was acceptable (ICC > 0.6) over an 18-month time period for all pairwise comparisons and all time points together for the handgrip, vertical jump, and pull-up assessments. The Harvard step test and 60-second jump test had poor reliability (ICC < 0.6) between baseline and other time points. When we excluded the baseline data and calculated the ICC for 6-month, 12-month, and 18-month time points, both the Harvard step test and 60-second jump test demonstrated acceptable reliability. Dynamic balance was unreliable in all contexts. Limit-of-agreement analysis demonstrated considerable intraindividual variability for some tests and a learning effect by administrators on others. Conclusions: Five of the 6 tests in this battery had acceptable reliability over an 18-month time frame, but the values for certain individuals may vary considerably from time to time for some tests. Specific tests may require a learning period for administrators. PMID:22488138

  18. Computerised patient-specific guidelines for management of common mental disorders in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Hollie V; Lewis, Glyn; Watson, Margaret; Bell, Truda; Lyons, Ita; Lloyd, Keith; Weich, Scott; Sharp, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    Background: A large proportion of people with depression and anxiety go unrecognised by their general practitioner (GP). Case-finding does not appear to be effective on its own. Aim: To compare the effectiveness of case-finding followed by computer-generated patient-specific guidelines with usual care for the management of common mental disorders in primary care. Design of study: Individual patient randomised controlled trial. Setting: Five general practices in Bristol and Cardiff. Method: 762 individuals aged ≥16 years scoring ≥12 on the Clinical Interview Schedule Revised were randomised. The experimental intervention required participants to complete a computerised psychosocial assessment that generated a report for the GP including patient-specific treatment recommend-ations. The control patients were treated as usual with access to locally agreed guidelines. Results: Participants' 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) score dropped irrespective of treatment allocation. The experimental group had a significantly lower GHQ score at 6 weeks, but not at 6 months. Recovery at 6 months was 3% greater among those receiving the experimental intervention (95% confidence interval [CI] = −4 to 10). Treatment was not significantly associated with quality of life or patient satisfaction. Conclusion: Only small benefits are likely from using case-finding followed by patient-specific guidelines to improve clinical management of common mental disorders in primary care. However, depression and anxiety are important public health problems so the utility of such systems should be further investigated. PMID:15527609

  19. An integrated modeling approach for monitoring and predicting common reed (Phragmites australis) colonization in a managed South Carolina estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Samuel Peter

    Recently, research efforts have focused on the development and testing of geographic information processing (GIP) techniques to more effectively identify and monitor invasive plant species in coastal ecosystems. While these efforts are progressing, particularly with refinements in hyperspectral image processing, there remains a lack of practical, science-based tools for decision-making with respect to the monitoring and mitigation of invasive plant species. Therefore, a geographic information systems (GIS) model is proposed to quantify the probability of a future exotic plant invasion in a user-defined area of interest. The primary objective of this investigation is to present conceptual and technical descriptions of a proposed modeling approach for prediction of common reed (Phragmites australis) colonization in a managed coastal wetland environment. Successful validation and adoption of the model will promote continued discourse regarding the impact of invasive species in coastal ecosystems, while providing the management community with a valuable decision support tool. Three main chapters comprise this manuscript; Chapter 1 focuses on the evaluation of remote sensing data and techniques for directly identifying Phragmites australis in a coastal ecosystem; Chapter 2 describes proposed, GIS-based models for predicting Phragmites colonization and future growth projections; and Chapter 3 discusses the results of the compiled relative suitability index (RSI) compilation and growth models, and considers the key management implications of the investigation. In the absence of a universal eradication solution for the invasive species Phragmites australis, an integrated management approach that utilizes a suite of dynamic, geo-spatial techniques in concert with more traditional practices is ultimately recommended. Keywords. Invasive species, estuary, NERRS, Phragmites, GIS-based models, remote sensing, coastal resource management, geographic information processing.

  20. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): Developing a Common Framework for Marine Data Management on a Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, H. M.; Schaap, D.

    2014-12-01

    As marine research becomes increasingly multidisciplinary in its approach there has been a corresponding rise in the demand for large quantities of high quality interoperable data. A number of regional initiatives are already addressing this requirement through the establishment of e-infrastructures to improve the discovery and access of marine data. Projects such as Geo-Seas and SeaDataNet in Europe, Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) in the USA and IMOS in Australia have implemented local infrastructures to facilitate the exchange of standardised marine datasets. However, each of these regional initiatives has been developed to address their own requirements and independently of other regions. To establish a common framework for marine data management on a global scale these is a need to develop interoperability solutions that can be implemented across these initiatives.Through a series of workshops attended by the relevant domain specialists, the Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project has identified areas of commonality between the regional infrastructures and used these as the foundation for the development of three prototype interoperability solutions addressing: the use of brokering services for the purposes of providing access to the data available in the regional data discovery and access services including via the GEOSS portal the development of interoperability between cruise summary reporting systems in Europe, the USA and Australia for routine harvesting of cruise data for delivery via the Partnership for Observation of Global Oceans (POGO) portal the establishment of a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) for selected sensors installed on vessels and in real-time monitoring systems using sensor web enablement (SWE) These prototypes will be used to underpin the development of a common global approach to the management of marine data which can be promoted to the wider marine research community. ODIP is a community lead project that is currently

  1. A multilingual medical thesaurus browser for patients and medical content managers.

    PubMed

    Göbel, G; Andreatta, S; Masser, J; Pfeiffer, K P

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces a user-friendly browser interface which integrates multilingual search and browsing functionalities within medical thesauri via the internet. The tool is being developed as part of the GIN Austria Patient Information System and is based on an adapted datamodel of the MeSH thesaurus. A prototype offers the possibility to build up queries and export lists of MeSH main headings collected during browsing the relevant MeSH trees. The thesaurus browser can be used both by patients and citizens to build queries based on a controlled vocabulary to match them with existing documents within GIN and by medical information managers to find out appropriate keywords for interactive tagging or indexing of medical contents. A key component of this tool is the flexible choice of different languages of the MeSH datasource as well as of the user interface. Both can be changed independently at any point during a session. Another central aspect is the use of the UMLS Metathesaurus in combination with localized Thesaurus versions due to existing international character set problems. PMID:11604758

  2. Embedding QR codes in tumor board presentations, enhancing educational content for oncology information management.

    PubMed

    Siderits, Richard; Yates, Stacy; Rodriguez, Arelis; Lee, Tina; Rimmer, Cheryl; Roche, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Quick Response (QR) Codes are standard in supply management and seen with increasing frequency in advertisements. They are now present regularly in healthcare informatics and education. These 2-dimensional square bar codes, originally designed by the Toyota car company, are free of license and have a published international standard. The codes can be generated by free online software and the resulting images incorporated into presentations. The images can be scanned by "smart" phones and tablets using either the iOS or Android platforms, which link the device with the information represented by the QR code (uniform resource locator or URL, online video, text, v-calendar entries, short message service [SMS] and formatted text). Once linked to the device, the information can be viewed at any time after the original presentation, saved in the device or to a Web-based "cloud" repository, printed, or shared with others via email or Bluetooth file transfer. This paper describes how we use QR codes in our tumor board presentations, discusses the benefits, the different QR codes from Web links and how QR codes facilitate the distribution of educational content. PMID:23270096

  3. Temporal and soil management effects on soil infiltration and water content in a hillslope vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddoccu, Marcella; Ferraris, Stefano; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    The maintenance of bare soil in the vineyard's inter-rows with tillage, as well as other mechanized operations which increase the vehicle traffic, expose the soil to degradation, favoring overland flow and further threats as compaction, reduction of soil water holding capacity and water infiltration. Water infiltration is strongly controlled by field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, which depends primarily on soil texture and structure, and it is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. Beyond the currently adopted soil management, some major causes in variability of infiltration rates are the history of cultivation and the structure of the first centimeters of the vineyard's soil. A study was carried out in two experimental vineyard plots included in the 'Tenuta Cannona Experimental Vine and Wine Centre of Regione Piemonte', located in NW Italy. The study was addressed to evaluate the temporal variations of the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, in relation to the soil management adopted in the inter-rows of a hillslope vineyard. The investigation was carried out in a vineyard comparing the adoption of two different soil managements in the inter-rows: 1) conventional tillage and 2) controlled grass cover. Several series of double-ring of infiltration tests were carried out during a 2-years period of observation, using the simplified falling head technique (SFH). In order to take into account the effect of tractor traffic, the tests were done both inside the the track, the portion of soil affected by the transit of tractor wheels or tracks, and outside the track. Before the execution of each test, bulk density and initial soil water content close to the investigated area were determined. Relations among infiltration behavior and these parameters were analyzed. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) at different sampling dates showed high variability, especially in the vineyard with cultivated soil. Indeed, highest infiltration rates were

  4. Gypsum-Water Management Interactions on the Survival, Yield, and Protein Content of Selected Species of Marsh Vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field study evaluating the effects of gypsum and water management on the survival, yield, and protein content of selected species of marsh vegetation was conducted on an open area inundated by brackish water near Hackberry, LA. The overall growth and yield responses of four species of marsh vegeta...

  5. GYPSUM-WATER MANAGEMENT INTERACTIONS ON THE SURVIVAL, YIELD, AND PROTEIN CONTENT OF SELECTED SPECIES OF MARSH VEGETATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field study evaluating the effects of gypsum and water management on the survival, yield, and protein content of selected species of marsh vegetation was conducted on an open area inundated by brackish water near Hackberry, LA. The overall growth and yield responses of four species of marsh vegeta...

  6. Student and Instructor Perceptions of Using ATutor as the Learning Content Management System for Learning at a Distance in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanserm, Sineenuch Khrutmuang

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to examine students' and instructors' perceptions of using ATutor as the learning content management system (LCMS) in e-learning courses at a distance university in Thailand. The population was composed of all 222 graduate students (census) and 10 instructors from an agricultural college at…

  7. Development, content validity, and piloting of an instrument designed to measure managers' attitude toward workplace breastfeeding support.

    PubMed

    Chow, Tan; Wolfe, Edward W; Olson, Beth H

    2012-07-01

    Manager attitude is influential in female employees' perceptions of workplace breastfeeding support. Currently, no instrument is available to assess manager attitude toward supporting women who wish to combine breastfeeding with work. We developed and piloted an instrument to measure manager attitudes toward workplace breastfeeding support entitled the "Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire," an instrument that measures four constructs using 60 items that are rated agree/disagree on a 4-point Likert rating scale. We established the content validity of the Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire measures through expert content review (n=22), expert assessment of item fit (n=11), and cognitive interviews (n=8). Data were collected from a purposive sample of 185 front-line managers who had experience supervising female employees, and responses were scaled using the Multidimensional Random Coefficients Multinomial Logit Model. Dimensionality analyses supported the proposed four-construct model. Reliability ranged from 0.75 to 0.86, and correlations between the constructs were moderately strong (0.47 to 0.71). Four items in two constructs exhibited model-to-data misfit and/or a low score-measure correlation. One item was revised and the other three items were retained in the Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire. Findings of this study suggest that the Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire measures are reliable and valid indicators of manager attitude toward workplace breastfeeding support, and future research should be conducted to establish external validity. The Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire could be used to collect data in a standardized manner within and across companies to measure and compare manager attitudes toward supporting breastfeeding. Organizations can subsequently develop targeted strategies to improve support for breastfeeding

  8. Quantification of radiation exposure in the operating theatre during management of common fractures of the upper extremity in children.

    PubMed

    Maempel, J F; Stone, O D; Murray, A W

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures to manage trauma to the wrist, forearm and elbow in children are very common. Image intensifiers are used routinely, yet studies/guidelines that quantify expected radiation exposure in such procedures are lacking. Methods Information on demographics, injury type, surgeon grade and dose area product (DAP) of radiation exposure per procedure was collected prospectively for 248 patients undergoing manipulation/fixation of injuries to the elbow, forearm or wrist at a paediatric hospital over 1 year. Results DAP exposure (in cGycm(2)) differed significantly across different procedures (p<0.001): wrist manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA; median, 0.39), wrist k-wiring (1.01), forearm MUA (0.50), flexible nailing of the forearm (2.67), supracondylar fracture MUA and k-wiring (2.23) and open reduction and internal fixation of the lateral humeral condyle (0.96). Fixation of a Gartland grade-3 supracondylar fracture (2.94cGycm(2)) was associated with higher exposure than grade-2 fixation (1.95cGycm(2)) (p=0.048). Fractures of the wrist or forearm necessitating metalwork fixation resulted in higher exposure than those requiring manipulation only (both p<0.001). For procedures undertaken by trainees, trainee seniority (between year-5 and year-8 and clinical fellow, p≥0.24) did not affect the DAP significantly. Conclusions The spectrum of radiation exposures for common procedures utilised in the management of paediatric upper limb trauma were quantified. These findings will be useful to surgeons auditing their practice and quantifying radiation-associated risks to patients. Our data may serve as a basis for implementing protocols designed to improve patient safety. PMID:27580309

  9. Examining leaf and canopy optical properties for the assessment of chlorophyll content to determine nitrogen management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, Michael R.

    content or N content in real time will be useful in agricultural N management. Additional investigation is needed for the design and construction of active systems that can implement the functions presented.

  10. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common global framework for marine data management through international collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, Helen

    2015-04-01

    Marine research is rapidly moving away from traditional discipline specific science to a wider ecosystem level approach. This more multidisciplinary approach to ocean science requires large amounts of good quality, interoperable data to be readily available for use in an increasing range of new and complex applications. Significant amounts of marine data and information are already available throughout the world as a result of e-infrastructures being established at a regional level to manage and deliver marine data to the end user. However, each of these initiatives has been developed to address specific regional requirements and independently of those in other regions. Establishing a common framework for marine data management on a global scale necessitates that there is interoperability across these existing data infrastructures and active collaboration between the organisations responsible for their management. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project is promoting co-ordination between a number of these existing regional e-infrastructures including SeaDataNet and Geo-Seas in Europe, the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) in Australia, the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) in the USA and the international IODE initiative. To demonstrate this co-ordinated approach the ODIP project partners are currently working together to develop several prototypes to test and evaluate potential interoperability solutions for solving the incompatibilities between the individual regional marine data infrastructures. However, many of the issues being addressed by the Ocean Data Interoperability Platform are not specific to marine science. For this reason many of the outcomes of this international collaborative effort are equally relevant and transferable to other domains.

  11. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common framework for marine data management on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, Helen; Schaap, Dick

    2015-04-01

    As marine research becomes increasingly multidisciplinary in its approach there has been a corresponding rise in the demand for large quantities of high quality interoperable data. A number of regional initiatives are already addressing this requirement through the establishment of e-infrastructures to improve the discovery and access of marine data. Projects such as SeaDataNet in Europe, Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) in the USA and the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) in Australia have implemented local infrastructures to facilitate the exchange of standardised marine datasets. However, each of these systems has been developed to address local requirements and created in isolation from those in other regions. To establish a common framework for marine data management on a global scale there is a need to develop interoperability solutions that can be implemented across these initiatives. Through a series of workshops attended by the relevant domain specialists, the Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project has identified areas of commonality between the regional infrastructures and used these as the foundation for the development of three prototype interoperability solutions addressing: 1. the use of brokering services for the purposes of providing access to the data available in the regional data discovery and access services including via the GEOSS portal 2. the development of interoperability between cruise summary reporting systems in Europe, the USA and Australia for routine harvesting of cruise data for delivery via the Partnership for Observation of Global Oceans (POGO) portal 3. the establishment of a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) for selected sensors installed on vessels and in real-time monitoring systems using sensor web enablement (SWE) These prototypes will be used to underpin the development of a common global approach to the management of marine data which can be promoted to the wider marine research community. ODIP is a

  12. PROCEEDINGS FROM THE RUST WORKSHOP AT THE 2005 BIC MEETING: Challenges to and Priorities for Management of Rusts of Common Bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 18th Biennial Meeting of the Bean Improvement Cooperative (October 31 to November 2, 2005), a special workshop (4th International Rust Workshop) was convened to provide an overview on common bean vulnerability to and advances in management of common rust (caused by Uromyces appendiculatus...

  13. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common framework for marine data management on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, D.

    2015-12-01

    Europe, the USA, and Australia are making significant progress in facilitating the discovery, access and long term stewardship of ocean and marine data through the development, implementation, population and operation of national, regional or international distributed ocean and marine observing and data management infrastructures such as SeaDataNet, EMODnet, IOOS, R2R, and IMOS. All of these developments are resulting in the development of standards and services implemented and used by their regional communities. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project is supported by the EU FP7 Research Infrastructures programme, National Science Foundation (USA) and Australian government and has been initiated 1st October 2012. Recently the project has been continued as ODIP 2 for another 3 years with EU HORIZON 2020 funding. ODIP includes all the major organisations engaged in ocean data management in EU, US, and Australia. ODIP is also supported by the IOC-IODE, closely linking this activity with its Ocean Data Portal (ODP) and Ocean Data Standards Best Practices (ODSBP) projects. The ODIP platform aims to ease interoperability between the regional marine data management infrastructures. Therefore it facilitates an organised dialogue between the key infrastructure representatives by means of publishing best practice, organising a series of international workshops and fostering the development of common standards and interoperability solutions. These are evaluated and tested by means of prototype projects. The presentation will give further background on the ODIP projects and the latest information on the progress of three prototype projects addressing: establishing interoperability between the regional EU, USA and Australia data discovery and access services (SeaDataNet CDI, US NODC, and IMOS MCP) and contributing to the global GEOSS and IODE-ODP portals; establishing interoperability between cruise summary reporting systems in Europe, the USA and Australia for

  14. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common framework for marine data management on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Glaves, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Europe, the USA, and Australia are making significant progress in facilitating the discovery, access and long term stewardship of ocean and marine data through the development, implementation, population and operation of national, regional or international distributed ocean and marine observing and data management infrastructures such as SeaDataNet, EMODnet, IOOS, R2R, and IMOS. All of these developments are resulting in the development of standards and services implemented and used by their regional communities. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project is supported by the EU FP7 Research Infrastructures programme, National Science Foundation (USA) and Australian government and has been initiated 1st October 2012. Recently the project has been continued as ODIP II for another 3 years with EU HORIZON 2020 funding. ODIP includes all the major organisations engaged in ocean data management in EU, US, and Australia. ODIP is also supported by the IOC-IODE, closely linking this activity with its Ocean Data Portal (ODP) and Ocean Data Standards Best Practices (ODSBP) projects. The ODIP platform aims to ease interoperability between the regional marine data management infrastructures. Therefore it facilitates an organised dialogue between the key infrastructure representatives by means of publishing best practice, organising a series of international workshops and fostering the development of common standards and interoperability solutions. These are evaluated and tested by means of prototype projects. The presentation will give further background on the ODIP projects and the latest information on the progress of three prototype projects addressing: 1. establishing interoperability between the regional EU, USA and Australia data discovery and access services (SeaDataNet CDI, US NODC, and IMOS MCP) and contributing to the global GEOSS and IODE-ODP portals; 2. establishing interoperability between cruise summary reporting systems in Europe, the USA and

  15. Effects of industrial canning on the proximate composition, bioactive compounds contents and nutritional profile of two Spanish common dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Cuadrado, Carmen; Burbano, Carmen; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Cabellos, Blanca; Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña; Asensio-Vegas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes produced by canning in the proximate composition and in the bioactive constituents of two "ready to eat" Spanish beans. The foremost difference in the raw beans corresponded to the lectin: a higher content was found in raw Curruquilla beans (16.50 mg 100 mg(-1)) compared with raw Almonga beans (0.6 mg 100 mg(-1)). In general, industrial canning significantly increased the protein (>7%) and dietary fibre (>5%) contents of both beans varieties. However, the minerals, total α-galactosides and inositol phosphates contents were reduced (>25%) in both canned seeds. The trypsin inhibitors content was almost abolished by canning, and no lectins were found in either of the canned samples. Canned Curruquilla showed a decrease (38%) of their antioxidant activity. These "ready to eat" beans exhibited adequate nutritive profiles according to the USDA dietary recommendations. Furthermore, they had bioactive components content that are suitable for establishing a healthy lifestyle. PMID:25053030

