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Sample records for common genetic mechanism

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of genetically defined autism candidate genes reveals common mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Austism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous behavioral disorder or condition characterized by severe impairment of social engagement and the presence of repetitive activities. The molecular etiology of ASD is still largely unknown despite a strong genetic component. Part of the difficulty in turning genetics into disease mechanisms and potentially new therapeutics is the sheer number and diversity of the genes that have been associated with ASD and ASD symptoms. The goal of this work is to use shRNA-generated models of genetic defects proposed as causative for ASD to identify the common pathways that might explain how they produce a core clinical disability. Methods Transcript levels of Mecp2, Mef2a, Mef2d, Fmr1, Nlgn1, Nlgn3, Pten, and Shank3 were knocked-down in mouse primary neuron cultures using shRNA constructs. Whole genome expression analysis was conducted for each of the knockdown cultures as well as a mock-transduced culture and a culture exposed to a lentivirus expressing an anti-luciferase shRNA. Gene set enrichment and a causal reasoning engine was employed to identify pathway level perturbations generated by the transcript knockdown. Results Quantification of the shRNA targets confirmed the successful knockdown at the transcript and protein levels of at least 75% for each of the genes. After subtracting out potential artifacts caused by viral infection, gene set enrichment and causal reasoning engine analysis showed that a significant number of gene expression changes mapped to pathways associated with neurogenesis, long-term potentiation, and synaptic activity. Conclusions This work demonstrates that despite the complex genetic nature of ASD, there are common molecular mechanisms that connect many of the best established autism candidate genes. By identifying the key regulatory checkpoints in the interlinking transcriptional networks underlying autism, we are better able to discover the ideal points of intervention that provide the

  2. DNA repair pathways underlie a common genetic mechanism modulating onset in polyglutamine diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Hensman‐Moss, Davina; Flower, Michael; Wiethoff, Sarah; Brice, Alexis; Goizet, Cyril; Stevanin, Giovanni; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios; Yescas‐Gómez, Petra; García‐Velázquez, Lizbeth Esmeralda; Alonso‐Vilatela, María Elisa; Lima, Manuela; Raposo, Mafalda; Traynor, Bryan; Sweeney, Mary; Wood, Nicholas; Giunti, Paola; Durr, Alexandra; Holmans, Peter; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) and multiple spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are among the commonest hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. They are caused by expanded CAG tracts, encoding glutamine, in different genes. Longer CAG repeat tracts are associated with earlier ages at onset, but this does not account for all of the difference, and the existence of additional genetic modifying factors has been suggested in these diseases. A recent genome‐wide association study (GWAS) in HD found association between age at onset and genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, and we therefore tested whether the modifying effects of variants in DNA repair genes have wider effects in the polyglutamine diseases. Methods We assembled an independent cohort of 1,462 subjects with HD and polyglutamine SCAs, and genotyped single‐nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the most significant hits in the HD study. Results In the analysis of DNA repair genes as a group, we found the most significant association with age at onset when grouping all polyglutamine diseases (HD+SCAs; p = 1.43 × 10–5). In individual SNP analysis, we found significant associations for rs3512 in FAN1 with HD+SCAs (p = 1.52 × 10–5) and all SCAs (p = 2.22 × 10–4) and rs1805323 in PMS2 with HD+SCAs (p = 3.14 × 10–5), all in the same direction as in the HD GWAS. Interpretation We show that DNA repair genes significantly modify age at onset in HD and SCAs, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism, which could operate through the observed somatic expansion of repeats that can be modulated by genetic manipulation of DNA repair in disease models. This offers novel therapeutic opportunities in multiple diseases. Ann Neurol 2016;79:983–990 PMID:27044000

  3. A common genetic mechanism determines plasma apolipoprotein B levels and dense LDL subfraction distribution in familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed Central

    Juo, S H; Bredie, S J; Kiemeney, L A; Demacker, P N; Stalenhoef, A F

    1998-01-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a common lipid disorder characterized by elevations of plasma cholesterol and/or triglyceride in first-degree relatives. A predominance of small, dense LDL particles and elevated apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels is commonly found in members of FCH families. Many studies have investigated the genetic mechanisms determining individuals' lipid levels, in FCH families. Previously, we demonstrated a major gene effect on LDL particle size and codominant Mendelian inheritance involved in determination of apoB levels in a sample of 40 well-defined FCH families. An elevation of apoB levels is associated metabolically with a predominance of small, dense LDL particles in FCH. To establish whether a common gene regulates both traits, we conducted a bivariate genetic analysis to test the hypothesis of a common genetic mechanism. In this study, we found that 66% of the total phenotypic correlation is due to shared genetic components. Further bivariate segregation analysis suggested that both traits share a common major gene plus individual polygenic components. This common major gene explains 37% of the variance of adjusted LDL particle size and 23% of the variance of adjusted apoB levels. Our study suggests that a major gene that has pleiotropic effects on LDL particle size and apoB levels may be the gene underlying FCH in the families we studied. PMID:9683593

  4. Resilience to orthostasis and haemorrhage: A pilot study of common genetic and conditioning mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitry M.; Zhdanov, Renad I.; Dvoenosov, Vladimir G.; Kravtsova, Olga A.; Voronina, Elena N.; Filipenko, Maxim L.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge presently is not only to identify the genetic polymorphisms increasing risk to diseases, but to also find out factors and mechanisms, which can counteract a risk genotype by developing a resilient phenotype. The objective of this study was to examine acquired and innate vagal mechanisms that protect against physical challenges and haemorrhages in 19 athletes and 61 non-athletes. These include examining change in heart rate variability (HF-HRV; an indicator of vagus activity) in response to orthostatic challenge, platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV), and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that encode several coagulation factors, PAI-1, and MTHFR. Individual differences in PLT and MPV were significant predictors, with opposite effects, of the profiles of the HF-HRV changes in response to orthostasis. Regular physical training of athletes indirectly (through MPV) modifies the genetic predisposing effects of some haemostatic factors (PAI-1 and MTHFR) on vagal tone and reactivity. Individual differences in vagal tone were also associated with relationships between Factor 12 C46T and Factor 11 C22771T genes polymorphisms. This study showed that genetic predispositions for coagulation are modifiable. Its potential significance is promoting advanced protection against haemorrhages in a variety of traumas and injuries, especially in individuals with coagulation deficits. PMID:26024428

  5. Mechanisms of population genetic heterogeneity among molting common mergansers on Kodiak Island, Alaska: implications for assessments of migratory connectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, John M.; Zwiefelhofer, Denny; Maryanski, Nate

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying population genetic heterogeneity within nonbreeding aggregations can inform our understanding of patterns of site fidelity, migratory connectivity, and gene flow between breeding and nonbreeding areas. However, characterizing mechanisms that contribute to heterogeneity, such as migration and dispersal, is required before site fidelity and migratory connectivity can be assessed accurately. We studied nonbreeding groups of Common Mergansers (Mergus merganser) molting on Kodiak Island, Alaska, from 2005 to 2007, using banding data to assess rates of recapture, mitochondrial (mt) DNA to determine natal area, and nuclear microsatellite genotypes to assess dispersal. Using baseline information from differentiated mtDNA haplogroups across North America, we were able to assign individuals to natal regions and document population genetic heterogeneity within and among molting groups. Band-recovery and DNA data suggest that both migration from and dispersal among natal areas contribute to admixed groups of males molting on Kodiak Island. A lack of differentiation in the Common Merganser's nuclear, bi-parentally inherited DNA, observed across North America, implies that dispersal can mislead genetic assessments of migratory connectivity and assignments of nonbreeding individuals to breeding areas. Thus multiple and independent data types are required to account for such behaviors before accurate assessments of migratory connectivity can be made.

  6. Commonalities in biological pathways, genetics, and cellular mechanism between Alzheimer Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases: An in silico-updated overview.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Khurshid; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Greig, Nigel H; Choi, Inho

    2017-02-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common and well-studied neurodegenerative disease (ND). Biological pathways, pathophysiology and genetics of AD show commonalities with other NDs viz. Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD), Prion Disease and Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Many of the NDs, sharing the common features and molecular mechanisms suggests that pathology may be directly comparable and be implicated in disease prevention and development of highly effective therapies. In this review, a brief description of pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and available treatment of various NDs have been explored with special emphasis on AD. Commonalities in these fatal NDs provide support for therapeutic advancements and enhance the understanding of disease manifestation. The studies concentrating on the commonalities in biological pathways, cellular mechanisms and genetics may provide the scope to researchers to identify few novel common target/s for disease prevention and development of effective common drugs for multi-neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Genetic influences in common respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Workman, M Linda; Winkelman, Chris

    2008-06-01

    Respiratory disorders are common problems for adults and children in North America and generally represent the outcome of gene-environment interactions. Some problems are considered genetic in origin, such as cystic fibrosis, and others are considered environmental in origin, such as respiratory infections. Emerging information indicates that even genetic-based disorders are influenced by the environment and that environmental-based disorders are modified by personal genetic factors in individual physiologic responses. An understanding of an individual's personal risk factors for disease or health problem development can allow health care professionals to tailor health promotion strategies and treatment plans with appropriate environmental manipulation. This article explores the genetic influences that may affect the individual's physiologic responses and the consequences of environmental stimuli.

  8. Genetic control of inflorescence in common bean.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S R; Ramalho, M A P; de F B Abreu, A; Pereira, L A

    2014-12-04

    The number of pods per common bean plant is a primary component of grain yield, which depends on the number of flowers produced and on the flower set. Thus, a larger number of flowers per plant would increase yield. Lines with inflorescences that had a large number of flowers compared to common bean plants now under cultivation were identified. We analyzed the genetic control of this trait and its association with grain yield. The cultivar BRSMG Talismã was crossed with 2 lines, L.59583 and L.59692, which have a large number of flowers. The F1, F2, and F3 generations were obtained. These generations were assessed together with the parents in a randomized block experimental design with 2 replications. The traits assessed included length of inflorescence, number of pods per inflorescence, number of pods per plant, number of grains per plant, 100-grain weight, and grain yield per plant. Mean genetic components and variance were estimated. The traits length of inflorescence and number of pods per inflorescence exhibited genetic control with predominance that showed an additive effect. In the 2 crosses, genetic control of grain yield and of its primary components showed that the allelic interaction of dominance was high. The wide variability in the traits assessed may be used to increase yield of the common bean plant by increasing the number of flowers on the plant.

  9. Genetic defects in common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kopecký, O; Lukešová, Š

    2007-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most frequent clinically manifested primary immunodeficiency. According to clinical and laboratory findings, CVID is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Recently, the defects of molecules regulating activation and terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes have been described in some patients with CVID. In this study, we show the overview of deficiencies of inducible costimulator, transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cytophilin ligand interactor, CD19 molecules, their genetic basis, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. PMID:17627754

  10. Latent common genetic components of obesity traits

    PubMed Central

    Harders, R; Luke, A; Zhu, X; Cooper, RS

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is rapidly becoming a global epidemic. Unlike many complex human diseases, obesity is defined not just by a single trait or phenotype, but jointly by measures of anthropometry and metabolic status. Methods We applied maximum likelihood factor analysis to identify common latent factors underlying observed covariance in multiple obesity-related measures. Both the genetic components and the mode of inheritance of the common factors were evaluated. A total of 1775 participants from 590 families for whom measures on obesity-related traits were available were included in this study. Results The average age of participants was 37 years, 39% of the participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30.0 kg/m2) and 26% were overweight (body mass index 25.0 - 29.9 kg/m2). Two latent common factors jointly accounting for over 99% of the correlations among obesity-related traits were identified. Complex segregation analysis of the age and sex-adjusted latent factors provide evidence for a Mendelian mode of inheritance of major genetic effect with heritability estimates of 40.4% and 47.5% for the first and second factors, respectively. Conclusions These findings provide a support for multivariate-based approach for investigating pleiotropic effects on obesity-related traits which can be applied in both genetic linkage and association mapping. PMID:18936762

  11. Genetics of allergy and allergic sensitization: common variants, rare mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Sparks, Rachel; Waage, Johannes; Milner, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the specific genetic lesions in allergy has improved in recent years due to identification of common risk variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and studies of rare, monogenic diseases. Large-scale GWAS have identified novel susceptibility loci and provided information about shared genetics between allergy, related phenotypes and autoimmunity. Studies of monogenic diseases have elucidated critical cellular pathways and protein functions responsible for allergy. These complementary approaches imply genetic mechanisms involved in Th2 immunity, T-cell differentiation, TGFβ signaling, regulatory T-cell function and skin/mucosal function as well as yet unknown mechanisms associated with newly identified genes. Future studies, in combination with data on gene expression and epigenetics, are expected to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of allergy. PMID:26386198

  12. Is there more than one way to skin a newt? Convergent toxin resistance in snakes is not due to a common genetic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, C R; Durso, A M; Hanifin, C T; Pfrender, M E; Ducey, P K; Stokes, A N; Barnett, K E; Brodie III, E D; Brodie Jr, E D

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evolution of tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistance, at both the phenotypic and genetic levels, characterizes coevolutionary arms races between amphibians and their snake predators around the world, and reveals remarkable predictability in the process of adaptation. Here we examine the repeatability of the evolution of TTX resistance in an undescribed predator–prey relationship between TTX-bearing Eastern Newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) and Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes (Heterodon platirhinos). We found that that local newts contain levels of TTX dangerous enough to dissuade most predators, and that Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes within newt range are highly resistant to TTX. In fact, these populations of Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes are so resistant to TTX that the potential for current reciprocal selection might be limited. Unlike all other cases of TTX resistance in vertebrates, H. platirhinos lacks the adaptive amino acid substitutions in the skeletal muscle sodium channel that reduce TTX binding, suggesting that physiological resistance in Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes is conferred by an alternate genetic mechanism. Thus, phenotypic convergence in this case is not due to parallel molecular evolution, indicating that there may be more than one way for this adaptation to arise, even among closely related species. PMID:26374236

  13. Is there a Common Genetic Basis for Autoimmune Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gómez, LuisMiguel; Castiblanco, John

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. The commonality between them however, is the damage to tissues and organs that arises from the response to self-antigens. The presence of shared pathophysiological mechanisms within ADs has stimulated searches for common genetic roots to these diseases. Two approaches have been undertaken to sustain the “common genetic origin” theory of ADs. Firstly, a clinical genetic analysis showed that autoimmunity aggregates within families of probands diagnosed with primary Sjögren's (pSS) syndrome or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). A literature review supported the establishment of a familiar cluster of ADs depending upon the proband's disease phenotype. Secondly, in a same and well-defined population, a large genetic association study indicated that a number of polymorphic genes (i.e. HLA-DRB1, TNF and PTPN22) influence the susceptibility for acquiring different ADs. Likewise, association and linkage studies in different populations have revealed that several susceptibility loci overlap in ADs, and clinical studies have shown that frequent clustering of several ADs occurs. Thus, the genetic factors for ADs consist of two types: those which are common to many ADs (acting in epistatic pleitropy) and those that are specific to a given disorder. Their identification and functional characterization will allow us to predict their effect as well as to indicate potential new therapeutic interventions. Both autoimmunity family history and the co-occurrence of ADs in affected probands should be considered when performing genetic association and linkage studies. PMID:17162361

  14. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  15. Identifying genetics and genomics nursing competencies common among published recommendations.

    PubMed

    Greco, Karen E; Salveson, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify published recommendations for genetics and genomics competencies or curriculum for nurses in the United States and to summarize genetic and genomic nursing competencies based on common themes among these documents. A review of the literature between January 1998 and June 2008 was conducted. Efforts were also made to access the gray literature. Five consensus documents describing recommendations for genetics and genomics competencies for nurses meeting inclusion criteria were analyzed. Twelve genetics and genomics competencies were created based on common themes among the recommendations. These competencies include: demonstrate an understanding of basic genetic and genomic concepts, provide and explain genetic and genomic information, refer to appropriate genetics professionals and services, and identify the limits of one's own genetics and genomics expertise. The competencies represent fundamental genetics and genomics competencies for nurses on the basis of common themes among several consensus recommendations identified in the literature.

  16. Genetic mechanisms of apomixis.

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Melissa; Vinkenoog, Rinke; Scott, Rod J

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of apomixis to crops would allow desirable genotypes to be propagated while preventing undesirable gene flow, but so far there has been little success in transferring this trait from a natural apomict to another species. One explanation is the sensitivity of endosperm to changes in relative maternal and paternal contribution owing to parental imprinting, an epigenetic system of transcriptional regulation by which some genes are expressed from only the maternally or paternally contributed allele. In sexual species, endosperm typically requires a ratio of two maternal genomes to one paternal genome for normal development, but this ratio is often altered in apomicts, suggesting that the imprinting system is altered as well. We present evidence that modification of DNA methylation is one mechanism by which the imprinting system could be altered to allow endosperm development in apomicts. Another feature of natural apomixis is the modification of the normal fertilization programme. Sexual reproduction uses both sperm from each pollen grain, but pseudogamous apomicts, which require a sexual endosperm to support the asexual embryo, often use just one. We present evidence that multiple fertilization of the central cell is possible in Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that pseudogamous apomicts may also need to acquire a mechanism for preventing more than one sperm from contributing to the endosperm. We conclude that strategies to transfer apomixis to crop species should take account of endosperm development and particularly its sensitivity to parental imprinting, as well as the mechanism of fertilization. PMID:12831475

  17. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  18. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  19. Genetics Home Reference: common variable immune deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... H, Lougaris V, Plebani A, Gertz EM, Schäffer AA, Hammarström L, Grimbacher B. Deleterious mutations in LRBA ... 2015 Jun 19. Review. Citation on PubMed Schäffer AA, Salzer U, Hammarström L, Grimbacher B. Deconstructing common ...

  20. Space Station Freedom common berthing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illi, Erik

    1992-01-01

    The Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) is a generic device used to join the pressurized elements of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) utilizing the Space Shuttle Orbiter Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) or the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). The two berthing halves, the active, and the passive, maintain a pressurized atmosphere to allow astronaut passage, as well as to provide a structural linkage between elements. The generic design of the CBM allows any Passive Berthing Mechanism to berth with any Active Berthing Mechanism, permitting a variety of pressurized module patterns to be built.

  1. The phenotypic and genetic signatures of common musculoskeletal pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Diatchenko, Luda; Fillingim, Roger B.; Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, William

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia and low back pain, tend to coexist in affected individuals and are characterized by a report of pain greater than expected based on the results of a standard physical evaluation. The pathophysiology of these conditions is largely unknown, we lack biological markers for accurate diagnosis, and conventional therapeutics have limited effectiveness. Growing evidence suggests that chronic pain conditions are associated with both physical and psychological triggers, which initiate pain amplification and psychological distress; thus, susceptibility is dictated by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Herein, we review phenotypic and genetic markers of common musculoskeletal pain conditions, selected based on their association with musculoskeletal pain in previous research. The phenotypic markers of greatest interest include measures of pain amplification and ‘psychological’ measures (such as emotional distress, somatic awareness, psychosocial stress and catastrophizing). Genetic polymorphisms reproducibly linked with musculoskeletal pain are found in genes contributing to serotonergic and adrenergic pathways. Elucidation of the biological mechanisms by which these markers contribute to the perception of pain in these patients will enable the development of novel effective drugs and methodologies that permit better diagnoses and approaches to personalized medicine. PMID:23545734

  2. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  3. Genetics of Common Endocrine Disease: The Present and the Future

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context: In honor of the 75th issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, the author was invited to present his perspectives on genetics in human endocrinology. This paper reviews what the field has achieved in the genetics of common endocrine disease, and offers predictions on where the field will move in the future and its impact on endocrine clinical practice. Evidence Acquisition: The October 2015 data release of the National Human Genome Research Institute-European Bioinformatics Institute (NHGRI-EBI) Catalog of Published Genome-wide Association Studies was queried regarding endocrinologic diseases and traits. PubMed searches were focused on genetic prediction of disease, genetic findings and drug targets, functional interrogation of genetic loci, use of genetics to subtype disease, missing heritability, systems genomics, and higher order chromatin structures as regulators of gene function. Evidence Synthesis: Nearly a quarter of genome wide association study findings concern endocrinologic diseases and traits. While these findings have not yet dramatically altered clinical care, genetics will have a major impact by providing the drug targets of tomorrow, facilitated by experimental and bioinformatic advances that will shorten the time from gene discovery to drug development. Use of genetic findings to subtype common endocrine disease will allow more precise prevention and treatment efforts. Future advances will allow us to move away from the common view of DNA as a string of letters, allowing exploration of higher order structure that likely explains much “missing heritability.” Conclusions: The future will see a greater role of genetics at the bedside, with genetic epidemiologic discoveries leading not only to new treatments of endocrine disease, but also helping us prescribe the right drug to the right patients by allowing subclassification of common heterogeneous endocrine conditions. Future technological breakthroughs will reveal

  4. Prospects for genetically modified non-human primate models, including the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Genetically modified mice have contributed much to studies in the life sciences. In some research fields, however, mouse models are insufficient for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of pathology or as disease models. Often, genetically modified non-human primate (NHP) models are desired, as they are more similar to human physiology, morphology, and anatomy. Recent progress in studies of the reproductive biology in NHPs has enabled the introduction of exogenous genes into NHP genomes or the alteration of endogenous NHP genes. This review summarizes recent progress in the production of genetically modified NHPs, including the common marmoset, and future perspectives for realizing genetically modified NHP models for use in life sciences research.

  5. [Molecular genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai-Xian

    2005-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major type of primary liver cancer and one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. Common risk factors of human HCC include chronic hepatitis virus (HBV and HCV) infection, dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) ingestion, chronic alcohol abuse, and cirrhosis associated with genetic liver diseases. Hepatocarcinogenesis is the result of interaction between hereditary and environmental factors. Inheritance determines individual susceptibility to cancer; environment determines which susceptible individuals express cancer. Studies of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis showed that HCC development is a complex polygene and multipathway process; the activation of proto-oncogenes and the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes induced by genetic and epigenetic alterations are core biological processes of hepatocarcinogenesis; RB1, p53, and Wnt pathways are commonly affected in HCCs of different etiologies, which may reflect common pathologic sequence of HCC: chronic liver injury, cirrhosis, atypical hyperplastic nodules, and HCC of early stages. Hepatitis virus infection-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in RB1 pathway, including methylation of p16INK4a and RB1 genes and amplification of Cyclin D1. AFB1 exposure-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in p53 pathway; the G-->T mutation of p53 gene at codon 249 has been identified as a genetic hallmark of HCC caused by AFB1. Alcoholism-associated HCCs have frequent alterations in both RB1 and p53 pathways. The roles of some important genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA repair, drug metabolism, and tumor metastasis in hepatocarcinogenesis had been discussed.

  6. Evidence of Common Genetic Overlap Between Schizophrenia and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Leon; Tansey, Katherine E; Rai, Dheeraj; Jones, Peter; Ripke, Stephan; Chambert, Kimberly D; Moran, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Steven A; Linden, David E J; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Walters, James T R; Zammit, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia but there is limited understanding of the genetic relationship between cognition in the general population and schizophrenia. We examine how common variants associated with schizophreniaen massecontribute to childhood cognitive ability in a population-based sample, and the extent to which common genetic variants associated with childhood cognition explain variation in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia polygenic risk scores were derived from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (n= 69 516) and tested for association with IQ, attention, processing speed, working memory, problem solving, and social cognition in over 5000 children aged 8 from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children birth cohort. Polygenic scores for these cognitive domains were tested for association with schizophrenia in a large UK schizophrenia sample (n= 11 853). Bivariate genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) estimated the amount of shared genetic factors between schizophrenia and cognitive domains. Schizophrenia polygenic risk score was associated with lower performance IQ (P= .001) and lower full IQ (P= .013). Polygenic score for performance IQ was associated with increased risk for schizophrenia (P= 3.56E-04). Bivariate GCTA revealed moderate genetic correlation between schizophrenia and both performance IQ (rG= -.379,P= 6.62E-05) and full IQ (rG= -.202,P= 5.00E-03), with approximately 14% of the genetic component of schizophrenia shared with that for performance IQ. Our results support the presence of shared common genetic factors between schizophrenia and childhood cognitive ability. We observe a genetic relationship between schizophrenia and performance IQ but not verbal IQ or other cognitive variables, which may have implications for studies utilizing cognitive endophenotypes for psychosis.

  7. Parents' Attitudes Toward Pediatric Genetic Testing for Common Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hensley Alford, Sharon; Emmons, Karen M.; Lipkus, Isaac M.; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; McBride, Colleen M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe parents' attitudes toward pediatric genetic testing for common, adult-onset health conditions and to identify factors underlying these attitudes. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Parents (n = 219) enrolled in a large, group-practice health plan were offered a “multiplex” genetic test for susceptibility to 8 common, adult-onset health conditions and completed an online survey assessing attitudes and beliefs about the risks and benefits of the test for their child, their willingness to consider having their child tested, and other psychosocial variables. RESULTS: Parents viewed the benefits of pediatric testing to outweigh its risks (positive decisional balance) and were moderately interested in pediatric testing. Variables associated with positive decisional balance included greater interest in knowing about gene-health associations in their child, anticipation of less difficulty understanding their child's genetic health risks, and more positive emotional reactions to learning about their child's decreased health risks (adjusted R2 = 0.33, P < .0001). Similarly, variables associated with greater parental willingness to test were being a mother (versus being a father), greater perceived risk of diseases in their child, greater interest in knowing about gene-health relationships in their child, anticipating less difficulty learning about their child's genetic health risks, anticipating more positive emotional reactions to learning about their child's decreased health risks, and positive decisional balance (adjusted R2 = 0.57, P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: As genetic susceptibility testing for common, adult-onset health conditions proliferates, pediatricians should anticipate parents' interest in testing children and be prepared to facilitate informed decision making about such testing. PMID:21502235

  8. Progress and promise in understanding the genetic basis of common diseases

    PubMed Central

    Price, Alkes L.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Donnelly, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility to common human diseases is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The explosive growth of genetic data, and the knowledge that it is generating, are transforming our biological understanding of these diseases. In this review, we describe the technological and analytical advances that have enabled genome-wide association studies to be successful in identifying a large number of genetic variants robustly associated with common disease. We examine the biological insights that these genetic associations are beginning to produce, from functional mechanisms involving individual genes to biological pathways linking associated genes, and the identification of functional annotations, some of which are cell-type-specific, enriched in disease associations. Although most efforts have focused on identifying and interpreting genetic variants that are irrefutably associated with disease, it is increasingly clear that—even at large sample sizes—these represent only the tip of the iceberg of genetic signal, motivating polygenic analyses that consider the effects of genetic variants throughout the genome, including modest effects that are not individually statistically significant. As data from an increasingly large number of diseases and traits are analysed, pleiotropic effects (defined as genetic loci affecting multiple phenotypes) can help integrate our biological understanding. Looking forward, the next generation of population-scale data resources, linking genomic information with health outcomes, will lead to another step-change in our ability to understand, and treat, common diseases. PMID:26702037

  9. Identification of common genetic variation that modulates alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Hull, Jeremy; Campino, Susana; Rowlands, Kate; Chan, Man-Suen; Copley, Richard R; Taylor, Martin S; Rockett, Kirk; Elvidge, Gareth; Keating, Brendan; Knight, Julian; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2007-06-01

    Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by naturally occurring DNA sequence variation and in particular by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In this study, we surveyed the splicing patterns of 250 exons in 22 individuals who had been previously genotyped by the International HapMap Project. We identified 70 simple cassette exon alternative splicing events in our experimental system; for six of these, we detected consistent differences in splicing pattern between individuals, with a highly significant association between splice phenotype and neighbouring SNPs. Remarkably, for five out of six of these events, the strongest correlation was found with the SNP closest to the intron-exon boundary, although the distance between these SNPs and the intron-exon boundary ranged from 2 bp to greater than 1,000 bp. Two of these SNPs were further investigated using a minigene splicing system, and in each case the SNPs were found to exert cis-acting effects on exon splicing efficiency in vitro. The functional consequences of these SNPs could not be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms. Our findings suggest that phenotypic variation in splicing patterns is determined by the presence of SNPs within flanking introns or exons. Effects on splicing may represent an important mechanism by which SNPs influence gene function.

  10. Monogenic mouse models of autism spectrum disorders: Common mechanisms and missing links.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S W; Jiang, Y-H

    2016-05-03

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present unique challenges in the fields of genetics and neurobiology because of the clinical and molecular heterogeneity underlying these disorders. Genetic mutations found in ASD patients provide opportunities to dissect the molecular and circuit mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors using animal models. Ongoing studies of genetically modified models have offered critical insight into possible common mechanisms arising from different mutations, but links between molecular abnormalities and behavioral phenotypes remain elusive. The challenges encountered in modeling autism in mice demand a new analytic paradigm that integrates behavioral assessment with circuit-level analysis in genetically modified models with strong construct validity.

  11. Cochlear Implantation in Common Forms of Genetic Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Vivero, Richard J.; Fan, Kenneth; Angeli, Simon; Balkany, Thomas J; Liu, Xue Z

    2010-01-01

    Genetic factors are among the main etiologies of severe to profound hearing loss and may play an important role in cochlear implantation (CI) outcomes. While genes for common forms of deafness have been cloned, efforts to correlate the functional outcome of CIs with a genetic form of deafness carried by the patient have been largely anecdotal to date. It has been suggested that the differences in auditory performance may be explained by differences in the number of surviving spiral ganglion cells, etiology of hearing loss, and other factors. Knowledge of the specific loci and mutations involved in patients who receive cochlear implants may elucidate other factors related to CI performance. In this review article, current knowledge of cochlear implants for hereditary hearing loss will be discussed with an emphasis on relevant clinical genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:20655117

  12. Cochlear implantation in common forms of genetic deafness.

    PubMed

    Vivero, Richard J; Fan, Kenneth; Angeli, Simon; Balkany, Thomas J; Liu, Xue Z

    2010-10-01

    Genetic factors are among the main etiologies of severe to profound hearing loss and may play an important role in cochlear implantation (CI) outcomes. While genes for common forms of deafness have been cloned, efforts to correlate the functional outcome of CIs with a genetic form of deafness carried by the patient have been largely anecdotal to date. It has been suggested that the differences in auditory performance may be explained by differences in the number of surviving spiral ganglion cells, etiology of hearing loss, and other factors. Knowledge of the specific loci and mutations involved in patients who receive cochlear implants may elucidate other factors related to CI performance. In this review article, current knowledge of cochlear implants for hereditary hearing loss will be discussed with an emphasis on relevant clinical genotype-phenotype correlations.

  13. Genetic mechanisms of pollution resistance in a marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Galletly, Bronwyn C; Blows, Mark W; Marshall, Dustin J

    2007-12-01

    Pollution is a common stress in the marine environment and one of today's most powerful agents of selection, yet we have little understanding of how anthropogenic toxicants influence mechanisms of adaptation in marine populations. Due to their life history strategies, marine invertebrates are unable to avoid stress and must adapt to variable environments. We examined the genetic basis of pollution resistance across multiple environments using the marine invertebrate, Styela plicata. Gametes were crossed in a quantitative genetic breeding design to enable partitioning of additive genetic variance across a concentration gradient of a common marine pollutant, copper. Hatching success was scored as a measure of stress resistance in copper concentrations of 0, 75, 150, and 350 microg/L. There was a significant genotype x environment interaction in hatching success across copper concentrations. Further analysis using factor analytic modeling confirmed a significant dimension of across-environment genetic variation where the genetic basis of resistance to stress in the first three environments differed from that in the environment of highest copper concentration. A second genetic dimension further differentiated between the genetic basis of resistance to low and high stress environments. These results suggest that marine organisms use different genetic mechanisms to adapt to different levels of pollution and that the level of genetic variation to adapt to intense pollution stresses may be limited.

  14. New IBD genetics: common pathways with other diseases.

    PubMed

    Lees, C W; Barrett, J C; Parkes, M; Satsangi, J

    2011-12-01

    Complex disease genetics has been revolutionised in recent years by the advent of genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have seen notable successes culminating in the discovery of 99 published susceptibility loci/genes (71 Crohn's disease; 47 ulcerative colitis) to date. Approximately one-third of loci described confer susceptibility to both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Amongst these are multiple genes involved in IL23/Th17 signalling (IL23R, IL12B, JAK2, TYK2 and STAT3), IL10, IL1R2, REL, CARD9, NKX2.3, ICOSLG, PRDM1, SMAD3 and ORMDL3. The evolving genetic architecture of IBD has furthered our understanding of disease pathogenesis. For Crohn's disease, defective processing of intracellular bacteria has become a central theme, following gene discoveries in autophagy and innate immunity (associations with NOD2, IRGM, ATG16L1 are specific to Crohn's disease). Genetic evidence has also demonstrated the importance of barrier function to the development of ulcerative colitis (HNF4A, LAMB1, CDH1 and GNA12). However, when the data are analysed in more detail, deeper themes emerge including the shared susceptibility seen with other diseases. Many immune-mediated diseases overlap in this respect, paralleling the reported epidemiological evidence. However, in several cases the reported shared susceptibility appears at odds with the clinical picture. Examples include both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review we will detail the presently available data on the genetic overlap between IBD and other diseases. The discussion will be informed by the epidemiological data in the published literature and the implications for pathogenesis and therapy will be outlined. This arena will move forwards very quickly in the next few years. Ultimately, we anticipate that these genetic insights will transform the landscape of common complex diseases such as IBD.

  15. Common Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Blood Biomarker Measurements in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, M. Bradley; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Yang, Jenny; Chen, Ting-huei; Quibrera, Pedro Miguel; Anderson, Wayne; Barr, R. Graham; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Beaty, Terri; Casaburi, Richard; Castaldi, Peter; Cho, Michael H.; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Criner, Gerard; Demeo, Dawn; Christenson, Stephanie A.; Couper, David J.; Doerschuk, Claire M.; Freeman, Christine M.; Gouskova, Natalia A.; Han, MeiLan K.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hersh, Craig P.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Kaner, Robert J.; Kanner, Richard E.; Kleerup, Eric C.; Lutz, Sharon; Martinez, Fernando J.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Peters, Stephen P.; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Silverman, Edwin K.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Bowler, Russell P.

    2016-01-01

    conclusion, given the frequency of highly significant local pQTLs, the large amount of variance potentially explained by pQTL, and the differences observed between pQTLs and eQTLs SNPs, we recommend that protein biomarker-disease association studies take into account the potential effect of common local SNPs and that pQTLs be integrated along with eQTLs to uncover disease mechanisms. Large-scale blood biomarker studies would also benefit from close attention to the ABO blood group. PMID:27532455

  16. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  17. Factors of skin ageing share common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Giacomoni, P U; Rein, G

    2001-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as the accumulation of molecular modifications which manifest as macroscopic clinical changes. Human skin, unique among mammalians insofar as it is deprived of fur, is particularly sensitive to environmental stress. Major environmental factors have been recognized to induce modifications of the morphological and biophysical properties of the skin. Metabolites from ingested or inhaled substances do affect skin, which is also sensitive to endogenous hormone levels. Factors as diverse as ultraviolet radiation, atmospheric pollution, wounds, infections, traumatisms, anoxya, cigarette smoke, and hormonal status have a role in increasing the rate of accumulation of molecular modifications and have thus been termed 'factors of ageing'. All these factors share as a common feature, the capability to directly or indirectly induce one of the steps of the micro-inflammatory cycle, which includes the expression of ICAM-1 in endothelial cells. This triggers a process leading to the accumulation of damages in the skin resulting in skin ageing since ICAM-1 expression provokes recruitment and diapedesis of circulating immune cells, which digest the extracellular matrix (ECM) by secreting collagenases, myeloperoxidases and reactive oxygen species. The activation of these lytic processes provokes random damage to resident cells, which in turn secrete prostaglandines and leukotrienes. These signaling molecules induce the degranulation of resident mast cells which release the autacoid histamine and the cytokine TNF-alpha thus activating endothelial cells lining adjacent capillaries which release P-selectin and synthesize ICAM-1. This closes a self-maintained micro-inflammatory cycle, which results in the accumulation of ECM damage, i.e. skin aging. In this paper we review the evidence that two factors able to induce macroscopical and molecular modifications in the skin, protein glycation and stretch, activate the micro-inflammatory cycle. We further present

  18. Genetic Diagnosis Using Whole Exome Sequencing in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maffucci, Patrick; Filion, Charles A.; Boisson, Bertrand; Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has proven an effective tool for the discovery of genetic defects in patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). However, success in dissecting the genetic etiology of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has been limited. We outline a practical framework for using WES to identify causative genetic defects in these subjects. WES was performed on 50 subjects diagnosed with CVID who had at least one of the following criteria: early onset, autoimmune/inflammatory manifestations, low B lymphocytes, and/or familial history of hypogammaglobulinemia. Following alignment and variant calling, exomes were screened for mutations in 269 PID-causing genes. Variants were filtered based on the mode of inheritance and reported frequency in the general population. Each variant was assessed by study of familial segregation and computational predictions of deleteriousness. Out of 433 variations in PID-associated genes, we identified 17 probable disease-causing mutations in 15 patients (30%). These variations were rare or private and included monoallelic mutations in NFKB1, STAT3, CTLA4, PIK3CD, and IKZF1, and biallelic mutations in LRBA and STXBP2. Forty-two other damaging variants were found but were not considered likely disease-causing based on the mode of inheritance and/or patient phenotype. WES combined with analysis of PID-associated genes is a cost-effective approach to identify disease-causing mutations in CVID patients with severe phenotypes and was successful in 30% of our cohort. As targeted therapeutics are becoming the mainstay of treatment for non-infectious manifestations in CVID, this approach will improve management of patients with more severe phenotypes. PMID:27379089

  19. Caveats in modeling a common motif in genetic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labavić, Darka; Nagel, Hannes; Janke, Wolfhard; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2013-06-01

    From a coarse-grained perspective, the motif of a self-activating species, activating a second species that acts as its own repressor, is widely found in biological systems, in particular in genetic systems with inherent oscillatory behavior. Here we consider a specific realization of this motif as a genetic circuit, termed the bistable frustrated unit, in which genes are described as directly producing proteins. Upon an improved resolution in time, we focus on the effect that inherent time scales on the underlying scale can have on the bifurcation patterns on a coarser scale. Time scales are set by the binding and unbinding rates of the transcription factors to the promoter regions of the genes. Depending on the ratio of these rates to the decay times of both proteins, the appropriate averaging procedure for obtaining a coarse-grained description changes and leads to sets of deterministic equations, which considerably differ in their bifurcation structure. In particular, the desired intermediate range of regular limit cycles fades away when the binding rates of genes are not fast as compared to the decay time of the proteins. Our analysis illustrates that the common topology of the widely found motif alone does not imply universal features in the dynamics.

  20. MCDK, UPJO, and VUR: A common genetic cause

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, W.L.M.; Rogers, R.C.; Leung, A.K.C.

    1995-11-20

    Devriendt and Fryns suggest the possibility that multicystic dysplasia of the kidney (MCDK) and uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) may have a common genetic cause transmitted as an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression, and that a candidate gene is localized on chromosome arm 6p. Izquierdo et al. reported that 4 of 5 families with autosomal dominant hereditary hydronephrosis demonstrated linkage to the major histocompatibility locus at 6p21. Fryns et al. provide further support for their hypothesis by reporting a fetus with bilateral MCDK and an associated de novo balanced translocation (6;19) (p23.1; q13.4). We agree that a genetically determined disturbance in blood supply to the ureteric bud might cause MCDK and UPJO. Devriendt and Fryns further suggest that vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) might also be caused by permutations of the candidate gene on 6p. Contralateral VUR has been reported in 11 to 28% of patients with MCDK. In patients with unilateral renal agenesis (URA), VUR has been noted in 15 to 30% of patients. VUR has been noted in up to 40% of patients with UPJO. The frequent occurrence of VUR in URA, MCDK, and UPJO supports the suggestion by Devriendt and Fryns that this association might be linked to different mutations in a single gene. 10 refs.

  1. Genetic determinants of common obesity and their value in prediction.

    PubMed

    Loos, Ruth J F

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revolutionised the discovery of genes for common traits and diseases, including obesity-related traits. In less then four years time, 52 genetic loci were identified to be unequivocally associated with obesity-related traits. This vast success raised hope and expectations that genetic information would become soon an integral part of personalised medicine. However, these loci have only small effects on obesity-susceptibility and explain just a fraction of the total variance. As such, their accuracy to predict obesity is poor and not competitive with the predictive ability of traditional risk factors. Nevertheless, some of these loci are being used in commercially available personal genome tests to estimate individuals' lifetime risk of obesity. While proponents believe that personal genome profiling could have beneficial effects on behaviour, early reports do not support this hypothesis. To conclude, the most valuable contribution of GWAS-identified loci lies in their contribution to elucidating new physiological pathways that underlie obesity-susceptibility.

  2. Most common 'sporadic' cancers have a significant germline genetic component.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Ek, Weronica E; Whiteman, David; Vaughan, Thomas L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D; Thompson, Deborah J; Dunning, Alison M; Hayward, Nicholas K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Macgregor, Stuart

    2014-11-15

    Common cancers have been demarcated into 'hereditary' or 'sporadic' ('non-hereditary') types historically. Such distinctions initially arose from work identifying rare, highly penetrant germline mutations causing 'hereditary' cancer. While rare mutations are important in particular families, most cases in the general population are 'sporadic'. Twin studies have suggested that many 'sporadic' cancers show little or no heritability. To quantify the role of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility, we applied a method for estimating the importance of common genetic variants (array heritability, h(2)g) to twelve cancer types. The following cancers showed a significant (P < 0.05) array heritability: melanoma USA set h(2)g = 0.19 (95% CI = 0.01-0.37) and Australian set h(2)g = 0.30 (0.10-0.50); pancreatic h(2)g = 0.18 (0.06-0.30); prostate h(2)g = 0.81 (0.32-1); kidney h(2)g = 0.18 (0.04-0.32); ovarian h(2)g = 0.30 (0.18-0.42); esophageal adenocarcinoma h(2)g = 0.24 (0.14-0.34); esophageal squamous cell carcinoma h(2)g = 0.19 (0.07-0.31); endometrial UK set h(2)g = 0.23 (0.01-0.45) and Australian set h(2)g = 0.39 (0.02-0.76). Three cancers showed a positive but non-significant effect: breast h(2) g = 0.13 (0-0.56); gastric h(2)g = 0.11 (0-0.27); lung h(2)g = 0.10 (0-0.24). One cancer showed a small effect: bladder h(2)g = 0.01 (0-0.11). Among these cancers, previous twin studies were only able to show heritability for prostate and breast cancer, but we can now make much stronger statements for several common cancers which emphasize the important role of genetic variants in cancer susceptibility. We have demonstrated that several 'sporadic' cancers have a significant inherited component. Larger genome-wide association studies in these cancers will continue to find more loci, which explain part of the remaining polygenic component.

  3. Low-frequency and common genetic variation in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rainer; Traylor, Matthew; Pulit, Sara L.; Bevan, Steve; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Zhao, Wei; Abrantes, Patricia; Amouyel, Philippe; Attia, John R.; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Berger, Klaus; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Chauhan, Ganesh; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Clarke, Robert; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Debette, Stephanie; Falcone, Guido J.; Ferro, Jose M.; Gamble, Dale M.; Ilinca, Andreea; Kittner, Steven J.; Kourkoulis, Christina E.; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Christopher R.; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Arne; Liu, Jingmin; Meschia, James F.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Oliveira, Sofia A.; Pera, Joana; Reiner, Alex P.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Thijs, Vincent; Vicente, Astrid M.; Woo, Daniel; Seshadri, Sudha; Saleheen, Danish; Rosand, Jonathan; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of common and low-frequency genetic variants on the risk of ischemic stroke (all IS) and etiologic stroke subtypes. Methods: We meta-analyzed 12 individual genome-wide association studies comprising 10,307 cases and 19,326 controls imputed to the 1000 Genomes (1 KG) phase I reference panel. We selected variants showing the highest degree of association (p < 1E-5) in the discovery phase for replication in Caucasian (13,435 cases and 29,269 controls) and South Asian (2,385 cases and 5,193 controls) samples followed by a transethnic meta-analysis. We further investigated the p value distribution for different bins of allele frequencies for all IS and stroke subtypes. Results: We showed genome-wide significance for 4 loci: ABO for all IS, HDAC9 for large vessel disease (LVD), and both PITX2 and ZFHX3 for cardioembolic stroke (CE). We further refined the association peaks for ABO and PITX2. Analyzing different allele frequency bins, we showed significant enrichment in low-frequency variants (allele frequency <5%) for both LVD and small vessel disease, and an enrichment of higher frequency variants (allele frequency 10% and 30%) for CE (all p < 1E-5). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the missing heritability in IS subtypes can in part be attributed to low-frequency and rare variants. Larger sample sizes are needed to identify the variants associated with all IS and stroke subtypes. PMID:26935894

  4. Convergence of circuit dysfunction in ASD: a common bridge between diverse genetic and environmental risk factors and common clinical electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Port, Russell G.; Gandal, Michael J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Siegel, Steven J.; Carlson, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Most recent estimates indicate that 1 in 68 children are affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Though decades of research have uncovered much about these disorders, the pathological mechanism remains unknown. Hampering efforts is the seeming inability to integrate findings over the micro to macro scales of study, from changes in molecular, synaptic and cellular function to large-scale brain dysfunction impacting sensory, communicative, motor and cognitive activity. In this review, we describe how studies focusing on neuronal circuit function provide unique context for identifying common neurobiological disease mechanisms of ASD. We discuss how recent EEG and MEG studies in subjects with ASD have repeatedly shown alterations in ensemble population recordings (both in simple evoked related potential latencies and specific frequency subcomponents). Because these disease-associated electrophysiological abnormalities have been recapitulated in rodent models, studying circuit differences in these models may provide access to abnormal circuit function found in ASD. We then identify emerging in vivo and ex vivo techniques, focusing on how these assays can characterize circuit level dysfunction and determine if these abnormalities underlie abnormal clinical electrophysiology. Such circuit level study in animal models may help us understand how diverse genetic and environmental risks can produce a common set of EEG, MEG and anatomical abnormalities found in ASD. PMID:25538564

  5. Convergence of circuit dysfunction in ASD: a common bridge between diverse genetic and environmental risk factors and common clinical electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Port, Russell G; Gandal, Michael J; Roberts, Timothy P L; Siegel, Steven J; Carlson, Gregory C

    2014-01-01

    Most recent estimates indicate that 1 in 68 children are affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Though decades of research have uncovered much about these disorders, the pathological mechanism remains unknown. Hampering efforts is the seeming inability to integrate findings over the micro to macro scales of study, from changes in molecular, synaptic and cellular function to large-scale brain dysfunction impacting sensory, communicative, motor and cognitive activity. In this review, we describe how studies focusing on neuronal circuit function provide unique context for identifying common neurobiological disease mechanisms of ASD. We discuss how recent EEG and MEG studies in subjects with ASD have repeatedly shown alterations in ensemble population recordings (both in simple evoked related potential latencies and specific frequency subcomponents). Because these disease-associated electrophysiological abnormalities have been recapitulated in rodent models, studying circuit differences in these models may provide access to abnormal circuit function found in ASD. We then identify emerging in vivo and ex vivo techniques, focusing on how these assays can characterize circuit level dysfunction and determine if these abnormalities underlie abnormal clinical electrophysiology. Such circuit level study in animal models may help us understand how diverse genetic and environmental risks can produce a common set of EEG, MEG and anatomical abnormalities found in ASD.

  6. Kin-Aggregations Explain Chaotic Genetic Patchiness, a Commonly Observed Genetic Pattern, in a Marine Fish.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Jason D; Hogan, J Derek; Downey-Wall, Alan M; Gurski, Lauren M; Portnoy, David S; Heath, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of chaotic genetic patchiness is a pattern commonly seen in marine organisms, particularly those with demersal adults and pelagic larvae. This pattern is usually associated with sweepstakes recruitment and variable reproductive success. Here we investigate the biological underpinnings of this pattern in a species of marine goby Coryphopterus personatus. We find that populations of this species show tell-tale signs of chaotic genetic patchiness including: small, but significant, differences in genetic structure over short distances; a non-equilibrium or "chaotic" pattern of differentiation among locations in space; and within locus, within population deviations from the expectations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). We show that despite having a pelagic larval stage, and a wide distribution across Caribbean coral reefs, this species forms groups of highly related individuals at small spatial scales (<10 metres). These spatially clustered family groups cause the observed deviations from HWE and local population differentiation, a finding that is rarely demonstrated, but could be more common than previously thought.

  7. Kin-Aggregations Explain Chaotic Genetic Patchiness, a Commonly Observed Genetic Pattern, in a Marine Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, J. Derek; Downey-Wall, Alan M.; Gurski, Lauren M.; Portnoy, David S.; Heath, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of chaotic genetic patchiness is a pattern commonly seen in marine organisms, particularly those with demersal adults and pelagic larvae. This pattern is usually associated with sweepstakes recruitment and variable reproductive success. Here we investigate the biological underpinnings of this pattern in a species of marine goby Coryphopterus personatus. We find that populations of this species show tell-tale signs of chaotic genetic patchiness including: small, but significant, differences in genetic structure over short distances; a non-equilibrium or “chaotic” pattern of differentiation among locations in space; and within locus, within population deviations from the expectations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). We show that despite having a pelagic larval stage, and a wide distribution across Caribbean coral reefs, this species forms groups of highly related individuals at small spatial scales (<10 metres). These spatially clustered family groups cause the observed deviations from HWE and local population differentiation, a finding that is rarely demonstrated, but could be more common than previously thought. PMID:27119659

  8. Deconstructing Mendel: new paradigms in genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, D; Glerum, D M; Wevrick, R

    2000-06-01

    As knowledge of the mechanisms of genetic action expands, this new information must be incorporated into the whole. The result is that old concepts are modified or deleted or new paradigms are created. The authors review advances in the understanding of traditional and nontraditional inheritance, including genomic imprinting and mitochondrial inheritance.

  9. Additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Calero, Olga; Soriano, Eduardo; Avila, Jesús; Medina, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mostly associated with early onset, is caused by mutations in three genes (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) involved in the production of the amyloid β peptide. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the most common late onset sporadic AD remain largely unknown. With the implementation of an increasing number of case-control studies and the upcoming of large-scale genome-wide association studies there is a mounting list of genetic risk factors associated with common genetic variants that have been associated with sporadic AD. Besides apolipoprotein E, that presents a strong association with the disease (OR∼4), the rest of these genes have moderate or low degrees of association, with OR ranging from 0.88 to 1.23. Taking together, these genes may account only for a fraction of the attributable AD risk and therefore, rare variants and epistastic gene interactions should be taken into account in order to get the full picture of the genetic risks associated with AD. Here, we review recent whole-exome studies looking for rare variants, somatic brain mutations with a strong association to the disease, and several studies dealing with epistasis as additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to AD. Altogether, recent evidence underlines the importance of defining molecular and genetic pathways, and networks rather than the contribution of specific genes. PMID:25914626

  10. Genetic Correlation between Body Fat Percentage and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Suggests Common Genetic Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Gjesing, Anette P.; Sandholt, Camilla H.; Jonsson, Anna; Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Have, Christian T.; Ekstrøm, Claus T.; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise; Brage, Soren; Witte, Daniel R.; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Aadahl, Mette; Thuesen, Betina H.; Linneberg, Allan; Eiberg, Hans; Pedersen, Oluf; Grarup, Niels; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Hansen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Objectives It has long been discussed whether fitness or fatness is a more important determinant of health status. If the same genetic factors that promote body fat percentage (body fat%) are related to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), part of the concurrent associations with health outcomes could reflect a common genetic origin. In this study we aimed to 1) examine genetic correlations between body fat% and CRF; 2) determine whether CRF can be attributed to a genetic risk score (GRS) based on known body fat% increasing loci; and 3) examine whether the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) locus associates with CRF. Methods Genetic correlations based on pedigree information were examined in a family based cohort (n = 230 from 55 families). For the genetic association analyses, we examined two Danish population-based cohorts (ntotal = 3206). The body fat% GRS was created by summing the alleles of twelve independent risk variants known to associate with body fat%. We assessed CRF as maximal oxygen uptake expressed in millilitres of oxygen uptake per kg of body mass (VO2max), per kg fat-free mass (VO2maxFFM), or per kg fat mass (VO2maxFM). All analyses were adjusted for age and sex, and when relevant, for body composition. Results We found a significant negative genetic correlation between VO2max and body fat% (ρG = -0.72 (SE ±0.13)). The body fat% GRS associated with decreased VO2max (β = -0.15 mL/kg/min per allele, p = 0.0034, age and sex adjusted). The body fat%-increasing FTO allele was associated with a 0.42 mL/kg/min unit decrease in VO2max per allele (p = 0.0092, age and sex adjusted). Both associations were abolished after additional adjustment for body fat%. The fat% increasing GRS and FTO risk allele were associated with decreased VO2maxFM but not with VO2maxFFM. Conclusions Our findings suggest a shared genetic etiology between whole body fat% and CRF. PMID:27846319

  11. [Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in obesity].

    PubMed

    Hinney, A; Herrfurth, N; Schonnop, L; Volckmar, A-L

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a relevant medical problem. Around 60 % of German adults are overweight, 20 % are obese. The hereditary contribution to the variance of body weight is high. Nevertheless, molecular genetic studies have as yet explained only a small part of the inter-individual variability in the body mass index (BMI). Monogenic forms of obesity, in which loss of a single gene product leads to extreme obesity, are very infrequent. Variance of body weight is commonly explained by a complex interplay of many genetic variants (polygenic obesity). Each variant contributes only a small amount to the body weight. Currently, the largest published analysis of individuals of European origin identified 32 genetic variations (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) associated with BMI (obesity). Overall, these polygenic obesity variants only explain about 5 % of the variance of the BMI. In addition to the DNA variants epigenetic factors seem to also play a role in body weight regulation. These epigenetic marks can change in the course of life. They might provide an interface between genetic and environmental influences. It is conceivable that in future it will be possible to use epigenetic and genetic markers to detect a predisposition for obesity and to improve prevention and therapy.

  12. Do common eiders nest in kin groups? Microgeographic genetic structure in a philopatric sea duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.; Lanctot, Richard B.; McCracken, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated local genetic associations among female Pacific common eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum) nesting in a stochastic Arctic environment within two groups of barrier islands (Simpson Lagoon and Mikkelsen Bay) in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Nonrandom genetic associations were observed among nesting females using regional spatial autocorrelation analyses for distance classes up to 1000 m in Simpson Lagoon. Nearest-neighbour analyses identified clusters of genetically related females with positive lr values observed for 0-13% and 0-7% of the comparisons in Simpson Lagoon and Mikkelsen Bay, respectively, across years. These results indicate that a proportion of females are nesting in close proximity to more genetically related individuals, albeit at low frequency. Such kin groupings may form through active association between relatives or through natal philopatry and breeding site fidelity. Eiders nest in close association with driftwood, which is redistributed annually by seasonal storms. Yet, genetic associations were still observed. Microgeographic structure may thus be more attributable to kin association than natal philopatry and site fidelity. However, habitat availability may also influence the level of structure observed. Regional structure was present only within Simpson Lagoon and this island group includes at least three islands with sufficient driftwood for colonies, whereas only one island at Mikkelsen Bay has these features. A long-term demographic study is needed to understand more fully the mechanisms that lead to fine-scale genetic structure observed in common eiders breeding in the Beaufort Sea. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Common structure and toxic function of amyloid oligomers implies a common mechanism of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Glabe, Charles G; Kayed, Rakez

    2006-01-24

    Recent findings indicate that soluble amyloid oligomers may represent the primary pathologic species in degenerative diseases. These amyloid oligomers share common structural features and the ability to permeabilize membranes, suggesting that they also share a common primary mechanism of pathogenesis. Membrane permeabilization by amyloid oligomers may initiate a common group of downstream pathologic processes, including intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis, production of reactive oxygen species, altered signaling pathways, and mitochondrial dysfunction that represent key effectors of cellular dysfunction and cell death in amyloid-associated degenerative disease, such as sporadic inclusion-body myositis.

  14. Common mechanism underlies repeated evolution of extreme pollution tolerance.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Andrew; Pilcher, Whitney; Champlin, Denise; Nacci, Diane

    2012-02-07

    Human alterations to the environment can exert strong evolutionary pressures, yet contemporary adaptation to human-mediated stressors is rarely documented in wildlife populations. A common-garden experimental design was coupled with comparative transcriptomics to discover evolved mechanisms enabling three populations of killifish resident in urban estuaries to survive normally lethal pollution exposure during development, and to test whether mechanisms are unique or common across populations. We show that killifish populations from these polluted sites have independently converged on a common adaptive mechanism, despite variation in contaminant profiles among sites. These populations are united by a similarly profound desensitization of aryl-hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcriptional activation, which is associated with extreme tolerance to the lethal effects of toxic dioxin-like pollutants. The rapid, repeated, heritable and convergent nature of evolved tolerance suggests that ancestral killifish populations harboured genotypes that enabled adaptation to twentieth-century industrial pollutants.

