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Sample records for common structural motif

  1. Detection of common motifs in RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Margalit, H; Shapiro, B A; Oppenheim, A B; Maizel, J V

    1989-01-01

    We describe a novel computerized system for comparison of RNA secondary structures and demonstrate its use for experimental studies. The system is able to screen a very large number of structures, to cluster similar structures and to detect specific structural motifs. In particular, the system is useful for detecting mutations with specific structural effects among all possible point mutations, and for predicting compensatory mutations that will restore the wild type structure. The algorithms are independent of the folding rules that are used to generate the secondary structures. PMID:2473442

  2. Two common structural motifs for TCR recognition by staphylococcal enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Rödström, Karin E. J.; Regenthal, Paulina; Bahl, Christopher; Ford, Alex; Baker, David; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus, called staphylococcal enterotoxins (abbreviated SEA to SEU). They can cross-link the T cell receptor (TCR) and major histocompatibility complex class II, triggering a massive T cell activation and hence disease. Due to high stability and toxicity, superantigens are potential agents of bioterrorism. Hence, antagonists may not only be useful in the treatment of disease but also serve as countermeasures to biological warfare. Of particular interest are inhibitors against SEA and SEB. SEA is the main cause of food poisoning, while SEB is a common toxin manufactured as a biological weapon. Here, we present the crystal structures of SEA in complex with TCR and SEE in complex with the same TCR, complemented with computational alanine-scanning mutagenesis of SEA, SEB, SEC3, SEE, and SEH. We have identified two common areas that contribute to the general TCR binding for these superantigens. This paves the way for design of single antagonists directed towards multiple toxins. PMID:27180909

  3. Improved K-means clustering algorithm for exploring local protein sequence motifs representing common structural property.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Altun, Gulsah; Harrison, Robert; Tai, Phang C; Pan, Yi

    2005-09-01

    Information about local protein sequence motifs is very important to the analysis of biologically significant conserved regions of protein sequences. These conserved regions can potentially determine the diverse conformation and activities of proteins. In this work, recurring sequence motifs of proteins are explored with an improved K-means clustering algorithm on a new dataset. The structural similarity of these recurring sequence clusters to produce sequence motifs is studied in order to evaluate the relationship between sequence motifs and their structures. To the best of our knowledge, the dataset used by our research is the most updated dataset among similar studies for sequence motifs. A new greedy initialization method for the K-means algorithm is proposed to improve traditional K-means clustering techniques. The new initialization method tries to choose suitable initial points, which are well separated and have the potential to form high-quality clusters. Our experiments indicate that the improved K-means algorithm satisfactorily increases the percentage of sequence segments belonging to clusters with high structural similarity. Careful comparison of sequence motifs obtained by the improved and traditional algorithms also suggests that the improved K-means clustering algorithm may discover some relatively weak and subtle sequence motifs, which are undetectable by the traditional K-means algorithms. Many biochemical tests reported in the literature show that these sequence motifs are biologically meaningful. Experimental results also indicate that the improved K-means algorithm generates more detailed sequence motifs representing common structures than previous research. Furthermore, these motifs are universally conserved sequence patterns across protein families, overcoming some weak points of other popular sequence motifs. The satisfactory result of the experiment suggests that this new K-means algorithm may be applied to other areas of bioinformatics

  4. A database of protein structure families with common folding motifs.

    PubMed

    Holm, L; Ouzounis, C; Sander, C; Tuparev, G; Vriend, G

    1992-12-01

    The availability of fast and robust algorithms for protein structure comparison provides an opportunity to produce a database of three-dimensional comparisons, called families of structurally similar proteins (FSSP). The database currently contains an extended structural family for each of 154 representative (below 30% sequence identity) protein chains. Each data set contains: the search structure; all its relatives with 70-30% sequence identity, aligned structurally; and all other proteins from the representative set that contain substructures significantly similar to the search structure. Very close relatives (above 70% sequence identity) rarely have significant structural differences and are excluded. The alignments of remote relatives are the result of pairwise all-against-all structural comparisons in the set of 154 representative protein chains. The comparisons were carried out with each of three novel automatic algorithms that cover different aspects of protein structure similarity. The user of the database has the choice between strict rigid-body comparisons and comparisons that take into account interdomain motion or geometrical distortions; and, between comparisons that require strictly sequential ordering of segments and comparisons, which allow altered topology of loop connections or chain reversals. The data sets report the structurally equivalent residues in the form of a multiple alignment and as a list of matching fragments to facilitate inspection by three-dimensional graphics. If substructures are ignored, the result is a database of structure alignments of full-length proteins, including those in the twilight zone of sequence similarity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Disordered amyloidogenic peptides may insert into the membrane and assemble into common cyclic structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Arce, Fernando Teran; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Kagan, Bruce L.; Lal, Ratnesh; Nussinov, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation of disordered amyloidogenic peptides into oligomers is the causative agent of amyloid-related diseases. In solution, disordered protein states are characterized by heterogeneous ensembles. Among these, β-rich conformers self-assemble via a conformational selection mechanism to form energetically-favored cross-β structures, regardless of their precise sequences. These disordered peptides can also penetrate the membrane, and electrophysiological data indicate that they form ion-conducting channels. Based on these and additional data, including imaging and molecular dynamic simulations of a range of amyloid peptides, Alzheimer’s amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, its disease-related variants with point mutations and N-terminal truncated species, other amyloidogenic peptides, as well as a cytolytic peptide and a synthetic gel-forming peptide, we suggest that disordered amyloidogenic peptides can also present a common motif in the membrane. The motif consists of curved, moon-like β-rich oligomers associated into annular organizations. The motif is favored in the lipid bilayer since it permits hydrophobic side chains to face and interact with the membrane and the charged/polar residues to face the solvated channel pores. Such channels are toxic since their pores allow uncontrolled leakage of ions into/out of the cell, destabilizing cellular ionic homeostasis. Here we detail Aβ, whose aggregation is associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and for which there are the most abundant data. AD is a protein misfolding disease characterized by a build-up of Aβ peptide as senile plaques, neurodegeneration, and memory loss. Excessively produced Aβ peptides may directly induce cellular toxicity, even without the involvement of membrane receptors through Aβ peptide-plasma membrane interactions. PMID:24566672

  6. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  7. Decavanadate possesses alpha-adrenergic agonist activity and a structural motif common with trans-beta form of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, B V; Ravishankar, H N; Rao, A V; Kalyani, P; Sharada, G; Namboodiri, K; Gabor, B; Ramasarma, T

    1997-04-01

    Decavanadate, an inorganic polymer of vanadate, produced contraction of rat aortic rings at a relatively high concentration compared to phenylephrine, an agonist of alpha-adrenergic receptor. This effect was blocked by two known alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonists, prazosin and phenoxybenzamine. Decavanadate, formed by possible dimerization of V5 under acid conditions, possessed a structural feature of two pairs of unshared oxygen atoms at a distance of 3.12 A, not found in its constituents of V4 or V5. A structural motif of O..O..O using such oxygen atoms is recognized in decavanadate. This matches with a similar motif of N..O..O that uses the essential amino and hydroxyl groups of the side-chain and the m-hydroxyl group in trans-beta form of noradrenaline. The interaction of such a structural motif with the membrane receptor is likely to be the basis of the unusual noradrenaline-mimic action of decavanadate.

  8. The common and the distinctive features of the bulged-G motif based on a 1.04 Å resolution RNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Carl C.; Beneken, Jutta; Plantinga, Matthew J.; Lubbers, Melissa; Chan, Yuen-Ling

    2003-01-01

    Bulged-G motifs are ubiquitous internal RNA loops that provide specific recognition sites for proteins and RNAs. To establish the common and distinctive features of the motif we determined the structures of three variants and compared them with related structures. The variants are 27-nt mimics of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) from Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA that is an essential part of the binding site for elongation factors (EFs). The wild-type SRL has now been determined at 1.04 Å resolution, supplementing data obtained before at 1.11 Å and allowing the first calculation of coordinate error for an RNA motif. The other two structures, having a viable (C2658U•G2663A) or a lethal mutation (C2658G• G2663C), were determined at 1.75 and 2.25 Å resolution, respectively. Comparisons reveal that bulged-G motifs have a common hydration and geometry, with flexible junctions at flanking structural elements. Six conserved nucleotides preserve the fold of the motif; the remaining seven to nine vary in sequence and alter contacts in both grooves. Differences between accessible functional groups of the lethal mutation and those of the viable mutation and wild-type SRL may account for the impaired elongation factor binding to ribosomes with the C2658G•G2663C mutation and may underlie the lethal phenotype. PMID:14627814

  9. Betaine 0.77-perhydrate 0.23-hydrate and common structural motifs in crystals of amino acid perhydrates.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Vasily S; Kapustin, Evgeny A; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2013-04-01

    The title compound, betaine 0.77-perhydrate 0.23-hydrate, (CH3)3N(+)CH2COO(-)·0.77H2O2·0.23H2O, crystallizes in the orthorhombic noncentrosymmetric space group Pca2(1). Chiral molecules of hydrogen peroxide are positionally disordered with water molecules in a ratio of 0.77:0.23. Betaine, 2-(trimethylazaniumyl)acetate, preserves its zwitterionic state, with a positively charged ammonium group and a negatively charged carboxylate group. The molecular conformation of betaine here differs from the conformations of both anhydrous betaine and its hydrate, mainly in the orientation of the carboxylate group with respect to the C-C-N skeleton. Hydrogen peroxide is linked via two hydrogen bonds to carboxylate groups, forming infinite chains along the crystallographic a axis, which are very similar to those in the crystal structure of betaine hydrate. The present work contributes to the understanding of the structure-forming factors for amino acid perhydrates, which are presently attracting much attention. A correlation is suggested between the ratio of amino acid zwitterions and hydrogen peroxide in the unit cell and the structural motifs present in the crystal structures of all currently known amino acids perhydrates. This can help to classify the crystal structures of amino acid perhydrates and to design new crystal structures.

  10. North American Species of Cerambycid Beetles in the Genus Neoclytus Share a Common Hydroxyhexanone-Hexanediol Pheromone Structural Motif.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ann M; Millar, Jocelyn G; Moreira, Jardel A; McElfresh, J Steven; Mitchell, Robert F; Barbour, James D; Hanks, Lawrence M

    2015-08-01

    Many species of cerambycid beetles in the subfamily Cerambycinae are known to use male-produced pheromones composed of one or a few components such as 3-hydroxyalkan-2-ones and the related 2,3-alkanediols. Here, we show that this pheromone structure is characteristic of the cerambycine genus Neoclytus Thomson, based on laboratory and field studies of 10 species and subspecies. Males of seven taxa produced pheromones composed of (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one as a single component, and the synthetic pheromone attracted adults of both sexes in field bioassays, including the eastern North American taxa Neoclytus caprea (Say), Neoclytus mucronatus mucronatus (F.), and Neoclytus scutellaris (Olivier), and the western taxa Neoclytus conjunctus (LeConte), Neoclytus irroratus (LeConte), and Neoclytus modestus modestus Fall. Males of the eastern Neoclytus acuminatus acuminatus (F.) and the western Neoclytus tenuiscriptus Fall produced (2S,3S)-2,3-hexanediol as their dominant or sole pheromone component. Preliminary data also revealed that males of the western Neoclytus balteatus LeConte produced a blend of (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and (2S,3S)-2,3-hexanediol but also (2S,3S)-2,3-octanediol as a minor component. The fact that the hydroxyketone-hexanediol structural motif is consistent among these North American species provides further evidence of the high degree of conservation of pheromone structures among species in the subfamily Cerambycinae.

  11. A common structural motif in immunopotentiating peptides with sequences present in human autoantigens. Elicitation of a response mediated by monocytes and Th1 cells.

    PubMed

    López-Moratalla, N; Ruíz, E; López-Zabalza, M J; Santiago, E

    1996-12-16

    We have found a common structural motif in human autoantigens, heat shock proteins and viral proteins. Peptides modelled after sequences present in those molecules were synthesized and immunomodulating properties tested. They share a core of 15 amino acid residues and a common pattern ('2-6-11' motif) characterized by requirements at fixed positions with respect to a Pro (position 6); an apolar residue or a Lys at position 2; and a Glu, Asp or Lys at position 11. Any of these peptides, when added to cultures of lymphomononuclear cells, caused the activation of monocytes manifested by a release of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF alpha. A release of INF gamma and IL-2 took also place; this release was abolished by anti-DR antibodies. Neither IL-4 nor IL-5 could be detected. This suggests a presentation by APCs and the appearance of cells with a Th1 phenotype. Monocytes and Th1 cells freshly obtained from 12 patients of Graves' disease, 8 of Hashimoto's disease and 8 of primary biliary cirrhosis exhibited activation features similar to those found in cells from healthy subjects incubated in the presence of peptides with a "2-6-11' motif and representing fragments of autoantigens. Their immunopotentiating properties suggest their involvement in the initiation or progression of the autoimmune response mediated by activated monocytes and Th1 cells.

  12. Cofunctional Subpathways Were Regulated by Transcription Factor with Common Motif, Common Family, or Common Tissue.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Shang, Desi; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Yang, Haixiu; Liu, Baoquan; Su, Shengyang; Chen, Lina; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting the characteristics of the transcription factor (TF) regulatory subpathway is helpful for understanding the TF underlying regulatory function in complex biological systems. To gain insight into the influence of TFs on their regulatory subpathways, we constructed a global TF-subpathways network (TSN) to analyze systematically the regulatory effect of common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs on subpathways. We performed cluster analysis to show that the common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs that regulated the same pathway classes tended to cluster together and contribute to the same biological function that led to disease initiation and progression. We analyzed the Jaccard coefficient to show that the functional consistency of subpathways regulated by the TF pairs with common motif, common family, or common tissue was significantly greater than the random TF pairs at the subpathway level, pathway level, and pathway class level. For example, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha) and NR1I3 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3) were a pair of TFs with common motif, common family, and common tissue. They were involved in drug metabolism pathways and were liver-specific factors required for physiological transcription. In short, we inferred that the cofunctional subpathways were regulated by common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs.

  13. Caveats in modeling a common motif in genetic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labavić, Darka; Nagel, Hannes; Janke, Wolfhard; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2013-06-01

    From a coarse-grained perspective, the motif of a self-activating species, activating a second species that acts as its own repressor, is widely found in biological systems, in particular in genetic systems with inherent oscillatory behavior. Here we consider a specific realization of this motif as a genetic circuit, termed the bistable frustrated unit, in which genes are described as directly producing proteins. Upon an improved resolution in time, we focus on the effect that inherent time scales on the underlying scale can have on the bifurcation patterns on a coarser scale. Time scales are set by the binding and unbinding rates of the transcription factors to the promoter regions of the genes. Depending on the ratio of these rates to the decay times of both proteins, the appropriate averaging procedure for obtaining a coarse-grained description changes and leads to sets of deterministic equations, which considerably differ in their bifurcation structure. In particular, the desired intermediate range of regular limit cycles fades away when the binding rates of genes are not fast as compared to the decay time of the proteins. Our analysis illustrates that the common topology of the widely found motif alone does not imply universal features in the dynamics.

  14. Automated discovery of active motifs in multiple RNA secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.T.L.; Chang, Chia-Yo; Shapiro, B.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present a method for discovering approximately common motifs (also known as active motifs) in multiple RNA secondary structures. The secondary structures can be represented as ordered trees (i.e., the order among siblings matters). Motifs in these trees are connected subgraphs that can differ in both substitutions and deletions/insertions. The proposed method consists of two steps: (1) find candidate motifs in a small sample of the secondary structures; (2) search all of the secondary structures to determine how frequently these motifs occur (within the allowed approximation) in the secondary structures. To reduce the running time, we develop two optimization heuristics based on sampling and pattern matching techniques. Experimental results obtained by running these algorithms on both generated data and RNA secondary structures show the good performance of the algorithms. To demonstrate the utility of our algorithms, we discuss their applications to conducting the phylogenetic study of RNA sequences obtained from GenBank.