  16. Developing Web-Based/Multimedia Empowered Courses in Engineering Management: Content, Pedagogy, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, John M.; Smith, Steven V.; Mablekos, Carole; Fekete, John

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of a model Web-based distance-learning graduate course in Engineering Management at Drexel University (Pennsylvania). Highlights include a new pedagogical model; vendor selection; knowledge engineering; time commitment; development management; copyright issues; and costs. (LRW)

  17. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Kaptein, Ad A; Fischer, Maarten J; Scharloo, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients’ functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD. PMID:25214777

  18. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): supporting the development of a common global framework for marine data management through international collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, Helen; Schaap, Dick; Arko, Robert; Proctor, Roger

    2014-05-01

    Ecosystem level marine research necessitates that large amounts of interoperable data are readily available for use in a wide range of new and complex multidisciplinary applications. Significant amounts of marine data and information are available throughout the world due to the implementation of e-infrastructures at a regional level to manage and deliver this data to the end user. However, each of these initiatives has been developed to address specific regional requirements and independently of those in other regions. To establish a common framework for marine data management on a global scale that supports an ecosystem level approach to marine research there is a need to develop interoperability across these existing data infrastructures. The Ocean Data Interoperability (ODIP) project is creating a co-ordination platform to support collaboration between a number of these existing regional e-infrastructures which include Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) in the USA, SeaDataNet and Geo-Seas in Europe, IMOS in Australia and also the international IODE initiative. To demonstrate this co-ordinated approach several prototypes will be developed to test and evaluate potential interoperability solutions for solving the incompatibilities identified between the different regional data infrastructures. These prototypes will be used to underpin the development of a common approach to the management of marine data which can also be promoted to the wider marine research community with a view to expanding this framework to include other regional marine data infrastructures. To achieve these objectives relevant domain experts are coming together at a series of workshops where areas of commonality between the regional infrastructures will be identified which can then be used as the foundation for the development of the prototype solutions. As a result six topics are currently being addressed by the ODIP project which have been identified and analysed during the first two ODIP

  19. Leadership Strategies of Performance Measures Impacts in Public Sector Management: A National Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubala, James Joseph

    A quantitative and qualitative study examined three leadership strategies found in performance-based management (human resource, scientific management and political strategies used in public sector management); a framework by which performance measurement (PM) supports leadership strategies; and how the strategies impact PM. It examined leadership…

  20. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common framework for marine data management on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, Helen; Schaap, Dick

    2016-04-01

    The increasingly ocean basin level approach to marine research has led to a corresponding rise in the demand for large quantities of high quality interoperable data. This requirement for easily discoverable and readily available marine data is currently being addressed by initiatives such as SeaDataNet in Europe, Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) in the USA and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) with each having implemented an e-infrastructure to facilitate the discovery and re-use of standardised multidisciplinary marine datasets available from a network of distributed repositories, data centres etc. within their own region. However, these regional data systems have been developed in response to the specific requirements of their users and in line with the priorities of the funding agency. They have also been created independently of the marine data infrastructures in other regions often using different standards, data formats, technologies etc. that make integration of marine data from these regional systems for the purposes of basin level research difficult. Marine research at the ocean basin level requires a common global framework for marine data management which is based on existing regional marine data systems but provides an integrated solution for delivering interoperable marine data to the user. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP/ODIP II) project brings together those responsible for the management of the selected marine data systems and other relevant technical experts with the objective of developing interoperability across the regional e-infrastructures. The commonalities and incompatibilities between the individual data infrastructures are identified and then used as the foundation for the specification of prototype interoperability solutions which demonstrate the feasibility of sharing marine data across the regional systems and also with relevant larger global data services such as GEO, COPERNICUS, IODE, POGO etc. The potential

  1. Comparison of the Content of Web Sites of Higher Education Institutions Providing for Sports Management Education: The Case of Turkish and English Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katirci, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Considering various themes, this study aims to examine the content of web sites of universities that provide sports management education in higher education level in Turkey and in England. Within this framework, the websites of the higher education institutions that provide sports management education are analyzed by using the content analysis…

  2. A Call for Common Content: Core Curriculum Must Build a Bridge from Standards to Achievement--Sign On to Show Your Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In the last issue of "American Educator," several scholars argued in favor of a common core curriculum. By common core, they meant that the curriculum should be broadly adopted (enabling improvements in instructional materials, student tests, and teacher training), but also limited (preserving instructional time for districts, schools, and…

  3. Stakeholder Analysis and Social-Biophysical Interdependencies for Common Pool Resource Management: La Brava Wetland (Argentina) as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, Asunción; Massone, Héctor E.; Escalante, Alicia H.

    2011-09-01

    This article gives an account of the implementation of a stakeholder analysis framework at La Brava Wetland Basin, Argentina, in a common-pool resource (CPR) management context. Firstly, the context in which the stakeholder framework was implemented is described. Secondly, a four-step methodology is applied: (1) stakeholder identification, (2) stakeholder differentiation-categorization, (3) investigation of stakeholders' relationships, and (4) analysis of social-biophysical interdependencies. This methodology classifies stakeholders according to their level of influence on the system and their potential in the conservation of natural resources. The main influential stakeholders are La Brava Village residents and tourism-related entrepreneurs who are empowered to make the more important decisions within the planning process of the ecosystem. While these key players are seen as facilitators of change, there are other groups (residents of the inner basin and fishermen) which are seen mainly as key blockers. The applied methodology for the Stakeholder Analysis and the evaluation of social-biophysical interdependencies carried out in this article can be seen as an encouraging example for other experts in natural sciences to learn and use these methods developed in social sciences. Major difficulties and some recommendations of applying this method in the practice by non-experts are discussed.

  4. Stakeholder analysis and social-biophysical interdependencies for common pool resource management: La Brava Wetland (Argentina) as a case study.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Asunción; Massone, Héctor E; Escalante, Alicia H

    2011-09-01

    This article gives an account of the implementation of a stakeholder analysis framework at La Brava Wetland Basin, Argentina, in a common-pool resource (CPR) management context. Firstly, the context in which the stakeholder framework was implemented is described. Secondly, a four-step methodology is applied: (1) stakeholder identification, (2) stakeholder differentiation-categorization, (3) investigation of stakeholders' relationships, and (4) analysis of social-biophysical interdependencies. This methodology classifies stakeholders according to their level of influence on the system and their potential in the conservation of natural resources. The main influential stakeholders are La Brava Village residents and tourism-related entrepreneurs who are empowered to make the more important decisions within the planning process of the ecosystem. While these key players are seen as facilitators of change, there are other groups (residents of the inner basin and fishermen) which are seen mainly as key blockers. The applied methodology for the Stakeholder Analysis and the evaluation of social-biophysical interdependencies carried out in this article can be seen as an encouraging example for other experts in natural sciences to learn and use these methods developed in social sciences. Major difficulties and some recommendations of applying this method in the practice by non-experts are discussed. PMID:21667179

  5. Legacy2Drupal - Conversion of an existing oceanographic relational database to a semantically enabled Drupal content management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.; Work, T.; Allen, J.; Groman, R. C.; Fox, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Content Management Systems (CMSs) provide powerful features that can be of use to oceanographic (and other geo-science) data managers. However, in many instances, geo-science data management offices have previously designed customized schemas for their metadata. The WHOI Ocean Informatics initiative and the NSF funded Biological Chemical and Biological Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) have jointly sponsored a project to port an existing, relational database containing oceanographic metadata, along with an existing interface coded in Cold Fusion middleware, to a Drupal6 Content Management System. The goal was to translate all the existing database tables, input forms, website reports, and other features present in the existing system to employ Drupal CMS features. The replacement features include Drupal content types, CCK node-reference fields, themes, RDB, SPARQL, workflow, and a number of other supporting modules. Strategic use of some Drupal6 CMS features enables three separate but complementary interfaces that provide access to oceanographic research metadata via the MySQL database: 1) a Drupal6-powered front-end; 2) a standard SQL port (used to provide a Mapserver interface to the metadata and data; and 3) a SPARQL port (feeding a new faceted search capability being developed). Future plans include the creation of science ontologies, by scientist/technologist teams, that will drive semantically-enabled faceted search capabilities planned for the site. Incorporation of semantic technologies included in the future Drupal 7 core release is also anticipated. Using a public domain CMS as opposed to proprietary middleware, and taking advantage of the many features of Drupal 6 that are designed to support semantically-enabled interfaces will help prepare the BCO-DMO database for interoperability with other ecosystem databases.

  6. Operations Management: Is There a Disconnect between Journal Article Content and Employer Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Marc G.; Welborn, Cliff A.

    2014-01-01

    The authors sought to determine whether topics researched by academicians in the field of operations management were aligned with the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) employers were seeking from potential employees. Twenty-eight research topics were identified in the operations management literature and were compared to the KSAs derived…

  7. Learning Objectives and Content of Science Curricula for Undergraduate Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledley, Fred D.; Holt, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Business is progressively integrating technologies and R&D with corporate and business strategy. This trend is creating increasing demand for executives and managers who have sufficient technology-centered knowledge to work effectively in interdisciplinary environments. This study addresses how management education could address the growing…

  8. The Caffeine Content of Dietary Supplements Commonly Purchased in the U.S.: Analysis of 53 Products Having Caffeine-containing Ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a study initiating the development of an analytically validated Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) in the United States (U.S.), a selection of dietary supplement products were analyzed for their caffeine content. Products sold as tablets, caplets, or capsules and listing at l...

  9. Copy Number Variation of Cytokinin Oxidase Gene Tackx4 Associated with Grain Weight and Chlorophyll Content of Flag Leaf in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Ma, Chuan-Xi; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    As the main pigment in photosynthesis, chlorophyll significantly affects grain filling and grain weight of crop. Cytokinin (CTK) can effectively increase chlorophyll content and chloroplast stability, but it is irreversibly inactivated by cytokinin oxidase (CKX). In this study, therefore, twenty-four pairs of primers were designed to identify variations of wheat CKX (Tackx) genes associated with flag leaf chlorophyll content after anthesis, as well as grain weight in 169 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from Triticum aestivum Jing 411 × Hongmangchun 21. Results indicated variation of Tackx4, identified by primer pair T19-20, was proven to significantly associate with chlorophyll content and grain weight in the RIL population. Here, two Tackx4 patterns were identified: one with two co-segregated fragments (Tackx4-1/Tackx4-2) containing 618 bp and 620 bp in size (as in Jing 411), and another with no PCR product. The two genotypes were designated as genotype-A and genotype-B, respectively. Grain weight and leaf chlorophyll content at 5~15 days after anthesis (DAA) were significantly higher in genotype-A lines than those in genotype-B lines. Mapping analysis indicated Tackx4 was closely linked to Xwmc169 on chromosome 3AL, as well as co-segregated with a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for both grain weight and chlorophyll content of flag leaf at 5~15 DAA. This QTL explained 8.9~22.3% phenotypic variations of the two traits across four cropping seasons. Among 102 wheat varieties, a third genotype of Tackx4 was found and designated as genotype-C, also having two co-segregated fragments, Tackx4-2 and Tackx4-3 (615bp). The sequences of three fragments, Tackx4-1, Tackx4-2, and Tackx4-3, showed high identity (>98%). Therefore, these fragments could be considered as different copies at Tackx4 locus on chromosome 3AL. The effect of copy number variation (CNV) of Tackx4 was further validated. In general, genotype-A contains both significantly higher grain weight

  10. Managing the Contents of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics Archives — Copyright Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdie, C.; Vagiswari, A.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss some of the challenges faced by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) archives with reference to the use of both physical and digital contents and the attempts made to keep the balance between providing access and not infringing the copyright laws.

  11. Graphic Design: A Sustainable Solution to Manage the Contents of Teaching Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victor, Garcia Izaguirre; Luisa, Pier Castello Maria; Eduardo, Arvizu Sanchez

    2010-01-01

    There is a concern that the teaching of subjects is applied not only with support from a set of technological devices, but largely in the proper use of teaching and new technologies. Taking this idea, the authors develop a research and sustainable design that result in educational materials in solid content and technological innovation, also to…

  12. Local versus Standardized Content Assessment: Some Management Implications, or Why Bother?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lois J.; Clements, Christine; Olson, Janet E.

    2010-01-01

    In a quest to improve student learning and simultaneously to satisfy accrediting agencies, colleges make decisions about how to assess knowledge or content as students graduate. The authors address the strengths and weaknesses of locally developed exams as contrasted to national, standardized tools, and describe a process for developing local…

  13. Modeling sugar content of farmer-managed sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured or estimated leaf and root physical and chemical traits of spatio-temporally heterogeneous field-grown sugar beet throughout its ontogeny during three growing seasons. The objective was to quantify the impact of temporal changes in these traits on root sugar content [S(R); g 100g**-1 roo...

  14. Extended Relation Metadata for SCORM-Based Learning Content Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Eric Jui-Lin; Horng, Gwoboa; Yu, Chia-Ssu; Chou, Ling-Ying

    2010-01-01

    To increase the interoperability and reusability of learning objects, Advanced Distributed Learning Initiative developed a model called Content Aggregation Model (CAM) to describe learning objects and express relationships between learning objects. However, the suggested relations defined in the CAM can only describe structure-oriented…

  15. Switchgrass harvest time management can impact biomass yield and nutrient content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a dedicated energy crop native to much of North America. While high-biomass yield is of significant importance for the development of switchgrass as a bioenergy crop, nutrient content in the biomass as it relates to biofuel conversion efficiency is also critical...

  16. Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: Teacher Self Learning Series. Module 5: The Standards for Mathematical Practice--Connecting the Practices to Content Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This module assumes that the information presented in previous modules is well known to the learner. Module 5 is the second of three modules (4, 5, and 6) designed to provide an in-depth look at the Standards of Mathematical Practice which are part of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Module 5 focuses on how the practices connect to…

  17. Cognitive Language and Content Standards: Language Inventory of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics and the Next Generation Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Kathleen M.; Mi Choi, Kyong; Hand, Brian

    2016-01-01

    STEM education is a current focus of many educators and policymakers and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) with the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSSM) are foundational documents driving curricular and instructional decision making for teachers and students in K-8 classrooms across the United States. Thus, practitioners…

  18. Measuring Job Content: Skills, Technology, and Management Practices. Discussion Paper No. 1357-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptualization and measurement of key job characteristics has not changed greatly for most social scientists since the Dictionary of Occupational Titles and Quality of Employment surveys were created, despite their recognized limitations. However, debates over the roles of job skill requirements, technology, and new management practices in…

  19. The Effect of Changing American Social Values on the Editorial Content, Style and Management of Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Donna Roman

    An examination of the "Los Angeles Times," the "Long Beach Independent Press-Telegram," the "Register," and the "Herald Examiner" as well as personal interviews conducted at the editorial and management levels reveal the effect of changing American social values. Changing values can be marked by such broad indicators as graphic renovation,…

  20. Beyond Content: How Teachers Manage Classrooms to Facilitate Intellectual Engagement for Disengaged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schussler, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores how teachers manage classrooms to facilitate the intellectual engagement of disengaged students. The author proposes that teachers create an environment conducive to intellectual engagement when students perceive: (a) that there are opportunities for them to succeed, (b) that flexible avenues exist through which learning can…

  1. Behavior Management Instructional Practices and Content of College/University Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavay, Barry; Henderson, Hester; French, Ron; Guthrie, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Background: Since 1969, the annual United States Educational Gallup Poll has reported the ability to manage behavior and motivate students as a major challenge for teachers and the primary reason why novice teachers leave the profession prematurely. Indeed, over one-third of all new teachers resign within three years due to this perceived…

  2. Effects of entrapment on nucleic acid content, cell morphology, cell surface property, and stress of pure cultures commonly found in biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Sudipta; Khanna, Rohit; Katti, Kalpana; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak

    2011-10-01

    The effects of cell entrapment on nucleic acid content, cell morphology, cell surface property, and stress of major groups of bacteria (betaproteobacteria and gammaproteobacteria) in biological municipal wastewater treatment were investigated. Three different entrapment media (alginate, carrageenan, and polyvinyl alcohol) were examined. Results indicated that the entrapment and type of entrapment media affected nucleic acid content, cell morphology, cell surface property, and stress of the three representative species (Alcaligenes faecalis, Comamonas testosteroni, and Pseudomonas putida) studied. The highest deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid increases were observed with the alginate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) entrapment, respectively. A cell morphological change from bacilli to coccoidal was observed in the case of alginate entrapment while the PVA-entrapped cells had a slim morphology when compared to non-entrapped cells and formed putative nanowires. The entrapment increased or decreased the surface roughness of cells depending on the type of entrapment media. Expression of a nitrosative stress gene, which is linked to oxygen deprivation, was observed more in the alginate-entrapped cells. These research findings advance the fundamental understanding of the entrapped cell physiology which can lead to more efficient entrapped cell-based wastewater treatment. PMID:21660542

  3. Phenolic acid content and composition in leaves and roots of common commercial sweetpotato (Ipomea batatas L.) cultivars in the United States.