  15. Common mechanism underlies repeated evolution of extreme pollution tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Andrew; Pilcher, Whitney; Champlin, Denise; Nacci, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Human alterations to the environment can exert strong evolutionary pressures, yet contemporary adaptation to human-mediated stressors is rarely documented in wildlife populations. A common-garden experimental design was coupled with comparative transcriptomics to discover evolved mechanisms enabling three populations of killifish resident in urban estuaries to survive normally lethal pollution exposure during development, and to test whether mechanisms are unique or common across populations. We show that killifish populations from these polluted sites have independently converged on a common adaptive mechanism, despite variation in contaminant profiles among sites. These populations are united by a similarly profound desensitization of aryl-hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcriptional activation, which is associated with extreme tolerance to the lethal effects of toxic dioxin-like pollutants. The rapid, repeated, heritable and convergent nature of evolved tolerance suggests that ancestral killifish populations harboured genotypes that enabled adaptation to twentieth-century industrial pollutants. PMID:21733895

  16. Genome-wide genetic investigation of serological measures of common infections

    PubMed Central

    Rubicz, Rohina; Yolken, Robert; Drigalenko, Eugene; Carless, Melanie A; Dyer, Thomas D; Kent Jr, Jack; Curran, Joanne E; Johnson, Matthew P; Cole, Shelley A; Fowler, Sharon P; Arya, Rector; Puppala, Sobha; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K; Kraig, Ellen; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John; Leach, Charles T; Göring, Harald HH

    2015-01-01

    Populations and individuals differ in susceptibility to infections because of a number of factors, including host genetic variation. We previously demonstrated that differences in antibody titer, which reflect infection history, are significantly heritable. Here we attempt to identify the genetic factors influencing variation in these serological phenotypes. Blood samples from >1300 Mexican Americans were quantified for IgG antibody level against 12 common infections, selected on the basis of their reported role in cardiovascular disease risk: Chlamydia pneumoniae; Helicobacter pylori; Toxoplasma gondii; cytomegalovirus; herpes simplex I virus; herpes simplex II virus; human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6); human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8); varicella zoster virus; hepatitis A virus (HAV); influenza A virus; and influenza B virus. Pathogen-specific quantitative antibody levels were analyzed, as were three measures of pathogen burden. Genome-wide linkage and joint linkage and association analyses were performed using ~1 million SNPs. Significant linkage (lod scores >3.0) was obtained for HHV6 (on chromosome 7), HHV8 (on chromosome 6), and HAV (on chromosome 13). SNP rs4812712 on chromosome 20 was significantly associated with C. pneumoniae (P=5.3 × 10−8). However, no genome-wide significant loci were obtained for the other investigated antibodies. We conclude that it is possible to localize host genetic factors influencing some of these antibody traits, but that further larger-scale investigations will be required to elucidate the genetic mechanisms contributing to variation in antibody levels. PMID:25758998

  17. Mean Platelet Volume and Arterial Stiffness – Clinical Relationship and Common Genetic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Panova-Noeva, Marina; Arnold, Natalie; Hermanns, M. Iris; Prochaska, Jürgen H.; Schulz, Andreas; Spronk, Henri M.; Binder, Harald; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Beutel, Manfred; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Lotz, Johannes; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J.; ten Cate, Hugo; Wild, Philipp S.

    2017-01-01

    Vessel wall stiffening is an important clinical parameter, but it is unknown whether platelets, key elements in the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis, are associated with arterial stiffness. The present studies sought to determine whether mean platelet volume (MPV), a potential marker of platelet activation, is linked to vascular elasticity as assessed by the augmentation index (AIx), in 15,010 individuals from the population-based Gutenberg Health Study. Multivariable analysis showed that MPV in both males (β 0.776; 95thCI [0.250;1.16]; p = 0.0024) and females (β 0.881[0.328;1.43]; p = 0.0018) is strongly associated with AIx. Individuals with MPV and AIx above the sex-specific medians had worse survival. Association analysis between MPV-related genetic variants and arterial stiffness identified four genetic variants in males and one in females related with AIx. Cox regression analysis for mortality identified one of these joint genetic variants close to ring finger protein 145 gene (RNF145, rs10076782) linked with increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.02; 95thCI [1.35;3.02]; p = 0.00061). Thus, these population-based data demonstrate a close relation between platelet volume as a potential marker of platelet activation and arterial stiffness in both sexes. Further research is warranted to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying larger platelets‘ role in arterial stiffening including the role of shared common genetics. PMID:28059166

  18. Chemoconvulsant-induced seizure susceptibility: toward a common genetic basis?

    PubMed

    Chaix, Yohan; Ferraro, Thomas N; Lapouble, Eve; Martin, Benoît

    2007-01-01

    Despite the efforts employed, understanding the genetic architecture underlying epilepsy remains difficult. To reach this aim, convulsive epilepsies are classically modeled in mice, where genetic studies are less constricting than in humans. Pharmacogenetic approaches are one major source of investigation where kainic acid, pentylenetetrazol, and the ss-carboline family represent compounds that are used extensively. Several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influencing the convulsant effects of these drugs have been mapped using either recombinant inbred strains (RIS) or segregating F2 populations (or both). In our laboratory, we have recently mapped two QTLs for methyl 6, 7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-ss-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), and seizure response using an F2 method. One is located on the distal part of Chromosome 1, a region implicated in a number of other studies. Here, we address the general importance of this chromosomal fragment for influencing seizure susceptibility.

  19. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is

  20. Identification of Toxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Their Common Hepatotoxicity Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinmiao; Kang, Hong; Feng, Jun; Yang, Yiyan; Tang, Kailin; Zhu, Ruixin; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs) are currently one of the most important botanical hepatotoxic ingredients. Glutathion (GSH) metabolism is the most reported pathway involved in hepatotoxicity mechanism of PAs. We speculate that, for different PAs, there should be a common mechanism underlying their hepatotoxicity in GSH metabolism. Computational methods were adopted to test our hypothesis in consideration of the limitations of current experimental approaches. Firstly, the potential targets of 22 PAs (from three major PA types) in GSH metabolism were identified by reverse docking; Secondly, glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) targets pattern was found to be a special characteristic of toxic PAs with stepwise multiple linear regressions; Furthermore, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactions within toxic PAs and these two targets was demonstrated with the ligand-protein interaction analysis; Finally, GSTA1 and GPX1 were proved to be significant nodes in GSH metabolism. Overall, toxic PAs could be identified by GSTA1 and GPX1 targets pattern, which suggests their common hepatotoxicity mechanism: the interfering of detoxication in GSH metabolism. In addition, all the strategies developed here could be extended to studies on toxicity mechanism of other toxins. PMID:26959016

  1. Identification of Toxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Their Common Hepatotoxicity Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinmiao; Kang, Hong; Feng, Jun; Yang, Yiyan; Tang, Kailin; Zhu, Ruixin; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-03-07

    Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs) are currently one of the most important botanical hepatotoxic ingredients. Glutathion (GSH) metabolism is the most reported pathway involved in hepatotoxicity mechanism of PAs. We speculate that, for different PAs, there should be a common mechanism underlying their hepatotoxicity in GSH metabolism. Computational methods were adopted to test our hypothesis in consideration of the limitations of current experimental approaches. Firstly, the potential targets of 22 PAs (from three major PA types) in GSH metabolism were identified by reverse docking; Secondly, glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) targets pattern was found to be a special characteristic of toxic PAs with stepwise multiple linear regressions; Furthermore, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactions within toxic PAs and these two targets was demonstrated with the ligand-protein interaction analysis; Finally, GSTA1 and GPX1 were proved to be significant nodes in GSH metabolism. Overall, toxic PAs could be identified by GSTA1 and GPX1 targets pattern, which suggests their common hepatotoxicity mechanism: the interfering of detoxication in GSH metabolism. In addition, all the strategies developed here could be extended to studies on toxicity mechanism of other toxins.

  2. Common molecular mechanisms in explicit and implicit memory.

    PubMed

    Barco, Angel; Bailey, Craig H; Kandel, Eric R

    2006-06-01

    Cellular and molecular studies of both implicit and explicit memory suggest that experience-dependent modulation of synaptic strength and structure is a fundamental mechanism by which these memories are encoded and stored within the brain. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of two types of memory storage: (i) sensitization in Aplysia, a simple form of implicit memory, and (ii) formation of explicit spatial memories in the mouse hippocampus. These two processes share common molecular mechanisms that have been highly conserved through evolution.

  3. Feline and canine coronaviruses: common genetic and pathobiological features.

    PubMed

    Le Poder, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    A new human coronavirus responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was identified in 2003, which raised concern about coronaviruses as agents of serious infectious disease. Nevertheless, coronaviruses have been known for about 50 years to be major agents of respiratory, enteric, or systemic infections of domestic and companion animals. Feline and canine coronaviruses are widespread among dog and cat populations, sometimes leading to the fatal diseases known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) and pantropic canine coronavirus infection in cats and dogs, respectively. In this paper, different aspects of the genetics, host cell tropism, and pathogenesis of the feline and canine coronaviruses (FCoV and CCoV) will be discussed, with a view to illustrating how study of FCoVs and CCoVs can improve our general understanding of the pathobiology of coronaviruses.

  4. [Genetic polymorphisms commonly influencing efficacy of diverse addictive substances].

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Daisuke; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2014-04-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. The authors have focused on G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel subunits, GIRK2 and GIRK3, that are important molecules in opioid transmission, and found that the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the GIRK2 and GIRK3 gene regions were significantly associated with postoperative requirements of analgesics including opioids in patients who underwent abdominal surgery and mRNA expression of these genes in postmortem specimens, one of which was also associated with vulnerability to methamphetamine (METH) dependence. Further, by conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, the authors found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3-2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate SNP, rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower 'Reward Dependence score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. The results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. These outcomes provide valuable information for the

  5. Population genetics of invasive common carp Cyprinus carpio L. in coastal drainages in eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Haynes, G D; Gilligan, D M; Grewe, P; Moran, C; Nicholas, F W

    2010-10-01

    The common carp Cyprinus carpio introduced in two drainages in eastern Australia are largely descended from European common carp, and in a third drainage they descend largely from East Asian common carp. The partial genetic differentiation among the species in those drainages is consistent with their origins.

  6. Kidney and eye diseases: common risk factors, etiological mechanisms, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chee Wai; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2014-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease is an emerging health problem worldwide. The eye shares striking structural, developmental, and genetic pathways with the kidney, suggesting that kidney disease and ocular disease may be closely linked. A growing number of studies have found associations of chronic kidney disease with age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataract. In addition, retinal microvascular parameters have been shown to be predictive of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease shares common vascular risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and obesity, and pathogenetic mechanisms including inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and microvascular dysfunction, with ocular diseases supporting the 'Common Soil Hypothesis.' In this review, we present major epidemiological evidence for these associations and explore underlying pathogenic mechanisms and common risk factors for kidney and ocular disease. Understanding the link between kidney and ocular disease can lead to the development of new treatment and screening strategies for both diseases.

  7. Epidemiological mechanisms of genetic resistance to kuru

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Katherine E.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Medlock, Jan; Galvani, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), such as kuru, are invariably fatal neurodegenerative conditions caused by a malformation of the prion protein. Heterozygosity of codon 129 of the prion protein gene has been associated with increased host resistance to TSEs, although the mechanism by which this resistance is achieved has not been determined. To evaluate the epidemiological mechanism of human resistance to kuru, we developed a model that combines the dynamics of kuru transmission and the population genetics of human resistance. We fitted our model to kuru data from the epidemic that occurred in Papua New Guinea over the last hundred years. To elucidate the epidemiological mechanism of human resistance, we estimated the incubation period and transmission rate of kuru for codon 129 heterozygotes and homozygotes using kuru incidence data and human genotype frequency data from 1957 to 2004. Our results indicate that human resistance arises from a combination of both a longer incubation period and reduced susceptibility to infection. This work provides evidence for balancing selection acting on a human population and the mechanistic basis for the heterozygote resistance to kuru. PMID:23740487

  8. Diverse system stresses: common mechanisms of chromosome fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J B; Abdallah, B Y; Liu, G; Ye, C J; Horne, S D; Wang, G; Savasan, S; Shekhar, M; Krawetz, S A; Hüttemann, M; Tainsky, M A; Wu, G S; Xie, Y; Zhang, K; Heng, H H Q

    2011-06-30

    Chromosome fragmentation (C-Frag) is a newly identified MCD (mitotic cell death), distinct from apoptosis and MC (mitotic catastrophe). As different molecular mechanisms can induce C-Frag, we hypothesize that the general mechanism of its induction is a system response to cellular stress. A clear link between C-Frag and diverse system stresses generated from an array of molecular mechanisms is shown. Centrosome amplification, which is also linked to diverse mechanisms of stress, is shown to occur in association with C-Frag. This led to a new model showing that diverse stresses induce common, MCD. Specifically, different cellular stresses target the integral chromosomal machinery, leading to system instability and triggering of MCD by C-Frag. This model of stress-induced cell death is also applicable to other types of cell death. The current study solves the previously confusing relationship between the diverse molecular mechanisms of chromosome pulverization, suggesting that incomplete C-Frag could serve as the initial event responsible for forms of genome chaos including chromothripsis. In addition, multiple cell death types are shown to coexist with C-Frag and it is more dominant than apoptosis at lower drug concentrations. Together, this study suggests that cell death is a diverse group of highly heterogeneous events that are linked to stress-induced system instability and evolutionary potential.

  9. Common mechanisms of pain and depression: are antidepressants also analgesics?

    PubMed Central

    Nekovarova, Tereza; Yamamotova, Anna; Vales, Karel; Stuchlik, Ales; Fricova, Jitka; Rokyta, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Neither pain, nor depression exist as independent phenomena per se, they are highly subjective inner states, formed by our brain and built on the bases of our experiences, cognition and emotions. Chronic pain is associated with changes in brain physiology and anatomy. It has been suggested that the neuronal activity underlying subjective perception of chronic pain may be divergent from the activity associated with acute pain. We will discuss the possible common pathophysiological mechanism of chronic pain and depression with respect to the default mode network of the brain, neuroplasticity and the effect of antidepressants on these two pathological conditions. The default mode network of the brain has an important role in the representation of introspective mental activities and therefore can be considered as a nodal point, common for both chronic pain and depression. Neuroplasticity which involves molecular, cellular and synaptic processes modifying connectivity between neurons and neuronal circuits can also be affected by pathological states such as chronic pain or depression. We suppose that pathogenesis of depression and chronic pain shares common negative neuroplastic changes in the central nervous system (CNS). The positive impact of antidepressants would result in a reduction of these pathological cellular/molecular processes and in the amelioration of symptoms, but it may also increase survival times and quality of life of patients with chronic cancer pain. PMID:24723864

  10. Change Is Good: Variations in Common Biological Mechanisms in the Epsilonproteobacterial Genera Campylobacter and Helicobacter

    PubMed Central

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J.; Cody, William L.; Merrell, D. Scott; Hendrixson, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Microbial evolution and subsequent species diversification enable bacterial organisms to perform common biological processes by a variety of means. The epsilonproteobacteria are a diverse class of prokaryotes that thrive in diverse habitats. Many of these environmental niches are labeled as extreme, whereas other niches include various sites within human, animal, and insect hosts. Some epsilonproteobacteria, such as Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori, are common pathogens of humans that inhabit specific regions of the gastrointestinal tract. As such, the biological processes of pathogenic Campylobacter and Helicobacter spp. are often modeled after those of common enteric pathogens such as Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli. While many exquisite biological mechanisms involving biochemical processes, genetic regulatory pathways, and pathogenesis of disease have been elucidated from studies of Salmonella spp. and E. coli, these paradigms often do not apply to the same processes in the epsilonproteobacteria. Instead, these bacteria often display extensive variation in common biological mechanisms relative to those of other prototypical bacteria. In this review, five biological processes of commonly studied model bacterial species are compared to those of the epsilonproteobacteria C. jejuni and H. pylori. Distinct differences in the processes of flagellar biosynthesis, DNA uptake and recombination, iron homeostasis, interaction with epithelial cells, and protein glycosylation are highlighted. Collectively, these studies support a broader view of the vast repertoire of biological mechanisms employed by bacteria and suggest that future studies of the epsilonproteobacteria will continue to provide novel and interesting information regarding prokaryotic cellular biology. PMID:21372321

  11. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian J.; Davis, Richard C.; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R. Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Gargalovic, Peter S.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  12. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian J; Davis, Richard C; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C; Hazen, Stanley L; Gargalovic, Peter S; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-12-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  13. Drosophila neurotrophins reveal a common mechanism for nervous system formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bangfu; Pennack, Jenny A; McQuilton, Peter; Forero, Manuel G; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Sutcliffe, Ben; Gu, Chun-Jing; Fenton, Janine C; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2008-11-18

    Neurotrophic interactions occur in Drosophila, but to date, no neurotrophic factor had been found. Neurotrophins are the main vertebrate secreted signalling molecules that link nervous system structure and function: they regulate neuronal survival, targeting, synaptic plasticity, memory and cognition. We have identified a neurotrophic factor in flies, Drosophila Neurotrophin (DNT1), structurally related to all known neurotrophins and highly conserved in insects. By investigating with genetics the consequences of removing DNT1 or adding it in excess, we show that DNT1 maintains neuronal survival, as more neurons die in DNT1 mutants and expression of DNT1 rescues naturally occurring cell death, and it enables targeting by motor neurons. We show that Spätzle and a further fly neurotrophin superfamily member, DNT2, also have neurotrophic functions in flies. Our findings imply that most likely a neurotrophin was present in the common ancestor of all bilateral organisms, giving rise to invertebrate and vertebrate neurotrophins through gene or whole-genome duplications. This work provides a missing link between aspects of neuronal function in flies and vertebrates, and it opens the opportunity to use Drosophila to investigate further aspects of neurotrophin function and to model related diseases.

  14. PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF COMMON LOON GENETIC STRUCTURE IN NORTH AMERICA BASED ON FIVE MICROSATELLITE LOCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study seeks to determine fine-scale genetic structure of Common Loon breeding populations in order to link wintering birds with their breeding regions. Common Loons are large piscivorous birds that breed in lakes of northern North America and Iceland. Loons are highly phil...

  15. Rapid Target Modeling Through Genetic Inheritance Mechanism Genetically Evolved Target Prototypmg (GETP). Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-10

    Phase I Final Report Rapid Target Modeling Through Genetic Inheritance Mechanism Genetically Evolved Target Prototyping (GETP) Pbiai Dat December 10...COVERED 12/10/96 Final Report 5/7/96-12/10/96 A. TITE AND SUBTITU S. FUNDING NUMBERS Rapid Target Modeling Through Genetic Inheritance Mechanism... Genetically Evolved Target Prototyping (GETP) 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Jerzy Bala (P1) Dr. Peter Pachowicz (Co-P1) B.K. Gogia (PM) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  16. Multiple mutations of lung squamous cell carcinoma shared common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Gu, Biao; Shi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) is a subtype of non-small cell lung cancers which is the cause of 80% of all lung cancer deaths. The genes that highly mutated in patients with LUSC and their roles played in the tumorigenesis remains unknown. Data of patients with Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differentially expressed genes were identified between control and cancer samples. Patients and controls can be separated by mRNA expression level showing that the between-group variance and totally 1265 genes were differentially expressed between controls and patients. Top genes whose mutations highly occurred in patients with LUSC were identified, most of these genes were shown to be related with tumorigenesis in previous studies. All of the genes mostly mutated were independently correlated with expression levels of all genes. These mutations did not show the trend of co-occurrence. However, the influenced gene of these mutations had overlaps. After studying the intersection of these genes, a group of shared genes were identified. The shared pathways enriched which played critical role in LUSC were identified based on these shared genes. Different mutations had contribution to the progression of LUSC. Though these genes involved different specific mechanisms, most of them may share a common mechanism which is critical for LUSC. The results may suggest a neglected mechanism and also indicate a potential target for therapies. PMID:27835590

  17. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variation of common species predicts ranges of threatened ones.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Trevon L; Thomassen, Henri A; Peralvo, Manuel; Buermann, Wolfgang; Milá, Borja; Kieswetter, Charles M; Jarrín-V, Pablo; Devitt, Susan E Cameron; Mason, Eliza; Schweizer, Rena M; Schlunegger, Jasmin; Chan, Janice; Wang, Ophelia; Schneider, Christopher J; Pollinger, John P; Saatchi, Sassan; Graham, Catherine H; Wayne, Robert K; Smith, Thomas B

    2013-06-07

    Predicting where threatened species occur is useful for making informed conservation decisions. However, because they are usually rare, surveying threatened species is often expensive and time intensive. Here, we show how regions where common species exhibit high genetic and morphological divergence among populations can be used to predict the occurrence of species of conservation concern. Intraspecific variation of common species of birds, bats and frogs from Ecuador were found to be a significantly better predictor for the occurrence of threatened species than suites of environmental variables or the occurrence of amphibians and birds. Fully 93 per cent of the threatened species analysed had their range adequately represented by the geographical distribution of the morphological and genetic variation found in seven common species. Both higher numbers of threatened species and greater genetic and morphological variation of common species occurred along elevation gradients. Higher levels of intraspecific divergence may be the result of disruptive selection and/or introgression along gradients. We suggest that collecting data on genetic and morphological variation in common species can be a cost effective tool for conservation planning, and that future biodiversity inventories include surveying genetic and morphological data of common species whenever feasible.

  18. [Ontogenetic clock: molecular-genetic mechanism].

    PubMed

    Pisaruk, A V

    2010-01-01

    Proposed is a hypothesis of the mechanism providing for the cell to count out the time of life and to change (according to the set program) the expression of chromosomal genes in order to control ontogenesis ("ontogenetic clock"). This mechanism represents an autonomous molecular-genetic oscillator, which memorizes the number of cycles of own oscillations through cutting the terminal tau-segment of chrono-DNA using special restrictase. The latter is formed at this segment out of two sub-units (proteins) in each cycle of oscillator operation. These proteins are alternately synthesized on ribosomes, since each inhibits the synthesis of the other, thus ensuring successive binding of restrictase sub-units at the terminal segment of chrono-DNA and its single section in one cycle. In addition, each of these proteins is a repressor of own gene and activator of the gene of the other protein, thus ensuring efficiency and reliability of oscillator operation. The design of oscillator of ontogenetic clock is similar to that of circadian oscillator, but its frequency is not synchronized with the nature's physical rhythms and depends on body temperature. Therefore, it is physical rather than biological time that is measured. The chrono-DNA consists of short repetitive sequences of nucleotides (tau-segments) and temporal (regulatory) genes inserted over specified number of these segments. The shortening of chrono-DNA leads to uncovering the next gene and to its destruction by exonuclease. As a result, the synthesis of activator (repressor) stops and the expression of some chromosomal genes changes, initiating the next stage of ontogenesis.

  19. Common folds and transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yigong

    2013-01-01

    Secondary active transporters exploit the electrochemical potential of solutes to shuttle specific substrate molecules across biological membranes, usually against their concentration gradient. Transporters of different functional families with little sequence similarity have repeatedly been found to exhibit similar folds, exemplified by the MFS, LeuT, and NhaA folds. Observations of multiple conformational states of the same transporter, represented by the LeuT superfamily members Mhp1, AdiC, vSGLT, and LeuT, led to proposals that structural changes are associated with substrate binding and transport. Despite recent biochemical and structural advances, our understanding of substrate recognition and energy coupling is rather preliminary. This review focuses on the common folds and shared transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters. Available structural information generally supports the alternating access model for substrate transport, with variations and extensions made by emerging structural, biochemical, and computational evidence.

  20. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    Küpper Cardoso Perseguini, Juliana Morini; Chioratto, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Moraes; Costa Mondego, Jorge Mauricio; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Franco Garcia, Antonio Augusto; de Campos, Tatiana; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Rubiano, Luciana Benchimol

    2011-01-01

    A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats – SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms – AFLPs) for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger’s modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively) than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm. PMID:21637550

  1. Common mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity in spinal neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca A.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2013-01-01

    In many neurological disorders that disrupt spinal function and compromise breathing (e.g. ALS, cervical spinal injury, MS), patients often maintain ventilatory capacity well after the onset of severe CNS pathology. In progressive neurodegenerative diseases, patients ultimately reach a point where compensation is no longer possible, leading to catastrophic ventilatory failure. In this brief review, we consider evidence that common mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity preserve breathing capacity in diverse clinical disorders, despite the onset of severe pathology (e.g. respiratory motor neuron denervation and/or death). We propose that a suite of mechanisms, operating at distinct sites in the respiratory control system, underlies compensatory respiratory plasticity, including: 1) increased (descending) central respiratory drive, 2) motor neuron plasticity, 3) plasticity at the neuromuscular junction or spared respiratory motor neurons, and 4) shifts in the balance from more to less severely compromised respiratory muscles. To establish this framework, we contrast three rodent models of neural dysfunction, each posing unique problems for the generation of adequate inspiratory motor output: 1) respiratory motor neuron death, 2) de- or dysmyelination of cervical spinal pathways, and 3) cervical spinal cord injury, a neuropathology with components of demyelination and motor neuron death. Through this contrast, we hope to understand the multilayered strategies used to “fight” for adequate breathing in the face of mounting pathology. PMID:23727226

  2. Common Functional Genetic Variants in Catecholamine Storage Vesicle Protein Promoter Motifs Interact to Trigger Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Wang, Lei; Rana, Brinda K.; Ghosh, Sajalendu; Mahata, Manjula; Salem, Rany M.; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Fung, Maple M.; Waalen, Jill; Tayo, Bamidele; Taupenot, Laurent; Mahata, Sushil K.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore transcriptional mechanisms whereby genetic variation in the CHGB promoter influence BP and hypertension. Background Hypertension is a complex trait in which deranged autonomic control of the circulation may be an etiological culprit. Chromogranin B (CHGB) is a major soluble protein in the core of catecholamine storage vesicles, playing a necessary (catalytic) role in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles. Previously we found that genetic variation at CHGB influenced plasma CHGB expression as well as autonomic function, and that BP association was maximal towards the 5′ end of the gene. Methods After polymorphism discovery, we functionally characterized the 2 common variants in the proximal CHGB promoter, A-296C and A-261T, which lay within the same haplotype block in black and white populations. CHGB promoter activity was studied by haplotype/luciferase reporter transfection. Transcriptional mechanisms were probed by EMSA and ChIP. Results The A-296C variant disrupted a c-FOS motif, and exhibited differential mobility shifting to chromaffin cell nuclear proteins during EMSA, differential binding of endogenous c-FOS on ChIP, and differential transcriptional response to exogenous c-FOS. A-261T disrupted motifs for SRY and YY1, with similar consequences for gel mobility during EMSA, endogenous factor binding during ChIP, and transcriptional responses to the exogenous factors. 2-SNP haplotype analyses demonstrated a profound (p∼3×10-20) effect of CHGB promoter variation on BP in the European ancestry population, with a rank order of CT

  3. Genetic analysis of mechanisms of aging.

    PubMed

    Rose, M R; Archer, M A

    1996-06-01

    A wide range of genetic models with postponed aging are now available, from selected mice and Drosophilia to mutant Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These systems allow efficient testing of alternative mechanistic hypotheses for aging. Genetic analysis is forging stronger connections between particular alleles and susceptibility to particular 'diseases of aging'; for example, two different genes for Alzheimer disease have been identified.

  4. Update on iron metabolism and molecular perspective of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seongseok; Vincelette, Nicole D

    2015-07-01

    Iron is an essential component of erythropoiesis and its metabolism is tightly regulated by a variety of internal and external cues including iron storage, tissue hypoxia, inflammation and degree of erythropoiesis. There has been remarkable improvement in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of iron metabolism past decades. The classical model of iron metabolism with iron response element/iron response protein (IRE/IRP) is now extended to include hepcidin model. Endogenous and exogenous signals funnel down to hepcidin via wide range of signaling pathways including Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3), Bone Morphogenetic Protein/Hemojuvelin/Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog (BMP/HJV/SMAD), and Von Hippel Lindau/Hypoxia-inducible factor/Erythropoietin (VHL/HIF/EPO), then relay to ferroportin, which directly regulates intra- and extracellular iron levels. The successful molecular delineation of iron metabolism further enhanced our understanding of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis. The majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients are now shown to have mutations in the genes coding either upstream or downstream proteins of hepcidin, resulting in iron overload. The update on hepcidin centered mechanisms of iron metabolism and their clinical perspective in hemochromatosis will be discussed in this review.

  5. Admixture and the organization of genetic diversity in a butterfly species complex revealed through common and rare genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah; Lucas, Lauren K; Buerkle, C Alex; Forister, Matthew L; Fordyce, James A; Nice, Chris C

    2014-09-01

    Detailed information about the geographic distribution of genetic and genomic variation is necessary to better understand the organization and structure of biological diversity. In particular, spatial isolation within species and hybridization between them can blur species boundaries and create evolutionary relationships that are inconsistent with a strictly bifurcating tree model. Here, we analyse genome-wide DNA sequence and genetic ancestry variation in Lycaeides butterflies to quantify the effects of admixture and spatial isolation on how biological diversity is organized in this group. We document geographically widespread and pervasive historical admixture, with more restricted recent hybridization. This includes evidence supporting previously known and unknown instances of admixture. The genome composition of admixed individuals varies much more among than within populations, and tree- and genetic ancestry-based analyses indicate that multiple distinct admixed lineages or populations exist. We find that most genetic variants in Lycaeides are rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%). Because the spatial and taxonomic distributions of alleles reflect demographic and selective processes since mutation, rare alleles, which are presumably younger than common alleles, were spatially and taxonomically restricted compared with common variants. Thus, we show patterns of genetic variation in this group are multifaceted, and we argue that this complexity challenges simplistic notions concerning the organization of biological diversity into discrete, easily delineated and hierarchically structured entities.

  6. High frequency of genetic recombination is a common feature of primate lentivirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Powell, Douglas; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2006-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombines at exceedingly high rates, approximately 1 order of magnitude more frequently than simple gammaretroviruses such as murine leukemia virus and spleen necrosis virus. We hypothesize that this high frequency of genetic recombination is a common feature of primate lentiviruses. Alternatively, it is possible that HIV-1 is unique among primate lentiviruses in possessing high recombination rates. Among other primate lentiviruses, only the molecular mechanisms of HIV-2 replication have been extensively studied. There are reported differences between the replication mechanisms of HIV-1 and those of HIV-2, such as preferences for RNA packaging in cis and properties of reverse transcriptase and RNase H activities. These biological disparities could lead to differences in recombination rates between the two viruses. Currently, HIV-1 is the only primate lentivirus in which recombination rates have been measured. To test our hypothesis, we established recombination systems to measure the recombination rates of two other primate lentiviruses, HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus from African green monkeys (SIVagm), in one round of viral replication. We determined that, for markers separated by 588, 288, and 90 bp, HIV-2 recombined at rates of 7.4%, 5.5%, and 2.4%, respectively, whereas SIVagm recombined at rates of 7.8%, 5.6%, and 2.7%, respectively. These high recombination rates are within the same range as the previously measured HIV-1 recombination rates. Taken together, our results indicate that HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVagm all possess high recombination frequencies; hence, the high recombination potential is most likely a common feature of primate lentivirus replication.

  7. Genome-wide association studies and genetic architecture of common human diseases.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Grant W

    2011-06-03

    Genome-wide association scans provide the first successful method to identify genetic variation contributing to risk for common complex disease. Progress in identifying genes associated with melanoma show complex relationships between genes for pigmentation and the development of melanoma. Novel risk loci account for only a small fraction of the genetic variation contributing to this and many other diseases. Large meta-analyses find additional variants, but there is current debate about the contribution of common polymorphisms, rare polymorphisms or mutations to disease risk.

  8. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony R; Sweeten, Thayne L; Johnson, Randall C; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C; Davies, Christopher J; Thomas, Aaron J; Croen, Lisa A; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The "common variant-common disease" hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the "common variant-common disease" hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in autism over

  9. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Johnson, Randall C.; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C.; Davies, Christopher J.; Thomas, Aaron J.; Croen, Lisa A.; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The “common variant—common disease” hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the “common variant—common disease” hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in

  10. Grasping in the pigeon (Columba livia): final common path mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Klein, B G; Deich, J D; Zeigler, H P

    1985-12-01

    A combination of cinematographic and denervation procedures were used to analyse the mechanisms involved in the adjustment of gape size during grasping in the pigeon. Gape size was found to vary directly with seed size and to reflect the operation of two variables, jaw opening velocity and jaw opening duration. Effects upon duration are mediated, indirectly, by the effect of seed size upon head height, which, in turn, controls the velocity of head descent. The data suggest that the control of gape during grasping may involve two different effector systems (jaw muscles, neck muscles). Analysis of the displacement of individual jaws (maxilla, mandible) during grasping indicates that both opener muscles take part in the control of gape. Denervation experiments (motor nerve section) identified these opener motoneurons as contributors to the final common path for the opening phase of grasping. A comparison of the kinematics of pecking/grasping in pigeons and reaching/grasping in humans reveals a number of similarities in the topography and spatiotemporal organization of these behaviors.

  11. Population genetic structure in Atlantic and Pacific Ocean common murres (Uria aalge): Natural replicate tests of post-Pleistocene evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris-Pocock, J. A.; Taylor, S.A.; Birt, T.P.; Damus, M.; Piatt, J.F.; Warheit, K.I.; Friesen, V.L.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the factors that influence population differentiation in temperate taxa can be difficult because the signatures of both historic and contemporary demographics are often reflected in population genetic patterns. Fortunately, analyses based on coalescent theory can help untangle the relative influence of these historic and contemporary factors. Common murres (Uria aalge) are vagile seabirds that breed in the boreal and low arctic waters of the Northern Hemisphere. Previous analyses revealed that Atlantic and Pacific populations are genetically distinct; however, less is known about population genetic structure within ocean basins. We employed the mitochondrial control region, four microsatellite loci and four intron loci to investigate population genetic structure throughout the range of common murres. As in previous studies, we found that Atlantic and Pacific populations diverged during the Pleistocene and do not currently exchange migrants. Therefore, Atlantic and Pacific murre populations can be used as natural replicates to test mechanisms of population differentiation. While we found little population genetic structure within the Pacific, we detected significant east-west structuring among Atlantic colonies. The degree that population genetic structure reflected contemporary population demographics also differed between ocean basins. Specifically, while the low levels of population differentiation in the Pacific are at least partially due to high levels of contemporary gene flow, the east-west structuring of populations within the Atlantic appears to be the result of historic fragmentation of populations rather than restricted contemporary gene flow. The contrasting results in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans highlight the necessity of carefully considering multilocus nonequilibrium population genetic approaches when reconstructing the demographic history of temperate Northern Hemisphere taxa. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  12. Are Farm-Reared Quails for Game Restocking Really Common Quails (Coturnix coturnix)?: A Genetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Donoso, Ines; Vilà, Carles; Puigcerver, Manel; Butkauskas, Dalius; Caballero de la Calle, José Ramón; Morales-Rodríguez, Pablo Antonio; Rodríguez-Teijeiro, José Domingo

    2012-01-01

    The common quail (Coturnix coturnix) is a popular game species for which restocking with farm-reared individuals is a common practice. In some areas, the number of released quails greatly surpasses the number of wild breeding common quail. However, common quail are difficult to raise in captivity and this casts suspicion about a possible hybrid origin of the farmed individuals from crosses with domestic Japanese quail (C. japonica). In this study we used a panel of autosomal microsatellite markers to characterize the genetic origin of quails reared for hunting purposes in game farms in Spain and of quails from an experimental game farm which was founded with hybrids that have been systematically backcrossed with wild common quails. The genotypes of these quail were compared to those of wild common quail and domestic strains of Japanese quail. Our results show that more than 85% of the game farm birds were not common quail but had domestic Japanese quail ancestry. In the experimental farm a larger proportion of individuals could not be clearly separated from pure common quails. We conclude that the majority of quail sold for restocking purposes were not common quail. Genetic monitoring of individuals raised for restocking is indispensable as the massive release of farm-reared hybrids could represent a severe threat for the long term survival of the native species. PMID:22701745

  13. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex) versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context of results from genome

  14. Ancient Humans Influenced the Current Spatial Genetic Structure of Common Walnut Populations in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Pollegioni, Paola; Woeste, Keith E.; Chiocchini, Francesca; Del Lungo, Stefano; Olimpieri, Irene; Tortolano, Virginia; Clark, Jo; Hemery, Gabriel E.; Mapelli, Sergio; Malvolti, Maria Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Common walnut (Juglans regia L) is an economically important species cultivated worldwide for its wood and nuts. It is generally accepted that J. regia survived and grew spontaneously in almost completely isolated stands in its Asian native range after the Last Glacial Maximum. Despite its natural geographic isolation, J. regia evolved over many centuries under the influence of human management and exploitation. We evaluated the hypothesis that the current distribution of natural genetic resources of common walnut in Asia is, at least in part, the product of ancient anthropogenic dispersal, human cultural interactions, and afforestation. Genetic analysis combined with ethno-linguistic and historical data indicated that ancient trade routes such as the Persian Royal Road and Silk Road enabled long-distance dispersal of J. regia from Iran and Trans-Caucasus to Central Asia, and from Western to Eastern China. Ancient commerce also disrupted the local spatial genetic structure of autochthonous walnut populations between Tashkent and Samarkand (Central-Eastern Uzbekistan), where the northern and central routes of the Northern Silk Road converged. A significant association between ancient language phyla and the genetic structure of walnut populations is reported even after adjustment for geographic distances that could have affected both walnut gene flow and human commerce over the centuries. Beyond the economic importance of common walnut, our study delineates an alternative approach for understanding how the genetic resources of long-lived perennial tree species may be affected by the interaction of geography and human history. PMID:26332919

  15. Ancient Humans Influenced the Current Spatial Genetic Structure of Common Walnut Populations in Asia.

    PubMed

    Pollegioni, Paola; Woeste, Keith E; Chiocchini, Francesca; Del Lungo, Stefano; Olimpieri, Irene; Tortolano, Virginia; Clark, Jo; Hemery, Gabriel E; Mapelli, Sergio; Malvolti, Maria Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Common walnut (Juglans regia L) is an economically important species cultivated worldwide for its wood and nuts. It is generally accepted that J. regia survived and grew spontaneously in almost completely isolated stands in its Asian native range after the Last Glacial Maximum. Despite its natural geographic isolation, J. regia evolved over many centuries under the influence of human management and exploitation. We evaluated the hypothesis that the current distribution of natural genetic resources of common walnut in Asia is, at least in part, the product of ancient anthropogenic dispersal, human cultural interactions, and afforestation. Genetic analysis combined with ethno-linguistic and historical data indicated that ancient trade routes such as the Persian Royal Road and Silk Road enabled long-distance dispersal of J. regia from Iran and Trans-Caucasus to Central Asia, and from Western to Eastern China. Ancient commerce also disrupted the local spatial genetic structure of autochthonous walnut populations between Tashkent and Samarkand (Central-Eastern Uzbekistan), where the northern and central routes of the Northern Silk Road converged. A significant association between ancient language phyla and the genetic structure of walnut populations is reported even after adjustment for geographic distances that could have affected both walnut gene flow and human commerce over the centuries. Beyond the economic importance of common walnut, our study delineates an alternative approach for understanding how the genetic resources of long-lived perennial tree species may be affected by the interaction of geography and human history.

  16. Common DNA sequences with potential for detection of genetically manipulated organisms in food.

    PubMed

    MacCormick, C A; Griffin, H G; Underwood, H M; Gasson, M J

    1998-06-01

    Foods produced by genetic engineering technology are now appearing on the market and many more are likely to emerge in the future. The safety aspects, regulation, and labelling of these foods are still contentious issues in most countries and recent surveys highlight consumer concerns about the safety and labelling of genetically modified food. In most countries it is necessary to have approval for the use of genetically manipulated organisms (GMOs) in the production of food. In order to police regulations, a technology to detect such foods is desirable. In addition, a requirement to label approved genetically modified food would necessitate a monitoring system. One solution is to 'tag' approved GMOs with some form of biological or genetic marker, permitting the surveillance of foods for the presence of approved products of genetic engineering. While non-approved GMOs would not be detected by such a surveillance, they might be detected by a screen for DNA sequences common to all or most GMOs. This review focuses on the potential of using common DNA sequences as detection probes for GMOs. The identification of vector sequences, plant transcription terminators, and marker genes by PCR and hybridization techniques is discussed.

  17. Common Genetic and Environmental Influences on Major Depressive Disorder and Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subbarao, Anjali; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Young, Susan E.; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Corley, Robin P.; Hewitt, John K.

    2008-01-01

    The evidence for common genetic and environmental influences on conduct disorder (CD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents was examined. A sample of 570 monozygotic twin pairs, 592 dizygotic twin pairs, and 426 non-twin siblings, aged 12-18 years, was recruited from the Colorado Twin Registry. For the past year data, there was a…

  18. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of crown rust resistance in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley crown rust, caused by Puccinia coronata var. hordei, primarily occurs on barley in the Great Plain regions of the United States. However, a few genotypes of common wheat were found to be susceptible to this pathogen among 750 wheat accessions evaluated. To investigate the genetics of crown ru...

  19. Genetic Variation in Human Vitamin C Transporter Genes in Common Complex Diseases123

    PubMed Central

    Shaghaghi, Mandana Amir; Kloss, Olena

    2016-01-01

    Adequate plasma, cellular, and tissue vitamin C concentrations are required for maintaining optimal health through suppression of oxidative stress and optimizing functions of certain enzymes that require vitamin C as a cofactor. Polymorphisms in the vitamin C transporter genes, compromising genes encoding sodium-dependent ascorbate transport proteins, and also genes encoding facilitative transporters of dehydroascorbic acid, are associated with plasma and tissue cellular ascorbate status and hence cellular redox balance. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the links between variations in vitamin C transporter genes and common chronic diseases. We conclude that emerging genetic knowledge has a good likelihood of defining future personalized dietary recommendations and interventions; however, further validations through biological studies as well as controlled dietary trials are required to identify predictive and actionable genetic biomarkers. We further advocate the need to consider genetic variation of vitamin C transporters in future clinical and epidemiologic studies on common complex diseases. PMID:26980812

  20. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H.; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F.; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lee, James J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Medland, Sarah E.; Miller, Michael B.; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J.; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G.; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H.; Starr, John M.; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ward, Mary E.; Wright, Margaret J.; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Koellinger, Philipp D.

    2014-01-01

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated SNPs. Second, using independent samples (n = 24,189), we measure the association of these education-associated SNPs with cognitive performance. Three SNPs (rs1487441, rs7923609, and rs2721173) are significantly associated with cognitive performance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In an independent sample of older Americans (n = 8,652), we also show that a polygenic score derived from the education-associated SNPs is associated with memory and absence of dementia. Convergent evidence from a set of bioinformatics analyses implicates four specific genes (KNCMA1, NRXN1, POU2F3, and SCRT). All of these genes are associated with a particular neurotransmitter pathway involved in synaptic plasticity, the main cellular mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:25201988

  1. Neanderthal and Denisova genetic affinities with contemporary humans: introgression versus common ancestral polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Robert K; Uribe, Gabriel; Jimenez, Eric B; Weiss, Mark A; Herrera, Kristian J; Regueiro, Maria; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-11-01

    Analyses of the genetic relationships among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans have suggested that 1-4% of the non-Sub-Saharan African gene pool may be Neanderthal derived, while 6-8% of the Melanesian gene pool may be the product of admixture between the Denisovans and the direct ancestors of Melanesians. In the present study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity among a worldwide collection of contemporary human populations with respect to the genetic constitution of these two archaic hominins and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee). We partitioned SNPs into subsets, including those that are derived in both archaic lineages, those that are ancestral in both archaic lineages and those that are only derived in one archaic lineage. By doing this, we have conducted separate examinations of subsets of mutations with higher probabilities of divergent phylogenetic origins. While previous investigations have excluded SNPs from common ancestors in principal component analyses, we included common ancestral SNPs in our analyses to visualize the relative placement of the Neanderthal and Denisova among human populations. To assess the genetic similarities among the various hominin lineages, we performed genetic structure analyses to provide a comparison of genetic patterns found within contemporary human genomes that may have archaic or common ancestral roots. Our results indicate that 3.6% of the Neanderthal genome is shared with roughly 65.4% of the average European gene pool, which clinally diminishes with distance from Europe. Our results suggest that Neanderthal genetic associations with contemporary non-Sub-Saharan African populations, as well as the genetic affinities observed between Denisovans and Melanesians most likely result from the retention of ancient mutations in these populations.

  2. Teaching Evolutionary Mechanisms: Genetic Drift and M&M's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staub, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity that teaches the mechanism of genetic drift to undergraduates. Illustrates a number of concepts that are critical in developing evolution literacy by sampling M&M milk chocolate candies. (MM)

  3. Common Genetic Factors Influence Hand Strength, Processing Speed, and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Soshiro; Kato, Kenji; Honda, Chika; Hayakawa, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to detect cognitive decline at an early stage, especially before onset of mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Processing speed and working memory are aspects of cognitive function that are associated with cognitive decline. Hand strength is an inexpensive, easily measurable indicator of cognitive decline. However, associations between hand strength, processing speed, and working memory have not been studied. In addition, the genetic and environmental structure of the association between hand strength and cognitive decline is unclear. We investigated phenotypic associations between hand strength, processing speed, and working memory and examined the genetic and environmental structure of the associations between phenotypes. Methods Hand strength, processing speed (digit symbol performance), and working memory (digit span performance) were examined in monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify phenotypic associations, and structural equation modeling was used to investigate the genetic and environmental structure of the association. Results Generalized estimating equations showed that hand strength was phenotypically associated with digit symbol performance but not with digit span performance. Structural equation modeling showed that common genetic factors influenced hand strength and digit symbol and digit span performance. Conclusions There was a phenotypic association between hand strength and processing speed. In addition, some genetic factors were common to hand strength, processing speed, and working memory. PMID:24292650

  4. Genetic mutations and mechanisms in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Golbus, Jessica R; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mutations account for a significant percentage of cardiomyopathies, which are a leading cause of congestive heart failure. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac output is limited by the thickened myocardium through impaired filling and outflow. Mutations in the genes encoding the thick filament components myosin heavy chain and myosin binding protein C (MYH7 and MYBPC3) together explain 75% of inherited HCMs, leading to the observation that HCM is a disease of the sarcomere. Many mutations are "private" or rare variants, often unique to families. In contrast, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is far more genetically heterogeneous, with mutations in genes encoding cytoskeletal, nucleoskeletal, mitochondrial, and calcium-handling proteins. DCM is characterized by enlarged ventricular dimensions and impaired systolic and diastolic function. Private mutations account for most DCMs, with few hotspots or recurring mutations. More than 50 single genes are linked to inherited DCM, including many genes that also link to HCM. Relatively few clinical clues guide the diagnosis of inherited DCM, but emerging evidence supports the use of genetic testing to identify those patients at risk for faster disease progression, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia.

  5. Genetic structure of the Common Eider in the western Aleutian Islands prior to fox eradication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Wilson, Robert E.; Petersen, Margaret R.; Williams, Jeffrey C.; Byrd, G. Vernon; McCracken, Kevin G.

    2013-01-01

    Since the late 18th century bird populations residing in the Aleutian Archipelago have been greatly reduced by introduced arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). We analyzed data from microsatellite, nuclear intron, and mitochondrial (mtDNA) loci to examine the spatial genetic structure, demography, and gene flow among four Aleutian Island populations of the Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) much reduced by introduced foxes. In mtDNA, we found high levels of genetic structure within and between island groups (ΦST = 0.643), but we found no population subdivision in microsatellites or nuclear introns. Differences in genetic structure between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes are consistent with the Common Eider's breeding and winter biology, as females are highly philopatric and males disperse. Nevertheless, significant differences between islands in the mtDNA of males and marginal significance (P =0.07) in the Z-linked locus Smo 1 suggest that males may also have some level of fidelity to island groups. Severe reduction of populations by the fox, coupled with females' high philopatry, may have left the genetic signature of a bottleneck effect, resulting in the high levels of genetic differentiation observed in mtDNA (ΦST = 0.460–0.807) between islands only 440 km apart. Reestablishment of the Common Eider following the fox's eradication was likely through recruitment from within the islands and bolstered by dispersal from neighboring islands, as suggested by the lack of genetic structure and asymmetry in gene flow between Attu and the other Near Islands.

  6. A QTL model to map the common genetic basis for correlative phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Lyu, Yafei; Xu, Fang; Bo, Wenhao; Zhai, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Pang, Xiaoming; Zheng, Bingsong; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    As an important mechanism for adaptation to heterogeneous environment, plastic responses of correlated traits to environmental alteration may also be genetically correlated, but less is known about the underlying genetic basis. We describe a statistical model for mapping specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control the interrelationship of phenotypic plasticity between different traits. The model is constructed by a bivariate mixture setting, implemented with the EM algorithm to estimate the genetic effects of QTLs on correlative plastic response. We provide a series of procedure that test (1) how a QTL controls the phenotypic plasticity of a single trait; and (2) how the QTL determines the correlation of environment-induced changes of different traits. The model is readily extended to test how epistatic interactions among QTLs play a part in the correlations of different plastic traits. The model was validated through computer simulation and used to analyse multi-environment data of genetic mapping in winter wheat, showing its utilization in practice.

  7. Common Mechanism Underlies Repeated Evolution of Extreme Pollution Tolerance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human alterations to the environment can exert strong evolutionary pressures, yet contemporary adaptation to human-mediated stressors is rarely documented in wild populations. A common-garden experimental design was coupled with comparative transcriptomics to discover evolved me...

  8. The Mosaic Theory Revisited: Common Molecular Mechanisms Coordinating Diverse Organ and Cellular Events in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, Dr. Irvine Page proposed the Mosaic Theory of hypertension, which states that many factors, including genetics, environment, adaptive, neural, mechanical and hormonal perturbations interdigitate to raise blood pressure. In the past two decades, it has become clear that common molecular and cellular events in various organs underlie many features of the Mosaic Theory. Two of these are the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. These factors increase neuronal firing in specific brain centers, increase sympathetic outflow, alter vascular tone and morphology and promote sodium retention in the kidney. Moreover, factors such as genetics and environment contribute to oxidant generation and inflammation. Other common cellular signals, including calcium signaling and endoplasmic reticulum stress are similarly perturbed in different cells in hypertension and contribute to components of Dr. Page’s theory. Thus, Dr. Page’s Mosaic Theory formed a framework for future studies of molecular and cellular signals in the context of hypertension, and has greatly aided our understanding of this complex disease. PMID:23321405

  9. Sensitization to Common and Uncommon Pets or Other Furry Animals: Which May Be Common Mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Liccardi, G; Triggiani, M; Piccolo, A; Salzillo, A; Parente, R; Manzi, F; Vatrella, A

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to animal allergens constitutes a relevant risk factor for the development of allergic sensitization. Moreover, an increasing number of people become owners of less common animals. In this article we summarize aspects related to sensitization to cat/dog which may be applied also to uncommon pets or other furry animals. The data discussed here suggest that several different factors may induce allergic sensitization to furry animals with or without previous contact. Allergic sensitization without animal exposure is a relevant risk for patients because they are not aware about the possibility that even severe respiratory symptoms may develop after an occasional animal contact. This aspect should be taken into account by susceptible individuals before acquiring pets or beginning a contact for working/leisure activity with a common as well as uncommon animal. As a consequence, skin prick test and/or evaluation of specific IgE antibodies (by classic ImmunoCAP or micro-array technique ImmunoCAP ISAC) also to less common (“new”) mammalian allergens could be recommended in individuals already sensitized to common pets to identify the occurrence of allergic sensitization and consequently to avoid future exposures to uncommon animal allergens. PMID:27326390

  10. Citizens in the commons: blood and genetics in the making of the civic

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Deepa S.

    2013-01-01

    This essay is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted with the Indian community in Houston, as part of a NIH/NHGRI-sponsored ethics study and sample collection initiative entitled ‘Indian and Hindu Perspectives on Genetic Variation Research.’ Taking a cue from my Indian interlocutors who largely support and readily respond to such initiatives on the grounds that they will undoubtedly serve ‘humanity’ and the common good, I explore notions of the commons that are created in the process of soliciting blood for genetic research. How does blood become the stuff of which a civic discourse is made? How do idealistic individual appeals to donate blood, ethics research protocols, open-source databases, debates on approaches to genetic research, patents and Intellectual Property regulations, markets and the nation-state itself variously engage, limit or further ideas of the common good? Moving much as my interlocutors do, between India and the United States, I explore the nature of the commons that is both imagined and pragmatically reckoned in both local and global diasporic contexts. PMID:24478538

  11. Genetic advances uncover mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chua, K C; Kroetz, D L

    2017-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common dose-limiting toxicity experienced in 30-40% of patients undergoing treatment with various chemotherapeutics, including taxanes, vinca alkaloids, epothilones, proteasome inhibitors, and thalidomide. Importantly, CIPN significantly affects a patient's quality of life. Recent genetic association studies are enhancing our understanding of CIPN pathophysiology and serve as a foundation for identification of genetic biomarkers to predict toxicity risk and for the development of novel strategies for prevention and treatment.

  12. Commonality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Albert E., Jr.

    Commonality analysis is an attempt to understand the relative predictive power of the regressor variables, both individually and in combination. The squared multiple correlation is broken up into elements assigned to each individual regressor and to each possible combination of regressors. The elements have the property that the appropriate sums…

  13. Associations Between Common and Rare Exonic Genetic Variants and Serum Levels of 20 Cardiovascular-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Terry; Smith, Erin N.; Matsui, Hiroko; Braekkan, Sigrid K.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Njølstad, Inger; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Background— Genetic variation can be used to study causal relationships between biomarkers and diseases. Here, we identify new common and rare genetic variants associated with cardiovascular-related protein levels (protein quantitative trait loci [pQTLs]). We functionally annotate these pQTLs, predict and experimentally confirm a novel molecular interaction, and determine which pQTLs are associated with diseases and physiological phenotypes. Methods and Results— As part of a larger case–control study of venous thromboembolism, serum levels of 51 proteins implicated in cardiovascular diseases were measured in 330 individuals from the Tromsø Study. Exonic genetic variation near each protein’s respective gene (cis) was identified using sequencing and arrays. Using single site and gene-based tests, we identified 27 genetic associations between pQTLs and the serum levels of 20 proteins: 14 associated with common variation in cis, of which 6 are novel (ie, not previously reported); 7 associations with rare variants in cis, of which 4 are novel; and 6 associations in trans. Of the 20 proteins, 15 were associated with single sites and 7 with rare variants. cis-pQTLs for kallikrein and F12 also show trans associations for proteins (uPAR, kininogen) known to be cleaved by kallikrein and with NTproBNP. We experimentally demonstrate that kallikrein can cleave proBNP (NTproBNP precursor) in vitro. Nine of the pQTLs have previously identified associations with 17 disease and physiological phenotypes. Conclusions— We have identified cis and trans genetic variation associated with the serum levels of 20 proteins and utilized these pQTLs to study molecular mechanisms underlying disease and physiological phenotypes. PMID:27329291

  14. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10(-5)). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes-common to five of six disorders-included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20-30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders.

  15. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W.; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10−5). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes—common to five of six disorders–included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20–30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders. PMID:25414627

  16. Serial and Free Recall: Common Effects and Common Mechanisms? A Reply to Murdock (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick; Neath, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Reply to comments on an article "Issues With the SIMPLE Model: Comment on Brown, Neath, and Chater" (2007) by Bennet Murdock on the current authors' original article "A temporal ratio model of memory" by Brown, Neath, and Chater. Does a single mechanism underpin serial and free recall? B. Murdock (2008) argued against the claim, embodied in the…

  17. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy: are there clues to the understanding of common kidney diseases?

    PubMed

    Conway, B R; Maxwell, A P

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the Western world. There is evidence for a genetic susceptibility to diabetic kidney disease, but despite intensive research efforts it has proved difficult to identify the causative genes. Improvements in genotyping technologies have made genome-wide association studies (GWAS), employing hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms, affordable. Recently, such scans have advanced understanding of the genetics of common complex diseases, finding more than 100 novel susceptibility variants for diverse disorders including type 1 and 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, type 2 diabetes is highlighted to illustrate how genome-wide association studies have been used to study the genetics of complex multifactorial conditions; in addition, diabetic nephropathy will be used to demonstrate how similar scans could be employed to detect genetic factors predisposing to kidney disease. The identification of such variants would permit early identification of atrisk patients, enabling targeting of therapy and a move towards primary prevention. In addition, these powerful research methodologies may identify genes that were not previously known to predispose to nephropathy, thereby enhancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of renal disorders and potentially leading to novel therapeutic approaches.

  18. Mechanisms of Non-Genetic Inheritance and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Inheritance is typically associated with the Mendelian transmission of information from parents to offspring by alleles (DNA sequence). However, empirical data clearly suggest that traits can be acquired from ancestors by mechanisms that do not involve genetic alleles, referred to as non-genetic inheritance. Information that is non-genetically transmitted across generations includes parental experience and exposure to certain environments, but also parental mutations and polymorphisms, because they can change the parental ‘intrinsic' environment. Non-genetic inheritance is not limited to the first generation of the progeny, but can involve the grandchildren and even further generations. Non-genetic inheritance has been observed for multiple traits including overall development, cardiovascular risk and metabolic symptoms, but this review will focus on the inheritance of behavioral abnormalities pertinent to psychiatric disorders. Multigenerational non-genetic inheritance is often interpreted as the transmission of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modifications, via the gametes (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). However, information can be carried across generations by a large number of bioactive substances, including hormones, cytokines, and even microorganisms, without the involvement of the gametes. We reason that this broader definition of non-genetic inheritance is more appropriate, especially in the context of psychiatric disorders, because of the well-recognized role of parental and early life environmental factors in later life psychopathology. Here we discuss the various forms of non-genetic inheritance in humans and animals, as well as rodent models of psychiatric conditions to illustrate possible mechanisms. PMID:24889369

  19. Mechanisms of non-genetic inheritance and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Toth, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Inheritance is typically associated with the Mendelian transmission of information from parents to offspring by alleles (DNA sequence). However, empirical data clearly suggest that traits can be acquired from ancestors by mechanisms that do not involve genetic alleles, referred to as non-genetic inheritance. Information that is non-genetically transmitted across generations includes parental experience and exposure to certain environments, but also parental mutations and polymorphisms, because they can change the parental 'intrinsic' environment. Non-genetic inheritance is not limited to the first generation of the progeny, but can involve the grandchildren and even further generations. Non-genetic inheritance has been observed for multiple traits including overall development, cardiovascular risk and metabolic symptoms, but this review will focus on the inheritance of behavioral abnormalities pertinent to psychiatric disorders. Multigenerational non-genetic inheritance is often interpreted as the transmission of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modifications, via the gametes (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). However, information can be carried across generations by a large number of bioactive substances, including hormones, cytokines, and even microorganisms, without the involvement of the gametes. We reason that this broader definition of non-genetic inheritance is more appropriate, especially in the context of psychiatric disorders, because of the well-recognized role of parental and early life environmental factors in later life psychopathology. Here we discuss the various forms of non-genetic inheritance in humans and animals, as well as rodent models of psychiatric conditions to illustrate possible mechanisms.