  15. Classification and assessment tools for structural motif discovery algorithms.

    PubMed

    Badr, Ghada; Al-Turaiki, Isra; Mathkour, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Motif discovery is the problem of finding recurring patterns in biological data. Patterns can be sequential, mainly when discovered in DNA sequences. They can also be structural (e.g. when discovering RNA motifs). Finding common structural patterns helps to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of action (e.g. post-transcriptional regulation). Unlike DNA motifs, which are sequentially conserved, RNA motifs exhibit conservation in structure, which may be common even if the sequences are different. Over the past few years, hundreds of algorithms have been developed to solve the sequential motif discovery problem, while less work has been done for the structural case. In this paper, we survey, classify, and compare different algorithms that solve the structural motif discovery problem, where the underlying sequences may be different. We highlight their strengths and weaknesses. We start by proposing a benchmark dataset and a measurement tool that can be used to evaluate different motif discovery approaches. Then, we proceed by proposing our experimental setup. Finally, results are obtained using the proposed benchmark to compare available tools. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to compare tools solely designed for structural motif discovery. Results show that the accuracy of discovered motifs is relatively low. The results also suggest a complementary behavior among tools where some tools perform well on simple structures, while other tools are better for complex structures. We have classified and evaluated the performance of available structural motif discovery tools. In addition, we have proposed a benchmark dataset with tools that can be used to evaluate newly developed tools.

  16. Motifs and structural blocks retrieval by GHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, Virginio; Ferone, Alessio; Petrosino, Alfredo; Polat, Ozlem

    2014-06-01

    The structure of a protein gives more insight on the protein function than its amino acid sequence. Protein structure analysis and comparison are important for understanding the evolutionary relationships among proteins, predicting protein functions, and predicting protein folding. Proteins are formed by two basic regular 3D structural patterns, called Secondary Structures (SSs): helices and sheets. A structural motif is a compact 3D protein block referring to a small specific combination of secondary structural elements, which appears in a variety of molecules. In this paper we compare a few approaches for motif retrieval based on the Generalized Hough Transform (GHT). A primary technique is to adopt the single SS as structural primitives; alternatives are to adopt a SSs pair as primitive structural element, or a SSs triplet, and so on up-to an entire motif. The richer the primitive, the higher the time for pre-analysis and search, and the simpler the inspection process on the parameter space for analyzing the peaks. Performance comparisons, in terms of precision and computation time, are here presented considering the retrieval of motifs composed by three to five SSs for more than 15 million searches. The approach can be easily applied to the retrieval of greater blocks, up to protein domains, or even entire proteins.

  17. Analyzing network reliability using structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Khorramzadeh, Yasamin; Youssef, Mina; Eubank, Stephen; Mowlaei, Shahir

    2015-04-01

    This paper uses the reliability polynomial, introduced by Moore and Shannon in 1956, to analyze the effect of network structure on diffusive dynamics such as the spread of infectious disease. We exhibit a representation for the reliability polynomial in terms of what we call structural motifs that is well suited for reasoning about the effect of a network's structural properties on diffusion across the network. We illustrate by deriving several general results relating graph structure to dynamical phenomena.

  18. Protein structural motifs in prediction and design.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Craig O; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2017-06-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) has been an integral resource for shaping our fundamental understanding of protein structure and for the advancement of such applications as protein design and structure prediction. Over the years, information from the PDB has been used to generate models ranging from specific structural mechanisms to general statistical potentials. With accumulating structural data, it has become possible to mine for more complete and complex structural observations, deducing more accurate generalizations. Motif libraries, which capture recurring structural features along with their sequence preferences, have exposed modularity in the structural universe and found successful application in various problems of structural biology. Here we summarize recent achievements in this arena, focusing on subdomain level structural patterns and their applications to protein design and structure prediction, and suggest promising future directions as the structural database continues to grow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. RNA structural motif recognition based on least-squares distance.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Wong, Hau-San; Zhang, Shaohong; Zhang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    RNA structural motifs are recurrent structural elements occurring in RNA molecules. RNA structural motif recognition aims to find RNA substructures that are similar to a query motif, and it is important for RNA structure analysis and RNA function prediction. In view of this, we propose a new method known as RNA Structural Motif Recognition based on Least-Squares distance (LS-RSMR) to effectively recognize RNA structural motifs. A test set consisting of five types of RNA structural motifs occurring in Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA is compiled by us. Experiments are conducted for recognizing these five types of motifs. The experimental results fully reveal the superiority of the proposed LS-RSMR compared with four other state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Occurrence probability of structured motifs in random sequences.

    PubMed

    Robin, S; Daudin, J-J; Richard, H; Sagot, M-F; Schbath, S

    2002-01-01

    The problem of extracting from a set of nucleic acid sequences motifs which may have biological function is more and more important. In this paper, we are interested in particular motifs that may be implicated in the transcription process. These motifs, called structured motifs, are composed of two ordered parts separated by a variable distance and allowing for substitutions. In order to assess their statistical significance, we propose approximations of the probability of occurrences of such a structured motif in a given sequence. An application of our method to evaluate candidate promoters in E. coli and B. subtilis is presented. Simulations show the goodness of the approximations.

  1. A multi-pronged search for a common structural motif in the secretion signal of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III effector proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Niemann, George; Baker, Erin Shammel; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.; McDermott, Jason E.

    2010-11-08

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into the host cell where they reprogram host defenses and facilitate pathogenesis. While it has been determined that the first 20 - 30 N-terminal residues usually contain the ‘secretion signal’ that targets effector proteins for translocation, the molecular basis for recognition of this signal is not understood. Recent machine-learning approaches, such as SVM-based Identification and Evaluation of Virulence Effectors (SIEVE), have improved the ability to identify effector proteins from genomics sequence information. While these methods all suggest that the T3SS secretion signal has a characteristic amino acid composition bias, it is still unclear if the amino acid pattern is important and if there are any unifying structural properties that direct recognition. To address these issues a peptide corresponding to the secretion signal for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium effector SseJ was synthesized (residues 1-30, SseJ) along with scrambled peptides of the same amino acid composition that produced high (SseJ-H) and low (SseJ-L) SIEVE scores. The secretion properties of these three peptides were tested using a secretion signal-CyaA fusion assay and their structures systematically probed using circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry. The signal-CyaA fusion assay showed that the native and SseJ-H fusion constructs were secreted into J774 macrophage at similar levels via the SPI-2 secretion pathway while secretion of the SseJ-L fusion construct was substantially retarded, suggesting that the SseJ secretion signal was sequence order dependent. The structural studies showed that the SseJ, SseJ-H, and SseJ-L peptides were intrinsically disordered in aqueous solution with only a small predisposition to adopt nascent helical structure in the presence of the powerful structure stabilizing agent, 1

  2. A beta strand lock exchange for signal transduction in TonB-dependent transducers on the basis of a common structural motif.

    PubMed

    Brillet, Karl; Journet, Laure; Célia, Hervé; Paulus, Laetitia; Stahl, Aude; Pattus, Franc; Cobessi, David

    2007-11-01

    Transport of molecules larger than 600 Da across the outer membrane involves TonB-dependent receptors and TonB-ExbB-ExbD of the inner membrane. The transport is energy consuming, and involves direct interactions between a short N-terminal sequence of receptor, called the TonB box, and TonB. We solved the structure of the ferric pyoverdine (Pvd-Fe) outer membrane receptor FpvA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in its apo form. Structure analyses show that residues of the TonB box are in a beta strand which interacts through a mixed four-stranded beta sheet with the periplasmic signaling domain involved in interactions with an inner membrane sigma regulator. In this conformation, the TonB box cannot form a four-stranded beta sheet with TonB. The FhuA-TonB or BtuB-TonB structures show that the TonB-FpvA interactions require a conformational change which involves a beta strand lock-exchange mechanism. This mechanism is compatible with movements of the periplasmic domain deduced from crystallographic analyses of FpvA, FpvA-Pvd, and FpvA-Pvd-Fe.

  3. Ballast: A Ball-based Algorithm for Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    He, Lu; Vandin, Fabio; Pandurangan, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Structural motifs encapsulate local sequence-structure-function relationships characteristic of related proteins, enabling the prediction of functional characteristics of new proteins, providing molecular-level insights into how those functions are performed, and supporting the development of variants specifically maintaining or perturbing function in concert with other properties. Numerous computational methods have been developed to search through databases of structures for instances of specified motifs. However, it remains an open problem how best to leverage the local geometric and chemical constraints underlying structural motifs in order to develop motif-finding algorithms that are both theoretically and practically efficient. We present a simple, general, efficient approach, called Ballast (ball-based algorithm for structural motifs), to match given structural motifs to given structures. Ballast combines the best properties of previously developed methods, exploiting the composition and local geometry of a structural motif and its possible instances in order to effectively filter candidate matches. We show that on a wide range of motif-matching problems, Ballast efficiently and effectively finds good matches, and we provide theoretical insights into why it works well. By supporting generic measures of compositional and geometric similarity, Ballast provides a powerful substrate for the development of motif-matching algorithms. PMID:23383999

  4. SLiMDisc: short, linear motif discovery, correcting for common evolutionary descent

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Norman E.; Shields, Denis C.; Edwards, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Many important interactions of proteins are facilitated by short, linear motifs (SLiMs) within a protein's primary sequence. Our aim was to establish robust methods for discovering putative functional motifs. The strongest evidence for such motifs is obtained when the same motifs occur in unrelated proteins, evolving by convergence. In practise, searches for such motifs are often swamped by motifs shared in related proteins that are identical by descent. Prediction of motifs among sets of biologically related proteins, including those both with and without detectable similarity, were made using the TEIRESIAS algorithm. The number of motif occurrences arising through common evolutionary descent were normalized based on treatment of BLAST local alignments. Motifs were ranked according to a score derived from the product of the normalized number of occurrences and the information content. The method was shown to significantly outperform methods that do not discount evolutionary relatedness, when applied to known SLiMs from a subset of the eukaryotic linear motif (ELM) database. An implementation of Multiple Spanning Tree weighting outperformed two other weighting schemes, in a variety of settings. PMID:16855291

  5. Binding Mode of Acetylated Histones to Bromodomains: Variations on a Common Motif.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Jean-Rémy; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2015-08-01

    Bromodomains, epigenetic readers that recognize acetylated lysine residues in histone tails, are potential drug targets in cancer and inflammation. Herein we review the crystal structures of human bromodomains in complex with histone tails and analyze the main interaction motifs. The histone backbone is extended and occupies, in one of the two possible orientations, the bromodomain surface groove lined by the ZA and BC loops. The acetyl-lysine side chain is buried in the cavity between the four helices of the bromodomain, and its oxygen atom accepts hydrogen bonds from a structural water molecule and a conserved asparagine residue in the BC loop. In stark contrast to this common binding motif, a large variety of ancillary interactions emerge from our analysis. In 10 of 26 structures, a basic side chain (up to five residues up- or downstream in sequence with respect to the acetyl-lysine) interacts with the carbonyl groups of the C-terminal turn of helix αB. Furthermore, the complexes reveal many heterogeneous backbone hydrogen bonds (direct or water-bridged). These interactions contribute unselectively to the binding of acetylated histone tails to bromodomains, which provides further evidence that specific recognition is modulated by combinations of multiple histone modifications and multiple modules of the proteins involved in transcription.

  6. Automated motif extraction and classification in RNA tertiary structures

    PubMed Central

    Djelloul, Mahassine; Denise, Alain

    2008-01-01

    We used a novel graph-based approach to extract RNA tertiary motifs. We cataloged them all and clustered them using an innovative graph similarity measure. We applied our method to three widely studied structures: Haloarcula marismortui 50S (H.m 50S), Escherichia coli 50S (E. coli 50S), and Thermus thermophilus 16S (T.th 16S) RNAs. We identified 10 known motifs without any prior knowledge of their shapes or positions. We additionally identified four putative new motifs. PMID:18957493

  7. A novel secondary structure based on fused five-membered rings motif

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Jesmita; Kishore, Raghuvansh; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of protein structures indicates the existence of a novel, fused five-membered rings motif, comprising of two residues (i and i + 1), stabilized by interresidue Ni+1–H∙∙∙Ni and intraresidue Ni+1–H∙∙∙O=Ci+1 hydrogen bonds. Fused-rings geometry is the common thread running through many commonly occurring motifs, such as β-turn, β-bulge, Asx-turn, Ser/Thr-turn, Schellman motif, and points to its structural robustness. A location close to the beginning of a β-strand is rather common for the motif. Devoid of side chain, Gly seems to be a key player in this motif, occurring at i, for which the backbone torsion angles cluster at ~(−90°, −10°) and (70°, 20°). The fused-rings structures, distant from each other in sequence, can hydrogen bond with each other, and the two segments aligned to each other in a parallel fashion, give rise to a novel secondary structure, topi, which is quite common in proteins, distinct from two major secondary structures, α-helix and β-sheet. Majority of the peptide segments making topi are identified as aggregation-prone and the residues tend to be conserved among homologous proteins. PMID:27511362

  8. Coagulase and Efb of Staphylococcus aureus Have a Common Fibrinogen Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Kang, Mingsong; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Ravirajan, Dharmanand; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coagulase (Coa) and Efb, secreted Staphylococcus aureus proteins, are important virulence factors in staphylococcal infections. Coa interacts with fibrinogen (Fg) and induces the formation of fibrin(ogen) clots through activation of prothrombin. Efb attracts Fg to the bacterial surface and forms a shield to protect the bacteria from phagocytic clearance. This communication describes the use of an array of synthetic peptides to identify variants of a linear Fg binding motif present in Coa and Efb which are responsible for the Fg binding activities of these proteins. This motif represents the first Fg binding motif identified for any microbial protein. We initially located the Fg binding sites to Coa’s C-terminal disordered segment containing tandem repeats by using recombinant fragments of Coa in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding experiments. Sequence analyses revealed that this Coa region contained shorter segments with sequences similar to the Fg binding segments in Efb. An alanine scanning approach allowed us to identify the residues in Coa and Efb that are critical for Fg binding and to define the Fg binding motifs in the two proteins. In these motifs, the residues required for Fg binding are largely conserved, and they therefore constitute variants of a common Fg binding motif which binds to Fg with high affinity. Defining a specific motif also allowed us to identify a functional Fg binding register for the Coa repeats that is different from the repeat unit previously proposed. PMID:26733070

  9. The k-junction motif in RNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Daldrop, Peter; Huang, Lin; Lilley, David M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The k-junction is a structural motif in RNA comprising a three-way helical junction based upon kink turn (k-turn) architecture. A computer program written to examine relative helical orientation identified the three-way junction of the Arabidopsis TPP riboswitch as an elaborated k-turn. The Escherichia coli TPP riboswitch contains a related k-junction, and analysis of >11 000 sequences shows that the structure is common to these riboswitches. The k-junction exhibits all the key features of an N1-class k-turn, including the standard cross-strand hydrogen bonds. The third helix of the junction is coaxially aligned with the C (canonical) helix, while the k-turn loop forms the turn into the NC (non-canonical) helix. Analysis of ligand binding by ITC and global folding by gel electrophoresis demonstrates the importance of the k-turn nucleotides. Clearly the basic elements of k-turn structure are structurally well suited to generate a three-way helical junction, retaining all the key features and interactions of the k-turn. PMID:24531930

  10. Peptide-binding motifs of two common equine class I MHC molecules in Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Tobias; Lindvall, Mikaela; Moore, Erin; Moore, Eugene; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Myers, Paisley T; Malaker, Stacy A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Hunt, Donald F; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    Quantitative peptide-binding motifs of MHC class I alleles provide a valuable tool to efficiently identify putative T cell epitopes. Detailed information on equine MHC class I alleles is still very limited, and to date, only a single equine MHC class I allele, Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3 haplotype), has been characterized. The present study extends the number of characterized ELA class I specificities in two additional haplotypes found commonly in the Thoroughbred breed. Accordingly, we here report quantitative binding motifs for the ELA-A2 allele Eqca-16*00101 and the ELA-A9 allele Eqca-1*00201. Utilizing analyses of endogenously bound and eluted ligands and the screening of positional scanning combinatorial libraries, detailed and quantitative peptide-binding motifs were derived for both alleles. Eqca-16*00101 preferentially binds peptides with aliphatic/hydrophobic residues in position 2 and at the C-terminus, and Eqca-1*00201 has a preference for peptides with arginine in position 2 and hydrophobic/aliphatic residues at the C-terminus. Interestingly, the Eqca-16*00101 motif resembles that of the human HLA A02-supertype, while the Eqca-1*00201 motif resembles that of the HLA B27-supertype and two macaque class I alleles. It is expected that the identified motifs will facilitate the selection of candidate epitopes for the study of immune responses in horses.