    PubMed

    Truong, V-D; McFeeters, R F; Thompson, R T; Dean, L L; Shofran, B

    2007-08-01

    Phenolic acids in commercially important sweet potato cultivars grown in the United States were analyzed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and 3,4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid were well separated with an isocratic elution in less than 25 min compared to about 120 min for analyzing and re-equilibrating the column with a gradient method. The isocratic elution order of these caffeoylquinic acid derivatives was confirmed by LC-MS/MS. Chlorogenic acid was the highest in root tissues, while 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and/or 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid were predominant in the leaves. Steam cooking resulted in statistically nonsignificant increases in the concentration of total phenolics and all the individual phenolic acids identified. Sweetpotato leaves had the highest phenolic acid content followed by the peel, whole root, and flesh tissues. However, there was no significant difference in the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity between purees made from the whole and peeled sweet potatoes. PMID:17995676

  4. Managing Phenol Contents in Crop Plants by Phytochemical Farming and Breeding—Visions and Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Treutter, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Two main fields of interest form the background of actual demand for optimized levels of phenolic compounds in crop plants. These are human health and plant resistance to pathogens and to biotic and abiotic stress factors. A survey of agricultural technologies influencing the biosynthesis and accumulation of phenolic compounds in crop plants is presented, including observations on the effects of light, temperature, mineral nutrition, water management, grafting, elevated atmospheric CO2, growth and differentiation of the plant and application of elicitors, stimulating agents and plant activators. The underlying mechanisms are discussed with respect to carbohydrate availability, trade-offs to competing demands as well as to regulatory elements. Outlines are given for genetic engineering and plant breeding. Constraints and possible physiological feedbacks are considered for successful and sustainable application of agricultural techniques with respect to management of plant phenol profiles and concentrations. PMID:20479987

  5. Managing phenol contents in crop plants by phytochemical farming and breeding-visions and constraints.

    PubMed

    Treutter, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Two main fields of interest form the background of actual demand for optimized levels of phenolic compounds in crop plants. These are human health and plant resistance to pathogens and to biotic and abiotic stress factors. A survey of agricultural technologies influencing the biosynthesis and accumulation of phenolic compounds in crop plants is presented, including observations on the effects of light, temperature, mineral nutrition, water management, grafting, elevated atmospheric CO(2), growth and differentiation of the plant and application of elicitors, stimulating agents and plant activators. The underlying mechanisms are discussed with respect to carbohydrate availability, trade-offs to competing demands as well as to regulatory elements. Outlines are given for genetic engineering and plant breeding. Constraints and possible physiological feedbacks are considered for successful and sustainable application of agricultural techniques with respect to management of plant phenol profiles and concentrations. PMID:20479987

  6. Management of a pregnant woman with common variable immunodeficiency and previous reactions to intravenous IgG administration

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Moretti, Romina; Pettinari, Lucia; Gambini, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adulthood. Pregnant women with common variable immunodeficiency have different needs from other patients with the same disease. Because of immature state of the fetal and neonatal immune system, transplacental transfer of immunoglobulin G (IgG) has a relevant role in protecting the infant. We here report on a high-risk pregnant woman with common variable immunodeficiency with adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin that was successfully rescued with a new Ig human intravenous, 10% liquid preparation. The treatment was tailored to the health status and characteristics of the patient. The new product was safe and well tolerated. The mother did not report any infections during pregnancy and the baby had a healthy course with ‘protective’ serum IgG levels. Our case is a further demonstration that intravenous immunoglobulin tolerability in patients with immunodeficiency could be linked to a product's characteristics. PMID:23257273

  7. Management of a pregnant woman with common variable immunodeficiency and previous reactions to intravenous IgG administration.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Moretti, Romina; Pettinari, Lucia; Gambini, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adulthood. Pregnant women with common variable immunodeficiency have different needs from other patients with the same disease. Because of immature state of the fetal and neonatal immune system, transplacental transfer of immunoglobulin G (IgG) has a relevant role in protecting the infant. We here report on a high-risk pregnant woman with common variable immunodeficiency with adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin that was successfully rescued with a new Ig human intravenous, 10% liquid preparation. The treatment was tailored to the health status and characteristics of the patient. The new product was safe and well tolerated. The mother did not report any infections during pregnancy and the baby had a healthy course with 'protective' serum IgG levels. Our case is a further demonstration that intravenous immunoglobulin tolerability in patients with immunodeficiency could be linked to a product's characteristics. PMID:23257273

  8. Common Space, Common Time, Common Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Melody J.

    2005-01-01

    The most valued means of support and learning cited by new teachers at Poland Regional High School in rural Maine are the collegial interactions that common workspace, common planning time, and common tasks make possible. The school has used these everyday structures to enable new and veteran teachers to converse about curricular and pedagogical…

  9. Physiological and content considerations for a second low frequency channel for bass management, subwoofers, and low frequency enhancement (LFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Robert E. (Robin)

    2005-04-01

    Perception of very low frequencies (VLF) below 125 Hz reproduced by large woofers and subwoofers (SW), encompassing 3 octaves of the 10 regarded as audible, has physiological and content aspects. Large room acoustics and vibrato add VLF fluctuations, modulating audible carrier frequencies to >1 Hz. By convention, sounds below 90 Hz produce no interaural cues useful for spatial perception or localization, therefore bass management redirects the VLF range from main channels to a single (monaural) subwoofer channel, even if to more than one subwoofer. Yet subjects claim they hear a difference between a single subwoofer channel and two (stereo bass). If recordings contain spatial VLF content, is it possible physiologically to perceive interaural time/phase difference (ITD/IPD) between 16 and 125 Hz? To what extent does this perception have a lifelike quality; to what extent is it localization? If a first approximation of localization, would binaural SWs allow a higher crossover frequency (smaller satellite speakers)? Reported research supports the Jeffress model of ITD determination in brain structures, and extending the accepted lower frequency limit of IPD. Meanwhile, uncorrelated very low frequencies exist in all tested multi-channel music and movie content. The audibility, recording, and reproduction of uncorrelated VLF are explored in theory and experiments.

  10. The Role of Macronutrient Content in the Diet for Weight Management.

    PubMed

    Bray, George A; Siri-Tarino, Patty W

    2016-09-01

    Diets to treat obesity have been in existence since Hippocrates treated obesity some 2500 years ago. There are currently a wide variety of diets and a common misconception that a single magical diet can cure overweight and obesity. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that all diets work when adhered to and that initial weight loss can predict the amount of weight lost and maintained for up to 4 years. Individual preferences are thus key in selecting a diet. There are emerging data pinpointing genetic variability in the metabolic responses to variation in macronutrient intake. PMID:27519132

  11. Dynamic Content Manager - A New Conceptual Model for E-Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Terje; Lamo, Yngve; Hinna, Kristin Ran Choi; Hole, Grete Oline

    In this paper a conceptual model for e-learning, which uses elements from learning Objects and Concepts Maps, is introduced. The learning material is divided into atomic units and organized in graphs called Knowledge Map, Learning Map and Student Map. Such a structure provides an easy-to-use navigation interface for existing learning material. Any course content created is stored in a repository for future reference. The model is used to structure a course in geometry for post-graduate teacher students. In teacher education one has to account for the ability to transfer knowledge to students, in addition to the assimilation of knowledge. The established model is therefore discussed in a learning or didactical context.

  12. Which common clinical conditions should medical students be able to manage by graduation? A perspective from Australian interns.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, I E; Pearson, S-A; Sanson-Fisher, R W; Ringland, C; Bayley, S; Hart, A; Kelly, S

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to report the development of a core curriculum that details the clinical conditions medical students should be able to manage upon graduation; and to canvass the opinion of interns (first-year postgraduate doctors) regarding their perceptions of the level of skill required to manage each condition. Literature relating to core curriculum development and training of junior medical officers was reviewed and stakeholders in the education and training of medical students and junior doctors in the state of New South Wales, Australia (intern supervisors, academics, registrars, nurses and interns) were consulted. The final curriculum spanned 106 conditions, 77 'differentiated' and 29 'undifferentiated'. Four levels of skill at which conditions should potentially be managed were also identified: 'Theoretical knowledge only'; 'Recognize symptoms and signs without supervision'; Initiate preliminary investigations, management and/or treatment without supervision'; and 'Total investigation, management and/or treatment without supervision'. The list of conditions in the curriculum was converted to a survey format and a one-in-two random sample of interns (n = 193) practising in New South Wales who graduated from the state's three medical schools were surveyed regarding the level of skill required for managing each clinical condition at graduation. A total of 51.3% of interns responded to the survey. Interns felt they should be able to initiate preliminary investigation, management and/or treatment for most conditions in the curriculum, with more than half acknowledging this level of management for 53 of the differentiated and 28 of the undifferentiated conditions. It is concluded that developing core curricula in medical education can involve multiple stakeholders, including junior doctors as the consumers of educational experiences. The data gathered may be useful to medical schools revising their curricula. PMID:12098452

  13. Does elevating silver content in zinc-based glass polyalkenoate cements increase their antibacterial efficacy against two common bacteria using the agar gel diffusion method?

    PubMed

    Coughlan, A; Breed, S M; Ashraf, C; Cardinale, J A; Hall, M M; Towler, M R

    2013-03-01

    The authors have previously shown that it is possible to incorporate silver into a soda-zinc-silicate glass and subsequently form a glass polyalkenoate cement from it. The objective of the research described herein is to determine if incremental increases in the silver content of these glass polyalkenoate cements will increase their antibacterial efficacy against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria using the accepted spread plate method. Four glass polyalkenoate cements were formulated; three contained increasing amounts of silver incorporated into them (cements A, B, and C, containing 0.33 mol%, 0.66 mol%, and 0.99 mol% silver, respectively) and a fourth contained no silver, which acted as a control (control cement). The handling properties of the glass polyalkenoate cements were evaluated, where working times were around 2 min and setting times ranged from 1 h 17 min to 2 h 41 min. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was employed to determine silver ion release with cement maturation for up to 14 days. The majority of silver ions were released within the first 24 h, with up to 2 mg/L cumulative ion release recorded up to 14 days. The antibacterial properties of the coatings were evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. The silver-glass polyalkenoate cements exhibited antibacterial effect against both bacterial strains. The maximum inhibition zones recorded against S. aureus was 14.8 mm (SD ± 1.11) and against P. aeruginosa was 20.6 mm (SD ± 0.81). Cement B had a greater antibacterial effect compared to cement A, however, cements B and C had comparable antibacterial effects after 14 days even though cement C contained 0.33 mol% more silver than B. This indicates that by increasing the silver content in these cements, the antibacterial efficacy increases to a point, but there is a threshold where further silver ion release does not increase the antibacterial effect

  14. Elucidating the Common Generalist Predators of Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in an Organic Apple Orchard Using Molecular Gut-Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jason M; Szendrei, Zsofia; Grieshop, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), plum curculio, is a serious direct pest of North American tree fruit including, apples, cherries, peaches and plums. Historically, organophosphate insecticides were used for control, but this tool is no longer registered for use in tree fruit. In addition, few organically approved insecticides are available for organic pest control and none have proven efficacy as this time. Therefore, promoting biological control in these systems is the next step, however, little is known about the biological control pathways in this system and how these are influenced by current mechanical and cultural practices required in organic systems. We used molecular gut-content analysis for testing field caught predators for feeding on plum curculio. During the study we monitored populations of plum curculio and the predator community in a production organic apple orchard. Predator populations varied over the season and contained a diverse assemblage of spiders and beetles. A total of 8% of all predators (eight Araneae, two Hemiptera, and six Coleoptera species) assayed for plum curculio predation were observed positive for the presence of plum curculio DNA in their guts, indicating that these species fed on plum curculio prior to collection Results indicate a number of biological control agents exist for this pest and this requires further study in relation to cultural practices. PMID:27348005

  15. Analysis of genetics and chemical contents relation compared to commonly used Cissus quadrangularis L. and barcode markers of some Thailand Cissus species.

    PubMed

    Sudmoon, Runglawan; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Tanee, Tawatchai

    2016-01-01

    Several Cissus species are commonly used as traditional and modified medicines, and their chemical constituents are major point for precise usage. However, C. quadrangularis is the only species for which the usages and the chemical composition have been reported. These data should be investigated for other species in the genus. Eight species namely C. assamica, C. carnosa, C. elongata, C. hastata, C. javana, C. pteroclada, C. quadrangular is and C. repens were evaluated for genetic relationships and chemical composition. Constructed dendrogram shows high-powered efficiency of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) data used which can clearly identify different and identical species. Genetic similarity (S) value of the identical species is 0.86, whereas for different species the value can vary from 0.53 to 0.75. Four highly related species (S=0.64-0.72), C. assamica, C. carnosa, C. hastata and C. repens were selected to undergo chemical study by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the methanol crude extract. Only one compound, β-sitosterol, found in the four species is identical to the compound reported from C. quadrangular is, where there were five identical chemicals found in the selected species. Species-specific barcode with rbcL region was constructed. Nucleotide variation was evaluated indicating genetic distance value of 0.025 to 0.072. PMID:26826840

  16. Older Adults' Coping with Negative Life Events: Common Processes of Managing Health, Interpersonal, and Financial/Work Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Rudolf H.; Brennan, Penny L.; Schutte, Kathleen K.; Moos, Bernice S.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined how older adults cope with negative life events in health, interpersonal, and financial/work domains and whether common stress and coping processes hold across these three domains. On three occasions, older adults identified the most severe negative event they faced in the last year and described how they appraised and coped…

  17. Experimental design to monitor the influence of crop residue management on the dynamics of soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chélin, Marie; Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Parvin, Nargish; Bodson, Bernard; Degré, Aurore; Nguyen, Frédéric; Garré, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Choices related to crop residue management affecting soil structure determine spatio-temporal dynamics of water content and eventually crop yields. In this contribution, we will discuss the experimental design we adopted to study the influence of agricultural management strategies (tillage and residue management) on the soil water dynamics under maize in a Cutanic Siltic Luvisol in Gembloux, Belgium. Three different treatments will be studied: a conventional ploughing realized either in December 2014 or just before sowing in April 2015, and a strip tillage in April 2015. A bare soil under conventional ploughing will also be monitored in order to better understand the influence of the plant over the growing season. In order to limit soil disturbance, we opted for the use of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and we use the bulk electrical conductivity as a proxy for soil moisture content. ERT will be collected every week on a surface of two square meters corresponding to three rows of seven maize plants through surface stainless steel electrodes. Five additional sticks with stainless steel electrodes will be vertically inserted into the soil up to 1.50 m to get more detailed information near to the central maize row. In each of the monitoring plots, two time-domain reflectometry (TDR) probes will be installed for data validation. In order to calibrate the relationship between electrical resistivity and soil water content under highly variable field conditions (changes in soil structure, variable weather conditions, plant growth, fertilization), a trench will be dug, in which a set of four electrodes, one TDR probe and one temperature sensor will be placed at four different depths. In addition, two suction cups will be installed in each of the plots to quantify changes in ion composition and electrical conductivity of the soil solution at two different depths. Within the framework of the multidisciplinary research platform AgricultureIsLife, regular assessment

  18. Recognition and management of common acute conditions of the oral cavity resulting from tooth decay, periodontal disease, and trauma: an update for the family physician.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul C; Kanjirath, Preetha

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of common and/or significant diseases of the oral cavity that the family physician is likely to encounter, with an emphasis on pathogenesis, recognition, complications, and management. Topics reviewed include the sequelae of dental caries, periodontal disease, and trauma. Prevention and early intervention strategies are emphasized. Recent updates and practical issues for the family physician are highlighted. PMID:20453174

  19. Content Management System for Developing a Virtual Platform for Association of Women's Aid with Lack of Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainz de Abajo, Beatriz; Flores García, Alberto; García Salcines, Enrique; Burón Fernández, F. Javier; López Coronado, Miguel; de Castro Lozano, Carlos

    In this paper we show a Virtual Platform for an Association of Women's Aid called Centro Integral de Ayuda a la Mujer (CIAM). After analyzing different Content Management Systems (CMS) and the benefits that its use would contribute to the development of the Virtual Platform, taking into account the needs and requirements set by CIAM, we have opted for the use of Joomla!. This free CMS, for its characteristics, is the most benefits provided us. The virtual platform design has been developed following customer specifications, to have understood the simplicity and easy handling of the resulting platform. This platform will be integrated into the Web portal that has the Amarex Association and it will be able to be administrates from the CIAM without specific knowledge of programming languages. If new services were necessary, they would be easily implemented, adding new modules and components to perform these services.

  20. The effectiveness of the nonsedating antihistamine loratadine plus pseudoephedrine in the symptomatic management of the common cold.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, R B; Connell, J T; Dietz, A J; Greenstein, S M; Tinkelman, D G

    1989-10-01

    A multicentered trial compared the effects of the non-sedating antihistamine, loratadine, 5 mg plus pseudoephedrine 120 mg with a placebo on the signs and symptoms of the common cold. One hundred forty-two (142) subjects were treated with the loratadine/pseudoephedrine combination and 141 subjects were treated with placebo twice daily for five days. Evaluations by both subjects and physicians suggest that this antihistamine/decongestant combination is superior to placebo in relieving symptoms of the common cold. Specific differences were found in symptoms including nasal congestion, sneezing, postnasal drainage, and nasal discharge. Differences between groups for the following side effects were found: dry mouth (9% for the combination vs 2% for placebo), insomnia (6% vs 3%), and nervousness (4% vs 2%). There were no differences between groups for the frequency of drowsiness. PMID:2529799

  1. Influence of management regime and harvest date on the forage quality of rangelands plants: the importance of dry matter content.

    PubMed

    Bumb, Iris; Garnier, Eric; Bastianelli, Denis; Richarte, Jean; Bonnal, Laurent; Kazakou, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their recognized ecological value, relatively little is known about the nutritional value of species-rich rangelands for herbivores. We investigated the sources of variation in dry matter digestibility (DMD), neutral detergent fibre content (NDF) and nitrogen concentration (NC) in plants from species-rich Mediterranean rangelands in southern France, and tested whether the dry matter content (DMC) was a good predictor of the forage quality of different plant parts. Sixteen plant species with contrasting growth forms (rosette, tussock, extensive and stemmed-herb) were studied, representative of two management regimes imposed in these rangelands: (i) fertilization and intensive grazing and (ii) non-fertilization and moderate grazing. Among the 16 plant species, four species were found in both treatments, allowing us to assess the intraspecific variability in forage quality and DMC across the treatments. The components of nutritional value (DMD, NDF and NC) as well as the DMC of leaves, stems and reproductive plant parts, were assessed at the beginning of the growing season and at peak standing biomass. All components of nutritional value and DMC were affected by species growth form: rosettes had higher DMD and NC than tussocks; the reverse being found for NDF and DMC. As the season progressed, DMD and NC of the different plant parts decreased while NDF and DMC increased for all species. DMC was negatively related to DMD and NC and positively to NDF, regardless of the source of variation (species, harvest date, management regime or plant part). Path analysis indicated that NDF was the main determinant of DMD. Better assessment of forage quality in species-rich systems requires consideration of their growth form composition. DMC of all plant parts, which is closely related to NDF, emerged as a good predictor and easily measured trait to estimate DMD in these species-rich systems. PMID:27339049

  2. Influence of management regime and harvest date on the forage quality of rangelands plants: the importance of dry matter content

    PubMed Central

    Bumb, Iris; Garnier, Eric; Bastianelli, Denis; Richarte, Jean; Bonnal, Laurent; Kazakou, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their recognized ecological value, relatively little is known about the nutritional value of species-rich rangelands for herbivores. We investigated the sources of variation in dry matter digestibility (DMD), neutral detergent fibre content (NDF) and nitrogen concentration (NC) in plants from species-rich Mediterranean rangelands in southern France, and tested whether the dry matter content (DMC) was a good predictor of the forage quality of different plant parts. Sixteen plant species with contrasting growth forms (rosette, tussock, extensive and stemmed-herb) were studied, representative of two management regimes imposed in these rangelands: (i) fertilization and intensive grazing and (ii) non-fertilization and moderate grazing. Among the 16 plant species, four species were found in both treatments, allowing us to assess the intraspecific variability in forage quality and DMC across the treatments. The components of nutritional value (DMD, NDF and NC) as well as the DMC of leaves, stems and reproductive plant parts, were assessed at the beginning of the growing season and at peak standing biomass. All components of nutritional value and DMC were affected by species growth form: rosettes had higher DMD and NC than tussocks; the reverse being found for NDF and DMC. As the season progressed, DMD and NC of the different plant parts decreased while NDF and DMC increased for all species. DMC was negatively related to DMD and NC and positively to NDF, regardless of the source of variation (species, harvest date, management regime or plant part). Path analysis indicated that NDF was the main determinant of DMD. Better assessment of forage quality in species-rich systems requires consideration of their growth form composition. DMC of all plant parts, which is closely related to NDF, emerged as a good predictor and easily measured trait to estimate DMD in these species-rich systems. PMID:27339049

  3. Mobile Phone Apps for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Self-Management: A Systematic Assessment of Content and Tools

    PubMed Central

    Con, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Background The rising incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) over the past decade has resulted in increased health care utilization and longer IBD outpatient waiting lists. Self-management is recognized as an important aspect of chronic disease management but its application to IBD has been limited. The age of IBD onset in a majority of patients is in their 20s to 30s. Mobile phone apps are a technology familiar to young adults and represent an opportunity to explore self-management as a new model of health care delivery for IBD. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the content and tools of existing IBD apps to identify functionalities that may facilitate patient self-management. Methods We systematically assessed apps targeted at IBD patients via searches of Google (Android devices) and Apple (iOS devices) app stores with pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Apps were assessed for specific functionalities; presence of professional medical involvement; consistency with international IBD guidelines based on “complete,” “partial,” or “absent” coverage of consensus statements derived from the European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation, American College of Gastroenterology, and the Gastroenterology Society of Australia; comprehensiveness of data that could be entered; and average pricing. Results Of the 238 apps screened, 26 apps were assessed, including 10 available on Android platforms, 8 on iOS platforms, and 8 on both. Over half (14/26, 54%) of the apps had diary functionalities; over a third (10/26, 39%) provided health information about IBD. None of the apps offered decision support to facilitate the self-initiation of medical therapy. Five of 26 (19%) had professional medical involvement in their design. Apps demonstrated “complete” coverage of only 38% of the international consensus statements explored. The average price of the apps was AUD$1.37. Conclusions Apps may provide a useful adjunct to the management of IBD

  4. Newly rare or newly common: evolutionary feedbacks through changes in population density and relative species abundance, and their management implications

    PubMed Central

    Lankau, Richard A; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2011-01-01

    Environmental management typically seeks to increase or maintain the population sizes of desirable species and to decrease population sizes of undesirable pests, pathogens, or invaders. With changes in population size come long-recognized changes in ecological processes that act in a density-dependent fashion. While the ecological effects of density dependence have been well studied, the evolutionary effects of changes in population size, via changes in ecological interactions with community members, are underappreciated. Here, we provide examples of changing selective pressures on, or evolution in, species as a result of changes in either density of conspecifics or changes in the frequency of heterospecific versus conspecific interactions. We also discuss the management implications of such evolutionary responses in species that have experienced rapid increases or decreases in density caused by human actions. PMID:25567977

  5. Meeting the common needs of a more effective and efficient testing and assessment paradigm for chemical risk management.