  20. Common biological networks underlie genetic risk for alcoholism in African- and European-American populations

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Mark Z.; Yan, Jia; Dick, Danielle M.; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Rice, John P.; Johnson, Eric O.; Schuckit, Marc; Kuperman, Sam; Kramer, John; Goate, Alison M.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Foroud, Tatiana; Nurnberger, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Porjesz, Bernice; Bierut, Laura J.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Almasy, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is a heritable substance addiction with adverse physical and psychological consequences, representing a major health and economic burden on societies worldwide. Genes thus far implicated via linkage, candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for only a small fraction of its overall risk, with effects varying across ethnic groups. Here we investigate the genetic architecture of alcoholism and report on the extent to which common, genome-wide SNPs collectively account for risk of AD in two US populations, African-Americans (AAs) and European-Americans (EAs). Analyzing GWAS data for two independent case-control sample sets, we compute polymarker scores that are significantly associated with alcoholism (P=1.64 × 10−3 and 2.08 × 10−4 for EAs and AAs, respectively), reflecting the small individual effects of thousands of variants derived from patterns of allelic architecture that are population-specific. Simulations show that disease models based on rare and uncommon causal variants (MAF<0.05) best fit the observed distribution of polymarker signals. When scoring bins were annotated for gene location and examined for constituent biological networks, gene enrichment is observed for several cellular processes and functions in both EA and AA populations, transcending their underlying allelic differences. Our results reveal key insights into the complex etiology of AD, raising the possibility of an important role for rare and uncommon variants, and identify polygenic mechanisms that encompass a spectrum of disease liability, with some, such as chloride transporters and glycine metabolism genes, displaying subtle, modifying effects that are likely to escape detection in most GWAS designs. PMID:23607416

  1. Common biological networks underlie genetic risk for alcoholism in African- and European-American populations.

    PubMed

    Kos, M Z; Yan, J; Dick, D M; Agrawal, A; Bucholz, K K; Rice, J P; Johnson, E O; Schuckit, M; Kuperman, S; Kramer, J; Goate, A M; Tischfield, J A; Foroud, T; Nurnberger, J; Hesselbrock, V; Porjesz, B; Bierut, L J; Edenberg, H J; Almasy, L

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is a heritable substance addiction with adverse physical and psychological consequences, representing a major health and economic burden on societies worldwide. Genes thus far implicated via linkage, candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for only a small fraction of its overall risk, with effects varying across ethnic groups. Here we investigate the genetic architecture of alcoholism and report on the extent to which common, genome-wide SNPs collectively account for risk of AD in two US populations, African-Americans (AAs) and European-Americans (EAs). Analyzing GWAS data for two independent case-control sample sets, we compute polymarker scores that are significantly associated with alcoholism (P = 1.64 × 10(-3) and 2.08 × 10(-4) for EAs and AAs, respectively), reflecting the small individual effects of thousands of variants derived from patterns of allelic architecture that are population specific. Simulations show that disease models based on rare and uncommon causal variants (MAF < 0.05) best fit the observed distribution of polymarker signals. When scoring bins were annotated for gene location and examined for constituent biological networks, gene enrichment is observed for several cellular processes and functions in both EA and AA populations, transcending their underlying allelic differences. Our results reveal key insights into the complex etiology of AD, raising the possibility of an important role for rare and uncommon variants, and identify polygenic mechanisms that encompass a spectrum of disease liability, with some, such as chloride transporters and glycine metabolism genes, displaying subtle, modifying effects that are likely to escape detection in most GWAS designs.

  2. A common biological mechanism in cancer and Alzheimer’s disease?

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Maria I; Lendon, Corinne; Roe, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are two common disorders for which the final pathophysiological mechanism is not yet clearly defined. In a prospective longitudinal study we have previously shown an inverse association between AD and cancer, such that the rate of developing cancer in general with time was significantly slower in participants with AD, while participants with a history of cancer had a slower rate of developing AD. In cancer, cell regulation mechanisms are disrupted with augmentation of cell survival and/or proliferation, whereas conversely, AD is associated with increased neuronal death, either caused by, or concomitant with, beta amyloid (Aβ) and tau deposition. The possibility that perturbations of mechanisms involved in cell survival/death regulation could be involved in both disorders is discussed. Genetic polymorphisms, DNA methylation or other mechanisms that induce changes in activity of molecules with key roles in determining the decision to “repair and live”- or “die” could be involved in the pathogenesis of the two disorders. As examples, the role of p53, Pin1 and the Wnt signaling pathway are discussed as potential candidates that, speculatively, may explain inverse associations between AD and cancer. PMID:19519301

  3. Genetic-basis analysis of heterotic loci in Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Jin; Xin, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Jin-Shui

    2012-04-01

    Heterosis is widely used in genetic crop improvement; however, the genetic basis of heterosis is incompletely understood. The use of whole-genome segregating populations poses a problem for establishing the genetic basis of heterosis, in that interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. However, introgression line (IL) populations permit the partitioning of heterosis into defined genomic regions, eliminating a major part of the genome-wide epistasis. In our previous study, based on mid-parental heterosis (HMP) value with single-point analysis, 42 heterotic loci (HLs) associated with six yield-related traits were detected in wild and cultivated rice using a set of 265 ILs of Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.). In this study, the genetic effects of HLs were determined as the combined effects of both additive and dominant gene actions, estimated from the performance values of testcross F1s and the dominance effects estimated from the HMP values of testcross F1s. We characterized the gene action type at each HL. Thirty-eight of the 42 HLs were over-dominant, and in the absence of epistasis, four HLs were dominant. Therefore, we favour that over-dominance is a major genetic basis of 'wild-cultivar' crosses at the single functional Mendelian locus level.

  4. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine. PMID:27279675

  5. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  6. A common mechanism for coenzyme cobalamin-dependent reductive dehalogenases.

    PubMed

    Johannissen, Linus O; Leys, David; Hay, Sam

    2017-02-22

    Distinct mechanisms have been proposed for the biological dehalogenation catalyzed by cobalamin-dependent enzymes, with two recent crystallographic studies suggesting different mechanisms based on the observed interaction between the organohalide substrate and cobalamin. In one case, involving an aromatic dibromide substrate in NpRdhA, a novel Co(II)-Br interaction was observed using EPR, suggesting a mechanism involving a [CoXR] adduct. However, in the case of trichloroethylene in PceA, a significantly longer Co-Cl distance was observed in X-ray crystal structures, suggesting a dissociative electron transfer mechanism. Subsequent DFT models of these reactions have not reproduced these differences in binding modes. Here, we have performed molecular docking and DFT calculations to investigate and compare the interaction between different organohalides and cobalamin in both NpRdhA and PceA. In each case, despite differences in binding in the Co(II) state, the reaction likely proceeds via formation of a [CoXR] adduct in the Co(I) state that weakens the breaking carbon-halide bond, suggesting this could be a general mechanism for cobalamin-dependent dehalogenation.

  7. Competition--a common motif for the imprinting mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, D P

    1997-01-01

    Imprinted genes, in contrast to the majority of mammalian genes, are able to restrict expression to one of the two parental alleles in somatic diploid cells. Although the silent allele of an imprinted gene appears to be transcriptionally repressed, it often bears little other resemblance to normal genes in an inactive state. The key to the imprinting mechanism may be a form of parental-specific expression-competition between cis-linked genes and not parental-specific expression versus repression. Thus, the imprinting mechanism may be better understood if the chromosomal region containing imprinted genes is viewed as 'active' on both parental chromosomes. PMID:9384569

  8. [Genetic background in common forms of obesity - from studies on identical twins to candidate genes of obesity].

    PubMed

    Bendlová, Běla; Lukášová, Petra; Vaňková, Markéta; Vejražková, Daniela; Bradnová, Olga; Včelák, Josef; Stanická, Soňa; Zamrazilová, Hana; Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Dušátková, Lenka; Kunešová, Marie; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    Common obesity is a result of interaction between genes and environmental/lifestyle factors, with heritability estimates 40-70%. Not only the susceptibility to obesity but also the success of weight management depends on the genetic background of each individual. This paper summarizes the up-to-date knowledge on genetic causes of common obesities. Introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to an identification of a total of 32 variants associated with obesity/BMI and 14 with body fat distribution. Further, a great progress in revealing the mechanisms regulating the energy balance was also noted. However, the proportion of explained variance for BMI is still low, suggesting other mechanisms such as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, rare gene variants, copy number variants polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications and microRNAs regulating gene transcription. In summary, we present results of our studies on obesity risk variants in Czech adults, children and adolescents including those evaluating the influence of selected gene variants on the outcomes of weight management.

  9. Genetic evidence for female host-specific races of the common cuckoo.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, H L; Sorenson, M D; Marchetti, K; Brooke, M D; Davies, N B; Nakamura, H

    2000-09-14

    The common cuckoo Cuculus canorus is divided into host-specific races (gentes). Females of each race lay a distinctive egg type that tends to match the host's eggs, for instance, brown and spotted for meadow pipit hosts or plain blue for redstart hosts. The puzzle is how these gentes remain distinct. Here, we provide genetic evidence that gentes are restricted to female lineages, with cross mating by males maintaining the common cuckoo genetically as one species. We show that there is differentiation between gentes in maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, but not in microsatellite loci of nuclear DNA. This supports recent behavioural evidence that female, but not male, common cuckoos specialize on a particular host, and is consistent with the possibility that genes affecting cuckoo egg type are located on the female-specific W sex chromosome. Our results also support the ideas that common cuckoos often switched hosts during evolution, and that some gentes may have multiple, independent origins, due to colonization by separate ancestral lineages.

  10. Common Brain Mechanisms of Chronic Pain and Addiction.

    PubMed

    Elman, Igor; Borsook, David

    2016-01-06

    While chronic pain is considered by some to be a CNS disease, little is understood about underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Addiction models have heuristic value in this regard, because both pain and addictive disorders are characterized by impaired hedonic capacity, compulsive drug seeking, and high stress. In drug addiction such symptomatology has been attributed to reward deficiency, impaired inhibitory control, incentive sensitization, aberrant learning, and anti-reward allostatic neuroadaptations. Here we propose that similar neuroadaptations exist in chronic pain patients.

  11. Advancing the understanding of autism disease mechanisms through genetics

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Won, Hyejung; Stein, Jason L; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Progress in understanding the genetic etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has fueled remarkable advances in our understanding of its potential neurobiological mechanisms. Yet, at the same time, these findings highlight extraordinary causal diversity and complexity at many levels ranging from molecules to circuits and emphasize the gaps in our current knowledge. Here we review current understanding of the genetic architecture of ASD and integrate genetic evidence, neuropathology and studies in model systems with how they inform mechanistic models of ASD pathophysiology. Despite the challenges, these advances provide a solid foundation for the development of rational, targeted molecular therapies. PMID:27050589

  12. Genetic Mechanisms Involved in the Phenotype of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of significant intellectual disability in the human population, occurring in roughly 1 in 700 live births. The ultimate cause of DS is trisomy of all or part of the set of genes located on chromosome 21. How this trisomy leads to the phenotype of DS is unclear. The completion of the DNA…

  13. Genetic, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Underlying the J Wave Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    An early repolarization (ER) pattern in the ECG, distinguished by J-point elevation, slurring of the terminal part of the QRS and ST-segment elevation has long been recognized and considered to be a benign electrocardiographic manifestation. Experimental studies conducted over a decade ago suggested that some cases of ER may be associated with malignant arrhythmias. Validation of this hypothesis was provided by recent studies demonstrating that an ER pattern in the inferior or inferolateral leads is associated with increased risk for life-threatening arrhythmias, termed ER syndrome (ERS). Because accentuated J waves characterize both Brugada syndrome (BS) and ERS, these syndromes have been grouped under the term “J wave syndromes”. ERS and BS share similar ECG characteristics, clinical outcomes and risk factors, as well as a common arrhythmic platform related to amplification of Ito-mediated J waves. Although BS and ERS differ with respect to the magnitude and lead location of abnormal J wave manifestation, they can be considered to represent a continuous spectrum of phenotypic expression. Although most subjects exhibiting an ER pattern are at minimal to no risk, mounting evidence suggests that careful attention should be paid to subjects with “high risk” ER. The challenge ahead is to be able to identify those at risk for sudden cardiac death. Here I review the clinical and genetic aspects as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the J wave syndromes. PMID:22498570

  14. Assessing Genetic Structure in Common but Ecologically Distinct Carnivores: The Stone Marten and Red Fox.

    PubMed

    Basto, Mafalda P; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Simões, Luciana; Grilo, Clara; Cardoso, Luís; Cortes, Helder; Bruford, Michael W; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The identification of populations and spatial genetic patterns is important for ecological and conservation research, and spatially explicit individual-based methods have been recognised as powerful tools in this context. Mammalian carnivores are intrinsically vulnerable to habitat fragmentation but not much is known about the genetic consequences of fragmentation in common species. Stone martens (Martes foina) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) share a widespread Palearctic distribution and are considered habitat generalists, but in the Iberian Peninsula stone martens tend to occur in higher quality habitats. We compared their genetic structure in Portugal to see if they are consistent with their differences in ecological plasticity, and also to illustrate an approach to explicitly delineate the spatial boundaries of consistently identified genetic units. We analysed microsatellite data using spatial Bayesian clustering methods (implemented in the software BAPS, GENELAND and TESS), a progressive partitioning approach and a multivariate technique (Spatial Principal Components Analysis-sPCA). Three consensus Bayesian clusters were identified for the stone marten. No consensus was achieved for the red fox, but one cluster was the most probable clustering solution. Progressive partitioning and sPCA suggested additional clusters in the stone marten but they were not consistent among methods and were geographically incoherent. The contrasting results between the two species are consistent with the literature reporting stricter ecological requirements of the stone marten in the Iberian Peninsula. The observed genetic structure in the stone marten may have been influenced by landscape features, particularly rivers, and fragmentation. We suggest that an approach based on a consensus clustering solution of multiple different algorithms may provide an objective and effective means to delineate potential boundaries of inferred subpopulations. sPCA and progressive partitioning

  15. Assessing Genetic Structure in Common but Ecologically Distinct Carnivores: The Stone Marten and Red Fox

    PubMed Central

    Basto, Mafalda P.; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Simões, Luciana; Grilo, Clara; Cardoso, Luís; Cortes, Helder; Bruford, Michael W.; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The identification of populations and spatial genetic patterns is important for ecological and conservation research, and spatially explicit individual-based methods have been recognised as powerful tools in this context. Mammalian carnivores are intrinsically vulnerable to habitat fragmentation but not much is known about the genetic consequences of fragmentation in common species. Stone martens (Martes foina) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) share a widespread Palearctic distribution and are considered habitat generalists, but in the Iberian Peninsula stone martens tend to occur in higher quality habitats. We compared their genetic structure in Portugal to see if they are consistent with their differences in ecological plasticity, and also to illustrate an approach to explicitly delineate the spatial boundaries of consistently identified genetic units. We analysed microsatellite data using spatial Bayesian clustering methods (implemented in the software BAPS, GENELAND and TESS), a progressive partitioning approach and a multivariate technique (Spatial Principal Components Analysis-sPCA). Three consensus Bayesian clusters were identified for the stone marten. No consensus was achieved for the red fox, but one cluster was the most probable clustering solution. Progressive partitioning and sPCA suggested additional clusters in the stone marten but they were not consistent among methods and were geographically incoherent. The contrasting results between the two species are consistent with the literature reporting stricter ecological requirements of the stone marten in the Iberian Peninsula. The observed genetic structure in the stone marten may have been influenced by landscape features, particularly rivers, and fragmentation. We suggest that an approach based on a consensus clustering solution of multiple different algorithms may provide an objective and effective means to delineate potential boundaries of inferred subpopulations. sPCA and progressive partitioning

  16. Pleiotropy among Common Genetic Loci Identified for Cardiometabolic Disorders and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ligthart, Symen; de Vries, Paul S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Dehghan, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotropic genetic variants have independent effects on different phenotypes. C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with several cardiometabolic phenotypes. Shared genetic backgrounds may partially underlie these associations. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify the shared genetic background of inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes using published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We also evaluated whether the pleiotropic effects of such loci were biological or mediated in nature. First, we examined whether 283 common variants identified for 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes in GWAS are associated with CRP level. Second, we tested whether 18 variants identified for serum CRP are associated with 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes. We used a Bonferroni corrected p-value of 1.1×10-04 (0.05/463) as a threshold of significance. We evaluated the independent pleiotropic effect on both phenotypes using individual level data from the Women Genome Health Study. Evaluating the genetic overlap between inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes, we found 13 pleiotropic regions. Additional analyses showed that 6 regions (APOC1, HNF1A, IL6R, PPP1R3B, HNF4A and IL1F10) appeared to have a pleiotropic effect on CRP independent of the effects on the cardiometabolic phenotypes. These included loci where individuals carrying the risk allele for CRP encounter higher lipid levels and risk of type 2 diabetes. In addition, 5 regions (GCKR, PABPC4, BCL7B, FTO and TMEM18) had an effect on CRP largely mediated through the cardiometabolic phenotypes. In conclusion, our results show genetic pleiotropy among inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes. In addition to reverse causation, our data suggests that pleiotropic genetic variants partially underlie the association between CRP and cardiometabolic phenotypes. PMID:25768928

  17. Genetic Structure in the Northern Range Margins of Common Ash, Fraxinus excelsior L.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefsrud, Mari Mette; Myking, Tor; Sønstebø, Jørn Henrik; Lygis, Vaidotas; Hietala, Ari Mikko; Heuertz, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    During post glacial colonization, loss of genetic diversity due to leading edge effects may be attenuated in forest trees because of their prolonged juvenile phase, allowing many migrants to reach the colonizing front before populations become reproductive. The northern range margins of temperate tree taxa in Europe are particularly suitable to study the genetic processes that follow colonization because they have been little affected by northern refugia. Here we examined how post glacial range dynamics have shaped the genetic structure of common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) in its northern range compared to its central range in Europe. We used four chloroplast and six nuclear microsatellites to screen 42 populations (1099 trees), half of which corresponded to newly sampled populations in the northern range and half of which represented reference populations from the central range obtained from previously studies. We found that northern range populations of common ash have the same chloroplast haplotypes as south-eastern European populations, suggesting that colonization of the northern range took place along a single migration route, a result confirmed by the structure at the nuclear microsatellites. Along this route, diversity strongly decreased only in the northern range, concomitantly with increasing population differentiation and complex population substructures, a pattern consistent with a leading edge colonization model. Our study highlights that while diversity is maintained in the central range of common ash due to broad colonizing fronts and high levels of gene flow, it profoundly decreases in the northern range, where colonization was unidirectional and probably involved repeated founder events and population fluctuations. Currently, common ash is threatened by ash dieback, and our results on northern populations will be valuable for developing gene conservation strategies. PMID:27907032

  18. Common Lung Microbiome Identified among Mechanically Ventilated Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ashley D.; Zhang, Yan; Barber, Robert C.; Minshall, Christian T.; Huebinger, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of the pulmonary microbiome in patients with non-chronic disease states has not been extensively examined. Traditional culture based screening methods are often unable to identify bacteria from bronchoalveolar lavage samples. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies allows for a culture-independent molecular based analysis to determine the microbial composition in the lung of this patient population. For this study, the Ion Torrent PGM system was used to assess the microbial complexity of culture negative bronchoalveolar lavage samples. A group of samples were identified that all displayed high diversity and similar relative abundance of bacteria. This group consisted of Hydrogenophaga, unclassified Bacteroidetes, Pedobacter, Thauera, and Acinetobacter. These bacteria may be representative of a common non-pathogenic pulmonary microbiome associated within this population of patients. PMID:27898681

  19. A Common Mechanism Underlying Food Choice and Social Decisions.

    PubMed

    Krajbich, Ian; Hare, Todd; Bartling, Björn; Morishima, Yosuke; Fehr, Ernst

    2015-10-01

    People make numerous decisions every day including perceptual decisions such as walking through a crowd, decisions over primary rewards such as what to eat, and social decisions that require balancing own and others' benefits. The unifying principles behind choices in various domains are, however, still not well understood. Mathematical models that describe choice behavior in specific contexts have provided important insights into the computations that may underlie decision making in the brain. However, a critical and largely unanswered question is whether these models generalize from one choice context to another. Here we show that a model adapted from the perceptual decision-making domain and estimated on choices over food rewards accurately predicts choices and reaction times in four independent sets of subjects making social decisions. The robustness of the model across domains provides behavioral evidence for a common decision-making process in perceptual, primary reward, and social decision making.

  20. New insights into mechanisms of small vessel disease stroke from genetics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rhea; Traylor, Matthew; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes; Markus, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common cause of lacunar strokes, vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and vascular dementia. SVD is thought to result in reduced cerebral blood flow, impaired cerebral autoregulation and increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying SVD are incompletely understood. Recent studies in monogenic forms of SVD, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and 'sporadic' SVD have shed light on possible disease mechanisms in SVD. Proteomic and biochemical studies in post-mortem monogenic SVD patients, as well as in animal models of monogenic disease have suggested that disease pathways are shared between different types of monogenic disease, often involving the impairment of extracellular matrix (ECM) function. In addition, genetic studies in 'sporadic' SVD have also shown that the disease is highly heritable, particularly among young-onset stroke patients, and that common variants in monogenic disease genes may contribute to disease processes in some SVD subtypes. Genetic studies in sporadic lacunar stroke patients have also suggested distinct genetic mechanisms between subtypes of SVD. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have also shed light on other potential disease mechanisms that may be shared with other diseases involving the white matter, or with pathways implicated in monogenic disease. This review brings together recent data from studies in monogenic SVD and genetic studies in 'sporadic' SVD. It aims to show how these provide new insights into the pathogenesis of SVD, and highlights the possible convergence of disease mechanisms in monogenic and sporadic SVD.

  1. Genetic structure, diversity, and interisland dispersal in the endangered Mariana Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus guami)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Haig, Susan M.; Takano, Leilani; Garcia, Karla

    2015-01-01

    The Mariana Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus guami) is a highly endangered taxon, with fewer than 300 individuals estimated to occur in the wild. The subspecies is believed to have undergone population declines attributable to loss of wetland habitats on its native islands in the Mariana Islands. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (control region and ND2 genes) and nuclear microsatellite loci in Mariana Common Moorhens from Guam and Saipan, the two most distal islands inhabited by the subspecies. Our analyses revealed similar nuclear genetic diversity and effective population size estimates on Saipan and Guam. Birds from Guam and Saipan were genetically differentiated (microsatellites: FST = 0.152; control region: FST = 0.736; ND2: FST= 0.390); however, assignment tests revealed the presence of first-generation dispersers from Guam onto Saipan (1 of 27 sampled birds) and from Saipan onto Guam (2 of 28 sampled birds), suggesting the capability for long-distance interpopulation movements within the subspecies. The observed dispersal rate was consistent with long-term estimates of effective numbers of migrants per generation between islands, indicating that movement between islands has been an ongoing process in this system. Despite known population declines, bottleneck tests revealed no signature of historical bottleneck events, suggesting that the magnitude of past population declines may have been comparatively small relative to the severity of declines that can be detected using genetic data.

  2. Integrating Genetic and Functional Genomic Data to Elucidate Common Disease Tra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schadt, Eric

    2005-03-01

    The reconstruction of genetic networks in mammalian systems is one of the primary goals in biological research, especially as such reconstructions relate to elucidating not only common, polygenic human diseases, but living systems more generally. Here I present a statistical procedure for inferring causal relationships between gene expression traits and more classic clinical traits, including complex disease traits. This procedure has been generalized to the gene network reconstruction problem, where naturally occurring genetic variations in segregating mouse populations are used as a source of perturbations to elucidate tissue-specific gene networks. Differences in the extent of genetic control between genders and among four different tissues are highlighted. I also demonstrate that the networks derived from expression data in segregating mouse populations using the novel network reconstruction algorithm are able to capture causal associations between genes that result in increased predictive power, compared to more classically reconstructed networks derived from the same data. This approach to causal inference in large segregating mouse populations over multiple tissues not only elucidates fundamental aspects of transcriptional control, it also allows for the objective identification of key drivers of common human diseases.

  3. Application of SNPscan in Genetic Screening for Common Hearing Loss Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jia; Li, Tao; Hu, Ping; Song, Yu; Xu, Chiyu; Wang, Jie; Cheng, Jing; Zhang, Lei; Duan, Hong; Yuan, Huijun; Ma, Furong

    2016-01-01

    The current study reports the successful application of a fast and efficient genetic screening system for common hearing loss (HL) genes based on SNPscan genotyping technology. Genetic analysis of 115 variants in common genes related to HL, GJB2, SLC26A4 and MT-RNR, was performed on 695 subjects with non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) from the Northern China. The results found that 38.7% (269/695) of cases carried bi-allelic pathogenic variants in GJB2 and SLC26A4 and 0.7% (5/695) of cases carried homoplasmic MT-RNR1 variants. The variant allele frequency of GJB2, SLC26A4 and MT-RNR1 was 19.8% (275/1390), 21.9% (304/1390), and 0.86% (6/695), respectively. This approach can explain ~40% of NSHL cases and thus is a useful tool for establishing primary molecular diagnosis of NSHL in clinical genetics. PMID:27792752

  4. Association between Common Genetic Variants and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Risk in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Yuan, Yi; Yang, Hua; Li, Jingjie; Feng, Tian; Ouyang, Yongri; Jin, Tianbo; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinopathies affecting 5-7% of reproductive age women worldwide. The aim of our study was to explore the PCOS-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations between common genetic variants and PCOS risk in a Han Chinese women population. Methods: In this case-control study, 285 Chinese Han women aged 28.50±6.858 years with PCOS and 299 controls of a mean age of 32.66±7.018 years were compared. We selected recently published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) which identified several genetic loci in PCOS. All the SNPs were genotyped by Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. Associations between the gene and the risk of PCOS were tested using various genetic models by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and Plink. Results: We found that rs705702 in the RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS (odds ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.87, p=0.011) and increased the PCOS risk. The genotypic model analysis also showed that rs705702 was associated with PCOS risk. Conclusion: Our results suggest that SNPs rs705702 in gene RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS in Han Chinese women. PMID:27217259

  5. A common genetic influence on human intensity ratings of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Zhu, Gu; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    The perception of sweetness varies among individuals but the sources of this variation are not fully understood. Here, in a sample of 1,901 adolescent and young adults (53.8% female; 243 MZ and 452 DZ twin pairs, 511 unpaired individuals; mean age 16.2±2.8, range 12–26 years), we studied the variation in the perception of sweetness intensity of two monosaccharides and two high-potency sweeteners: glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame. Perceived intensity for all sweeteners decreased with age (2–5% per year) and increased with the history of otitis media (6–9%). Males rated aspartame slightly stronger than females (7%). We found similar heritabilities for sugars (glucose: h2=0.31, fructose: h2=0.34) and high-potency sweeteners (NHDC: h2=0.31, aspartame: h2=0.30); all were in the modest range. Multivariate modeling showed that a common genetic factor accounted for >75% of the genetic variance in the four sweeteners, suggesting that individual differences in perceived sweet intensity, which are partly due to genetic factors, may be attributed to a single set of genes. This study provided evidence of the shared genetic pathways between the perception of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

  6. Common genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Hua-Fang; Lu, Xuan; Jian, Xiao-Rong; Jin, Bi; Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Qing; Wang, Qing-Yun; Wu, Tang-Chun; Guo, Huan; Liu, Hui; Guo, Tao; Yu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Rui; Yang, Yan; Hu, Yu

    2013-02-07

    Venous thrombosis is a major medical disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Little is known about the genetic background of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. A total of 1,304 individuals diagnosed with a first venous thrombosis and 1,334 age- and sex-matched healthy participants were enrolled in this study. Resequencing of THBD (encoding thrombomodulin) in 60 individuals with venous thrombosis and 60 controls and a functional assay showed that a common variant, c.-151G>T (rs16984852), in the 5' UTR significantly reduced the gene expression and could cause a predisposition to venous thrombosis. Therefore, this variant was genotyped in a case-control study, and results indicated that heterozygotes had a 2.80-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.88-4.29) increased risk of venous thrombosis. The THBD c.-151G>T variant was further investigated in a family analysis involving 176 first-degree relatives from 38 index families. First-degree relatives with this variant had a 3.42-fold increased risk of venous thrombosis, and their probability of remaining thrombosis-free was significantly lower than that of relatives without the variant. In addition, five rare mutations that might be deleterious were also identified in thrombophilic individuals by sequencing. This study is the largest genetic investigation of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. Further study on genetics of thrombosis should focus on resequencing of THBD and other hemostasis genes in different populations.

  7. PERIODIC LATERALIZED EPILEPTIFORM DISCHARGES AND AFTERDISCHARGES: COMMON DYNAMIC MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Kalamangalam, Giridhar P; Slater, Jeremy D

    2015-01-01

    Objective No neurophysiological hypothesis currently exist addressing how and why periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) arise in certain types of brain disease. Based on spectral analysis of clinical scalp EEG traces, we formulated a general mechanism for the emergence of PLEDs. Methods We retrospectively analyzed spectra of PLED time-series and control EEG segments from the opposite hemisphere in 25 hospitalized neurological patients. The observations led to the development of a phenomenological model for PLED emergence. Results Similar to that observed in our previous work (Kalamangalam et al. 2014) with afterdischarges, an analytic relationship is found between the spectrum of the baseline EEG and the PLED EEG, characterized by ‘condensation’ of the main baseline spectral cluster, with variable inclusion of higher harmonics of the condensate. Significance PLEDs may arise by synchronization of pre-existing local field potentials, through a variable combination of enhancement of excitatory neurotransmission and inactivation of inhibitory neurotransmission provoked by the PLED-associated disease process. Higher harmonics in the PLED spectrum may arise by recurrent feedback, possibly from entrained single units. Significance A mechanism is suggested for PLED emergence in certain diseased brain states, and the association of PLEDs with EEG seizures. The framework is a spatially extended version of that which we proposed underlies afterdischarge, and analogous to the cooperative behavior seen in a variety of natural multi-oscillator systems. PMID:25710632

  8. Memory, reasoning, and categorization: parallels and common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Brett K.; Heit, Evan; Rotello, Caren M.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, memory, reasoning, and categorization have been treated as separate components of human cognition. We challenge this distinction, arguing that there is broad scope for crossover between the methods and theories developed for each task. The links between memory and reasoning are illustrated in a review of two lines of research. The first takes theoretical ideas (two-process accounts) and methodological tools (signal detection analysis, receiver operating characteristic curves) from memory research and applies them to important issues in reasoning research: relations between induction and deduction, and the belief bias effect. The second line of research introduces a task in which subjects make either memory or reasoning judgments for the same set of stimuli. Other than broader generalization for reasoning than memory, the results were similar for the two tasks, across a variety of experimental stimuli and manipulations. It was possible to simultaneously explain performance on both tasks within a single cognitive architecture, based on exemplar-based comparisons of similarity. The final sections explore evidence for empirical and processing links between inductive reasoning and categorization and between categorization and recognition. An important implication is that progress in all three of these fields will be expedited by further investigation of the many commonalities between these tasks. PMID:24987380

  9. Memory, reasoning, and categorization: parallels and common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan; Rotello, Caren M

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, memory, reasoning, and categorization have been treated as separate components of human cognition. We challenge this distinction, arguing that there is broad scope for crossover between the methods and theories developed for each task. The links between memory and reasoning are illustrated in a review of two lines of research. The first takes theoretical ideas (two-process accounts) and methodological tools (signal detection analysis, receiver operating characteristic curves) from memory research and applies them to important issues in reasoning research: relations between induction and deduction, and the belief bias effect. The second line of research introduces a task in which subjects make either memory or reasoning judgments for the same set of stimuli. Other than broader generalization for reasoning than memory, the results were similar for the two tasks, across a variety of experimental stimuli and manipulations. It was possible to simultaneously explain performance on both tasks within a single cognitive architecture, based on exemplar-based comparisons of similarity. The final sections explore evidence for empirical and processing links between inductive reasoning and categorization and between categorization and recognition. An important implication is that progress in all three of these fields will be expedited by further investigation of the many commonalities between these tasks.

  10. A common mechanism of cellular death induced by bactericidal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kohanski, Michael A; Dwyer, Daniel J; Hayete, Boris; Lawrence, Carolyn A; Collins, James J

    2007-09-07

    Antibiotic mode-of-action classification is based upon drug-target interaction and whether the resultant inhibition of cellular function is lethal to bacteria. Here we show that the three major classes of bactericidal antibiotics, regardless of drug-target interaction, stimulate the production of highly deleterious hydroxyl radicals in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, which ultimately contribute to cell death. We also show, in contrast, that bacteriostatic drugs do not produce hydroxyl radicals. We demonstrate that the mechanism of hydroxyl radical formation induced by bactericidal antibiotics is the end product of an oxidative damage cellular death pathway involving the tricarboxylic acid cycle, a transient depletion of NADH, destabilization of iron-sulfur clusters, and stimulation of the Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that all three major classes of bactericidal drugs can be potentiated by targeting bacterial systems that remediate hydroxyl radical damage, including proteins involved in triggering the DNA damage response, e.g., RecA.

  11. [Genetic diversity of reaction of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars to light intensity].

    PubMed

    Evtushenko, E V; Chekurov, V M

    2000-05-01

    The effect of low light intensity (LI) on the period from sprouting to earing was studied in 12 cultivars of the spring common wheat under controlled conditions. Differences between cultivars with respect to their responses to LI (RLIs) were found both for those that were photoperiod-sensitive and those that were almost photoperiod-neutral. Specifically, a prolonged photoperiod and a low LI differently increased the period from sprouting to earling in different cultivars. Genetic analysis of the RLI demonstrated, for the first time, that the weak response was incompletely dominant in F1. The results of genetic analysis agree with the hypothesis that the cultivars Pitic 62 and Novosibirskaya 22 differ in alleles of two loci controlling the RLI in wheat.

  12. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss - A Common Hereditary Deafness.

    PubMed

    Wingard, Jeffrey C; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. However, there is no apparent, demonstrable relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel) functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K(+)-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Cx30 (GJB6), Cx29 (GJC3), Cx31 (GJB3), and Cx43 (GJA1) mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation-induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes remain unclear. Also, little is known about specific mutation-induced pathological changes in vivo and little information is available for humans. Such further studies are urgently required.

  13. Hierarchical spatial genetic structure of Common Eiders (Somateria Mollissima) breeding along a migratory corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Scribner, K.T.; McCracken, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    Documentation of spatial genetic discordance among breeding populations of Arctic-nesting avian species is important, because anthropogenic change is altering environmental linkages at micro- and macrogeographic scales. We estimated levels of population subdivision within Pacific Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum) breeding on 12 barrier islands in the western Beaufort Sea, Alaska, using molecular markers and capture-mark-recapture (CMR) data. Common Eider populations were genetically structured on a microgeographic scale. Regional comparisons between populations breeding on island groups separated by 90 km (Mikkelsen Bay and Simpson Lagoon) revealed structuring at 14 microsatellite loci (FST = 0.004, P < 0.01), a nuclear intron (FST = 0.022, P = 0.02), and mitochondrial DNA (??ST = 0.082, P < 0.05). The CMR data (n = 34) did not indicate female dispersal between island groups. Concordance between genetic and CMR data indicates that females breeding in the western Beaufort Sea are strongly philopatric to island groups rather than to a particular island. Despite the apparent high site fidelity of females, coalescence-based models of gene flow suggest that asymmetrical western dispersal occurs between island groups and is likely mediated by Mikkelsen Bay females stopping early on spring migration at Simpson Lagoon to breed. Alternatively, late-arriving females may be predisposed to nest in Simpson Lagoon because of the greater availability and wider distribution of nesting habitat. Our results indicate that genetic discontinuities, mediated by female philopatry, can exist at microgeographic scales along established migratory corridors. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2009.

  14. Common neural mechanisms underlying reversal learning by reward and punishment.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gui; Xue, Feng; Droutman, Vita; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Read, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in flexible goal-directed decisions, often examined by reversal learning, are associated with behavioral abnormalities characterized by impulsiveness and disinhibition. Although the lateral orbital frontal cortex (OFC) has been consistently implicated in reversal learning, it is still unclear whether this region is involved in negative feedback processing, behavioral control, or both, and whether reward and punishment might have different effects on lateral OFC involvement. Using a relatively large sample (N = 47), and a categorical learning task with either monetary reward or moderate electric shock as feedback, we found overlapping activations in the right lateral OFC (and adjacent insula) for reward and punishment reversal learning when comparing correct reversal trials with correct acquisition trials, whereas we found overlapping activations in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) when negative feedback signaled contingency change. The right lateral OFC and DLPFC also showed greater sensitivity to punishment than did their left homologues, indicating an asymmetry in how punishment is processed. We propose that the right lateral OFC and anterior insula are important for transforming affective feedback to behavioral adjustment, whereas the right DLPFC is involved in higher level attention control. These results provide insight into the neural mechanisms of reversal learning and behavioral flexibility, which can be leveraged to understand risky behaviors among vulnerable populations.

  15. Innovation and problem solving: a review of common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Andrea S; Guez, David

    2014-11-01

    Behavioural innovations have become central to our thinking about how animals adjust to changing environments. It is now well established that animals vary in their ability to innovate, but understanding why remains a challenge. This is because innovations are rare, so studying innovation requires alternative experimental assays that create opportunities for animals to express their ability to invent new behaviours, or use pre-existing ones in new contexts. Problem solving of extractive foraging tasks has been put forward as a suitable experimental assay. We review the rapidly expanding literature on problem solving of extractive foraging tasks in order to better understand to what extent the processes underpinning problem solving, and the factors influencing problem solving, are in line with those predicted, and found, to underpin and influence innovation in the wild. Our aim is to determine whether problem solving can be used as an experimental proxy of innovation. We find that in most respects, problem solving is determined by the same underpinning mechanisms, and is influenced by the same factors, as those predicted to underpin, and to influence, innovation. We conclude that problem solving is a valid experimental assay for studying innovation, propose a conceptual model of problem solving in which motor diversity plays a more central role than has been considered to date, and provide recommendations for future research using problem solving to investigate innovation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cognition in the wild.

  16. Promoting the Use of Common Oat Genetic Resources through Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction.

    PubMed

    Boczkowska, Maja; Łapiński, Bogusław; Kordulasińska, Izabela; Dostatny, Denise F; Czembor, Jerzy H

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of diversity and population structure and construction of a core collection is beneficial for the efficient use and management of germplasm. A unique collection of common oat landraces, cultivated in the temperate climate of central Europe until the end of the twentieth century, is preserved in the Polish gene bank. It consists of 91 accessions that have never been used in breeding programs. In order to optimise the use of this genetic resource, we aimed to: (1) determine genetic and agro-morphological diversity, (2) identify internal genetic variation of the tested accessions, (3) form a core collection and (4) recognise the accessions useful for breeding programs or re-release for cultivation. The collection was screened using ISSR markers (1520 loci) and eight agro-morphological traits. Uniquely, we performed molecular studies based on 24 individuals of every accession instead of bulk samples. Therefore, assessment of the degree of diversity within each population and the identification of overlapping gene pools were possible. The observed internal diversity (Nei unbiased coefficient) was in the range of 0.17-0.31. Based on combined genetic and agro-morphological data, we established the core collection composed of 21 landraces. Due to valuable compositions of important traits, some accessions were also identified as useful for breeding programs. The population structure and principal coordinate analysis revealed two major clusters. Based on the previous results, the accessions classified within the smaller one were identified as obsolete varieties instead of landraces. Our results show that the oat landraces are, in general, resistant to local races of diseases, well adapted to local conditions and, in some cases, yielding at the level of modern varieties. Therefore, in situ conservation of the landraces in the near future may be satisfactory for both farmers and researchers in terms of the genetic resources preservation.

  17. Promoting the Use of Common Oat Genetic Resources through Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    PubMed Central

    Łapiński, Bogusław; Kordulasińska, Izabela; Dostatny, Denise F.; Czembor, Jerzy H.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of diversity and population structure and construction of a core collection is beneficial for the efficient use and management of germplasm. A unique collection of common oat landraces, cultivated in the temperate climate of central Europe until the end of the twentieth century, is preserved in the Polish gene bank. It consists of 91 accessions that have never been used in breeding programs. In order to optimise the use of this genetic resource, we aimed to: (1) determine genetic and agro-morphological diversity, (2) identify internal genetic variation of the tested accessions, (3) form a core collection and (4) recognise the accessions useful for breeding programs or re-release for cultivation. The collection was screened using ISSR markers (1520 loci) and eight agro-morphological traits. Uniquely, we performed molecular studies based on 24 individuals of every accession instead of bulk samples. Therefore, assessment of the degree of diversity within each population and the identification of overlapping gene pools were possible. The observed internal diversity (Nei unbiased coefficient) was in the range of 0.17–0.31. Based on combined genetic and agro-morphological data, we established the core collection composed of 21 landraces. Due to valuable compositions of important traits, some accessions were also identified as useful for breeding programs. The population structure and principal coordinate analysis revealed two major clusters. Based on the previous results, the accessions classified within the smaller one were identified as obsolete varieties instead of landraces. Our results show that the oat landraces are, in general, resistant to local races of diseases, well adapted to local conditions and, in some cases, yielding at the level of modern varieties. Therefore, in situ conservation of the landraces in the near future may be satisfactory for both farmers and researchers in terms of the genetic resources preservation. PMID:27959891

  18. Common genetic variation near MC4R is associated with waist circumference and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John C; Elliott, Paul; Zabaneh, Delilah; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Yun; Froguel, Philippe; Balding, David; Scott, James; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2008-06-01

    We carried out a genome-wide association study (318,237 SNPs) for insulin resistance and related phenotypes in 2,684 Indian Asians, with further testing in 11,955 individuals of Indian Asian or European ancestry. We found associations of rs12970134 near MC4R with waist circumference (P = 1.7 x 10(-9)) and, independently, with insulin resistance. Homozygotes for the risk allele of rs12970134 have approximately 2 cm increased waist circumference. Common genetic variation near MC4R is associated with risk of adiposity and insulin resistance.

  19. Divided versus selective attention: evidence for common processing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Britta; Wolkenberg, Frank A; Ross, Thomas J; Myers, Carol S; Heishman, Stephen J; Stein, Dan J; Kurup, Pradeep K; Stein, Elliot A

    2008-06-18

    The current study revisited the question of whether there are brain mechanisms specific to divided attention that differ from those used in selective attention. Increased neuronal activity required to simultaneously process two stimulus dimensions as compared with each separate dimension has often been observed, but rarely has activity induced by a divided attention condition exceeded the sum of activity induced by the component tasks. Healthy participants performed a selective-divided attention paradigm while undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). The task required participants to make a same-different judgment about either one of two simultaneously presented stimulus dimensions, or about both dimensions. Performance accuracy was equated between tasks by dynamically adjusting the stimulus display time. Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signal differences between tasks were identified by whole-brain voxel-wise comparisons and by region-specific analyses of all areas modulated by the divided attention task (DIV). No region displayed greater activation or deactivation by DIV than the sum of signal change by the two selective attention tasks. Instead, regional activity followed the tasks' processing demands as reflected by reaction time. Only a left cerebellar region displayed a correlation between participants' BOLD signal intensity and reaction time that was selective for DIV. The correlation was positive, reflecting slower responding with greater activation. Overall, the findings do not support the existence of functional brain activity specific to DIV. Increased activity appears to reflect additional processing demands by introducing a secondary task, but those demands do not appear to qualitatively differ from processes of selective attention.

  20. Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, Trygve E.; Roddey, J. Cooper; Djurovic, Srdjan; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Casey, B. J.; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Jernigan, Terry L.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David N.; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Murray, Sarah S.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Rimol, Lars M.; Mattingsdal, Morten; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Dale, Anders M.

    2012-01-01

    Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (Pcombined = 3.2 × 10−8). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10−9) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5′ UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception. PMID:22343285

  1. Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Trygve E; Roddey, J Cooper; Djurovic, Srdjan; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Casey, B J; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Gruen, Jeffrey R; Jernigan, Terry L; Kaufmann, Walter E; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David N; Kuperman, Joshua M; Murray, Sarah S; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Rimol, Lars M; Mattingsdal, Morten; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Schork, Nicholas J; Dale, Anders M; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q; Toga, Arthur W; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C; Saykin, Andrew J; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Cairns, Nigel J; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J Q; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M Y; Korecka, Magdalena; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L; Lord, Joanne L; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S; Bell, Karen L; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Coleman, R Edward; Arnold, Steven E; Karlawish, Jason H; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M; Porsteinsson, Anton P; Goldstein, Bonnie S; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M; Ismail, M Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J; Cellar, Janet S; Burns, Jeffrey M; Anderson, Heather S; Swerdlow, Russell H; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H S; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H; Carson, Richard E; MacAvoy, Martha G; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Ging-Yuek; Hsiung, Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Potkin, Steven G; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B; Schwartz, Eben S; Sink, Kaycee M; Williamson, Jeff D; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabether; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Jernigan, Terry; McCabe, Connor; Grant, Ellen; Ernst, Thomas; Kuperman, Josh; Chung, Yoon; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Darst, Burcu; Pritchett, Lexi; Saito, Ashley; Amaral, David; DiNino, Mishaela; Eyngorina, Bella; Sowell, Elizabeth; Houston, Suzanne; Soderberg, Lindsay; Kaufmann, Walter; van Zijl, Peter; Rizzo-Busack, Hilda; Javid, Mohsin; Mehta, Natasha; Ruberry, Erika; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Gebhard, Nitzah; Manigan, Holly; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Yakutis, Lauren; Hill, Michael; Gruen, Jeffrey; Bosson-Heenan, Joan; Carlson, Heatherly

    2012-03-06

    Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.

  2. Evaluation of Mechanical Losses in Piezoelectric Plates using Genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F. J.; Gonçalves, M. S.; Massaro, F. R.; Martins, P. S.

    Numerical methods are used for the characterization of piezoelectric ceramics. A procedure based on genetic algorithm is applied to find the physical coefficients and mechanical losses. The coefficients are estimated from a minimum scoring of cost function. Electric impedances are calculated from Mason's model including mechanical losses constant and dependent on frequency as a linear function. The results show that the electric impedance percentage error in the investigated interval of frequencies decreases when mechanical losses depending on frequency are inserted in the model. A more accurate characterization of the piezoelectric ceramics mechanical losses should be considered as frequency dependent.

  3. Genetic factors and epigenetic mechanisms of longevity: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Jessica; Mather, Karen A; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Kwok, John B J

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional longevity phenotype, defined as living beyond the age of 95, results from complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, mediate the interaction of these factors. This review will provide an overview of animal model studies used to examine age-related epigenetic modifications. Key human studies will be used to illustrate the progress made in the identification of the genetic loci associated with exceptional longevity, including APOE and FOXO3 and genes/loci that are also differentially methylated between long-lived individuals and younger controls. Future studies should focus on elucidating whether identified longevity genetic loci directly influence epigenetic mechanisms, especially on differentially methylated regions associated with longevity.

  4. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development. PMID:28203254

  5. Discovery of common human genetic variants of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) governing nitric oxide, autonomic activity, and cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lian; Rao, Fangwen; Zhang, Kuixing; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Das, Madhusudan; Vaingankar, Sucheta M.; Bao, Xuping; Rana, Brinda K.; Smith, Douglas W.; Wessel, Jennifer; Salem, Rany M.; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Ziegler, Michael G.; O’Connor, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is rate limiting in the provision of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin for biosynthesis of catecholamines and NO. We asked whether common genetic variation at GCH1 alters transmitter synthesis and predisposes to disease. Here we undertook a systematic search for polymorphisms in GCH1, then tested variants’ contributions to NO and catecholamine release as well as autonomic function in twin pairs. Renal NO and neopterin excretions were significantly heritable, as were baroreceptor coupling (heart rate response to BP fluctuation) and pulse interval (1/heart rate). Common GCH1 variant C+243T in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTRs) predicted NO excretion, as well as autonomic traits: baroreceptor coupling, maximum pulse interval, and pulse interval variability, though not catecholamine secretion. In individuals with the most extreme BP values in the population, C+243T affected both diastolic and systolic BP, principally in females. In functional studies, C+243T decreased reporter expression in transfected 3′-UTRs plasmids. We conclude that human NO secretion traits are heritable, displaying joint genetic determination with autonomic activity by functional polymorphism at GCH1. Our results document novel pathophysiological links between a key biosynthetic locus and NO metabolism and suggest new strategies for approaching the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of risk predictors for cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. PMID:17717598

  6. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  7. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  8. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  9. Genomic selection for recovery of original genetic background from hybrids of endangered and common breeds

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carmen; Hayes, Ben J; Daetwyler, Hans D

    2014-01-01

    Critically endangered breeds and populations are often crossed with more common breeds or subspecies. This results in genetic admixture that can be undesirable when it challenges the genetic integrity of wild and domestic populations, causing a loss in special characteristics or unique genetic material and ultimately extinction. Here, we present two genomic selection strategies, using genome-wide DNA markers, to recover the genomic content of the original endangered population from admixtures. Each strategy relies on the estimation of the proportion of nonintrogressed genome in individuals based on a different method: either genomic prediction or identification of breed-specific haplotypes. Then, breeding programs that remove introgressed genomic information can be designed. To test these strategies, we used empirical 50K SNP array data from two pure sheep breeds, Merino (used as target breed), Poll Dorset and an existing admixed population of both breeds. Sheep populations with varying degrees of introgression and admixture were simulated starting from these real genotypes. Both strategies were capable of identifying segment origin, and both removed up to the 100% of the Poll Dorset segments. While the selection process led to substantial inbreeding, we controlled it by imposing a minimum number of individuals contributing to the next generation. PMID:24567744

  10. [Genetic singularity coefficients of common vetch Vicia sativa L. accessions determined with molecular markers].

    PubMed

    Potokina, E K; Aleksandrova, T G

    2008-11-01

    Organization and practical application of ex situ collections require estimation of genetic differences between numerous accessions of local cultivars and field weed forms collected from the same ecological and geographical region and similar in their morphophysiological characteristics. A mathematical algorithm for estimating the degree of genetic singularity of a specimen in the system of local gene pool determined with the help of molecular markers is described. The utility of this algorithm is demonstrated by the example of classification of 677 common vetch accessions from the collection of the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry from 11 ecological-geographic regions of Russia analyzed using AFLP. The proposed classification of accessions is the result of processing the AFLP data by weighting the marker traits based on their frequency in particular regions. This allowed each accession to be characterized according to the ratio of rare and frequent alleles as a genetic singularity coefficient. The proposed method is appropriate for any types of molecular markers. A practical result of its application is the classification of accessions using a five-point score scale, which can be added to descriptors of certificate databases and used for optimization of the work with collections.

  11. C9orf72 expansions are the most common genetic cause of Huntington disease phenocopies

    PubMed Central

    Hensman Moss, Davina J.; Poulter, Mark; Beck, Jon; Hehir, Jason; Polke, James M.; Campbell, Tracy; Adamson, Garry; Mudanohwo, Ese; McColgan, Peter; Haworth, Andrea; Wild, Edward J.; Sweeney, Mary G.; Houlden, Henry; Mead, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In many cases where Huntington disease (HD) is suspected, the genetic test for HD is negative: these are known as HD phenocopies. A repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene has recently been identified as a major cause of familial and sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our objective was to determine whether this mutation causes HD phenocopies. Methods: A cohort of 514 HD phenocopy patients were analyzed for the C9orf72 expansion using repeat primed PCR. In cases where the expansion was found, Southern hybridization was performed to determine expansion size. Clinical case notes were reviewed to determine the phenotype of expansion-positive cases. Results: Ten subjects (1.95%) had the expansion, making it the most common identified genetic cause of HD phenocopy presentations. The size of expansion was not significantly different from that associated with other clinical presentations of C9orf72 expanded cases. The C9orf72 expansion-positive subjects were characterized by the presence of movement disorders, including dystonia, chorea, myoclonus, tremor, and rigidity. Furthermore, the age at onset in this cohort was lower than previously reported for subjects with the C9orf72 expansion and included one case with pediatric onset. Discussion: This study extends the known phenotype of the C9orf72 expansion in both age at onset and movement disorder symptoms. We propose a revised clinico-genetic algorithm for the investigation of HD phenocopy patients based on these data. PMID:24363131

  12. The mGA1.0: A common LISP implementation of a messy genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, David E.; Kerzic, Travis

    1990-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are finding increased application in difficult search, optimization, and machine learning problems in science and engineering. Increasing demands are being placed on algorithm performance, and the remaining challenges of genetic algorithm theory and practice are becoming increasingly unavoidable. Perhaps the most difficult of these challenges is the so-called linkage problem. Messy GAs were created to overcome the linkage problem of simple genetic algorithms by combining variable-length strings, gene expression, messy operators, and a nonhomogeneous phasing of evolutionary processing. Results on a number of difficult deceptive test functions are encouraging with the mGA always finding global optima in a polynomial number of function evaluations. Theoretical and empirical studies are continuing, and a first version of a messy GA is ready for testing by others. A Common LISP implementation called mGA1.0 is documented and related to the basic principles and operators developed by Goldberg et. al. (1989, 1990). Although the code was prepared with care, it is not a general-purpose code, only a research version. Important data structures and global variations are described. Thereafter brief function descriptions are given, and sample input data are presented together with sample program output. A source listing with comments is also included.

  13. Genetic evidence for common pathways in human age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Simon C; Dong, Xiao; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the single largest risk factor for chronic disease. Studies in model organisms have identified conserved pathways that modulate aging rate and the onset and progression of multiple age-related diseases, suggesting that common pathways of aging may influence age-related diseases in humans as well. To determine whether there is genetic evidence supporting the notion of common pathways underlying age-related diseases, we analyzed the genes and pathways found to be associated with five major categories of age-related disease using a total of 410 genomewide association studies (GWAS). While only a small number of genes are shared among all five disease categories, those found in at least three of the five major age-related disease categories are highly enriched for apoliprotein metabolism genes. We found that a more substantial number of gene ontology (GO) terms are shared among the 5 age-related disease categories and shared GO terms include canonical aging pathways identified in model organisms, such as nutrient-sensing signaling, translation, proteostasis, stress responses, and genome maintenance. Taking advantage of the vast amount of genetic data from the GWAS, our findings provide the first direct evidence that conserved pathways of aging simultaneously influence multiple age-related diseases in humans as has been demonstrated in model organisms. PMID:26077337

  14. Modelling the evolution of common cuckoo host-races: speciation or genetic swamping?

    PubMed

    Krüger, O; Kolss, M

    2013-11-01

    Co-evolutionary arms races have provided clear evidence for evolutionary change, especially in host-parasite systems. The evolution of host-specific races in the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), however, is also an example where sexual conflict influences the outcome. Cuckoo females benefit from better adaptation to overcome host defences, whereas cuckoo males face a trade-off between the benefits of better adaptation to a host and the benefits of multiple mating with females from other host-races. The outcome of this trade-off might be genetic differentiation or prevention of it by genetic swamping. We use a simulation model to test which outcome is more likely with three sympatric cuckoo host-races. We assume a cost for cuckoo chicks that express a host adaptation allele not suited to their foster host species and that cuckoo males that switch to another host-race experience either a fitness benefit or cost. Over most of the parameter space, cuckoo male host-race fidelity increases significantly with time, and gene flow between host-races ceases within a few thousand to a hundred thousand generations. Our results hence support the idea that common cuckoo host-races might be in the incipient stages of speciation.

  15. Abandoning the common law: medical negligence, genetic tests and wrongful life in the Australian High Court.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; Jefferys, Susannah

    2007-05-01

    The Australian High Court recently found that the common law could allow parents to claim tortious damages when medical negligence was proven to have led to the birth of an unplanned, but healthy, baby (Cattanach v Melchior (2003) 215 CLR 1). In Harriton v Stephens (2006) 80 ALJR 791; [2006] HCA 15 and Waller v James; Waller v Hoolahan (2006) 80 ALJR 846; [2006] HCA 16 the High Court in a six-to-one decision (Kirby J dissenting) decided that no such claim could be made by a child when medical negligence in failing to order an in utero genetic test caused the child severe disability. In an era when almost all pregnancies will soon require patented fetal genetic tests as part of the professional standard of care, the High Court, by barring so-called "wrongful life" (better termed "wrongful suffering") claims, may have created a partial immunity from suit for their corporate manufacturers and the doctors who administer them. What lessons can be learnt from this case about how the Australian High Court is, or should be, approaching medical negligence cases and its role as guardian of the Australian common law?

  16. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  17. Maintenance of genetic variation in human personality: testing evolutionary models by estimating heritability due to common causal variants and investigating the effect of distant inbreeding.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Karin J H; Yang, Jian; Lahti, Jari; Veijola, Juha; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Heinonen, Kati; Pouta, Anneli; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Widen, Elisabeth; Taanila, Anja; Isohanni, Matti; Miettunen, Jouko; Palotie, Aarno; Penke, Lars; Service, Susan K; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Räikkönen, Katri; Eriksson, Johan G; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Lehtimäki, Terho; Martin, Nicholas G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Visscher, Peter M; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2012-10-01

    Personality traits are basic dimensions of behavioral variation, and twin, family, and adoption studies show that around 30% of the between-individual variation is due to genetic variation. There is rapidly growing interest in understanding the evolutionary basis of this genetic variation. Several evolutionary mechanisms could explain how genetic variation is maintained in traits, and each of these makes predictions in terms of the relative contribution of rare and common genetic variants to personality variation, the magnitude of nonadditive genetic influences, and whether personality is affected by inbreeding. Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from > 8000 individuals, we estimated that little variation in the Cloninger personality dimensions (7.2% on average) is due to the combined effect of common, additive genetic variants across the genome, suggesting that most heritable variation in personality is due to rare variant effects and/or a combination of dominance and epistasis. Furthermore, higher levels of inbreeding were associated with less socially desirable personality trait levels in three of the four personality dimensions. These findings are consistent with genetic variation in personality traits having been maintained by mutation-selection balance.

  18. Development of taxon-specific sequences of common wheat for the detection of genetically modified wheat.

    PubMed

    Iida, Mayu; Yamashiro, Satomi; Yamakawa, Hirohito; Hayakawa, Katsuyuki; Kuribara, Hideo; Kodama, Takashi; Furui, Satoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Maitani, Tamio; Hino, Akihiro

    2005-08-10

    Qualitative and quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) systems aimed at the specific detection and quantification of common wheat DNA are described. Many countries have issued regulations to label foods that include genetically modified organisms (GMOs). PCR technology is widely recognized as a reliable and useful technique for the qualitative and quantitative detection of GMOs. Detection methods are needed to amplify a target GM gene, and the amplified results should be compared with those of the corresponding taxon-specific reference gene to obtain reliable results. This paper describes the development of a specific DNA sequence in the waxy-D1 gene for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and the design of a specific primer pair and TaqMan probe on the waxy-D1 gene for PCR analysis. The primers amplified a product (Wx012) of 102 bp. It is indicated that the Wx012 DNA sequence is specific to common wheat, showing homogeneity in qualitative PCR results and very similar quantification accuracy along 19 distantly related common wheat varieties. In Southern blot and real-time PCR analyses, this sequence showed either a single or a low number of copy genes. In addition, by qualitative and quantitative PCR using wx012 primers and a wx012-T probe, the limits of detection of the common wheat genome were found to be about 15 copies, and the reproducibility was reliable. In consequence, the PCR system using wx012 primers and wx012-T probe is considered to be suitable for use as a common wheat-specific taxon-specific reference gene in DNA analyses, including GMO tests.