  11. Conditional graphical models for protein structural motif recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Carbonell, Jaime; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Weigele, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Determining protein structures is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of infection and designing drugs. However, the elucidation of protein folds by crystallographic experiments can be a bottleneck in the development process. In this article, we present a probabilistic graphical model framework, conditional graphical models, for predicting protein structural motifs. It represents the structure characteristics of a structural motif using a graph, where the nodes denote the secondary structure elements, and the edges indicate the side-chain interactions between the components either within one protein chain or between chains. Then the model defines the optimal segmentation of a protein sequence against the graph by maximizing its "conditional" probability so that it can take advantages of the discriminative training approach. Efficient approximate inference algorithms using reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm are developed to handle the resulting complex graphical models. We test our algorithm on four important structural motifs, and our method outperforms other state-of-art algorithms for motif recognition. We also hypothesize potential membership proteins of target folds from Swiss-Prot, which further supports the evolutionary hypothesis about viral folds.

  12. Structural Relationships in the Lysozyme Superfamily: Significant Evidence for Glycoside Hydrolase Signature Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Huet, Joëlle; Looze, Yvan; Wintjens, René

    2010-01-01

    Background Chitin is a polysaccharide that forms the hard, outer shell of arthropods and the cell walls of fungi and some algae. Peptidoglycan is a polymer of sugars and amino acids constituting the cell walls of most bacteria. Enzymes that are able to hydrolyze these cell membrane polymers generally play important roles for protecting plants and animals against infection with insects and pathogens. A particular group of such glycoside hydrolase enzymes share some common features in their three-dimensional structure and in their molecular mechanism, forming the lysozyme superfamily. Results Besides having a similar fold, all known catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolase proteins of lysozyme superfamily (families and subfamilies GH19, GH22, GH23, GH24 and GH46) share in common two structural elements: the central helix of the all-α domain, which invariably contains the catalytic glutamate residue acting as general-acid catalyst, and a β-hairpin pointed towards the substrate binding cleft. The invariant β-hairpin structure is interestingly found to display the highest amino acid conservation in aligned sequences of a given family, thereby allowing to define signature motifs for each GH family. Most of such signature motifs are found to have promising performances for searching sequence databases. Our structural analysis further indicates that the GH motifs participate in enzymatic catalysis essentially by containing the catalytic water positioning residue of inverting mechanism. Conclusions The seven families and subfamilies of the lysozyme superfamily all have in common a β-hairpin structure which displays a family-specific sequence motif. These GH β-hairpin motifs contain potentially important residues for the catalytic activity, thereby suggesting the participation of the GH motif to catalysis and also revealing a common catalytic scheme utilized by enzymes of the lysozyme superfamily. PMID:21085702

  13. Defining and searching for structural motifs using DeepView/Swiss-PdbViewer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Today, recognition and classification of sequence motifs and protein folds is a mature field, thanks to the availability of numerous comprehensive and easy to use software packages and web-based services. Recognition of structural motifs, by comparison, is less well developed and much less frequently used, possibly due to a lack of easily accessible and easy to use software. Results In this paper, we describe an extension of DeepView/Swiss-PdbViewer through which structural motifs may be defined and searched for in large protein structure databases, and we show that common structural motifs involved in stabilizing protein folds are present in evolutionarily and structurally unrelated proteins, also in deeply buried locations which are not obviously related to protein function. Conclusions The possibility to define custom motifs and search for their occurrence in other proteins permits the identification of recurrent arrangements of residues that could have structural implications. The possibility to do so without having to maintain a complex software/hardware installation on site brings this technology to experts and non-experts alike. PMID:22823337

  14. New structural motif for carboxylic acid perhydrolases.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Purpero, Vince M; Fujii, Ryota; Jing, Qing; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2013-02-25

    Some serine hydrolases also catalyze a promiscuous reaction--reversible perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to make peroxycarboxylic acids. Five X-ray crystal structures of these carboxylic acid perhydrolases show a proline in the oxyanion loop. Here, we test whether this proline is essential for high perhydrolysis activity using Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase (PFE). The L29P variant of this esterase catalyzes perhydrolysis 43-fold faster (k(cat) comparison) than the wild type. Surprisingly, saturation mutagenesis at the 29 position of PFE identified six other amino acid substitutions that increase perhydrolysis of acetic acid at least fourfold over the wild type. The best variant, L29I PFE, catalyzed perhydrolysis 83-times faster (k(cat) comparison) than wild-type PFE and twice as fast as L29P PFE. Despite the different amino acid in the oxyanion loop, L29I PFE shows a similar selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over water as L29P PFE (β(0)=170 vs. 160 M(-1)), and a similar fast formation of acetyl-enzyme (140 vs. 62 U mg(-1)). X-ray crystal structures of L29I PFE with and without bound acetate show an unusual mixture of two different oxyanion loop conformations. The type II β-turn conformation resembles the wild-type structure and is unlikely to increase perhydrolysis, but the type I β-turn conformation creates a binding site for a second acetate. Modeling suggests that a previously proposed mechanism for L29P PFE can be extended to include L29I PFE, so that an acetate accepts a hydrogen bond to promote faster formation of the acetyl-enzyme.

  15. New structural motif for carboxylic acid perhydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Purpero, Vince M.; Fujii, Ryota; Jing, Qing; Kazlauskas, Romas J.

    2013-01-01

    Some serine hydrolases also catalyze a promiscuous reaction – reversible perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to make peroxycarboxylic acids. Five x-ray crystal structures of these carboxylic acid perhydrolases show a proline in the oxyanion loop. Here, we test whether this proline is essential for high perhydrolysis activity using Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase (PFE). The L29P variant of this esterase catalyzes perhydrolysis 43-fold faster (kcat comparison) than wild type. Surprisingly, saturation mutagenesis at the 29 position of PFE identified six other amino acid substitutions that increase perhydrolysis of acetic acid at least fourfold over wild type. The best variant, L29I PFE, catalyzed perhydrolysis 83 times faster (kcat comparison) than wild-type PFE and twice as fast as L29P PFE. Despite the different amino acid in the oxyanion loop, L29I PFE shows a similar selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over water as L29P PFE (β0 = 170 M−1 vs. 160 M−1), and a similar fast formation of acetyl-enzyme (140 U/mg vs. 62 U/mg). X-ray crystal structures of L29I PFE with and without bound acetate show an unusual mixture of two different oxyanion loop conformations. The type II β-turn conformation resembles the wild-type structure and is unlikely to increase perhydrolysis, but the type I β-turn conformation creates a binding site for a second acetate. Modeling suggests that a previously proposed mechanism for L29P PFE can be extended to include L29I PFE where an acetate accepts a hydrogen bond to promote faster formation of the acetyl enzyme. PMID:23325572

  16. Extensive Mutagenesis of the Conserved Box E Motif in Duck Hepatitis B Virus P Protein Reveals Multiple Functions in Replication and a Common Structure with the Primer Grip in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Luo, Cheng; Zhao, Dan; Beck, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including the pathogenic hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate their small DNA genomes through protein-primed reverse transcription, mediated by the terminal protein (TP) domain in their P proteins and an RNA stem-loop, ϵ, on the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). No direct structural data are available for P proteins, but their reverse transcriptase (RT) domains contain motifs that are conserved in all RTs (box A to box G), implying a similar architecture; however, experimental support for this notion is limited. Exploiting assays available for duck HBV (DHBV) but not the HBV P protein, we assessed the functional consequences of numerous mutations in box E, which forms the DNA primer grip in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RT. This substructure coordinates primer 3′-end positioning and RT subdomain movements during the polymerization cycle and is a prime target for nonnucleosidic RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) of HIV-1 RT. Box E was indeed critical for DHBV replication, with the mutations affecting the folding, ϵ RNA interactions, and polymerase activity of the P protein in a position- and amino acid side chain-dependent fashion similar to that of HIV-1 RT. Structural similarity to HIV-1 RT was underlined by molecular modeling and was confirmed by the replication activity of chimeric P proteins carrying box E, or even box C to box E, from HIV-1 RT. Hence, box E in the DHBV P protein and likely the HBV P protein forms a primer grip-like structure that may provide a new target for anti-HBV NNRTIs. PMID:22514339

  17. Maximum likelihood density modification by pattern recognition of structural motifs

    DOEpatents

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-04-13

    An electron density for a crystallographic structure having protein regions and solvent regions is improved by maximizing the log likelihood of a set of structures factors {F.sub.h } using a local log-likelihood function: (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV)p.sub.SOLV (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.H)p.sub.H (x)], where p.sub.PROT (x) is the probability that x is in the protein region, p(.rho.(x).vertline.PROT) is the conditional probability for .rho.(x) given that x is in the protein region, and p.sub.SOLV (x) and p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV) are the corresponding quantities for the solvent region, p.sub.H (x) refers to the probability that there is a structural motif at a known location, with a known orientation, in the vicinity of the point x; and p(.rho.(x).vertline.H) is the probability distribution for electron density at this point given that the structural motif actually is present. One appropriate structural motif is a helical structure within the crystallographic structure.

  18. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Reid, John E; Evans, Kenneth J; Dyer, Nigel; Wernisch, Lorenz; Ott, Sascha

    2010-01-14

    Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable models of motifs of variable

  19. A Common Molecular Motif Characterizes Extracellular Allosteric Enhancers of GPCR Aminergic Receptors and Suggests Enhancer Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Robert Root; Dillon, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Several classes of compounds that have no intrinsic activity on aminergic systems nonetheless enhance the potency of aminergic receptor ligands three-fold or more while significantly increasing their duration of activity, preventing tachyphylaxis and reversing fade. Enhancer compounds include ascorbic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, cortico-steroids, opioid peptides, opiates and opiate antagonists. This paper provides the first review of aminergic enhancement, demonstrating that all enhancers have a common, inobvious molecular motif and work through a common mechanism that is manifested by three common characteristics. First, aminergic enhancers bind directly to the amines they enhance, suggesting that the common structural motif is reflected in common binding targets. Second, one common target is the first extracellular loop of aminergic receptors. Third, at least some enhancers are antiphosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that aminergic enhancers act on the extracellular surface of aminergic receptors to keep the receptor in its high affinity state, trapping the ligand inside the receptor. Enhancer binding produces allosteric modifications of the receptor structure that interfere with phosphorylation of the receptor, thereby inhibiting down-regulation of the receptor. The mechanism explains how enhancers potentiate aminergic activity and increase duration of activity and makes testable predictions about additional compounds that should act as aminergic enhancers. PMID:25174918

  20. Structural and functional analysis of the GABARAP interaction motif (GIM)

    DOE PAGES

    Rogov, Vladimir V.; Stolz, Alexandra; Ravichandran, Arvind C.; ...

    2017-06-27

    Through the canonical LC3 interaction motif (LIR), [W/F/Y]–X1–X2[I/L/V], protein complexes are recruited to autophagosomes to perform their functions as either autophagy adaptors or receptors. How these adaptors/receptors selectively interact with either LC3 or GABARAP families remains unclear. Herein, we determine the range of selectivity of 30 known core LIR motifs towards individual LC3s and GABARAPs. From these, we define a GABARAP Interaction Motif (GIM) sequence ([W/F]–[V/I]–X2–V) that the adaptor protein PLEKHM1 tightly conforms to. Using biophysical and structural approaches, we show that the PLEKHM1–LIR is indeed 11–fold more specific for GABARAP than LC3B. Selective mutation of the X1 and X2more » positions either completely abolished the interaction with all LC3 and GABARAPs or increased PLEKHM1–GIM selectivity 20–fold towards LC3B. Finally, we show that conversion of p62/SQSTM1, FUNDC1 and FIP200 LIRs into our newly defined GIM, by introducing two valine residues, enhances their interaction with endogenous GABARAP over LC3B. In conclusion, the identification of a GABARAP–specific interaction motif will aid the identification and characterization of the expanding array of autophagy receptor and adaptor proteins and their in vivo functions.« less

  1. Structural assessment of glycyl mutations in invariantly conserved motifs.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Tulika; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bhasin, Yasha; Ramakrishnan, C; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2007-11-15

    Motifs that are evolutionarily conserved in proteins are crucial to their structure and function. In one of our earlier studies, we demonstrated that the conserved motifs occurring invariantly across several organisms could act as structural determinants of the proteins. We observed the abundance of glycyl residues in these invariantly conserved motifs. The role of glycyl residues in highly conserved motifs has not been studied extensively. Thus, it would be interesting to examine the structural perturbations induced by mutation in these conserved glycyl sites. In this work, we selected a representative set of invariant signature (IS) peptides for which both the PDB structure and mutation information was available. We thoroughly analyzed the conformational features of the glycyl sites and their local interactions with the surrounding residues. Using Ramachandran angles, we showed that the glycyl residues occurring in these IS peptides, which have undergone mutation, occurred more often in the L-disallowed as compared with the L-allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. Short range contacts around the mutation site were analyzed to study the steric effects. With the results obtained from our analysis, we hypothesize that any change of activity arising because of such mutations must be attributed to the long-range interaction(s) of the new residue if the glycyl residue in the IS peptide occurred in the L-allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. However, the mutation of those conserved glycyl residues that occurred in the L-disallowed region of the Ramachandran plot might lead to an altered activity of the protein as a result of an altered conformation of the backbone in the immediate vicinity of the glycyl residue, in addition to long range effects arising from the long side chains of the new residue. Thus, the loss of activity because of mutation in the conserved glycyl site might either relate to long range interactions or to local perturbations around the site

  2. Functional implications of local DNA structures in regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA has been proposed to be a major determinant for functional transcription factors (TFs) and DNA interaction. Here, we use hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern as a measure of local DNA structure. We compared the conservation between DNA sequence and structure in terms of information content and attempted to assess the functional implications of DNA structures in regulatory motifs. We used statistical methods to evaluate the structural divergence of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. The following are our major observations: (i) we observed more information in structural alignment than in the corresponding sequence alignment for most of the transcriptional factors; (ii) for each TF, majority of positions have more information in the structural alignment as compared to the sequence alignment; (iii) we further defined a DNA structural divergence score (SD score) for each wild-type and mutant pair that is distinguished by single-base mutation. The SD score for benign mutations is significantly lower than that of switch mutations. This indicates structural conservation is also important for TFBS to be functional and DNA structures will provide previously unappreciated information for TF to realize the binding specificity.

  3. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-02

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis.

  4. Structural motifs recurring in different folds recognize the same ligand fragments

    PubMed Central

    Ausiello, Gabriele; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Gatti, Elena; Incani, Ottaviano; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Background The structural analysis of protein ligand binding sites can provide information relevant for assigning functions to unknown proteins, to guide the drug discovery process and to infer relations among distant protein folds. Previous approaches to the comparative analysis of binding pockets have usually been focused either on the ligand or the protein component. Even though several useful observations have been made with these approaches they both have limitations. In the former case the analysis is restricted to binding pockets interacting with similar ligands, while in the latter it is difficult to systematically check whether the observed structural similarities have a functional significance. Results Here we propose a novel methodology that takes into account the structure of both the binding pocket and the ligand. We first look for local similarities in a set of binding pockets and then check whether the bound ligands, even if completely different, share a common fragment that can account for the presence of the structural motif. Thanks to this method we can identify structural motifs whose functional significance is explained by the presence of shared features in the interacting ligands. Conclusion The application of this method to a large dataset of binding pockets allows the identification of recurring protein motifs that bind specific ligand fragments, even in the context of molecules with a different overall structure. In addition some of these motifs are present in a high number of evolutionarily unrelated proteins. PMID:19527512

  5. Motif structure and cooperation in real-world complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Mostafa; Rabiee, Hamid R.; Jalili, Mahdi

    2010-12-01

    Networks of dynamical nodes serve as generic models for real-world systems in many branches of science ranging from mathematics to physics, technology, sociology and biology. Collective behavior of agents interacting over complex networks is important in many applications. The cooperation between selfish individuals is one of the most interesting collective phenomena. In this paper we address the interplay between the motifs’ cooperation properties and their abundance in a number of real-world networks including yeast protein-protein interaction, human brain, protein structure, email communication, dolphins’ social interaction, Zachary karate club and Net-science coauthorship networks. First, the amount of cooperativity for all possible undirected subgraphs with three to six nodes is calculated. To this end, the evolutionary dynamics of the Prisoner’s Dilemma game is considered and the cooperativity of each subgraph is calculated as the percentage of cooperating agents at the end of the simulation time. Then, the three- to six-node motifs are extracted for each network. The significance of the abundance of a motif, represented by a Z-value, is obtained by comparing them with some properly randomized versions of the original network. We found that there is always a group of motifs showing a significant inverse correlation between their cooperativity amount and Z-value, i.e. the more the Z-value the less the amount of cooperativity. This suggests that networks composed of well-structured units do not have good cooperativity properties.