    PubMed

    Dellarco, Vicki; Henry, Tala; Sayre, Phil; Seed, Jennifer; Bradbury, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Significant advances have been made in human health and ecological risk assessment over the last decade. Substantial challenges, however, remain in providing credible scientific information in a timely and efficient manner to support chemical risk assessment and management decisions. A major challenge confronting risk managers is the need for critical information to address risk uncertainties in large chemical inventories such as high- and medium-production-volume industrial chemicals or pesticide inert ingredients. From a strategic and tactical viewpoint, an integrated approach that relies on all existing knowledge and uses a range of methods, including those from emerging and novel technologies, is needed to advance progressive and focused testing strategies, as well as to advance the utility and predictability of the risk assessment by providing more relevant information. A hypothesis-based approach that draws on all relevant information is consistent with the vision articulated in the 2007 report by the National Research Council, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy. This article describes the current practices in evaluating chemical risks and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality and efficiency of risk assessment and risk management decisions within the Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:20574907

  6. Common Schools for Common Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Eamonn

    1995-01-01

    A vision of common education for citizens of a liberal democracy warrants faith in common schools as an instrument of social good. Some kinds of separate schooling are not inconsistent with common schooling and are even desirable. Equal respect, as defined by J. Rawls, is a basis for common education. (SLD)

  7. Variation in Broccoli Cultivar Phytochemical Content under Organic and Conventional Management Systems: Implications in Breeding for Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Erica N. C.; Lammerts van Bueren, Edith T.; Myers, James R.; Paulo, Maria João; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Zhu, Ning; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic agriculture requires cultivars that can adapt to organic crop management systems without the use of synthetic pesticides as well as genotypes with improved nutritional value. The aim of this study encompassing 16 experiments was to compare 23 broccoli cultivars for the content of phytochemicals associated with health promotion grown under organic and conventional management in spring and fall plantings in two broccoli growing regions in the US (Oregon and Maine). The phytochemicals quantified included: glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassin), tocopherols (δ-, γ-, α-tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene). For glucoraphanin (17.5%) and lutein (13%), genotype was the major source of total variation; for glucobrassicin, region (36%) and the interaction of location and season (27.5%); and for neoglucobrassicin, both genotype (36.8%) and its interactions (34.4%) with season were important. For δ- and γ- tocopherols, season played the largest role in the total variation followed by location and genotype; for total carotenoids, genotype (8.41–13.03%) was the largest source of variation and its interactions with location and season. Overall, phytochemicals were not significantly influenced by management system. We observed that the cultivars with the highest concentrations of glucoraphanin had the lowest for glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin. The genotypes with high concentrations of glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin were the same cultivars and were early maturing F1 hybrids. Cultivars highest in tocopherols and carotenoids were open pollinated or early maturing F1 hybrids. We identified distinct locations and seasons where phytochemical performance was higher for each compound. Correlations among horticulture traits and phytochemicals demonstrated that glucoraphanin was negatively correlated with the carotenoids and the carotenoids were correlated with one another. Little or no association between

  8. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  9. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  10. Strategies to improve palatability and increase consumption intentions for Momordica charantia (bitter melon): A vegetable commonly used for diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although beneficial to health, dietary phytonutrients are bitter, acid and/or astringent in taste and therefore reduce consumer choice and acceptance during food selection. Momordica charantia, commonly known as bitter melon has been traditionally used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat diabetes and its complications. The aim of this study was to develop bitter melon-containing recipes and test their palatability and acceptability in healthy individuals for future clinical studies. Methods A cross-sectional sensory evaluation of bitter melon-containing ethnic recipes was conducted among 50 healthy individuals. The primary endpoints assessed in this analysis were current consumption information and future intentions to consume bitter melon, before and after provision of attribute- and health-specific information. A convenience sample of 50, self-reported non-diabetic adults were recruited from the University of Hawaii. Sensory evaluations were compared using two-way ANOVA, while differences in stage of change (SOC) before and after receiving health information were analyzed by Chi-square (χ2) analyses. Results Our studies indicate that tomato-based recipes were acceptable to most of the participants and readily acceptable, as compared with recipes containing spices such as curry powder. Health information did not have a significant effect on willingness to consume bitter melon, but positively affected the classification of SOC. Conclusions This study suggests that incorporating bitter foods in commonly consumed food dishes can mask bitter taste of bitter melon. Furthermore, providing positive health information can elicit a change in the intent to consume bitter melon-containing dishes despite mixed palatability results. PMID:21794176

  11. Psoriasis beyond the skin: an expert group consensus on the management of psoriatic arthritis and common co-morbidities in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Strohal, R; Kirby, B; Puig, L

    2014-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and co-morbidities of psoriasis represent a significant clinical and economic burden for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Often these co-morbidities may go unrecognized or undertreated. While published data are available on the incidence and impact of some of them, practical guidance for dermatologists on detection and management of these co-morbidities is lacking. Objective To prepare expert recommendations to improve the detection and management of common co-morbidities in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted on some common co-morbidities of psoriasis–cardiovascular (CV) diseases (including obesity, hypertension, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia), psychological co-morbidities (including depression, alcohol abuse and smoking) and PsA–to establish the incidence and impact of each. Data gaps were identified and a Delphi survey was carried out to obtain consensus on the detection and management of each co-morbidity. The expert panel members for the Delphi survey comprised 10 dermatologists with substantial clinical expertise in managing moderate-to-severe psoriasis patients, as well as a cardiologist and a psychologist (see appendix) with an interest in dermatology. Agreement was defined using a Likert scale of 1–7. Consensus regarding agreement for each statement was defined as ≥75% of respondents scoring either 1 (strongly agree) or 2 (agree). Results The expert panel members addressed several topics including screening, intervention, monitoring frequency, and the effects of anti-psoriatic treatment on each co-morbidity. Consensus was achieved on 12 statements out of 22 (3 relating to PsA, 4 relating to psychological factors, 5 relating to CV factors). The panel members felt that dermatologists have an important role in screening their psoriasis patients for PsA and in assessing them for psychological and CV co-morbidities. In most cases, however

  12. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 5. The diagnosis and management of common soft-tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Davison, A J; Rotstein, O D

    1988-09-01

    Soft-tissue bacterial infections range from the superficial, relatively benign form, readily treated by oral administration of antibiotics, to the highly lethal variety which requires extensive surgical débridement, administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and patient monitoring in the intensive care unit. The key to patient survival in the latter group is early diagnosis and treatment. Those at risk of serious infections include diabetic and cirrhotic patients and trauma victims who have been treated either surgically or medically. In addition to awareness of the possibility of serious infection, x-ray films of the soft tissue to show gas, aspiration of fluid collections for Gram's staining and local incision of the tissue to inspect fascia and muscle are all useful aids in diagnosis. This review attempts to classify soft-tissue infections and to recommend an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:3046731

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  14. Use of Commonly Available Technologies for Diabetes Information and Self-Management Among Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: A Web-Based Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaala, Sarah E; Hood, Korey K; Laffel, Lori; Kumah-Crystal, Yaa A; Lybarger, Cindy K

    2015-01-01

    Background For individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D), following a complicated daily medical regimen is critical to maintaining optimal health. Adolescents in particular struggle with regimen adherence. Commonly available technologies (eg, diabetes websites, apps) can provide diabetes-related support, yet little is known about how many adolescents with T1D use them, why they are used, or relationships between use and self-management. Objective This study examined adolescent and parent use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes, including proportions who use each technology, frequency of use, and number of different technologies used for diabetes. Analyses also investigated the reasons adolescents reported for using or not using technologies for diabetes, and factors correlated with adolescents’ technology use. Finally, this study examined relationships between the type and number of technologies adolescents use for diabetes and their self-management and glycemic control. Methods Adolescents (12-17 years) and their parents (N=174 pairs), recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic (n=134) and the Children with Diabetes community website (n=40), participated in this Web-based survey study. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) values were obtained from medical records for pediatric clinic patients. Adolescents reported their use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes (ie, social networking, diabetes websites, mobile diabetes apps, text messaging, and glucometer/insulin pump software), reasons for use, and self-management behavior (Self-Care Inventory-Revised, SCI-R). Results Most adolescents and parents used at least one of the 5 technologies for diabetes. Among adolescents, the most commonly used technology for diabetes was text messaging (53%), and the least commonly used was diabetes websites (25%). Most adolescents who used diabetes apps, text messaging, or pump/glucometer software did so more frequently (≥2 times per week), compared to social

  15. Emergencies in orthodontics. Part 1: Management of general orthodontic problems as well as common problems with fixed appliances.

    PubMed

    Dowsing, Paul; Murray, Alison; Sandler, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Fixed appliance treatment is a popular treatment modality with a burgeoning increase in the numbers of children and adults realizing the benefits that can be gained. Appliance breakage is an unavoidable nuisance which is at best inconvenient, and at worst may result in significant pain or discomfort for the patient. General dental practitioners (GDPs) should have the practical knowledge of how to provide timely and appropriate orthodontic 'emergency treatment'. This will significantly reduce the sometimes considerable inconvenience and discomfort for both the patient and his/her parents, and the inevitable frustration for the clinician providing ongoing care. This first paper will deal with general orthodontic problems that commonly present, as well as some issues specific to fixed appliances. The second paper will deal with the other orthodontic appliances that may be encountered by GDPs in their daily practice. Clinical Relevance: Appropriate handling of an orthodontic 'emergency' by the general practitioner will, on many occasions, provide immediate relief of pain and distress for the patient. This will in turn allow treatment to continue moving in the right direction, thus allowing more efficient and effective use of valuable resources. PMID:26058226

  16. Management of a Common Breast Augmentation Complication: Treatment of the Double-Bubble Deformity With Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Bresnick, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    The double-bubble deformity is one of the most common problems in breast augmentation, with or without mastopexy. Classically, open techniques have been used to treat this deformity, including elevation and reconstruction of the inframammary crease or parenchymal scoring. In this study, the author reports experience with a simple, closed technique of serial fat grafting procedures to treat the double-bubble deformity. Twenty-eight patients with double-bubble deformities were retrospectively evaluated. Fifteen patients had undergone primary augmentation, whereas 13 patients had undergone augmentation mastopexy. Eight patients presented with bilateral double-bubble deformity. Up to 3 sessions of fat grafting were performed on each patient, with a mean of 2.1 sessions required for patients in the series. An average of 27 cm3 of fat was injected with each treatment per breast. Fat was injected with a 1.5-mm blunt cannula into the subdermal and superficial breast tissue layers beneath the old inframammary fold. There were no oil cysts, infections, or donor site problems noted in the series. Twelve patients with limited breast tissue underwent magnetic resonance imaging examination at the conclusion of the fat grafting sessions, and no implant injury or disruption was noted. All patients were pleased with the results of treatment, and no revisional surgery was required. This study suggests that fat grafting is an effective treatment of the breast double-bubble deformity. The procedure allows the correction of a challenging deformity with a simple, closed technique which is safe and cost-effective. PMID:26101976

  17. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  18. Evidence-Based Classroom and Behaviour Management Content in Australian Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Coursework: Wherefore Art Thou?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Sue C.; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Beginning teachers often report feeling less than adequately prepared by their teacher education programs in the area of classroom and behaviour management (CBM). This article reports the prevalence of evidence-based practices in the coursework content on offer in Australian undergraduate primary teacher education programs. First a set of CBM…

  19. Student Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  20. Surveying the Commons: Current Implementation of Information Commons Web sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeder, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the content of 72 academic library Information Commons (IC) Web sites using content analysis, quantitative assessment and qualitative surveys of site administrators to analyze current implementation by the academic library community. Results show that IC Web sites vary widely in content, design and functionality, with few…

  1. Do You Hear What I See? Assessing Accessibility of Digital Commons and CONTENTdm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Wendy; Keenan, Teressa

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the accessibility of two content management systems, Berkeley Electronic Press's Digital Commons and OCLC's CONTENTdm, widely used in libraries to host institutional repository and digital collections content. Based on observations by a visually impaired student who used the JAWS screen reader to view the design and display…

  2. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the most common reason that children miss school and parents miss work. Parents often get colds ... other children. A cold can spread quickly through schools or daycares. Colds can occur at any time ...

  3. Mathematics: Common Curriculum Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document defines what are considered to be the essentials in a strong mathematics program for the state of Oregon for grades K-12. The common curriculum goals are organized into nine content strands: (1) number and numeration; (2) appropriate computational skills; (3) problem solving; (4) geometry and visualization skills; (5) measurement;…

  4. Management of Type 9 Hepatic Arterial Anatomy at the time of Pancreaticoduodenectomy: Considerations for Preservation and Reconstruction of a Completely Replaced Common Hepatic Artery.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Burkhart, Richard A; Weiss, Matthew J; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Cameron, Andrew M; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-07-01

    Recognition and management of aberrant hepatic arterial anatomy for patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are critical to ensure safe completion of the operation. When the common hepatic artery (CHA) is noted to emanate from the superior mesenteric artery (Michels' type 9 variant), it is vulnerable to injury during the dissection required for PD. While this anatomy does not preclude an operation, care must be taken to avoid injury, often by identifying the CHA throughout its entire course before beginning the dissection of the portal venous structures. The oncologic principle that cautions against resection of a pancreatic cancer when it involves the CHA in its standard position may not universally apply to tumors that focally involve the CHA in the type 9 anatomic variant. In highly selected patients, surgical resection may be entertained as disease biology may be analogous to local involvement of the gastroduodenal artery in a patient with standard anatomy. Here, we review the indications, techniques, and outcomes associated with arterial resection and reconstruction during pancreatectomy among patients with a pancreatic tumor involving a common hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:27138326

  5. Making the Common Good Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth ...

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  10. Muscle Cramp - A Common Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Muscle Cramp – A Common Pain Page Content Has a ... body’s natural tendency toward self-healing. Causes of Muscle Cramps Unfortunately, cramps can occur anywhere, anytime to ...

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  15. Using invasion process theory to enhance the understanding and management of introduced species: a case study reconstructing the invasion sequence of the common myna (Acridotheres tristis).

    PubMed

    Grarock, Kate; Lindenmayer, David B; Wood, Jeff T; Tidemann, Chris R

    2013-11-15

    Research indicates that invasion is a multi-step process, where each stage is contingent on the stage that precedes it. Numerous hypotheses addressing the factors that influence each stage of the invasion process have been formulated, but how well does this theory match what occurs in the natural world? We created a general conceptual model for the invasion process based on invasion theory. Using a composite 41-year data set, we then reconstructed the invasion sequence of the common myna (Acridotheres tristis) to investigate the similarities between invasion theory and this observed invasion. We observed a lag period before population growth of 2.7 (±0.3) years, a maximum rate of population growth of 24.1 (±6.4) birds per km(2) per year, a lag period before spreading of six years and an average spreading rate of 0.4 km per year. The length and duration of these stages correspond closely with what invasion process theory would anticipate. We suggest that a conceptual model, coupled with basic species, environment and event information, could be a useful tool to enhance the understanding and management of invasions. PMID:23995141

  16. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation may preserve sphincter of Oddi function after common bile duct stone management: evaluation from the viewpoint of endoscopic manometry

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Kodama, T; Takaaki, J; Tatsumi, Y; Maeda, T; Fujita, S; Fukui, Y; Ogasawara, H; Mitsufuji, S

    1997-01-01

    Background—Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) has been reported as a safe and effective alternative to endoscopic sphincterotomy in the management of common bile duct (CBD) stones; its effect on papillary function has yet to be elucidated. 
Aim—To investigate sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility before and after EPBD to determine its effect on SO function. 
Patients and methods—The papillary function of 10 patients with CBD stones was studied using endoscopic manometry before and one week after EPBD. The manometric studies were repeated one month after EPBD in seven patients. 
Results—One week after EPBD, CBD pressure, SO peak pressure, SO basal pressure, and SO frequency decreased significantly. One month after EPBD, however, all parameters increased although the increases in SO basal pressure and CBD pressure were not significant. There was no significant difference in values of any parameter before and one month after EPBD. No serious complications occurred. 
Conclusion—These data suggest at least partial recovery of papillary function one month after the procedure. EPBD seems to preserve papillary function in treatment of CBD stones; a longer term follow up study with SO manometry should be performed to clarify the effect of EPBD on SO function. 

 Keywords: endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation; sphincter of Oddi PMID:9391256

  17. How Views about the Nature of Management Can Affect the Content of Management Education Programmes: The Advance of the Political Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bob; Piper, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Although management has always been viewed as a subject from different perspectives, it is argued in this article that the developing emphasis in management theory on the political nature of organizational processes is radically different from earlier approaches. (Author/CT)

  18. Utilization of Common Automotive Three-Way NO{sub x} Reduction Catalyst for Managing Off- Gas from Thermal Treatment of High-Nitrate Waste - 13094

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Adam L.; Ki Song, P.E.

    2013-07-01

    Studsvik's Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR) steam reforming process has been tested and proven to effectively treat radioactive and hazardous wastes streams with high nitrate contents to produce dry, stable mineral products, while providing high conversion (>98%) of nitrates and nitrites directly to nitrogen gas. However, increased NO{sub x} reduction may be desired for some waste streams under certain regulatory frameworks. In order to enhance the NO{sub x} reduction performance of the THOR process, a common Three-Way catalytic NO{sub x} reduction unit was installed in the process gas piping of a recently completed Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD). The catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit was located downstream of the main THOR process vessel, and it was designed to catalyze the reduction of residual NO{sub x} to nitrogen gas via the oxidation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds that are inherent to the THOR process gas. There was no need for auxiliary injection of a reducing gas, such as ammonia. The unit consisted of four monolith type catalyst sections positioned in series with a gas mixing section located between each catalyst section. The process gas was monitored for NO{sub x} concentration upstream and downstream of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. Conversion efficiencies ranged from 91% to 97% across the catalytic unit, depending on the composition of the inlet gas. Higher concentrations of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the THOR process gas increased the NO{sub x} reduction capability of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. The NO{sub x} destruction performance of THOR process in combination with the Three-Way catalytic unit resulted in overall system NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of greater than 99.9% with an average NO{sub x} reduction efficiency of 99.94% for the entire demonstration program. This allowed the NO{sub x} concentration in the ESTD exhaust gas to be maintained at less than 40 parts per million (ppm), dry

  19. Effects of Forest Management Intensity on Carbon and Nitrogen Content in Different Soil Size Fractions of a North Florida Spodosol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pine plantations of the southeastern US are regional carbon sinks. In spite of huge increases in woody biomass, studies have shown little or even negative effects on the carbon content of the extremely sandy soils of this region. Hence, it is important to understand the mechanisms that determine the...