  19. Heritability estimates of the Big Five personality traits based on common genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Power, R A; Pluess, M

    2015-07-14

    According to twin studies, the Big Five personality traits have substantial heritable components explaining 40-60% of the variance, but identification of associated genetic variants has remained elusive. Consequently, knowledge regarding the molecular genetic architecture of personality and to what extent it is shared across the different personality traits is limited. Using genomic-relatedness-matrix residual maximum likelihood analysis (GREML), we here estimated the heritability of the Big Five personality factors (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness for experience) in a sample of 5011 European adults from 527,469 single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. We tested for the heritability of each personality trait, as well as for the genetic overlap between the personality factors. We found significant and substantial heritability estimates for neuroticism (15%, s.e. = 0.08, P = 0.04) and openness (21%, s.e. = 0.08, P < 0.01), but not for extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness. The bivariate analyses showed that the variance explained by common variants entirely overlapped between neuroticism and openness (rG = 1.00, P < 0.001), despite low phenotypic correlation (r = - 0.09, P < 0.001), suggesting that the remaining unique heritability may be determined by rare or structural variants. As far as we are aware of, this is the first study estimating the shared and unique heritability of all Big Five personality traits using the GREML approach. Findings should be considered exploratory and suggest that detectable heritability estimates based on common variants is shared between neuroticism and openness to experiences.

  20. Common and Distinct Genetic Properties of ESCRT-II Components in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Chen, Zhihong; Bolduc, Clare; Bergmann, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic studies in yeast have identified class E vps genes that form the ESCRT complexes required for protein sorting at the early endosome. In Drosophila, mutations of the ESCRT-II component vps25 cause endosomal defects leading to accumulation of Notch protein and increased Notch pathway activity. These endosomal and signaling defects are thought to account for several phenotypes. Depending on the developmental context, two different types of overgrowth can be detected. Tissue predominantly mutant for vps25 displays neoplastic tumor characteristics. In contrast, vps25 mutant clones in a wild-type background trigger hyperplastic overgrowth in a non-autonomous manner. In addition, vps25 mutant clones also promote apoptotic resistance in a non-autonomous manner. Principal Findings Here, we genetically characterize the remaining ESCRT-II components vps22 and vps36. Like vps25, mutants of vps22 and vps36 display endosomal defects, accumulate Notch protein and – when the tissue is predominantly mutant – show neoplastic tumor characteristics. However, despite these common phenotypes, they have distinct non-autonomous phenotypes. While vps22 mutations cause strong non-autonomous overgrowth, they do not affect apoptotic resistance. In contrast, vps36 mutations increase apoptotic resistance, but have little effect on non-autonomous proliferation. Further characterization reveals that although all ESCRT-II mutants accumulate Notch protein, only vps22 and vps25 mutations trigger Notch activity. Conclusions/Significance The ESCRT-II components vps22, vps25 and vps36 display common and distinct genetic properties. Our data redefine the role of Notch for hyperplastic and neoplastic overgrowth in these mutants. While Notch is required for hyperplastic growth, it appears to be dispensable for neoplastic transformation. PMID:19132102

  1. The role of common genetic variation in educational attainment and income: evidence from the National Child Development Study.

    PubMed

    Davies, Neil M; Hemani, Gibran; Timpson, Nic J; Windmeijer, Frank; Davey Smith, George

    2015-11-12

    We investigated the role of common genetic variation in educational attainment and household income. We used data from 5,458 participants of the National Child Development Study to estimate: 1) the associations of rs9320913, rs11584700 and rs4851266 and socioeconomic position and educational phenotypes; and 2) the univariate chip-heritability of each phenotype, and the genetic correlation between each phenotype and educational attainment at age 16. The three SNPs were associated with most measures of educational attainment. Common genetic variation contributed to 6 of 14 socioeconomic background phenotypes, and 17 of 29 educational phenotypes. We found evidence of genetic correlations between educational attainment at age 16 and 4 of 14 social background and 8 of 28 educational phenotypes. This suggests common genetic variation contributes both to differences in educational attainment and its relationship with other phenotypes. However, we remain cautious that cryptic population structure, assortative mating, and dynastic effects may influence these associations.

  2. The role of common genetic variation in educational attainment and income: evidence from the National Child Development Study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil M.; Hemani, Gibran; Timpson, Nic J.; Windmeijer, Frank; Davey Smith, George

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of common genetic variation in educational attainment and household income. We used data from 5,458 participants of the National Child Development Study to estimate: 1) the associations of rs9320913, rs11584700 and rs4851266 and socioeconomic position and educational phenotypes; and 2) the univariate chip-heritability of each phenotype, and the genetic correlation between each phenotype and educational attainment at age 16. The three SNPs were associated with most measures of educational attainment. Common genetic variation contributed to 6 of 14 socioeconomic background phenotypes, and 17 of 29 educational phenotypes. We found evidence of genetic correlations between educational attainment at age 16 and 4 of 14 social background and 8 of 28 educational phenotypes. This suggests common genetic variation contributes both to differences in educational attainment and its relationship with other phenotypes. However, we remain cautious that cryptic population structure, assortative mating, and dynastic effects may influence these associations. PMID:26561353

  3. Detecting Genetic Association of Common Human Facial Morphological Variation Using High Density 3D Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sile; Zhou, Hang; Guo, Jing; Jin, Li; Tang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Human facial morphology is a combination of many complex traits. Little is known about the genetic basis of common facial morphological variation. Existing association studies have largely used simple landmark-distances as surrogates for the complex morphological phenotypes of the face. However, this can result in decreased statistical power and unclear inference of shape changes. In this study, we applied a new image registration approach that automatically identified the salient landmarks and aligned the sample faces using high density pixel points. Based on this high density registration, three different phenotype data schemes were used to test the association between the common facial morphological variation and 10 candidate SNPs, and their performances were compared. The first scheme used traditional landmark-distances; the second relied on the geometric analysis of 15 landmarks and the third used geometric analysis of a dense registration of ∼30,000 3D points. We found that the two geometric approaches were highly consistent in their detection of morphological changes. The geometric method using dense registration further demonstrated superiority in the fine inference of shape changes and 3D face modeling. Several candidate SNPs showed potential associations with different facial features. In particular, one SNP, a known risk factor of non-syndromic cleft lips/palates, rs642961 in the IRF6 gene, was validated to strongly predict normal lip shape variation in female Han Chinese. This study further demonstrated that dense face registration may substantially improve the detection and characterization of genetic association in common facial variation. PMID:24339768

  4. Genetic diversity and selection of common bean lines based on technological quality and biofortification.

    PubMed

    Steckling, S de M; Ribeiro, N D; Arns, F D; Mezzomo, H C; Possobom, M T D F

    2017-03-22

    The development of common bean cultivars with high technological quality that are biofortified with minerals, is required to meet the demand for food with health benefits. The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether common bean genotypes differ in terms of technological and mineral biofortification traits, to study the correlations between these characters, to analyze the genetic dissimilarity of common bean genotypes, and to select superior lines for these traits. For this, 14 common bean genotypes were evaluated in experiments conducted in three growing seasons in the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. A significant genotype x environment interaction was observed for technological quality (mass of 100 grains and cooking time) and biofortification traits (concentration of potassium, phosphorus, calcium, iron, zinc, and copper). Positive correlation estimates were obtained between phosphorus and potassium (r = 0.575), iron and zinc (r = 0.641), copper and iron (r = 0.729), and copper and phosphorus (r = 0.533). In the main component cluster analysis, four groups of genotypes were formed. The following lines are recommended for selection: LP 11-363 for fast-cooking, CNFC 11 948 for high iron concentration, and LEC 03-14 for high potassium, phosphorus, and calcium concentrations in grains. Common bean lines with high phosphorus and iron concentrations in grains can be indirectly selected based on higher potassium, copper, and zinc concentrations. Controlled crossings between LP 11-363 x CNFC 11 948 and LP 11-363 x LEC 03-14 are recommended to obtain segregating lines that are fast-cooking and biofortified with minerals.

  5. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kathryn L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Jacob J; Christiansen, Morten H; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population.

  6. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population. PMID:27064276

  7. Genome sequence and genetic diversity of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xumin; Li, Jiongtang; Liu, Guiming; Kuang, Youyi; Xu, Jian; Zheng, Xianhu; Ren, Lufeng; Wang, Guoliang; Zhang, Yan; Huo, Linhe; Zhao, Zixia; Cao, Dingchen; Lu, Cuiyun; Li, Chao; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Zhanjiang; Fan, Zhonghua; Shan, Guangle; Li, Xingang; Wu, Shuangxiu; Song, Lipu; Hou, Guangyuan; Jiang, Yanliang; Jeney, Zsigmond; Yu, Dan; Wang, Li; Shao, Changjun; Song, Lai; Sun, Jing; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jian; Li, Qiang; Xu, Liming; Sun, Fanyue; Feng, Jianxin; Wang, Chenghui; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Baosen; Li, Yan; Zhu, Yaping; Xue, Wei; Zhao, Lan; Wang, Jintu; Gu, Ying; Lv, Weihua; Wu, Kejing; Xiao, Jingfa; Wu, Jiayan; Zhang, Zhang; Yu, Jun; Sun, Xiaowen

    2014-11-01

    The common carp, Cyprinus carpio, is one of the most important cyprinid species and globally accounts for 10% of freshwater aquaculture production. Here we present a draft genome of domesticated C. carpio (strain Songpu), whose current assembly contains 52,610 protein-coding genes and approximately 92.3% coverage of its paleotetraploidized genome (2n = 100). The latest round of whole-genome duplication has been estimated to have occurred approximately 8.2 million years ago. Genome resequencing of 33 representative individuals from worldwide populations demonstrates a single origin for C. carpio in 2 subspecies (C. carpio Haematopterus and C. carpio carpio). Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analyses were used to identify loci potentially associated with traits including scaling patterns and skin color. In combination with the high-resolution genetic map, the draft genome paves the way for better molecular studies and improved genome-assisted breeding of C. carpio and other closely related species.

  8. Genetic variation of piperidine alkaloids in Pinus ponderosa: a common garden study

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Elizabeth A.; Kelsey, Rick G.; St Clair, J. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous measurements of conifer alkaloids have revealed significant variation attributable to many sources, environmental and genetic. The present study takes a complementary and intensive, common garden approach to examine genetic variation in Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa alkaloid production. Additionally, this study investigates the potential trade-off between seedling growth and alkaloid production, and associations between topographic/climatic variables and alkaloid production. Methods Piperidine alkaloids were quantified in foliage of 501 nursery seedlings grown from seed sources in west-central Washington, Oregon and California, roughly covering the western half of the native range of ponderosa pine. A nested mixed model was used to test differences among broad-scale regions and among families within regions. Alkaloid concentrations were regressed on seedling growth measurements to test metabolite allocation theory. Likewise, climate characteristics at the seed sources were also considered as explanatory variables. Key Results Quantitative variation from seedling to seedling was high, and regional variation exceeded variation among families. Regions along the western margin of the species range exhibited the highest alkaloid concentrations, while those further east had relatively low alkaloid levels. Qualitative variation in alkaloid profiles was low. All measures of seedling growth related negatively to alkaloid concentrations on a natural log scale; however, coefficients of determination were low. At best, annual height increment explained 19·4 % of the variation in ln(total alkaloids). Among the climate variables, temperature range showed a negative, linear association that explained 41·8 % of the variation. Conclusions Given the wide geographic scope of the seed sources and the uniformity of resources in the seedlings' environment, observed differences in alkaloid concentrations are evidence for genetic regulation of alkaloid

  9. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Efficiency of Indigenous Common Bean Rhizobia in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Pohajda, Ines; Babić, Katarina Huić; Rajnović, Ivana; Kajić, Sanja; Sikora, Sanja

    2016-12-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) in symbiotic associations with legumes enable considerable entries of biologically fixed nitrogen into soil. Efforts are therefore made to intensify the natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume inoculation. Studies of field populations of rhizobia open up the possibility to preserve and probably exploit some indigenous strains with hidden symbiotic or ecological potentials. The main aim of the present study is to determine genetic diversity of common bean rhizobia isolated from different field sites in central Croatia and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency and compatibility with host plants. The isolation procedure revealed that most soil samples contained no indigenous common bean rhizobia. The results indicate that the cropping history had a significant impact on the presence of indigenous strains. Although all isolates were found to belong to species Rhizobium leguminosarum, significant genetic diversity at the strain level was determined. Application of both random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC- -PCR) methods resulted in similar grouping of strains. Symbiotic efficiency of indigenous rhizobia as well as their compatibility with two commonly grown bean varieties were tested in field experiments. Application of indigenous rhizobial strains as inoculants resulted in significantly different values of nodulation, seed yield as well as plant nitrogen and seed protein contents. The most abundant nodulation and the highest plant nitrogen and protein contents were determined in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum strains S17/2 and S21/6. Although, in general, the inoculation had a positive impact on seed yield, differences depending on the applied strain were not determined. The overall results show the high degree of symbiotic efficiency of the specific indigenous strain S21/6. These results indicate different symbiotic

  10. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Efficiency of Indigenous Common Bean Rhizobia in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Pohajda, Ines; Babić, Katarina Huić; Rajnović, Ivana; Kajić, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) in symbiotic associations with legumes enable considerable entries of biologically fixed nitrogen into soil. Efforts are therefore made to intensify the natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume inoculation. Studies of field populations of rhizobia open up the possibility to preserve and probably exploit some indigenous strains with hidden symbiotic or ecological potentials. The main aim of the present study is to determine genetic diversity of common bean rhizobia isolated from different field sites in central Croatia and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency and compatibility with host plants. The isolation procedure revealed that most soil samples contained no indigenous common bean rhizobia. The results indicate that the cropping history had a significant impact on the presence of indigenous strains. Although all isolates were found to belong to species Rhizobium leguminosarum, significant genetic diversity at the strain level was determined. Application of both random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus–polymerase chain reaction (ERIC- -PCR) methods resulted in similar grouping of strains. Symbiotic efficiency of indigenous rhizobia as well as their compatibility with two commonly grown bean varieties were tested in field experiments. Application of indigenous rhizobial strains as inoculants resulted in significantly different values of nodulation, seed yield as well as plant nitrogen and seed protein contents. The most abundant nodulation and the highest plant nitrogen and protein contents were determined in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum strains S17/2 and S21/6. Although, in general, the inoculation had a positive impact on seed yield, differences depending on the applied strain were not determined. The overall results show the high degree of symbiotic efficiency of the specific indigenous strain S21/6. These results indicate different

  11. Biology and genetics of oculocutaneous albinism and vitiligo - common pigmentation disorders in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manga, Prashiela; Kerr, Robyn; Ramsay, Michèle; Kromberg, Jennifer G R

    2013-07-29

    Pigmentation disorders span the genetic spectrum from single-gene autosomal recessive disorders such as oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), the autosomal dominant disorder piebaldism to X-linked ocular albinism and multifactorial vitiligo. OCA connotes a group of disorders that result in hypopigmented skin due to decreased melanin production in melanocytes and loss of visual acuity. There are four non-syndromic forms, OCA1-4, which are classified based on the gene that is mutated (tyrosinase, OCA2, tyrosinase-related protein 1 and SLC45A2, respectively). Despite the fact that multiple genes account for the various forms of OCA, the phenotypes of all four forms result from disruption in the maturation and trafficking of the enzyme tyrosinase. OCA2 is the most prevalent autosomal recessive disorder among southern African blacks, affecting 1/3 900 individuals; while OCA3, although rare, is most prevalent in southern Africa. Another common pigmentation disorder in southern Africa is vitiligo, which affects 1 - 2% of people worldwide. Vitiligo is a complex, acquired disorder in which melanocytes are destroyed due to an autoimmune response. The aetiology underlying this disorder is poorly understood, although recent genetic association studies have begun to shed light on the contributing factors. Pigmentation disorders have significant psychosocial implications and co-morbidities, yet therapies are still lacking. Recent progress in our understanding of the pathobiology of both albinism and vitiligo may herald novel treatment strategies for these disorders. 

  12. GOOD GIFTS FOR THE COMMON GOOD: Blood and Bioethics in the Market of Genetic Research

    PubMed Central

    REDDY, DEEPA S.

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted with the Indian community in Houston, as part of a NIH–NHGRI-sponsored ethics study and sample collection initiative entitled “Indian and Hindu Perspectives on Genetic Variation Research.” At the heart of this research is one central exchange—blood samples donated for genetic research—that draws both the Indian community and a community of researchers into an encounter with bioethics. I consider the meanings that come to be associated with blood donation as it passes through various hands, agendas, and associated ethical filters on its way to the lab bench: how and why blood is solicited, how the giving and taking of blood is rationalized, how blood as material substance is alienated, processed, documented, and made available for the promised ends of basic science research. Examining corporeal substances and asking what sorts of gifts and problems these represent, I argue, sheds some light on two imbricated tensions expressed by a community of Indians, on the one hand, and of geneticists and basic science researchers, on the other hand: that gifts ought to be free (but are not), and that science ought to be pure (but is not). In this article, I explore how experiences of bioethics are variously shaped by the histories and habits of Indic giving, prior sample collection controversies, commitments to “good science” and the common “good of humanity,” and negotiations of the sites where research findings circulate. PMID:18458755

  13. Web-based, participant-driven studies yield novel genetic associations for common traits.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Nicholas; Macpherson, J Michael; Tung, Joyce Y; Hon, Lawrence S; Naughton, Brian; Saxonov, Serge; Avey, Linda; Wojcicki, Anne; Pe'er, Itsik; Mountain, Joanna

    2010-06-24

    Despite the recent rapid growth in genome-wide data, much of human variation remains entirely unexplained. A significant challenge in the pursuit of the genetic basis for variation in common human traits is the efficient, coordinated collection of genotype and phenotype data. We have developed a novel research framework that facilitates the parallel study of a wide assortment of traits within a single cohort. The approach takes advantage of the interactivity of the Web both to gather data and to present genetic information to research participants, while taking care to correct for the population structure inherent to this study design. Here we report initial results from a participant-driven study of 22 traits. Replications of associations (in the genes OCA2, HERC2, SLC45A2, SLC24A4, IRF4, TYR, TYRP1, ASIP, and MC1R) for hair color, eye color, and freckling validate the Web-based, self-reporting paradigm. The identification of novel associations for hair morphology (rs17646946, near TCHH; rs7349332, near WNT10A; and rs1556547, near OFCC1), freckling (rs2153271, in BNC2), the ability to smell the methanethiol produced after eating asparagus (rs4481887, near OR2M7), and photic sneeze reflex (rs10427255, near ZEB2, and rs11856995, near NR2F2) illustrates the power of the approach.

  14. Web-Based, Participant-Driven Studies Yield Novel Genetic Associations for Common Traits

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Nicholas; Macpherson, J. Michael; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hon, Lawrence S.; Naughton, Brian; Saxonov, Serge; Avey, Linda; Wojcicki, Anne; Pe'er, Itsik; Mountain, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Despite the recent rapid growth in genome-wide data, much of human variation remains entirely unexplained. A significant challenge in the pursuit of the genetic basis for variation in common human traits is the efficient, coordinated collection of genotype and phenotype data. We have developed a novel research framework that facilitates the parallel study of a wide assortment of traits within a single cohort. The approach takes advantage of the interactivity of the Web both to gather data and to present genetic information to research participants, while taking care to correct for the population structure inherent to this study design. Here we report initial results from a participant-driven study of 22 traits. Replications of associations (in the genes OCA2, HERC2, SLC45A2, SLC24A4, IRF4, TYR, TYRP1, ASIP, and MC1R) for hair color, eye color, and freckling validate the Web-based, self-reporting paradigm. The identification of novel associations for hair morphology (rs17646946, near TCHH; rs7349332, near WNT10A; and rs1556547, near OFCC1), freckling (rs2153271, in BNC2), the ability to smell the methanethiol produced after eating asparagus (rs4481887, near OR2M7), and photic sneeze reflex (rs10427255, near ZEB2, and rs11856995, near NR2F2) illustrates the power of the approach. PMID:20585627

  15. Genetic characterization of Common Eiders breeding in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Talbot, Sandra L.; McCracken, Kevin G.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed population genetic subdivision among four colonies of Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum) breeding in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD), Alaska, using microsatellite genotypes and DNA sequences with differing modes of inheritance. Significant, albeit low, levels of genetic differentiation were observed between mainland populations and Kigigak Island for nuclear intron lamin A and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. Intercolony variation in haplotypic frequencies also was observed at mtDNA. Positive growth signatures assayed from microsatellites, nuclear introns, and mtDNA indicate recent colonization of the YKD, and may explain the low levels of structuring observed. Gene flow estimates based on microsatellites, nuclear introns, and mtDNA suggest asymmetrical gene flow between mainland colonies and Kigigak Island, with more individuals on average dispersing from mainland populations to Kigigak Island than vice versa. The directionality of gene flow observed may be explained by the colonization of the YKD from northern glacial refugia or by YKD metapopulation dynamics.

  16. A Comprehensive Analysis of Common Genetic Variation Around Six Candidate Loci for Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Peter H; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Chambers, Jennifer; Donnelly, Jennifer; Cooley, Sharon; Buckley, Rebecca; Mannino, Ramona; Jarvis, Sheba; Syngelaki, Argyro; Geenes, Victoria; Paul, Priyadarshini; Sothinathan, Meera; Kubitz, Ralf; Lammert, Frank; Tribe, Rachel M; Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Glantz, Anna; Khan, Shahid A; Nicolaides, Kypros; Whittaker, John; Geary, Michael; Williamson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) has a complex etiology with a significant genetic component. Heterozygous mutations of canalicular transporters occur in a subset of ICP cases and a population susceptibility allele (p.444A) has been identified in ABCB11. We sought to expand our knowledge of the detailed genetic contribution to ICP by investigation of common variation around candidate loci with biological plausibility for a role in ICP (ABCB4, ABCB11, ABCC2, ATP8B1, NR1H4, and FGF19). METHODS: ICP patients (n=563) of white western European origin and controls (n=642) were analyzed in a case–control design. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers (n=83) were selected from the HapMap data set (Tagger, Haploview 4.1 (build 22)). Genotyping was performed by allelic discrimination assay on a robotic platform. Following quality control, SNP data were analyzed by Armitage's trend test. RESULTS: Cochran–Armitage trend testing identified six SNPs in ABCB11 together with six SNPs in ABCB4 that showed significant evidence of association. The minimum Bonferroni corrected P value for trend testing ABCB11 was 5.81×10−4 (rs3815676) and for ABCB4 it was 4.6×10−7(rs2109505). Conditional analysis of the two clusters of association signals suggested a single signal in ABCB4 but evidence for two independent signals in ABCB11. To confirm these findings, a second study was performed in a further 227 cases, which confirmed and strengthened the original findings. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis of a large cohort of ICP cases has identified a key role for common variation around the ABCB4 and ABCB11 loci, identified the core associations, and expanded our knowledge of ICP susceptibility. PMID:24366234

  17. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  18. Current review of genetics of human obesity: from molecular mechanisms to an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, David; Stice, Eric; Rodríguez-López, Raquel; Manco, Licíno; Nóbrega, Clévio

    2015-08-01

    It is well-known that obesity is a complex multifactorial and heterogeneous condition with an important genetic component. Recently, major advances in obesity research emerged concerning the molecular mechanisms contributing to the obese condition. This review outlines several studies and data concerning the genetics and other important factors in the susceptibility risk to develop obesity. Based in the genetic etiology three main categories of obesity are considered: monogenic, syndromic, and common obesity. For the monogenic forms of obesity, the gene causing the phenotype is clearly identified, whereas for the common obesity the loci architecture underlying the phenotype is still being characterized. Given that, in this review we focus mainly in this obesity form, reviewing loci found until now by genome-wide association studies related with the susceptibility risk to develop obesity. Moreover, we also detail the obesity-related loci identified in children and in different ethnic groups, trying to highlight the complexity of the genetics underlying the common obese phenotype. Importantly, we also focus in the evolutionary hypotheses that have been proposed trying to explain how natural selection favored the spread of genes that increase the risk for an obese phenotype and how this predisposition to obesity evolved. Other factors are important in the obesity condition, and thus, we also discuss the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the susceptibility and development of obesity. Covering all these topics we expect to provide a complete and recent perspective about the underlying mechanisms involved in the development and origin of obesity. Only with a full understanding of the factors and mechanisms contributing to obesity, it will be possible to provide and allow the development of new therapeutic approaches to this condition.

  19. SNP marker development for linkage map construction, anchoring of the common bean whole genome sequence and genetic research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objectives were to identify SNP DNA markers based on a diverse set of common bean cultivars via next generation sequencing technologies; to develop Illumina Infinium BeadChip assays containing SNPs with high polymorphism within and between common bean market classes, to create high density genet...

  20. Genetic diversity of indigenous common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) rhizobia from the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Adalgisa Ribeiro; Cursino, Luciana; Muro-Abad, Júpiter Israel; Gomes, Eliane Aparecida; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; Hungria, Mariangela; Cassini, Sérvio Túlio Alves

    2009-01-01

    We characterized indigenous common bean rhizobia from five districts of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The isolates were trapped by two common bean varieties, the Mineiro Precoce (Andean origin) and Ouro Negro (Mesoamerican origin). Analysis by BOX-PCR of selected isolates detected a high level of genetic diversity. PMID:24031433

  1. Considering causal genes in the genetic dissection of kernel traits in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Volker; Albrecht, Theresa; Castell, Adelheid; Diethelm, Manuela; Schweizer, Günther; Hartl, Lorenz

    2016-11-01

    Genetic factors controlling thousand-kernel weight (TKW) were characterized for their association with other seed traits, including kernel width, kernel length, ratio of kernel width to kernel length (KW/KL), kernel area, and spike number per m(2) (SN). For this purpose, a genetic map was established utilizing a doubled haploid population derived from a cross between German winter wheat cultivars Pamier and Format. Association studies in a diversity panel of elite cultivars supplemented genetic analysis of kernel traits. In both populations, genomic signatures of 13 candidate genes for TKW and kernel size were analyzed. Major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for TKW were identified on chromosomes 1B, 2A, 2D, and 4D, and their locations coincided with major QTL for kernel size traits, supporting the common belief that TKW is a function of other kernel traits. The QTL on chromosome 2A was associated with TKW candidate gene TaCwi-A1 and the QTL on chromosome 4D was associated with dwarfing gene Rht-D1. A minor QTL for TKW on chromosome 6B coincided with TaGW2-6B. The QTL for kernel dimensions that did not affect TKW were detected on eight chromosomes. A major QTL for KW/KL located at the distal tip of chromosome arm 5AS is being reported for the first time. TaSus1-7A and TaSAP-A1, closely linked to each other on chromosome 7A, could be related to a minor QTL for KW/KL. Genetic analysis of SN confirmed its negative correlation with TKW in this cross. In the diversity panel, TaSus1-7A was associated with TKW. Compared to the Pamier/Format bi-parental population where TaCwi-A1a was associated with higher TKW, the same allele reduced grain yield in the diversity panel, suggesting opposite effects of TaCwi-A1 on these two traits.

  2. Genetic Diversity of Fusarium oxysporum Strains from Common Bean Fields in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Santos, Fernando M.; Benito, Ernesto P.; Eslava, Arturo P.; Díaz-Mínguez, José María

    1999-01-01

    Fusarium wilt is an endemic disease in El Barco de Avila (Castilla y León, west-central Spain), where high-quality common bean cultivars have been cultured for the last century. We used intergenic spacer (IGS) region polymorphism of ribosomal DNA, electrophoretic karyotype patterns, and vegetative compatibility and pathogenicity analyses to assess the genetic diversity within Fusarium oxysporum isolates recovered from common bean plants growing in fields around El Barco de Avila. Ninety-six vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) were found among 128 isolates analyzed; most of these VCGs contained only a single isolate. The strains belonging to pathogenic VCGs and the most abundant nonpathogenic VCGs were further examined for polymorphisms in the IGS region and electrophoretic karyotype patterns. Isolates belonging to the same VCG exhibited the same IGS haplotype and very similar electrophoretic karyotype patterns. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that VCGs represent clonal lineages that rarely, if ever, reproduce sexually. The F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli strains recovered had the same IGS haplotype and similar electrophoretic karyotype patterns, different from those found for F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli from the Americas, and were assigned to three new VCGs (VCGs 0166, 0167, and 0168). Based on our results, we do not consider the strains belonging to F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli to be a monophyletic group within F. oxysporum, as there is no correlation between pathogenicity and VCG, IGS restriction fragment length polymorphism, or electrophoretic karyotype. PMID:10427016

  3. Common genetic variants on 5p14.1 associate with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Ma, Deqiong; Bucan, Maja; Glessner, Joseph T.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Salyakina, Daria; Imielinski, Marcin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi; Rappaport, Eric; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette; Korvatska, Olena; Piven, Joseph; Sonnenblick, Lisa I.; Retuerto, Ana I. Alvarez; Herman, Edward I.; Dong, Hongmei; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian; Ozonoff, Sally; Klin, Ami; Owley, Thomas; Sweeney, John A.; Brune, Camille W.; Cantor, Rita M.; Bernier, Raphael; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; McMahon, William M.; Miller, Judith; State, Matthew W.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Coon, Hilary; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Nurnberger, John I.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Cook, Edwin H.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Dawson, Geraldine; Grant, Struan F. A.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)—two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules—revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 × 10−8, odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 × 10−8 to 2.1 × 10−10. Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs. PMID:19404256

  4. Biaxial mechanical properties of the human thoracic and abdominal aorta, common carotid, subclavian, renal and common iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Dzenis, Yuris A; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Pemberton, Mark A; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Phillips, Nick Y; Herber, Kyle; Woodford, Thomas; Bowen, Robert E; Lomneth, Carol S; MacTaggart, Jason N

    2014-11-01

    The biomechanics of large- and medium-sized arteries influence the pathophysiology of arterial disease and the response to therapeutic interventions. However, a comprehensive comparative analysis of human arterial biaxial mechanical properties has not yet been reported. Planar biaxial extension was used to establish the passive mechanical properties of human thoracic (TA, [Formula: see text]) and abdominal (AA, [Formula: see text]) aorta, common carotid (CCA, [Formula: see text]), subclavian (SA, [Formula: see text]), renal (RA, [Formula: see text]) and common iliac (CIA, [Formula: see text]) arteries from 11 deceased subjects ([Formula: see text] years old). Histological evaluation determined the structure of each specimen. Experimental data were used to determine constitutive parameters for a structurally motivated nonlinear anisotropic constitutive model. All arteries demonstrated appreciable anisotropy and large nonlinear deformations. Most CCA, SA, TA, AA and CIA specimens were stiffer longitudinally, while most RAs were stiffer circumferentially. A switch in anisotropy was occasionally demonstrated for all arteries. The CCA was the most compliant, least anisotropic and least frequently diseased of all arteries, while the CIA and AA were the stiffest and the most diseased. The severity of atherosclerosis correlated with age, but was not affected by laterality. Elastin fibers in the aorta, SA and CCA were uniformly and mostly circumferentially distributed throughout the media, while in the RA and CIA, elastin was primarily axially aligned and concentrated in the external elastic lamina. Constitutive modeling provided good fits to the experimental data for most arteries. Biomechanical and architectural features of major arteries differ depending on location and functional environment. A better understanding of localized arterial mechanical properties may support the development of site-specific treatment modalities for arterial disease.

  5. Common genetic architecture underlying young children’s food fussiness and liking for vegetables and fruit123

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food fussiness (FF) is common in early childhood and is often associated with the rejection of nutrient-dense foods such as vegetables and fruit. FF and liking for vegetables and fruit are likely all heritable phenotypes; the genetic influence underlying FF may explain the observed genetic influence on liking for vegetables and fruit. Twin analyses make it possible to get a broad-based estimate of the extent of the shared genetic influence that underlies these traits. Objective: We quantified the extent of the shared genetic influence that underlies FF and liking for vegetables and fruit in early childhood with the use of a twin design. Design: Data were from the Gemini cohort, which is a population-based sample of twins born in England and Wales in 2007. Parents of 3-y-old twins (n = 1330 pairs) completed questionnaire measures of their children’s food preferences (liking for vegetables and fruit) and the FF scale from the Children’s Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Multivariate quantitative genetic modeling was used to estimate common genetic influences that underlie FF and liking for vegetables and fruit. Results: Genetic correlations were significant and moderate to large in size between FF and liking for both vegetables (−0.65) and fruit (−0.43), which indicated that a substantial proportion of the genes that influence FF also influence liking. Common genes that underlie FF and liking for vegetables and fruit largely explained the observed phenotypic correlations between them (68–70%). Conclusions: FF and liking for fruit and vegetables in young children share a large proportion of common genetic factors. The genetic influence on FF may determine why fussy children typically reject fruit and vegetables. PMID:26864359

  6. Common genetic variation and survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Chan, Andrew T.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Fisher, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hsu, Li; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jansen, Lina; Kaplan, Richard; Kap, Elisabeth J.; Maughan, Timothy S.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; West, Hannah; White, Emily; Peters, Ulrike; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence. Common germline genetic variation may also be related to CRC survival. We used a discovery-based approach to identify SNPs related to survival outcomes after CRC diagnosis. Genome-wide genotyping arrays were conducted for 3494 individuals with invasive CRC enrolled in six prospective cohort studies (median study-specific follow-up = 4.2–8.1 years). In pooled analyses, we used Cox regression to assess SNP-specific associations with CRC-specific and overall survival, with additional analyses stratified by stage at diagnosis. Top findings were followed-up in independent studies. A P value threshold of P < 5×10−8 in analyses combining discovery and follow-up studies was required for genome-wide significance. Among individuals with distant-metastatic CRC, several SNPs at 6p12.1, nearest the ELOVL5 gene, were statistically significantly associated with poorer survival, with the strongest associations noted for rs209489 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.8, P = 7.6×10−10 and HR = 1.8, P = 3.7×10−9 for CRC-specific and overall survival, respectively). No SNPs were statistically significantly associated with survival among all cases combined or in cases without distant-metastases. SNPs in 6p12.1/ELOVL5 were associated with survival outcomes in individuals with distant-metastatic CRC, and merit further follow-up for functional significance. Findings from this genome-wide association study highlight the potential importance of genetic variation in CRC prognosis and provide clues to genomic regions of potential interest. PMID:26586795

  7. Association of a common genetic variant in prostate stem cell antigen with cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Zhang, Li Feng; Wu, Xiao Peng; Zhou, Zhong Xing; Zou, Jian Gang; He, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphisms in the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene have been hypothesized to increase the genetic susceptibility to cancers. The common sequence variation in PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) has been implicated in cancer risk. However, results of the relevant published studies were somewhat underpowered and controversial in general. Material and methods To evaluate the role of PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) genotype in global cancer, we performed a pooled analysis of all the available published studies involving 22,817 cancer patients and 27,753 control subjects. Results The results showed evidence that PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) was associated with increased total cancer risk in the overall comparisons. Stratified analysis by cancer type indicated that PSCA rs2294008 T is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.09–1.42, pheterogeneity < 0.001, I2 = 88.0%) and bladder cancer (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.04–1.11, pheterogeneity = 0.108, I2 = 55.0%) by allelic contrast. Furthermore, in stratified analysis by histological types of gastric cancer, this PSCA variant showed significant associations with diffuse type (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.16–2.81, pheterogeneity < 0.001, I2 = 88.9%) but not intestinal type (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 0.95–1.74, pheterogeneity < 0.001, I2 = 85.2%) in a dominant genetic model. Similar results were found in Asian and European descendents and population-based studies. Conclusions In all, our meta-analysis suggests that PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) may play allele-specific roles in cancer development. Further prospective studies with larger numbers of participants worldwide should be performed in different kinds of cancer and other descendents in more detail. PMID:25097570

  8. The molecular genetics of autism spectrum disorders: genomic mechanisms, neuroimmunopathology, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting the neural pathways impacted by these disease-generating mechanisms. The goal of current autism research is directed toward a systems biological approach to find the most basic genetic and environmental causes to this severe developmental disease. It is hoped that future genomic and neuroimmunological research will be directed toward finding the road toward prevention, treatment, and cure of ASD.

  9. The Molecular Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Genomic Mechanisms, Neuroimmunopathology, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting the neural pathways impacted by these disease-generating mechanisms. The goal of current autism research is directed toward a systems biological approach to find the most basic genetic and environmental causes to this severe developmental disease. It is hoped that future genomic and neuroimmunological research will be directed toward finding the road toward prevention, treatment, and cure of ASD. PMID:22937247

  10. The Last Universal Common Ancestor: emergence, constitution and genetic legacy of an elusive forerunner

    PubMed Central

    Glansdorff, Nicolas; Xu, Ying; Labedan, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background Since the reclassification of all life forms in three Domains (Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya), the identity of their alleged forerunner (Last Universal Common Ancestor or LUCA) has been the subject of extensive controversies: progenote or already complex organism, prokaryote or protoeukaryote, thermophile or mesophile, product of a protracted progression from simple replicators to complex cells or born in the cradle of "catalytically closed" entities? We present a critical survey of the topic and suggest a scenario. Results LUCA does not appear to have been a simple, primitive, hyperthermophilic prokaryote but rather a complex community of protoeukaryotes with a RNA genome, adapted to a broad range of moderate temperatures, genetically redundant, morphologically and metabolically diverse. LUCA's genetic redundancy predicts loss of paralogous gene copies in divergent lineages to be a significant source of phylogenetic anomalies, i.e. instances where a protein tree departs from the SSU-rRNA genealogy; consequently, horizontal gene transfer may not have the rampant character assumed by many. Examining membrane lipids suggest LUCA had sn1,2 ester fatty acid lipids from which Archaea emerged from the outset as thermophilic by "thermoreduction," with a new type of membrane, composed of sn2,3 ether isoprenoid lipids; this occurred without major enzymatic reconversion. Bacteria emerged by reductive evolution from LUCA and some lineages further acquired extreme thermophily by convergent evolution. This scenario is compatible with the hypothesis that the RNA to DNA transition resulted from different viral invasions as proposed by Forterre. Beyond the controversy opposing "replication first" to metabolism first", the predictive arguments of theories on "catalytic closure" or "compositional heredity" heavily weigh in favour of LUCA's ancestors having emerged as complex, self-replicating entities from which a genetic code arose under natural selection. Conclusion Life

  11. Advances in the genetic mechanisms of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Vladutiu, G D

    1997-12-01

    During the past 16 years since the delineation of the human mitochondrial genome, substantial advances have been made in identifying pathogenic mutations causing mitochondrial disorders. However, just as we have come to accept the unexpected in the nontraditional aspects of Mendelian inheritance with the discovery of trinucleotide expansions, imprinting and uniparental disomy, unusual characteristics of mitochondrial inheritance also have been found that defy existing laws. For example, we now know that the nuclear genetic background of an individual might influence the expression and tissue specificity of mitochondrial mutations. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations contribute to the generation of new mutations by compromising mitochondrial function and increasing free radical production. Evidence for recombination raises new questions about repair mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA. It appears that the more we learn about the bases of mitochondrial disease, the more complex diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling become.

  12. metabolicMine: an integrated genomics, genetics and proteomics data warehouse for common metabolic disease research.

    PubMed

    Lyne, Mike; Smith, Richard N; Lyne, Rachel; Aleksic, Jelena; Hu, Fengyuan; Kalderimis, Alex; Stepan, Radek; Micklem, Gos

    2013-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine diseases such as diabetes affect millions of people worldwide and have a major health impact, frequently leading to complications and mortality. In a search for better prevention and treatment, there is ongoing research into the underlying molecular and genetic bases of these complex human diseases, as well as into the links with risk factors such as obesity. Although an increasing number of relevant genomic and proteomic data sets have become available, the quantity and diversity of the data make their efficient exploitation challenging. Here, we present metabolicMine, a data warehouse with a specific focus on the genomics, genetics and proteomics of common metabolic diseases. Developed in collaboration with leading UK metabolic disease groups, metabolicMine integrates data sets from a range of experiments and model organisms alongside tools for exploring them. The current version brings together information covering genes, proteins, orthologues, interactions, gene expression, pathways, ontologies, diseases, genome-wide association studies and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Although the emphasis is on human data, key data sets from mouse and rat are included. These are complemented by interoperation with the RatMine rat genomics database, with a corresponding mouse version under development by the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) group. The web interface contains a number of features including keyword search, a library of Search Forms, the QueryBuilder and list analysis tools. This provides researchers with many different ways to analyse, view and flexibly export data. Programming interfaces and automatic code generation in several languages are supported, and many of the features of the web interface are available through web services. The combination of diverse data sets integrated with analysis tools and a powerful query system makes metabolicMine a valuable research resource. The web interface makes it accessible to first

  13. metabolicMine: an integrated genomics, genetics and proteomics data warehouse for common metabolic disease research

    PubMed Central

    Lyne, Mike; Smith, Richard N; Lyne, Rachel; Aleksic, Jelena; Hu, Fengyuan; Kalderimis, Alex; Stepan, Radek; Micklem, Gos

    2013-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine diseases such as diabetes affect millions of people worldwide and have a major health impact, frequently leading to complications and mortality. In a search for better prevention and treatment, there is ongoing research into the underlying molecular and genetic bases of these complex human diseases, as well as into the links with risk factors such as obesity. Although an increasing number of relevant genomic and proteomic data sets have become available, the quantity and diversity of the data make their efficient exploitation challenging. Here, we present metabolicMine, a data warehouse with a specific focus on the genomics, genetics and proteomics of common metabolic diseases. Developed in collaboration with leading UK metabolic disease groups, metabolicMine integrates data sets from a range of experiments and model organisms alongside tools for exploring them. The current version brings together information covering genes, proteins, orthologues, interactions, gene expression, pathways, ontologies, diseases, genome-wide association studies and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Although the emphasis is on human data, key data sets from mouse and rat are included. These are complemented by interoperation with the RatMine rat genomics database, with a corresponding mouse version under development by the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) group. The web interface contains a number of features including keyword search, a library of Search Forms, the QueryBuilder and list analysis tools. This provides researchers with many different ways to analyse, view and flexibly export data. Programming interfaces and automatic code generation in several languages are supported, and many of the features of the web interface are available through web services. The combination of diverse data sets integrated with analysis tools and a powerful query system makes metabolicMine a valuable research resource. The web interface makes it accessible to first

  14. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  15. Studying the Genetics of Resistance to CyHV-3 Disease Using Introgression from Feral to Cultured Common Carp Strains

    PubMed Central

    Tadmor-Levi, Roni; Asoulin, Efrat; Hulata, Gideon; David, Lior

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability and further development of aquaculture production are constantly challenged by outbreaks of fish diseases, which are difficult to prevent or control. Developing fish strains that are genetically resistant to a disease is a cost-effective and a sustainable solution to address this challenge. To do so, heritable genetic variation in disease resistance should be identified and combined together with other desirable production traits. Aquaculture of common carp has suffered substantial losses from the infectious disease caused by the cyprinid herpes virus type 3 (CyHV-3) virus and the global spread of outbreaks indicates that many cultured strains are susceptible. In this research, CyHV-3 resistance from the feral strain “Amur Sassan” was successfully introgressed into two susceptible cultured strains up to the first backcross (BC1) generation. Variation in resistance of families from F1 and BC1 generations was significantly greater compared to that among families of any of the susceptible parental lines, a good starting point for a family selection program. Considerable additive genetic variation was found for CyHV-3 resistance. This phenotype was transferable between generations with contributions to resistance from both the resistant feral and the susceptible cultured strains. Reduced scale coverage (mirror phenotype) is desirable and common in cultured strains, but so far, cultured mirror carp strains were found to be susceptible. Here, using BC1 families ranging from susceptible to resistant, no differences in resistance levels between fully scaled and mirror full-sib groups were found, indicating that CyHV-3 resistance was successfully combined with the desirable mirror phenotype. In addition, the CyHV-3 viral load in tissues throughout the infection of susceptible and resistant fish was followed. Although resistant fish get infected, viral loads in tissues of these fish are significantly lesser than in those of susceptible fish, allowing them

  16. Genetic Association Analysis of Common Variants in FOXO3 Related to Longevity in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongjing; Liao, Xiaoping; Wang, Xianshou; Fu, Yunxin; Cai, Wangwei

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that forkhead box class O3 (FOXO3) functions as a key regulator for the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1signaling pathway that influence aging and longevity. This study aimed to comprehensively elucidate the association of common genetic variants in FOXO3 with human longevity in a Chinese population. Eighteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FOXO3 were successfully genotyped in 616 unrelated long-lived individuals and 846 younger controls. No nominally significant effects were found. However, when stratifying by gender, four SNPs (rs10499051, rs7762395, rs4946933 and rs3800230) previously reported to be associated with longevity and one novel SNP (rs4945815) showed significant association with male longevity (P-values: 0.007–0.032), but all SNPs were not associated with female longevity. Correspondingly, males carrying the G-G-T-G haplotype of rs10499051, rs7762395, rs4945815 and rs3800230 tended to have longer lifespan than those carrying the most common haplotype A-G-C-T (odds ratio = 2.36, 95% confidence interval = 1.20–4.63, P = 0.013). However, none of the associated SNPs and haplotype remained significant after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the FOXO3 variants we tested in our population of Chinese men and women were associated with longevity in men only. None of these associations passed Bonferroni correction. Bonferroni correction is very stringent for association studies. We therefore believe the effects of these nominally significant variants on human longevity will be confirmed by future studies. PMID:27936216

  17. Neuroinflammation as a Common Mechanism Associated with the Modifiable Risk Factors for Alzheimer's and Parkinson`s Diseases.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Jordan Alexander; Spielman, Lindsay J; Pointer, Caitlin B; Lowry, Jessica R; Bajwa, Ekta; Lee, Carolyn W; Klegeris, Andis

    2017-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are among the most common causes of dementia, which increasingly contribute to morbidity and mortality worldwide. A common hallmark in the pathogenesis of these two diseases is neuroinflammation, which is initially triggered by the presence of pathological structures associated with these disorders. Chronic neuroinflammation is sustained by persistent and aberrant microglial activation in the brain, which results in damage and death of neighboring cells, including neurons and glial cells. Two types of risk factors contribute to the development of AD and PD: non-modifiable risk factors and modifiable risk factors. Non-modifiable risk factors include genetic susceptibility that increases an individual's risk of developing the disease, whereas modifiable risk factors include a wide variety of health- and lifestyle-related factors that may be altered by changing individual behaviors. Exposure to environmental toxins could be viewed as a partially modifiable risk factor. This review focuses on four modifiable risk factors including physical inactivity, vascular disease-related conditions, obesity and type two diabetes mellitus, all of which have been identified as risk factors for the development of AD and PD. We highlight that control of the modifiable risk factors is a valid approach for managing the increased incidence of AD and PD. We describe neuroinflammatory mechanisms, which are common to AD and PD, that may link both these neurodegenerative diseases with the four common modifiable risk factors. Understanding these mechanisms could help identify novel therapeutic targets for combating these neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Teaching the Common Aspects in Mechanical, Electromagnetic and Quantum Waves at Interfaces and Waveguides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas, R.; Robles, P.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss common features in mechanical, electromagnetic and quantum systems, supporting identical results for the transmission and reflection coefficients of waves arriving perpendicularly at a plane interface. Also, we briefly discuss the origin of special notions such as refractive index in quantum mechanics, massive photons in wave guides and…

  19. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    SciTech Connect

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  20. Genetic progress estimation strategy for upright common bean plants using recurrent selection.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L A; Abreu, A F B; Júnior, I C Vieira; Pires, L P M; Ramalho, M A P

    2017-03-22

    Common bean producers in Brazil tend to grow plants as upright as possible. Because the control of this trait involves a large number of genes, recurrent selection (RS) is the best approach for successful plant improvement. Because plant architecture (PA) is evaluated using scores and usually has high heritability, RS for PA is performed through visual selection in generation S0. The aim of the present study was to evaluate selection progress and investigate whether this progress varies with the number of selected progenies or the generation evaluated. In addition, the effect of RS for the upright (PA) trait on progeny grain yield (GY) was investigated. Data of progenies S0:3 and S0:4 of the fifth, eighth, and twelfth cycles were used. A combined analysis of variance was performed using the adjusted means of the 47 best progenies from each generation and cycle, using two control cultivars as reference. A joint analysis of the two generations used during the evaluation of progenies for the different cycles was also performed. The genetic progress (GP) was estimated by fitting a linear regression equation to the relationship between the adjusted mean of each cycle and the number of cycles. We found that RS was efficient and the estimated GP of the evaluated progenies was 4.5%. Based on the GY heritability estimates, in more advanced generation selection for GY can be successfully performed on progenies. Thus, the selection already done for PA in F2 could be associated to the most productive progenies.

  1. A Common Genetic Origin for Early Farmers from Mediterranean Cardial and Central European LBK Cultures.

    PubMed

    Olalde, Iñigo; Schroeder, Hannes; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Vinner, Lasse; Lobón, Irene; Ramirez, Oscar; Civit, Sergi; García Borja, Pablo; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Talamo, Sahra; María Fullola, Josep; Xavier Oms, Francesc; Pedro, Mireia; Martínez, Pablo; Sanz, Montserrat; Daura, Joan; Zilhão, João; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2015-12-01

    The spread of farming out of the Balkans and into the rest of Europe followed two distinct routes: An initial expansion represented by the Impressa and Cardial traditions, which followed the Northern Mediterranean coastline; and another expansion represented by the LBK (Linearbandkeramik) tradition, which followed the Danube River into Central Europe. Although genomic data now exist from samples representing the second migration, such data have yet to be successfully generated from the initial Mediterranean migration. To address this, we generated the complete genome of a 7,400-year-old Cardial individual (CB13) from Cova Bonica in Vallirana (Barcelona), as well as partial nuclear data from five others excavated from different sites in Spain and Portugal. CB13 clusters with all previously sequenced early European farmers and modern-day Sardinians. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that both Cardial and LBK peoples derived from a common ancient population located in or around the Balkan Peninsula. The Iberian Cardial genome also carries a discernible hunter-gatherer genetic signature that likely was not acquired by admixture with local Iberian foragers. Our results indicate that retrieving ancient genomes from similarly warm Mediterranean environments such as the Near East is technically feasible.

  2. A Common Genetic Origin for Early Farmers from Mediterranean Cardial and Central European LBK Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Olalde, Iñigo; Schroeder, Hannes; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Vinner, Lasse; Lobón, Irene; Ramirez, Oscar; Civit, Sergi; García Borja, Pablo; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Talamo, Sahra; María Fullola, Josep; Xavier Oms, Francesc; Pedro, Mireia; Martínez, Pablo; Sanz, Montserrat; Daura, Joan; Zilhão, João; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2015-01-01

    The spread of farming out of the Balkans and into the rest of Europe followed two distinct routes: An initial expansion represented by the Impressa and Cardial traditions, which followed the Northern Mediterranean coastline; and another expansion represented by the LBK (Linearbandkeramik) tradition, which followed the Danube River into Central Europe. Although genomic data now exist from samples representing the second migration, such data have yet to be successfully generated from the initial Mediterranean migration. To address this, we generated the complete genome of a 7,400-year-old Cardial individual (CB13) from Cova Bonica in Vallirana (Barcelona), as well as partial nuclear data from five others excavated from different sites in Spain and Portugal. CB13 clusters with all previously sequenced early European farmers and modern-day Sardinians. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that both Cardial and LBK peoples derived from a common ancient population located in or around the Balkan Peninsula. The Iberian Cardial genome also carries a discernible hunter–gatherer genetic signature that likely was not acquired by admixture with local Iberian foragers. Our results indicate that retrieving ancient genomes from similarly warm Mediterranean environments such as the Near East is technically feasible. PMID:26337550

  3. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines. PMID:28076395

  4. Common variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes do not confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Chen; Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Gong, Wei; Tang, Jinsong; Wang, Dong; Lu, Weihong; Chen, Xiaogang; Fang, Yiru; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with a complex etiology. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been frequently reported in schizophrenia. Phosphatase and tension homologue-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protease (PARL) are mitochondrial proteins, and genetic variants of these two genes may confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia by influencing mitochondrial function. In this study, we conducted a two-stage genetic association study to test this hypothesis. We genotyped 4 PINK1 and 5 PARL genetic variants and evaluated the potential association of the 9 SNPs with schizophrenia in two independent case-control cohorts of 2510 Han Chinese individuals. No positive association of common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes with schizophrenia was identified in our samples after Bonferroni correction. Re-analysis of the newly updated Psychiatric Genetics Consortium (PGC) data sets confirmed our negative result. Intriguingly, one PINK1 SNP (rs10916832), which showed a marginally significant association in only Hunan samples (P = 0.032), is associated with the expression of a schizophrenia susceptible gene KIF17 according to the expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. Our study indicated that common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes are unlikely to be involved in schizophrenia. Further studies are essential to characterize the role of the PINK1 and PARL genes in schizophrenia.

  5. Cellular Mechanisms of Tissue Fibrosis. 1. Common and organ-specific mechanisms associated with tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological scarring process that leads to destruction of organ architecture and impairment of organ function. Chronic loss of organ function in most organs, including bone marrow, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, and skin, is associated with fibrosis, contributing to an estimated one third of natural deaths worldwide. Effective therapies to prevent or to even reverse existing fibrotic lesions are not yet available in any organ. There is hope that an understanding of common fibrosis pathways will lead to development of antifibrotic therapies that are effective in all of these tissues in the future. Here we review common and organ-specific pathways of tissue fibrosis. PMID:23255577

  6. Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum nodulate common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico: population genetics and biogeographic implications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudia; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Souza, Valeria

    2003-02-01

    The stability of the genetic structure of rhizobial populations nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris cultivated in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico was studied over three consecutive years. The set of molecular markers analyzed (including partial rrs, glnII, nifH, and nodB sequences), along with host range experiments, placed the isolates examined in Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli and Rhizobium gallicum bv. gallicum. Cluster analysis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and plasmid profile data separated the two species and identified numerically dominant clones within each of them. Population genetic analyses showed that there was high genetic differentiation between the two species and that there was low intrapopulation differentiation of the species over the 3 years. The results of linkage disequilibrium analyses are consistent with an epidemic genetic structure for both species, with frequent genetic exchange taking place within conspecific populations but not between the R. etli and R. gallicum populations. A subsample of isolates was selected and used for 16S ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, nifH copy number determination, and host range experiments. Plasmid profiles and nifH hybridization patterns also revealed the occurrence of lateral plasmid transfer among distinct multilocus genotypes within species but not between species. Both species were recovered from nodules of the same plants, indicating that mechanisms other than host, spatial, or temporal isolation may account for the genetic barrier between the species. The biogeographic implications of finding an R. gallicum bv. gallicum population nodulating common bean in America are discussed.

  7. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of neurofibromatosis type I

    SciTech Connect

    Metheny, L.J.; Amedeo, M.S.; Cappione, J.

    1995-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is a common genetic disease which leads to a variety of clinical features affecting cells of neural crest origin. In the period since the NF1 gene was isolated 1991, our understanding of the genetics of NF1 has increased remarkably. One of the most striking aspects of NF1 genetics is its complexity, both in terms of gene organization and expression. The gene is large and, when mutated, gives rise to diverse manifestations. A growing body of data suggests that mutations in the NF1 gene alone may not be responsible for all of the features of this disease. Epigenetic mechanisms, those which affect the NF1 transcript, play a role in the normal expression of the NF1 gene. Therefore, aberrations in those epigenetic processes are most likely pathogenic. Herein we summarize salient aspects of the vast body of NF1 literature and provide some insights into the myriad of regulatory mechanisms that may go awry in the genesis of this common but complex disease. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and non-genetic risk factors in Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C.; John, Esther M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M.; Wolff, Roger K.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. Methods We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. Results We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele odds ratio (OR): 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.74–1.20), 1.20 (0.94–1.53) and 1.49 (1.28–1.75) for current, former and never hormone therapy users, respectively, P-interaction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72–1.42), 1.19 (0.98–1.45) and 1.69 (1.26–2.26) for never, <12 months, and >12 months breastfeeding, respectively, P-interaction 0.014]. Conclusions The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. Impact These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and non-genetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. PMID:26364163

  9. Genetic insights into the mechanisms of Fgf signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, J. Richard; Mazot, Pierre; Soriano, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) family of ligands and receptor tyrosine kinases is required throughout embryonic and postnatal development and also regulates multiple homeostatic functions in the adult. Aberrant Fgf signaling causes many congenital disorders and underlies multiple forms of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms that govern Fgf signaling is therefore important to appreciate many aspects of Fgf biology and disease. Here we review the mechanisms of Fgf signaling by focusing on genetic strategies that enable in vivo analysis. These studies support an important role for Erk1/2 as a mediator of Fgf signaling in many biological processes but have also provided strong evidence for additional signaling pathways in transmitting Fgf signaling in vivo. PMID:27036966

  10. Genetic insights into the mechanisms of Fgf signaling.

    PubMed

    Brewer, J Richard; Mazot, Pierre; Soriano, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) family of ligands and receptor tyrosine kinases is required throughout embryonic and postnatal development and also regulates multiple homeostatic functions in the adult. Aberrant Fgf signaling causes many congenital disorders and underlies multiple forms of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms that govern Fgf signaling is therefore important to appreciate many aspects of Fgf biology and disease. Here we review the mechanisms of Fgf signaling by focusing on genetic strategies that enable in vivo analysis. These studies support an important role for Erk1/2 as a mediator of Fgf signaling in many biological processes but have also provided strong evidence for additional signaling pathways in transmitting Fgf signaling in vivo.

  11. High-level DNA amplifications are common genetic aberrations in B-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, C. A.; Döhner, H.; Joos, S.; Trümper, L. H.; Baudis, M.; Barth, T. F.; Ott, G.; Möller, P.; Lichter, P.; Bentz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Gene amplification is one of the molecular mechanisms resulting in the up-regulation of gene expression. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, such gene amplifications have been identified rarely. Using comparative genomic hybridization, a technique that has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of high-level DNA amplifications, we analyzed 108 cases of B-cell neoplasms (42 chronic B-cell leukemias, 5 mantle cell lymphomas, and 61 aggressive B-cell lymphomas). Twenty-four high-level amplifications were identified in 13% of the patients and mapped to 15 different genomic regions. Regions most frequently amplified were bands Xq26-28, 2p23-24, and 2p14-16 as well as 18q21 (three times each). Amplification of several proto-oncogenes and a cell cycle control gene (N-MYC (two cases), BCL2, CCND2, and GLI) located within the amplified regions was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei of tumor cells. These data demonstrate that gene amplifications in B-cell neoplasms are much more frequent than previously assumed. The identification of highly amplified DNA regions and genes included in the amplicons provides important information for further analyses of genetic events involved in lymphomagenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250147

  12. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-03-03

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman.