  6. Structure and ubiquitin binding of the ubiquitin-interacting motif

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Wang, B.; Alam, S.; Higginson, D.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, C.; Hill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is used to target proteins into a large number of different biological processes including proteasomal degradation, endocytosis, virus budding, and vacuolar protein sorting (Vps). Ubiquitylated proteins are typically recognized using one of several different conserved ubiquitin binding modules. Here, we report the crystal structure and ubiquitin binding properties of one such module, the ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM). We found that UIM peptides from several proteins involved in endocytosis and vacuolar protein sorting including Hrs, Vps27p, Stam1, and Eps15 bound specifically, but with modest affinity (K{sub d} = 0.1-1 mM), to free ubiquitin. Full affinity ubiquitin binding required the presence of conserved acidic patches at the N and C terminus of the UIM, as well as highly conserved central alanine and serine residues. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping experiments demonstrated that all of these UIM peptides bind to the I44 surface of ubiquitin. The 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the second yeast Vps27p UIM (Vps27p-2) revealed that the ubiquitin-interacting motif forms an amphipathic helix. Although Vps27p-2 is monomeric in solution, the motif unexpectedly crystallized as an antiparallel four-helix bundle, and the potential biological implications of UIM oligomerization are therefore discussed.

  7. Spectral Barcoding of Quantum Dots: Deciphering Structural Motifs from the Excitonic Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mlinar, V.; Zunger, A.

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) show in high-resolution single-dot spectra a multitude of sharp lines, resembling a barcode, due to various neutral and charged exciton complexes. Here we propose the 'spectral barcoding' method that deciphers structural motifs of dots by using such barcode as input to an artificial-intelligence learning system. Thus, we invert the common practice of deducing spectra from structure by deducing structure from spectra. This approach (i) lays the foundation for building a much needed structure-spectra understanding for large nanostructures and (ii) can guide future design of desired optical features of QDs by controlling during growth only those structural motifs that decide given optical features.

  8. Spectral barcoding of quantum dots: Deciphering structural motifs from the excitonic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlinar, Vladan; Zunger, Alex

    2009-07-01

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) show in high-resolution single-dot spectra a multitude of sharp lines, resembling a barcode, due to various neutral and charged exciton complexes. Here we propose the “spectral barcoding” method that deciphers structural motifs of dots by using such barcode as input to an artificial-intelligence learning system. Thus, we invert the common practice of deducing spectra from structure by deducing structure from spectra. This approach (i) lays the foundation for building a much needed structure-spectra understanding for large nanostructures and (ii) can guide future design of desired optical features of QDs by controlling during growth only those structural motifs that decide given optical features.

  9. Dissecting protein loops with a statistical scalpel suggests a functional implication of some structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the strategies for protein function annotation is to search particular structural motifs that are known to be shared by proteins with a given function. Results Here, we present a systematic extraction of structural motifs of seven residues from protein loops and we explore their correspondence with functional sites. Our approach is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA (Hidden Markov Model - Structural Alphabet), which allows simplification of protein structures into uni-dimensional sequences, and advanced pattern statistics adapted to short sequences. Structural motifs of interest are selected by looking for structural motifs significantly over-represented in SCOP superfamilies in protein loops. We discovered two types of structural motifs significantly over-represented in SCOP superfamilies: (i) ubiquitous motifs, shared by several superfamilies and (ii) superfamily-specific motifs, over-represented in few superfamilies. A comparison of ubiquitous words with known small structural motifs shows that they contain well-described motifs as turn, niche or nest motifs. A comparison between superfamily-specific motifs and biological annotations of Swiss-Prot reveals that some of them actually correspond to functional sites involved in the binding sites of small ligands, such as ATP/GTP, NAD(P) and SAH/SAM. Conclusions Our findings show that statistical over-representation in SCOP superfamilies is linked to functional features. The detection of over-represented motifs within structures simplified by HMM-SA is therefore a promising approach for prediction of functional sites and annotation of uncharacterized proteins. PMID:21689388

  10. MoTeX-II: structured MoTif eXtraction from large-scale datasets.

    PubMed

    Pissis, Solon P

    2014-07-08

    Identifying repeated factors that occur in a string of letters or common factors that occur in a set of strings represents an important task in computer science and biology. Such patterns are called motifs, and the process of identifying them is called motif extraction. In biology, motif extraction constitutes a fundamental step in understanding regulation of gene expression. State-of-the-art tools for motif extraction have their own constraints. Most of these tools are only designed for single motif extraction; structured motifs additionally allow for distance intervals between their single motif components. Moreover, motif extraction from large-scale datasets-for instance, large-scale ChIP-Seq datasets-cannot be performed by current tools. Other constraints include high time and/or space complexity for identifying long motifs with higher error thresholds. In this article, we introduce MoTeX-II, a word-based high-performance computing tool for structured MoTif eXtraction from large-scale datasets. Similar to its predecessor for single motif extraction, it uses state-of-the-art algorithms for solving the fixed-length approximate string matching problem. It produces similar and partially identical results to state-of-the-art tools for structured motif extraction with respect to accuracy as quantified by statistical significance measures. Moreover, we show that it matches or outperforms these tools in terms of runtime efficiency by merging single motif occurrences efficiently. MoTeX-II comes in three flavors: a standard CPU version; an OpenMP-based version; and an MPI-based version. For instance, the MPI-based version of MoTeX-II requires only a couple of hours to process all human genes for structured motif extraction on 1056 processors, while current sequential tools require more than a week for this task. Finally, we show that MoTeX-II is successful in extracting known composite transcription factor binding sites from real datasets. Use of MoTeX-II in biological

  11. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanchen; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Most biological processes happen at the nanometer scale, and understanding the energy transformations and material transportation mechanisms within living organisms has proved challenging. To better understand the secrets of life, researchers have investigated artificial molecular motors and devices over the past decade because such systems can mimic certain biological processes. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures is one system that has played an important role in these investigations. In this Account, we summarize recent advances in functional DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures. The i-motif is a DNA quadruplex that occurs as four stretches of cytosine repeat sequences form C·CH(+) base pairs, and their stabilization requires slightly acidic conditions. This unique property has produced the first DNA molecular motor driven by pH changes. The motor is reliable, and studies show that it is capable of millisecond running speeds, comparable to the speed of natural protein motors. With careful design, the output of these types of motors was combined to drive micrometer-sized cantilevers bend. Using established DNA nanostructure assembly and functionalization methods, researchers can easily integrate the motor within other DNA assembled structures and functional units, producing DNA molecular devices with new functions such as suprahydrophobic/suprahydrophilic smart surfaces that switch, intelligent nanopores triggered by pH changes, molecular logic gates, and DNA nanosprings. Recently, researchers have produced motors driven by light and electricity, which have allowed DNA motors to be integrated within silicon-based nanodevices. Moreover, some devices based on i-motif structures have proven useful for investigating processes within living cells. The pH-responsiveness of the i-motif structure also provides a way to control the stepwise assembly of DNA nanostructures. In addition, because of the stability of the i-motif, this

  12. WildSpan: mining structured motifs from protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Automatic extraction of motifs from biological sequences is an important research problem in study of molecular biology. For proteins, it is desired to discover sequence motifs containing a large number of wildcard symbols, as the residues associated with functional sites are usually largely separated in sequences. Discovering such patterns is time-consuming because abundant combinations exist when long gaps (a gap consists of one or more successive wildcards) are considered. Mining algorithms often employ constraints to narrow down the search space in order to increase efficiency. However, improper constraint models might degrade the sensitivity and specificity of the motifs discovered by computational methods. We previously proposed a new constraint model to handle large wildcard regions for discovering functional motifs of proteins. The patterns that satisfy the proposed constraint model are called W-patterns. A W-pattern is a structured motif that groups motif symbols into pattern blocks interleaved with large irregular gaps. Considering large gaps reflects the fact that functional residues are not always from a single region of protein sequences, and restricting motif symbols into clusters corresponds to the observation that short motifs are frequently present within protein families. To efficiently discover W-patterns for large-scale sequence annotation and function prediction, this paper first formally introduces the problem to solve and proposes an algorithm named WildSpan (sequential pattern mining across large wildcard regions) that incorporates several pruning strategies to largely reduce the mining cost. Results WildSpan is shown to efficiently find W-patterns containing conserved residues that are far separated in sequences. We conducted experiments with two mining strategies, protein-based and family-based mining, to evaluate the usefulness of W-patterns and performance of WildSpan. The protein-based mining mode of WildSpan is developed for

  13. WildSpan: mining structured motifs from protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chen-Ming; Chen, Chien-Yu; Liu, Baw-Jhiune

    2011-03-31

    Automatic extraction of motifs from biological sequences is an important research problem in study of molecular biology. For proteins, it is desired to discover sequence motifs containing a large number of wildcard symbols, as the residues associated with functional sites are usually largely separated in sequences. Discovering such patterns is time-consuming because abundant combinations exist when long gaps (a gap consists of one or more successive wildcards) are considered. Mining algorithms often employ constraints to narrow down the search space in order to increase efficiency. However, improper constraint models might degrade the sensitivity and specificity of the motifs discovered by computational methods. We previously proposed a new constraint model to handle large wildcard regions for discovering functional motifs of proteins. The patterns that satisfy the proposed constraint model are called W-patterns. A W-pattern is a structured motif that groups motif symbols into pattern blocks interleaved with large irregular gaps. Considering large gaps reflects the fact that functional residues are not always from a single region of protein sequences, and restricting motif symbols into clusters corresponds to the observation that short motifs are frequently present within protein families. To efficiently discover W-patterns for large-scale sequence annotation and function prediction, this paper first formally introduces the problem to solve and proposes an algorithm named WildSpan (sequential pattern mining across large wildcard regions) that incorporates several pruning strategies to largely reduce the mining cost. WildSpan is shown to efficiently find W-patterns containing conserved residues that are far separated in sequences. We conducted experiments with two mining strategies, protein-based and family-based mining, to evaluate the usefulness of W-patterns and performance of WildSpan. The protein-based mining mode of WildSpan is developed for discovering

  14. An Efficient Scheme for Crystal Structure Prediction Based on Structural Motifs

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Zizhong; Wu, Ping; Wu, Shunqing; ...

    2017-05-15

    An efficient scheme based on structural motifs is proposed for the crystal structure prediction of materials. The key advantage of the present method comes in two fold: first, the degrees of freedom of the system are greatly reduced, since each structural motif, regardless of its size, can always be described by a set of parameters (R, θ, φ) with five degrees of freedom; second, the motifs could always appear in the predicted structures when the energies of the structures are relatively low. Both features make the present scheme a very efficient method for predicting desired materials. The method has beenmore » applied to the case of LiFePO4, an important cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Numerous new structures of LiFePO4 have been found, compared to those currently available, available, demonstrating the reliability of the present methodology and illustrating the promise of the concept of structural motifs.« less

  15. A simple motif for protein recognition in DNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Landt, Stephen G; Ramirez, Alejandro; Daugherty, Matthew D; Frankel, Alan D

    2005-09-02

    DNA in a single-stranded form (ssDNA) exists transiently within the cell and comprises the telomeres of linear chromosomes and the genomes of some DNA viruses. As with RNA, in the single-stranded state, some DNA sequences are able to fold into complex secondary and tertiary structures that may be recognized by proteins and participate in gene regulation. To better understand how such DNA elements might fold and interact with proteins, and to compare recognition features to those of a structured RNA, we used in vitro selection to identify ssDNAs that bind an RNA-binding peptide from the HIV Rev protein with high affinity and specificity. The large majority of selected binders contain a non-Watson-Crick G.T base-pair and an adjacent C:G base-pair and both are essential for binding. This GT motif can be presented in different DNA contexts, including a nearly perfect duplex and a branched three-helix structure, and appears to be recognized in large part by arginine residues separated by one turn of an alpha-helix. Interestingly, a very similar GT motif is necessary also for protein binding and function of a well-characterized model ssDNA regulatory element from the proenkephalin promoter.

  16. Computational study of the fibril organization of polyglutamine repeats reveals a common motif identified in beta-helices.

    PubMed

    Zanuy, David; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Lesk, Arthur M; Nussinov, Ruth

    2006-04-21

    The formation of fibril aggregates by long polyglutamine sequences is assumed to play a major role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington. Here, we model peptides rich in glutamine, through a series of molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from a rigid nanotube-like conformation, we have obtained a new conformational template that shares structural features of a tubular helix and of a beta-helix conformational organization. Our new model can be described as a super-helical arrangement of flat beta-sheet segments linked by planar turns or bends. Interestingly, our comprehensive analysis of the Protein Data Bank reveals that this is a common motif in beta-helices (termed beta-bend), although it has not been identified so far. The motif is based on the alternation of beta-sheet and helical conformation as the protein sequence is followed from the N to the C termini (beta-alpha(R)-beta-polyPro-beta). We further identify this motif in the ssNMR structure of the protofibril of the amyloidogenic peptide Abeta(1-40). The recurrence of the beta-bend suggests a general mode of connecting long parallel beta-sheet segments that would allow the growth of partially ordered fibril structures. The design allows the peptide backbone to change direction with a minimal loss of main chain hydrogen bonds. The identification of a coherent organization beyond that of the beta-sheet segments in different folds rich in parallel beta-sheets suggests a higher degree of ordered structure in protein fibrils, in agreement with their low solubility and dense molecular packing.

  17. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Walen, Holly

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. The experimental observations presented here—made under identical conditions—together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  18. Junctions between i-motif tetramers in supramolecular structures

    PubMed Central

    Guittet, Eric; Renciuk, Daniel; Leroy, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The symmetry of i-motif tetramers gives to cytidine-rich oligonucleotides the capacity to associate into supramolecular structures (sms). In order to determine how the tetramers are linked together in such structures, we have measured by gel filtration chromatography and NMR the formation and dissociation kinetics of sms built by oligonucleotides containing two short C stretches separated by a non-cytidine-base. We show that a stretch of only two cytidines either at the 3′- or 5′-end is long enough to link the tetramers into sms. The analysis of the properties of sms formed by oligonucleotides differing by the length of the oligo-C stretches, the sequence orientation and the nature of the non-C base provides a model of the junction connecting the tetramers in sms. PMID:22362739

  19. Crystal Structures of IAPP Amyloidogenic Segments Reveal a Novel Packing Motif of Out-of-Register Beta Sheets.

    PubMed

    Soriaga, Angela B; Sangwan, Smriti; Macdonald, Ramsay; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David

    2016-07-07

    Structural studies of amyloidogenic segments by X-ray crystallography have revealed a novel packing motif, consisting of out-of-register β sheets, which may constitute one of the toxic species in aggregation related diseases. Here we sought to determine the presence of such a motif in islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), whose amyloidogenic properties are associated with type 2 diabetes. We determined four new crystal structures of segments within IAPP, all forming steric zippers. Most interestingly, one of the segments in the fibril core of IAPP forms an out-of-register steric zipper. Analysis of this structure reveals several commonalities with previously solved out-of-register fibrils. Our results provide additional evidence of out-of-register β sheets as a common structural motif in amyloid aggregates.