  20. Constructing the Commons: Practical Projects To Build the Information Commons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Daniel R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several projects aimed at building the Information Commons, including: Knowledge Conservancy plans to create a database of all freely available digitized content; the Universal Library, a project with the long-term goal of providing free, online access to all books; and several projects of the Creative Commons intended to build a robust…

  1. Antioxidant and phytochemical properties of Carpobrotus edulis (L.) bolus leaf used for the management of common infections in HIV/AIDS patients in Eastern Cape Province

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpobrotus edulis (Mesembryanthemaceae), also known as igcukuma in Xhosa language is a medicinal plant used by the traditional healers to treat common infections in HIV/AIDS patients. Based on this information, we researched on the plant phytoconstituents, as well as its inhibitory effect using aqueous and three different organic solvent extracts in order to justify its therapeutic usage. Methods Antioxidant activity of the extracts were investigated spectrophotometrically against 1,1- diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) diammonium salt, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric reducing power, Total phenols, flavonoids, flavonols, proanthocyanidins, tannins, alkaloids and saponins were also determined using the standard methods. Results Quantitative phytochemical analysis of the four solvent extracts revealed a high percentage of phenolics (55.7 ± 0.404%) in the acetone extract, with appreciable amount of proanthocyanidins (86.9 ± 0.005%) and alkaloids (4.5 ± 0.057%) in the aqueous extract, while tannin (48.9 ± 0.28%) and saponin (4.5 ± 0.262%) were major constituents of the ethanol extract. Flavonoids (0.12 ± 0.05%) and flavonols (0.12 ± 0.05%) were found at higher level in the hexane extract in comparison with the other extracts. The leaf extracts demonstrated strong hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity, with the exception of water and ethanol extracts. IC50 values of the aqueous and ethanolic extract against DPPH, ABTS, and NO were 0.018 and 0.016; 0.020 and 0.022; 0.05 and 0.023 mg/ml, respectively. The reducing power of the extract was found to be concentration dependent. Conclusion The inhibitory effect of the extracts on free radicals may justify the traditional use of this plant in the management of common diseases in HIV/AIDs patients in Eastern Cape Province. Overall, both aqueous and ethanol were found to be the best solvents for

  2. 25 CFR 900.37 - What provisions of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circulars or the “common rule” apply to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) circulars or the âcommon ruleâ apply to self-determination contracts? 900.37 Section 900.37 Indians BUREAU... and Budget (OMB) circulars or the “common rule” apply to self-determination contracts? The only provisions of OMB Circulars and the only provisions of the “common rule” that apply to...

  3. 25 CFR 900.37 - What provisions of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circulars or the “common rule” apply to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) circulars or the âcommon ruleâ apply to self-determination contracts? 900.37 Section 900.37 Indians BUREAU... and Budget (OMB) circulars or the “common rule” apply to self-determination contracts? The only provisions of OMB Circulars and the only provisions of the “common rule” that apply to...

  4. Analyzing Commonality In A System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacheco, Alfred; Pool, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Cost decreased by use of fewer types of parts. System Commonality Analysis Tool (SCAT) computer program designed to aid managers and engineers in identifying common, potentially common, and unique components of system. Incorporates three major functions: program for creation and maintenance of data base, analysis of commonality, and such system utilities as host-operating-system commands and loading and unloading of data base. Produces reports tabulating maintenance, initial configurations, and expected total costs. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  5. Life-history traits of the common snook Centropomus undecimalis in a Caribbean estuary and large-scale biogeographic patterns relevant to management.

    PubMed

    Andrade, H; Santos, J; Taylor, R

    2013-06-01

    The ecology of common snook Centropomus undecimalis in Amatique Bay, a tropical estuary in eastern Guatemala, was investigated and life-history traits were used to conduct a meta-analysis of the species from Florida to Brazil. The reproduction cycle of C. undecimalis in Amatique was strongly related to the precipitation cycle, with a lag of 2 months. Spawning occurred from April to November with a peak spawning after the onset of the summer rains. Protandric sex reversal occurred early in the dry season (December) before somatic recovery from spawning. The growth cycle preceded that of body condition by c. 1 month, and was out of phase with the reproductive cycle. Growth was fast, as many individuals reached >70% of the maximum observed total length (LT , 102 cm) after 3 years. Sex transition occurred within a relatively narrow LT range (70-79 cm), but over a wide range of ages, indicating plasticity in this respect. The meta-analysis indicated a latitudinal-temperature gradient in life-history traits, as well as different seasonal patterns relative to temperature and hydrographical cycles. Centropomus undecimalis from cooler winter waters (e.g. Florida) reach larger maximum LT and LT at sex change, as well as greater gonado-somatic indices and longer life spans. Further, increased fishing mortality results in younger age at sex reversal and male predominance in the populations compared. Recognition of large-scale biogeographic patterns in this important, but little studied, fish species helps in the formulation of management advice in other areas of its occurrence. PMID:23731146

  6. Standardizing Legal Content with OWL and RDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondros, Constantine

    Wolters Kluwer is one of the largest legal publishers in the world. Its various publishing units use a multitude of different formats to mark up what is effectively similar content. We describe a common content architecture based on OWL, RDF and XHTML that is used to build a standard representation of legal content, allowing publishable assets to be integrated across the enterprise. This architecture is governed by an OWL ontology that models the (occasionally complex) behaviour of legal documents and acts as a domain model of common legal metadata. How do OWL and RDF scale up to real-world publishing? We describe practical issues in producing and validating RDF on an industrial scale; in performance management; in handling fragmented ontologies; and the challenge of using RDF in a performant XSLT pipeline.

  7. CoSN K12 Open Technologies Implementation Study #3. Moodle: An Open Learning Content Management System for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for School Networking (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report introduces educators to Moodle, an open-source software program for managing courses online. It briefly defines what Moodle is, what it can do, and gives specific examples of how it is being implemented. An appendix contains brief profiles of five school organizations that are using Moodle.

  8. Preservice Teachers' Classroom Management Training: A Survey of Self-Reported Training Experiences, Content Coverage, and Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christofferson, Michael; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Many teachers report that their preservice training in classroom management was inadequate or ineffective, but little is known about the types of training they receive. In this exploratory study, 157 preservice teachers from throughout the United States were surveyed about the training sources through which they obtained knowledge and skills in…

  9. Higher Education Curriculum for Sustainability: Course Contents Analyses of Purchasing and Supply Management Programme of Polytechnics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etse, Daniel; Ingley, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the degree of attention to and the nature of sustainability issues in the curriculum of the Higher National Diploma (HND) Purchasing and Supply Management programme of Ghana. Design/Methodology/Approach: Documentary research is the approach used to analyse the curriculum document for the programme…

  10. Developing an interactive mobile phone self-report system for self-management of hypertension. Part 2: Content validity and usability

    PubMed Central

    Kjellgren, Karin; Höfer, Stefan; Taft, Charles; Ring, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Self-management support tools using technology may improve adherence to hypertension treatment. There is a need for user-friendly tools facilitating patients’ understanding of the interconnections between blood pressure, wellbeing and lifestyle. This study aimed to examine comprehension, comprehensiveness and relevance of items, and further to evaluate the usability and reliability of an interactive hypertension-specific mobile phone self-report system. Areas important in supporting self-management and candidate items were derived from five focus group interviews with patients and healthcare professionals (n = 27), supplemented by a literature review. Items and response formats were drafted to meet specifications for mobile phone administration and were integrated into a mobile phone data-capture system. Content validity and usability were assessed iteratively in four rounds of cognitive interviews with patients (n = 21) and healthcare professionals (n = 4). Reliability was examined using a test–retest. Focus group analyses yielded six areas covered by 16 items. The cognitive interviews showed satisfactory item comprehension, relevance and coverage; however, one item was added. The mobile phone self-report system was reliable and perceived easy to use. The mobile phone self-report system appears efficiently to capture information relevant in patients’ self-management of hypertension. Future studies need to evaluate the effectiveness of this tool in improving self-management of hypertension in clinical practice. PMID:24786778

  11. Comparing the content of leadership theories and managers' shared perceptions of effective leadership: a Q-method study of trainee managers in the English NHS.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Tim

    2013-08-01

    Health service managers face potential conflicts between corporate and professional agendas, a tension sharpened for trainees by their junior status and relative inexperience. While academic leadership theory forms an integral part of contemporary management development programmes, relatively little is known of trainees' patterned subjectivities in relation to leadership theories. The objective of this study was to explore such subjectivities within a cohort of trainees on the National Health Service Graduate Management Training Scheme (NHS GMTS), a 'fast-track' programme which prepares graduate entrants for director-level health service management posts. A Q-method design was used and four shared subjectivities were identified: leadership as collaborative social process ('relational'); leadership as integrity ('moral'); leadership as effective support of subordinates ('team'); and leadership as construction of a credible leadership persona ('identity'). While the factors broadly map onto competencies indicated within the NHS Leadership Qualities Framework which underpin assessments of performance for this student group, it is important not to overstate the governance effect of the assessment regime. Rather, factors reflect tensions between required competencies, namely the mobilisation of diverse interest groups, the ethical base of decisions and the identity work required to convince others of leadership status. Indeed, factor 2 ('moral') effectively defines leadership as the embodiment of public service ethos. PMID:25595001

  12. Common Anorectal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.; Umar, Sarah B.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal disorders result in many visits to healthcare specialists. These disorders include benign conditions such as hemorrhoids to more serious conditions such as malignancy; thus, it is important for the clinician to be familiar with these disorders as well as know how to conduct an appropriate history and physical examination. This article reviews the most common anorectal disorders, including hemorrhoids, anal fissures, fecal incontinence, proctalgia fugax, excessive perineal descent, and pruritus ani, and provides guidelines on comprehensive evaluation and management. PMID:24987313

  13. Teaching Economics to Undergraduates in Europe: Volume, Structure, and Contents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Manfred

    2001-01-01

    Examines how much time is spent in economics and management sciences programs; how much time is allocated among different courses within programs; what common thematic denominators exist; and whether and in what way content in microeconomics and macroeconomics courses differs. (RLH)

  14. Spectral broadening in low OH content and dispersion-managed tellurite fibres for compact mid IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutynski, C.; Picot-Clémente, J.; Amrani, F.; Mouawad, O.; Désévédavy, F.; Gadret, G.; Jules, J. C.; Kibler, B.; Deng, D.; Cheng, T.; Ohishi, Y.; Smektala, F.

    2015-05-01

    We report the manufacturing and characterization of Tellurite micro structured fibres (MOFs) with low OH content. The different purification processes used during the fabrication of the TeO2 - ZnO - Na2O glass allowed us to reduce the hydroxyl compounds concentration down to 1ppm mass. A suspended core MOF was drawn from this material and then pumped by nanojoule-level femtosecond pulses at 1.7μm, its zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW), and well above it at 2.5μm. We show the related supercontinuum (SC) generated in the two distinct dispersion regimes of the waveguide. Moreover, the SC spanning was extended in both visible and mid-IR regions (between 600nm up to 3300nm) by the taperisation of the previously tested MOFs.

  15. Content Independence in Multimedia Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Arjen P.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the role of data management in multimedia digital libraries, and its implications for the design of database management systems. Introduces the notions of content abstraction and content independence. Proposes a blueprint of a new class of database technology, which supports the basic functionality for the management of both content…

  16. Working for the Common Good: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Management. AAHE's Series on Service-Learning in the Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul C., Ed.; Grasso, Edward T., Ed.

    The articles in this volume, 15th in a series of monographs on service learning and the academic disciplines, show how student learning can be enhanced by joining management theory with experience and management analysis with action. Service learning prepares business students to see new dimensions of relevance in their coursework, and it provides…

  17. Guidelines on the scope, content, and use of comprehensive risk assessment in the management of high-level nuclear waste transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, D.; White, A.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the scope of risk assessment strategies in the management of the transport of high-level radioactive wastes. In spite of the shortcomings of probabilistic risk assessment(PRA), the Transportation Needs Assessment recommended this as the preferred methodology to assess the risks of high level nuclear waste (HLNW) transportation. A PRA also will need to heed the lessons learned from the development and application of PRA elsewhere, such as in the nuclear power industry. A set of guidelines will aid this endeavor by outlining the appropriate scope, content, and use of a risk assessment which is more responsive to the uncertainties, human-technical interactions, social forces, and iterative relationship with risk management strategies, than traditional PRAS. This more expansive definition, which encompasses but is not totally reliant on rigorous data requirements and quantitative probability estimates, we term Comprehensive Risk Assessment (CRA) Guidelines will be developed in three areas: the limitations of existing methodologies and suggested modifications; CRA as part of a flexible, effective, adaptive risk management system for HLNW transportation; and, the use of CRA in risk communication.

  18. Herbs and other dietary supplements: current regulations and recommendations for use to maintain health in the management of the common cold or other related infectious respiratory illnesses.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Angelo; Bellanger, Renee

    2010-04-01

    Herbal preparations are sold as dietary supplements in the United States and are subject to the rules and regulations of various health care and economic government agencies that monitor the sale of these products. One approach to assessing the usefulness of these substances is to focus on one particular disease state and then review both the primary literature and expert opinion. The common cold is an important illness due to its recurring nature, the number of people it afflicts, and its economic impact on patients. Dietary supplements have been shown to decrease the duration, the severity, and the frequency of symptoms of the common cold. The most commonly available supplements are zinc, ginseng, echinacea, and vitamin C. Data from expert opinion suggested that certain supplements are more beneficial than others to maintain one's health during episodes of the common cold. Expert opinion regarding the use of dietary supplements in other related infectious respiratory illnesses, such as the flu, when aggregated with expert opinion findings regarding the common cold were not contradictory. The primary literature provided insights into specific dosages and compounds that may be used in practice. PMID:21507804

  19. Commonly missed orthopedic problems.

    PubMed

    Ballas, M T; Tytko, J; Mannarino, F

    1998-01-15

    When not diagnosed early and managed appropriately, common musculoskeletal injuries may result in long-term disabling conditions. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are some of the most common knee ligament injuries. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis may present with little or no hip pain, and subtle or absent physical and radiographic findings. Femoral neck stress fractures, if left untreated, may result in avascular necrosis, refractures and pseudoarthrosis. A delay in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures may cause early wrist arthrosis if nonunion results. Ulnar collateral ligament tears are a frequently overlooked injury in skiers. The diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture is missed as often as 25 percent of the time. Posterior tibial tendon tears may result in fixed bony planus if diagnosis is delayed, necessitating hindfoot fusion rather than simple soft tissue repair. Family physicians should be familiar with the initial assessment of these conditions and, when appropriate, refer patients promptly to an orthopedic surgeon. PMID:9456991

  20. Management of carotid Dacron patch infection: a case report using median sternotomy for proximal common carotid artery control and in situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 58-year-old male who presented with an enlarging cervical hematoma 3 months following carotid endarterectomy with Dacron patch repair, due to septic disruption of the Dacron patch secondary to presumed infection. The essential features of this case are the control of the proximal common carotid artery gained through a median sternotomy, because the patient was markedly obese with minimal thyromental distance, and the treatment consisting of in situ polytetrafluoroethylene bypass grafting, due to the absence of a suitable autogenous saphenous vein. Median sternotomy is rarely required in case of reintervention for septic false aneurysms and hematomas following carotid endarterectomy but should be considered whenever difficult control of the common carotid artery, when entering the previous cervicotomy, is anticipated. In situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting can be considered if autogenous vein material is lacking. PMID:19875014

  1. An investigation into the fatty acid content of selected fish-based commercial infant foods in the UK and the impact of commonly practiced re-heating treatments used by parents for the preparation of infant formula milks.

    PubMed

    Loughrill, Emma; Zand, Nazanin

    2016-04-15

    The importance of dietary lipids during infancy is paramount for rapid growth and development. Linoleic acid (LA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) were quantified using RP-HPLC with charged aerosol detection in a range of complementary infant foods and formula milk. Total daily intake of fatty acids for infants aged 6-9 months was calculated based on the consumption of complementary infant foods and formula milk. Total daily intakes of ALA, AA and DHA were below, whereas LA was above the recommended intake. This provides scope for product optimisation, to improve the nutritive value of commercial infant food products. The impact of re-heating treatments by parents on fatty acid content of formula milk was investigated and statistically significant changes were observed. Furthermore, the transparency of the labelling information declared by the manufacturers was within recommendations despite a degree of significant variation. PMID:26617017

  2. A model for common ground development to support collaborative health communities.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig E; O'Sullivan, Tracey L

    2015-03-01

    Common ground is necessary for developing collaboration as part of building resilience for public health preparedness. While the importance of common ground as an essential component of collaboration has been well described, there is a need for studies to identify how common ground develops over time, across individual and group dimensions, and the contexts that influence its development. This paper studied common ground development in three Canadian communities between October 2010 and March 2011 through a project on capacity building for disaster management. Disaster management requires the integration of paid and volunteer participants across public and private sectors and is therefore a good domain to study common ground development. We used directed qualitative content analysis to develop a model of common ground development over time that describes its progression through coordinative, cooperative and collaborative common ground. We also identified how common ground develops at micro (individual) and macro (group) levels, as well as how agency, technology and geographical contexts influence its development. We then use the four phases of disaster management to illustrate how our model can support longitudinal common ground development. Our findings provide useful insight to enable proactive development of common ground in collaborative health communities. PMID:25621403

  3. Policosanol contents and compositions of wheat varieties.

    PubMed

    Irmak, Sibel; Dunford, Nurhan Turgut

    2005-07-13

    Policosanol (PC) is the common name for a mixture of high molecular weight (20-36 carbon) aliphatic primary alcohols, which are constituents of plant epicuticular waxes. Wheat germ oil has been reported to improve human physical fitness, and this effect is attributed to its high PC, specifically its high octacosanol (OC) content. Although the PC composition of wheat leaves has been studied extensively, information on PC content and composition of wheat grain fractions is scarce. The objective of this study was to examine the PC contents and compositions of wheat grain fractions of 31 varieties grown in Oklahoma. PC compositions of the samples were identified using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer. The PC content of wheat bran was higher than that of the germ, shorts, and flour. The Trego and Intrada varieties had the highest PC content among the 31 wheat varieties studied. Tetracosanol (C24), hexacosanol (C26), and OC (C28) were the major PC components in all varieties. This study showed that wheat varieties grown under identical growing conditions and management differ significantly in PC content and composition. PMID:15998118

  4. No Common Opinion on the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the three authors of this article, the 2014 "EdNext" poll yields four especially important new findings: (1) Opinion with respect to the Common Core has yet to coalesce. The idea of a common set of standards across the country has wide appeal, and the Common Core itself still commands the support of a majority of the public.…

  5. A qualitative content analysis of global health engagements in Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute's stability operations lessons learned and information management system.