  13. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M; Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collée, J Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I; Neuhausen, Susan L; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V; Nielsen, Finn C; Greene, Mark H; Greene, Mark I; Mai, Phuong L; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Daly, Mark J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Altshuler, David M; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-10-28

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5) and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4). These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  14. Genomic Analysis of Storage Protein Deficiency in Genetically Related Lines of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Diapari, Marwan; Yin, Fuqiang; Munholland, Seth; Perry, Gregory E.; Chapman, B. Patrick; Huang, Shangzhi; Sparvoli, Francesca; Bollini, Roberto; Crosby, William L.; Pauls, Karl P.; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E) but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome rebalancing might

  15. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk Based on Profiling With Common Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E.; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. Methods: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. Results: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. Conclusions: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. PMID:25855707

  16. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the CASC15, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1, and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated eight additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNPs at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2,101 cases and 4,202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing, and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNPs associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014: Pcombined = 0.0050; OR, 0.88; rs2979704: Pcombined = 0.0072; OR, 0.87; rs1059111: Pcombined = 0.0049; OR, 0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biologic investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens were associated with better overall survival (P = 0.03; HR, 0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and

  17. Common genetic variants in pituitary-thyroid axis genes and the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Susana; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; González, Eddy R; Castell, Juan; Biarnés, Josefina; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors, THRA and THRB, together with the TSH receptor, TSHR, are key regulators of thyroid function. Alterations in the genes of these receptors (THRA, THRB and TSHR) have been related to thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that predisposition to differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is related to common genetic variants with low penetrance that interact with each other and with environmental factors. In this study, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the THRA (one SNP), THRB (three SNPs) and TSHR (two SNPs) genes with DTC risk. A case-control association study was conducted with 398 patients with sporadic DTC and 479 healthy controls from a Spanish population. Among the polymorphisms studied, only THRA-rs939348 was found to be associated with an increased risk of DTC (recessive model, odds ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval=1.03-3.14, P=0.037). Gene-gene interaction analysis using the genotype data of this study together with our previous genotype data on TG and TRHR indicated a combined effect of the pairwises: THRB-TG (P interaction=0.014, THRB-rs3752874 with TG-rs2076740; P interaction=0.099, THRB-rs844107 with TG-rs2076740) and THRB-TRHR (P interaction=0.0024, THRB-rs3752874 with TRHR-rs4129682) for DTC risk in a Spanish population. Our results confirm that THRA is a risk factor for DTC, and we show for the first time the combined effect of THRB and TG or TRHR on DTC susceptibility, supporting the importance of gene-gene interaction in thyroid cancer risk.

  18. [Genetic diversity revealed by ISSR molecular marker in common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection].

    PubMed

    Du, Jin-Kun; Yao, Ying-Yin; Ni, Zhong-Fu; Peng, Hui-Ru; Sun, Qi-Xin

    2002-05-01

    It is important to estimate the genetic diversity between the parents for improving the heterosis of hybrid wheat. In this study, ISSR(inter-simple sequence repeat) marker was used to measure the genetic diversity within and among common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), spelt (Triticum spelta L.), compactum (Triticum compactum Host.) and progeny of foreign wheat-based recurrent selection, and the possibility of establishing the new heterotic group was also assessed. Forty seven genotypes were used for ISSR analysis, which included 14 common wheat, 10 spelt wheat, 11 compactum and 12 progeny of recurrent selection. Eleven of 33 ISSR primers that can produce distinguishable bands were selected for PCR amplification. A total of 238 bands were amplified, among which 207 (87%) bands were polymorphic. The polymorphic bands amplified by each primer ranged from 11 to 38, with an averaged of 18.8. The percentage of polymorphic band (80.3%) in common wheat was higher than that in progeny of recurrent selection (78.7%), spelt (75.0%) and compactum (74.9%). The 238 polymorphic products were used to calculate Nei's similarity index (GS) and the genetic distance (GD). It was found that the mean genetic distance between different wheat types (0.3115-0.3442) was obviously higher than that within common wheat (0.2743), spelt (0.2351), compactum (0.2622). In addition, progeny of recurrent selection also showed much higher genetic distance with other three wheat types (0.3217, 0.3256, 0.3198). The cluster analysis was performed based on the genetic distance (GD) matrix by using UPGMA method. Common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection were classified into four different groups. In this study, ISSR marker was firstly used to assess genetic diversity among common wheat, spelt, compactum and progeny of recurrent selection, and can differentiate the wheat cultivars (lines) that selected from the same cross combination. It was concluded that spelt, compactum and progeny

  19. Common Genetic and Nonshared Environmental Factors Contribute to the Association between Socioemotional Dispositions and the Externalizing Factor in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jeanette; Allan, Nicholas; Mikolajewski, Amy J.; Hart, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Childhood behavioral disorders including conduct disorder (CD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often co-occur. Prior twin research shows that common sets of genetic and environmental factors are associated with these various disorders and they form a latent factor called…

  20. [Microsatellite data verify low genetic differentiation between western and eastern subspecies of the common crane Grusgrus L. (Gruidae, Aves)].

    PubMed

    Mudrik, E A; Kashentseva, T A; Redchuk, P S; Politov, D V

    2015-01-01

    Using a set of 10 microsatellite loci (Gram-22, Gram-30, Gpa-12, Gpa-38, Gpa-39, Gj-M15, Gj-M34, Gj-4066, Gj-8077, Gj-2298) a high level of genetic variability (N(A) = 10.2, H(O) = = 0.684, H(E) = 0.728) and low genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.011) in the Common crane (Grus grus L.) was detected throughout its range. Genetic diversity in disputed western (G. g. grus) and eastern (G. g. lilfordi) sub- species was shown to be similar. Spatial distribution of multi-locus individual genotypes has not been revealed (R(XY) = 0.017). Despite low differentiation, subspecies and local populations of the Common crane should be considered as separate conservational units. Organization of programs for gene pool conservation and monitor- ing requires more detailed analysis based on combined analysis of various molecular markers.

  1. Genetic Variability and Geographic Diversity of the Common Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Populations from the Midwest Using Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Narain, Ralph B; Lalithambika, Sreedevi; Kamble, Shripat T

    2015-07-01

    With the recent global resurgence of the bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.), there is a need to better understand its biology, ecology, and ability to establish populations. Bed bugs are domestic pests that feed mainly on mammalian blood. Although bed bugs have not been implicated as vectors of pathogens, their biting activity inflicts severe insomnia and allergic reactions. Moreover, they have recently developed resistance to various insecticides, which requires further molecular research to determine genetic variation and appropriate interventions. Population dynamics, including genetic differentiation and genetic distance of 10 populations from the Midwest were analyzed in this study. The bed bug samples collected by pest control companies were genotyped using eight species-specific microsatellite markers. Results showed all eight markers were polymorphic, with 8-16 alleles per locus, suggesting high genetic diversity. The FST values were >0.25, signifying pronounced genetic differentiation. The G-test results also indicated high genetic differentiation among populations. The frequency of the most common allele across all eight loci was 0.42. The coefficient of relatedness between each of the populations was >0.5, indicative of sibling or parent-offspring relationships, while the FIS and its confidence interval values were statistically insignificant within the populations tested. The populations departed from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, possibly because of high heterozygosity. The genetic distance analysis using a neighbor-joining tree showed that the populations from Kansas City, MO, were genetically separate from most of those from Nebraska, indicating a geographic pattern of genetic structure. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of using microsatellite markers to study bed bugs population structure, thereby improving our understanding of bed bug population dynamics in the Midwest. Overall, this study showed a high genetic diversity and identified several

  2. Common Variants of KCNJ10 Are Associated with Susceptibility and Anti-Epileptic Drug Resistance in Chinese Genetic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yong; Yan, Kui Po; Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Chen, Zi Gui; Song, Tao; Luo, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Zhong-Yi; Bi, Chang-Long; Liu, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    To explore genetic mechanism of genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) is challenging because of their complex heritance pattern and genetic heterogeneity. KCNJ10 gene encodes Kir4.1 channels and plays a major role in modulating resting membrane potentials in excitable cells. It may cause GGEs if mutated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association between KCNJ10 common variants and the susceptibility and drug resistance of GGEs in Chinese population. The allele-specific MALDI–TOF mass spectrometry method was used to assess 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KCNJ10 in 284 healthy controls and 483 Chinese GGEs patients including 279 anti-epileptic drug responsive patients and 204 drug resistant patients. We found the rs6690889 TC+TT genotypes were lower frequency in the GGEs group than that in the healthy controls (6.7% vs 9.5%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.50[0.29–0.86]). The frequency of rs1053074 G allele was lower in the childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) group than that in the healthy controls (28.4% vs 36.2%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.70[0.53–0.93]). The frequency of rs12729701 G allele and AG+GG genotypes was lower in the CAE group than that in the healthy controls (21.2% vs 28.4%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.74[0.59–0.94] and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). The frequency of rs12402969 C allele and the CC+CT genotypes were higher in the GGEs drug responsive patients than that in the drug resistant patients (9.3% vs 5.6%, OR = 1.73[1.06–2.85], p = 0.026 and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). This study identifies potential SNPs of KCNJ10 gene that may contribute to seizure susceptibility and anti-epileptic drug resistance. PMID:25874548

  3. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  4. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of the common wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on islands at its northern range.

    PubMed

    Michaelides, Sozos; Cornish, Nina; Griffiths, Richard; Groombridge, Jim; Zajac, Natalia; Walters, Graham J; Aubret, Fabien; While, Geoffrey M; Uller, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Populations at range limits are often characterized by lower genetic diversity, increased genetic isolation and differentiation relative to populations at the core of geographical ranges. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that populations situated at range limits might be the result of human introductions rather than natural dispersal. It is therefore important to document the origin and genetic diversity of marginal populations to establish conservation priorities. In this study, we investigate the phylogeography and genetic structure of peripheral populations of the common European wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on Jersey (Channel Islands, UK) and in the Chausey archipelago. We sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in 200 individuals of P. muralis to infer the phylogeography of the island populations using Bayesian approaches. We also genotyped 484 individuals from 21 populations at 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci to evaluate the genetic structure and diversity of island and mainland (Western France) populations. We detected four unique haplotypes in the island populations that formed a sub-clade within the Western France clade. There was a significant reduction in genetic diversity (HO, HE and AR) of the island populations in relation to the mainland. The small fragmented island populations at the northern range margin of the common wall lizard distribution are most likely native, with genetic differentiation reflecting isolation following sea level increase approximately 7000 BP. Genetic diversity is lower on islands than in marginal populations on the mainland, potentially as a result of early founder effects or long-term isolation. The combination of restriction to specific localities and an inability to expand their range into adjacent suitable locations might make the island populations more vulnerable to extinction.

  5. Phylogeography and Conservation Genetics of the Common Wall Lizard, Podarcis muralis, on Islands at Its Northern Range

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Sozos; Cornish, Nina; Griffiths, Richard; Groombridge, Jim; Zajac, Natalia; Walters, Graham J.; Aubret, Fabien; While, Geoffrey M.; Uller, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Populations at range limits are often characterized by lower genetic diversity, increased genetic isolation and differentiation relative to populations at the core of geographical ranges. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that populations situated at range limits might be the result of human introductions rather than natural dispersal. It is therefore important to document the origin and genetic diversity of marginal populations to establish conservation priorities. In this study, we investigate the phylogeography and genetic structure of peripheral populations of the common European wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on Jersey (Channel Islands, UK) and in the Chausey archipelago. We sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in 200 individuals of P. muralis to infer the phylogeography of the island populations using Bayesian approaches. We also genotyped 484 individuals from 21 populations at 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci to evaluate the genetic structure and diversity of island and mainland (Western France) populations. We detected four unique haplotypes in the island populations that formed a sub-clade within the Western France clade. There was a significant reduction in genetic diversity (HO, HE and AR) of the island populations in relation to the mainland. The small fragmented island populations at the northern range margin of the common wall lizard distribution are most likely native, with genetic differentiation reflecting isolation following sea level increase approximately 7000 BP. Genetic diversity is lower on islands than in marginal populations on the mainland, potentially as a result of early founder effects or long-term isolation. The combination of restriction to specific localities and an inability to expand their range into adjacent suitable locations might make the island populations more vulnerable to extinction. PMID:25659074

  6. The mechanisms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Artrish; Cadet, Valerie E; Hielscher, Abigail

    2015-09-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancer is an emerging field of cancer research and therapy. Oncolytic viruses are designed to induce tumor specific immunity while replicating selectively within cancer cells to cause lysis of the tumor cells. While there are several forms of oncolytic viruses, the use of vaccinia viruses for oncolysis may be more beneficial than other forms of oncolytic viruses. For example, vaccinia viruses have been shown to exert their anti-tumor effects through genetic engineering strategies which enhance their therapeutic efficacy. This paper will address some of the most common forms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses and will explore the mechanisms whereby they selectively target, enter and destroy cancer cells. Furthermore, this review will highlight how vaccinia viruses activate host immune responses against cancer cells and will address clinical trials evaluating the tumor-directed and killing efficacy of these viruses against solid tumors.

  7. Epigenetics and genetics in endometrial cancer: new carcinogenic mechanisms and relationship with clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer worldwide among females. An increased incidence and a younger age of patients are also predicted to occur, and therefore elucidation of the pathological mechanisms is important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, epigenetic mechanisms have been examined. Silencing of genes by DNA hypermethylation, hereditary epimutation of DNA mismatch repair genes and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs may underlie carcinogenesis in endometrial cancer. New therapies include targeting epigenetic changes using histone deacetylase inhibitors. Some cases of endometrial cancer may also be hereditary. Thus, patients with Lynch syndrome which is a hereditary disease, have a higher risk for developing endometrial cancer than the general population. Identification of such disease-related genes may contribute to early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer.

  8. First genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii infection in common quails (Coturnix coturnix) intended for human consumption in China.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wei; Ju, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Meng, Qing-Feng; Ma, Jian-Gang; Qian, Ai-Dong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is widely distributed in humans and other animals including birds throughout the world. However, little is known of the molecular epidemiology and genotypes of T. gondii infecting quails in China. Therefore, the present study was conducted to characterize T. gondii genotypes in common quails in China. During December 2014 to October 2015, a total of 390 muscle tissue samples of common quails were collected and the T. gondii B1 gene was amplified using a nested PCR, and the positive samples were genotyped at 11 genetic markers (SAG1, 5'-and 3'-SAG2, alternative SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, L358, PK1, c22-8, c29-2, and Apico) using multilocus polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technology. Twenty-five of the 390 common quails (6.41%) were tested positive by nested PCR. Three DNA samples from the 25 positive samples were typed completely and were identified as ToxoDB Genotype #9 (http://toxodb.org/toxo/). The results of the present study indicated that T. gondii infection in common quails was common in China, which provided the information of T. gondii genetic diversity in this host species. This is the first genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates from quails in China, which is useful for monitoring and controlling the T. gondii infection in quails, other animals and humans.

  9. Autoimmune thyroid disease: mechanism, genetics and current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y H; Fu, D G

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies recognized a steady increase in the incidence of different autoimmune endocrine disorders, including autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The etiology of AITD is multifactorial and involves genetic and environmental factors and apparently with a strong preponderance in females. There are mainly two types of AITD, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease and both of these show strong association in age groups above 45-50 years. Among environmental factors smoking and alcohol have significant effects, both protective as well as for aggravating the disease, even though the precise nature of these effects are not clearly known. There are elevated levels of circulating antibodies against the thyroid proteins, mainly thyroid oxidase, thyroglobulin and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor, in patients with Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. Linkage and association studies in AITD identified several major genes that are relevant for the onset of AITD, including the thyroid-specific genes, thyroglobulin and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor and also many immune-regulatory genes. In this review we addressed many aspects of AITD including disease mechanisms, involved thyroid antigens, environmental factors and genetic factors.

  10. Pollution and genetic structure of North American populations of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale).

    PubMed

    Keane, Brian; Collier, Matthew H; Rogstad, Steven H

    2005-06-01

    Assessing the genetic structure of natural populations differentially impacted by anthropogenic contaminants can be a useful tool for evaluating the population genetic consequences of exposure to pollution. In this study, measures of genetic diversity at variable-number-tandem-repeat loci in six dandelion populations (3 urban and 3 rural) showed patterns that may have been influenced by exposure to environmental contaminants. Mean genetic similarity among individuals within a population was significantly and positively correlated with increasing levels of airborne particulate matter (< or = 10 microm, PM10) and soil concentrations of four metals (Cd, Fe, Ni and Pb). In addition, mean genetic similarity was always significantly higher at the urban sites compared to rural sites. There was a significant negative correlation between the number of genotypes at a site and increasing amounts of PM10, concentrations of five soil metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni and Pb), leaf tissue levels of Fe and a significant positive correlation between the extent of clonality at a site and levels of PM10 and soil concentrations of five metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni and Pb). Although, this study does not directly establish a causal link between the specific contaminants detected at the study sites and differences in genetic diversity, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that pollution-induced selection has contributed in some fashion to the lower genetic diversity found at the urban sites.

  11. Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Pain Are Mediated by Common TLR4-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; White, Imogen A; Manavis, Jim; Hutchinson, Mark R; Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Logan, Richard M; Bowen, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    Strong epidemiological data indicate that chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain occur in parallel, indicating common underlying mechanisms. We have recently outlined evidence suggesting that TLR4 signaling may contribute to both side effects. We therefore aimed to determine if genetic deletion of TLR4 improves chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain. Forty-two female wild-type (WT) and 42 Tlr4 null (-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g (10-13 weeks) received a single 270 mg/kg (i.p.) dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. Bacterial sequencing was conducted on cecal samples of control animals to determine the gut microbiome profile. Gut toxicity was assessed using validated clinical and histopathologic markers, permeability assays, and inflammatory markers. Chemotherapy-induced pain was assessed using the validated rodent facial grimace criteria, as well as immunologic markers of glial activation in the lumbar spinal cord. TLR4 deletion attenuated irinotecan-induced gut toxicity, with improvements in weight loss (P = 0.0003) and diarrhea (P < 0.0001). Crypt apoptosis was significantly decreased in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P < 0.0001), correlating with lower mucosal injury scores (P < 0.005). Intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran (4 kDa) and LPS translocation was greater in WT mice than in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) (P = 0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively). GFAP staining in the lumbar spinal cord, indicative of astrocytic activation, was increased at 6 and 72 hours in WT mice compared with BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P = 0.008, P = 0.01). These data indicate that TLR4 is uniquely positioned to mediate irinotecan-induced gut toxicity and pain, highlighting the possibility of a targetable gut/CNS axis for improved toxicity outcomes. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1376-86. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agúndez, José A G; García-Martín, Elena; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Díaz-Sánchez, María; Calleja, Patricia; Pisa, Diana; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Ayuso-Peralta, Lucía; Torrecillas, Dolores; García-Albea, Esteban; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier

    2016-02-12

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, and experimental data suggest a possible role of oxidative stress in the ethiopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis(MS). Heme-oxygenases(HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, and HMOX1 is overexpressed in the brain and spinal cord of MS patients and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis(EAE). We analyzed whether common polymorphisms affecting the HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop MS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations(CNVs) of these genes in 292 subjects MS and 533 healthy controls, using TaqMan assays. The frequencies of HMOX2 rs1051308AA genotype and HMOX2 rs1051308A and HMOX1 rs2071746A alleles were higher in MS patients than in controls, although only that of the SNP HMOX2 rs1051308 in men remained as significant after correction for multiple comparisons. None of the studied polymorphisms was related to the age at disease onset or with the MS phenotype. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphism and the risk to develop MS in Spanish Caucasian men and a trend towards association between the HMOX1 rs2071746A and MS risk.

  13. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Steven C.; Sirota, Marina; Chen, Richard; Butte, Atul J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford), and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED); data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups. PMID:27115429

  14. Temporal changes in genetic diversity of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions cultivated between 1800 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Maras, M; Susnik, S; Sustar-Vozlic, J; Meglic, V

    2006-07-01

    Fourteen microsatellite markers were used to describe genetic diversity in a sample of 128 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions cultivated within the territory of Slovenia and its nearby regions between 1800 and 2000. The accessions were grouped into three periods, Period I comprising accessions from the beginning of the 19th century, while the other two periods included accessions from the middle (Period II) and the end of the 20th century (Period III). Seven control accessions of known Mesoamerican and Andean origin were also included in the study. A total of 130 alleles were generated. Allelic richness, in terms of number of alleles per locus, was 6.07 for Period I, 6.71 for Period II and 6.07 for Period III. In the UPGMA dendrogram, all studied accessions were intermixed in three main clusters, indicating that the diversity in the time periods overlapped. Two clusters consisted of accessions of Andean and Mesoamerican origin, while the third represents additional variation, which existed in this area already 200 years ago. The analysis of molecular variance showed that a great part of genetic diversity has been preserved till today, confirming the results of cluster analysis. The calculation of number of alleles per locus revealed no significant quantitative change in genetic diversity over the last 200 years of common bean cultivation. However, the calculation of genetic distances indicated slight qualitative shifts in genetic diversity of common bean germplasm over time, while the calculations of allelic frequency variation and polymorphic information content revealed recent decline of some alleles' frequencies. These findings should stress the need for establishing an appropriate strategy of genetic resources management.

  15. Mechanical Testing of Common-Use Polymeric Materials with an In-House-Built Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrosa, Cristiana; Mendes, Joaquim; Magalhaes, Fernao D.

    2006-01-01

    A low-cost tensile testing machine was built for testing polymeric films. This apparatus also allows for tear-strength and flexural tests. The experimental results, obtained from common-use materials, selected by the students, such as plastic bags, illustrate important aspects of the mechanical behavior of polymeric materials. Some of the tests…

  16. Association of common genetic variants with risperidone adverse events in a Spanish schizophrenic population.

    PubMed

    Almoguera, B; Riveiro-Alvarez, R; Lopez-Castroman, J; Dorado, P; Vaquero-Lorenzo, C; Fernandez-Piqueras, J; Llerena, A; Abad-Santos, F; Baca-García, E; Dal-Ré, R; Ayuso, C

    2013-04-01

    Risperidone non-compliance is often high due to undesirable side effects, whose development is in part genetically determined. Studies with genetic variants involved in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of risperidone have yielded inconsistent results. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the putative association of genetic markers with the occurrence of four frequently observed adverse events secondary to risperidone treatment: sleepiness, weight gain, extrapyramidal symptoms and sexual adverse events. A series of 111 schizophrenia inpatients were genotyped for genetic variants previously associated with or potentially involved in risperidone response. Presence of adverse events was the main variable and potential confounding factors were considered. Allele 16Gly of ADRB2 was significantly associated with a higher risk of sexual adverse events. There were other non-significant trends for DRD3 9Gly and SLC6A4 S alleles. Our results, although preliminary, provide new candidate variants of potential use in risperidone safety prediction.

  17. Developing germplasm resources to identify the genetic basis of resistance to common scab in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common scab, caused mainly by the soil-borne bacterium Streptomyces scabies, produces lesions on potato tubers, reducing tuber quality and profitability. Methods to manage common scab are often expensive, impractical, and can be ineffective. Therefore, creating cultivars that are resistant to common...

  18. Genome-wide Comparative Analysis of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis Gives Insight into Opposing Genetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D.; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A.E.; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Morris, Derek W.; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M.; Novak, Natalija; O’Regan, Grainne M.; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E.; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C.; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T.; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J.; Brown, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21–22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features. PMID:25574825

  19. Genome-wide comparative analysis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis gives insight into opposing genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A E; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W H Irwin; Morris, Derek W; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M; Novak, Natalija; O'Regan, Grainne M; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J; Brown, Sara J

    2015-01-08

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21-22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features.

  20. Epidemiology and genetics of common mental disorders in the general population: the PEGASUS-Murcia project

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Tormo, MJ; Vilagut, G; Alonso, J; Ruíz-Merino, G; Escámez, T; Salmerón, D; Júdez, J; Martínez, S; Navarro, C

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, epidemiologists, neurogeneticists and statisticians on research projects has been encouraged to improve our knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying the aetiology and burden of mental disorders. The PEGASUS-Murcia (Psychiatric Enquiry to General Population in Southeast Spain-Murcia) project was designed to assess the prevalence of common mental disorders and to identify the risk and protective factors, and it also included the collection of biological samples to study the gene–environmental interactions in the context of the World Mental Health Survey Initiative. Methods and analysis The PEGASUS-Murcia project is a new cross-sectional face-to-face interview survey based on a representative sample of non-institutionalised adults in the Region of Murcia (Mediterranean Southeast, Spain). Trained lay interviewers used the latest version of the computer-assisted personal interview of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) for use in Spain, specifically adapted for the project. Two biological samples of buccal mucosal epithelium will be collected from each interviewed participant, one for DNA extraction for genomic and epigenomic analyses and the other to obtain mRNA for gene expression quantification. Several quality control procedures will be implemented to assure the highest reliability and validity of the data. This article describes the rationale, sampling methods and questionnaire content as well as the laboratory methodology. Ethics and dissemination Informed consent will be obtained from all participants and a Regional Ethics Research Committee has approved the protocol. Results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at the national and the international conferences. Discussion Cross-sectional studies, which combine detailed personal information with biological data, offer new and exciting opportunities to study the gene

  1. Comparative analysis of riverscape genetic structure in rare, threatened and common freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galbraith, Heather S.; Zanatta, David T; Wilson, Chris C.

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoida) are highly imperiled with many species on the verge of local extirpation or global extinction. This study investigates patterns of genetic structure and diversity in six species of freshwater mussels in the central Great Lakes region of Ontario, Canada. These species vary in their conservation status (endangered to not considered at risk), life history strategy, and dispersal capabilities. Evidence of historical genetic connectivity within rivers was ubiquitous across species and may reflect dispersal abilities of host fish. There was little to no signature of recent disturbance events or bottlenecks, even in endangered species, likely as a function of mussel longevity and historical population sizes (i.e., insufficient time for genetic drift to be detectable). Genetic structure was largely at the watershed scale suggesting that population augmentation via translocation within rivers may be a useful conservation tool if needed, while minimizing genetic risks to recipient sites. Recent interest in population augmentation via translocation and propagation may rely on these results to inform management of unionids in the Great Lakes region.

  2. [Advance on genetic mechanism of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and genetic relationship map].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Jun; Li, Shu-yuan; Wu, Xian; Hu, Bin; Wang, Xiao-feng; Zhou, Xu-hui

    2015-09-01

    Identification of genetic risk factors is the hotspot of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Through candidate gene approach and genome-wide association studies (GWAS), some genes were preliminary identified. To review AIS related genes,and construct the gene network map of AIS gene. We searched on NCBI PubMed and Web of Science database using search terms "adolescent idiopathic scoliosis" and "gene", to classify induction genes. We then constructed gene diagram using string-db. We found 35 AIS genes relating to connective tissue, nervous system active substances, melatonin synthesis and metabolism, puberty and growth, and genes whose function is unknown. Gene diagram shows that a network relationship between gene and other genes,in which IL6, ESR1, ESR2, VDR, TGFB1, IGF1 gene may as the key gene about AIS' genetic mechanism. Two sites of 3 GWAS results outside the network, it is suggesting new pathway that need to be explored. The study about AIS susceptibility gene is still preliminary, requiring in-depth research to identify the new networks.

  3. Testing Genetic Association with Rare and Common Variants in Family Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Malzahn, Dörthe; Balliu, Brunilda; Li, Cong; Bailey, Julia N.

    2015-01-01

    With the advance of next-generation sequencing technologies in recent years, rare genetic variant data have now become available for genetic epidemiology studies. For family samples however, only a few statistical methods for association analysis of rare genetic variants have been developed. Rare variant approaches are of great interest particularly for family data because samples enriched for trait-relevant variants can be ascertained and rare variants are putatively enriched through segregation. To facilitate the evaluation of existing and new rare variant testing approaches for analyzing family data, Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 (GAW18) provided genotype and next-generation sequencing data and longitudinal blood pressure traits from extended pedigrees of Mexican-American families from the San Antonio Family Study. Our GAW18 group members analyzed real and simulated phenotype data from GAW18 by using generalized linear mixed-effects models or principal components to adjust for familial correlation or by testing binary traits using a correction factor for familial effects. With one exception, approaches dealt with the extended pedigrees in their original state using information based on the kinship matrix or alternative genetic similarity measures. For simulated data, our group demonstrated that the family-based kernel machine score test is superior in power to family-based single-marker or burden tests, except in a few specific scenarios. For real data, three contributions identified significant associations. They substantially reduced the number of tests before performing the association analysis. We conclude from our real data analyses that further development of strategies for targeted testing or more focused screening of genetic variants is strongly desirable. PMID:25112186

  4. [Analysis of genetic diversity of Russian regional populations based on common STR markers used in DNA identification].

    PubMed

    Pesik, V Yu; Fedunin, A A; Agdzhoyan, A T; Utevska, O M; Chukhraeva, M I; Evseeva, I V; Churnosov, M I; Lependina, I N; Bogunov, Yu V; Bogunova, A A; Ignashkin, M A; Yankovsky, N K; Balanovska, E V; Orekhov, V A; Balanovsky, O P

    2014-06-01

    We conducted the first genetic analysis of a wide a range of rural Russian populations in European Russia with a panel of common DNA markers commonly used in criminalistics genetic identification. We examined a total of 647 samples from indigenous ethnic Russian populations in Arkhangelsk, Belgorod, Voronezh, Kursk, Rostov, Ryazan, and Orel regions. We employed a multiplex genotyping kit, COrDIS Plus, to genotype Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci, which included the genetic marker panel officially recommended for DNA identification in the Russian Federation, the United States, and the European Union. In the course of our study, we created a database of allelic frequencies, examined the distribution of alleles and genotypes in seven rural Russian populations, and defined the genetic relationships between these populations. We found that, although multidimensional analysis indicated a difference between the Northern gene pool and the rest of the Russian European populations, a pairwise comparison using 19 STR markers among all populations did not reveal significant differences. This is in concordance with previous studies, which examined up to 12 STR markers of urban Russian populations. Therefore, the database of allelic frequencies created in this study can be applied for forensic examinations and DNA identification among the ethnic Russian population over European Russia. We also noted a decrease in the levels of heterozygosity in the northern Russian population compared to ethnic populations in southern and central Russia, which is consistent with trends identified previously using classical gene markers and analysis of mitochondrial DNA.

  5. Synchronization in a mechanical resonator array coupled quadratically to a common electromagnetic field mode.

    PubMed

    León Aveleyra, G; Holmes, C A; Milburn, G J

    2014-06-01

    Optomechanical systems are based on the nonlinear coupling between the electromagnetic (EM) field in a resonator and one or more bulk mechanical resonators such that the frequency of the EM field resonator depends on the displacement coordinates of each of the mechanical resonators. In this paper we consider the case of multiple mechanical resonators interacting with a common field for which the frequency of the EM resonance is tuned to depend quadratically (to lowest order) on the displacement of the resonators. By using the method of amplitude equations around a critical point, it is shown that groups of near-identical bulk mechanical resonators with low driving fail to synchronize unless their natural frequencies are identical, in which case the resulting system can exhibit multistability.

  6. Cognitive Ability, Self-Assessed Intelligence and Personality: Common Genetic but Independent Environmental Aetiologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratko, Denis; Butkovic, Ana; Vukasovic, Tena; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; von Stumm, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Self-perceived abilities (SPA), which play an important role in academic achievement, have been recently reported to be fully attributable to genetic and non-shared environmental influences. To replicate and extend this finding, 732 Croatian twins (15-22 years old) were assessed on cognitive ability, self-assessed intelligence (SAI), and Five…

  7. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  8. Whole-genome sequencing to understand the genetic architecture of common gene expression and biomarker phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew R; Tuke, Marcus A; Nalls, Mike; Hernandez, Dena; Gibbs, J Raphael; Lin, Haoxiang; Xu, Christopher S; Li, Qibin; Shen, Juan; Jun, Goo; Almeida, Marcio; Tanaka, Toshiko; Perry, John R B; Gaulton, Kyle; Rivas, Manny; Pearson, Richard; Curran, Joanne E; Johnson, Matthew P; Göring, Harald H H; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John; Mccarthy, Mark I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M

    2015-03-01

    Initial results from sequencing studies suggest that there are relatively few low-frequency (<5%) variants associated with large effects on common phenotypes. We performed low-pass whole-genome sequencing in 680 individuals from the InCHIANTI study to test two primary hypotheses: (i) that sequencing would detect single low-frequency-large effect variants that explained similar amounts of phenotypic variance as single common variants, and (ii) that some common variant associations could be explained by low-frequency variants. We tested two sets of disease-related common phenotypes for which we had statistical power to detect large numbers of common variant-common phenotype associations-11 132 cis-gene expression traits in 450 individuals and 93 circulating biomarkers in all 680 individuals. From a total of 11 657 229 high-quality variants of which 6 129 221 and 5 528 008 were common and low frequency (<5%), respectively, low frequency-large effect associations comprised 7% of detectable cis-gene expression traits [89 of 1314 cis-eQTLs at P < 1 × 10(-06) (false discovery rate ∼5%)] and one of eight biomarker associations at P < 8 × 10(-10). Very few (30 of 1232; 2%) common variant associations were fully explained by low-frequency variants. Our data show that whole-genome sequencing can identify low-frequency variants undetected by genotyping based approaches when sample sizes are sufficiently large to detect substantial numbers of common variant associations, and that common variant associations are rarely explained by single low-frequency variants of large effect.

  9. Marginal role for 53 common genetic variants in cardiovascular disease prediction

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Richard W; Cooper, Jackie A; Shah, Tina; Wong, Andrew; Drenos, Fotios; Engmann, Jorgen; McLachlan, Stela; Jefferis, Barbara; Dale, Caroline; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Talmud, Philippa J; Price, Jacqueline F; Dudbridge, Frank; Hingorani, Aroon D; Humphries, Steve E

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated discrimination and calibration of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk scores when genotypic was added to phenotypic information. The potential of genetic information for those at intermediate risk by a phenotype-based risk score was assessed. Methods Data were from seven prospective studies including 11 851 individuals initially free of CVD or diabetes, with 1444 incident CVD events over 10 years' follow-up. We calculated a score from 53 CVD-related single nucleotide polymorphisms and an established CVD risk equation ‘QRISK-2’ comprising phenotypic measures. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), detection rate for given false-positive rate (FPR) and net reclassification improvement (NRI) index were estimated for gene scores alone and in addition to the QRISK-2 CVD risk score. We also evaluated use of genetic information only for those at intermediate risk according to QRISK-2. Results The AUROC was 0.635 for QRISK-2 alone and 0.623 with addition of the gene score. The detection rate for 5% FPR improved from 11.9% to 12.0% when the gene score was added. For a 10-year CVD risk cut-off point of 10%, the NRI was 0.25% when the gene score was added to QRISK-2. Applying the genetic risk score only to those with QRISK-2 risk of 10%–<20% and prescribing statins where risk exceeded 20% suggested that genetic information could prevent one additional event for every 462 people screened. Conclusion The gene score produced minimal incremental population-wide utility over phenotypic risk prediction of CVD. Tailored prediction using genetic information for those at intermediate risk may have clinical utility. PMID:27365493

  10. Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum Nodulate Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in a Traditionally Managed Milpa Plot in Mexico: Population Genetics and Biogeographic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Claudia; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Souza, Valeria

    2003-01-01

    The stability of the genetic structure of rhizobial populations nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris cultivated in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico was studied over three consecutive years. The set of molecular markers analyzed (including partial rrs, glnII, nifH, and nodB sequences), along with host range experiments, placed the isolates examined in Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli and Rhizobium gallicum bv. gallicum. Cluster analysis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and plasmid profile data separated the two species and identified numerically dominant clones within each of them. Population genetic analyses showed that there was high genetic differentiation between the two species and that there was low intrapopulation differentiation of the species over the 3 years. The results of linkage disequilibrium analyses are consistent with an epidemic genetic structure for both species, with frequent genetic exchange taking place within conspecific populations but not between the R. etli and R. gallicum populations. A subsample of isolates was selected and used for 16S ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, nifH copy number determination, and host range experiments. Plasmid profiles and nifH hybridization patterns also revealed the occurrence of lateral plasmid transfer among distinct multilocus genotypes within species but not between species. Both species were recovered from nodules of the same plants, indicating that mechanisms other than host, spatial, or temporal isolation may account for the genetic barrier between the species. The biogeographic implications of finding an R. gallicum bv. gallicum population nodulating common bean in America are discussed. PMID:12571008

  11. Cytokine Imbalance as a Common Mechanism in Both Psoriasis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong; Qi, Qiu; Bai, Yanping; Jiang, Chunyan; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis (PS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Previous studies showed that these two diseases had a common pathogenesis, but the precise molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, RNA sequencing of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was employed to explore both the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 10 PS and 10 RA patients compared with those of 10 healthy volunteers and the shared DEGs between these two diseases. Bioinformatics network analysis was used to reveal the connections among the shared DEGs and the corresponding molecular mechanism. In total, 120 and 212 DEGs were identified in PS and RA, respectively, and 31 shared DEGs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the cytokine imbalance relevant to key molecules (such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF3), interleukin- (IL-) 6, and interferon gene (IFNG)) and canonical signaling pathways (such as the complement system, antigen presentation, macropinocytosis signaling, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, and IL-17 signaling) was responsible for the common comprehensive mechanism of PS and RA. Our findings provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PS and RA, suggesting potential strategies for treating and preventing both diseases. This study may also provide a new paradigm for illuminating the common pathogenesis of different diseases. PMID:28239238

  12. Synaptic Dysfunction in Alzheimer’s Disease and Glaucoma: From Common Degenerative Mechanisms Toward Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Criscuolo, Chiara; Fabiani, Carlotta; Cerri, Elisa; Domenici, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and glaucoma are two distinct multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases, primarily affecting the elderly. Common pathophysiological mechanisms have been elucidated in the past decades. First of all both diseases are progressive, with AD leading to dementia and glaucoma inducing blindness. Pathologically, they all feature synaptic dysfunction with changes of neuronal circuitry, progressive accumulation of protein aggregates such as the beta amyloid (Aβ) and intracellular microtubule inclusions containing hyperphosphorylated tau, which belongs to microtubule associated protein family. During an early phase of degeneration, both diseases are characterized by synaptic dysfunction and changes of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Common degenerative mechanisms underlying both diseases are discussed here, along with recent results on the potential use of the visual system as a biomarker for diagnosis and progression of AD. Common neuropathological changes and mechanisms in AD and glaucoma have facilitated the transfer of therapeutic strategies between diseases. In particular, we discuss past and present evidence for neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). PMID:28289378

  13. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The epilepsies are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. Despite strong evidence for heritability, genome-wide association studies have had little success in identification of risk loci associated with epilepsy, probably because of relatively small sample sizes and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). Methods We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance threshold at p<1·66 × 10−8. Findings We included 8696 cases and 26 157 controls in our analysis. Meta-analysis of the all-epilepsy cohort identified loci at 2q24.3 (p=8·71 × 10−10), implicating SCN1A, and at 4p15.1 (p=5·44 × 10−9), harbouring PCDH7, which encodes a protocadherin molecule not previously implicated in epilepsy. For the cohort of genetic generalised epilepsy, we noted a single signal at 2p16.1 (p=9·99 × 10−9), implicating VRK2 or FANCL. No single nucleotide polymorphism achieved genome-wide significance for focal epilepsy. Interpretation This meta-analysis describes a new locus not previously implicated in epilepsy and provides further evidence about the genetic architecture of these disorders, with the

  14. A common genetic background could explain early-onset Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Zanin, Valentina; Girardelli, Martina; Magnolato, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Martellossi, Stefano; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Crovella, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease, in which environmental, microbial and genetic factors play important roles. CD is characterized by a chronic granulomatous inflammation by necrotic scarring with aspects of full-thickness wall. In spite of affecting mainly young adults, sometimes, CD can be present in the first year of life (early onset Crohn disease, EOCD) showing an unpredictable course and being often more severe than at older ages. In this paper we propose the hypothesis that EOCD patients should be analyzed using a Mendelian approach with family studies aimed to identify new loci directly involved in the early onset Crohn's disease. So we will leave the classic association study approach used until now for the identification of genes responsible for susceptibility to CD and propose linkage family analysis as alternative and powerful tool for the identification of new genetic variants associated with familiar cases of EOCD.

  15. Microsatellite diversity and genetic structure among common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces in Brazil, a secondary center of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Burle, Marília Lobo; Fonseca, Jaime Roberto; Kami, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and consumer of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which is the most important source of human dietary protein in that country. This study assessed the genetic diversity and the structure of a sample of 279 geo-referenced common bean landraces from Brazil, using molecular markers. Sixty-seven microsatellite markers spread over the 11 linkage groups of the common bean genome, as well as Phaseolin, PvTFL1y, APA and four SCAR markers were used. As expected, the sample showed lower genetic diversity compared to the diversity in the primary center of diversification. Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools were both present but the latter gene pool was four times more frequent than the former. The two gene pools could be clearly distinguished; limited admixture was observed between these groups. The Mesoamerican group consisted of two sub-populations, with a high level of admixture between them leading to a large proportion of stabilized hybrids not observed in the centers of domestication. Thus, Brazil can be considered a secondary center of diversification of common bean. A high degree of genome-wide multilocus associations even among unlinked loci was observed, confirming the high level of structure in the sample and suggesting that association mapping should be conducted in separate Andean and Mesoamerican Brazilian samples. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1350-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20502861

  16. Is There Any Evidence for Rapid, Genetically-Based, Climatic Niche Expansion in the Invasive Common Ragweed?

    PubMed Central

    Gallien, Laure; Thuiller, Wilfried; Fort, Noémie; Boleda, Marti; Alberto, Florian J.; Rioux, Delphine; Lainé, Juliette; Lavergne, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Climatic niche shifts have been documented in a number of invasive species by comparing the native and adventive climatic ranges in which they occur. However, these shifts likely represent changes in the realized climatic niches of invasive species, and may not necessarily be driven by genetic changes in climatic affinities. Until now the role of rapid niche evolution in the spread of invasive species remains a challenging issue with conflicting results. Here, we document a likely genetically-based climatic niche expansion of an annual plant invader, the common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.), a highly allergenic invasive species causing substantial public health issues. To do so, we looked for recent evolutionary change at the upward migration front of its adventive range in the French Alps. Based on species climatic niche models estimated at both global and regional scales we stratified our sampling design to adequately capture the species niche, and localized populations suspected of niche expansion. Using a combination of species niche modeling, landscape genetics models and common garden measurements, we then related the species genetic structure and its phenotypic architecture across the climatic niche. Our results strongly suggest that the common ragweed is rapidly adapting to local climatic conditions at its invasion front and that it currently expands its niche toward colder and formerly unsuitable climates in the French Alps (i.e. in sites where niche models would not predict its occurrence). Such results, showing that species climatic niches can evolve on very short time scales, have important implications for predictive models of biological invasions that do not account for evolutionary processes. PMID:27116455

  17. Internalization of multiple cells during C. elegans gastrulation depends on common cytoskeletal mechanisms but different cell polarity and cell fate regulators

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, Jessica R.; Goldstein, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the links between developmental patterning mechanisms and force-producing cytoskeletal mechanisms is a central goal in studies of morphogenesis. Gastrulation is the first morphogenetic event in the development of many organisms. Gastrulation involves the internalization of surface cells, often driven by the contraction of actomyosin networks that are deployed with spatial precision -- both in specific cells and in a polarized manner within each cell. These cytoskeletal mechanisms rely on different cell fate and cell polarity regulators in different organisms. C. elegans gastrulation presents an opportunity to examine the extent to which diverse mechanisms may be used by dozens of cells that are internalized at distinct times within a single organism. We identified 66 cells that are internalized in C. elegans gastrulation, many of which were not known previously to gastrulate. To gain mechanistic insights into how these cells internalize, we genetically manipulated cell fate, cell polarity and cytoskeletal regulators and determined the effects on cell internalization. We found that cells of distinct lineages depend on common actomyosin-based mechanisms to gastrulate, but different cell fate regulators, and, surprisingly, different cell polarity regulators. We conclude that diverse cell fate and cell polarity regulators control common mechanisms of morphogenesis in C. elegans. The results highlight the variety of developmental patterning mechanisms that can be associated with common cytoskeletal mechanisms in the morphogenesis of an animal embryo. PMID:20875815

  18. Remind me again what disease we are studying? A population genetics, genetic analysis, and real data perspective on why progress on identifying genetic influences on common epilepsies has been so slow.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David A; Stewart, William L

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we will use the concepts and perspective of population genetics and genetic analysis to discuss the trends that are currently popular in the epilepsy genetics literature. We will also show that some of the recent approaches to understanding epilepsy genetics are unlikely to lead to insight into the causes of the most common epilepsies. Much effort has been directed toward very rare influences on epilepsy expression and away from approaches that could shed light on the most heritable epilepsies. The latest genetic technology, e.g., exome sequencing and copy number variants (CNV) analysis, has been applied without proper consideration of the important principles of population genetics, inheritance, or phenotype definition that are critical in common disease studies. We will show that ignoring these issues has led to unlikely suppositions about etiology and about which genes should be pursued. We also suggest that, taken together, the existing evidence supports a neurodevelopmental origin for common epilepsies. We recommend a return to thorough phenotype definition and family studies and a more careful and thoughtful application of the new technology.

  19. Mechanical Stress as the Common Denominator between Chronic Inflammation, Cancer, and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Levy Nogueira, Marcel; da Veiga Moreira, Jorgelindo; Baronzio, Gian Franco; Dubois, Bruno; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Schwartz, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of common diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer, are currently poorly understood. Inflammation is a common risk factor for cancer and AD. Recent data, provided by our group and from others, demonstrate that increased pressure and inflammation are synonymous. There is a continuous increase in pressure from inflammation to fibrosis and then cancer. This is in line with the numerous papers reporting high interstitial pressure in cancer. But most authors focus on the role of pressure in the lack of delivery of chemotherapy in the center of the tumor. Pressure may also be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Increased pressure is responsible for oncogene activation and cytokine secretion. Accumulation of mechanical stress plays a key role in the development of diseases of old age, such as cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, and osteoarthritis. Growing evidence suggest also a possible link between mechanical stress in the pathogenesis of AD. The aim of this review is to describe environmental and endogenous mechanical factors possibly playing a pivotal role in the mechanism of chronic inflammation, AD, and cancer. PMID:26442209

  20. Failed Lactation and Perinatal Depression: Common Problems with Shared Neuroendocrine Mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Grewen, Karen; Pedersen, Cort A.; Propper, Cathi; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the early postpartum period, mother and infant navigate a critical neuroendocrine transition from pregnancy to lactation. Two major clinical problems that occur during this transition are failed lactation and perinatal mood disorders. These disorders often overlap in clinical settings. Failed lactation is common. Although all major medical organizations recommend 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding, only 13% of women in the United States achieve this recommendation. Perinatal mood disorders affect 10% of mothers, with substantial morbidity for mother and child. We hypothesize that shared neuroendocrine mechanisms contribute to both failed lactation and perinatal mood disorders. In this hypothesis article, we discuss data from both animal models and clinical studies that suggest neuroendocrine mechanisms that may underlie these two disorders. Research to elucidate the role of these underlying mechanisms may identify treatment strategies both to relieve perinatal depression and to enable women to achieve their infant feeding goals. PMID:22204416

  1. ASD and schizophrenia show distinct developmental profiles in common genetic overlap with population-based social communication difficulties.

    PubMed

    St Pourcain, B; Robinson, E B; Anttila, V; Sullivan, B B; Maller, J; Golding, J; Skuse, D; Ring, S; Evans, D M; Zammit, S; Fisher, S E; Neale, B M; Anney, R J L; Ripke, S; Hollegaard, M V; Werge, T; Ronald, A; Grove, J; Hougaard, D M; Børglum, A D; Mortensen, P B; Daly, M J; Davey Smith, G

    2017-01-03

    Difficulties in social communication are part of the phenotypic overlap between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. Both conditions follow, however, distinct developmental patterns. Symptoms of ASD typically occur during early childhood, whereas most symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia do not appear before early adulthood. We investigated whether overlap in common genetic influences between these clinical conditions and impairments in social communication depends on the developmental stage of the assessed trait. Social communication difficulties were measured in typically-developing youth (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, N⩽5553, longitudinal assessments at 8, 11, 14 and 17 years) using the Social Communication Disorder Checklist. Data on clinical ASD (PGC-ASD: 5305 cases, 5305 pseudo-controls; iPSYCH-ASD: 7783 cases, 11 359 controls) and schizophrenia (PGC-SCZ2: 34 241 cases, 45 604 controls, 1235 trios) were either obtained through the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) or the Danish iPSYCH project. Overlap in genetic influences between ASD and social communication difficulties during development decreased with age, both in the PGC-ASD and the iPSYCH-ASD sample. Genetic overlap between schizophrenia and social communication difficulties, by contrast, persisted across age, as observed within two independent PGC-SCZ2 subsamples, and showed an increase in magnitude for traits assessed during later adolescence. ASD- and schizophrenia-related polygenic effects were unrelated to each other and changes in trait-disorder links reflect the heterogeneity of genetic factors influencing social communication difficulties during childhood versus later adolescence. Thus, both clinical ASD and schizophrenia share some genetic influences with impairments in social communication, but reveal distinct developmental profiles in their genetic links, consistent with the onset of clinical symptoms.Molecular Psychiatry advance online

  2. Age at Onset in Two Common Neurodegenerative Diseases Is Genetically Controlled

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Ju; Scott, William K.; Hedges, Dale J.; Zhang, Fengyu; Gaskell, P. Craig; Nance, Martha A.; Watts, Ray L.; Hubble, Jean P.; Koller, William C.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Matthew B.; Hiner, Bradley C.; Jankovic, Joseph; Allen, Jr., Fred H.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Mastaglia, Frank; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Gibson, Rachel A.; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Saunders, Ann M.; Scott, Burton L.; Small, Gary W.; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Reed, Allison D.; Schmechel, Donald E.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Conneally, P. Michael; Roses, Allen D.; Gilbert, John R.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    To identify genes influencing age at onset (AAO) in two common neurodegenerative diseases, a genomic screen was performed for AAO in families with Alzheimer disease (AD; n=449) and Parkinson disease (PD; n=174). Heritabilities between 40%–60% were found in both the AD and PD data sets. For PD, significant evidence for linkage to AAO was found on chromosome 1p (LOD = 3.41). For AD, the AAO effect of APOE (LOD = 3.28) was confirmed. In addition, evidence for AAO linkage on chromosomes 6 and 10 was identified independently in both the AD and PD data sets. Subsequent unified analyses of these regions identified a single peak on chromosome 10q between D10S1239 and D10S1237, with a maximum LOD score of 2.62. These data suggest that a common gene affects AAO in these two common complex neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:11875758

  3. Age at onset in two common neurodegenerative diseases is genetically controlled.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Ju; Scott, William K; Hedges, Dale J; Zhang, Fengyu; Gaskell, P Craig; Nance, Martha A; Watts, Ray L; Hubble, Jean P; Koller, William C; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Matthew B; Hiner, Bradley C; Jankovic, Joseph; Allen, Fred A; Goetz, Christopher G; Mastaglia, Frank; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Gibson, Rachel A; Middleton, Lefkos T; Saunders, Ann M; Scott, Burton L; Small, Gary W; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Reed, Allison D; Schmechel, Donald E; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Conneally, P Michael; Roses, Allen D; Gilbert, John R; Vance, Jeffery M; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2002-04-01

    To identify genes influencing age at onset (AAO) in two common neurodegenerative diseases, a genomic screen was performed for AAO in families with Alzheimer disease (AD; n=449) and Parkinson disease (PD; n=174). Heritabilities between 40%--60% were found in both the AD and PD data sets. For PD, significant evidence for linkage to AAO was found on chromosome 1p (LOD = 3.41). For AD, the AAO effect of APOE (LOD = 3.28) was confirmed. In addition, evidence for AAO linkage on chromosomes 6 and 10 was identified independently in both the AD and PD data sets. Subsequent unified analyses of these regions identified a single peak on chromosome 10q between D10S1239 and D10S1237, with a maximum LOD score of 2.62. These data suggest that a common gene affects AAO in these two common complex neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Common genetic variants associated with resting oxygenation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Cho, Michael H; Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Lutz, Sharon M; Castaldi, Peter J; Lomas, David A; Coxson, Harvey O; Edwards, Lisa D; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen I; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bakke, Per; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Miller, Bruce E; Gulsvik, Amund; Casaburi, Richard; Wells, J Michael; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Hokanson, John E; Lange, Christoph; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxemia is a major complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that correlates with disease prognosis. Identifying genetic variants associated with oxygenation may provide clues for deciphering the heterogeneity in prognosis among patients with COPD. However, previous genetic studies have been restricted to investigating COPD candidate genes for association with hypoxemia. To report results from the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of resting oxygen saturation (as measured by pulse oximetry [Spo2]) in subjects with COPD, we performed a GWAS of Spo2 in two large, well characterized COPD populations: COPDGene, including both the non-Hispanic white (NHW) and African American (AA) groups, and Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). We identified several suggestive loci (P < 1 × 10(-5)) associated with Spo2 in COPDGene in the NHW (n = 2810) and ECLIPSE (n = 1758) groups, and two loci on chromosomes 14 and 15 in the AA group (n = 820) from COPDGene achieving a level of genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)). The chromosome 14 single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs6576132, located in an intergenic region, was nominally replicated (P < 0.05) in the NHW group from COPDGene. The chromosome 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were rare in subjects of European ancestry, so the results could not be replicated. The chromosome 15 region contains several genes, including TICRR and KIF7, and is proximal to RHCG (Rh family C glyocoprotein gene). We have identified two loci associated with resting oxygen saturation in AA subjects with COPD, and several suggestive regions in subjects of European descent with COPD. Our study highlights the importance of investigating the genetics of complex traits in different racial groups.

  5. Common Genetic Variants Associated with Resting Oxygenation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Lutz, Sharon M.; Castaldi, Peter J.; Lomas, David A.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Edwards, Lisa D.; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M. A.; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen I.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Bakke, Per; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Miller, Bruce E.; Gulsvik, Amund; Casaburi, Richard; Wells, J. Michael; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Lange, Christoph; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxemia is a major complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that correlates with disease prognosis. Identifying genetic variants associated with oxygenation may provide clues for deciphering the heterogeneity in prognosis among patients with COPD. However, previous genetic studies have been restricted to investigating COPD candidate genes for association with hypoxemia. To report results from the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of resting oxygen saturation (as measured by pulse oximetry [Spo2]) in subjects with COPD, we performed a GWAS of Spo2 in two large, well characterized COPD populations: COPDGene, including both the non-Hispanic white (NHW) and African American (AA) groups, and Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). We identified several suggestive loci (P < 1 × 10−5) associated with Spo2 in COPDGene in the NHW (n = 2810) and ECLIPSE (n = 1758) groups, and two loci on chromosomes 14 and 15 in the AA group (n = 820) from COPDGene achieving a level of genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). The chromosome 14 single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs6576132, located in an intergenic region, was nominally replicated (P < 0.05) in the NHW group from COPDGene. The chromosome 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were rare in subjects of European ancestry, so the results could not be replicated. The chromosome 15 region contains several genes, including TICRR and KIF7, and is proximal to RHCG (Rh family C glyocoprotein gene). We have identified two loci associated with resting oxygen saturation in AA subjects with COPD, and several suggestive regions in subjects of European descent with COPD. Our study highlights the importance of investigating the genetics of complex traits in different racial groups. PMID:24825563

  6. Common Practice Lightning Strike Protection Characterization Technique to Quantify Damage Mechanisms on Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.; Mcneill, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    To support FAA certification airworthiness standards, composite substrates are subjected to lightning direct-effect electrical waveforms to determine performance characteristics of the lightning strike protection (LSP) conductive layers used to protect composite substrates. Test results collected from independent LSP studies are often incomparable due to variability in test procedures & applied practices at different organizations, which impairs performance correlations between different LSP data sets. Under a NASA supported contract, The Boeing Company developed technical procedures and documentation as guidance in order to facilitate a test method for conducting universal common practice lightning strike protection test procedures. The procedures obtain conformity in future lightning strike protection evaluations to allow meaningful performance correlations across data sets. This universal common practice guidance provides the manufacturing specifications to fabricate carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) test panels, including finish, grounding configuration, and acceptable methods for pretest nondestructive inspection (NDI) and posttest destructive inspection. The test operations guidance elaborates on the provisions contained in SAE ARP5416 to address inconsistencies in the generation of damage protection performance data, so as to provide for maximum achievable correlation across capable lab facilities. In addition, the guidance details a direct effects test bed design to aid in quantification of the multi-physical phenomena surrounding a lightning direct attachment supporting validation data requirements for the development of predictive computational modeling. The lightning test bed is designed to accommodate a repeatable installation procedure to secure the test panel and eliminate test installation uncertainty. It also facilitates a means to capture the electrical waveform parameters in 2 dimensions, along with the mechanical displacement and thermal

  7. The common sense model of self-regulation and psychological adjustment to predictive genetic testing: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H J T; van Asperen, Christi J; Sijmons, Rolf H; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Gool, Arthur R; Klijn, Jan G M; Tibben, Aad

    2007-12-01

    This prospective study explored the contribution of illness representations and coping to cancer-related distress in unaffected individuals undergoing predictive genetic testing for an identified mutation in BRCA1/2 (BReast CAncer) or an HNPCC (Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer)-related gene, based on the common sense model of self-regulation. Coping with hereditary cancer (UCL), illness representations (IPQ-R) and risk perception were assessed in 235 unaffected applicants for genetic testing before test result disclosure. Hereditary cancer distress (IES) and cancer worry (CWS) were assessed before, 2 weeks after and 6 months after result disclosure. Timeline (r = 0.30), consequences (r = 0.25), illness coherence (r = 0.21) and risk perception (r = 0.20) were significantly correlated to passive coping. Passive coping predicted hereditary cancer distress and cancer worry from pre-test (beta = 0.46 and 0.42, respectively) up to 6 months after result disclosure (beta = 0.32 and 0.19, respectively). Illness coherence predicted hereditary cancer distress up to 6 months after result disclosure (beta = 0.24), too. The self-regulatory model may be useful to predict the cognitive and emotional reactions to genetic cancer susceptibility testing. Identifying unhelpful representations and cognitive restructuring may be appropriate interventions to help distressed individuals undergoing genetic susceptibility testing for a BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC-related mutation.