  20. Automated protein motif generation in the structure-based protein function prediction tool ProMOL.

    PubMed

    Osipovitch, Mikhail; Lambrecht, Mitchell; Baker, Cameron; Madha, Shariq; Mills, Jeffrey L; Craig, Paul A; Bernstein, Herbert J

    2015-12-01

    ProMOL, a plugin for the PyMOL molecular graphics system, is a structure-based protein function prediction tool. ProMOL includes a set of routines for building motif templates that are used for screening query structures for enzyme active sites. Previously, each motif template was generated manually and required supervision in the optimization of parameters for sensitivity and selectivity. We developed an algorithm and workflow for the automation of motif building and testing routines in ProMOL. The algorithm uses a set of empirically derived parameters for optimization and requires little user intervention. The automated motif generation algorithm was first tested in a performance comparison with a set of manually generated motifs based on identical active sites from the same 112 PDB entries. The two sets of motifs were equally effective in identifying alignments with homologs and in rejecting alignments with unrelated structures. A second set of 296 active site motifs were generated automatically, based on Catalytic Site Atlas entries with literature citations, as an expansion of the library of existing manually generated motif templates. The new motif templates exhibited comparable performance to the existing ones in terms of hit rates against native structures, homologs with the same EC and Pfam designations, and randomly selected unrelated structures with a different EC designation at the first EC digit, as well as in terms of RMSD values obtained from local structural alignments of motifs and query structures. This research is supported by NIH grant GM078077.

  1. Plasticity of the RNA Kink Turn Structural Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, A.; Cochrane, J; Lipchock, S; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01

    The kink turn (K-turn) is an RNA structural motif found in many biologically significant RNAs. While most examples of the K-turn have a similar fold, the crystal structure of the Azoarcus group I intron revealed a novel RNA conformation, a reverse kink turn bent in the direction opposite that of a consensus K-turn. The reverse K-turn is bent toward the major grooves rather than the minor grooves of the flanking helices, yet the sequence differs from the K-turn consensus by only a single nucleotide. Here we demonstrate that the reverse bend direction is not solely defined by internal sequence elements, but is instead affected by structural elements external to the K-turn. It bends toward the major groove under the direction of a tetraloop-tetraloop receptor. The ability of one sequence to form two distinct structures demonstrates the inherent plasticity of the K-turn sequence. Such plasticity suggests that the K-turn is not a primary element in RNA folding, but instead is shaped by other structural elements within the RNA or ribonucleoprotein assembly.

  2. The 'helix clamp' in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: a new nucleic acid binding motif common in nucleic acid polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T; Meier, T; Götte, M; Heumann, H

    1994-01-01

    Amino acid sequences homologous to 259KLVGKL (X)16KLLR284 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) are conserved in several nucleotide polymerizing enzymes. This amino acid motif has been identified in the crystal structure model as an element of the enzyme's nucleic acid binding apparatus. It is part of the helix-turn-helix structure, alpha H-turn-alpha I, within the 'thumb' region of HIV-1 RT. The motif grasps the complexed nucleic acid at one side. Molecular modeling studies on HIV-1 RT in complex with a nucleic acid fragment suggest that the motif has binding function in the p66 subunit as well as in the p51 subunit, acting as a kind of 'helix clamp'. Given its wide distribution within the nucleic acid polymerases, the helix clamp motif is assumed to be a structure of general significance for nucleic acid binding. Images PMID:7527138

  3. Peptoid nanosheets exhibit a new secondary-structure motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.; Haxton, Thomas K.; Proulx, Caroline; Robertson, Ellen J.; Battigelli, Alessia; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    A promising route to the synthesis of protein-mimetic materials that are capable of complex functions, such as molecular recognition and catalysis, is provided by sequence-defined peptoid polymers--structural relatives of biologically occurring polypeptides. Peptoids, which are relatively non-toxic and resistant to degradation, can fold into defined structures through a combination of sequence-dependent interactions. However, the range of possible structures that are accessible to peptoids and other biological mimetics is unknown, and our ability to design protein-like architectures from these polymer classes is limited. Here we use molecular-dynamics simulations, together with scattering and microscopy data, to determine the atomic-resolution structure of the recently discovered peptoid nanosheet, an ordered supramolecular assembly that extends macroscopically in only two dimensions. Our simulations show that nanosheets are structurally and dynamically heterogeneous, can be formed only from peptoids of certain lengths, and are potentially porous to water and ions. Moreover, their formation is enabled by the peptoids' adoption of a secondary structure that is not seen in the natural world. This structure, a zigzag pattern that we call a Σ(`sigma')-strand, results from the ability of adjacent backbone monomers to adopt opposed rotational states, thereby allowing the backbone to remain linear and untwisted. Linear backbones tiled in a brick-like way form an extended two-dimensional nanostructure, the Σ-sheet. The binary rotational-state motif of the Σ-strand is not seen in regular protein structures, which are usually built from one type of rotational state. We also show that the concept of building regular structures from multiple rotational states can be generalized beyond the peptoid nanosheet system.

  4. Highly sampled tetranucleotide and tetraloop motifs enable evaluation of common RNA force fields

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Henriksen, Niel M.; Roe, Daniel R.; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent modifications and improvements to standard nucleic acid force fields have attempted to fix problems and issues that have been observed as longer timescale simulations have become routine. Although previous work has shown the ability to fold the UUCG stem–loop structure, until now no group has attempted to quantify the performance of current force fields using highly converged structural populations of the tetraloop conformational ensemble. In this study, we report the use of multiple independent sets of multidimensional replica exchange molecular dynamics (M-REMD) simulations with different initial conditions to generate well-converged conformational ensembles for the tetranucleotides r(GACC) and r(CCCC), as well as the larger UUCG tetraloop motif. By generating what is to our knowledge the most complete RNA structure ensembles reported to date for these systems, we remove the coupling between force field errors and errors due to incomplete sampling, providing a comprehensive comparison between current top-performing MD force fields for RNA. Of the RNA force fields tested in this study, none demonstrate the ability to correctly identify the most thermodynamically stable structure for all three systems. We discuss the deficiencies present in each potential function and suggest areas where improvements can be made. The results imply that although “short” (nsec-μsec timescale) simulations may stay close to their respective experimental structures and may well reproduce experimental observables, inevitably the current force fields will populate alternative incorrect structures that are more stable than those observed via experiment. PMID:26124199

  5. Comparing graph representations of protein structure for mining family-specific residue-based packing motifs.

    PubMed

    Huan, Jun; Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Wang, Wei; Snoeyink, Jack; Prins, Jan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    We find recurring amino-acid residue packing patterns, or spatial motifs, that are characteristic of protein structural families, by applying a novel frequent subgraph mining algorithm to graph representations of protein three-dimensional structure. Graph nodes represent amino acids, and edges are chosen in one of three ways: first, using a threshold for contact distance between residues; second, using Delaunay tessellation; and third, using the recently developed almost-Delaunay edges. For a set of graphs representing a protein family from the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database, subgraph mining typically identifies several hundred common subgraphs corresponding to spatial motifs that are frequently found in proteins in the family but rarely found outside of it. We find that some of the large motifs map onto known functional regions in two protein families explored in this study, i.e., serine proteases and kinases. We find that graphs based on almost-Delaunay edges significantly reduce the number of edges in the graph representation and hence present computational advantage, yet the patterns extracted from such graphs have a biological interpretation approximately equivalent to that of those extracted from distance based graphs.

  6. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walen, Holly

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. We choose very specific conditions: very low temperature (5 K), and very low sulfur coverage (≤ 0.1 monolayer). In this region of temperature-coverage space, which has not been examined previously for these adsorbate-metal systems, the effects of individual interactions between metals and sulfur are most apparent and can be assessed extensively with the aid of theory and modeling. Furthermore, at this temperature diffusion is minimal and relatively-mobile species can be isolated, and at low coverage the structures observed are not consumed by an extended reconstruction. The primary experimental technique is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental observations presented here---made under identical conditions---together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  7. Crossover among structural motifs in Pd-Au nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beien; Guesmi, Hazar; Creuze, Jérôme; Legrand, Bernard; Mottet, Christine

    2015-11-14

    The crossovers among the most abundant structural motifs (icosahedra, decahedra and truncated octahedra) of Pd-Au nanoalloys have been determined theoretically in a size range between 2 and 7 nm and for three compositions equivalent to Pd3Au, PdAu and PdAu3. The chemical ordering and segregation optimisation are performed via Monte Carlo simulations using semi-empirical tight-binding potentials fitted to ab initio calculations. The chemical configurations are then quenched via molecular dynamic simulations in order to compare their energy and characterize the equilibrium structures as a function of the cluster size. For the smaller sizes (of around 300 atoms and fewer) the structures are also optimized at the electronic level within ab initio calculations in order to validate the semi-empirical potential. The predictions of the crossover sizes for the nanoalloys cannot be simply extrapolated from the crossover of the pure nanoparticles but imply stress release phenomena related to the size misfit between the two metals. Indeed, alloying extends the range of stability of the icosahedron beyond that of the pure systems and the energy differences between decahedra and truncated octahedra become asymptotic, around the sizes of 5-6 nm. Nevertheless, such equilibrium results should be modulated regarding kinetic considerations or possible gas adsorption under experimental conditions.

  8. Common Functional Genetic Variants in Catecholamine Storage Vesicle Protein Promoter Motifs Interact to Trigger Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Wang, Lei; Rana, Brinda K.; Ghosh, Sajalendu; Mahata, Manjula; Salem, Rany M.; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Fung, Maple M.; Waalen, Jill; Tayo, Bamidele; Taupenot, Laurent; Mahata, Sushil K.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore transcriptional mechanisms whereby genetic variation in the CHGB promoter influence BP and hypertension. Background Hypertension is a complex trait in which deranged autonomic control of the circulation may be an etiological culprit. Chromogranin B (CHGB) is a major soluble protein in the core of catecholamine storage vesicles, playing a necessary (catalytic) role in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles. Previously we found that genetic variation at CHGB influenced plasma CHGB expression as well as autonomic function, and that BP association was maximal towards the 5′ end of the gene. Methods After polymorphism discovery, we functionally characterized the 2 common variants in the proximal CHGB promoter, A-296C and A-261T, which lay within the same haplotype block in black and white populations. CHGB promoter activity was studied by haplotype/luciferase reporter transfection. Transcriptional mechanisms were probed by EMSA and ChIP. Results The A-296C variant disrupted a c-FOS motif, and exhibited differential mobility shifting to chromaffin cell nuclear proteins during EMSA, differential binding of endogenous c-FOS on ChIP, and differential transcriptional response to exogenous c-FOS. A-261T disrupted motifs for SRY and YY1, with similar consequences for gel mobility during EMSA, endogenous factor binding during ChIP, and transcriptional responses to the exogenous factors. 2-SNP haplotype analyses demonstrated a profound (p∼3×10-20) effect of CHGB promoter variation on BP in the European ancestry population, with a rank order of CT

  9. RNAMotifScanX: a graph alignment approach for RNA structural motif identification.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cuncong; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-03-01

    RNA structural motifs are recurrent three-dimensional (3D) components found in the RNA architecture. These RNA structural motifs play important structural or functional roles and usually exhibit highly conserved 3D geometries and base-interaction patterns. Analysis of the RNA 3D structures and elucidation of their molecular functions heavily rely on efficient and accurate identification of these motifs. However, efficient RNA structural motif search tools are lacking due to the high complexity of these motifs. In this work, we present RNAMotifScanX, a motif search tool based on a base-interaction graph alignment algorithm. This novel algorithm enables automatic identification of both partially and fully matched motif instances. RNAMotifScanX considers noncanonical base-pairing interactions, base-stacking interactions, and sequence conservation of the motifs, which leads to significantly improved sensitivity and specificity as compared with other state-of-the-art search tools. RNAMotifScanX also adopts a carefully designed branch-and-bound technique, which enables ultra-fast search of large kink-turn motifs against a 23S rRNA. The software package RNAMotifScanX is implemented using GNU C++, and is freely available from http://genome.ucf.edu/RNAMotifScanX. © 2015 Zhong and Zhang; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Highly sampled tetranucleotide and tetraloop motifs enable evaluation of common RNA force fields.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Henriksen, Niel M; Roe, Daniel R; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Recent modifications and improvements to standard nucleic acid force fields have attempted to fix problems and issues that have been observed as longer timescale simulations have become routine. Although previous work has shown the ability to fold the UUCG stem-loop structure, until now no group has attempted to quantify the performance of current force fields using highly converged structural populations of the tetraloop conformational ensemble. In this study, we report the use of multiple independent sets of multidimensional replica exchange molecular dynamics (M-REMD) simulations with different initial conditions to generate well-converged conformational ensembles for the tetranucleotides r(GACC) and r(CCCC), as well as the larger UUCG tetraloop motif. By generating what is to our knowledge the most complete RNA structure ensembles reported to date for these systems, we remove the coupling between force field errors and errors due to incomplete sampling, providing a comprehensive comparison between current top-performing MD force fields for RNA. Of the RNA force fields tested in this study, none demonstrate the ability to correctly identify the most thermodynamically stable structure for all three systems. We discuss the deficiencies present in each potential function and suggest areas where improvements can be made. The results imply that although "short" (nsec-μsec timescale) simulations may stay close to their respective experimental structures and may well reproduce experimental observables, inevitably the current force fields will populate alternative incorrect structures that are more stable than those observed via experiment. © 2015 Bergonzo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Construction of DNA logic gates utilizing a H+/Ag+ induced i-motif structure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunhua; Sun, Hongxia; Xiang, Junfeng; Chen, Hongbo; Yang, Qianfan; Guan, Aijiao; Li, Qian; Yu, Lijia; Tang, Yalin

    2014-12-18

    A simple technology to construct diverse DNA logic gates (OR and INHIBIT) has been designed utilizing a H(+) and/or Ag(+) induced i-motif structure. The logic gates are easily controlled and also show a real time response towards inputs. The research provides a new insight for designing DNA logic gates using an i-motif DNA structure.

  12. A Common Motif Targets Huntingtin and the Androgen Receptor to the Proteasome*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Shweta; Shao, Jieya; Li, Jennifer X.; Li, Mei; Longo, Frank M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2008-01-01

    Huntington disease derives from a critically expanded polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (Htt) protein; a similar polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinobulbar muscular atrophy. AR activity also plays an essential role in prostate cancer. Molecular mechanisms that regulate Htt and AR degradation are not well understood but could have important therapeutic implications. We find that a pentapeptide motif (FQKLL) within the Htt protein regulates its degradation and subcellular localization to cytoplasm puncta. Disruption of the motif by alanine substitution at the hydrophobic residues increases the steady state level of the protein. Pulsechase analyses indicate that the motif regulates degradation. A similar motif (FQNLF) has corresponding activities in the AR protein. Transfer of the Htt motif with five flanking amino acids on either side to YFP reduces the steady state YFP level by rendering it susceptible to proteasome degradation. This work defines a novel proteasome-targeting motif that is necessary and sufficient to regulate the degradation of two disease-associated proteins. PMID:18586675

  13. Composite Structural Motifs of Binding Sites for Delineating Biological Functions of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Akira R.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Most biological processes are described as a series of interactions between proteins and other molecules, and interactions are in turn described in terms of atomic structures. To annotate protein functions as sets of interaction states at atomic resolution, and thereby to better understand the relation between protein interactions and biological functions, we conducted exhaustive all-against-all atomic structure comparisons of all known binding sites for ligands including small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids, and identified recurring elementary motifs. By integrating the elementary motifs associated with each subunit, we defined composite motifs that represent context-dependent combinations of elementary motifs. It is demonstrated that function similarity can be better inferred from composite motif similarity compared to the similarity of protein sequences or of individual binding sites. By integrating the composite motifs associated with each protein function, we define meta-composite motifs each of which is regarded as a time-independent diagrammatic representation of a biological process. It is shown that meta-composite motifs provide richer annotations of biological processes than sequence clusters. The present results serve as a basis for bridging atomic structures to higher-order biological phenomena by classification and integration of binding site structures. PMID:22347478

  14. Stabilization of i-motif structures by 2′-β-fluorination of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hala Abou; Harkness, Robert W.; Martin-Pintado, Nerea; Wilds, Christopher J.; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Mittermaier, Anthony K.; González, Carlos; Damha, Masad J.