    PubMed

    Nang, Roberto N; Monahan, Felicia; Diehl, Glendon B; French, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Many institutions collect reports in databases to make important lessons-learned available to their members. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences collaborated with the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute to conduct a descriptive and qualitative analysis of global health engagements (GHEs) contained in the Stability Operations Lessons Learned and Information Management System (SOLLIMS). This study used a summative qualitative content analysis approach involving six steps: (1) a comprehensive search; (2) two-stage reading and screening process to identify first-hand, health-related records; (3) qualitative and quantitative data analysis using MAXQDA, a software program; (4) a word cloud to illustrate word frequencies and interrelationships; (5) coding of individual themes and validation of the coding scheme; and (6) identification of relationships in the data and overarching lessons-learned. The individual codes with the most number of text segments coded included: planning, personnel, interorganizational coordination, communication/information sharing, and resources/supplies. When compared to the Department of Defense's (DoD's) evolving GHE principles and capabilities, the SOLLIMS coding scheme appeared to align well with the list of GHE capabilities developed by the Department of Defense Global Health Working Group. The results of this study will inform practitioners of global health and encourage additional qualitative analysis of other lessons-learned databases. PMID:25826346

  6. CPL: Common Pipeline Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESO CPL Development Team

    2014-02-01

    The Common Pipeline Library (CPL) is a set of ISO-C libraries that provide a comprehensive, efficient and robust software toolkit to create automated astronomical data reduction pipelines. Though initially developed as a standardized way to build VLT instrument pipelines, the CPL may be more generally applied to any similar application. The code also provides a variety of general purpose image- and signal-processing functions, making it an excellent framework for the creation of more generic data handling packages. The CPL handles low-level data types (images, tables, matrices, strings, property lists, etc.) and medium-level data access methods (a simple data abstraction layer for FITS files). It also provides table organization and manipulation, keyword/value handling and management, and support for dynamic loading of recipe modules using programs such as EsoRex (ascl:1504.003).

  7. Removal of common organic solvents from aqueous waste streams via supercritical C02 extraction: a potential green approach to sustainable waste management in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Leazer, Johnnie L; Gant, Sean; Houck, Anthony; Leonard, William; Welch, Christopher J

    2009-03-15

    Supercritical CO2 extraction of aqueous streams is a convenient and effective method to remove commonly used solvents of varying polarities from aqueous waste streams. The resulting aqueous layers can potentially be sewered; whereas the organic layer can be recovered for potential reuse. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a technology that is increasingly being used in commercial processes (1). Supercritical fluids are well suited for extraction of a variety of media, including solids, natural products, and liquid products. Many supercritical fluids have low critical temperatures, allowing for extractions to be done at modestly low temperatures, thus avoiding any potential thermal decomposition of the solutes under study (2). Furthermore, the CO2 solvent strength is easily tuned by adjusting the density of the supercritical fluid (The density is proportional to the pressure of the extraction process). Since many supercritical fluids are gases at ambient temperature, the extract can be concentrated by simply venting the reaction mixture to a cyclone collection vessel, using appropriate safety protocols. PMID:19368207

  8. Content Area Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Students' vocabulary knowledge is a significant predictor of their overall comprehension. The Common Core State Standards are raising the expectations for word learning and there are now 4 distinct standards related to vocabulary as well as expectations in other standards, including content areas. To address these expectations, teachers need…

  9. Intraocular pressure-lowering effects of commonly used fixed combination drugs with timolol in the management of primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Murat Atabey; Acar, Mutlu; Yildirim, Cem

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect and ocular tolerability of brimonidine/timolol, dorzolamide/timolol and latanoprost/timolol fixed combination therapies in the management of primary open angle glaucoma. METHODS Each drug was administered for two months, after which a circadian tonometric curve was recorded using a Goldmann applanation tonometer. Ocular discomfort (conjunctival hyperemia, burning or stinging, foreign body sensation, itching, ocular pain) of each eye was assessed by the subject on a standardized ocular discomfort scale. RESULTS Among the three study groups, there were no significant differences in the mean baseline IOP measurements, mean 2nd mo IOP measurements, and mean (%) change of IOPs from baseline. Among the three study groups, there were no significant differences in the mean IOP measurements obtained at circadian tonometric curves at baseline and at two months controls. In sum brimonidine/timolol, dorzolamide/timolol and latanoprost/timolol fixed combination therapies showed similar effects on IOP levels. CONCLUSION Brimonidine/timolol, dorzolamide/timolol and latanoprost/timolol fixed combination therapies showed similar lowering efficaties on IOP levels whereas there was no any difference between each other. PMID:25349802

  10. Assessment of a design to monitor the influence of crop residue management on the dynamics of soil water content with ERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelin, Marie; Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Hermans, Thomas; Binley, Andrew; Garre, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Choices related to crop residue management affect the soil structure. As a consequence, they may determine the spatio-temporal dynamics of water content and eventually the crop yields. In order to better understand the influence of these strategies on hydraulic processes occurring at the plot scale, we opted for the use electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). This approach presents the advantage to limit soil disturbance but is still faced to important challenges when applied in an agricultural field context. Especially changing soil-electrode contact has to be considered, as it can lead to bad quality data, especially for setups with small electrodes and small inter-electrode distance. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency of a high-resolution 3-D field measurement design to properly assess the dynamics of soil water content. ERT measurements were conducted in a Cutanic Siltic Luvisol in Gembloux, Belgium, on two plots of 2m2 ploughed in Oct 2014 at a depth of 25 cm and sown with maize in April 2015. The plants were removed on one of the plots in order to obtain a bare soil reference. A grid of 98 surface stainless steel electrodes was layed-out on each plot and four sticks supporting each eight stainless steel electrodes were vertically inserted into the soil up to 1.20 m to get more detailed information in depth. The experiments were performed between Jul and Oct 2015, in order to get measurements both in dry and wet periods. For surface and borehole monitoring, a dipole-dipole array configuration including in-line and cross-line measurements was adopted. Normal and reciprocal measurements were performed systematically to assess the data quality: only the datasets with a mean reciprocal error lower than 3% were considered for the data inversion. This contribution will show the first inverted results showing the complexity of experimental design and data analysis for high-resolution, timelapse ERT in field conditions. Based on these results, we

  11. Single-Center Experience and 1-Year Follow-up Results of 'Sandwich Technique' in the Management of Common Iliac Artery Aneurysms During EVAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Leonini, Sara; Tommasino, Giulio; Muzzi, Luigi; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Neri, Eugenio

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) accompanied by common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms requires a more demanding procedure owing to the difficulties in obtaining an adequate distal landing zone for the stent-graft limb(s), a potential site of endoleak. The 'sandwich technique' is a procedure to increase EVAR feasibility in the setting of adverse or challenging CIA anatomy. Its main advantages include no restrictions in terms of CIA diameter or length or internal iliac artery (IIA) diameter, no need to wait for a specific stent-graft. Our purpose is to describe our single-center experience and one year follow-up results of this new procedure. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to June 2010, the sandwich technique was performed in our institution in 7 patients treated for AAA and unilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 5) or bilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 2). Inclusion criteria were the presence of unilateral or bilateral CIA aneurysm (independently from its diameter), IIA artery measuring up to 9 mm in its maximum diameter, not dilatation of IIA and EIA. Results: The mean follow-up length was 15 months (range: 14-20 months). All stent-implanted iliac branches remained patent on 1 year follow-up and IIA flow was preserved. None of the patients had symptoms of pelvic ischemia. CT scan follow-up showed aneurysm shrinkage in five patients, without any sign of endoleaks in all cases. Conclusions: In selected cases, the 'sandwich technique' showed good outcomes confirming to be a safe and easy to perform way to overcome anatomical constraints and expanding the limits of EVAR.

  12. Common problems in gastrointestinal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers approximately 70 common diagnostic problems in gastro-intestinal radiology. Each problem, includes a short illustrated case history, a discussion of the radiologic findings, a general discussion of the case, the differential diagnosis, a description of the management of the problem or procedure used, and, where appropriate, the results of the therapy suggested.

  13. What Are Some Common Signs of Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications What are some common signs of pregnancy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The primary sign of pregnancy is missing a menstrual period or ...

  14. Shaping Digital Library Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rush G.

    2002-01-01

    Explores issues related to the selection and purchase of digital content in academic libraries, including commercially-produced databases, electronic journals, and books and other electronic resources that are purchased from vendors; and in-house digitization projects. Considers the degree to which standard collection management principles apply.…

  15. 49 CFR 1185.5 - Common control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... carriers if such carriers are operated under common control or management either: (a) Pursuant to approval... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Common control. 1185.5 Section 1185.5... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE INTERLOCKING OFFICERS § 1185.5 Common control. It shall not...

  16. 49 CFR 1185.5 - Common control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Common control. 1185.5 Section 1185.5... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE INTERLOCKING OFFICERS § 1185.5 Common control. It shall not be... carriers if such carriers are operated under common control or management either: (a) Pursuant to...

  17. 49 CFR 1185.5 - Common control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Common control. 1185.5 Section 1185.5... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE INTERLOCKING OFFICERS § 1185.5 Common control. It shall not be... carriers if such carriers are operated under common control or management either: (a) Pursuant to...

  18. Emergence Prediction of Common Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common groundsel is an important weed of strawberry and other horticultural crops. There are few herbicides registered for common groundsel control in such crops, and understanding and predicting the timing and extent of common groundsel emergence may facilitate its management. We developed simple e...

  19. 49 CFR 1185.5 - Common control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Common control. 1185.5 Section 1185.5... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE INTERLOCKING OFFICERS § 1185.5 Common control. It shall not be... carriers if such carriers are operated under common control or management either: (a) Pursuant to...

  20. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

  1. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  2. Common sleep disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kevin A; Hathaway, Nathanael E; Lettieri, Christine F

    2014-03-01

    Up to 50% of children will experience a sleep problem. Early identification of sleep problems may prevent negative consequences, such as daytime sleepiness, irritability, behavioral problems, learning difficulties, motor vehicle crashes in teenagers, and poor academic performance. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs in 1% to 5% of children. Polysomnography is needed to diagnose the condition because it may not be detected through history and physical examination alone. Adenotonsillectomy is the primary treatment for most children with obstructive sleep apnea. Parasomnias are common in childhood; sleepwalking, sleep talking, confusional arousals, and sleep terrors tend to occur in the first half of the night, whereas nightmares are more common in the second half of the night. Only 4% of parasomnias will persist past adolescence; thus, the best management is parental reassurance and proper safety measures. Behavioral insomnia of childhood is common and is characterized by a learned inability to fall and/or stay asleep. Management begins with consistent implementation of good sleep hygiene practices, and, in some cases, use of extinction techniques may be appropriate. Delayed sleep phase disorder is most common in adolescence, presenting as difficulty falling asleep and awakening at socially acceptable times. Treatment involves good sleep hygiene and a consistent sleep-wake schedule, with nighttime melatonin and/or morning bright light therapy as needed. Diagnosing restless legs syndrome in children can be difficult; management focuses on trigger avoidance and treatment of iron deficiency, if present. PMID:24695508

  3. Common Career Technical Core: Common Standards, Common Vision for CTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium's (NASDCTEc) Common Career Technical Core (CCTC), a state-led initiative that was created to ensure that career and technical education (CTE) programs are consistent and high quality across the United States. Forty-two states,…

  4. Threads of common knowledge.

    PubMed

    Icamina, P

    1993-04-01

    Indigenous knowledge is examined as it is affected by development and scientific exploration. The indigenous culture of shamanism, which originated in northern and southeast Asia, is a "political and religious technique for managing societies through rituals, myths, and world views." There is respect for the natural environment and community life as a social common good. This world view is still practiced by many in Latin America and in Colombia specifically. Colombian shamanism has an environmental accounting system, but the Brazilian government has established its own system of land tenure and political representation which does not adequately represent shamanism. In 1992 a conference was held in the Philippines by the International Institute for Rural Reconstruction and IDRC on sustainable development and indigenous knowledge. The link between the two is necessary. Unfortunately, there are already examples in the Philippines of loss of traditional crop diversity after the introduction of modern farming techniques and new crop varieties. An attempt was made to collect species, but without proper identification. Opposition was expressed to the preservation of wilderness preserves; the desire was to allow indigenous people to maintain their homeland and use their time-tested sustainable resource management strategies. Property rights were also discussed during the conference. Of particular concern was the protection of knowledge rights about biological diversity or pharmaceutical properties of indigenous plant species. The original owners and keepers of the knowledge must retain access and control. The research gaps were identified and found to be expansive. Reference was made to a study of Mexican Indian children who knew 138 plant species while non-Indian children knew only 37. Sometimes there is conflict of interest where foresters prefer timber forests and farmers desire fuelwood supplies and fodder and grazing land, which is provided by shrubland. Information

  5. Crisis and the Content of Managerial Communications: A Study of the Focus of Attention of Top Managers in Surviving and Failing Firms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Aveni, Richard A.; MacMillan, Ian C.

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory study of 57 bankrupt firms and 57 matched survivors compared senior managers' letters to shareholders during demand-decline crises to discover which environmental aspects they pay attention to. Managers of surviving firms pay more attention to the critical aspects of their external environment than do failing managers. Includes 75…

  6. Fractions, Decimals, and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreith, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    At grade 7, Common Core's content standards call for the use of long division to find the decimal representation of a rational number. With an eye to reconciling this requirement with Common Core's call for "a balanced combination of procedure and understanding," a more transparent form of long division is developed. This leads to the…

  7. LCS Content Document Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstadt, Jake

    2011-01-01

    My project at KSC during my spring 2011 internship was to develop a Ruby on Rails application to manage Content Documents..A Content Document is a collection of documents and information that describes what software is installed on a Launch Control System Computer. It's important for us to make sure the tools we use everyday are secure, up-to-date, and properly licensed. Previously, keeping track of the information was done by Excel and Word files between different personnel. The goal of the new application is to be able to manage and access the Content Documents through a single database backed web application. Our LCS team will benefit greatly with this app. Admin's will be able to login securely to keep track and update the software installed on each computer in a timely manner. We also included exportability such as attaching additional documents that can be downloaded from the web application. The finished application will ease the process of managing Content Documents while streamlining the procedure. Ruby on Rails is a very powerful programming language and I am grateful to have the opportunity to build this application.

  8. A Lot of Action, But Not in the Right Direction: Systematic Review and Content Analysis of Smartphone Applications for the Prevention, Detection, and Management of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Rossini Ying Kwan; To, Matthew Jason; Deacken, Laetitia; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile phones have become nearly ubiquitous, offering a promising means to deliver health interventions. However, little is known about smartphone applications (apps) for cancer. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize the purpose and content of cancer-focused smartphone apps available for use by the general public and the evidence on their utility or effectiveness. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the official application stores for the four major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Nokia, and BlackBerry. Apps were included in the review if they were focused on cancer and available for use by the general public. This was complemented by a systematic review of literature from MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to identify evaluations of cancer-related smartphone apps. Results A total of 295 apps from the smartphone app stores met the inclusion criteria. The majority of apps targeted breast cancer (46.8%, 138/295) or cancer in general (28.5%, 84/295). The reported app purpose was predominantly to raise awareness about cancer (32.2%, 95/295) or to provide educational information about cancer (26.4%, 78/295), followed by apps to support fundraising efforts (12.9%, 38/295), assist in early detection (11.5%, 34/295), promote a charitable organization (10.2%, 30/295), support disease management (3.7%, 11/295), cancer prevention (2.0%, 6/295), or social support (1.0%, 3/295). The majority of the apps did not describe their organizational affiliation (64.1%, 189/295). Apps affiliated with non-profit organizations were more likely to be free of cost (χ2 1=16.3, P<.001) and have a fundraising or awareness purpose (χ2 2=13.3, P=.001). The review of the health literature yielded 594 articles, none of which reported an evaluation of a cancer-focused smartphone application. Conclusions There are hundreds of cancer-focused apps with the potential to enhance efforts to promote behavior change, to monitor a host of symptoms and

  9. Adaptations and Access to Assessment of Common Core Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettler, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter introduces theory that undergirds the role of testing adaptations in assessment, provides examples of item modifications and testing accommodations, reviews research relevant to each, and introduces a new paradigm that incorporates opportunity to learn (OTL), academic enablers, testing adaptations, and inferences that can be made from…

  10. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  11. Common Ground for Managing Invasive Annual Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive annual grasses often reach their full biological potential in ecosystems of the western United States. This suggests that crucial ecosystem "checks and balances" are not functioning. In other words, invasion occurs because ecosystems have lost resistance to invasion, and invasive plants a...

  12. Management of Common Infant Feeding Problems

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Feeding problems in babies are not uncommon. It is important that they should be recognized for what they are, their etiology clearly understood, and the best treatment given. Recourse to drugs is usually only palliative, is often a confession of the physician's failure, and does not provide a permanent cure. PMID:20469288

  13. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of common interventional techniques is below. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures Angiography An X-ray exam of the ... into the vertebra. Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair Ridge Drive • Suite ...

  14. How Common Is the Common Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Amande; Edson, Alden J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) in 2010, stakeholders in adopting states have engaged in a variety of activities to understand CCSSM standards and transition from previous state standards. These efforts include research, professional development, assessment and modification of curriculum resources,…

  15. The New Common School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Horace Mann's goal of creating a common school that brings our society's children together in mutual respect and common learning need not be frustrated by residential segregation and geographical separation of the haves and have-nots. Massachusetts' new common school vision boasts a Metro Program for minority students, 80 magnet schools, and…

  16. The Common Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.

    Current curricula in institutions of higher education are criticized in this speech for their lack of a common core of education. Several possibilities for developing such a common core include education centered around our common heritage and the challenges of the present. It is suggested that all students must be introduced to the events,…

  17. Knowledge representation for commonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, Dorian P.

    1990-01-01

    Domain-specific knowledge necessary for commonality analysis falls into two general classes: commonality constraints and costing information. Notations for encoding such knowledge should be powerful and flexible and should appeal to the domain expert. The notations employed by the Commonality Analysis Problem Solver (CAPS) analysis tool are described. Examples are given to illustrate the main concepts.

  18. Managing the Sneezing Season

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Managing the Sneezing Season Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents Seasonal ... Read More "Managing Allergies" Articles Managing the Sneezing Season / A Pollen Primer / Seasonal Allergies: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and ...

  19. Common Adult Skin and Soft Tissue Lesions.

    PubMed

    Trost, Jeffrey G; Applebaum, Danielle S; Orengo, Ida

    2016-08-01

    A strong foundational knowledge of dermatologic disease is crucial for a successful practice in plastic surgery. A plastic surgeon should be able to identify and appreciate common dermatologic diseases that may require medical and/or surgical evaluation and management. In this article, the authors describe epidermal/dermal, infectious, pigmented, and malignant cutaneous lesions that are commonly encountered in practice. Descriptions include the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical course, and management options for each type of lesion. PMID:27478418

  20. A Content Standard for Computational Models; Digital Rights Management (DRM) Architectures; A Digital Object Approach to Interoperable Rights Management: Finely-Grained Policy Enforcement Enabled by a Digital Object Infrastructure; LOCKSS: A Permanent Web Publishing and Access System; Tapestry of Time and Terrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Linda L.; Crosier, Scott J.; Smith, Terrence R.; Goodchild, Michael; Iannella, Renato; Erickson, John S.; Reich, Vicky; Rosenthal, David S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Includes five articles. Topics include requirements for a content standard to describe computational models; architectures for digital rights management systems; access control for digital information objects; LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) that allows libraries to run Web caches for specific journals; and a Web site from the U.S.…

  1. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Rosario; MacFadyen, Bruce V

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration has become the procedure of choice in the management of choledocholithiasis in several laparoscopic centers. The increasing interest for this laparoscopic approach is due to the development of instrumentation and technique, allowing the procedure to be performed safely, and it is also the result of the revised role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which has been questioned because of its cost, risk of complications and effectiveness. Many surgeons, however, are still not familiar with this technique. In this article we discuss the technique and results of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Both the laparoscopic transcystic approach and choledochotomy are discussed, together with the results given in the literature. When one considers the costs, morbidity, mortality and the time required before the patient can return to work, it would appear that laparoscopic cholecystectomy with common bile duct exploration is more favorable than open surgery or laparoscopic cholecystectomy with preoperative or postoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy. However, the technique requires advanced laparoscopic skills, including suturing, knot tying, the use of a choledochoscope, guidewire, dilators and balloon stone extractor. Although laparoscopic common bile duct exploration appears to be the most cost-effective method to treat common bile duct stones, it should be emphasized that this procedure is very challenging, and it should be performed by well-trained laparoscopic surgeons with experience in biliary surgery. PMID:11981684

  2. Development of the KOSMS management simulation training system and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, Yoshiki

    The use of games which simulate actual corporate management has recently become more common and is now utilized in various ways for in-house corporate training courses. KOSMS (Kobe Steel Management Simulation System), a training system designed to help improve the management skills of senior management staff, is a unique management simulation training system in which the participants, using personal computers, must make decisions concerning a variety of management activities, in simulated competition with other corporations. This report outlines the KOSMS system, and describes the basic structure and detailed contents of the management simulation models, and actual application of the KOSMS management simulation training.