  8. Analysis of the common genetic component of large-vessel vasculitides through a meta-Immunochip strategy.

    PubMed

    Carmona, F David; Coit, Patrick; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, María C; Solans, Roser; Castañeda, Santos; Vaglio, Augusto; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A; Boiardi, Luigi; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A; Martín, Javier; Sawalha, Amr H

    2017-03-09

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TAK) are major forms of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) that share clinical features. To evaluate their genetic similarities, we analysed Immunochip genotyping data from 1,434 LVV patients and 3,814 unaffected controls. Genetic pleiotropy was also estimated. The HLA region harboured the main disease-specific associations. GCA was mostly associated with class II genes (HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQA1) whereas TAK was mostly associated with class I genes (HLA-B/MICA). Both the statistical significance and effect size of the HLA signals were considerably reduced in the cross-disease meta-analysis in comparison with the analysis of GCA and TAK separately. Consequently, no significant genetic correlation between these two diseases was observed when HLA variants were tested. Outside the HLA region, only one polymorphism located nearby the IL12B gene surpassed the study-wide significance threshold in the meta-analysis of the discovery datasets (rs755374, P = 7.54E-07; ORGCA = 1.19, ORTAK = 1.50). This marker was confirmed as novel GCA risk factor using four additional cohorts (PGCA = 5.52E-04, ORGCA = 1.16). Taken together, our results provide evidence of strong genetic differences between GCA and TAK in the HLA. Outside this region, common susceptibility factors were suggested, especially within the IL12B locus.

  9. Analysis of the common genetic component of large-vessel vasculitides through a meta-Immunochip strategy

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, F. David; Coit, Patrick; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, María C.; Solans, Roser; Castañeda, Santos; Vaglio, Augusto; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A.; Boiardi, Luigi; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier; Sawalha, Amr H.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Vuelta, Ana Belén Madroñero; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; Vicente, Esther F.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Martínez, Lina; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Narváez, Javier; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; García-Villanueva, María Jesús; Guijarro Rojas, Mercedes; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Sanchez Pernaute, Olga; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Blanco, Ricardo; Prieto-González, Sergio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Soriano, Alessandra; Lunardi, Claudio; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Bonatti, Francesco; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Emmi, Giacomo; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marcello; Cimmino, Marco A.; Mesut Onat, Ahmet; Cefle, Ayse; Yazici, Ayten; Kısacık, Bünyamin; Dalkilic, Ediz; Seyahi, Emire; Fresko, Izzet; Tunc, Ercan; Erken, Eren; TE Ozer, Hüseyin; Aksu, Kenan; Keser, Gokhan; Ozturk, Mehmet A.; Bıcakcıgil, Muge; Duzgun, Nurşen; Karadag, Omer; Kiraz, Sedat; Pamuk, Ömer N.; Akar, Servet; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah; Kamali, Sevil; Inanc, Murat; Yentür, Sibel P.; Aydin, Sibel Z.; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Cobankara, Veli; Ozbalkan, Zeynep; Ates, Askin; Karaaslan, Yasar; Carette, Simon; Chung, Sharon A.; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsay J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; McKinnon-Maksimowicz, Kathleen; Monach, Paul A.; Moreland, Larry; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu’s arteritis (TAK) are major forms of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) that share clinical features. To evaluate their genetic similarities, we analysed Immunochip genotyping data from 1,434 LVV patients and 3,814 unaffected controls. Genetic pleiotropy was also estimated. The HLA region harboured the main disease-specific associations. GCA was mostly associated with class II genes (HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQA1) whereas TAK was mostly associated with class I genes (HLA-B/MICA). Both the statistical significance and effect size of the HLA signals were considerably reduced in the cross-disease meta-analysis in comparison with the analysis of GCA and TAK separately. Consequently, no significant genetic correlation between these two diseases was observed when HLA variants were tested. Outside the HLA region, only one polymorphism located nearby the IL12B gene surpassed the study-wide significance threshold in the meta-analysis of the discovery datasets (rs755374, P = 7.54E-07; ORGCA = 1.19, ORTAK = 1.50). This marker was confirmed as novel GCA risk factor using four additional cohorts (PGCA = 5.52E-04, ORGCA = 1.16). Taken together, our results provide evidence of strong genetic differences between GCA and TAK in the HLA. Outside this region, common susceptibility factors were suggested, especially within the IL12B locus. PMID:28277489

  10. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; González, Laura F; Kimani, Paul M; Butare, Louis

    2010-07-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes region of Central Africa, including a large group of landraces from Rwanda as well as varieties from primary centers of diversity and from neighboring countries of Central Africa, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, using 30 fluorescently labeled microsatellite markers and automated allele detection. In addition, the landraces were evaluated for their seed iron and zinc concentration to determine if genetic diversity influenced nutritional quality. Principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses allowed the separation of the landraces into 132 Andean and 195 Mesoamerican (or Middle American) genotypes with 32 landraces and 6 varieties intermediate between the gene pools and representing inter-gene pool introgression in terms of seed characteristics and alleles. Genetic diversity and the number of alleles were high for the collection, reflecting the preference for a wide range of seed types in the region and no strong commercial class preference, although red, red mottled and brown seeded beans were common. Observed heterozygosity was also high and may be explained by the common practice of maintaining seed and plant mixtures, a coping strategy practiced by Central African farmers to reduce the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Finally, nutritional quality differed between the gene pools with respect to seed iron and zinc concentration, while genotypes from the intermediate group were notably high in both minerals. In conclusion, this study has shown that

  11. Genome-wide genetic dissection of supernumerary spikelet and related traits in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Branched spike or supernumerary spikelet (SS) is a naturally occurring variant in wheat and holds great potential for increasing the number of grains per spike, and ultimately, increasing wheat yield. However, detailed knowledge of the molecular basis of spike branching in common wheat is lacking. I...

  12. A legume biofortification quandary: Variability and genetic control of seed coat micronutrient accumulation in common beans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), like many legumes, are rich in iron, zinc, and certain other microelements that are generally found to be in low concentrations in cereals, other seed crops, and root or tubers, and therefore are good candidates for biofortification. But a quandary exists in com...

  13. Genetic characterization and molecular mapping pse-2 gene for resistance to halo blight in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psp) causes ‘Halo Blight’, which is a serious bacterial disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Several R genes have been discovered in host differential cultivar ZAA 12. Our objectives were to further characterize and enable marker-assisted selection ...

  14. Cryptic Distant Relatives Are Common in Both Isolated and Cosmopolitan Genetic Samples

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, J. Michael; Eriksson, Nick; Saxonov, Serge; Pe'er, Itsik; Mountain, Joanna L.

    2012-01-01

    Although a few hundred single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) suffice to infer close familial relationships, high density genome-wide SNP data make possible the inference of more distant relationships such as 2nd to 9th cousinships. In order to characterize the relationship between genetic similarity and degree of kinship given a timeframe of 100–300 years, we analyzed the sharing of DNA inferred to be identical by descent (IBD) in a subset of individuals from the 23andMe customer database (n = 22,757) and from the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP-CEPH, n = 952). With data from 121 populations, we show that the average amount of DNA shared IBD in most ethnolinguistically-defined populations, for example Native American groups, Finns and Ashkenazi Jews, differs from continentally-defined populations by several orders of magnitude. Via extensive pedigree-based simulations, we determined bounds for predicted degrees of relationship given the amount of genomic IBD sharing in both endogamous and ‘unrelated’ population samples. Using these bounds as a guide, we detected tens of thousands of 2nd to 9th degree cousin pairs within a heterogenous set of 5,000 Europeans. The ubiquity of distant relatives, detected via IBD segments, in both ethnolinguistic populations and in large ‘unrelated’ populations samples has important implications for genetic genealogy, forensics and genotype/phenotype mapping studies. PMID:22509285

  15. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sieberts, Solveig K.; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O.; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S. K.; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R.; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M.; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Calaza, Manuel; Elmarakeby, Haitham; Heath, Lenwood S.; Long, Quan; Moore, Jonathan D.; Opiyo, Stephen Obol; Savage, Richard S.; Zhu, Jun; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Louis Bridges Jr., S.; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h2=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data. PMID:27549343

  16. Cryptic distant relatives are common in both isolated and cosmopolitan genetic samples.

    PubMed

    Henn, Brenna M; Hon, Lawrence; Macpherson, J Michael; Eriksson, Nick; Saxonov, Serge; Pe'er, Itsik; Mountain, Joanna L

    2012-01-01

    Although a few hundred single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) suffice to infer close familial relationships, high density genome-wide SNP data make possible the inference of more distant relationships such as 2(nd) to 9(th) cousinships. In order to characterize the relationship between genetic similarity and degree of kinship given a timeframe of 100-300 years, we analyzed the sharing of DNA inferred to be identical by descent (IBD) in a subset of individuals from the 23andMe customer database (n = 22,757) and from the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP-CEPH, n = 952). With data from 121 populations, we show that the average amount of DNA shared IBD in most ethnolinguistically-defined populations, for example Native American groups, Finns and Ashkenazi Jews, differs from continentally-defined populations by several orders of magnitude. Via extensive pedigree-based simulations, we determined bounds for predicted degrees of relationship given the amount of genomic IBD sharing in both endogamous and 'unrelated' population samples. Using these bounds as a guide, we detected tens of thousands of 2(nd) to 9(th) degree cousin pairs within a heterogenous set of 5,000 Europeans. The ubiquity of distant relatives, detected via IBD segments, in both ethnolinguistic populations and in large 'unrelated' populations samples has important implications for genetic genealogy, forensics and genotype/phenotype mapping studies.

  17. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sieberts, Solveig K; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S K; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-Ud-Din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F; Louis Bridges, S; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M; Bridges, S Louis; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M

    2016-08-23

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h(2)=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data.

  18. Do nightmares and generalized anxiety disorder in childhood and adolescence have a common genetic origin?

    PubMed

    Coolidge, Frederick L; Segal, Daniel L; Coolidge, Christa M; Spinath, Frank M; Gottschling, Juliana

    2010-05-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence and heritability of nightmares and their comorbidity with psychopathology in a sample (N = 1,318) of children, adolescents, and child and adolescent twins ranging in age from 4 to 17 years old. The prevalence of terrible nightmares was estimated to be 6.4%, which is similar to previous studies. There were marginal gender differences in this rate (7.7% for boys; 5.1% in girls), contrary to previous studies that purport higher rates for girls. There was little evidence for prevalence changes across age. Nightmares were highly heritable and attributed to an additive genetic influence (51%) and nonshared environmental effects (49%). There was little evidence for a shared genetic correlation for nightmares and generalized waking anxiety (Overanxious Disorder of Childhood). There was also a substantial and pervasive comorbid psychopathology for those parents who reported Strongly True on Item 59: My child has terrible nightmares on the 200-item parent-as-respondent, Coolidge Personality and Neuropsychological Inventory. Issues in estimating prevalence rates of nightmares were identified.

  19. FAS haploinsufficiency is a common disease mechanism in the human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Caminha, Iusta; Niemela, Julie E; Rao, V Koneti; Davis, Joie; Fleisher, Thomas A; Oliveira, João B

    2011-05-15

    The autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by early-onset lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, immune cytopenias, and an increased risk for B cell lymphomas. Most ALPS patients harbor mutations in the FAS gene, which regulates lymphocyte apoptosis. These are commonly missense mutations affecting the intracellular region of the protein and have a dominant-negative effect on the signaling pathway. However, analysis of a large cohort of ALPS patients revealed that ∼30% have mutations affecting the extracellular region of FAS, and among these, 70% are nonsense, splice site, or insertions/deletions with frameshift for which no dominant-negative effect would be expected. We evaluated the latter patients to understand the mechanism(s) by which these mutations disrupted the FAS pathway and resulted in clinical disease. We demonstrated that most extracellular-region FAS mutations induce low FAS expression due to nonsense-mediated RNA decay or protein instability, resulting in defective death-inducing signaling complex formation and impaired apoptosis, although to a lesser extent as compared with intracellular mutations. The apoptosis defect could be corrected by FAS overexpression in vitro. Our findings define haploinsufficiency as a common disease mechanism in ALPS patients with extracellular FAS mutations.

  20. Origin and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance: The Common Mechanisms of Emergence and Spread in Water Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Agnese; Coyne, Sébastien; Berendonk, Thomas Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The environment, and especially freshwater, constitutes a reactor where the evolution and the rise of new resistances occur. In water bodies such as waste water effluents, lakes, and rivers or streams, bacteria from different sources, e.g., urban, industrial, and agricultural waste, probably selected by intensive antibiotic usage, are collected and mixed with environmental species. This may cause two effects on the development of antibiotic resistances: first, the contamination of water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise of resistances due to selection processes, for instance, of strains over-expressing broad range defensive mechanisms, such as efflux pumps. Second, since environmental species are provided with intrinsic antibiotic resistance mechanisms, the mixture with allochthonous species is likely to cause genetic exchange. In this context, the role of phages and integrons for the spread of resistance mechanisms appears significant. Allochthonous species could acquire new resistances from environmental donors and introduce the newly acquired resistance mechanisms into the clinics. This is illustrated by clinically relevant resistance mechanisms, such as the fluoroquinolones resistance genes qnr. Freshwater appears to play an important role in the emergence and in the spread of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the necessity for strategies of water quality improvement. We assume that further knowledge is needed to better understand the role of the environment as reservoir of antibiotic resistances and to elucidate the link between environmental pollution by anthropogenic pressures and emergence of antibiotic resistances. Only an integrated vision of these two aspects can provide elements to assess the risk of spread of antibiotic resistances via water bodies and suggest, in this context, solutions for this urgent health issue. PMID:22303296

  1. Commonalities between pain and memory mechanisms and their meaning for understanding chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Price, Theodore J; Inyang, Kufreobong E

    2015-01-01

    Pain sensing neurons in the periphery (called nociceptors) and the central neurons that receive their projections show remarkable plasticity following injury. This plasticity results in amplification of pain signaling that is now understood to be crucial for the recovery and survival of organisms following injury. These same plasticity mechanisms may drive a transition to a nonadaptive chronic pain state if they fail to resolve following the termination of the healing process. Remarkable advances have been achieved in the past two decades in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie pain plasticity following injury. The mechanisms bear a striking resemblance to molecular mechanisms involved in learning and memory processes in other brain regions, including the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Here those mechanisms, their commonalities and subtle differences, will be highlighted and their role in causing chronic pain will be discussed. Arising from these data is the striking argument that chronic pain is a disease of the nervous system, which distinguishes this phenomena from acute pain that is frequently a symptom alerting the organism to injury. This argument has important implications for the development of disease modifying therapeutics.

  2. Trypanosoma vivax: mechanical transmission in cattle by one of the most common African tabanids, Atylotus agrestis.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Dia, Mamadou Lamine

    2003-01-01

    The role of mechanical vectors in the transmission of African livestock trypanosomes has always been controversial relative to tsetse flies, their cyclical vectors. An experiment was carried out in Burkina Faso to demonstrate mechanical transmission of Trypanosoma vivax by one of the most common tabanids in Africa: Atylotus agrestis. Eight heifers (crossbred zebuxBaoulé), free of trypanosome infection, were kept in a corral covered by a mosquito net, together with two heifers infected experimentally with a local stock of T. vivax. On average, 324 A. agrestis, freshly captured with Nzi traps, were introduced daily over 20 days. Parasitological, PCR and serological examinations were carried out regularly to assess infections and levels of parasitaemia. Microscopic examination of buffy-coats indicated that five of the eight receiver-heifers were infected on days 8, 13, 32, 41, and 48. PCR results indicated that these five heifers were already infected by day 13. Mechanical transmission of T. vivax by A. agrestis was demonstrated unequivocally, at a high rate (63% in 13-20 days). Conditions of transmission in this experiment are discussed in terms of natural rates of challenge. The importance of tabanids as mechanical vectors of T. vivax should be re-considered, in light of these results. Creation of tsetse free zones in Africa will generally lead to the disappearance of T. congolense, T. brucei, and most often T. vivax as well; however, in areas where T. vivax can be mechanically transmitted, clearance of tsetse may not be sufficient to eradicate livestock trypanosomosis.

  3. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  4. Genetic analysis of QTL for eye cross and eye diameter in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) using microsatellites and SNPs.

    PubMed

    Jin, S B; Zhang, X F; Lu, J G; Fu, H T; Jia, Z Y; Sun, X W

    2015-04-17

    A group of 107 F1 hybrid common carp was used to construct a linkage map using JoinMap 4.0. A total of 4877 microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers isolated from a genomic library (978 microsatellite and 3899 SNP markers) were assigned to construct the genetic map, which comprised 50 linkage groups. The total length of the linkage map for the common carp was 4775.90 cM with an average distance between markers of 0.98 cM. Ten quantitative trait loci (QTL) were associated with eye diameter, corresponding to 10.5-57.2% of the total phenotypic variation. Twenty QTL were related to eye cross, contributing to 10.8-36.9% of the total phenotypic variation. Two QTL for eye diameter and four QTL for eye cross each accounted for more than 20% of the total phenotypic variation and were considered to be major QTL. One growth factor related to eye diameter was observed on LG10 of the common carp genome, and three growth factors related to eye cross were observed on LG10, LG35, and LG44 of the common carp genome. The significant positive relationship of eye cross and eye diameter with other commercial traits suggests that eye diameter and eye cross can be used to assist in indirect selection for many commercial traits, particularly body weight. Thus, the growth factor for eye cross may also contribute to the growth of body weight, implying that aggregate breeding could have multiple effects. These findings provide information for future genetic studies and breeding of common carp.

  5. The Underlying Mechanisms: How Hypothyroidism Affects the Formation of Common Bile Duct Stones—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Laukkarinen, Johanna; Sand, Juhani; Nordback, Isto

    2012-01-01

    For decades, one well-known risk factor for the development of gallbladder stones has been hypothyroidism. Recent studies have interestingly reported that the risk in particular for common bile duct (CBD) stones increases in clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism. There are multiple factors that may contribute to the formation and/or accumulation of CBD stones in hypothyroid patients, including decreased liver cholesterol metabolism, diminished bile secretion, and reduced sphincter of Oddi relaxation. This paper focuses on the mechanisms possibly underlying the association between hypothyroidism and CBD stones. The authors conclude that when treating patients with CBD stones or microlithiasis, clinicians should be aware of the possible hypothyroid background. PMID:23049165

  6. [Examination of processed vegetable foods for the presence of common DNA sequences of genetically modified tomatoes].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mamiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Ubukata, Shoji; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of processed vegetable foods with genetically modified tomatoes was investigated by the use of qualitative PCR methods to detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) and the kanamycin resistance gene (NPTII). DNA fragments of P35S and NPTII were detected in vegetable juice samples, possibly due to contamination with the genomes of cauliflower mosaic virus infecting juice ingredients of Brassica species and soil bacteria, respectively. Therefore, to detect the transformation construct sequences of GM tomatoes, primer pairs were designed for qualitative PCR to specifically detect the border region between P35S and NPTII, and the border region between nopaline synthase gene promoter and NPTII. No amplification of the targeted sequences was observed using genomic DNA purified from the juice ingredients. The developed qualitative PCR method is considered to be a reliable tool to check contamination of products with GM tomatoes.

  7. Genetic variation, phenotypic stability, and repeatability of drought response in European larch throughout 50 years in a common garden experiment.

    PubMed

    George, Jan-Peter; Grabner, Michael; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Weißenbacher, Lambert; Schueler, Silvio

    2016-09-26

    Assessing intra-specific variation in drought stress response is required to mitigate the consequences of climate change on forest ecosystems. Previous studies suggest that European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), an important European conifer in mountainous and alpine forests, is highly vulnerable to drought. In light of this, we estimated the genetic variation in drought sensitivity and its degree of genetic determination in a 50-year-old common garden experiment in the drought-prone northeastern Austria. Tree ring data from larch provenances originating from across the species' natural range were used to estimate the drought reaction in four consecutive drought events (1977, 1981, 1990-1994, and 2003) with extremely low standardized precipitation- and evapotranspiration-index values that affected growth in all provenances. We found significant differences among provenances across the four drought periods for the trees' capacity to withstand drought (resistance) and for their capacity to reach pre-drought growth levels after drought (resilience). Provenances from the species' northern distribution limit in the Polish lowlands were found to be more drought resistant and showed higher stability across all drought periods than provenances from mountainous habitats at the southern fringe. The degree of genetic determination, as estimated by the repeatability, ranged up to 0.39, but significantly differed among provenances, indicating varying degrees of natural selection at the provenance origin. Generally, the relationship between the provenances' source climate and drought behavior was weak, suggesting that the contrasting patterns of drought response are a result of both genetic divergence out of different refugial lineages and local adaptation to summer or winter drought conditions. Our analysis suggests that European larch posseses high genetic variation among and within provenances that can be used for assisted migration and breeding programs.

  8. Urinary metabolites along with common and rare genetic variations are associated with incident chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Gearoid M; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Clish, Clary B; Tin, Adrienne; Yang, Qiong; Larson, Martin G; Rhee, Eugene P; Li, Man; Levy, Daniel; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Coresh, Josef; Young, J Hunter; Gerszten, Robert E; Fox, Caroline S

    2017-03-14

    We assessed the association between urinary metabolites, genetic variants, and incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the Framingham Offspring cohort. Among the participants, 193 individuals developed CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 ml/min/1.73m(2)) between cohort examinations 6 (1995-1998) and 8 (2005-2008, mean follow-up 9.7 years). They were age- and sex-matched to 193 control individuals free of CKD. A total of 154 urinary metabolites were measured using mass spectrometry, and the association between metabolites and CKD was examined using logistic regression. Next, we tested the genetic associations of each metabolite with an Illumina exome chip. Urinary glycine and histidine were associated with a lower risk of incident CKD with an odds ratio of 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.43-0.80) and 0.65 (0.50-0.85) respectively, per one standard deviation increase in metabolite concentration. Follow-up in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities cohort confirmed the association of urinary glycine with CKD. In exome chip analyses, 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms at 30 loci were significantly associated with 31 metabolites. We surveyed exome chip findings for associations with known renal function loci such as rs8101881 in SLC7A9 coding for an amino acid transporter, which has been associated with a lower risk of CKD. We found this polymorphism was significantly associated with higher levels of lysine and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA). Increased urinary lysine and NMMA were associated with a lower risk of CKD (0.73 [0.50-0.90] and 0.66 [0.53-0.83], respectively) in the univariate model. Thus, low urinary glycine and histidine are associated with incident CKD. Furthermore, genomic association of urinary metabolomics identified lysine and NMMA as being linked with CKD and provided additional evidence for the association of SLC7A9 with kidney disease.

  9. Common Genetic Polymorphisms within NFκB-Related Genes and the Risk of Developing Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Lupiañez, Carmen B.; Villaescusa, María T.; Carvalho, Agostinho; Springer, Jan; Lackner, Michaela; Sánchez-Maldonado, José M.; Canet, Luz M.; Cunha, Cristina; Segura-Catena, Juana; Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Solano, Carlos; Fianchi, Luana; Pagano, Livio; Potenza, Leonardo; Aguado, José M.; Luppi, Mario; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Einsele, Hermann; Vázquez, Lourdes; Ríos-Tamayo, Rafael; Loeffler, Jurgen; Jurado, Manuel; Sainz, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Invasive Aspergillosis (IA) is an opportunistic infection caused by Aspergillus, a ubiquitously present airborne pathogenic mold. A growing number of studies suggest a major host genetic component in disease susceptibility. Here, we evaluated whether 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within NFκB1, NFκB2, RelA, RelB, Rel, and IRF4 genes influence the risk of IA in a population of 834 high-risk patients (157 IA and 677 non-IA) recruited through a collaborative effort involving the aspBIOmics consortium and four European clinical institutions. No significant overall associations between selected SNPs and the risk of IA were found in this large cohort. Although a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT)-stratified analysis revealed that carriers of the IRF4rs12203592T/T genotype had a six-fold increased risk of developing the infection when compared with those carrying the C allele (ORREC = 6.24, 95%CI 1.25–31.2, P = 0.026), the association of this variant with IA risk did not reach significance at experiment-wide significant threshold. In addition, we found an association of the IRF4AATC and IRF4GGTC haplotypes (not including the IRF4rs12203592T risk allele) with a decreased risk of IA but the magnitude of the association was similar to the one observed in the single-SNP analysis, which indicated that the haplotypic effect on IA risk was likely due to the IRF4rs12203592 SNP. Finally, no evidence of significant interactions among the genetic markers tested and the risk of IA was found. These results suggest that the SNPs on the studied genes do not have a clinically relevant impact on the risk of developing IA. PMID:27570521

  10. Identification of Common Genetic Variants Influencing Spontaneous Dizygotic Twinning and Female Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Mbarek, Hamdi; Steinberg, Stacy; Nyholt, Dale R.; Gordon, Scott D.; Miller, Michael B.; McRae, Allan F.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Day, Felix R.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.; Davies, Gareth E.; Martin, Hilary C.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Jansen, Rick; McAloney, Kerrie; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Plomin, Robert; Spector, Tim D.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Reversade, Bruno; Harris, R. Alan; Aagaard, Kjersti; Kristjansson, Ragnar P.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Iacono, William G.; Lambalk, Cornelis B.; Montgomery, Grant W.; McGue, Matt; Ong, Ken K.; Perry, John R.B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kari; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning occurs in 1%–4% of women, with familial clustering and unknown physiological pathways and genetic origin. DZ twinning might index increased fertility and has distinct health implications for mother and child. We performed a GWAS in 1,980 mothers of spontaneous DZ twins and 12,953 control subjects. Findings were replicated in a large Icelandic cohort and tested for association across a broad range of fertility traits in women. Two SNPs were identified (rs11031006 near FSHB, p = 1.54 × 10−9, and rs17293443 in SMAD3, p = 1.57 × 10−8) and replicated (p = 3 × 10−3 and p = 1.44 × 10−4, respectively). Based on ∼90,000 births in Iceland, the risk of a mother delivering twins increased by 18% for each copy of allele rs11031006-G and 9% for rs17293443-C. A higher polygenic risk score (PRS) for DZ twinning, calculated based on the results of the DZ twinning GWAS, was significantly associated with DZ twinning in Iceland (p = 0.001). A higher PRS was also associated with having children (p = 0.01), greater lifetime parity (p = 0.03), and earlier age at first child (p = 0.02). Allele rs11031006-G was associated with higher serum FSH levels, earlier age at menarche, earlier age at first child, higher lifetime parity, lower PCOS risk, and earlier age at menopause. Conversely, rs17293443-C was associated with later age at last child. We identified robust genetic risk variants for DZ twinning: one near FSHB and a second within SMAD3, the product of which plays an important role in gonadal responsiveness to FSH. These loci contribute to crucial aspects of reproductive capacity and health. PMID:27132594

  11. Common Genetic Variants and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Jose D.; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Post, Wendy S.; Polak, Joseph F.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Bluemke, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Subclinical atherosclerosis (sCVD), measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) of CIMT and CVD have focused primarily on Caucasian populations. We hypothesized that these associations may differ in populations from distinct genetic backgrounds. Methods The associations between sCVD and 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from published GWAS of sCVD and CVD were tested in 8224 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and MESA Family participants [2329 Caucasians (EUA), 691 Chinese (CHN), 2482 African Americans (AFA), and 2012 Hispanic (HIS)] using an additive model adjusting for CVD risk factors, with SNP significance defined by a Bonferroni-corrected p < 7.6 × 10−4 (0.05/66). Results In EUA there were significant associations for CAC with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P=2 × 10−9; rs4977574, P= 4 × 10−9), COL4A1 (rs9515203, P=9 × 10−6), and PHACTR1 (rs9349379, P= 4 × 10−4). In HIS, CAC was associated with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P=8 × 10−5; rs4977574, P=5 × 10−5), APOA5 (rs964184, P=2 × 10−4), and ADAMTS7 (rs7173743, P=4 × 10−4). There were no associations with the 9p21 region for AFA and CHN. Fine mapping of the 9p21 region revealed SNPs with robust associations with CAC in EUA and HIS but no significant associations in AFA and CHN. Conclusion Our results suggest some shared genetic architecture for sCVD across ethnic groups, while also underscoring the possibility of novel variants and/or pathways in risk of CVD in ethnically diverse populations. PMID:26789557

  12. Common genetic variation within IGFI, IGFII, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 and endometrial cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Monica; Lee, I-Min; Buring, Julie; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2011-01-01

    Objective The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway plays a critical role in the growth and development of the uterus and is believed to function as a mediator of steroid hormone actions in the endometrium. The local expression of genes encoding IGFs and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) are important in determining IGF bioactivity in the uterus. Genetic variation in key genes within the IGF pathway may influence the rate of cellular proliferation and differentiation in the uterus and ultimately affect the risk of endometrial cancer. Our hypothesis is that variant alleles in key genes involved in the IGF pathway will influence the development of endometrial cancer. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the Women's Health Study (WHS) to investigate the association between forty-four polymorphisms within IGFI, IGFII, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 with endometrial cancer risk using 692 invasive endometrial cancer cases and 1723 matched controls. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the risk of endometrial cancer. Results We observed an inverse association with IGFII rs3741211 and endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.99)) and IGFII rs1004446 and endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.80 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.94)). We also observed an inverse association with IGFBP-3 rs2453839 and endometrial cancer risk (OR= 0.81 (95%CI: 0.67, 0.98). However, we did not observe any statistically significant associations with the polymorphisms in IGFI and IGFBP1 and endometrial cancer risk. Conclusions Genetic variation with IGFII and IGFBP-3 may influence endometrial cancer risk in Caucasians. Polymorphisms in IGFI and IGFBP-1 were not associated with endometrial cancer risk, but further research is needed. PMID:21078522

  13. A legume biofortification quandary: variability and genetic control of seed coat micronutrient accumulation in common beans.

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; Izquierdo, Paulo; Astudillo, Carolina; Grusak, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), like many legumes, are rich in iron, zinc, and certain other microelements that are generally found to be in low concentrations in cereals, other seed crops, and root or tubers and therefore are good candidates for biofortification. But a quandary exists in common bean biofortification: namely that the distribution of iron has been found to be variable between the principal parts of seed; namely the cotyledonary tissue, embryo axis and seed coat. The seed coat represents ten or more percent of the seed weight and must be considered specifically as it accumulates much of the anti-nutrients such as tannins that effect mineral bioavailability. Meanwhile the cotyledons accumulate starch and phosphorus in the form of phytates. The goal of this study was to evaluate a population of progeny derived from an advanced backcross of a wild bean and a cultivated Andean bean for seed coat versus cotyledonary minerals to identify variability and predict inheritance of the minerals. We used wild common beans because of their higher seed mineral concentration compared to cultivars and greater proportion of seed coat to total seed weight. Results showed the most important gene for seed coat iron was on linkage group B04 but also identified other QTL for seed coat and cotyledonary iron and zinc on other linkage groups, including B11 which has been important in studies of whole seed. The importance of these results in terms of physiology, candidate genes and plant breeding are discussed.

  14. A legume biofortification quandary: variability and genetic control of seed coat micronutrient accumulation in common beans

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew W.; Izquierdo, Paulo; Astudillo, Carolina; Grusak, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), like many legumes, are rich in iron, zinc, and certain other microelements that are generally found to be in low concentrations in cereals, other seed crops, and root or tubers and therefore are good candidates for biofortification. But a quandary exists in common bean biofortification: namely that the distribution of iron has been found to be variable between the principal parts of seed; namely the cotyledonary tissue, embryo axis and seed coat. The seed coat represents ten or more percent of the seed weight and must be considered specifically as it accumulates much of the anti-nutrients such as tannins that effect mineral bioavailability. Meanwhile the cotyledons accumulate starch and phosphorus in the form of phytates. The goal of this study was to evaluate a population of progeny derived from an advanced backcross of a wild bean and a cultivated Andean bean for seed coat versus cotyledonary minerals to identify variability and predict inheritance of the minerals. We used wild common beans because of their higher seed mineral concentration compared to cultivars and greater proportion of seed coat to total seed weight. Results showed the most important gene for seed coat iron was on linkage group B04 but also identified other QTL for seed coat and cotyledonary iron and zinc on other linkage groups, including B11 which has been important in studies of whole seed. The importance of these results in terms of physiology, candidate genes and plant breeding are discussed. PMID:23908660

  15. HLA-B35, a common genetic trait, in a familial case of Henoch-Schoenlein purpura and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, M C; Matarazzo, L; Neri, E; Pennesi, M; Crovella, S

    2014-04-08

    Nephritis characterized by IgA mesangial depositions has been described both in Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP) and in Berger's disease (BD), but common genetic traits are still uncertain. We report here the case of two brothers, the first affected by HSP with persistent nephritis and the second by BD, accidentally discovered as silent microhematuria 1 year after HSP onset in the first brother. HLA genotyping demonstrated the presence of HLA-B35 in both patients. Our findings reinforce the need to screen for urinary abnormalities in family members of patients affected by HSP nephritis to identify a silent IgA nephropathy.

  16. A controlled study of Tourette syndrome. VII. Summary: a common genetic disorder causing disinhibition of the limbic system.

    PubMed Central

    Comings, D E

    1987-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is one of the most common genetic disorders affecting man. Approximately one in 100 individuals manifests one or more of the aspects of the TS gene. This series of papers has emphasized that although motor and vocal tics are the hallmark of TS, the complete range of behavioral problems is much broader. This spectrum of behavior can be explained on the basis of the TS gene causing an imbalance of the mesencephalic-mesolimbic dopamine pathways, resulting in disinhibition of the limbic system. PMID:3314491

  17. Genetic lineage tracing discloses arteriogenesis as the main mechanism for collateral growth in the mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    He, Lingjuan; Liu, Qiaozhen; Hu, Tianyuan; Huang, Xiuzhen; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Xueying; Yan, Yan; Wang, Li; Huang, Yu; Miquerol, Lucile; Wythe, Joshua D.; Zhou, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Capillary and arterial endothelial cells share many common molecular markers in both the neonatal and adult hearts. Herein, we aim to establish a genetic tool that distinguishes these two types of vessels in order to determine the cellular mechanism underlying collateral artery formation. Methods and results Using Apln-GFP and Apln-LacZ reporter mice, we demonstrate that APLN expression is enriched in coronary vascular endothelial cells. However, APLN expression is reduced in coronary arterial endothelial cells. Genetic lineage tracing, using an Apln-CreER mouse line, robustly labelled capillary endothelial cells, but not arterial endothelial cells. We leveraged this differential activity of Apln-CreER to study collateral artery formation following myocardial infarction (MI). In a neonatal heart MI model, we found that Apln-CreER-labelled capillary endothelial cells do not contribute to the large collateral arteries. Instead, these large collateral arteries mainly arise from pre-existing, infrequently labelled coronary arteries, indicative of arteriogenesis. Furthermore, in an adult heart MI model, Apln-CreER activity also distinguishes large and small diameter arteries from capillaries. Lineage tracing in this setting demonstrated that most large and small coronary arteries in the infarcted myocardium and border region are derived not from capillaries, but from pre-existing arteries. Conclusion Apln-CreER-mediated lineage tracing distinguishes capillaries from large arteries, in both the neonatal and adult hearts. Through genetic fate mapping, we demonstrate that pre-existing arteries, but not capillaries, extensively contribute to collateral artery formation following myocardial injury. These results suggest that arteriogenesis is the major mechanism underlying collateral vessel formation. PMID:26768261

  18. More than spikes: Common oscillatory mechanisms for content specific neural representations during perception and memory

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Andrew J.; Fell, Juergen; Ekstrom, Arne D.; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    Although previous research into the mechanisms underlying sensory and episodic representations has primarily focused on changes in neural firing rate, more recent evidence suggests that neural oscillations also contribute to these representations. Here, we argue that multiplexed oscillatory power and phase contribute to neural representations at the mesoscopic scale, complementary to neuronal firing. Reviewing recent studies which used oscillatory activity to decipher content-specific neural representations, we identify oscillatory mechanisms common to both sensory and episodic memory representations and incorporate these into a model of episodic encoding and retrieval. This model advances the idea that oscillations provide a reference frame for phase-coded item representations during memory encoding and that shifts in oscillatory frequency and phase coordinate ensemble activity during memory retrieval. PMID:25129044

  19. Genome-wide association study: a useful tool to identify common genetic variants associated with drug toxicity and efficacy in cancer pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Low, Siew-Kee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Mushiroda, Taisei; Kubo, Michiaki

    2014-05-15

    In recent years, the utilization of genome-wide association study (GWAS) has proved to be a beneficial method to identify novel common genetic variations not only for disease susceptibility but also for drug efficacy and drug-induced toxicity, creating a field of pharmacogenomics studies. In addition, the findings from GWAS also generate new biologic hypotheses that could improve the understanding of pathophysiology for disease or the mechanism of drug-induced toxicity. This review highlights the implications of GWAS that have been published to date and discusses the successes as well as challenges of using GWAS in cancer pharmacogenomics. The aim of pharmacogenomics is to realize the vision of personalized medicine; it is hoped that through GWAS, novel common genetic variations could be identified to predict clinical outcome and/or toxicity in cancer therapies that subsequently could be implemented to improve the quality of lives of patients with cancer. Nevertheless, given the complexity of cancer therapies, underpowered studies, and large heterogeneity of study designs, collaborative efforts are needed to validate these findings and overcome the limitations of GWA studies before clinical implementation. See all articles in this ccr focus section, "Progress in pharmacodynamic endpoints."

  20. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2: An Update on Clinical Aspects, Genetic and Pathomolecular Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Giovanni; Cardani, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common adult muscular dystrophy, characterized by autosomal dominant progressive myopathy, myotonia and multiorgan involvement. To date two distinct forms caused by similar mutations have been identified. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, Steinert’s disease) is caused by a (CTG)n expansion in DMPK, while myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is caused by a (CCTG)n expansion in CNBP. Despite clinical and genetic similarities, DM1 and DM2 are distinct disorders. The pathogenesis of DM is explained by a common RNA gain-of-function mechanism in which the CUG and CCUG repeats alter cellular function, including alternative splicing of various genes. However additional pathogenic mechanism like changes in gene expression, modifier genes, protein translation and micro-RNA metabolism may also contribute to disease pathology and to clarify the phenotypic differences between these two types of myotonic dystrophies. This review is an update on the latest findings specific to DM2, including explanations for the differences in clinical manifestations and pathophysiology between the two forms of myotonic dystrophies. PMID:27858759

  1. Common mechanics of mode switching in locomotion of limbless and legged animals

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Shigeru; Kunita, Itsuki; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Ishiguro, Akio; Kobayashi, Ryo; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Crawling using muscular waves is observed in many species, including planaria, leeches, nemertea, aplysia, snails, chitons, earthworms and maggots. Contraction or extension waves propagate along the antero-posterior axis of the body as the crawler pushes the ground substratum backward. However, the observation that locomotory waves can be directed forward or backward has attracted much attention over the past hundred years. Legged organisms such as centipedes and millipedes exhibit parallel phenomena; leg tips form density waves that propagate backward or forward. Mechanical considerations reveal that leg-density waves play a similar role to locomotory waves in limbless species, and that locomotory waves are used by a mechanism common to both legged and limbless species to achieve crawling. Here, we report that both mode switching of the wave direction and friction control were achieved when backward motion was induced in the laboratory. We show that the many variations of switching in different animals can essentially be classified in two types according to mechanical considerations. We propose that during their evolution, limbless crawlers first moved in a manner similar to walking before legs were obtained. Therefore, legged crawlers might have learned the mechanical mode of movement involved in walking long before obtaining legs. PMID:24718452

  2. Neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture for some common illnesses: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwokming James

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents some previously proposed neurobiological mechanisms on how acupuncture may work in some clinical applications from a clinician's perspective. For the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions, the proposed mechanisms included microinjury, increased local blood flow, facilitated healing, and analgesia. Acupuncture may trigger a somatic autonomic reflex, thereby affecting the gastric and cardiovascular functions. Acupuncture may also change the levels of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, thereby affecting the emotional state and craving. This mechanism may form the basis for the treatment of smoking cessation. By affecting other pain-modulating neurotransmitters such as met-enkephalin and substance P along the nociceptive pathway, acupuncture may relieve headache. Acupuncture may affect the hypothalamus pituitary axis and reduce the release of the luteinizing hormone in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition, two other approaches to the acupuncture mechanism, the fascia connective tissue network and the primo vascular system, are briefly reviewed. Finally, the idea of true versus sham acupuncture points, which are commonly used in clinical trials, is examined because the difference between true and sham points does not exist in the neurobiological model.

  3. Differential proteomics of dehydration and rehydration in bryophytes: evidence towards a common desiccation tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cruz DE Carvalho, Ricardo; Bernardes DA Silva, Anabela; Soares, Renata; Almeida, André M; Coelho, Ana Varela; Marques DA Silva, Jorge; Branquinho, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    All bryophytes evolved desiccation tolerance (DT) mechanisms during the invasion of terrestrial habitats by early land plants. Are these DT mechanisms still present in bryophytes that colonize aquatic habitats? The aquatic bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. was subjected to two drying regimes and alterations in protein profiles and sucrose accumulation during dehydration and rehydration were investigated. Results show that during fast dehydration, there is very little variation in protein profiles, and upon rehydration proteins are leaked. On the other hand, slow dehydration induces changes in both dehydration and rehydration protein profiles, being similar to the protein profiles displayed by the terrestrial bryophytes Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch and Schimp. and, to what is comparable with Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F. Weber and D. Mohr. During dehydration there was a reduction in proteins associated with photosynthesis and the cytoskeleton, and an associated accumulation of proteins involved in sugar metabolism and plant defence mechanisms. Upon rehydration, protein accumulation patterns return to control values for both photosynthesis and cytoskeleton whereas proteins associated with sugar metabolism and defence proteins remain high. The current results suggest that bryophytes from different ecological adaptations may share common DT mechanisms.

  4. Impairment of leaf photosynthesis after insect herbivory or mechanical injury on common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca.

    PubMed

    Delaney, K J; Haile, F J; Peterson, R K D; Higley, L G

    2008-10-01

    Insect herbivory has variable consequences on plant physiology, growth, and reproduction. In some plants, herbivory reduces photosynthetic rate (Pn) activity on remaining tissue of injured leaves. We sought to better understand the influence of leaf injury on Pn of common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca (Asclepiadaceae), leaves. Initially, we tested whether Pn reductions occurred after insect herbivory or mechanical injury. We also (1) examined the duration of photosynthetic recovery, (2) compared mechanical injury with insect herbivory, (3) studied the relationship between leaf Pn with leaf injury intensity, and (4) considered uninjured leaf compensatory Pn responses neighboring an injured leaf. Leaf Pn was significantly reduced on mechanically injured or insect-fed leaves in all reported experiments except one, so some factor(s) (cardiac glycoside induction, reproductive investment, and water stress) likely interacts with leaf injury to influence whether Pn impairment occurs. Milkweed tussock moth larval herbivory, Euchaetes egle L. (Arctiidae), impaired leaf Pn more severely than mechanical injury in one experiment. Duration of Pn impairment lasted > 5 d to indicate high leaf Pn sensitivity to injury, but Pn recovery occurred within 13 d in one experiment. The degree of Pn reduction was more severe from E. egle herbivory than similar levels of mechanical tissue removal. Negative linear relationships characterized leaf Pn with percentage tissue loss from single E. egle-fed leaves and mechanically injured leaves and suggested that the signal to trigger leaf Pn impairment on remaining tissue of an injured leaf was amplified by additional tissue loss. Finally, neighboring uninjured leaves to an E. egle-fed leaf had a small (approximately 10%) degree of compensatory Pn to partly offset tissue loss and injured leaf Pn impairment.

  5. Common Genetic Variants on 6q24 Associated With Exceptional Episodic Memory Performance in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Perls, Thomas T.; Province, Michael A.; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE There aregenetic influences on memory ability as we age. but no specific genes have been identified. OBJECTIVE To use a cognitive endophenotype. exceptional episodic memory(EEM) performance. derived from nondemented offspring from the Long Life FamilyStudy(LLFS) to identify genetic variants that may be responsible for the high cognitive performance of LLFS participants and further replicate these variants using an additional 4006 nondemented individuals from 4 independent elderly cohorts DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A total of 467 LLFS participants from 18 families with 2 or more offspring that exhibited exceptional memory performance were used for genome-wide linkage analysis Adjusted multivariate linear analyses in the 40-megabase region encompassing the linkage peak were conducted using 4 independent replication data sets that included 4006 nondemented elderly individuals. Results of the individual replication cohorts were combined by meta-analysis MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Episodic memory scores computed as the mean of the 2 standardized measures of Logical Memory IA and IIA RESULTS Heritability estimates indicated a significant genetic component for E EM (h2 = 0.21; SE = 0.09) Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed that EEM was linked to the 6q24 region (maximum logarithm of odds score, 3.64) Association analysis in LLFS families identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) nominally associated with EEM in the 40-megabase window encompassing the linkage peak Replication in one cohort identified a set of 26 SNPs associated with episodic memory (P ≤ 05) Meta-analysis of the 26 SNPs using the 4 independent replication cohorts found SN Ps rs9321334 and rs6902875 to be nominally significantly associated with episodic memory (P= .009 and P = .013. respectively). With meta-analysis restricted to individuals lacking an APOE ε4 allele. SNP rs6902875 became statistically significant (meta-analysis. P = 6.7 × 10−5) Haplotypeanalysis incorporating the

  6. Common cancers--genetics, origin, prevention, screening: Parts I and II.

    PubMed

    Schifeling, D J; Horton, J; Tafelski, T J

    1997-10-01

    Carcinogenesis is a stepwise process that occurs through mutations of cancer-related genes. Five or more genes must be mutated before malignant transformation occurs in most adult cancers; in some childhood cancers as few as two mutated genes may be sufficient. A rare inherited mutation of a critical gene may predestine cancer to occur in one or more sites. This germline mutation is present in virtually every cell in the body, except half of the germ cells, which do not contain the mutated gene in their haploid chromosome set. These and other genes have been used to piece together a puzzle of regulatory systems that govern cell division and proliferation, as well as apoptosis or programmed cell death. Mutations of these genes result not only in increased cell proliferation but also in diminished cell death. Most genetic changes that occur during carcinogenesis are not inherited or germline. They are acquired after birth and are called somatic mutations. A somatic mutation affects only the mutated cell and its progeny. Each time a cell divides, there is a chance of somatic mutation, and therefore there always is a low, background risk for cancer and other malignant lesions. A far more prevalent cause of cancer-related death in the United States is environmental exposure. Such exposure causes somatic mutations of cancer-related genes through direct damage to DNA or through alteration of proliferation or cell death, which enhances the baseline risk for mutation. As carcinogenesis becomes understood, interventions may be designed that selectively interfere in important steps. Screening for cancer is based on the premise that one can treat a patient for a cancer that has not spread from its primary site. Nevertheless, cancer screening is controversial and often confusing. Issues of costs, risks versus benefits, physical time and effort, and patient compliance all affect the clinician's view of screening, often to the extent that the true value of this approach to cancer

  7. Small-molecule inducers of Aβ-42 peptide production share a common mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Bettayeb, Karima; Oumata, Nassima; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Luo, Wenjie; Bustos, Victor; Galons, Hervé; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent; Flajolet, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The pathways leading specifically to the toxic Aβ42 peptide production, a key event in Alzheimer's disease (AD), are unknown. While searching for pathways that mediate pathological increases of Aβ42, we identified Aftin-4, a new compound that selectively and potently increases Aβ42 compared to DMSO (N2a cells: 7-fold; primary neurons: 4-fold; brain lysates: 2-fold) with an EC50 of 30 μM. These results were confirmed by ELISA and IP-WB. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified 3 proteins (VDAC1, prohibitin, and mitofilin) relevant to AD that interact with Aftin-4, but not with a structurally similar but inactive molecule. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Aftin-4 induces a reversible mitochondrial phenotype reminiscent of the one observed in AD brains. Sucrose gradient fractionation showed that Aftin-4 perturbs the subcellular localization of γ-secretase components and could, therefore, modify γ-secretase specificity by locally altering its membrane environment. Remarkably, Aftin-4 shares all these properties with two other “AD accelerator” compounds. In summary, treatment with three Aβ42 raising agents induced similar biochemical alterations that lead to comparable cellular phenotypes in vitro, suggesting a common mechanism of action involving three structural cellular targets.—Bettayeb, K., Oumata, N., Zhang, Y., Luo, W., Bustos, V., Galons, H., Greengard, P., Meijer, L., Flajolet, M. Small-molecule inducers of Aβ-42 peptide production share a common mechanism of action. PMID:22972917

  8. Distribution of common genetic subgroups in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in four developing countries.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rubina; Nancy, Nirmala; Naing, Win P; Ali, Sarah; Dar, Lalit; Khan, Baldip K; Padua, Rose A; Carr, Robert

    2010-07-15

    An international project was conducted to identify the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-specific fusion genes (ETV6-RUNX1,MLL-AF4,TCF3-PBX1, and BCR-ABL1) in developing countries to provide additional prognostic information at diagnosis. A total of 181 children with newly diagnosed ALL were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction at laboratories in India, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Sudan, following a common protocol. To our knowledge, this report is novel in its report from these countries, except India. Across the four countries, the ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion gene was present in only 5% of cases. All the positive samples were from children aged 1 to 10 years, in whom the prevalence of this fusion gene, which is associated with good prognosis, was 7.4% (9 out of 121 samples), a much lower rate than reported from Western populations. In the 18 ALL cases tested in Sudan, a notable excess of MLL-AF4 (17%) and BCR-ABL1 (22%) fusion genes was found. This study highlights the need for wider international surveys of the molecular epidemiology of ALL.

  9. A Next-Generation Sequencing Strategy for Evaluating the Most Common Genetic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Cristina; Jara-Acevedo, María; Corchete, Luis A; Castillo, David; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Sarasquete, María E; Puig, Noemí; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Prieto-Conde, María I; García-Álvarez, María; Chillón, María C; Balanzategui, Ana; Alcoceba, Miguel; Oriol, Albert; Rosiñol, Laura; Palomera, Luis; Teruel, Ana I; Lahuerta, Juan J; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, María V; Orfão, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F; González, Marcos; Gutiérrez, Norma C; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    Identification and characterization of genetic alterations are essential for diagnosis of multiple myeloma and may guide therapeutic decisions. Currently, genomic analysis of myeloma to cover the diverse range of alterations with prognostic impact requires fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and sequencing techniques, which are costly and labor intensive and require large numbers of plasma cells. To overcome these limitations, we designed a targeted-capture next-generation sequencing approach for one-step identification of IGH translocations, V(D)J clonal rearrangements, the IgH isotype, and somatic mutations to rapidly identify risk groups and specific targetable molecular lesions. Forty-eight newly diagnosed myeloma patients were tested with the panel, which included IGH and six genes that are recurrently mutated in myeloma: NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, TP53, MYC, and BRAF. We identified 14 of 17 IGH translocations previously detected by FISH and three confirmed translocations not detected by FISH, with the additional advantage of breakpoint identification, which can be used as a target for evaluating minimal residual disease. IgH subclass and V(D)J rearrangements were identified in 77% and 65% of patients, respectively. Mutation analysis revealed the presence of missense protein-coding alterations in at least one of the evaluating genes in 16 of 48 patients (33%). This method may represent a time- and cost-effective diagnostic method for the molecular characterization of multiple myeloma.

  10. Common genetic influences on negative emotionality and a general psychopathology factor in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Lahey, Benjamin B; van Hulle, Carol; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F; Rathouz, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity has supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a "bifactor"; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tested a prediction, derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially-at both phenotypic and genetic levels-with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9-17 years) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors.

  11. [Genetic diversity of rhizobia isolated from common legumes in the Karst area. Northwest Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; He, Xun-yang; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Ke-lin

    2015-12-01

    Legumes, with a strong resistance to the adverse environmental conditions, are pioneer plants in degraded habitats, and play an important role in ecosystem restoration. In this study, the nodulation characteristics of 24 legumes were surveyed in the Karst area of Northwest Guangxi. A total of 39 nodule samples were collected from 15 legumes, the DNA was extracted and the 16S rDNA and nifH gene were amplified. A phylogenetic tree was then constructed to analyze the genetic diversity of rhizobia. The results showed that 15 legumes were nodulated, of which 14 belonged to the Papilionoideae, one to the Mimosaceae, and none to the Caesalpinoideae. No nodules were found on some legumes that were reported as nodulated, which might result from soil water stress in Karst. BLAST result and phylogenetic analyse indicated that most of the legumes were associated with rhizobia that belonged to the genus Bradyrhizobium, with the exception of two samples from Callerya nitida that were associated with the genus Mesorhizobium. In the phylogenetic tree, the sequences obtained from the same plot or the sequences from the same host species clustered together in most cases. This finding suggested that host selection and the ecological environment are the major factors that influence the genotype of rhizobia.

  12. Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Fahmideh, Maral Adel; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schüz, Joachim; Röösli, Martin; Tynes, Tore; Grotzer, Michael A.; Johansen, Christoffer; Kuehni, Claudia E; Lannering, Birgitta; Prochazka, Michaela; Schmidt, Lisbeth S; Feychting, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk. The study is based on the largest series of PBT cases to date. Saliva DNA from 245 cases and 489 controls, aged 7–19 years at diagnosis/reference date, was genotyped for 68 SNPs. Data were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. The results showed EGFRrs730437 and EGFRrs11506105 may decrease susceptibility to PBTs, whereas ERCC1rs3212986 may increase risk of these tumors. Moreover, stratified analyses indicated CHAF1Ars243341, CHAF1Ars2992, and XRCC1rs25487 were associated with a decreased risk of astrocytoma subtype. Furthermore, an increased risk of non-astrocytoma subtype associated with EGFRrs9642393, EME1rs12450550, ATMrs170548, and GLTSCRrs1035938 as well as a decreased risk of this subtype associated with XRCC4rs7721416 and XRCC4rs2662242 were detected. This study indicates SNPs in EGFR, ERCC1, CHAF1A, XRCC1, EME1, ATM, GLTSCR1, and XRCC4 may be associated with the risk of PBTs. Therefore, cell cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways. PMID:27613841

  13. A genetic linkage map of the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion; Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Vijverberg, K; Van Der Hulst, R G M; Lindhout, P; Van Dijk, P J

    2004-02-01

    In this study, we mapped the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale, by using amplified fragment length polymorphism technology (AFLP) in 73 plants from a segregating population. Taraxacum serves as a model system to investigate the genetics, ecology, and evolution of apomixis. The genus includes sexual diploid as well as apomictic polyploid, mostly triploid, plants. Apomictic Taraxacum is diplosporous, parthenogenetic, and has autonomous endosperm formation. Previous studies have indicated that these three apomixis elements are controlled by more than one locus in Taraxacum and that diplospory inherits as a dominant, monogenic trait ( Ddd; DIP). A bulked segregant analysis provided 34 AFLP markers that were linked to DIP and were, together with two microsatellite markers, used for mapping the trait. The map length was 18.6 cM and markers were found on both sides of DIP, corresponding to 5.9 and 12.7 cM, respectively. None of the markers completely co-segregated with DIP. Eight markers were selected for PCR-based marker development, of which two were successfully converted. In contrast to all other mapping studies of apomeiosis to date, our results showed no evidence for suppression of recombination around the DIP locus in Taraxacum. No obvious evidence for sequence divergence between the DIP and non- DIP homologous loci was found, and no hemizygosity at the DIP locus was detected. These results may indicate that apomixis is relatively recent in Taraxacum.

  14. Common Genetic Variant in VIT Is Associated with Human Brain Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Tadayon, Sayed H.; Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Kahali, Pegah; Ansari Dezfouli, Mitra; Abbassian, Abdolhossein

    2016-01-01

    Brain asymmetry varies across individuals. However, genetic factors contributing to this normal variation are largely unknown. Here we studied variation of cortical surface area asymmetry in a large sample of subjects. We performed principal component analysis (PCA) to capture correlated asymmetry variation across cortical regions. We found that caudal and rostral anterior cingulate together account for a substantial part of asymmetry variation among individuals. To find SNPs associated with this subset of brain asymmetry variation we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in an independent cohort. We identified one SNP (rs11691187) that had genome-wide significant association (PCombined = 2.40e-08). The rs11691187 is in the first intron of VIT. In a follow-up analysis, we found that VIT gene expression is associated with brain asymmetry in six donors of the Allen Human Brain Atlas. Based on these findings we suggest that VIT contributes to normal brain asymmetry variation. Our results can shed light on disorders associated with altered brain asymmetry. PMID:27252636

  15. Common Genetic Variant in VIT Is Associated with Human Brain Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Tadayon, Sayed H; Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Kahali, Pegah; Ansari Dezfouli, Mitra; Abbassian, Abdolhossein

    2016-01-01

    Brain asymmetry varies across individuals. However, genetic factors contributing to this normal variation are largely unknown. Here we studied variation of cortical surface area asymmetry in a large sample of subjects. We performed principal component analysis (PCA) to capture correlated asymmetry variation across cortical regions. We found that caudal and rostral anterior cingulate together account for a substantial part of asymmetry variation among individuals. To find SNPs associated with this subset of brain asymmetry variation we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in an independent cohort. We identified one SNP (rs11691187) that had genome-wide significant association (P Combined = 2.40e-08). The rs11691187 is in the first intron of VIT. In a follow-up analysis, we found that VIT gene expression is associated with brain asymmetry in six donors of the Allen Human Brain Atlas. Based on these findings we suggest that VIT contributes to normal brain asymmetry variation. Our results can shed light on disorders associated with altered brain asymmetry.

  16. Maine Coon renal screening: ultrasonographical characterisation and preliminary genetic analysis for common genes in cats with renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Karine; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Lang, Johann; Leeb, Tosso

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of renal cysts and other renal abnormalities in purebred Maine Coon cats, and to characterise these through genetic typing. Voluntary pre-breeding screening programmes for polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are offered for this breed throughout Switzerland, Germany and other northern European countries. We performed a retrospective evaluation of Maine Coon screening for renal disease at one institution over an 8-year period. Renal ultrasonography was performed in 187 healthy Maine Coon cats. Renal changes were observed in 27 of these cats. Renal cysts were found in seven cats, and were mostly single and unilateral (6/7, 85.7%), small (mean 3.6 mm) and located at the corticomedullary junction (4/6, 66.7%). Sonographical changes indicating chronic kidney disease (CKD) were observed in 10/187 (5.3%) cats and changes of unknown significance were documented in 11/187 (5.9%) cats. All six cats genetically tested for PKD1 were negative for the mutation, and gene sequencing of these cats did not demonstrate any common genetic sequences. Cystic renal disease occurs with a low prevalence in Maine Coons and is unrelated to the PKD observed in Persians and related breeds. Ultrasonographical findings compatible with CKD are not uncommon in juvenile Maine Coons.