    2016-01-01

    i-Motifs are four-stranded DNA structures consisting of two parallel DNA duplexes held together by hemi-protonated and intercalated cytosine base pairs (C:CH+). They have attracted considerable research interest for their potential role in gene regulation and their use as pH responsive switches and building blocks in macromolecular assemblies. At neutral and basic pH values, the cytosine bases deprotonate and the structure unfolds into single strands. To avoid this limitation and expand the range of environmental conditions supporting i-motif folding, we replaced the sugar in DNA by 2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinose. We demonstrate that such a modification significantly stabilizes i-motif formation over a wide pH range, including pH 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that 2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinose adopts a C2′-endo conformation, instead of the C3′-endo conformation usually found in unmodified i-motifs. Nevertheless, this substitution does not alter the overall i-motif structure. This conformational change, together with the changes in charge distribution in the sugar caused by the electronegative fluorine atoms, leads to a number of favorable sequential and inter-strand electrostatic interactions. The availability of folded i-motifs at neutral pH will aid investigations into the biological function of i-motifs in vitro, and will expand i-motif applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27166371

  15. Motif discovery with data mining in 3D protein structure databases: discovery, validation and prediction of the U-shape zinc binding ("Huf-Zinc") motif.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Gao, He; Han, Hao; Baeten, Lies; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Zhang, Louxin; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Data mining in protein databases, derivatives from more fundamental protein 3D structure and sequence databases, has considerable unearthed potential for the discovery of sequence motif--structural motif--function relationships as the finding of the U-shape (Huf-Zinc) motif, originally a small student's project, exemplifies. The metal ion zinc is critically involved in universal biological processes, ranging from protein-DNA complexes and transcription regulation to enzymatic catalysis and metabolic pathways. Proteins have evolved a series of motifs to specifically recognize and bind zinc ions. Many of these, so called zinc fingers, are structurally independent globular domains with discontinuous binding motifs made up of residues mostly far apart in sequence. Through a systematic approach starting from the BRIX structure fragment database, we discovered that there exists another predictable subset of zinc-binding motifs that not only have a conserved continuous sequence pattern but also share a characteristic local conformation, despite being included in totally different overall folds. While this does not allow general prediction of all Zn binding motifs, a HMM-based web server, Huf-Zinc, is available for prediction of these novel, as well as conventional, zinc finger motifs in protein sequences. The Huf-Zinc webserver can be freely accessed through this URL (http://mendel.bii.a-star.edu.sg/METHODS/hufzinc/).

  16. Virus-Host Coevolution: Common Patterns of Nucleotide Motif Usage in Flaviviridae and Their Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Francisco P.; Mota, Bruno E. F.; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Azevedo, Vasco; Macedo, Andréa M.; Tauch, Andreas; Machado, Carlos R.; Franco, Glória R.

    2009-01-01

    Virus-host biological interaction is a continuous coevolutionary process involving both host immune system and viral escape mechanisms. Flaviviridae family is composed of fast evolving RNA viruses that infects vertebrate (mammals and birds) and/or invertebrate (ticks and mosquitoes) organisms. These host groups are very distinct life forms separated by a long evolutionary time, so lineage-specific anti-viral mechanisms are likely to have evolved. Flaviviridae viruses which infect a single host lineage would be subjected to specific host-induced pressures and, therefore, selected by them. In this work we compare the genomic evolutionary patterns of Flaviviridae viruses and their hosts in an attempt to uncover coevolutionary processes inducing common features in such disparate groups. Especially, we have analyzed dinucleotide and codon usage patterns in the coding regions of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms as well as in Flaviviridae viruses which specifically infect one or both host types. The two host groups possess very distinctive dinucleotide and codon usage patterns. A pronounced CpG under-representation was found in the vertebrate group, possibly induced by the methylation-deamination process, as well as a prominent TpA decrease. The invertebrate group displayed only a TpA frequency reduction bias. Flaviviridae viruses mimicked host nucleotide motif usage in a host-specific manner. Vertebrate-infecting viruses possessed under-representation of CpG and TpA, and insect-only viruses displayed only a TpA under-representation bias. Single-host Flaviviridae members which persistently infect mammals or insect hosts (Hepacivirus and insect-only Flavivirus, respectively) were found to posses a codon usage profile more similar to that of their hosts than to related Flaviviridae. We demonstrated that vertebrates and mosquitoes genomes are under very distinct lineage-specific constraints, and Flaviviridae viruses which specifically infect these lineages appear to be

  17. Active motif finder - a bio-tool based on mutational structures in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Mani; Shanmuga-priya, Palaniyandi; Hemavathi, Kamalakannan; Seenivasagam, Rengasamy

    2011-01-01

    Active Motif Finder (AMF) is a novel algorithmic tool, designed based on mutations in DNA sequences. Tools available at present for finding motifs are based on matching a given motif in the query sequence. AMF describes a new algorithm that identifies the occurrences of patterns which possess all kinds of mutations like insertion, deletion and mismatch. The algorithm is mainly based on the Alignment Score Matrix (ASM) computation by comparing input motif with full length sequence. Much of the effort in bioinformatics is directed to identify these motifs in the sequences of newly discovered genes. The proposed bio-tool serves as an open resource for analysis and useful for studying polymorphisms in DNA sequences. AMF can be searched via a user-friendly interface. This tool is intended to serve the scientific community working in the areas of chemical and structural biology, and is freely available to all users, at http://www.sastra.edu/scbt/amf/. PMID:23554723

  18. A common sequence motif determines the Cajal body-specific localization of box H/ACA scaRNAs.

    PubMed

    Richard, Patricia; Darzacq, Xavier; Bertrand, Edouard; Jády, Beáta E; Verheggen, Céline; Kiss, Tamás

    2003-08-15

    Post-transcriptional synthesis of 2'-O-methylated nucleotides and pseudouridines in Sm spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs takes place in the nucleoplasmic Cajal bodies and it is directed by guide RNAs (scaRNAs) that are structurally and functionally indistinguishable from small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) directing rRNA modification in the nucleolus. The scaRNAs are synthesized in the nucleoplasm and specifically targeted to Cajal bodies. Here, mutational analysis of the human U85 box C/D-H/ACA scaRNA, followed by in situ localization, demonstrates that box H/ACA scaRNAs share a common Cajal body-specific localization signal, the CAB box. Two copies of the evolutionarily conserved CAB consensus (UGAG) are located in the terminal loops of the 5' and 3' hairpins of the box H/ACA domains of mammalian, Drosophila and plant scaRNAs. Upon alteration of the CAB boxes, mutant scaRNAs accumulate in the nucleolus. In turn, authentic snoRNAs can be targeted into Cajal bodies by addition of exogenous CAB box motifs. Our results indicate that scaRNAs represent an ancient group of small nuclear RNAs which are localized to Cajal bodies by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism.

  19. Prediction of the structural motifs of sandwich proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fokas, A. S.; Gelfand, I. M.; Kister, A. E.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the supersecondary structure of a large group of proteins, the so-called sandwich proteins. The analysis of a large number of such proteins has led us to propose a set of rules that can be used to predict the possible arrangements of strands in the two β-sheets forming a given sandwich structure. These rules imply the existence of certain invariant supersecondary substructures common to all sandwich proteins. Furthermore, they dramatically restrict the number of permissible arrangements. For example, whereas for proteins consisting of three strands in each β-sheet 180 possible strand arrangements exist a priori, our rules imply that only 15 of them are permissible. Five of these predicted arrangements describe all currently known sandwich proteins with six strands. PMID:15550537

  20. Excluded volume effects on the kinetic assembling of a structural motif for RNA catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-09-01

    We establish the role of excluded volume effects on the loss of conformational entropy due to pseudoknot formation in RNA. This pseudoknot appears to be the structural motif responsible for shaping the splicing site of certain noncoding RNA transcriptional products. Focusing on the illustrative example of the YC4 intron, we show that the emergence of this motif is kinetically driven and prevails over competing catalytically inert secondary structure due to excluded volume effects which favor the correlation of interacting intramolecular loops.

  1. Pressure-dependent formation of i-motif and G-quadruplex DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Sugimoto, N

    2015-12-14

    Pressure is an important physical stimulus that can influence the fate of cells by causing structural changes in biomolecules such as DNA. We investigated the effect of high pressure on the folding of duplex, DNA i-motif, and G-quadruplex (G4) structures; the non-canonical structures may be modulators of expression of genes involved in cancer progression. The i-motif structure was stabilized by high pressure, whereas the G4 structure was destabilized. The melting temperature of an intramolecular i-motif formed by 5'-dCGG(CCT)10CGG-3' increased from 38.8 °C at atmospheric pressure to 61.5 °C at 400 MPa. This effect was also observed in the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, a crowding agent. In the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, the G4 structure was less destabilized than in the absence of the crowding agent. P-T stability diagrams of duplex DNA with a telomeric sequence indicated that the duplex is more stable than G4 and i-motif structures under low pressure, but the i-motif dominates the structural composition under high pressure. Under crowding conditions, the P-T diagrams indicated that the duplex does not form under high pressure, and i-motif and G4 structures dominate. Our findings imply that temperature regulates the formation of the duplex structure, whereas pressure triggers the formation of non-canonical DNA structures like i-motif and G4. These results suggest that pressure impacts the function of nucleic acids by stabilizing non-canonical structures; this may be relevant to deep sea organisms and during evolution under prebiotic conditions.

  2. Ciliate pellicular proteome identifies novel protein families with characteristic repeat motifs that are common to alveolates.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sven B; Kraft, Lesleigh G K; van Dooren, Giel G; Goodman, Christopher D; Ford, Kristina L; Cassin, Andrew M; Bacic, Antony; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Waller, Ross F

    2011-03-01

    The pellicles of alveolates (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates) share a common organization, yet perform very divergent functions, including motility, host cell invasion, and armor. The alveolate pellicle consists of a system of flattened membrane sacs (alveoli, which are the defining feature of the group) below the plasma membrane that is supported by a membrane skeleton as well as a network of microtubules and other filamentous elements. We recently showed that a family of proteins, alveolins, are common and unique to this pellicular structure in alveolates. To identify additional proteins that contribute to this structure, a pellicle proteome study was conducted for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. We found 1,173 proteins associated with this structure, 45% (529 proteins) of which represented novel proteins without matches to other functionally characterized proteins. Expression of four newly identified T. thermophila pellicular proteins as green fluorescent protein-fusion constructs confirmed pellicular location, and one new protein located in the oral apparatus. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that 21% of the putative pellicular proteins, predominantly the novel proteins, contained highly repetitive regions with strong amino acid biases for particular residues (K, E, Q, L, I, and V). When the T. thermophila novel proteins were compared with apicomplexan genomic data, 278 proteins with high sequence similarity were identified, suggesting that many of these putative pellicular components are shared between the alveolates. Of these shared proteins, 126 contained the distinctive repeat regions. Localization of two such proteins in Toxoplasma gondii confirmed their role in the pellicle and in doing so identified two new proteins of the apicomplexan invasive structure--the apical complex. Screening broadly for these repetitive domains in genomic data revealed large and actively evolving families of such proteins in alveolates, suggesting that these

  3. Recurring sequence-structure motifs in (βα)8-barrel proteins and experimental optimization of a chimeric protein designed based on such motifs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Tongchuan; Liu, Ruicun; Song, Meilin; Wang, Juncheng; Hong, Jiong; Chen, Quan; Liu, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    An interesting way of generating novel artificial proteins is to combine sequence motifs from natural proteins, mimicking the evolutionary path suggested by natural proteins comprising recurring motifs. We analyzed the βα and αβ modules of TIM barrel proteins by structure alignment-based sequence clustering. A number of preferred motifs were identified. A chimeric TIM was designed by using recurring elements as mutually compatible interfaces. The foldability of the designed TIM protein was then significantly improved by six rounds of directed evolution. The melting temperature has been improved by more than 20°C. A variety of characteristics suggested that the resulting protein is well-folded. Our analysis provided a library of peptide motifs that is potentially useful for different protein engineering studies. The protein engineering strategy of using recurring motifs as interfaces to connect partial natural proteins may be applied to other protein folds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimal motif peptide structure of metzincin clan zinc peptidases in micelles.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Akira; Suzuki, Takako; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Rumiko; Ariyasu, Shinya; Yamamura, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that the functions of metalloproteins generally originate from their metal-binding motifs. However, the intrinsic nature of individual motifs remains unknown, particularly the details about metal-binding effects on the folding of motifs; the converse is also unknown, although there is no doubt that the motif is the core of the reactivity for each metalloprotein. In this study, we focused our attention on the zinc-binding motif of the metzincin clan family, HEXXHXXGXXH; this family contains the general zinc-binding sequence His-Glu-Xaa-Xaa-His (HEXXH) and the extended GXXH region. We adopted the motif sequence of stromelysin-1 and investigated the folding properties of the Trp-labeled peptides WAHEIAHSLGLFHA (STR-W1), AWHEIAHSLGLFHA (STR-W2), AHEIAHSLGWFHA (STR-W11), and AHEIAHSLGLFHWA (STR-W14) in the presence and absence of zinc ions in hydrophobic micellar environments by circular dichroism (CD) measurements. We accessed successful incorporation of these zinc peptides into micelles using quenching of Trp fluorescence. Results of CD studies indicated that two of the Trp-incorporated peptides, STR-W1 and STR-W14, exhibited helical folding in the hydrophobic region of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride micelle. The NMR structural analysis of the apo STR-W14 revealed that the conformation in the C-terminus GXXH region significantly differred between the apo state in the micelle and the reported Zn-bound state of stromelysin-1 in crystal structures. The structural analyses of the qualitative Zn-binding properties of this motif peptide provide an interesting Zn-binding mechanism: the minimum consensus motif in the metzincin clan, a basic zinc-binding motif with an extended GXXH region, has the potential to serve as a preorganized Zn binding scaffold in a hydrophobic environment.

  5. Identifying DNA-binding proteins using structural motifs and the electrostatic potential

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Hugh P.; Garcia, Mario A.; Jones, Susan; Thornton, Janet M.

    2004-01-01

    Robust methods to detect DNA-binding proteins from structures of unknown function are important for structural biology. This paper describes a method for identifying such proteins that (i) have a solvent accessible structural motif necessary for DNA-binding and (ii) a positive electrostatic potential in the region of the binding region. We focus on three structural motifs: helix–turn-helix (HTH), helix–hairpin–helix (HhH) and helix–loop–helix (HLH). We find that the combination of these variables detect 78% of proteins with an HTH motif, which is a substantial improvement over previous work based purely on structural templates and is comparable to more complex methods of identifying DNA-binding proteins. Similar true positive fractions are achieved for the HhH and HLH motifs. We see evidence of wide evolutionary diversity for DNA-binding proteins with an HTH motif, and much smaller diversity for those with an HhH or HLH motif. PMID:15356290

  6. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  7. Ionic polymers as a new structural motif for high-energy-density materials.

    PubMed

    Bushuyev, Oleksandr S; Brown, Preston; Maiti, Amitesh; Gee, Richard H; Peterson, Geneva R; Weeks, Brandon L; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J

    2012-01-25

    Energetic materials have been used for nearly two centuries in military affairs and to cut labor costs and expedite laborious processes in mining, tunneling, construction, demolition, and agriculture, making a tremendous contribution to the world economy. Yet there has been little advancement in the development of altogether new energetic motifs despite long-standing research efforts to develop superior materials. We report the discovery of new energetic compounds of exceptionally high energy content and novel polymeric structure which avoid the use of lead and mercury salts common in conventional primary explosives. Laboratory tests indicate the remarkable performance of these Ni- and Co-based energetic materials, while DFT calculations indicate that these are possibly the most powerful metal-based energetic materials known to date, with heats of detonation comparable with those of the most powerful organic-based high explosives currently in use.

  8. A common set of conserved motifs in a vast variety of putative nucleic acid-dependent ATPases including MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, E V

    1993-01-01

    A new superfamily of (putative) DNA-dependent ATPases is described that includes the ATPase domains of prokaryotic NtrC-related transcription regulators, MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication, and a group of uncharacterized bacterial and chloroplast proteins. MCM proteins are shown to contain a modified form of the ATP-binding motif and are predicted to mediate ATP-dependent opening of double-stranded DNA in the replication origins. In a second line of investigation, it is demonstrated that the products of unidentified open reading frames from Marchantia mitochondria and from yeast, and a domain of a baculovirus protein involved in viral DNA replication are related to the superfamily III of DNA and RNA helicases that previously has been known to include only proteins of small viruses. Comparison of the multiple alignments showed that the proteins of the NtrC superfamily and the helicases of superfamily III share three related sequence motifs tightly packed in the ATPase domain that consists of 100-150 amino acid residues. A similar array of conserved motifs is found in the family of DnaA-related ATPases. It is hypothesized that the three large groups of nucleic acid-dependent ATPases have similar structure of the core ATPase domain and have evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:8332451

  9. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-04-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function.