  3. [Dementia Care Manager for patients with dementia. Determination of the requirements and qualifications contents for nurses in the DelpHi-MV study].

    PubMed

    Dreier, A; Hoffmann, W

    2013-10-01

    Dementia is one of the most prevalent chronic progressive diseases in older age. The progression of dementia is associated with an increasing demand for patient care. Thus, the nursing profession fulfills important tasks in the supply of care in dementia. Care of dementia patients requires nurses with more specialized professional knowledge. Consequently, the development of new qualification concepts in dementia is needed. Therefore, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Rostock/Greifswald, has developed a qualification according to the Dementia Care Management concept. A prospective cross-sectional study identified the tasks and qualifications of nurses as Dementia Care Managers. Overall, 27 tasks and 28 qualification items were identified for a nurse to qualify as a Dementia Care Manager. In the next step, the first version of the Dementia Care Management Curriculum was developed. PMID:23978981

  4. Common Standards for Career Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Office of College and Career Readiness has developed the "Common Standards for Career Education Programs." The six common standards are: (1) Program Management and Planning; (2) Curriculum; (3) Instruction; (4) Professional Development; (5) Career and Technical Student Organizations; and (6) Instructional Facilities and Equipment. These…

  5. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions

  6. Common Conditions in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Common Conditions in ...

  7. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  8. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  9. Barry Commoner Assails Petrochemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses Commoner's ideas on the social value of the petrochemical industry and his suggestions for curtailment or elimination of its productive operation to produce a higher environmental quality for mankind at a relatively low loss in social benefit. (CC)

  10. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  11. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  12. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    PubMed Central

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G; van Geel, Björn M; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I; van der Kruijk, Ruud A; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M; Baart, J Coby; Visser, Leo H; Arnoldus, Edo P; Gilhuis, H Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Lemmens, Wim; Donders, Rogier; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009–2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-)monitoring, self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in MS. Methods The notions underlying the MSmonitor concept and the program’s elements are described. We analyze MSmonitor’s role in the self-management of fatigue by retrospective comparison of fatigue and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before and after usage of specific elements of MSmonitor, and by a correlative analysis between frequency of usage and fatigue change. Results After a step-wise development the program comprises six validated questionnaires: Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile, Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-5 items (MFIS-5), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 items, and the 8-item Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life (LMSQoL) questionnaires; two inventories: Medication and Adherence Inventory, Miction Inventory; two diaries: Activities Diary, Miction Diary; and two functionalities: e-consult and personal e-logbook. The program is now used in 17 hospitals by 581 PwMS and their neurologists, MS nurses, physical therapists, rehabilitative doctors, continence nurses, and family doctors. Those PwMS (N=105) who used the LMSQoL and MFIS-5 questionnaires at least twice in a period of up to 6 months, showed improved HRQoL (P<0.026). In the subgroup (N=56) who had also used the Activities Diary twice or more, the frequency of diary usage correlated modestly with the degree of fatigue improvement (r=0.292; P=0.028). Conclusion MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated care in PwMS. Pilot data suggest that the repeated use of the short MFIS-5 and LMSQoL questionnaires is associated with an increase in HRQoL, and that a

  13. Other Common Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bottom of the page. Share this page Search PTSD Site Choose Section Enter Term and Search ... Coach Online Tools to help you manage stress. Search Pilots Search PILOTS *, the largest citation database on ...

  14. Common Reactions After Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bottom of the page. Share this page Search PTSD Site Choose Section Enter Term and Search ... Coach Online Tools to help you manage stress. Search Pilots Search PILOTS *, the largest citation database on ...

  15. Common Factors of High Performance Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Bruce; Madsen, Susan R.

    2005-01-01

    Utilization of work teams is now wide spread in all types of organizations throughout the world. However, an understanding of the important factors common to high performance teams is rare. The purpose of this content analysis is to explore the literature and propose findings related to high performance teams. These include definition and types,…

  16. Mathematical Rigor in the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Ted H.; Balka, Don S.; Miles, Ruth Harbin

    2013-01-01

    A whirlwind of activity surrounds the topic of teaching and learning mathematics. The driving forces are a combination of changes in assessment and advances in technology that are being spurred on by the introduction of content in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice. Although the issues are certainly complex, the same forces…

  17. Common hematological disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Deepak; Totadri, Sidharth

    2014-01-01

    It is common for primary care physicians to be faced with children with hematological disorders in everyday practice. The article seeks to provide realistic information for the first-contact physician in handling common hematological diseases in children. Practical step-wise approach to understanding and investigating anemia and bleeding disorders is illustrated. Requirement of iron in normal children and management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and thalassemia is explained. The gold standard for IDA continues to be ferrous sulphate which has good bioavailability and is inexpensive. There is emerging concept of delayed clamping of umbilical cord at birth, particularly in regions with widespread IDA, to augment iron stores in infancy. Typical case scenarios of children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and hemophilia are provided to facilitate the understanding of management in day to day practice. The vital role of the medical practitioner in shared care of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia is emphasized. A risk based treatment algorithm for febrile neutropenia is provided. PMID:23934100

  18. Saving the Information Commons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollier, David

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the control of digital content and the stakes for libraries and our democratic culture. Highlights include copyright term extension, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, use of contract law to limit the public domain, database legislation, trademarks versus the public domain, the void in our cultural vocabulary, and the concept of the…

  19. Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    On January 1, 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) signed a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) concerning the Oak Ridge Reservation. The FFA requires that inactive liquid low-level (radioactive) waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) be remediated in accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This revision is to update the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. The scope of this project is to transfer inventory from the five inactive LLLW tanks at the OHF into the active LLLW system.

  20. Power system commonality study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littman, Franklin D.

    1992-07-01

    A limited top level study was completed to determine the commonality of power system/subsystem concepts within potential lunar and Mars surface power system architectures. A list of power system concepts with high commonality was developed which can be used to synthesize power system architectures which minimize development cost. Examples of potential high commonality power system architectures are given in this report along with a mass comparison. Other criteria such as life cycle cost (which includes transportation cost), reliability, safety, risk, and operability should be used in future, more detailed studies to select optimum power system architectures. Nineteen potential power system concepts were identified and evaluated for planetary surface applications including photovoltaic arrays with energy storage, isotope, and nuclear power systems. A top level environmental factors study was completed to assess environmental impacts on the identified power system concepts for both lunar and Mars applications. Potential power system design solutions for commonality between Mars and lunar applications were identified. Isotope, photovoltaic array (PVA), regenerative fuel cell (RFC), stainless steel liquid-metal cooled reactors (less than 1033 K maximum) with dynamic converters, and in-core thermionic reactor systems were found suitable for both lunar and Mars environments. The use of SP-100 thermoelectric (TE) and SP-100 dynamic power systems in a vacuum enclosure may also be possible for Mars applications although several issues need to be investigated further (potential single point failure of enclosure, mass penalty of enclosure and active pumping system, additional installation time and complexity). There are also technical issues involved with development of thermionic reactors (life, serviceability, and adaptability to other power conversion units). Additional studies are required to determine the optimum reactor concept for Mars applications. Various screening

  1. Authoring Software to Make Online Lecture Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Teramoto, Akemi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    An authoring software for online lecture contents has been developed. Various multimedia such as HTML, SMIL and Real System are integrated in this software, which is named EzClassMaker. Professors who are not familiar to the information technology can make the online lecture content including the sound and movies, and place the content on Leaning Management System by using this software. Only the microcomputer with this software and a microphone (or a movie camera) is requested to make the content.

  2. What is the Common Morality, Really?

    PubMed

    Bautz, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    In recent editions of Tom Beauchamp and James Childress' Principles of Biomedical Ethics, their famous principles have been deployed as elements of the common morality recruited to anchor bioethical reasoning. In Principles, however, Beauchamp and Childress defend neither their assertions about the content, nor the normativity, of the common morality. Because these content and normativity claims form the backbone of their approach, both claims deserve substantive support if the project of Principles is to be completed. Defense of the normativity claim remains an issue that has to date gone underdeveloped in the literature. Here I evaluate three ways of mounting such a defense, arguing that only one-conceptual analysis demonstrating the principles to be part of the "definitional criteria" of morality-might succeed within the confines of Beauchamp and Childress' metaethical paradigm. I argue further that identification of the common morality with these "definitional criteria" presents a compelling way forward. PMID:27157110

  3. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  4. Estimation of soil water content for engineering and agricultural applications using ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, Katherine Rose

    2003-10-01

    Near-surface water content is important for a variety of applications in engineering, agriculture, ecology, and environmental monitoring and is an essential input parameter for hydrological and atmospheric models. Water content is both spatially and temporally variable and is difficult to characterize using conventional measurement techniques, which are invasive, time-consuming to collect, and provide only a limited number of point measurements. The purpose of this study is to investigate ground penetrating radar (GPR) techniques for improved estimation of water content. GPR techniques have potential for providing accurate, high-resolution estimates of water content quickly and non-invasively, but the efficacy of these techniques for field-scale applications has not been previously determined. This study begins with a literature review of the application of GPR techniques for water content estimation, followed by a description of the principles employed in GPR surveying and the general methodology for converting electromagnetic GPR measurements to water content estimates. Next, a pilot experiment using GPR techniques for water content estimation is described; this experiment was performed under very controlled conditions and used common-offset GPR reflections to estimate the water content in sandy test pits. This experiment showed that GPR techniques can estimate water content very accurately (within 0.017 cm3/cm3 of the volumetric water content estimates obtained gravimetrically) and provided motivation for the second, less-controlled experiment. The second study used common-offset GPR reflections to estimate water content in a transportation engineering application, where the GPR data were used to monitor the water content in sub-asphalt aggregate layers and to estimate deformation under dynamic loading. This experiment showed that GPR data could be used to accurately monitor changes in the horizontal and vertical distributions of sub-asphalt water content with

  5. Phenotyping common beans for adaptation to drought

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Stephen E.; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Blair, Matthew W.; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) originated in the New World and are the grain legume of greatest production for direct human consumption. Common bean production is subject to frequent droughts in highland Mexico, in the Pacific coast of Central America, in northeast Brazil, and in eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. This article reviews efforts to improve common bean for drought tolerance, referring to genetic diversity for drought response, the physiology of drought tolerance mechanisms, and breeding strategies. Different races of common bean respond differently to drought, with race Durango of highland Mexico being a major source of genes. Sister species of P. vulgaris likewise have unique traits, especially P. acutifolius which is well adapted to dryland conditions. Diverse sources of tolerance may have different mechanisms of plant response, implying the need for different methods of phenotyping to recognize the relevant traits. Practical considerations of field management are discussed including: trial planning; water management; and field preparation. PMID:23507928

  6. Colonisation of winter wheat grain by Fusarium spp. and mycotoxin content as dependent on a wheat variety, crop rotation, a crop management system and weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Czaban, Janusz; Wróblewska, Barbara; Sułek, Alicja; Mikos, Marzena; Boguszewska, Edyta; Podolska, Grażyna; Nieróbca, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted during three consecutive growing seasons (2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10) with four winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars - 'Bogatka', 'Kris', 'Satyna' and 'Tonacja' - grown on fields with a three-field crop rotation (winter triticale, spring barley, winter wheat) and in a four-field crop rotation experiment (spring wheat, spring cereals, winter rapeseed, winter wheat). After the harvest, kernels were surface disinfected with 2% NaOCl and then analysed for the internal infection by different species of Fusarium. Fusaria were isolated on Czapek-Dox iprodione dichloran agar medium and identified on the basis of macro- and micro-morphology on potato dextrose agar and synthetic nutrient agar media. The total wheat grain infection by Fusarium depended mainly on relative humidity (RH) and a rainfall during the flowering stage. Intensive rainfall and high RH in 2009 and 2010 in the period meant the proportions of infected kernels by the fungi were much higher than those in 2008 (lack of precipitation during anthesis). Weather conditions during the post-anthesis period changed the species composition of Fusarium communities internally colonising winter wheat grain. The cultivars significantly varied in the proportion of infected kernels by Fusarium spp. The growing season and type of crop rotation had a distinct effect on species composition of Fusarium communities colonising the grain inside. A trend of a higher percentage of the colonised kernels by the fungi in the grain from the systems using more fertilisers and pesticides as well as the buried straw could be perceived. The most frequent species in the grain were F. avenaceum, F. tricinctum and F. poae in 2008, and F. avenaceum, F. graminearum, F. tricinctum and F. poae in 2009 and 2010. The contents of deoxynivalenol and zearalenon in the grain were correlated with the percentage of kernels colonised by F. graminearum and were the highest in 2009 in the grain from the four

  7. Common Magnets, Unexpected Polarities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss a "misconception" in magnetism so simple and pervasive as to be typically unnoticed. That magnets have poles might be considered one of the more straightforward notions in introductory physics. However, the magnets common to students' experiences are likely different from those presented in educational…

  8. Solving Common Mathematical Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luz, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical Solutions Toolset is a collection of five software programs that rapidly solve some common mathematical problems. The programs consist of a set of Microsoft Excel worksheets. The programs provide for entry of input data and display of output data in a user-friendly, menu-driven format, and for automatic execution once the input data has been entered.

  9. Information Commons to Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Marc Dewey

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, Buffalo State College's E. H. Butler Library has used the Information Commons (IC) model to assist its 8,500 students with library research and computer applications. Campus Technology Services (CTS) plays a very active role in its IC, with a centrally located Computer Help Desk and a newly created Application Support Desk right in the…

  10. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    After outlining the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibility for regulating interstate common carrier communication (non-broadcast communication whose carriers are required by law to furnish service at reasonable charges upon request), this information bulletin reviews the history, technological development, and current…

  11. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This bulletin outlines the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibilities in regulating the interstate and foreign common carrier communication via electrical means. Also summarized are the history, technological development, and current capabilities and prospects of telegraph, wire telephone, radiotelephone, satellite communications,…

  12. Human Commonalities and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passmore, Kaye

    2008-01-01

    Educator Ernest Boyer believed that well-educated students should do more than master isolated facts. They should understand the "connectedness of things." He suggested organizing curriculum thematically around eight commonalities shared by people around the world. In the book "The Basic School: A Community for Learning," Boyer recommends that…

  13. Common conversion factors.

    PubMed

    2001-05-01

    This appendix presents tables of some of the more common conversion factors for units of measure used throughout Current Protocols manuals, as well as prefixes indicating powers of ten for SI units. Another table gives conversions between temperatures on the Celsius (Centigrade) and Fahrenheit scales. PMID:18770653

  14. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  15. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  16. Common file formats.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Shonda A; Littlejohn, Timothy G; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2007-01-01

    This appendix discusses a few of the file formats frequently encountered in bioinformatics. Specifically, it reviews the rules for generating FASTA files and provides guidance for interpreting NCBI descriptor lines, commonly found in FASTA files. In addition, it reviews the construction of GenBank, Phylip, MSF and Nexus files. PMID:18428774

  17. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  18. The Common Denominator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Nikki

    2005-01-01

    An author and a poet Nikki Grimes uses her art to reach across differences such as race and culture, and show the commonality of human experience. She uses the power of her poetry to break down racial barriers, shatter cultural stereotypes, and forge community.

  19. Common Dermatoses of Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Gora, Irv

    1986-01-01

    Within the pediatric population of their practices, family physicians frequently encounter infants with skin rashes. This article discusses several of the more common rashes of infancy: atopic dermatitis, cradle cap, diaper dermatitis and miliaria. Etiology, clinical picture and possible approaches to treatment are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:21267297

  20. Space station commonality analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This study was conducted on the basis of a modification to Contract NAS8-36413, Space Station Commonality Analysis, which was initiated in December, 1987 and completed in July, 1988. The objective was to investigate the commonality aspects of subsystems and mission support hardware while technology experiments are accommodated on board the Space Station in the mid-to-late 1990s. Two types of mission are considered: (1) Advanced solar arrays and their storage; and (2) Satellite servicing. The point of departure for definition of the technology development missions was a set of missions described in the Space Station Mission Requirements Data Base. (MRDB): TDMX 2151 Solar Array/Energy Storage Technology; TDMX 2561 Satellite Servicing and Refurbishment; TDMX 2562 Satellite Maintenance and Repair; TDMX 2563 Materials Resupply (to a free-flyer materials processing platform); TDMX 2564 Coatings Maintenance Technology; and TDMX 2565 Thermal Interface Technology. Issues to be addressed according to the Statement of Work included modularity of programs, data base analysis interactions, user interfaces, and commonality. The study was to consider State-of-the-art advances through the 1990s and to select an appropriate scale for the technology experiments, considering hardware commonality, user interfaces, and mission support requirements. The study was to develop evolutionary plans for the technology advancement missions.

  1. Common Standards for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    About three-fourths of the states have already adopted the Common Core State Standards, which were designed to provide more clarity about and consistency in what is expected of student learning across the country. However, given the brief time since the standards' final release in June, questions persist among educators, who will have the…

  2. Reduced CD300LG mRNA tissue expression, increased intramyocellular lipid content and impaired glucose metabolism in healthy male carriers of Arg82Cys in CD300LG: a novel genometabolic cross-link between CD300LG and common metabolic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Støy, Julie; Kampmann, Ulla; Mengel, Annette; Magnusson, Nils E; Jessen, Niels; Grarup, Niels; Rungby, Jørgen; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background CD300LG rs72836561 (c.313C>T, p.Arg82Cys) has in genetic-epidemiological studies been associated with the lipoprotein abnormalities of the metabolic syndrome. CD300LG belongs to the CD300-family of membrane-bound molecules which have the ability to recognize and interact with extracellular lipids. We tested whether this specific polymorphism results in abnormal lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle and liver and other indices of metabolic dysfunction. Methods 40 healthy men with a mean age of 55 years were characterized metabolically including assessment of insulin sensitivity by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, intrahepatic lipid content (IHLC) and intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL) by MR spectroscopy, and β-cell function by an intravenous glucose tolerance test. Changes in insulin signaling and CD300LG mRNA expression were determined by western blotting and quantitative PCR in muscle and adipose tissue. Results Compared with the 20 controls (CC carriers), the 20 CT carriers (polymorphism carriers) had higher IMCL (p=0.045), a reduced fasting forearm glucose uptake (p=0.011), a trend toward lower M-values during the clamp; 6.0 mg/kg/min vs 7.1 (p=0.10), and higher IHLC (p=0.10). CT carriers had lower CD300LG mRNA expression and CD300LG expression in muscle correlated with IMCL (β=−0.35, p=0.046), forearm glucose uptake (β=0.37, p=0.03), and tended to correlate with the M-value (β=0.33, p=0.06), independently of CD300LG genotype. β-cell function was unaffected. Conclusions The CD300LG polymorphism was associated with decreased CD300LG mRNA expression in muscle and adipose tissue, increased IMCL, and abnormalities of glucose metabolism. CD300LG mRNA levels correlated with IMCL and forearm glucose uptake. These findings link a specific CD300LG polymorphism with features of the metabolic syndrome suggesting a role for CD300LG in the regulation of common metabolic traits. Trial registration number NCT01571609. PMID:26336608

  3. The structure and content of the nursing component of a pilot electronic health record for the cardiac managed clinical network in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Charles

    2006-01-01

    The development of a Portal for the Cardiac Managed Clinical Network (MCN) in Glasgow, Scotland, provided an opportunity to move towards a paperless environment for health care records. Nursing diagnoses within NANDA were ranked and 39 core to cardiac nursing identified. Appropriate nursing interventions and outcomes were grouped to form 'templates' adaptable to the individual. A system was proposed to facilitate the use of these templates to ease the process of producing care plans. However, this did no more than serve as an ideal. This exercise acknowledges the complexity of nursing activity and highlights the need to standardise protocols and procedures in nursing practice. It also illustrates the imperative for nurses to be actively involved in developing clinical systems fit for purpose. PMID:17102277

  4. Common Badging and Access Control System (CBACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, Tim

    2005-01-01

    The goals of the project are: Achieve high business value through a common badging and access control system that integrates with smart cards. Provide physical (versus logical) deployment of smart cards initially. Provides a common consistent and reliable environment into which to release the smart card. Gives opportunity to develop agency-wide consistent processes, practices and policies. Enables enterprise data capture and management. Promotes data validation prior to SC issuance.