  17. Systems-level quantification of division timing reveals a common genetic architecture controlling asynchrony and fate asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; Wong, Ming-Kin; An, Xiaomeng; Guan, Daogang; Shao, Jiaofang; Ng, Hon Chun Kaoru; Ren, Xiaoliang; He, Kan; Liao, Jinyue; Ang, Yingjin; Chen, Long; Huang, Xiaotai; Yan, Bin; Xia, Yiji; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Chow, King Lau; Yan, Hong; Zhao, Zhongying

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of cell division timing is crucial for proper cell fate specification and tissue growth. However, the differential regulation of cell division timing across or within cell types during metazoan development remains poorly understood. To elucidate the systems-level genetic architecture coordinating division timing, we performed a high-content screening for genes whose depletion produced a significant reduction in the asynchrony of division between sister cells (ADS) compared to that of wild-type during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We quantified division timing using 3D time-lapse imaging followed by computer-aided lineage analysis. A total of 822 genes were selected for perturbation based on their conservation and known roles in development. Surprisingly, we find that cell fate determinants are not only essential for establishing fate asymmetry, but also are imperative for setting the ADS regardless of cellular context, indicating a common genetic architecture used by both cellular processes. The fate determinants demonstrate either coupled or separate regulation between the two processes. The temporal coordination appears to facilitate cell migration during fate specification or tissue growth. Our quantitative dataset with cellular resolution provides a resource for future analyses of the genetic control of spatial and temporal coordination during metazoan development. PMID:26063786

  18. Genetic progress resulting from forty-three years of breeding of the carioca common bean in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barili, L D; Vale, N M; Moura, L M; Paula, R G; Silva, F F; Carneiro, J E S

    2016-08-05

    We aimed to evaluate 40 common bean cultivars recommended by various Brazilian research institutions between 1970 and 2013 and estimate the genetic progress obtained for grain yield and other agronomic traits. Additionally, we proposed a bi-segmented nonlinear regression model to infer the year in which breeding began to show significant gains in Brazil. The experiment was carried out in Viçosa/MG and Coimbra/MG, in the dry and winter seasons of 2013. For this, a randomized complete block design with three replications was employed. The following traits were evaluated: number of pods per plant (NPP); number of seeds per pod (NSP); 1000-seed weight (W1000); grain yield (Yield); plant architecture (Arch); and grain aspect (GA). Genotypic means were estimated over years using linear mixed models, and genetic gains were estimated using bi-segmented nonlinear regression models. In summary, the methodology proposed in the present study indicated that bean breeding programs in Brazil began to influence Yield beginning in 1990, resulting in a gain of 6.74% per year (68.15 kg/ha per year). The years from which estimated genetic progress for NPP (5.62% per year), NSP (4.59% per year), W1000 (2.08% per year), and GA (1.36% per year) began to increase were 1994, 1990, 1989, and 1986, respectively.

  19. A genomic scan for habitual smoking in families of alcoholics: common and specific genetic factors in substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Bierut, Laura Jean; Rice, John P; Goate, Alison; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Nancy L; Foroud, Tatiana; Edenberg, Howard J; Cloninger, C Robert; Begleiter, Henri; Conneally, P Michael; Crowe, Raymond R; Hesselbrock, Victor; Li, Ting-Kai; Nurnberger, John I; Porjesz, Bernice; Schuckit, Marc A; Reich, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Smoking is a highly heritable, addictive disorder that commonly co-occurs with alcohol dependence. The purpose of this study is to perform a genomic screen for habitual smoking and comorbid habitual smoking and alcohol dependence in families from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). Subjects were assessed using the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism (SSAGA) to evaluate alcohol dependence and habitual smoking (smoking one pack per day or more for at least 6 months). Sixty seven multi-generational families with 154 independent sibling pairs affected with habitual smoking were genotyped in a screening sample. Analyses on 79 multi-generational families with 173 independent sibling pairs were repeated in a replication sample. Sibpair analyses were performed using ASPEX. Four chromosomal regions in the screening sample had increased allele sharing among sibling pairs for habitual smoking with a LOD score greater than 1 (chromosomes 5, 9, 11, and 21). The highest LOD score was on chromosome 9 (LOD = 2.02; allele sharing 58.9%). Four chromosomal regions also had modest evidence for linkage to the comorbid phenotype habitual smoking and alcohol dependence (chromosomes 1, 2, 11, 15); and the strongest finding was on chromosome 2 (LOD = 3.30; allele sharing 69.1%). Previously identified areas (chromosomes 1 and 7) implicated in the development of alcohol dependence in this same data set did not provide evidence for linkage to habitual smoking in the screening sample. In the replication data set, there continued to be increased allele sharing near peaks identified in the screening sample on chromosomes 2 and 9, but the results were modest. An area on chromosome 7, approximately 60 cM from a location previously identified in linkage analysis with alcohol dependence, had increased allele sharing for the comorbid habitual smoking and alcohol dependence. These data provide evidence of specific genetic regions involved in the

  20. [Genetic Structure of the Common Shrew Sorex araneus L. 1758 (Mammalia, Lipotyphla) in Continuous and Fragmented Areas].

    PubMed

    Grigoryeva, O O; Borisova, Yu M; Stakheev, V V; Balakirev, A E; Krivonogov, D M; Orlov, V N

    2015-06-01

    In this work the genetic variability of the common shrew populations Sorex araneus L. in Eastern Europe was studied via sequencing of the mitochondrial gene cyt b. A total of 82 sequences of the mitochondrial gene cyt b with a length of 953 basepairs were analyzed, including five chromosome races in a continuous area of the species in forest zone and two races in fragmented area in the steppe zone. Phylogeographic subdivision of the common shrew was not expressed, and there was no significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances in continuous areas. We did not acquire convincing evidence of the influence of narrow hybrid zones between chromosome races on the flow of neutral alleles. A significant p-distance (0.69 ± 0.27%) of geographically close populations of the chromosome race Neroosa indicates the formation of the karyotype of this race in the Pliocene or Pleistocene. In our work, the phylogeographic structure was determined more by species area fragmentation than by its karyotypic features.

  1. Metal uptake and acute toxicity in zebrafish: common mechanisms across multiple metals.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2011-10-01

    Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) were used to examine the mechanisms of action and acute toxicities of metals. Larvae had similar physiological responses and sensitivities to waterborne metals as adults. While cadmium and zinc have previously been shown to reduce Ca(2+) uptake, copper and nickel also decreased Ca(2+) uptake, suggesting that the epithelial transport of all these metals is through Ca(2+) pathways. However, exposure to cadmium, copper or nickel for up to 48 h had little or no effect on total whole body Ca(2+) levels, indicating that the reduction of Ca(2+) uptake is not the acute toxic mechanism of these metals. Instead, mortalities were effectively related to whole body Na(+), which decreased up to 39% after 48 h exposures to different metals around their respective 96 h LC50s. Decreases in whole body K(+) were also observed, although they were not as pronounced or frequent as Na(+) losses. None of the metals tested inhibited Na(+) uptake in zebrafish (Na(+) uptake was in fact increased with exposure) and the observed losses of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were proportional to the ionic gradients between the plasma and water, indicating diffusive ion loss with metal exposure. This study has shown that there is a common pathway for metal uptake and a common mechanism of acute toxicity across groups of metals in zebrafish. The disruption of ion uptake accompanying metal exposure does not appear to be responsible for the acute toxicity of metals, as has been previously suggested, but rather the toxicity is instead due to total ion loss (predominantly Na(+)).

  2. Molecular genetic analysis of grain protein content and flour whiteness degree using RILs in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xianyin; Wu, Ke; Zhao, Yan; Qian, Zhaoguo; Kong, Fanmei; Guo, Ying; Wang, Yingying; Li, Sishen

    2016-06-01

    Grain protein content (GPC) and flour whiteness degree (FWD) are important qualitative traits in common wheat. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for GPC and FWD was conducted using a set of 131 recombinant-inbred lines derived from the cross 'Chuan 35050 × Shannong 483' in six environmental conditions. A total of 22 putative QTLs (nine GPC and 13 FWD) were identified on 12 chromosomes with individual QTL explaining 4.5-34.0% phenotypic variation. Nine QTLs (40.9%) were detected in two or more environments. The colocated QTLs were on chromosomes 1B and 4B. Among the QTLs identified for GPC, QGpc.sdau-4A from the parent Shannong 483 represented some important favourable QTL alleles. QGpc.sdau-2A.1 and QFwd.sdau-2A.1 had a significant association with both GPC and FWD. The markers detected on top of QTL regions could be potential targets for marker-assisted selection.

  3. [Analysis of genetics and genomics of short tandem repeat loci commonly used in Kinship Testing].

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Tao; Guo, Hong; Zhao, Zhen-Min; Li, Li

    2008-06-01

    Since the foundation of FBI laboratory's Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) a decade ago, the 13 CODIS STR loci of the system as well as the recently developed Penta D, Penta E, D2S1338 and D19S433 loci have been widely used by kinship testing laboratories worldwide and have played an important role in the field of Kinship Testing and in construction of criminal database. This article systemically analyzed the characteristics of STR loci information and its genomic information analyzed through search of a variety of database including Webof Knowledge, Elsevier and Internet resources. The up-to-date application of the commonly used STR loci in recent years is also reviewed.

  4. Statistical Colocalization of Genetic Risk Variants for Related Autoimmune Diseases in the Context of Common Controls

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Mary D.; Guo, Hui; Burren, Oliver; Schofield, Ellen; Walker, Neil M.; Ban, Maria; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Ann; Eyre, Steve; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying whether potential causal variants for related diseases are shared can identify overlapping etiologies of multifactorial disorders. Colocalization methods disentangle shared and distinct causal variants. However, existing approaches require independent datasets. Here we extend two colocalization methods to allow for the shared control design commonly used in comparison of genome-wide association study results across diseases. Our analysis of four autoimmune diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis, revealed 90 regions that were associated with at least one disease, 33 (37%) of which with two or more disorders. Nevertheless, for 14 of these 33 shared regions there was evidence that causal variants differed. We identified novel disease associations in 11 regions previously associated with one or more of the other three disorders. Four of eight T1D-specific regions contained known type 2 diabetes candidate genes: COBL, GLIS3, RNLS and BCAR1, suggesting a shared cellular etiology. PMID:26053495

  5. Common genetic variants in metabolism and detoxification pathways and the risk of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Neta, Gila; Brenner, Alina V; Hutchinson, Amy; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Sturgis, Erich M; Xu, Li; Wheeler, William; Doody, Michele M; Chanock, Stephen J; Sigurdson, Alice J

    2012-01-01

    Relationships are unclear between polymorphisms in genes involved in metabolism and detoxification of various chemicals and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) risk as well as their potential modification by alcohol or tobacco intake. We evaluated associations between 1647 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 132 candidate genes/regions involved in metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds (Phase I/II, oxidative stress, and metal binding pathways) and PTC risk in 344 PTC cases and 452 controls. For 15 selected regions and their respective SNPs, we also assessed interaction with alcohol and tobacco use. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the main effect of SNPs (Ptrend) and interaction with alcohol/tobacco intake. Gene- and pathway-level associations and interactions (Pgene interaction) were evaluated by combining Ptrend values using the adaptive rank-truncated product method. While we found associations between PTC risk and nine SNPs (Ptrend≤0.01) and seven genes/regions (Pregion<0.05), none remained significant after correction for the false discovery rate. We found a significant interaction between UGT2B7 and NAT1 genes and alcohol intake (Pgene interaction=0.01 and 0.02 respectively) and between the CYP26B1 gene and tobacco intake (Pgene interaction=0.02). Our results are suggestive of interaction between the genetic polymorphisms in several detoxification genes and alcohol or tobacco intake on risk of PTC. Larger studies with improved exposure assessment should address potential modification of PTC risk by alcohol and tobacco intake to confirm or refute our findings. PMID:22389382

  6. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Sieh, Weiva; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Vierkant, Robert A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Thomsen, Lotte; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Schernhammer, Eva; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Amankwah, Ernest; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Ramus, Susan J.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Narod, Steven A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovaries where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant association was rs117104877 in BMAL1 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68–0.90, p = 5.59 × 10−4]. Functional analysis revealed a significant down regulation of BMAL1 expression following cMYC overexpression and increasing transformation in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells as well as alternative splicing of BMAL1 exons in ovarian and granulosa cells. These results suggest that variation in circadian genes, and specifically BMAL1, may be associated with risk of ovarian cancer, likely through disruption of hormonal pathways. PMID:26807442

  7. Common genetic variants associated with telomere length confer risk for neuroblastoma and other childhood cancers.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Whitehead, Todd P; de Smith, Adam J; Smirnov, Ivan V; Park, Minsun; Endicott, Alyson A; Francis, Stephen S; Codd, Veryan; Samani, Nilesh J; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant telomere lengthening is an important feature of cancer cells in adults and children. In addition to somatic mutations, germline polymorphisms in telomere maintenance genes impact telomere length. Whether these telomere-associated polymorphisms affect risk of childhood malignancies remains largely unexplored. We collected genome-wide data from three groups with pediatric malignancies [neuroblastoma (N = 1516), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (N = 958) and osteosarcoma (N = 660)] and three control populations (N = 6892). Using case-control comparisons, we analyzed eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes definitively associated with interindividual variation in leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in prior genome-wide association studies: ACYP2, TERC, NAF1, TERT, OBFC1, CTC1, ZNF208 and RTEL1 Six of these SNPs were associated (P < 0.05) with neuroblastoma risk, one with leukemia risk and one with osteosarcoma risk. The allele associated with longer LTL increased cancer risk for all these significantly associated SNPs. Using a weighted linear combination of the eight LTL-associated SNPs, we observed that neuroblastoma patients were predisposed to longer LTL than controls, with each standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL associated with a 1.15-fold increased odds of neuroblastoma (95%CI = 1.09-1.22; P = 7.9×10(-7)). This effect was more pronounced in adolescent-onset neuroblastoma patients (OR = 1.46; 95%CI = 1.03-2.08). A one standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL was more weakly associated with osteosarcoma risk (OR = 1.10; 95%CI = 1.01-1.19; P = 0.017) and leukemia risk (OR = 1.07; 95%CI = 1.00-1.14; P = 0.044), specifically for leukemia patients who relapsed (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 1.01-1.40; P = 0.043). These results indicate that genetic predisposition to longer LTL is a newly identified risk factor for neuroblastoma and potentially for other cancers of childhood.

  8. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC).

    PubMed

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja Kh; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Sieh, Weiva; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Vierkant, Robert A; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Thomsen, Lotte; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Schernhammer, Eva; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Amankwah, Ernest; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Kelemen, Linda E; Ramus, Susan J; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Goode, Ellen L; Narod, Steven A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovaries where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant association was rs117104877 in BMAL1 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68-0.90, p = 5.59 × 10(-4)]. Functional analysis revealed a significant down regulation of BMAL1 expression following cMYC overexpression and increasing transformation in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells as well as alternative splicing of BMAL1 exons in ovarian and granulosa cells. These results suggest that variation in circadian genes, and specifically BMAL1, may be associated with risk of ovarian cancer, likely through disruption of hormonal pathways.

  9. SNP discovery in common bean by restriction-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing for genetic diversity and population structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Valdisser, Paula Arielle M R; Pappas, Georgios J; de Menezes, Ivandilson P P; Müller, Bárbara S F; Pereira, Wendell J; Narciso, Marcelo G; Brondani, Claudio; Souza, Thiago L P O; Borba, Tereza C O; Vianello, Rosana P

    2016-06-01

    Researchers have made great advances into the development and application of genomic approaches for common beans, creating opportunities to driving more real and applicable strategies for sustainable management of the genetic resource towards plant breeding. This work provides useful polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for high-throughput common bean genotyping developed by RAD (restriction site-associated DNA) sequencing. The RAD tags were generated from DNA pooled from 12 common bean genotypes, including breeding lines of different gene pools and market classes. The aligned sequences identified 23,748 putative RAD-SNPs, of which 3357 were adequate for genotyping; 1032 RAD-SNPs with the highest ADT (assay design tool) score are presented in this article. The RAD-SNPs were structurally annotated in different coding (47.00 %) and non-coding (53.00 %) sequence components of genes. A subset of 384 RAD-SNPs with broad genome distribution was used to genotype a diverse panel of 95 common bean germplasms and revealed a successful amplification rate of 96.6 %, showing 73 % of polymorphic SNPs within the Andean group and 83 % in the Mesoamerican group. A slightly increased He (0.161, n = 21) value was estimated for the Andean gene pool, compared to the Mesoamerican group (0.156, n = 74). For the linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, from a group of 580 SNPs (289 RAD-SNPs and 291 BARC-SNPs) genotyped for the same set of genotypes, 70.2 % were in LD, decreasing to 0.10 %in the Andean group and 0.77 % in the Mesoamerican group. Haplotype patterns spanning 310 Mb of the genome (60 %) were characterized in samples from different origins. However, the haplotype frameworks were under-represented for the Andean (7.85 %) and Mesoamerican (5.55 %) gene pools separately. In conclusion, RAD sequencing allowed the discovery of hundreds of useful SNPs for broad genetic analysis of common bean germplasm. From now, this approach provides an excellent panel

  10. Conservation genetics of a rare Gerbil species: a comparison of the population genetic structures and demographic histories of the locally rare Pygmy Gerbil and the common Anderson's Gerbil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in evolutionary biology is identifying rare species and devising management plans to protect them while also sustaining their genetic diversity. However, in attempting a broad understanding of rarity, single-species studies provide limited insights because they do not reveal whether the factors that affect rare species differ from those that affect more common species. To illustrate this important concept and to arrive at a better understanding of the form of rarity characterizing the rare Gerbillus henleyi, we explored its population genetic structure alongside that of the locally common Gerbillus andersoni allenbyi. We trapped gerbils in several locations in Israel's western and inner Negev sand dunes. We then extracted DNA from ear samples, and amplified two mitochondrial sequences: the control region (CR) and the cytochrome oxidase 2 gene (CO2). Results Nucleotide diversity was low for all sequences, especially for the CR of G. a. allenbyi, which showed no diversity. We could not detect any significant population genetic structure in G. henleyi. In contrast, G. a. allenbyi's CO2 sequence showed significant population genetic structure. Pairwise PhiPT comparisons showed low values for G. henleyi but high values for G. a. allenbyi. Analysis of the species' demographic history indicated that G. henleyi's population size has not changed recently, and is under the influence of an ongoing bottleneck. The same analysis for G. a. allenbyi showed that this species has undergone a recent population expansion. Conclusions Comparing the two species, the populations of G. a. allenbyi are more isolated from each other, likely due to the high habitat specificity characterizing this species. The bottleneck pattern found in G. henleyi may be the result of competition with larger gerbil species. This result, together with the broad habitat use and high turnover rate characterizing G. henleyi, may explain the low level of differentiation

  11. Mechanical response of common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seeds under quasi-static compression: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Hasseldine, Benjamin P J; Gao, Chao; Collins, Joseph M; Jung, Hyun-Do; Jang, Tae-Sik; Song, Juha; Li, Yaning

    2017-01-06

    The common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seedcoat has a fascinating complex microstructure, with jigsaw puzzle-like epidermis cells articulated via wavy intercellular sutures to form a compact layer to protect the kernel inside. However, little research has been conducted on linking the microstructure details with the overall mechanical response of this interesting biological composite. To this end, an integrated experimental-numerical-analytical investigation was conducted to both characterize the microstructure and ascertain the microscale mechanical properties and to test the overall response of kernels and full seeds under macroscale quasi-static compression. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to examine the microstructure of the outer seedcoat and nanoindentation was performed to obtain the material properties of the seedcoat hard phase material. A multiscale computational strategy was applied to link the microstructure to the macroscale response of the seed. First, the effective anisotropic mechanical properties of the seedcoat were obtained from finite element (FE) simulations of a microscale representative volume element (RVE), which were further verified from sophisticated analytical models. Then, macroscale FE models of the individual kernel and full seed were developed. Good agreement between the compression experiments and FE simulations were obtained for both the kernel and the full seed. The results revealed the anisotropic property and the protective function of the seedcoat, and showed that the sutures of the seedcoat play an important role in transmitting and distributing loads in responding to external compression.

  12. Substrate Oxidation by Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase: EVIDENCE FOR A COMMON REACTION MECHANISM.

    PubMed

    Booth, Elizabeth S; Basran, Jaswir; Lee, Michael; Handa, Sandeep; Raven, Emma L

    2015-12-25

    The kynurenine pathway is the major route of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) catabolism in biology, leading ultimately to the formation of NAD(+). The initial and rate-limiting step of the kynurenine pathway involves oxidation of L-Trp to N-formylkynurenine. This is an O2-dependent process and catalyzed by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. More than 60 years after these dioxygenase enzymes were first isolated (Kotake, Y., and Masayama, I. (1936) Z. Physiol. Chem. 243, 237-244), the mechanism of the reaction is not established. We examined the mechanism of substrate oxidation for a series of substituted tryptophan analogues by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. We observed formation of a transient intermediate, assigned as a Compound II (ferryl) species, during oxidation of L-Trp, 1-methyl-L-Trp, and a number of other substrate analogues. The data are consistent with a common reaction mechanism for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-catalyzed oxidation of tryptophan and other tryptophan analogues.

  13. Epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis and febrile seizures linked by common genetic variation around SCN1A

    PubMed Central

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B.; Matarin, Mar; Leu, Costin; Novy, Jan; Tostevin, Anna; Leal, Bárbara; Hessel, Ellen V. S.; Hallmann, Kerstin; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Alhusaini, Saud; Doherty, Colin P.; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.; Zumsteg, Dominik; Duncan, Susan; Kälviäinen, Reetta K.; Eriksson, Kai J.; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Pandolfo, Massimo; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Schlachter, Kurt; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Zimprich, Fritz; Théâtre, Emilie; Smith, Colin; O’Brien, Terence J.; Meng Tan, K.; Petrovski, Slave; Robbiano, Angela; Paravidino, Roberta; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Sperling, Michael R.; Buono, Russell J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chaves, João; Costa, Paulo P.; Silva, Berta M.; da Silva, António M.; de Graan, Pierre N. E.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Becker, Albert; Schoch, Susanne; von Lehe, Marec; Reif, Philipp S.; Rosenow, Felix; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Rössler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Hamer, Hajo M.; Kobow, Katja; Coras, Roland; Blumcke, Ingmar; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Weale, Michael E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Kunz, Wolfram S.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy comprises several syndromes, amongst the most common being mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis are typically drug-resistant, and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is frequently associated with important co-morbidities, mandating the search for better understanding and treatment. The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is unknown, but there is an association with childhood febrile seizures. Several rarer epilepsies featuring febrile seizures are caused by mutations in SCN1A, which encodes a brain-expressed sodium channel subunit targeted by many anti-epileptic drugs. We undertook a genome-wide association study in 1018 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 7552 control subjects, with validation in an independent sample set comprising 959 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 3591 control subjects. To dissect out variants related to a history of febrile seizures, we tested cases with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with (overall n = 757) and without (overall n = 803) a history of febrile seizures. Meta-analysis revealed a genome-wide significant association for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures at the sodium channel gene cluster on chromosome 2q24.3 [rs7587026, within an intron of the SCN1A gene, P = 3.36 × 10−9, odds ratio (A) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.26–1.59]. In a cohort of 172 individuals with febrile seizures, who did not develop epilepsy during prospective follow-up to age 13 years, and 6456 controls, no association was found for rs7587026 and febrile seizures. These findings suggest SCN1A involvement in a common epilepsy syndrome, give new direction to biological understanding of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures

  14. Sixty-five common genetic variants and prediction of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Talmud, Philippa J; Cooper, Jackie A; Morris, Richard W; Dudbridge, Frank; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; White, Jon; McLachlan, Stela; Zabaneh, Delilah; Wong, Andrew; Ong, Ken K; Gaunt, Tom; Holmes, Michael V; Lawlor, Debbie A; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Wannamethee, S Goya; Strachan, Mark W J; Kumari, Meena; Whittaker, John C; Drenos, Fotios; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon D; Price, Jacqueline F; Humphries, Steve E

    2015-05-01

    We developed a 65 type 2 diabetes (T2D) variant-weighted gene score to examine the impact on T2D risk assessment in a U.K.-based consortium of prospective studies, with subjects initially free from T2D (N = 13,294; 37.3% women; mean age 58.5 [38-99] years). We compared the performance of the gene score with the phenotypically derived Framingham Offspring Study T2D risk model and then the two in combination. Over the median 10 years of follow-up, 804 participants developed T2D. The odds ratio for T2D (top vs. bottom quintiles of gene score) was 2.70 (95% CI 2.12-3.43). With a 10% false-positive rate, the genetic score alone detected 19.9% incident cases, the Framingham risk model 30.7%, and together 37.3%. The respective area under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.60 (95% CI 0.58-0.62), 0.75 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.77), and 0.76 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78). The combined risk score net reclassification improvement (NRI) was 8.1% (5.0 to 11.2; P = 3.31 × 10(-7)). While BMI stratification into tertiles influenced the NRI (BMI ≤24.5 kg/m(2), 27.6% [95% CI 17.7-37.5], P = 4.82 × 10(-8); 24.5-27.5 kg/m(2), 11.6% [95% CI 5.8-17.4], P = 9.88 × 10(-5); >27.5 kg/m(2), 2.6% [95% CI -1.4 to 6.6], P = 0.20), age categories did not. The addition of the gene score to a phenotypic risk model leads to a potentially clinically important improvement in discrimination of incident T2D.

  15. Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov., an indigenous N2-fixing symbiont of the Ecuadorian common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genetic pool.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Martins, Talita Busulini; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Marçon Delamuta, Jakeline Renata; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-09-01

    There are two major centres of genetic diversification of common bean (Phaseolus vilgaris L.), the Mesoamerican and the Andean, and the legume is capable of establishing nitrogen-fixing symbioses with several rhizobia; Rhizobium etli seems to be the dominant species in both centres. Another genetic pool of common bean, in Peru and Ecuador, is receiving increasing attention, and studies of microsymbionts from the region can help to increase our knowledge about coevolution of this symbiosis. We have previously reported several putative new lineages from this region and here present data indicating that strains belonging to one of them, PEL4, represent a novel species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, PEL4 strains are positioned in the Rhizobium phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade, but show unique properties in several morphological, physiological and biochemical analyses, as well as in BOX-PCR profiles ( < 75% similarity with related species). PEL4 strains also differed from related species based on multilocus sequence analysis of three housekeeping genes (glnII, gyrB and recA). Nucleotide identities of the three concatenated genes between PEL4 strains and related species ranged from 91.8 to 94.2%, being highest with Rhizobium fabae. DNA-DNA hybridization ( < 47% DNA relatedness) and average nucleotide identity values of the whole genomes ( < 90.2%) also supported the novel species status. The PEL4 strains were effective in nodulating and fixing N2 with common beans. The data supported the view that PEL4 strains represent a novel species, Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov. The type strain is CNPSo 671(T) ( = UMR 1450(T) = PIMAMPIRS I 5(T) = LMG 27578(T)).

  16. Syntenic relationships among legumes revealed using a gene-based genetic linkage map of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    McConnell, Melody; Mamidi, Sujan; Lee, Rian; Chikara, Shireen; Rossi, Monica; Papa, Roberto; McClean, Phillip

    2010-10-01

    Molecular linkage maps are an important tool for gene discovery and cloning, crop improvement, further genetic studies, studies on diversity and evolutionary history, and cross-species comparisons. Linkage maps differ in both the type of marker and type of population used. In this study, gene-based markers were used for mapping in a recombinant inbred (RI) population of Phaseolus vulgaris L. P. vulgaris, common dry bean, is an important food source, economic product, and model organism for the legumes. Gene-based markers were developed that corresponded to genes controlling mutant phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana, genes undergoing selection during domestication in maize, and genes that function in a biochemical pathway in A. thaliana. Sequence information, including introns and 3' UTR, was generated for over 550 genes in the two genotypes of P. vulgaris. Over 1,800 single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels were found, 300 of which were screened in the RI population. The resulting LOD 2.0 map is 1,545 cM in length and consists of 275 gene-based and previously mapped core markers. An additional 153 markers that mapped at LOD <1.0 were placed in genetic bins. By screening the parents of other mapping populations, it was determined that the markers were useful for other common Mesoamerican × Andean mapping populations. The location of the mapped genes relative to their homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana (At), Medicago truncatula (Mt), and Lotus japonicus (Lj) were determine by using a tblastx analysis with the current psedouchromosome builds for each of the species. While only short blocks of synteny were observed with At, large-scale macrosyntenic blocks were observed with Mt and Lj. By using Mt and Lj as bridging species, the syntenic relationship between the common bean and peanut was inferred.

  17. Rapid SAR target modeling through genetic inheritance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Jerzy; Pachowicz, Peter W.; Vafaie, Halleh

    1997-07-01

    The paper presents a methodology and GETP experimental system for rapid SAR target signature generation from limited initial sensory data. The methodology exploits and integrates the following four processes: (1) analysis of initial SAR image signatures and their transformation into higher-level blob representation, (2) blob modeling, (3) genetic inheritance modeling to generate new instances of a target model in blob representation, and (4) synthesis of new SAR signatures from genetically evolved blob data. The GETP system takes several SAR signatures of the target and transforms each signature into more general scattered blob graphs, where each blob represents local energy cluster. A single graph node is describe by blob relative position, confidence, and iconic data. Graph data is forwarded to the genetic modeling process while blob image is stored in a catalog. Genetic inheritance is applied to the initial population of graph data. New graph models of the target are generated and evaluated. Selected graph variations are forwarded to the synthesis process. The synthesis process restores target signature from a given graph and a catalog of blobs. The background is synthesized to complement the signature. Initial experimental results are illustrated with 64 X 32 image sections of a tank.

  18. Genetic mechanisms of Maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize resistance to viruses has been well-characterized at the genetic level, and loci responsible for resistance to potyviruses including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), have been mapped in several ge...

  19. Genetic effects of common polymorphisms in estrogen receptor alpha gene on osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hecheng; Wu, Weiqian; Yang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jianguo; Gong, Yubao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene has been implicated in the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA). However, the results are conflicting. We assessed the association of three common ESR1 polymorphisms, rs2234693, rs9340799 and rs2228480, with OA in this meta-analysis. Methods: A comprehensive search was performed to identify related studies. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using fixed or random effects model. Results: 15 studies (7036 cases and 9669 controls) for rs2234693 polymorphism, 14 studies (3904 cases and 6991 controls) for rs9340799 and 3 studies (331 cases and 619 controls) for rs2228480 polymorphism were identified. The final results indicated that the G allele in ESR1 rs9340799 was associated with decreased OA risk (GG+GA vs. AA: OR=0.878, 95% CI=0.792-0.972, P=0.012; G vs. A: OR=0.902, 95% CI=0.836-0.975, P=0.009). The A allele in rs2228480 might be associated with increased OA risk. But no significant association of rs2234693 polymorphism with OA susceptibility was observed. Conclusions: This meta-analysis indicates rs9340799 and rs2228480 rather than rs2234693 polymorphisms are associated with the incidence of OA. Some stable associations should be further confirmed in future. PMID:26550281

  20. Molecular analysis of common polymorphisms within the human Tyrosinase locus and genetic association with pigmentation traits

    PubMed Central

    Jagirdar, Kasturee; Smit, Darren J.; Ainger, Stephen A.; Lee, Katie J.; Brown, Darren L.; Chapman, Brett; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Stow, Jennifer L.; Duffy, David L.; Sturm, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We have compared the melanogenic activities of cultured melanocytes carrying two common TYR alleles as homozygous 192S-402R wildtype, heterozygous and homozygous variant. This includes assays of TYR protein, DOPAoxidase activity, glycosylation and temperature sensitivity of protein and DOPAoxidase levels. Homozygous wildtype strains on average had higher levels of TYR protein and enzyme activity than other genotypes. Homozygous 402Q/Q melanocytes produced significantly less TYR protein, displayed altered trafficking and glycosylation, with reduced DOPAoxidase. However, near wildtype TYR activity levels could be recovered at lower growth temperature. In a sample population from Southeast Queensland these two polymorphisms were present on four TYR haplotypes, designated as WT 192S-402R, 192Y-402R, 192S-402Q with a double variant 192Y-402Q of low frequency at 1.9%. Based on cell culture findings and haplotype associations, we have used an additive model to assess the penetrance of the ten possible TYR genotypes derived from the combination of these haplotypes. PMID:24739399

  1. On-going elucidation of mechanisms of primate specific synaptic spine development using the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2015-04-01

    Recently, pathophysiology of human psychiatry originates from abnormal numbers of synapses/spines. There are generally two-types of development of spines from birth depending on species. One is, after birth, synaptogenesis occurs, and there is a clear peak of spines, and then rapidly pruning occurring, which are called "overshoot-type" of development of synapses/spines. Primates including human belong to this type. In other type including rodents, even after a peak, general number of spines does not decrease so much. Although these differences, most of human psychiatric models have been genetic modified rodents. Now, transgenic primate (the common marmoset) became available. In near future, we can, examine pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders using this animal model, which is closer to human being. To begin with this endeavor, we should know how synapses/spines of normal marmosets developed, and molecular mechanisms of "overshoot-type" of spine development, which human being also shows. Here, we will present our recent effort to explore these questions, and future experiments will be discussed.

  2. Neuronal mechanisms of reconsolidation of an associative aversive skill to food in the common snail.

    PubMed

    Kozyrev, S A; Nikitin, V P

    2010-09-01

    We have previously established that reactivation of a long-term memory "trace" during exposure to a protein synthesis inhibitor in common snails trained to refuse a defined foodstuff impairs reproduction of this skill. In the present studies, the cellular mechanisms of memory reactivation were studied in defensive behavior command neurons LPl1 and RPl1 in snails. In the first series of experiments, the mechanisms of induction of amnesia were studied in semi-intact preparations 24 h after training of snails to refuse one foodstuff. These experiments showed that depression of the synaptic response to the conditioned stimulus developed 2.5 h after reminding (presentation of the conditioned food stimulus) on the background of exposure to cycloheximide. The second series of experiments addressed the neuronal mechanisms of development of amnesia. Animals were trained to refuse two foodstuffs. The snails were injected with cycloheximide 24 h after training and were subjected to the reminding procedure using one of the conditioned food stimuli. Semi-intact preparations were made 1, 3, 7, and 15 days after cycloheximide and the reminder. Responses to the conditioned food stimulus used as the reminder gradually decreased on days 1, 3, and 7. On days 7 and 15, measures of the responses to this conditioned stimulus were no different from those to the differential signal and were significantly smaller than responses to the second conditioned stimulus, which was not used as reminder. It is suggested that one of the cellular mechanisms of amnesia following impairment of long-term memory reconsolidation in snails consists of a specific, protein synthesis-dependent change in the efficiency of the synaptic connections of command neurons LPl1 and RPl1.

  3. Leaf mechanical resistance in plant trait databases: comparing the results of two common measurement methods

    PubMed Central

    Enrico, Lucas; Díaz, Sandra; Westoby, Mark; Rice, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims The influence of leaf mechanical properties on local ecosystem processes, such as trophic transfer, decomposition and nutrient cycling, has resulted in a growing interest in including leaf mechanical resistance in large-scale databases of plant functional traits. ‘Specific work to shear’ and ‘force to tear’ are two properties commonly used to describe mechanical resistance (toughness or strength) of leaves. Two methodologies have been widely used to measure them across large datasets. This study aimed to assess correlations and standardization between the two methods, as measured by two widely used apparatuses, in order to inter-convert existing data in those global datasets. Methods Specific work to shear (WSS) and force to tear (FT) were measured in leaves of 72 species from south-eastern Australia. The measurements were made including and excluding midribs. Relationships between the variables were tested by Spearman correlations and ordinary least square regressions. Key Results A positive and significant correlation was found between the methods, but coefficients varied according to the inclusion or exclusion of the midrib in the measurements. Equations for prediction varied according to leaf venation pattern. A positive and significant (r = 0·90, P < 0·0001) correlation was also found between WSS values for fresh and rehydrated leaves, which is considered to be of practical relevance. Conclusions In the context of broad-scale ecological hypotheses and used within the constraints recommended here, leaf mechanical resistance data obtained with both methodologies could be pooled together into a single coarser variable, using the equations provided in this paper. However, more detailed datasets of FT cannot be safely filled in with estimations based on WSS, or vice versa. In addition, WSS values of green leaves can be predicted with good accuracy from WSS of rehydrated leaves of the same species. PMID:26530215

  4. Multiple forms of LTP in hippocampal CA3 neurons use a common postsynaptic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yeckel, M F; Kapur, A; Johnston, D

    1999-07-01

    We investigated long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber synapses on CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. Using Ca2+ imaging techniques, we show here that when postsynaptic Ca2+ was sufficiently buffered so that [Ca2+]i did not rise during synaptic stimulation, the induction of mossy fiber LTP was prevented. In addition, induction of mossy fiber LTP was suppressed by postsynaptic injection of a peptide inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Finally, when ionotropic glutamate receptors were blocked, LTP depended on the postsynaptic release of Ca2+ from internal stores triggered by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. These results support the conclusion that mossy fiber LTP and LTP at other hippocampal synapses share a common induction mechanism involving an initial rise in postsynaptic [Ca2+].

  5. Surface transport properties of reticulopodia: do intracellular and extracellular motility share a common mechanism?

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; Israel, H A; McGee-Russell, S M; Rieder, C L

    1984-12-01

    The reticulopodial networks of the foraminiferan protozoans Allogromia sp., strain NF, and A. laticollaris display rapid (up to 11 microns/second) and bidirectional saltatory transport of membrane surface markers (polystyrene microspheres). Electron microscopy shows that microspheres adhere directly to the reticulopodial surface glycocalyx. A videomicroscopic analysis of this phenomenon reveals that microsphere movement is typically independent of pseudopod extension/withdrawal and that particles of different sizes and surface properties display similar motile characteristics. The motile properties of surface-associated microspheres appear identical to those of saltating intracellular organelles. Indeed, in some instances the surface-attached microspheres appear transiently linked in motion to these underlying organelles. Our observations suggest that, in reticulopodia, surface transport of microspheres and intracellular transport of organelles are driven by a common mechanism.

  6. Cannabinoid and heroin activation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission by a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanda, G; Pontieri, F E; Di Chiara, G

    1997-06-27

    The effects of the active ingredient of Cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), and of the highly addictive drug heroin on in vivo dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens were compared in Sprague-Dawley rats by brain microdialysis. Delta9-THC and heroin increased extracellular dopamine concentrations selectively in the shell of the nucleus accumbens; these effects were mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2. SR141716A, an antagonist of central cannabinoid receptors, prevented the effects of Delta9-THC but not those of heroin. Naloxone, a generic opioid antagonist, administered systemically, or naloxonazine, an antagonist of micro1 opioid receptors, infused into the ventral tegmentum, prevented the action of cannabinoids and heroin on dopamine transmission. Thus, Delta9-THC and heroin exert similar effects on mesolimbic dopamine transmission through a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism located in the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum.

  7. Impaired fear extinction learning and cortico-amygdala circuit abnormalities in a common genetic mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Kathryn; Whittle, Nigel; Juhasz, Jaynann; Norcross, Maxine; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J; Singewald, Nicolas; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-08-06

    Fear extinction is a form of new learning that results in the inhibition of conditioned fear. Trait deficits in fear extinction are a risk factor for anxiety disorders. There are few examples of naturally occurring animal models of impaired extinction. The present study compared fear extinction in a panel of inbred mouse strains. This strain survey revealed an impairment in fear extinction in 129/SvImJ (129S1). The phenotypic specificity of this deficit was evaluated by comparing 129S1 and C57BL/6J for one-trial and multitrial fear conditioning, nociception, and extinction of conditioned taste aversion and an appetitive instrumental response. 129S1 were tested for sensitivity to the extinction-facilitating effects of extended training, as well as d-cycloserine and yohimbine treatment. To elucidate the neural basis of impaired 129S1 fear extinction, c-Fos and Zif268 expression was mapped after extinction recall. Results showed that impaired fear extinction in 129S1 was unrelated to altered fear conditioning or nociception, and was dissociable from intact appetitive extinction. Yohimbine treatment facilitated extinction in 129S1, but neither extended extinction training nor d-cycloserine treatment improved 129S1 extinction. After extinction recall, 129S1 showed reduced c-Fos and Zif268 expression in the infralimbic cortex and basolateral amygdala, and elevated c-Fos or Zif268 expression in central nucleus of the amygdala and medial paracapsular intercalated cell mass, relative to C57BL/6J. Collectively, these data demonstrate a deficit in fear extinction in 129S1 associated with a failure to properly engage corticolimbic extinction circuitry. This common inbred strain provides a novel model for studying impaired fear extinction in anxiety disorders.

  8. Impaired fear extinction learning and cortico-amygdala circuit abnormalities in a common genetic mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Kathryn; Whittle, Nigel; Juhasz, Jaynann; Norcross, Maxine; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Singewald, Nicolas; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Fear extinction is a form of new learning that results in the inhibition of conditioned fear. Trait deficits in fear extinction are a risk factor for anxiety disorders. There are few examples of naturally-occurring animal models of impaired extinction. The present study compared fear extinction in a panel of inbred mouse strains. This strain survey revealed an impairment in fear extinction in 129/SvImJ (129S1). The phenotypic specificity of this deficit was evaluated by comparing 129S1 and C57BL/6J for one-trial and multi-trial fear conditioning, nociception, and extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) and an appetitive instrumental response. 129S1 were tested for sensitivity to the extinction-facilitating effects of extended training, as well as D-cycloserine and yohimbine treatment. To elucidate the neural basis of impaired 129S1 fear extinction, c-Fos and Zif268 expression was mapped following extinction recall. Results showed that impaired fear extinction in 129S1 was unrelated to altered fear conditioning or nociception, and was dissociable from intact appetitive extinction. Yohimbine treatment facilitated extinction in 129S1, but neither extended extinction training nor D-cycloserine treatment improved 129S1 extinction. Following extinction recall, 129S1 showed reduced c-Fos and Zif268 expression in the infralimbic cortex and basolateral amygdala, and elevated c-Fos or Zif268 expression in central nucleus of the amygdala and medial paracapsular intercalated cell mass, relative to C57BL/6J. Collectively, these data demonstrate a deficit in fear extinction in 129S1 associated with a failure to properly engage corticolimbic extinction circuitry. This common inbred strain provides a novel model for studying impaired fear extinction in anxiety disorders. PMID:18685032

  9. Cerebral ABC transporter-common mechanisms may modulate neurodegenerative diseases and depression in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Pahnke, Jens; Fröhlich, Christina; Paarmann, Kristin; Krohn, Markus; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Årsland, Dag; Winblad, Bengt

    2014-11-01

    In elderly subjects, depression and dementia often coincide but the actual reason is currently unknown. Does a causal link exist or is it just a reactive effect of the knowledge to suffer from dementia? The ABC transporter superfamily may represent a causal link between these mental disorders. Since the transporters ABCB1 and ABCC1 have been discovered as major β-amyloid-exporting molecules at the blood-brain barrier and ABCC1 was found to be directly activated by St. John's wort (SJW), depression and dementia certainly share an important pathophysiologic link. It was recognized that herbal anti-depressant formulations made from SJW are at least as effective for the treatment of unipolar depression in old age as classical pharmacotherapy, while having fewer side effects (Cochrane reports, 2008). SJW is known to activate various metabolizing and transport systems in the body, with cytochrome P450 enzymes and ABC transporters being most important. Does the treatment of depression in elderly subjects using pharmacological compounds or phytomedical extracts target a mechanism that also accounts for peptide storage in Alzheimer's disease and perhaps other proteopathies of the brain? In this review we summarize recent data that point to a common mechanism and present the first promising causal treatment results of demented elderly subjects with distinct SJW extracts. Insufficient trans-barrier clearance may indeed present a common problem in all the proteopathies of the brain where toxic peptides are deposited in a location-specific manner. Thus, activation of efflux molecules holds promise for future treatment of this large group of devastating disorders.

  10. Testing Multiple Psychological Processes for Common Neural Mechanisms Using EEG and Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R

    2016-03-08

    Temporal independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to an electrophysiological signal mixture (such as an EEG recording) to disentangle the independent neural source signals-independent components-underlying said signal mixture. When applied to scalp EEG, ICA is most commonly used either as a pre-processing step (e.g., to isolate physiological processes from non-physiological artifacts), or as a data-reduction step (i.e., to focus on one specific neural process with increased signal-to-noise ratio). However, ICA can be used in an even more powerful way that fundamentally expands the inferential utility of scalp EEG. The core assumption of EEG-ICA-namely, that individual independent components represent separable neural processes-can be leveraged to derive the following inferential logic: If a specific independent component shows activity related to multiple psychological processes within the same dataset (e.g., elicited by different experimental events), it follows that those psychological processes involve a common, non-separable neural mechanism. As such, this logic allows testing a class of hypotheses that is beyond the reach of regular EEG analyses techniques, thereby crucially increasing the inferential utility of the EEG. In the current article, this logic will be referred to as the 'common independent process identification' (CIPI) approach. This article aims to provide a tutorial into the application of this powerful approach, targeted at researchers that have a basic understanding of standard EEG analysis. Furthermore, the article aims to exemplify the usage of CIPI by outlining recent studies that successfully applied this approach to test neural theories of mental functions.

  11. Common Garden Experiment Reveals Genetic Control of Phenotypic Divergence between Swamp Sparrow Subspecies That Lack Divergence in Neutral Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ballentine, Barbara; Greenberg, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Background Adaptive divergence between populations in the face of strong selection on key traits can lead to morphological divergence between populations without concomitant divergence in neutral DNA. Thus, the practice of identifying genetically distinct populations based on divergence in neutral DNA may lead to a taxonomy that ignores evolutionarily important, rapidly evolving, locally-adapted populations. Providing evidence for a genetic basis of morphological divergence between rapidly evolving populations that lack divergence in selectively neutral DNA will not only inform conservation efforts but also provide insight into the mechanisms of the early processes of speciation. The coastal plain swamp sparrow, a recent colonist of tidal marsh habitat, differs from conspecific populations in a variety of phenotypic traits yet remains undifferentiated in neutral DNA. Methods and Principal Findings Here we use an experimental approach to demonstrate that phenotypic divergence between ecologically separated populations of swamp sparrows is the result of local adaptation despite the lack of divergence in neutral DNA. We find that morphological (bill size and plumage coloration) and life history (reproductive effort) differences observed between wild populations were maintained in laboratory raised individuals suggesting genetic divergence of fitness related traits. Conclusions and Significance Our results support the hypothesis that phenotypic divergence in swamps sparrows is the result of genetic differentiation, and demonstrate that adaptive traits have evolved more rapidly than neutral DNA in these ecologically divergent populations that may be in the early stages of speciation. Thus, identifying evolutionarily important populations based on divergence in selectively neutral DNA could miss an important level of biodiversity and mislead conservation efforts. PMID:20419104

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-08-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS.We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls.The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs.The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population.

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls. The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population. PMID:26313808

  14. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease12345

    PubMed Central

    van Meurs, Joyce BJ; Pare, Guillaume; Schwartz, Stephen M; Hazra, Aditi; Tanaka, Toshiko; Vermeulen, Sita H; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Yuan, Xin; Mälarstig, Anders; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bis, Joshua C; Blom, Henk; Brown, Morris J; Chen, Constance; Chen, Yii-Der; Clarke, Robert J; Dehghan, Abbas; Erdmann, Jeanette; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hamsten, Anders; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Goel, Anuj; Johnson, Andrew D; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kampman, Ellen; Kiel, Douglas P; Kiemeney, Lambertus ALM; Chambers, John C; Kraft, Peter; Lindemans, Jan; McKnight, Barbara; Nelson, Christopher P; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Psaty, Bruce M; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rose, Lynda M; Seedorf, Udo; Siscovick, David S; Schunkert, Heribert; Selhub, Jacob; Ueland, Per M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; den Heijer, Martin; Jacques, Paul; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Kooner, Jaspal S; Rader, Dan J; Reilly, Muredach P; Mooser, Vincent; Chasman, Daniel I; Samani, Nilesh J; Ahmadi, Kourosh R

    2013-01-01

    Background: The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CAD. Objective: We tested whether common genetic polymorphisms associated with variation in tHcy are also associated with CAD. Design: We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on tHcy concentrations in 44,147 individuals of European descent. Polymorphisms associated with tHcy (P < 10−8) were tested for association with CAD in 31,400 cases and 92,927 controls. Results: Common variants at 13 loci, explaining 5.9% of the variation in tHcy, were associated with tHcy concentrations, including 6 novel loci in or near MMACHC (2.1 × 10−9), SLC17A3 (1.0 × 10−8), GTPB10 (1.7 × 10−8), CUBN (7.5 × 10−10), HNF1A (1.2 × 10−12), and FUT2 (6.6 × 10−9), and variants previously reported at or near the MTHFR, MTR, CPS1, MUT, NOX4, DPEP1, and CBS genes. Individuals within the highest 10% of the genotype risk score (GRS) had 3-μmol/L higher mean tHcy concentrations than did those within the lowest 10% of the GRS (P = 1 × 10−36). The GRS was not associated with risk of CAD (OR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.04; P = 0.49). Conclusions: We identified several novel loci that influence plasma tHcy concentrations. Overall, common genetic variants that influence plasma tHcy concentrations are not associated with risk of CAD in white populations, which further refutes the causal relevance of moderately elevated tHcy concentrations and tHcy-related pathways for CAD. PMID:23824729

  15. Head Motion and Inattention/Hyperactivity Share Common Genetic Influences: Implications for fMRI Studies of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Couvy-Duchesne, Baptiste; Ebejer, Jane L.; Gillespie, Nathan A.; Duffy, David L.; Hickie, Ian B.; Thompson, Paul M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Wright, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    Head motion (HM) is a well known confound in analyses of functional MRI (fMRI) data. Neuroimaging researchers therefore typically treat HM as a nuisance covariate in their analyses. Even so, it is possible that HM shares a common genetic influence with the trait of interest. Here we investigate the extent to which this relationship is due to shared genetic factors, using HM extracted from resting-state fMRI and maternal and self report measures of Inattention and Hyperactivity-Impulsivity from the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviour (SWAN) scales. Our sample consisted of healthy young adult twins (N = 627 (63% females) including 95 MZ and 144 DZ twin pairs, mean age 22, who had mother-reported SWAN; N = 725 (58% females) including 101 MZ and 156 DZ pairs, mean age 25, with self reported SWAN). This design enabled us to distinguish genetic from environmental factors in the association between head movement and ADHD scales. HM was moderately correlated with maternal reports of Inattention (r = 0.17, p-value = 7.4E-5) and Hyperactivity-Impulsivity (r = 0.16, p-value = 2.9E-4), and these associations were mainly due to pleiotropic genetic factors with genetic correlations [95% CIs] of rg = 0.24 [0.02, 0.43] and rg = 0.23 [0.07, 0.39]. Correlations between self-reports and HM were not significant, due largely to increased measurement error. These results indicate that treating HM as a nuisance covariate in neuroimaging studies of ADHD will likely reduce power to detect between-group effects, as the implicit assumption of independence between HM and Inattention or Hyperactivity-Impulsivity is not warranted. The implications of this finding are problematic for fMRI studies of ADHD, as failing to apply HM correction is known to increase the likelihood of false positives. We discuss two ways to circumvent this problem: censoring the motion contaminated frames of the RS-fMRI scan or explicitly modeling the relationship between HM and Inattention or

  16. Head Motion and Inattention/Hyperactivity Share Common Genetic Influences: Implications for fMRI Studies of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Couvy-Duchesne, Baptiste; Ebejer, Jane L; Gillespie, Nathan A; Duffy, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Thompson, Paul M; Martin, Nicholas G; de Zubicaray, Greig I; McMahon, Katie L; Medland, Sarah E; Wright, Margaret J

    2016-01-01

    Head motion (HM) is a well known confound in analyses of functional MRI (fMRI) data. Neuroimaging researchers therefore typically treat HM as a nuisance covariate in their analyses. Even so, it is possible that HM shares a common genetic influence with the trait of interest. Here we investigate the extent to which this relationship is due to shared genetic factors, using HM extracted from resting-state fMRI and maternal and self report measures of Inattention and Hyperactivity-Impulsivity from the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviour (SWAN) scales. Our sample consisted of healthy young adult twins (N = 627 (63% females) including 95 MZ and 144 DZ twin pairs, mean age 22, who had mother-reported SWAN; N = 725 (58% females) including 101 MZ and 156 DZ pairs, mean age 25, with self reported SWAN). This design enabled us to distinguish genetic from environmental factors in the association between head movement and ADHD scales. HM was moderately correlated with maternal reports of Inattention (r = 0.17, p-value = 7.4E-5) and Hyperactivity-Impulsivity (r = 0.16, p-value = 2.9E-4), and these associations were mainly due to pleiotropic genetic factors with genetic correlations [95% CIs] of rg = 0.24 [0.02, 0.43] and rg = 0.23 [0.07, 0.39]. Correlations between self-reports and HM were not significant, due largely to increased measurement error. These results indicate that treating HM as a nuisance covariate in neuroimaging studies of ADHD will likely reduce power to detect between-group effects, as the implicit assumption of independence between HM and Inattention or Hyperactivity-Impulsivity is not warranted. The implications of this finding are problematic for fMRI studies of ADHD, as failing to apply HM correction is known to increase the likelihood of false positives. We discuss two ways to circumvent this problem: censoring the motion contaminated frames of the RS-fMRI scan or explicitly modeling the relationship between HM and Inattention or

  17. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Novel genetic causes of short stature.

    PubMed

    Wit, Jan M; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Kant, Sarina G

    2016-04-01

    The fast technological development, particularly single nucleotide polymorphism array, array-comparative genomic hybridization, and whole exome sequencing, has led to the discovery of many novel genetic causes of growth failure. In this review we discuss a selection of these, according to a diagnostic classification centred on the epiphyseal growth plate. We successively discuss disorders in hormone signalling, paracrine factors, matrix molecules, intracellular pathways, and fundamental cellular processes, followed by chromosomal aberrations including copy number variants (CNVs) and imprinting disorders associated with short stature. Many novel causes of GH deficiency (GHD) as part of combined pituitary hormone deficiency have been uncovered. The most frequent genetic causes of isolated GHD are GH1 and GHRHR defects, but several novel causes have recently been found, such as GHSR, RNPC3, and IFT172 mutations. Besides well-defined causes of GH insensitivity (GHR, STAT5B, IGFALS, IGF1 defects), disorders of NFκB signalling, STAT3 and IGF2 have recently been discovered. Heterozygous IGF1R defects are a relatively frequent cause of prenatal and postnatal growth retardation. TRHA mutations cause a syndromic form of short stature with elevated T3/T4 ratio. Disorders of signalling of various paracrine factors (FGFs, BMPs, WNTs, PTHrP/IHH, and CNP/NPR2) or genetic defects affecting cartilage extracellular matrix usually cause disproportionate short stature. Heterozygous NPR2 or SHOX defects may be found in ∼3% of short children, and also rasopathies (e.g., Noonan syndrome) can be found in children without clear syndromic appearance. Numerous other syndromes associated with short stature are caused by genetic defects in fundamental cellular processes, chromosomal abnormalities, CNVs, and imprinting disorders.

  18. Design and modelling of a link monitoring mechanism for the Common Data Link (CDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John W., III

    1994-09-01

    The Common Data Link (CDL) is a full duplex, point-to-point microwave communications system used in imagery and signals intelligence collection systems. It provides a link between two remote Local Area Networks (LAN's) aboard collection and surface platforms. In a hostile environment, there is an overwhelming need to dynamically monitor the link and thus, limit the impact of jamming. This work describes steps taken to design, model, and evaluate a link monitoring system suitable for the CDL. The monitoring system is based on features and monitoring constructs of the Link Control Protocol (LCP) in the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) suite. The CDL model is based on a system of two remote Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) LAN's. In particular, the policies and mechanisms associated with monitoring are described in detail. An implementation of the required mechanisms using the OPNET network engineering tool is described. Performance data related to monitoring parameters is reported. Finally, integration of the FDDI-CDL model with the OPNET Internet model is described.