  10. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  11. Novel DNA binding motifs in the DNA repair enzyme endonuclease III crystal structure.

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, M M; Ahern, H; Xing, D; Cunningham, R P; Tainer, J A

    1995-01-01

    The 1.85 A crystal structure of endonuclease III, combined with mutational analysis, suggests the structural basis for the DNA binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. Helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and [4Fe-4S] cluster loop (FCL) motifs, which we have named for their secondary structure, bracket the cleft separating the two alpha-helical domains of the enzyme. These two novel DNA binding motifs and the solvent-filled pocket in the cleft between them all lie within a positively charged and sequence-conserved surface region. Lys120 and Asp138, both shown by mutagenesis to be catalytically important, lie at the mouth of this pocket, suggesting that this pocket is part of the active site. The positions of the HhH motif and protruding FCL motif, which contains the DNA binding residue Lys191, can accommodate B-form DNA, with a flipped-out base bound within the active site pocket. The identification of HhH and FCL sequence patterns in other DNA binding proteins suggests that these motifs may be a recurrent structural theme for DNA binding proteins. Images PMID:7664751

  12. Novel method to detect a motif of local structures in different protein conformations.

    PubMed

    Wako, H; Yamato, T

    1998-11-01

    In order to detect a motif of local structures in different protein conformations, the Delaunay tessellation is applied to protein structures represented by C(alpha) atoms only. By the Delaunay tessellation the interior space of the protein is uniquely divided up into Delaunay tetrahedra whose vertices are the C(alpha) atom positions. Some edges of the tetrahedra are virtual bonds connecting adjacent residues' C(alpha) atoms along the polypeptide chain and others indicate interactions between residues nearest neighbouring in space. The rules are proposed to assign a code, i.e., a string of digits, to each tetrahedron to characterize the local structure constructed by the vertex residues of one relevant tetrahedron and four surrounding it. Many sets comprised of the local structures with the same code are obtained from 293 proteins, each of which has relatively low sequence similarity with the others. The local structures in each set are similar enough to each other to represent a motif. Some of them are parts of secondary or supersecondary structures, and others are irregular, but definite structures. The method proposed here can find motifs of local structures in the Protein Data Bank much more easily and rapidly than other conventional methods, because they are represented by codes. The motifs detected in this method can provide more detailed information about specific interactions between residues in the local structures, because the edges of the Delaunay tetrahedra are regarded to express interactions between residues nearest neighbouring in space.

  13. Structural coalescence underlies the aggregation propensity of a β-barrel protein motif.

    PubMed

    Angelani, Carla R; Caramelo, Julio J; Curto, Lucrecia M; Delfino, José M

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding of the structural foundations underlying protein aggregation is an elusive goal of central biomedical importance. A step toward this aim is exemplified by the β-barrel motif represented by the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and two abridged all-β sheet forms (Δ98Δ and Δ78Δ). At odds with the established notion that a perturbation of the native fold should necessarily favor a buildup of intermediate forms with an enhanced tendency to aggregate, the intrinsic stability (ΔG°H2O) of these proteins does not bear a straightforward correlation with their trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced aggregation propensity. In view of this fact, we found it more insightful to delve into the connection between structure and stability under sub-aggregating conditions (10% TFE). In the absence of the co-solvent, the abridged variants display a common native-like region decorated with a disordered C-terminal stretch. Upon TFE addition, an increase in secondary structure content is observed, assimilating them to the parent protein. In this sense, TFE perturbs a common native like region while exerting a global compaction effect. Importantly, in all cases, fatty acid binding function is preserved. Interestingly, energetic as well as structural diversity in aqueous solution evolves into a common conformational ensemble more akin in stability. These facts reconcile apparent paradoxical findings related to stability and rates of aggregation. This scenario likely mimics the accrual of aggregation-prone species in the population, an early critical event for the development of fibrillation.

  14. Structural coalescence underlies the aggregation propensity of a β-barrel protein motif

    PubMed Central

    Angelani, Carla R.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Curto, Lucrecia M.; Delfino, José M.

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding of the structural foundations underlying protein aggregation is an elusive goal of central biomedical importance. A step toward this aim is exemplified by the β-barrel motif represented by the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and two abridged all-β sheet forms (Δ98Δ and Δ78Δ). At odds with the established notion that a perturbation of the native fold should necessarily favor a buildup of intermediate forms with an enhanced tendency to aggregate, the intrinsic stability (ΔG°H2O) of these proteins does not bear a straightforward correlation with their trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced aggregation propensity. In view of this fact, we found it more insightful to delve into the connection between structure and stability under sub-aggregating conditions (10% TFE). In the absence of the co-solvent, the abridged variants display a common native-like region decorated with a disordered C-terminal stretch. Upon TFE addition, an increase in secondary structure content is observed, assimilating them to the parent protein. In this sense, TFE perturbs a common native like region while exerting a global compaction effect. Importantly, in all cases, fatty acid binding function is preserved. Interestingly, energetic as well as structural diversity in aqueous solution evolves into a common conformational ensemble more akin in stability. These facts reconcile apparent paradoxical findings related to stability and rates of aggregation. This scenario likely mimics the accrual of aggregation-prone species in the population, an early critical event for the development of fibrillation. PMID:28187186

  15. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. These structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs. PMID:26497381

  16. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. These structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.

  17. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi -Zhong; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. In addition, these structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.

  18. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; ...

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. In addition, these structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been muchmore » less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.« less

  19. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Richard J; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M; Majoul, Irina V; Hughson, Frederick M; Evans, Philip R; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J

    2015-11-17

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ'ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1-6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing.

  20. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  1. New structural and functional contexts of the Dx[DN]xDG linear motif: insights into evolution of calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J; Woodhead, Duncan D; Wong, Prudence W H; Galperin, Michael Y

    2011-01-01

    Binding of calcium ions (Ca²⁺) to proteins can have profound effects on their structure and function. Common roles of calcium binding include structure stabilization and regulation of activity. It is known that diverse families--EF-hands being one of at least twelve--use a Dx[DN]xDG linear motif to bind calcium in near-identical fashion. Here, four novel structural contexts for the motif are described. Existing experimental data for one of them, a thermophilic archaeal subtilisin, demonstrate for the first time a role for Dx[DN]xDG-bound calcium in protein folding. An integrin-like embedding of the motif in the blade of a β-propeller fold--here named the calcium blade--is discovered in structures of bacterial and fungal proteins. Furthermore, sensitive database searches suggest a common origin for the calcium blade in β-propeller structures of different sizes and a pan-kingdom distribution of these proteins. Factors favouring the multiple convergent evolution of the motif appear to include its general Asp-richness, the regular spacing of the Asp residues and the fact that change of Asp into Gly and vice versa can occur though a single nucleotide change. Among the known structural contexts for the Dx[DN]xDG motif, only the calcium blade and the EF-hand are currently found intracellularly in large numbers, perhaps because the higher extracellular concentration of Ca²⁺ allows for easier fixing of newly evolved motifs that have acquired useful functions. The analysis presented here will inform ongoing efforts toward prediction of similar calcium-binding motifs from sequence information alone.

  2. Computational study enlightens the structural role of the alcohol acyltransferase DFGWG motif.

    PubMed

    Morales-Quintana, Luis; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Herrera, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol acyltransferases (AAT) catalyze the esterification reaction of alcohols and acyl-CoA into esters in fruits and flowers. Despite the high divergence between AAT enzymes, two important and conserved motifs are shared: the catalytic HxxxD motif, and the DFGWG motif. The latter is proposed to play a structural role; however, its function remains unclear. The DFGWG motif is located in loop 21 and stabilized by a hydrogen bond between residues Y52 and D381. Also, this motif is distant from the HxxxD motif, and most probably without a direct role in the substrate interaction. To evaluate the role of the DFGWG motif, in silico analysis was performed in the VpAAT1 protein. Three mutants (Y52F, D381A and D381E) were evaluated. Major changes (size and shape) in the solvent channels were found, although no differences were revealed in the entire 3D structure. Molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies described unfavorable energies for interaction of the mutant proteins with different substrates, as well as unfavored ligand orientations in the solvent channel. Additionally, we examined the contribution of different energetic parameters to the total free energy of protein-ligand complexes by the MM-GBSA method. The complexes differed mainly in their van der Waals contributions and have unfavorable electrostatic interactions. VpAAT1, Y52F and D381A mutants showed a dramatic reduction in the binding capacity to several substrates, which is related to differences in electrostatic potential on the protein surfaces, suggesting that D381 from the DFGWG motif and residue Y52 play a crucial role in maintenance of the adequate solvent channel structure required for catalysis. Graphical abstract Molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM-GBSA free energy calculations were employed to obtain quantitative estimates for the binding free energies of wild type Vasconcellea pubescens alcohol acyltransferase (VpAAT1-WT) and the protein mutants. Left VpAAT1

  3. Intramolecular i-motif structure at acidic pH for progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) repeat d(CCCCGCCCCGCG)n.

    PubMed

    Pataskar, S S; Dash, D; Brahmachari, S K

    2001-10-01

    The most common mutation associated with Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy (EPM1) of Unverricht-Lundberg type is the expansion of a dodecamer repeat, d(CCCCGCCCCGCG)n. We show that the C-rich strand of this repeat (2-3 copies) forms intercalated i-motif structure at acidic pH as judged by CD spectroscopy and anomalous gel electrophoretic mobility. The stability of the structure increases with the increase in the length of the repeat. Transient formation of stable, folded back structure like i-motif could play an important role in the mechanism of expansion of this repeat.

  4. Using hybrid hierarchical K-means (HHK) clustering algorithm for protein sequence motif super-rule-tree (SRT) structure construction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bernard; He, Jieyue; Pellicer, Stephen; Pan, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Many algorithms or techniques to discover motifs require a predefined fixed window size in advance. Because of the fixed size, these approaches often deliver a number of similar motifs simply shifted by some bases or including mismatches. To confront the mismatched motifs problem, we use the super-rule concept to construct a Super-Rule-Tree (SRT) by a modified Hybrid Hierarchical K-means (HHK) clustering algorithm, which requires no parameter set-up to identify the similarities and dissimilarities between the motifs. By analysing the motif results generated by our approach, they are significant not only in sequence area but also in secondary structure similarity.

  5. 'Size leap' algorithm: an efficient extraction of the longest common motifs from a molecular sequence set. Application to the DNA sequence reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Danckaert, A; Chappey, C; Hazout, S

    1991-10-01

    We propose a new method, called 'size leap' algorithm, of search for motifs of maximum size and common to two fragments at least. It allows the creation of a reduced database of motifs from a set of sequences whose size obeys the series of Fibonacci numbers. The convenience lies in the efficiency of the motif extraction. It can be applied in the establishment of overlap regions for DNA sequence reconstruction and multiple alignment of biological sequences. The method of complete DNA sequence reconstruction by extraction of the longest motifs ('anchor motifs') is presented as an application of the size leap algorithm. The details of a reconstruction from three sequenced fragments are given as an example.

  6. ssHMM: extracting intuitive sequence-structure motifs from high-throughput RNA-binding protein data.

    PubMed

    Heller, David; Krestel, Ralf; Ohler, Uwe; Vingron, Martin; Marsico, Annalisa

    2017-08-30

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in RNA post-transcriptional regulation and recognize target RNAs via sequence-structure motifs. The extent to which RNA structure influences protein binding in the presence or absence of a sequence motif is still poorly understood. Existing RNA motif finders either take the structure of the RNA only partially into account, or employ models which are not directly interpretable as sequence-structure motifs. We developed ssHMM, an RNA motif finder based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) and Gibbs sampling which fully captures the relationship between RNA sequence and secondary structure preference of a given RBP. Compared to previous methods which output separate logos for sequence and structure, it directly produces a combined sequence-structure motif when trained on a large set of sequences. ssHMM's model is visualized intuitively as a graph and facilitates biological interpretation. ssHMM can be used to find novel bona fide sequence-structure motifs of uncharacterized RBPs, such as the one presented here for the YY1 protein. ssHMM reaches a high motif recovery rate on synthetic data, it recovers known RBP motifs from CLIP-Seq data, and scales linearly on the input size, being considerably faster than MEMERIS and RNAcontext on large datasets while being on par with GraphProt. It is freely available on Github and as a Docker image. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. A proposed superfamily of transposase genes: transposon-like elements in ciliated protozoa and a common "D35E" motif.

    PubMed Central

    Doak, T G; Doerder, F P; Jahn, C L; Herrick, G

    1994-01-01

    The transposon-like elements TBE1, Tec1, and Tec2 of hypotrichous ciliated protozoa appear to encode a protein that belongs to the IS630-Tc1 family of transposases. The Anabaena IS895 transposase also is placed in this family. We note that most family members transpose into the dinucleotide target, TA, and that members with eukaryotic hosts have a tendency for somatic excision that is carried to an extreme by the ciliate elements. Alignments including the additional members, and also mariner elements, show that transposases of this family share strongly conserved residues in a large C-terminal portion, including a fully conserved dipeptide, Asp-Glu (DE), and a block consisting of a fully conserved Asp and highly conserved Glu, separated by 34 or 35 residues (D35E). This D35E motif likely is homologous to the previously characterized D35E motif of the family of retroviral-retrotransposon integrases and IS3-like transposases. Because it is known that the IS3-retroposon D35E region is a critical portion of a domain capable of various in vitro transposition-related reactions, the results suggest that the two families share homologous catalytic transposase domains and that members of both families may share a common transposition mechanism. PMID:8302872

  8. Common Motifs in the Response of Cereal Primary Metabolism to Fungal Pathogens are not Based on Similar Transcriptional Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Voll, Lars Matthias; Horst, Robin Jonathan; Voitsik, Anna-Maria; Zajic, Doreen; Samans, Birgit; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Doehlemann, Gunther; Münch, Steffen; Wahl, Ramon; Molitor, Alexandra; Hofmann, Jörg; Schmiedl, Alfred; Waller, Frank; Deising, Holger Bruno; Kahmann, Regine; Kämper, Jörg; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    During compatible interactions with their host plants, biotrophic plant–pathogens subvert host metabolism to ensure the sustained provision of nutrient assimilates by the colonized host cells. To investigate, whether common motifs can be revealed in the response of primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism toward colonization with biotrophic fungi in cereal leaves, we have conducted a combined metabolome and transcriptome study of three quite divergent pathosystems, the barley powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei), the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, and the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola, the latter being a hemibiotroph that only exhibits an initial biotrophic phase during its establishment. Based on the analysis of 42 water-soluble metabolites, we were able to separate early biotrophic from late biotrophic interactions by hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, irrespective of the plant host. Interestingly, the corresponding transcriptome dataset could not discriminate between these stages of biotrophy, irrespective, of whether transcript data for genes of central metabolism or the entire transcriptome dataset was used. Strong differences in the transcriptional regulation of photosynthesis, glycolysis, the TCA cycle, lipid biosynthesis, and cell wall metabolism were observed between the pathosystems. However, increased contents of Gln, Asn, and glucose as well as diminished contents of PEP and 3-PGA were common to early post-penetration stages of all interactions. On the transcriptional level, genes of the TCA cycle, nucleotide energy metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis exhibited consistent trends among the compared biotrophic interactions, identifying the requirement for metabolic energy and the rearrangement of amino acid pools as common transcriptional motifs during early biotrophy. Both metabolome and transcript data were employed to generate models of leaf primary metabolism during early

  9. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA.

  10. Spectroscopic Signatures and Structural Motifs of Dopamine: a Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Vipin Bahadur

    2016-06-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an essential neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it plays integral role in numerous brain functions including behaviour, cognition, emotion, working memory and associated learning. In the present work the conformational landscapes of neutral and protonated dopamine have been investigated in the gas phase and in aqueous solution by MP2 and DFT (M06-2X, ωB97X-D, B3LYP and B3LYP-D3) methods. Twenty lowest energy structures of neutral DA were subjected to geometry optimization and the gauche conformer, GIa, was found to be the lowest gas phase structure at the each level of theory in agreement with the experimental rotational spectroscopy. All folded gauche conformers (GI) where lone electron pair of the NH2 group is directed towards the π system of the aromatic ring ( 'non up' ) are found more stable in the gas phase. While in aqueous solution, all those gauche conformers (GII) where lone electron pair of the NH2 group is directed opposite from the π system of the aromatic ring ('up' structures) are stabilized significantly.Nine lowest energy structures, protonated at the amino group, are optimized at the same MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. In the most stable gauche structures, g-1 and g+1, mainly electrostatic cation - π interaction is further stabilized by significant dispersion forces as predicted by the substantial differences between the DFT and dispersion corrected DFT-D3 calculations. In aqueous environment the intra-molecular cation- π distance in g-1 and g+1 isomers, slightly increases compared to the gas phase and the magnitude of the cation- π interaction is reduced relative to the gas phase, because solvation of the cation decreases its interaction energy with the π face of aromatic system. The IR intensity of the bound N-H+ stretching mode provides characteristic 'IR spectroscopic signatures' which can reflect the strength of cation- π interaction energy. The CC2 lowest lying S1 ( 1ππ* ) excited state of neutral

  11. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanvir; Alazmi, Meshari; Gao, Xin; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-06-15

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acid motifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs.