  5. Common Dermatologic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shelley; Kampp, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Dermatologists perform a wide variety of procedures on a daily basis. The skin biopsy is a fundamental technique that can be performed by all physicians who manage cutaneous conditions. Specimens should always be sent for pathologic evaluation, regardless of whether the sampled lesion appears benign. Postoperative care and education are critical for minimizing complications. PMID:26476254

  6. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    MedlinePlus

    ... abused people are more sensitive to the outside environment as well. In this issue of ACHE, we write about these topics. Most of these topics were provided to specialists interested in headache management at the 2010 American Headache Society Annual meeting. ...

  7. Content of general practice.

    PubMed

    Lim, T O

    1991-06-01

    Eight general practitioners participated in a survey of content of general practice. This is useful as an indicator or morbidity in the community as well as of workload of general practice. A total of 3164 consultations were recorded, of which 2764 (87%) were because of an illness and the rest (13%) for other reasons like medical examinations, antenatal check, family planning advice, pregnancy tests, pap smear and vaccination. The old and the young have high consultation rates for an illness, men consulted as often as women. The most common illness seen was upper respiratory tract infections, accounting for 37% of all illnesses. Other common minor illnesses were skin infections (6%), genito-urinary infections (5%), minor musculoskeletal (6%) and gastrointestinal (6%) complaints as well as minor injuries and cuts (4%). Major disorders form an unusually low proportion (18%) of all illnesses seen, in comparison with figures from United Kingdom. The common major disorders seen were hypertension, asthma, chronic rheumatic disorders and diabetes. Circulatory disorders were remarkably rare, accounting for only 1% of illnesses. Psychological disorders, both major and minor, were also rarely seen, accounting for only 1% of illnesses which is in marked contrast with figures from the United Kingdom. Factors contributing to these notable findings are discussed. PMID:1839420

  8. Content Priorities for Farm Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotts, C. Don; Webb, Earl S.

    1974-01-01

    Fifty successful young Texas farmers evaluated agricultural mechanics skills (in the broad areas of farm power and machinery, farm shop, farm electricity, buildings and conveniences, and soil and water management) in terms of their importance. Teachers can use the findings to plan course content relevant to their students' needs. (AJ)

  9. Common tester platform concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, Michael James

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

  10. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  11. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  12. Common drive unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Moore, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Common Drive Unit (CDU) is a high reliability rotary actuator with many versatile applications in mechanism designs. The CDU incorporates a set of redundant motor-brake assemblies driving a single output shaft through differential. Tachometers provide speed information in the AC version. Operation of both motors, as compared to the operation of one motor, will yield the same output torque with twice the output speed.

  13. Interoperability Gap Challenges for Learning Object Repositories & Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    An interoperability gap exists between Learning Management Systems (LMSs) and Learning Object Repositories (LORs). Learning Objects (LOs) and the associated Learning Object Metadata (LOM) that is stored within LORs adhere to a variety of LOM standards. A common LOM standard found in LORs is the Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM)…

  14. Common Geometry Module

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  15. Common HEP UNIX Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Arnaud

    After it had been decided to design a common user environment for UNIX platforms among HEP laboratories, a joint project between DESY and CERN had been started. The project consists in 2 phases: 1. Provide a common user environment at shell level, 2. Provide a common user environment at graphical level (X11). Phase 1 is in production at DESY and at CERN as well as at PISA and RAL. It has been developed around the scripts originally designed at DESY Zeuthen improved and extended with a 2 months project at CERN with a contribution from DESY Hamburg. It consists of a set of files which are customizing the environment for the 6 main shells (sh, csh, ksh, bash, tcsh, zsh) on the main platforms (AIX, HP-UX, IRIX, SunOS, Solaris 2, OSF/1, ULTRIX, etc.) and it is divided at several "sociological" levels: HEP, site, machine, cluster, group of users and user with some levels which are optional. The second phase is under design and a first proposal has been published. A first version of the phase 2 exists already for AIX and Solaris, and it should be available for all other platforms, by the time of the conference. This is a major collective work between several HEP laboratories involved in the HEPiX-scripts and HEPiX-X11 working-groups.

  16. 'Historicising common sense'.

    PubMed

    Millstone, Noah

    2012-12-01

    This essay is an expanded set of comments on the social psychology papers written for the special issue on History and Social Psychology. It considers what social psychology, and particularly the theory of social representations, might offer historians working on similar problems, and what historical methods might offer social psychology. The social history of thinking has been a major theme in twentieth and twenty-first century historical writing, represented most recently by the genre of 'cultural history'. Cultural history and the theory of social representations have common ancestors in early twentieth-century social science. Nevertheless, the two lines of research have developed in different ways and are better seen as complementary than similar. The theory of social representations usefully foregrounds issues, like social division and change over time, that cultural history relegates to the background. But for historians, the theory of social representations seems oddly fixated on comparing the thought styles associated with positivist science and 'common sense'. Using historical analysis, this essay tries to dissect the core opposition 'science : common sense' and argues for a more flexible approach to comparing modes of thought. PMID:23135802

  17. Common sense in nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, F.; Hoyle, G.

    1980-01-01

    Public concern about energy resource exhaustion is noted to have developed only after the means (nuclear power) for avoiding this disaster became available and the negative implications of a nuclear society became a focus for anxiety. Ironically, collapse of conventional energy supplies could lead to the nuclear confrontation which anti-nuclear forces claim as the inevitable outcome of nuclear power. A review of the risks, environmental impacts, and political implications of the major energy sources concludes that emotion, not common sense, has made nuclear energy an unpopular option. While the problems of proliferation, radiation protection, waste management, and accident prevention are far from trivial, they will respond to technological improvements and responsible control policies. An historical tradition of fearing new, poorly understood technologies is seen in the reaction to railroads during the early 19th Century. (DCK)

  18. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    PubMed

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. PMID:25728477

  19. Diets of introduced predators using stable isotopes and stomach contents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meckstroth, A.M.; Miles, A.K.; Chandra, S.

    2007-01-01

    In a study of predation on ground-nesting birds at South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, USA, we analyzed stomach contents and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to identify commonly consumed prey. We obtained the stomach contents from 206 nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes regalis) collected in the South Bay area and Monterey County during 1995-2001 and from 68 feral cats (Felis silvestris) from the South Bay area during 2001-2002. We determined prey identity, biomass, and frequency, described seasonal diet trends, and derived an Index of Relative Importance. Avian species were the most frequent prey we found in the stomachs of red foxes from South Bay (61%), whereas small rodents were most frequent for red foxes from Monterey County (62%). Small rodents were the most frequent prey we found in feral cats (63%). Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures for foxes supported stomach content findings. However, isotope results indicated that cats received a majority of their energy from a source other than rodents and outside the natural system, which differed from the stomach content analysis. We demonstrated the utility of both stable isotope and stomach content analyses to establish a more complete understanding of predators' diets. This information aids natural resource managers in planning and evaluating future predator-removal programs and increases our understanding of the impacts of nonnative foxes and cats on native species.

  20. Evolution of a common controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D.; Barbour, D.; Gilbreath, G.

    2012-06-01

    Precedent has shown common controllers must strike a balance between the desire for an integrated user interface design by human factors engineers and support of project-specific data requirements. A common user-interface requires the project-specific data to conform to an internal representation, but project-specific customization is impeded by the implicit rules introduced by the internal data representation. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) developed the latest version of the Multi-robot Operator Control Unit (MOCU) to address interoperability, standardization, and customization issues by using a modular, extensible, and flexible architecture built upon a sharedworld model. MOCU version 3 provides an open and extensible operator-control interface that allows additional functionality to be seamlessly added with software modules while providing the means to fully integrate the information into a layered game-like user interface. MOCU's design allows it to completely decouple the human interface from the core management modules, while still enabling modules to render overlapping regions of the screen without interference or a priori knowledge of other display elements, thus allowing more flexibility in project-specific customization.

  1. Common questions about Barrett esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Thomas G

    2014-01-15

    Barrett esophagus is a precancerous metaplasia of the esophagus that is more common in patients with chronic reflux symptoms, although it also occurs in patients without symptomatic reflux. Other risk factors include smoking, male sex, obesity, white race, hiatal hernia, and increasing age (particularly older than 50 years). Although Barrett esophagus is a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, its management and the need for screening or surveillance endoscopy are debatable. The annual incidence of progression to esophageal cancer is 0.12% to 0.33%; progression is more common in patients with high-grade dysplasia and long-segment Barrett esophagus. Screening endoscopy should be considered for patients with multiple risk factors, and those who have lesions with high-grade dysplasia should undergo endoscopic mucosal resection or other endoscopic procedures to remove the lesions. Although the cost-effectiveness is questionable, patients with nondysplastic Barrett esophagus can be followed with endoscopic surveillance. Lowgrade dysplasia should be monitored or eradicated via endoscopy. Although there is no evidence that medical or surgical therapies to reduce acid reflux prevent neoplastic progression, proton pump inhibitors can be used to help control reflux symptoms. PMID:24444576

  2. Managing Fault Management Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  3. Identification of commonly encountered Pratylenchus in Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pratylenchus species are commonly encountered in soil samples collected from a diversity of economically important crops in Oregon, including potato and small fruits. Proper identification is critical to the selection of an appropriate management strategy since, in many cases, populations are an as...

  4. Information Commons Help Desk Transactions Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Gabrielle K. W.

    2010-01-01

    With the purpose of designing a training program for a new team serving at a technology service point, the author analyzed the transactions log using a new, multi-faceted, taxonomy. The resulting list of competencies and the methodology would be useful for managers of information or learning commons. (Contains 5 tables.)

  5. Analysis of the relationship between the volumetric soil moisture content and the NDVI from high resolution multi-spectral images for definition of vineyard management zones to improve irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Casasnovas, J. A.; Ramos, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    As suggested by previous research in the field of precision viticulture, intra-field yield variability is dependent on the variation of soil properties, and in particular the soil moisture content. Since the mapping in detail of this soil property for precision viticulture applications is highly costly, the objective of the present research is to analyse its relationship with the normalised difference vegetation index from high resolution satellite images to the use it in the definition of vineyard zonal management. The final aim is to improve irrigation in commercial vineyard blocks for better management of inputs and to deliver a more homogeneous fruit to the winery. The study was carried out in a vineyard block located in Raimat (NE Spain, Costers del Segre Designation of Origin). This is a semi-arid area with continental Mediterranean climate and a total annual precipitation between 300-400 mm. The vineyard block (4.5 ha) is planted with Syrah vines in a 3x2 m pattern. The vines are irrigated by means of drips under a partial root drying schedule. Initially, the irrigation sectors had a quadrangular distribution, with a size of about 1 ha each. Yield is highly variable within the block, presenting a coefficient of variation of 24.9%. For the measurement of the soil moisture content a regular sampling grid of 30 x 40 m was defined. This represents a sample density of 8 samples ha-1. At the nodes of the grid, TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer) probe tubes were permanently installed up to the 80 cm or up to reaching a contrasting layer. Multi-temporal measures were taken at different depths (each 20 cm) between November 2006 and December 2007. For each date, a map of the variability of the profile soil moisture content was interpolated by means of geostatistical analysis: from the measured values at the grid points the experimental variograms were computed and modelled and global block kriging (10 m squared blocks) undertaken with a grid spacing of 3 m x 3 m. On the

  6. Common pediatric epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun T; Shahid, Asim M; Jammoul, Adham

    2015-02-01

    Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), childhood idiopathic occipital epilepsy (CIOE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) are some of the common epilepsy syndromes in the pediatric age group. Among the four, BRE is the most commonly encountered. BRE remits by age 16 years with many children requiring no treatment. Seizures in CAE also remit at the rate of approximately 80%; whereas, JME is considered a lifelong condition even with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Neonates and infants may also present with seizures that are self-limited with no associated psychomotor disturbances. Benign familial neonatal convulsions caused by a channelopathy, and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, have a favorable outcome with spontaneous resolution. Benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, also referred to as "fifth-day fits," are an example of another epilepsy syndrome in infants that carries a good prognosis. BRE, CIOE, benign familial neonatal convulsions, benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, and benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy are characterized as "benign" idiopathic age-related epilepsies as they have favorable implications, no structural brain abnormality, are sensitive to AEDs, have a high remission rate, and have no associated psychomotor disturbances. However, sometimes selected patients may have associated comorbidities such as cognitive and language delay for which the term "benign" may not be appropriate. PMID:25658216

  7. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  8. Commonly used gastrointestinal drugs.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the spectrum and mechanisms of neurologic adverse effects of commonly used gastrointestinal drugs including antiemetics, promotility drugs, laxatives, antimotility drugs, and drugs for acid-related disorders. The commonly used gastrointestinal drugs as a group are considered safe and are widely used. A range of neurologic complications are reported following use of various gastrointestinal drugs. Acute neurotoxicities, including transient akathisias, oculogyric crisis, delirium, seizures, and strokes, can develop after use of certain gastrointestinal medications, while disabling and pervasive tardive syndromes are described following long-term and often unsupervised use of phenothiazines, metoclopramide, and other drugs. In rare instances, some of the antiemetics can precipitate life-threatening extrapyramidal reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or serotonin syndrome. In contrast, concerns about the cardiovascular toxicity of drugs such as cisapride and tegaserod have been grave enough to lead to their withdrawal from many world markets. Awareness and recognition of the neurotoxicity of gastrointestinal drugs is essential to help weigh the benefit of their use against possible adverse effects, even if uncommon. Furthermore, as far as possible, drugs such as metoclopramide and others that can lead to tardive dyskinesias should be used for as short time as possible, with close clinical monitoring and patient education. PMID:24365343

  9. College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems Posted under Health Guides . ... March 2015. +Related Content What are student health services? The student health services (sometimes called the student ...

  10. 47 CFR 68.400 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2000-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2000-10-01 2000-10-01 false Content. 68.400 Section 68.400 Title 47- FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION-(CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.400 Content. A complaint shall be in...

  11. 47 CFR 68.400 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    1999-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 1999-10-01 1999-10-01 false Content. 68.400 Section 68.400 Title 47- FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION-(CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.400 Content. A complaint shall be in...

  12. 47 CFR 68.400 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    1997-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 1997-10-01 1997-10-01 false Content. 68.400 Section 68.400 COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.400 Content. A complaint shall be in writing and shall contain: (a) The name and address of...

  13. 47 CFR 68.400 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    1998-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 1998-10-01 1998-10-01 false Content. 68.400 Section 68.400 COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.400 Content. A complaint shall be in writing and shall contain: (a) The name and address of...

  14. 47 CFR 68.400 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    1996-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 1996-10-01 1996-10-01 false Content. 68.400 Section 68.400 COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.400 Content. A complaint shall be in writing and shall contain: (a) The name and address of...

  15. Common herbal remedies.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, B B

    2000-01-01

    Herbal remedies are becoming increasingly popular as people seek more effective, natural, or safer methods for treating a variety of complaints. As a result, nurses in every setting may expect to see increased numbers of patients who are using herbal products. When patients assume that the nurses will be critical of their use of herbals, they may withhold such information to avoid unpleasantness. This could place patients at risk for adverse effects, drug interactions, and complications related to ineffective treatment. Nurses who are knowledgeable about herbal products and who are open to discussion about these products can provide information and advice about safe use. The discussion in this article addresses actions, possible benefits, and dangers of the most common herbal products. Guidelines for assessing and teaching clients about herbal use are included. PMID:11062629

  16. Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) Glucosinolate Content Varies Across a Natural Light Gradient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren M

    2015-05-01

    Garlic mustard is a well-known invader of deciduous forests of North America, yet the influence of environmental factors on garlic mustard allelochemical production is not well understood. Three experiments were conducted to detect interactions between one garlic mustard allelochemical (glucosinolate) production and light availability. First, to detect patterns of glucosinolate production across a natural light gradient, leaves and roots of mature plants and first-year rosettes were sampled in patches ranging from 100 to 2 % of full sun within an Indiana forest. Second, to determine whether genetic variation drives observed correlations between glucosinolate content and light, seed collected across light gradients within six sites was grown in a common garden and glucosinolate production was measured. Finally, to understand whether local adaptation occurred in garlic mustard's response to light, seed collected from defined light environments across six sites was grown under four light treatments. Results of the field sampling showed that mature plants' root glucosinolate content was elevated in high compared to low light. In the common garden experiment, however, there was no correlation between light availability at seed origin and constitutive glucosinolate content. Additionally, in the common light treatments, there was no evidence for local adaptation to light environment. Overall, the results indicate that plasticity in response to light, not genetic variation among plants growing in different light environments, generates correlations between glucosinolate content and light in the field. Since mature garlic mustard populations in high light may exhibit increased glucosinolate content, it makes them potential targets for management. PMID:25912227

  17. A Management Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The article describes the contents of three training modules developed within the areas of personnel management and management development: (1) management and management development, (2) leadership and management, and (3) human relations and managerial effectiveness: how to get things done through people. Each module consists of a three day course…

  18. System Safety Common Cause Analysis

    1992-03-10

    The COMCAN fault tree analysis codes are designed to analyze complex systems such as nuclear plants for common causes of failure. A common cause event, or common mode failure, is a secondary cause that could contribute to the failure of more than one component and violates the assumption of independence. Analysis of such events is an integral part of system reliability and safety analysis. A significant common cause event is a secondary cause common tomore » all basic events in one or more minimal cut sets. Minimal cut sets containing events from components sharing a common location or a common link are called common cause candidates. Components share a common location if no barrier insulates any one of them from the secondary cause. A common link is a dependency among components which cannot be removed by a physical barrier (e.g.,a common energy source or common maintenance instructions).« less

  19. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  20. Common Core State Standards Assessments: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polikoff, Morgan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were created in response to the shortcomings of No Child Left Behind era standards and assessments. Among those failings were the poor quality of content standards and assessments and the variability in content expectations and proficiency targets across states, as well as concerns related to the economic…