  19. Diabetic Risk Factors Promote Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Misfolding by a Common, Membrane-mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Alan K.; Teranishi, Kazuki; Isas, J. Mario; Bedrood, Sahar; Chow, Robert H.; Langen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The current diabetes epidemic is associated with a diverse set of risk factors including obesity and exposure to plastics. Notably, significant elevations of negatively charged amphiphilic molecules are observed in obesity (e.g. free fatty acids and phosphatidic acid) and plastics exposure (monophthalate esters). It remains unclear whether these factors share pathogenic mechanisms and whether links exist with islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) misfolding, a process central to β-cell dysfunction and death. Using a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism and electron microscopy, we show that phosphatidic acid, oleic acid, and the phthalate metabolite MBzP partition into neutral membranes and enhance IAPP misfolding. The elevation of negative charge density caused by the presence of the risk factor molecules stabilizes a common membrane-bound α-helical intermediate that, in turn, facilitates IAPP misfolding. This shared mechanism points to a critical role for the membrane-bound intermediate in disease pathogenesis, making it a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27531121

  20. Anti-Sigma Factors in E. coli: Common Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Sigma Factors Availability

    PubMed Central

    Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis Gerardo; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Martínez-Flores, Irma

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, transcriptional regulation is a key step in cellular gene expression. All bacteria contain a core RNA polymerase that is catalytically competent but requires an additional σ factor for specific promoter recognition and correct transcriptional initiation. The RNAP core is not able to selectively bind to a given σ factor. In contrast, different σ factors have different affinities for the RNAP core. As a consequence, the concentration of alternate σ factors requires strict regulation in order to properly control the delicate interplay among them, which favors the competence for the RNAP core. This control is archived by different σ/anti-σ controlling mechanisms that shape complex regulatory networks and cascades, and enable the response to sudden environmental cues, whose global understanding is a current challenge for systems biology. Although there have been a number of excellent studies on each of these σ/anti-σ post-transcriptional regulatory systems, no comprehensive comparison of these mechanisms in a single model organism has been conducted. Here, we survey all these systems in E. coli dissecting and analyzing their inner workings and highlightin their differences. Then, following an integral approach, we identify their commonalities and outline some of the principles exploited by the cell to effectively and globally reprogram the transcriptional machinery. These principles provide guidelines for developing biological synthetic circuits enabling an efficient and robust response to sudden stimuli. PMID:24396271

  1. Anti-Sigma Factors in E. coli: Common Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Sigma Factors Availability.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis Gerardo; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Martínez-Flores, Irma

    2013-09-01

    In bacteria, transcriptional regulation is a key step in cellular gene expression. All bacteria contain a core RNA polymerase that is catalytically competent but requires an additional σ factor for specific promoter recognition and correct transcriptional initiation. The RNAP core is not able to selectively bind to a given σ factor. In contrast, different σ factors have different affinities for the RNAP core. As a consequence, the concentration of alternate σ factors requires strict regulation in order to properly control the delicate interplay among them, which favors the competence for the RNAP core. This control is archived by different σ/anti-σ controlling mechanisms that shape complex regulatory networks and cascades, and enable the response to sudden environmental cues, whose global understanding is a current challenge for systems biology. Although there have been a number of excellent studies on each of these σ/anti-σ post-transcriptional regulatory systems, no comprehensive comparison of these mechanisms in a single model organism has been conducted. Here, we survey all these systems in E. coli dissecting and analyzing their inner workings and highlightin their differences. Then, following an integral approach, we identify their commonalities and outline some of the principles exploited by the cell to effectively and globally reprogram the transcriptional machinery. These principles provide guidelines for developing biological synthetic circuits enabling an efficient and robust response to sudden stimuli.

  2. Do Quiescence and Wasp Venom-Induced Lethargy Share Common Neuronal Mechanisms in Cockroaches?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The escape behavior of a cockroach may not occur when it is either in a quiescent state or after being stung by the jewel wasp (Ampulex compressa). In the present paper, we show that quiescence is an innate lethargic state during which the cockroach is less responsive to external stimuli. The neuronal mechanism of such a state is poorly understood. In contrast to quiescence, the venom-induced lethargic state is not an innate state in cockroaches. The Jewel Wasp disables the escape behavior of cockroaches by injecting its venom directly in the head ganglia, inside a neuropile called the central complex a ‘higher center’ known to regulate motor behaviors. In this paper we show that the coxal slow motoneuron ongoing activity, known to be involved in posture, is reduced in quiescent animals, as compared to awake animals, and it is further reduced in stung animals. Moreover, the regular tonic firing of the slow motoneuron present in both awake and quiescent cockroaches is lost in stung cockroaches. Injection of procaine to prevent neuronal activity into the central complex to mimic the wasp venom injection produces a similar effect on the activity of the slow motoneuron. In conclusion, we speculate that the neuronal modulation during the quiescence and venom-induced lethargic states may occur in the central complex and that both states could share a common neuronal mechanism. PMID:28045911

  3. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Uniform backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Hillis, James M; Brainard, David H

    2005-10-01

    Color vision is useful for detecting surface boundaries and identifying objects. Are the signals used to perform these two functions processed by common mechanisms, or has the visual system optimized its processing separately for each task? We measured the effect of mean chromaticity and luminance on color discriminability and on color appearance under well-matched stimulus conditions. In the discrimination experiments, a pedestal spot was presented in one interval and a pedestal + test in a second. Observers indicated which interval contained the test. In the appearance experiments, observers matched the appearance of test spots across a change in background. We analyzed the data using a variant of Fechner's proposal, that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to visual sensitivity. We found that saturating visual response functions together with a model of adaptation that included multiplicative gain control and a subtractive term accounted for data from both tasks. This result suggests that effects of the contexts we studied on color appearance and discriminability are controlled by the same underlying mechanism.

  4. Common motor mechanisms support body load in serially homologous legs of cockroaches in posture and walking.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Laura A; Amer, Ayman S; Zill, Sasha N

    2006-03-01

    We studied the mechanisms underlying support of body load in posture and walking in serially homologous legs of cockroaches. Activities of the trochanteral extensor muscle in the front or middle legs were recorded neurographically while animals were videotaped. Body load was increased via magnets attached to the thorax and varied through a coil below the substrate. In posture, tonic firing of the slow trochanteral extensor motoneuron (Ds) in each leg was strongly modulated by changing body load. Rapid load increases produced decreases in body height and sharp increments in extensor firing. The peak of extensor activity more closely approximated the maximum velocity of body displacement than the body position. In walking, extensor bursts in front and middle legs were initiated during swing and continued into the stance phase. Moderate tonic increases in body load elicited similar, specific, phase dependent changes in both legs: extensor firing was not altered in swing but was higher after foot placement in stance. These motor adjustments to load are not anticipatory but apparently depend upon sensory feedback. These data are consistent with previous findings in the hind legs and support the idea that body load is countered by common motor mechanisms in serially homologous legs.

  5. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Uniform backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillis, James M.; Brainard, David H.

    2005-10-01

    Color vision is useful for detecting surface boundaries and identifying objects. Are the signals used to perform these two functions processed by common mechanisms, or has the visual system optimized its processing separately for each task? We measured the effect of mean chromaticity and luminance on color discriminability and on color appearance under well-matched stimulus conditions. In the discrimination experiments, a pedestal spot was presented in one interval and a pedestal + test in a second. Observers indicated which interval contained the test. In the appearance experiments, observers matched the appearance of test spots across a change in background. We analyzed the data using a variant of Fechner's proposal, that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to visual sensitivity. We found that saturating visual response functions together with a model of adaptation that included multiplicative gain control and a subtractive term accounted for data from both tasks. This result suggests that effects of the contexts we studied on color appearance and discriminability are controlled by the same underlying mechanism.

  6. Gene recruitment--a common mechanism in the evolution of transfer RNA gene families.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of alloacceptor transfer RNAs (tRNAs) has been traditionally thought to occur vertically and reflect the evolution of the genetic code. Yet there have been several indications that a tRNA gene could evolve horizontally, from a copy of an alloacceptor tRNA gene in the same genome. Earlier, we provided the first unambiguous evidence for the occurrence of such "tRNA gene recruitment" in nature--in the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the demosponge Axinella corrugata. Yet the extent and the pattern of this process in the evolution of tRNA gene families remained unclear. Here we analyzed tRNA genes from 21 mt genomes of demosponges as well as nuclear genomes of rhesus macaque, chimpanzee and human. We found four new cases of alloacceptor tRNA gene recruitment in mt genomes and eleven cases in the nuclear genomes. In most of these cases we observed a single nucleotide substitution at the middle position of the anticodon, which resulted in the change of not only the tRNA's amino-acid identity but also the class of the amino-acyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) involved in amino-acylation. We hypothesize that the switch to a different class of aaRSs may have prevented the conflict between anticodon and amino-acid identities of recruited tRNAs. Overall our results suggest that gene recruitment is a common phenomenon in tRNA multigene family evolution and should be taken into consideration when tRNA evolutionary history is reconstructed.

  7. Genetics and preliminary mechanism of chlorpyrifos resistance in Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad; Ijaz, Mamuna; Farooq, Zahra; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Abbas, Naeem

    2015-03-01

    Cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, is a serious pest of cotton and other crops and infestation by this pest results in yield losses that affect the economy of Pakistan. Various groups of insecticides have been used to control this pest but resistance development is a major factor that inhibits its control in the field. Chlorpyrifos is a common insecticide used against many pests including P. solenopsis. The present experiment was designed to assess the genetics and mechanism of chlorpyrifos resistance and to develop a better resistance management strategy and assess the genetics and mechanism of chlorpyrifos resistance. Before selection, the field strain showed 3.1-fold resistance compared to the susceptible strain (CSS). After 8 rounds of selection with chlorpyrifos, a selected population developed a 191.0-fold resistance compared to the CSS. The LC50 values of F1 (CRR ♀ × CSS ♂) and F1(†) (CRR ♂ × CSS ♀) strains were not significantly different and dominance (DLC) values were 0.42 and 0.55. Reciprocal crosses between chlorpyrifos susceptible and resistant strains indicated that resistance was autosomal and incompletely recessive. The monogenic model of fit test and calculation of number of genes segregating in the chlorpyrifos resistant strain demonstrated that resistance is controlled by multiple genes. A value of 0.59 was calculated for realized heritability for chlorpyrifos resistance. Synergism bioassays with piperonyl butoxide and S, S, S-butyl phosphorotrithioate showed that chlorpyrifos resistance was associated with microsomal oxidases and esterases. It was concluded that chlorpyrifos resistance in P. solenopsis was autosomally inherited, incompletely recessive and polygenic. These findings would be helpful to improve the management of P. solenopsis.

  8. Impaired Pavlovian fear extinction is a common phenotype across genetic lineages of the 129 inbred mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Camp, M; Norcross, M; Whittle, N; Feyder, M; D'Hanis, W; Yilmazer-Hanke, D; Singewald, N; Holmes, A

    2009-11-01

    Fear extinction is impaired in psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and schizophrenia, which have a major genetic component. However, the genetic factors underlying individual variability in fear extinction remain to be determined. By comparing a panel of inbred mouse strains, we recently identified a strain, 129S1/SvImJ (129S1), that exhibits a profound and selective deficit in Pavlovian fear extinction, and associated abnormalities in functional activation of a key prefrontal-amygdala circuit, as compared with C57BL/6J. The first aim of the present study was to assess fear extinction across multiple 129 substrains representing the strain's four different genetic lineages (parental, steel, teratoma and contaminated). Results showed that 129P1/ReJ, 129P3/J, 129T2/SvEmsJ and 129X1/SvJ exhibited poor fear extinction, relative to C57BL/6J, while 129S1 showed evidence of fear incubation. On the basis of these results, the second aim was to further characterize the nature and specificity of the extinction phenotype in 129S1, as an exemplar of the 129 substrains. Results showed that the extinction deficit in 129S1 was neither the result of a failure to habituate to a sensitized fear response nor an artifact of a fear response to (unconditioned) tone per se. A stronger conditioning protocol (i.e. five x higher intensity shocks) produced an increase in fear expression in 129S1, relative to C57BL/6J, due to rapid rise in freezing during tone presentation. Taken together, these data show that impaired fear extinction is a phenotypic feature common across 129 substrains, and provide preliminary evidence that impaired fear extinction in 129S1 may reflect a pro-fear incubation-like process.

  9. Nuclear internal transcribed spacer-1 as a sensitive genetic marker for environmental DNA studies in common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Uchii, Kimiko; Takahara, Teruhiko; Kitayoshi, Takumi; Tsuji, Satsuki; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Doi, Hideyuki

    2017-03-01

    The recently developed environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis has been used to estimate the distribution of aquatic vertebrates by using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a genetic marker. However, mtDNA markers have certain drawbacks such as variable copy number and maternal inheritance. In this study, we investigated the potential of using nuclear DNA (ncDNA) as a more reliable genetic marker for eDNA analysis by using common carp (Cyprinus carpio). We measured the copy numbers of cytochrome b (CytB) gene region of mtDNA and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of ribosomal DNA of ncDNA in various carp tissues and then compared the detectability of these markers in eDNA samples. In the DNA extracted from the brain and gill tissues and intestinal contents, CytB was detected at 95.1 ± 10.7 (mean ± 1 standard error), 29.7 ± 1.59 and 24.0 ± 4.33 copies per cell, respectively, and ITS1 was detected at 1760 ± 343, 2880 ± 503 and 1910 ± 352 copies per cell, respectively. In the eDNA samples from mesocosm, pond and lake water, the copy numbers of ITS1 were about 160, 300 and 150 times higher than those of CytB, respectively. The minimum volume of pond water required for quantification was 33 and 100 mL for ITS1 and CytB, respectively. These results suggested that ITS1 is a more sensitive genetic marker for eDNA studies of C. carpio.

  10. Influence of common genetic variation on lung cancer risk: meta-analysis of 14 900 cases and 29 485 controls

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Christiani, David C.; Field, John K.; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; McKay, James D.; Wang, Yufei; Dai, Juncheng; Gaborieau, Valerie; McLaughlin, John; Brenner, Darren; Narod, Steven A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Albanes, Demetrius; Thun, Michael; Eisen, Timothy; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Rosenberger, Albert; Han, Younghun; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Dakai; Spitz, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Pande, Mala; Zhao, Yang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Krokan, Hans E.; Gabrielsen, Maiken Elvestad; Skorpen, Frank; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary; Lathrop, Mark; Benhamou, Simone; Vooder, Tõnu; Välk, Kristjan; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Andres; Raji, Olaide; Chen, Ying; Gosney, John; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Muley, Thomas; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Shen, Hongbing; Stefansson, Kari; Brennan, Paul; Amos, Christopher I.; Houlston, Richard; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified common genetic variants at 5p15.33, 6p21–6p22 and 15q25.1 associated with lung cancer risk. Several other genetic regions including variants of CHEK2 (22q12), TP53BP1 (15q15) and RAD52 (12p13) have been demonstrated to influence lung cancer risk in candidate- or pathway-based analyses. To identify novel risk variants for lung cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 GWASs, totaling 14 900 cases and 29 485 controls of European descent. Our data provided increased support for previously identified risk loci at 5p15 (P = 7.2 × 10−16), 6p21 (P = 2.3 × 10−14) and 15q25 (P = 2.2 × 10−63). Furthermore, we demonstrated histology-specific effects for 5p15, 6p21 and 12p13 loci but not for the 15q25 region. Subgroup analysis also identified a novel disease locus for squamous cell carcinoma at 9p21 (CDKN2A/p16INK4A/p14ARF/CDKN2B/p15INK4B/ANRIL; rs1333040, P = 3.0 × 10−7) which was replicated in a series of 5415 Han Chinese (P = 0.03; combined analysis, P = 2.3 × 10−8). This large analysis provides additional evidence for the role of inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and insight into biological differences in the development of the different histological types of lung cancer. PMID:22899653

  11. Impact of common genetic variation on response to simvastatin therapy among 18 705 participants in the Heart Protection Study

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Jemma C.; Parish, Sarah; Offer, Alison; Link, Emma; Clarke, Robert; Lathrop, Mark; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory

    2013-01-01

    Aims Statins reduce LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and the risk of vascular events, but it remains uncertain whether there is clinically relevant genetic variation in their efficacy. This study of 18 705 individuals aims to identify genetic variants related to the lipid response to simvastatin and assess their impact on vascular risk response. Methods and results A genome-wide study of the LDL-C and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) response to 40 mg simvastatin daily was performed in 3895 participants in the Heart Protection Study, and the nine strongest associations were tested in 14 810 additional participants. Selected candidate genes were also tested in up to 18 705 individuals. There was 90% power to detect differences of 2.5% in LDL-C response (e.g. 42.5 vs. 40% reduction) in the genome-wide study and of 1% in the candidate gene study. None of the associations from the genome-wide study was replicated, and nor were significant associations found for 26 of 36 candidates tested. Novel lipid response associations with variants in LPA, CELSR2/PSRC1/SORT1, and ABCC2 were found, as well as confirmatory evidence for published associations in LPA, APOE, and SLCO1B1. The largest and most significant effects were with LPA and APOE, but were only 2–3% per allele. Reductions in the risk of major vascular events during 5 years of statin therapy among 18 705 high-risk patients did not differ significantly across genotypes associated with the lipid response. Conclusions Common genetic variants do not appear to alter the lipid response to statin therapy by more than a few per cent, and there were similar large reductions in vascular risk with simvastatin irrespective of genotypes associated with the lipid response to simvastatin. Consequently, their value for informing clinical decisions related to maximizing statin efficacy appears to be limited. PMID:23100282

  12. Population genetics and management units of invasive common carp Cyprinus carpio in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia.

    PubMed

    Haynes, G D; Gilligan, D M; Grewe, P; Nicholas, F W

    2009-08-01

    Common carp Cyprinus carpio were introduced into Australia on several occasions and are now the dominant fish in the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), the continent's largest river system. In this study, variability at 14 microsatellite loci was examined in C. carpio (n = 1037) from 34 sites throughout the major rivers in the MDB, from 3 cultured populations, from Prospect Reservoir in the Sydney Basin and from Lake Sorrell in Tasmania. Consistent with previous studies, assignment testing indicated that the Boolara, Yanco and koi strains of C. carpio are present in the MDB. Unique to this study, however, the Prospect strain was widely distributed throughout the MDB. Significant genetic structuring of populations (Fisher's exact test, AMOVA and distribution of the different strains) amongst the MDB sub-drainages was detected, and was strongly associated with contemporary barriers to dispersal and population history. The distributions of the strains were used to infer the history of introduction and spread of C. carpio in the MDB. Fifteen management units are proposed for control programmes that have high levels of genetic diversity, contain multiple interbreeding strains and show no evidence of founder effects or recent population bottlenecks.

  13. The genetic contribution to sex determination and number of sex chromosomes vary among populations of common frogs (Rana temporaria).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, N; Vuille, Y; Brelsford, A; Merilä, J; Perrin, N

    2016-07-01

    The patterns of sex determination and sex differentiation have been shown to differ among geographic populations of common frogs. Notably, the association between phenotypic sex and linkage group 2 (LG2) has been found to be perfect in a northern Swedish population, but weak and variable among families in a southern one. By analyzing these populations with markers from other linkage groups, we bring two new insights: (1) the variance in phenotypic sex not accounted for by LG2 in the southern population could not be assigned to genetic factors on other linkage groups, suggesting an epigenetic component to sex determination; (2) a second linkage group (LG7) was found to co-segregate with sex and LG2 in the northern population. Given the very short timeframe since post-glacial colonization (in the order of 1000 generations) and its seemingly localized distribution, this neo-sex chromosome system might be the youngest one described so far. It does not result from a fusion, but more likely from a reciprocal translocation between the original Y chromosome (LG2) and an autosome (LG7), causing their co-segregation during male meiosis. By generating a strict linkage between several important genes from the sex-determination cascade (Dmrt1, Amh and Amhr2), this neo-sex chromosome possibly contributes to the 'differentiated sex race' syndrome (strictly genetic sex determination and early gonadal development) that characterizes this northern population.

  14. Genetic consequences of population expansions and contractions in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) since the Late Pleistocene.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Céline; Dufresnes, Christophe; Okello, John B A; Noirard, Christian; Joly, Pierre; Nyakaana, Silvester; Muwanika, Vincent B; Alcala, Nicolas; Vuilleumier, Séverine; Siegismund, Hans R; Fumagalli, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Over the past two decades, an increasing amount of phylogeographic work has substantially improved our understanding of African biogeography, in particular the role played by Pleistocene pluvial-drought cycles on terrestrial vertebrates. However, still little is known on the evolutionary history of semi-aquatic animals, which faced tremendous challenges imposed by unpredictable availability of water resources. In this study, we investigate the Late Pleistocene history of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence variation and range-wide sampling. We documented a global demographic and spatial expansion approximately 0.1-0.3 Myr ago, most likely associated with an episode of massive drainage overflow. These events presumably enabled a historical continent-wide gene flow among hippopotamus populations, and hence, no clear continental-scale genetic structuring remains. Nevertheless, present-day hippopotamus populations are genetically disconnected, probably as a result of the mid-Holocene aridification and contemporary anthropogenic pressures. This unique pattern contrasts with the biogeographic paradigms established for savannah-adapted ungulate mammals and should be further investigated in other water-associated taxa. Our study has important consequences for the conservation of the hippo, an emblematic but threatened species that requires specific protection to curtail its long-term decline.

  15. Common genetic variation within the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 and late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Biechele, Travis; Wavrant De-Vrieze, Fabienne; Avila, Miguel E.; Major, Michael B.; Myers, Amanda; Sáez, Katia; Henríquez, Juan P.; Zhao, Alice; Wollmer, M. Axel; Nitsch, Roger M.; Hock, Christoph; Morris, Chris M.; Hardy, John; Moon, Randall T.

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage studies have defined a broad susceptibility region for late-onset Alzheimer's disease on chromosome 12, which contains the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6) gene, a coreceptor for Wnt signaling. Here, we report the association between common LRP6 variants and late-onset Alzheimer's disease in a multicenter case-control series as well as in a large family-based series ascertained by the National Institute of Mental Health–National Institute on Aging Genetics Initiative. As shown in the genome-wide linkage studies, our association depends mainly on apolipoprotein E-ε4 (APOE-ε4) carrier status. Haplotype tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a set of seven allelic variants of LRP6 identified a putative risk haplotype, which includes a highly conserved coding sequence SNP: Ile-1062 → Val. Functional analyses revealed that the associated allele Val-1062, an allele previously linked to low bone mass, has decreased β-catenin signaling in HEK293T cells. Our study unveils a genetic relationship between LRP6 and APOE and supports the hypothesis that altered Wnt/β-catenin signaling may be involved in this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:17517621

  16. Genetic diversity, seed size associations and population structure of a core collection of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; Díaz, Lucy M; Buendía, Hector F; Duque, Myriam C

    2009-10-01

    Cultivated common bean germplasm is especially diverse due to the parallel domestication of two genepools in the Mesoamerican and Andean centers of diversity and introgression between these gene pools. Classification into morphological races has helped to provide a framework for utilization of this cultivated germplasm. Meanwhile, core collections along with molecular markers are useful tools for organizing and analyzing representative sets of these genotypes. In this study, we evaluated 604 accessions from the CIAT core germplasm collection representing wide genetic variability from both primary and secondary centers of diversity with a newly developed, fluorescent microsatellite marker set of 36 genomic and gene-based SSRs to determine molecular diversity and with seed protein analysis to determine phaseolin alleles. The entire collection could be divided into two genepools and five predominant races with the division between the Mesoamerica race and the Durango-Jalisco group showing strong support within the Mesoamerican genepool and the Nueva Granada and Peru races showing less diversity overall and some between-group admixture within the Andean genepool. The Chile race could not be distinguished within the Andean genepool but there was support for the Guatemala race within the Mesoamerican genepool and this race was unique in its high level of diversity and distance from other Mesoamerican races. Based on this population structure, significant associations were found between SSR loci and seed size characteristics, some on the same linkage group as the phaseolin locus, which previously had been associated with seed size, or in other regions of the genome. In conclusion, this study has shown that common bean has very significant population structure that can help guide the construction of genetic crosses that maximize diversity as well as serving as a basis for additional association studies.

  17. Uncovering the genetic architecture of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resistance through QTL mapping and epistatic interaction analysis in common bean

    PubMed Central

    González, Ana M.; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Rodiño, A. Paula; De Ron, Antonio M.; Capel, Carmen; García-Alcázar, Manuel; Lozano, Rafael; Santalla, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in common bean. Despite the genetics of anthracnose resistance has been studied for a long time, few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) studies have been conducted on this species. The present work examines the genetic basis of quantitative resistance to races 23 and 1545 of C. lindemuthianum in different organs (stem, leaf and petiole). A population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the cross PMB0225 × PHA1037 was evaluated for anthracnose resistance under natural and artificial photoperiod growth conditions. Using multi-environment QTL mapping approach, 10 and 16 main effect QTLs were identified for resistance to anthracnose races 23 and 1545, respectively. The homologous genomic regions corresponding to 17 of the 26 main effect QTLs detected were positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL) proteins. Among them, it is worth noting that the main effect QTLs detected on linkage group 05 for resistance to race 1545 in stem, petiole and leaf were located within a 1.2 Mb region. The NL gene Phvul.005G117900 is located in this region, which can be considered an important candidate gene for the non-organ-specific QTL identified here. Furthermore, a total of 39 epistatic QTL (E-QTLs) (21 for resistance to race 23 and 18 for resistance to race 1545) involved in 20 epistatic interactions (eleven and nine interactions for resistance to races 23 and 1545, respectively) were identified. None of the main and epistatic QTLs detected displayed significant environment interaction effects. The present research provides essential information not only for the better understanding of the plant-pathogen interaction but also for the application of genomic assisted breeding for anthracnose resistance improvement in common bean through application of marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25852706

  18. Uncovering the genetic architecture of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resistance through QTL mapping and epistatic interaction analysis in common bean.

    PubMed

    González, Ana M; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Rodiño, A Paula; De Ron, Antonio M; Capel, Carmen; García-Alcázar, Manuel; Lozano, Rafael; Santalla, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in common bean. Despite the genetics of anthracnose resistance has been studied for a long time, few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) studies have been conducted on this species. The present work examines the genetic basis of quantitative resistance to races 23 and 1545 of C. lindemuthianum in different organs (stem, leaf and petiole). A population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the cross PMB0225 × PHA1037 was evaluated for anthracnose resistance under natural and artificial photoperiod growth conditions. Using multi-environment QTL mapping approach, 10 and 16 main effect QTLs were identified for resistance to anthracnose races 23 and 1545, respectively. The homologous genomic regions corresponding to 17 of the 26 main effect QTLs detected were positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL) proteins. Among them, it is worth noting that the main effect QTLs detected on linkage group 05 for resistance to race 1545 in stem, petiole and leaf were located within a 1.2 Mb region. The NL gene Phvul.005G117900 is located in this region, which can be considered an important candidate gene for the non-organ-specific QTL identified here. Furthermore, a total of 39 epistatic QTL (E-QTLs) (21 for resistance to race 23 and 18 for resistance to race 1545) involved in 20 epistatic interactions (eleven and nine interactions for resistance to races 23 and 1545, respectively) were identified. None of the main and epistatic QTLs detected displayed significant environment interaction effects. The present research provides essential information not only for the better understanding of the plant-pathogen interaction but also for the application of genomic assisted breeding for anthracnose resistance improvement in common bean through application of marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  19. Population genetic analysis of a recent range expansion: mechanisms regulating the poleward range limit in the volcano barnacle Tetraclita rubescens.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Michael N; Grosberg, Richard K; Stuart, Yoel E; Sanford, Eric

    2010-04-01

    As range shifts coincident with climate change have become increasingly well documented, efforts to describe the causes of range boundaries have increased. Three mechanisms-genetic impoverishment, migration load, or a physical barrier to dispersal-are well described theoretically, but the data needed to distinguish among them have rarely been collected. We describe the distribution, abundance, genetic variation, and environment of Tetraclita rubescens, an intertidal barnacle that expanded its northern range limit by several hundreds of kilometres from San Francisco, CA, USA, since the 1970s. We compare geographic variation in abundance with abiotic and biotic patterns, including sea surface temperatures and the distributions of 387 co-occurring species, and describe genetic variation in cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, mitochondrial noncoding region, and nine microsatellite loci from 27 locations between Bahia Magdalena (California Baja Sur, Mexico) and Cape Mendocino (CA, USA). We find very high gene flow, high genetic diversity, and a gradient in physical environmental variation coincident with the range limit. We infer that the primary cause of the northern range boundary in T. rubescens is migration load arising from flow of maladapted alleles into peripheral locations and that environmental change, which could have reduced selection against genotypes immigrating into the newly colonized portion of the range, is the most likely cause of the observed range expansion. Because environmental change could similarly affect all taxa in a region whose distributional limits are established by migration load, these mechanisms may be common causes of range boundaries and largely synchronous multi-species range expansions.

  20. Cumulative impact of common genetic variants and other risk factors on colorectal cancer risk in 42,103 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Ballereau, Stephane; Brewster, David H.; Pharoah, Paul DP.; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Völzke, Henry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; von Holst, Susanna; Picelli, Simone; Lindblom, Annika; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Casey, Graham; Duggan, David; Newcomb, Polly; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Niittymäki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri; Zanke, Brent W.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Gallinger, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Walther, Axel; Kerr, David; Lubbe, Steven; Broderick, Peter; Chandler, Ian; Pittman, Alan; Penegar, Steven; Campbell, Harry; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a substantial heritable component. Common genetic variation has been shown to contribute to CRC risk. In a large, multi-population study, we set out to assess the feasibility of CRC risk prediction using common genetic variant data, combined with other risk factors. We built a risk prediction model and applied it to the Scottish population using available data. Design Nine populations of European descent were studied to develop and validate colorectal cancer risk prediction models. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the combined effect of age, gender, family history (FH) and genotypes at 10 susceptibility loci that individually only modestly influence colorectal cancer risk. Risk models were generated from case-control data incorporating genotypes alone (n=39,266), and in combination with gender, age and family history (n=11,324). Model discriminatory performance was assessed using 10-fold internal cross-validation and externally using 4,187 independent samples. 10-year absolute risk was estimated by modelling genotype and FH with age- and gender-specific population risks. Results Median number of risk alleles was greater in cases than controls (10 vs 9, p<2.2×10−16), confirmed in external validation sets (Sweden p=1.2×10−6, Finland p=2×10−5). Mean per-allele increase in risk was 9% (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.05–1.13). Discriminative performance was poor across the risk spectrum (area under curve (AUC) for genotypes alone - 0.57; AUC for genotype/age/gender/FH - 0.59). However, modelling genotype data, FH, age and gender with Scottish population data shows the practicalities of identifying a subgroup with >5% predicted 10-year absolute risk. Conclusion We show that genotype data provides additional information that complements age, gender and FH as risk factors. However, individualized genetic risk prediction is not currently feasible. Nonetheless, the modelling exercise suggests public health potential, since it

  1. Innate and adaptive immunity in bacteria: mechanisms of programmed genetic variation to fight bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant microorganism on earth. Bacteria have evolved a variety of immunity mechanisms to resist bacteriophage infection. In response, bacteriophages can evolve counter-resistance mechanisms and launch a 'virus versus host' evolutionary arms race. In this context, rapid evolution is fundamental for the survival of the bacterial cell. Programmed genetic variation mechanisms at loci involved in immunity against bacteriophages generate diversity at a much faster rate than random point mutation and enable bacteria to quickly adapt and repel infection. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) and phase variation mechanisms enhance the generic (innate) immune response against bacteriophages. On the other hand, the integration of small bacteriophage sequences in CRISPR loci provide bacteria with a virus-specific and sequence-specific adaptive immune response. Therefore, although using different molecular mechanisms, both prokaryotes and higher organisms rely on programmed genetic variation to increase genetic diversity and fight rapidly evolving infectious agents.

  2. Mechanisms of vertebrate embryo segmentation: Common themes in trunk and limb development.

    PubMed

    Sheeba, Caroline J; Andrade, Raquel P; Palmeirim, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Various ultradian rhythms ensure proper temporal regulations during embryo development. The embryo molecular clock, which was first identified in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) underlying periodic somite formation, is one among them. Somites are the earliest manifestation of the segmented vertebrate body and they are formed with strict temporal precision. The tetrapod limb is also a segmented structure and the formation of limb bone elements have also been associated with a molecular clock, operating in the distal limb mesenchyme. In both the PSM and the distal limb mesenchyme, the molecular clock (MC) is influenced by FGF, SHH and RA, which are also the key regulators of the development of these tissues. While somitogenesis has been continuously scrutinized to understand the mechanisms of the MC, the limb bud has served as an outstanding paradigm to study how a cohort of undifferentiated cells is organized into functional 3D structures. The fact that both the trunk and limb development are shaped by the MC and by common signaling molecules has prompted the exciting possibility of establishing parallelisms between somitogenesis and limb development. Systematically correlating various parameters during trunk and limb development will help us to appreciate the common principles underlying segmented structure formation and allow the rise of new questions in order to fill the gaps in our present understanding. In this review we have established the parallelisms between somitogenesis and limb development at the level of gene expression patterns and their regulation. Finally, we have also discussed the most evident new avenues this exercise could open to the scientific community.

  3. Positive fragile X microsatellite associations point to a common mechanism of dynamic mutation evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Zhong, N.; Dobkin, C.

    1996-03-01

    We recently reported that the size of fragile X gene (FMR1) triplet repeats and two nearby microsatellites show positive allele-size associations. The larger alleles of microsatellite DXS548, located {approximately}150 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, and of FRAXAC1 (AC1), located 7 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, tend to occur together, and smaller alleles also tend to occur together. Also, fragile X chromosomes are more commonly found on the larger combined microsatellite-allele haplotypes. We now have extended these observations to include two other nearby repeats, FRAXAC2 (AC2), a complex three-part polymorphism located 12 kb distal, and the FRAXE triplet repeat, located 600 kb distal. We divided the chromosomes into controls with FMR1 repeats of <60 and fragile X chromosomes with repeats {>=}60, since FMR1 alleles with repeats {>=}60 show high intergenerational instability. In the 133 controls, previously analyzed for AGG interspersions, and in 119 fragile X chromosomes, we found that these repeats show nonrandom size associations. To describe this numerically, we calculated correlation coefficients for the repeat lengths. These repeats showed significantly positive correlations with each other. Although FRAXE alleles showed no correlation with the control repeats, they did have positive correlations with fragile X chromosome microsatellites (AC1 and AC2 but not DXS548), which may reflect the larger recombinational distances involved and the possibly more recent origin of the fragile X mutations. The correlations tended to be higher for the number of 3{prime} pure CGGs than for total FMR1 repeats in controls. These findings strengthen our hypothesis that there may be a common underlying mutational mechanism that simultaneously affects these repeat loci. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Multiple coloured ornaments in male common kestrels: different mechanisms to convey quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Pablo; Fargallo, Juan A.

    2011-04-01

    The simultaneous exhibition of more than one secondary sexual trait is a widespread phenomenon in nature, though it has rarely been explored. It has been proposed that different ornaments may convey complementary or back-up information about a single aspect of individual quality (redundancy hypothesis) or that each ornament may convey unique information (multiple-messages hypothesis). During a 5-year period, we measured several carotenoid-based (eye ring, bill cere and tarsi skin) and melanin-based (head, back, rump and tail feathers) potential ornamental colours in male common kestrels. We analysed whether multiple ornaments can convey different or related information about individual quality. We explored whether different ornaments can express different information depending on the pigment (carotenoids or melanins), the time-scale over which the ornament can change (dynamic vs. static) and the season of the year when the ornament is formed. We found that both melanin- and carotenoid- based traits correlated with indexes of quality, including body condition, body condition of their partners and laying date. However, not all ornaments correlated with the same measures of quality. In addition, some ornaments were intercorrelated within the same individuals while others were not. These results suggest that different ornaments can convey information about different qualities, as predicted by the multiple-messages hypothesis. In addition, this study suggests that the predominant pigment (e.g. carotenoid vs. melanin, eumelanin vs. pheomelanin), the time-scale over which the trait is developed (static feathers vs. dynamic skin) and the season of the year at which the ornament is produced can be potential mechanisms to convey different messages in male common kestrels.

  5. Multiple coloured ornaments in male common kestrels: different mechanisms to convey quality.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Pablo; Fargallo, Juan A

    2011-04-01

    The simultaneous exhibition of more than one secondary sexual trait is a widespread phenomenon in nature, though it has rarely been explored. It has been proposed that different ornaments may convey complementary or back-up information about a single aspect of individual quality (redundancy hypothesis) or that each ornament may convey unique information (multiple-messages hypothesis). During a 5-year period, we measured several carotenoid-based (eye ring, bill cere and tarsi skin) and melanin-based (head, back, rump and tail feathers) potential ornamental colours in male common kestrels. We analysed whether multiple ornaments can convey different or related information about individual quality. We explored whether different ornaments can express different information depending on the pigment (carotenoids or melanins), the time-scale over which the ornament can change (dynamic vs. static) and the season of the year when the ornament is formed. We found that both melanin- and carotenoid- based traits correlated with indexes of quality, including body condition, body condition of their partners and laying date. However, not all ornaments correlated with the same measures of quality. In addition, some ornaments were intercorrelated within the same individuals while others were not. These results suggest that different ornaments can convey information about different qualities, as predicted by the multiple-messages hypothesis. In addition, this study suggests that the predominant pigment (e.g. carotenoid vs. melanin, eumelanin vs. pheomelanin), the time-scale over which the trait is developed (static feathers vs. dynamic skin) and the season of the year at which the ornament is produced can be potential mechanisms to convey different messages in male common kestrels.

  6. Common Mechanism of Pathogenesis in Gastrointestinal Diseases Implied by Consistent Efficacy of Single Chinese Medicine Formula

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wei; Li, Yang; Jiang, Wei; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders often manifest similar symptoms with overlapping clinical diagnosis and unmet medical needs. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has history-proven benefits for GI diseases; albeit language barrier prevents Western readers from accessing the original reports in Chinese. The TCM formula Si-Ni-San (SNS) consists of 4 herbs targeting on homeostatic disturbances characterized by “reflux” and “irritable” problems. Here we used SNS as a therapeutic tool to explore the common mechanisms of pathogenesis in non-neoplastic GI diseases. Data sources from PUBMED, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases were searched for clinical trials. Comparisons were SNS as intervention and Western conventional medicine as control, which treat patients with upper GI disorders (gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis, duodenogastric reflux), lower GI diseases (irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis), and functional dyspepsia. Participants and studies in accordance with the Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement were eligible. We used the Jadad scale to assess methodological qualities, the fixed or random-effect model to evaluate therapeutic efficacy, and the funnel plots to explore publication bias. Outcome was clinical efficacy defined by symptom relief with normal GI endoscopy, radiology, and pathology. We included 83 studies involving 7762 participants: 1708 versus 1397 of the upper GI disorders in 34 studies, 901 versus 768 of the lower GI diseases in 19 studies, 1641 versus 1348 of functional dyspepsia in 30 studies, and 328 versus 287 of relapse rate in 8 studies. Six studies had a Jadad score >2 points and the rest were <2 points. Pooled data showed significant efficacy of SNS for the upper GI disorders (odds ratio [OR] = 3.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.09–4.92), lower GI diseases (OR = 4.91, 95% CI = 3.71–6.51), and

  7. The common ecotoxicology laboratory strain of Hyalella azteca is genetically distinct from most wild strains sampled in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Major, Kaley; Soucek, David J; Giordano, Rosanna; Wetzel, Mark J; Soto-Adames, Felipe

    2013-11-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is commonly used as a model for determining safe concentrations of contaminants in freshwaters. The authors sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for representatives of 38 populations of this species complex from US and Canadian toxicology research laboratories and eastern North American field sites to determine their genetic relationships. With 1 exception, all US and Canadian laboratory cultures sampled were identified as conspecific. In 22 wild populations spanning 5 US states and 1 Canadian province, the commonly occurring laboratory species was found only in northern Florida, USA. Therefore, the diversity of the H. azteca species complex detected in the wild is not accurately represented in North American laboratories, questioning the reliability of H. azteca cultures currently in use to accurately predict the responses of wild populations in ecotoxicological assays. The authors also examined the utility of different COI nucleotide fragments presently in use to determine phylogenetic relationships in this group and concluded that saturation in DNA sequences leads to inconsistent relationships between clades. Amino acid sequences for COI were not saturated and may allow a more accurate phylogeny estimate. Hyalella azteca is crucial for developing water-quality regulations; therefore, laboratories should know and standardize the strain(s) they use to confidently compare toxicity tests across laboratories and determine whether they are an appropriate surrogate for their regions.

  8. Identification of a common Wnt-associated genetic signature across multiple cell types in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    West, James D; Austin, Eric D; Gaskill, Christa; Marriott, Shennea; Baskir, Rubin; Bilousova, Ganna; Jean, Jyh-Chang; Hemnes, Anna R; Menon, Swapna; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C; Fessel, Joshua P; Kropski, Johnathan A; Irwin, David; Ware, Lorraine B; Wheeler, Lisa; Hong, Charles C; Meyrick, Barbara; Loyd, James E; Bowman, Aaron B; Ess, Kevin C; Klemm, Dwight J; Young, Pampee P; Merryman, W David; Kotton, Darrell; Majka, Susan M

    2014-09-01

    Understanding differences in gene expression that increase risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is essential to understanding the molecular basis for disease. Previous studies on patient samples were limited by end-stage disease effects or by use of nonadherent cells, which are not ideal to model vascular cells in vivo. These studies addressed the hypothesis that pathological processes associated with PAH may be identified via a genetic signature common across multiple cell types. Expression array experiments were initially conducted to analyze cell types at different stages of vascular differentiation (mesenchymal stromal and endothelial) derived from PAH patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Molecular pathways that were altered in the PAH cell lines were then compared with those in fibroblasts from 21 patients, including those with idiopathic and heritable PAH. Wnt was identified as a target pathway and was validated in vitro using primary patient mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggest that the molecular lesions that cause PAH are present in all cell types evaluated, regardless of origin, and that stimulation of the Wnt signaling pathway was a common molecular defect in both heritable and idiopathic PAH.

  9. Andrographolide: antibacterial activity against common bacteria of human health concern and possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-01-17

    Increasing bacterial resistance to common drugs is a major public health concern for the treatment of infectious diseases. Certain naturally occurring compounds of plant sources have long been reported to possess potential antimicrobial activity. This study was aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity and possible mechanism of action of andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone from a traditional medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. Extent of antibacterial action was assessed by minimal bactericidal concentration method. Radiolabeled N-acetyl glucosamine, leucine, thymidine, and uridine were used to determine the effect of Andro on the biosyntheses of cell wall, protein, DNA, and RNA, respectively. In addition, anti-biofilm potential of this compound was also tested. Andro showed potential antibacterial activity against most of the tested Gram-positive bacteria. Among those, Staphylococcus aureus was found to be most sensitive with a minimal inhibitory concentration value of 100 μg/mL. It was found to be bacteriostatic. Specific inhibition of intracellular DNA biosynthesis was observed in a dose-dependent manner in S. aureus. Andro mediated inhibition of biofilm formation by S. aureus was also found. Considering its antimicrobial potency, Andro might be accounted as a promising lead for new antibacterial drug development.

  10. Shading and texture: separate information channels with a common adaptation mechanism?

    PubMed

    Georgeson, Mark A; Schofield, Andrew J

    2002-01-01

    We outline a scheme for the way in which early vision may handle information about shading (luminance modulation, LM) and texture (contrast modulation, CM). Previous work on the detection of gratings has found no sub-threshold summation, and no cross-adaptation, between LM and CM patterns. This strongly implied separate channels for the detection of LM and CM structure. However, we now report experiments in which adapting to LM (or CM) gratings creates tilt aftereffects of similar magnitude on both LM and CM test gratings, and reduces the perceived strength (modulation depth) of LM and CM gratings to a similar extent. This transfer of aftereffects between LM and CM might suggest a second stage of processing at which LM and CM information is integrated. The nature of this integration, however, is unclear and several simple predictions are not fulfilled. Firstly, one might expect the integration stage to lose identity information about whether the pattern was LM or CM. We show instead that the identity of barely detectable LM and CM patterns is not lost. Secondly, when LM and CM gratings are combined in-phase or out-of-phase we find no evidence for cancellation, nor for 'phase-blindness'. These results suggest that information about LM and CM is not pooled or merged--shading is not confused with texture variation. We suggest that LM and CM signals are carried by separate channels, but they share a common adaptation mechanism that accounts for the almost complete transfer of perceptual aftereffects.

  11. Common molecular mechanisms in field- and agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering.

    PubMed

    Sabrina, F; Stollberg, J

    1997-04-01

    1. The aggregation of acetylcholine receptors at the developing neuromuscular junction is critical to the development and function of this synapse. In vitro studies have shown that receptor aggregation can be induced by the finding of agrin to the muscle cell surface and by the electric field-induced concentration of a (nonreceptor) molecule at the cathodal cell pole. 2. We report here on the interaction between agrin binding and electric fields with respect to the distribution of receptors and agrin binding sites. 3. (a) Pretreatment of cells with agrin completely blocks the development of field-induced receptor clusters. (b) Field-induced aggregation of receptors precedes the field-induced aggregation of agrin binding sites by approximately 30 min. (c) Electric fields prevent agrin-induced receptor clustering despite the presence of agrin binding sites and freely diffusing receptors. 4. These results indicate that another membrane component-but not the agrin binding site and not the receptor-is required for agrin-induced receptor clustering. They also suggest that electric fields and agrin cause receptor clustering via common molecular mechanisms.

  12. Molecular genetic and endocrine mechanisms of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Laura C; Rosenfield, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    The prenatal morphogenesis of hair follicles depends upon a precisely regulated series of molecular genetic processes. Hormones and their receptors play prominent roles in modulating postnatal hair cycling, which recapitulates some aspects of morphogenesis. The responses to androgen are the most obvious of these. The postnatal androgen sensitivity of pilosebaceous units in different skin areas is programmed during prenatal development to permit clinical outcomes such as hirsutism and pattern baldness. Thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids, insulin-like growth factor-I, and prolactin have clinically significant effects on specific aspects of hair growth. The nuclear receptors vitamin D receptor and retinoid X receptor are essential for postnatal hair cycling. Other hormones have less clear effects on hair growth. Advances in research on the interaction of hormone target genes with the biological processes involved in hair morphogenesis and cycling can be expected to improve management of hirsutism and alopecia.

  13. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  14. Angelman Syndrome: Genetic Mechanisms and Relationship to Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arabella

    1994-01-01

    Research points to two distinct regions within the Prader-Willi chromosome region: one for Prader Willi syndrome and one for Angelman syndrome. Genetic mechanisms in Angelman syndrome are complex, and at present, three mechanisms are recognized: maternal deletion, paternal uniparental disomy, and a nondeleted nondisomic form. (Author/JDD)

  15. Knowledge Sharing among University Students Facilitated with a Creative Commons Licensing Mechanism: A Case Study in a Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Lin, Chia-Ching; Chang, Chun-Yi; Chao, Po-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Creative Commons (CC) mechanism has been suggested as a potential means to foster a reliable environment for online knowledge sharing activity. This study investigates the role of the CC mechanism in supporting knowledge sharing among a group of university students studying programming from the perspectives of social cognitive and social capital…

  16. Genetic mechanisms control the linear scaling between related cortical primary and higher order sensory areas

    PubMed Central

    Zembrzycki, Andreas; Stocker, Adam M; Leingärtner, Axel; Sahara, Setsuko; Chou, Shen-Ju; Kalatsky, Valery; May, Scott R; Stryker, Michael P; O'Leary, Dennis DM

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the neocortical layout consists of few modality-specific primary sensory areas and a multitude of higher order ones. Abnormal layout of cortical areas may disrupt sensory function and behavior. Developmental genetic mechanisms specify primary areas, but mechanisms influencing higher order area properties are unknown. By exploiting gain-of and loss-of function mouse models of the transcription factor Emx2, we have generated bi-directional changes in primary visual cortex size in vivo and have used it as a model to show a novel and prominent function for genetic mechanisms regulating primary visual area size and also proportionally dictating the sizes of surrounding higher order visual areas. This finding redefines the role for intrinsic genetic mechanisms to concomitantly specify and scale primary and related higher order sensory areas in a linear fashion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11416.001 PMID:26705332

  17. [Genetic mechanism and evolutionary significance of the origin of parthenogenetic insects].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Ye

    2011-12-01

    There is a high proportion of parthenogenesis in insecta, and the parthenogenetic potential of insects is an important but often ignored threaten factor for the agricultural and forestry production. The maintenance of parthenogenetic species is a puzzling issue in evolutionary biology. In recent years, although the cellular mechanisms during parthenogenesis in some species have been well studied, the underlying genetic mechanisms that cause the switch from sexual reproduction to parthenogenesis have not been defined. While, understanding the genetic mechanism and evolutionary significance of the origin of parthenogenetic insects is crucial for preventing the pests in agricultural and forestry production. Here we summarized recent studies aimed at identifying the underlying genetic mechanism of parthenogenesis in insects, and briefly discussed its potential application in this filed.

  18. Inflammatory, metabolic, and genetic mechanisms of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2014-01-01

    This review centers on updating the active research area of vascular calcification. This pathology underlies substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, through adverse mechanical effects on vascular compliance, vasomotion, and, most likely, plaque stability. Biomineralization is a complex, regulated process occurring widely throughout nature. Decades ago, its presence in the vasculature was considered a mere curiosity and an unregulated, “dystrophic” process that does not involve biological mechanisms. While it remains controversial whether the process has any adaptive value or past evolutionary advantage, substantial advances have been made in understanding the biological mechanisms driving the process. Different types of calcific vasculopathy, such as inflammatory vs. metabolic, have parallel mechanisms in skeletal bone calcification, such as intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Recent work has identified important regulatory roles for inflammation, oxidized lipids, elastin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprogenitor cells, matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein (MGP), transglutaminase, osteoclastic regulatory factors, phosphate regulatory hormones and receptors, apoptosis, prelamin A, autophagy, and microvesicles or microparticles similar to the matrix vesicles of skeletal bone. Recent work has uncovered fascinating interactions between MGP, vitamin K, warfarin and transport proteins. And, lastly, recent breakthroughs in inherited forms of calcific vasculopathy, have identified the genes responsible as well as an unexpected overlap of phenotypes. PMID:24665125

  19. Meta-analysis of genetic and environmental Parkinson's disease models reveals a common role of mitochondrial protection pathways.

    PubMed

    Soreq, Lilach; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2012-03-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors trigger risks of and protection from Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative syndrome, but possible inter-relationships between these risk and protection processes were not yet explored. By examining gene expression changes in the brains of mice under multiple treatments that increase or attenuate PD symptoms we detected underlying disease and protection-associated genes and pathways. In search for potential links between these different genes and pathways, we conducted meta-analysis on 131 brain region transcriptomes from mice over-expressing native or mutated α-synuclein (SNCA) with or without the protective HSP70 chaperone, or exposed to the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), with or without the protective acetylcholinesterase (AChE-R) variant. All these models showed shared risk-inducible and protection-suppressible transcript modifications. Self-organized map (SOM) classification revealed risk- and protection-associated alterations in nuclear and mitochondrial metal ion-regulated transcripts, respectively; Gene Ontology based analysis validated these pathways. To complement this approach, and identify potential outcome damages, we further searched for shared functional enrichments in the lists of genes detected in young SNCA mutant or in old SNCA mutants and MPTP-exposed mice. This post-hoc functional analysis identified early-onset changes in Parkinsonian, immune and alternative splicing pathways which shifted into late-onset or exposure-associated NFkB-mediated neuro-inflammation. Our study suggests metal ions-mediated cross-talk between nuclear and mitochondrial pathways by both environmental and genetic risk and protective factors involved in Parkinson's disease, which eventually culminates in neuro-inflammation. Together, these findings offer new insights and novel targets for therapeutic interference with the gene-environment interactions underlying

  20. Prevalence and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium Isolates from Common Brushtail Possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) Adapted to Urban Settings▿

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nichola J.; Deane, Elizabeth M.; Power, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is one of the most abundant native marsupials in urban Australia, having successfully adapted to utilize anthropogenic resources. The habituation of possums to food and shelter available in human settlements has facilitated interaction with people, pets, and zoo animals, increasing the potential for transmission of zoonotic Cryptosporidium pathogens. This study sought to examine the identity and prevalence of Cryptosporidium species occurring in possums adapted to urban settings compared to possums inhabiting remote woodlands far from urban areas and to characterize the health of the host in response to oocyst shedding. Findings indicated that both populations were shedding oocysts of the same genotype (brushtail possum 1 [BTP1]) that were genetically and morphologically distinct from zoonotic species and genotypes and most closely related to Cryptosporidium species from marsupials. The urban population was shedding an additional five Cryptosporidium isolates that were genetically distinct from BTP1 and formed a sister clade with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis. Possums that were shedding oocysts showed no evidence of pathogenic changes, including elevated levels of white blood cells, diminished body condition (body mass divided by skeletal body length), or reduced nutritional state, suggesting a stable host-parasite relationship typical of Cryptosporidium species that are adapted to the host. Overall, Cryptosporidium occurred with a higher prevalence in possums from urban habitat (11.3%) than in possums from woodland habitat (5.6%); however, the host-specific nature of the genotypes may limit spillover infection in the urban setting. This study determined that the coexistence of possums with sympatric populations of humans, pets, and zoo animals in the urban Australian environment is unlikely to present a threat to public health safety. PMID:18641156

  1. Genetic basis and fitness correlates of dynamic carotenoid-based ornamental coloration in male and female common kestrels Falco tinnunculus.

    PubMed

    Vergara, P; Fargallo, J A; Martínez-Padilla, J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic basis of sexual ornaments is essential to understand their evolution through sexual selection. Although carotenoid-based ornaments have been instrumental in the study of sexual selection, given the inability of animals to synthesize carotenoids de novo, they are generally assumed to be influenced solely by environmental variation. However, very few studies have directly estimated the role of genes and the environment in shaping variation in carotenoid-based traits. Using long-term individual-based data, we here explore the evolutionary potential of a dynamic, carotenoid-based ornament (namely skin coloration), in male and female common kestrels. We first estimate the amount of genetic variation underlying variation in hue, chroma and brightness. After correcting for sex differences, the chroma of the orange-yellow eye ring coloration was significantly heritable (h2±SE=0.40±0.17), whereas neither hue (h2=0) nor brightness (h2=0.02) was heritable. Second, we estimate the strength and shape of selection acting upon chromatic (hue and chroma) and achromatic (brightness) variation and show positive and negative directional selection on female but not male chroma and hue, respectively, whereas brightness was unrelated to fitness in both sexes. This suggests that different components of carotenoid-based signals traits may show different evolutionary dynamics. Overall, we show that carotenoid-based coloration is a complex and multifaceted trait. If we are to gain a better understanding of the processes responsible for the generation and maintenance of variation in carotenoid-based coloration, these complexities need to be taken into account.

  2. Downregulation of GSTK1 Is a Common Mechanism Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Shota; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Okamoto, Ryuji; Ito, Masaaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    were increased in the gstk1-knockout zebrafish. In vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent protein in cardiomyocytes showed that gstk1 deletion significantly decreased the end diastolic volume and, to a lesser extent, end systolic volume. These results suggest that downregulation of GSTK1 may be a common mechanism underlying HCM of various etiologies, possibly through increasing oxidative stress and the expression of sarcomere genes. PMID:27378925

  3. Molecular population genetic analysis differentiates two virulence mechanisms of the fungal avirulence gene NIP1.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Stéphanie; Linde, Celeste C; Knogge, Wolfgang; Jackson, Lee F; McDonald, Bruce A

    2004-10-01

    Deletion or alteration of an avirulence gene are two mechanisms that allow pathogens to escape recognition mediated by the corresponding resistance gene in the host. We studied these two mechanisms for the NIP1 avirulence gene in field populations of the fungal barley pathogen Rhynchosporium secalis. The product of the avirulence gene, NIP1, causes leaf necrosis and elicits a defense response on plants with the Rrs1 resistance gene. A high NIP1 deletion frequency (45%) was found among 614 isolates from different geographic populations on four continents. NIP1 was also sequenced for 196 isolates, to identify DNA polymorphisms and corresponding NIP1 types. Positive diversifying selection was found to act on NIP1. A total of 14 NIP1 types were found, 11 of which had not been described previously. The virulence of the NIP1 types was tested on Rrs1 and rrs1 barley lines. Isolates carrying three of these types were virulent on the Rrs1 cultivar. One type each was found in California, Western Europe, and Jordan. Additionally, a field experiment with one pair of near-isogenic lines was conducted to study the selection pressure imposed by Rrs1 on field populations of R. secalis. Deletion of NIP1 was the only mechanism used to infect the Rrs1 cultivar in the field experiment. In this first comprehensive study on the population genetics of a fungal avirulence gene, virulence to Rrs1 in R. secalis was commonly achieved through deletion of the NIP1 avirulence gene but rarely also through point mutations in NIP1.

  4. Mechanisms and impact of genetic recombination in the evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Chaguza, Chrispin; Cornick, Jennifer E; Everett, Dean B

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a highly recombinogenic bacterium responsible for a high burden of human disease globally. Genetic recombination, a process in which exogenous DNA is acquired and incorporated into its genome, is a key evolutionary mechanism employed by the pneumococcus to rapidly adapt to selective pressures. The rate at which the pneumococcus acquires genetic variation through recombination is much higher than the rate at which the organism acquires variation through spontaneous mutations. This higher rate of variation allows the pneumococcus to circumvent the host innate and adaptive immune responses, escape clinical interventions, including antibiotic therapy and vaccine introduction. The rapid influx of whole genome sequence (WGS) data and the advent of novel analysis methods and powerful computational tools for population genetics and evolution studies has transformed our understanding of how genetic recombination drives pneumococcal adaptation and evolution. Here we discuss how genetic recombination has impacted upon the evolution of the pneumococcus.

  5. A quest to understand molecular mechanisms for genetic stability.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2006-06-10

    In the midst of the post-war turmoil in Japan, I fortunately followed a path to become a scientist. Sometime at an early stage of my career, I encountered the problem of the cellular response to DNA damage and had the chance to discover a DNA repair enzyme. This event greatly influenced the subsequent course of my research, and I extended my studies toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis as well as of carcinogenesis. Through these studies I came to understand the importance of mechanisms for dealing with the actions of reactive oxygen species to the living systems. These recollections deal with these endeavors with emphasis on the early part of my scientific career.

  6. Classical mechanics approach applied to analysis of genetic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Vasylchenkova, Anastasiia; Mraz, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Moskon, Miha

    2016-04-05

    Biological oscillators present a fundamental part of several regulatory mechanisms that control the response of various biological systems. Several analytical approaches for their analysis have been reported recently. They are, however, limited to only specific oscillator topologies and/or to giving only qualitative answers, i.e., is the dynamics of an oscillator given the parameter space oscillatory or not. Here we present a general analytical approach that can be applied to the analysis of biological oscillators. It relies on the projection of biological systems to classical mechanics systems. The approach is able to provide us with relatively accurate results in the meaning of type of behaviour system reflects (i.e. oscillatory or not) and periods of potential oscillations without the necessity to conduct expensive numerical simulations. We demonstrate and verify the proposed approach on three different implementations of amplified negative feedback oscillator.

  7. Genetically controlled MRI contrast mechanisms and their prospects in systems neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Westmeyer, Gil G; Jasanoff, Alan

    2007-07-01

    Application of MRI contrast agents to neural systems research is complicated by the need to deliver agents past the blood-brain barrier or into cells, and the difficulty of targeting agents to specific brain structures or cell types. In the future, these barriers may be wholly or partially overcome using genetic methods for producing and directing MRI contrast. Here we review MRI contrast mechanisms that have used gene expression to manipulate MRI signal in cultured cells or in living animals. We discuss both fully genetic systems involving endogenous biosynthesis of contrast agents, and semi-genetic systems in which expressed proteins influence the localization or activity of exogenous contrast agents. We close by considering which contrast-generating mechanisms might be most suitable for applications in neuroscience, and we ask how genetic control machinery could be productively combined with existing molecular agents to enable next-generation neuroimaging experi