  12. Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Structural Motifs: From Solution to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is involved in important metabolic reactions where the biological function is intrinsically related to changes in conformation. In the present work, FAD conformational changes were studied in solution and in gas phase by measuring the fluorescence decay time and ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS, in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer, TIMS) as a function of the solvent conditions (i.e., organic content) and gas-phase collisional partner (i.e., N2 doped with organic molecules). Changes in the fluorescence decay suggest that FAD can exist in four conformations in solution, where the abundance of the extended conformations increases with the organic content. TIMS-MS experiments showed that FAD can exist in the gas phase as deprotonated (M = C27H31N9O15P2) and protonated forms (M = C27H33N9O15P2) and that multiple conformations (up to 12) can be observed as a function of the starting solution for the [M + H]+ and [M + Na]+molecular ions. In addition, changes in the relative abundances of the gas-phase structures were observed from a “stack” to a “close” conformation when organic molecules were introduced in the TIMS cell as collision partners. Candidate structures optimized at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) were proposed for each IMS band, and results showed that the most abundant IMS band corresponds to the most stable candidate structure. Solution and gas-phase experiments suggest that the driving force that stabilizes the different conformations is based on the interaction of the adenine and isoalloxazine rings that can be tailored by the “solvation” effect created with the organic molecules. PMID:25222439

  13. Crystal structure of interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) bound to IL-21 reveals that sugar chain interacting with WSXWS motif is integral part of IL-21R.

    PubMed

    Hamming, Ole J; Kang, Lishan; Svensson, Anders; Karlsen, Jesper L; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik; Paludan, Søren R; Hjorth, Siv A; Bondensgaard, Kent; Hartmann, Rune

    2012-03-16

    IL-21 is a class I cytokine that exerts pleiotropic effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. It signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) and the common γ-chain. A hallmark of the class I cytokine receptors is the class I cytokine receptor signature motif (WSXWS). The exact role of this motif has not been determined yet; however, it has been implicated in diverse functions, including ligand binding, receptor internalization, proper folding, and export, as well as signal transduction. Furthermore, the WXXW motif is known to be a consensus sequence for C-mannosylation. Here, we present the crystal structure of IL-21 bound to IL-21R and reveal that the WSXWS motif of IL-21R is C-mannosylated at the first tryptophan. We furthermore demonstrate that a sugar chain bridges the two fibronectin domains that constitute the extracellular domain of IL-21R and anchors at the WSXWS motif through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, including mannosylation. The glycan thus transforms the V-shaped receptor into an A-frame. This finding offers a novel structural explanation of the role of the class I cytokine signature motif.

  14. Crystal Structure of Interleukin-21 Receptor (IL-21R) Bound to IL-21 Reveals That Sugar Chain Interacting with WSXWS Motif Is Integral Part of IL-21R*

    PubMed Central

    Hamming, Ole J.; Kang, Lishan; Svensson, Anders; Karlsen, Jesper L.; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik; Paludan, Søren R.; Hjorth, Siv A.; Bondensgaard, Kent; Hartmann, Rune

    2012-01-01

    IL-21 is a class I cytokine that exerts pleiotropic effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. It signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) and the common γ-chain. A hallmark of the class I cytokine receptors is the class I cytokine receptor signature motif (WSXWS). The exact role of this motif has not been determined yet; however, it has been implicated in diverse functions, including ligand binding, receptor internalization, proper folding, and export, as well as signal transduction. Furthermore, the WXXW motif is known to be a consensus sequence for C-mannosylation. Here, we present the crystal structure of IL-21 bound to IL-21R and reveal that the WSXWS motif of IL-21R is C-mannosylated at the first tryptophan. We furthermore demonstrate that a sugar chain bridges the two fibronectin domains that constitute the extracellular domain of IL-21R and anchors at the WSXWS motif through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, including mannosylation. The glycan thus transforms the V-shaped receptor into an A-frame. This finding offers a novel structural explanation of the role of the class I cytokine signature motif. PMID:22235133

  15. Investigation of structural mimetics of natural phosphate ion binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Kataev, Evgeny A; Shumilova, Tatiana A

    2015-02-16

    Phosphates are ubiquitous in biology and nearly half of all proteins interact with their partners by means of recognition of phosphate residues. Therefore, a better understanding of the phosphate ion binding by peptidic structures is highly desirable. Two new receptors have been designed and synthesized and their anion binding properties in an acetonitrile solution have been determined. The structure of hosts mimics a part of the kinase active site that is responsible for the recognition of the phosphate residue. New hosts contain additional free amino groups with the aim to facilitate coordination of protonated anions, such as dihydrogen phosphate. According to spectrophotometric measurements, stepwise 1:1 and 1:2 binding modes have been observed for both receptors in the presence of acetate, hydrogen sulfate and dihydrogen phosphate. Compared with the acyclic receptor, the macrocyclic receptor has demonstrated a remarkably enhanced selectivity for dihydrogen phosphate over other anions. Fluorometric measurements have revealed different responses of the acyclic and macrocyclic receptors towards anions. However, in both cases, a 5-8 nm hypsochromic shift of fluorescence maximum has been observed upon interaction of acetate and dihydrogen phosphate with receptors.

  16. Structural motifs and stability of small argon-nitrogen clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewage, Jinasena W.; Amar, François G.

    2003-11-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method is used to study Arm(N2)n clusters. Using realistic pair potentials for the argon-argon, nitrogen-nitrogen, and argon-nitrogen interactions, the structures and thermodynamics of these clusters are investigated. The initial focus of the study is the series of thirteen particle clusters of Arm(N2)13-m (0⩽m⩽13). These icosahedral argon-nitrogen clusters display systematic changes in energetics when argon is substituted by nitrogen in the central position. The relative stability of argon-centered clusters over nitrogen-centered clusters is further investigated by defining and calculating a "species-centric" order parameter which can be monitored during a MD simulation. These results are interpreted in terms of frustration effects due to anisotropy in the N2-N2 and N2-Ar potentials. The consequences of these observations for cluster stability and for dynamical behavior, such as melting and evaporation, are investigated. The dynamical studies of larger clusters reveal that the mixed clusters evolve towards a structure with an argon core coated by a nitrogen shell.

  17. Weak interactions involving organic fluorine: analysis of structural motifs in Flunazirine and Haloperidol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna, M. D.; Row, T. N. Guru

    2001-05-01

    The crystal structure of Flunazirine, an anticonvulsant drug, is analyzed in terms of intermolecular interactions involving fluorine. The structure displays motifs formed by only weak interactions C-H⋯F and C-H⋯π. The motifs thus generated show cavities, which could serve as hosts for complexation. The structure of Flunazirine displays cavities formed by C-H⋯F and C-H⋯π interactions. Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, shows F⋯F interactions in the crystalline lattice in lieu of Cl⋯Cl interactions. However, strong O-H⋯N interactions dominate packing. The salient features of the two structures in terms of intermolecular interactions reveal, even though organic fluorine has lower tendency to engage in hydrogen bonding and F⋯F interactions, these interactions could play a significant role in the design of molecular assemblies via crystal engineering.

  18. Identification of multiple distinct Snf2 subfamilies with conserved structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flaus, Andrew; Martin, David M. A.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins includes the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes found in all eukaryotes. These act to regulate the structure and dynamic properties of chromatin and so influence a broad range of nuclear processes. We have exploited progress in genome sequencing to assemble a comprehensive catalogue of over 1300 Snf2 family members. Multiple sequence alignment of the helicase-related regions enables 24 distinct subfamilies to be identified, a considerable expansion over earlier surveys. Where information is known, there is a good correlation between biological or biochemical function and these assignments, suggesting Snf2 family motor domains are tuned for specific tasks. Scanning of complete genomes reveals all eukaryotes contain members of multiple subfamilies, whereas they are less common and not ubiquitous in eubacteria or archaea. The large sample of Snf2 proteins enables additional distinguishing conserved sequence blocks within the helicase-like motor to be identified. The establishment of a phylogeny for Snf2 proteins provides an opportunity to make informed assignments of function, and the identification of conserved motifs provides a framework for understanding the mechanisms by which these proteins function. PMID:16738128

  19. Crystal structure of SEL1L: Insight into the roles of SLR motifs in ERAD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hanbin; Sim, Hyo Jung; Song, Eun Kyung; Lee, Hakbong; Ha, Sung Chul; Jun, Youngsoo; Park, Tae Joo; Lee, Changwook

    2016-01-01

    Terminally misfolded proteins are selectively recognized and cleared by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. SEL1L, a component of the ERAD machinery, plays an important role in selecting and transporting ERAD substrates for degradation. We have determined the crystal structure of the mouse SEL1L central domain comprising five Sel1-Like Repeats (SLR motifs 5 to 9; hereafter called SEL1Lcent). Strikingly, SEL1Lcent forms a homodimer with two-fold symmetry in a head-to-tail manner. Particularly, the SLR motif 9 plays an important role in dimer formation by adopting a domain-swapped structure and providing an extensive dimeric interface. We identified that the full-length SEL1L forms a self-oligomer through the SEL1Lcent domain in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the SLR-C, comprising SLR motifs 10 and 11, of SEL1L directly interacts with the N-terminus luminal loops of HRD1. Therefore, we propose that certain SLR motifs of SEL1L play a unique role in membrane bound ERAD machinery. PMID:27064360

  20. Identification of sequence–structure RNA binding motifs for SELEX-derived aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hoinka, Jan; Zotenko, Elena; Friedman, Adam; Sauna, Zuben E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX) represents a state-of-the-art technology to isolate single-stranded (ribo)nucleic acid fragments, named aptamers, which bind to a molecule (or molecules) of interest via specific structural regions induced by their sequence-dependent fold. This powerful method has applications in designing protein inhibitors, molecular detection systems, therapeutic drugs and antibody replacement among others. However, full understanding and consequently optimal utilization of the process has lagged behind its wide application due to the lack of dedicated computational approaches. At the same time, the combination of SELEX with novel sequencing technologies is beginning to provide the data that will allow the examination of a variety of properties of the selection process. Results: To close this gap we developed, Aptamotif, a computational method for the identification of sequence–structure motifs in SELEX-derived aptamers. To increase the chances of identifying functional motifs, Aptamotif uses an ensemble-based approach. We validated the method using two published aptamer datasets containing experimentally determined motifs of increasing complexity. We were able to recreate the author's findings to a high degree, thus proving the capability of our approach to identify binding motifs in SELEX data. Additionally, using our new experimental dataset, we illustrate the application of Aptamotif to elucidate several properties of the selection process. Contact: przytyck@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Zuben.Sauna@fda.hhs.gov PMID:22689764

  1. Unique Structural Features of Membrane-Bound C-Terminal Domain Motifs Modulate Complexin Inhibitory Function

    PubMed Central

    Snead, David; Lai, Alex L.; Wragg, Rachel T.; Parisotto, Daniel A.; Ramlall, Trudy F.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Freed, Jack H.; Eliezer, David

    2017-01-01

    Complexin is a small soluble presynaptic protein that interacts with neuronal SNARE proteins in order to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. While the SNARE-binding central helix of complexin is required for both the inhibition of spontaneous fusion and the facilitation of synchronous fusion, the disordered C-terminal domain (CTD) of complexin is specifically required for its inhibitory function. The CTD of worm complexin binds to membranes via two distinct motifs, one of which undergoes a membrane curvature dependent structural transition that is required for efficient inhibition of neurotransmitter release, but the conformations of the membrane-bound motifs remain poorly characterized. Visualizing these conformations is required to clarify the mechanisms by which complexin membrane interactions regulate its function. Here, we employ optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to precisely define the boundaries of the two CTD membrane-binding motifs and to characterize their conformations. We show that the curvature dependent amphipathic helical motif features an irregular element of helical structure, likely a pi-bulge, and that this feature is important for complexin inhibitory function in vivo. PMID:28596722

  2. Reusable amine-based structural motifs for green house gas (CO2) fixation.

    PubMed

    Dalapati, Sasanka; Jana, Sankar; Saha, Rajat; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2012-07-06

    A series of compounds with an amine based structural motif (ASM) have been synthesized for efficient atmospheric CO(2) fixation. The H-bonded ASM-bicarbonate complexes were formed with an in situ generated HCO(3)(-) ion. The complexes have been characterized by IR, (13)C NMR, and X-ray single-crystal structural analysis. ASM-bicarbonate salts have been converted to pure ASMs in quantitative yield under mild conditions for recycling processes.

  3. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs.

  4. Motif co-regulation and co-operativity are common mechanisms in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Van Roey, Kim; Davey, Norman E

    2015-12-01

    A substantial portion of the regulatory interactions in the higher eukaryotic cell are mediated by simple sequence motifs in the regulatory segments of genes and (pre-)mRNAs, and in the intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Although these regulatory modules are physicochemically distinct, they share an evolutionary plasticity that has facilitated a rapid growth of their use and resulted in their ubiquity in complex organisms. The ease of motif acquisition simplifies access to basal housekeeping functions, facilitates the co-regulation of multiple biomolecules allowing them to respond in a coordinated manner to changes in the cell state, and supports the integration of multiple signals for combinatorial decision-making. Consequently, motifs are indispensable for temporal, spatial, conditional and basal regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. In this review, we highlight that many of the key regulatory pathways of the cell are recruited by motifs and that the ease of motif acquisition has resulted in large networks of co-regulated biomolecules. We discuss how co-operativity allows simple static motifs to perform the conditional regulation that underlies decision-making in higher eukaryotic biological systems. We observe that each gene and its products have a unique set of DNA, RNA or protein motifs that encode a regulatory program to define the logical circuitry that guides the life cycle of these biomolecules, from transcription to degradation. Finally, we contrast the regulatory properties of protein motifs and the regulatory elements of DNA and (pre-)mRNAs, advocating that co-regulation, co-operativity, and motif-driven regulatory programs are common mechanisms that emerge from the use of simple, evolutionarily plastic regulatory modules.

  5. Structural motifs, mixing, and segregation effects in 38-atom binary clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Borbón, Lauro Oliver; Johnston, Roy L.; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    Thirty eight-atom binary clusters composed of elements from groups 10 and 11 of the Periodic Table mixing a second-row with a third-row transition metal (TM) (i.e., clusters composed of the four pairs: Pd-Pt, Ag-Au, Pd-Au, and Ag-Pt) are studied through a combined empirical-potential (EP)/density functional (DF) method. A "system comparison" approach is adopted in order to analyze a wide diversity of structural motifs, and the energy competition among different structural motifs is studied at the DF level for these systems, mainly focusing on the composition 24-14 (the first number refers to the second-row TM atom) but also considering selected motifs with compositions 19-19 (of interest for investigating surface segregation effects) and 32-6 (also 14-24 and 6-32 for the Pd-Au pair). The results confirm the EP predictions about the stability of crystalline structures at this size for the Au-Pd pair but with decahedral or mixed fivefold-symmetric/closed-packed structures in close competition with fcc motifs for the Ag-Au or Ag-Pt and Pd-Pt pairs, respectively. Overall, the EP description is found to be reasonably accurate for the Pd-Pt and Au-Pd pairs, whereas it is less reliable for the Ag-Au and Ag-Pt pairs due to electronic structure (charge transfer or directionality) effects. The driving force to core-shell chemical ordering is put on a quantitative basis, and surface segregation of the most cohesive element into the core is confirmed, with the exception of the Ag-Au pair for which charge transfer effects favor the segregation of Au to the surface of the clusters.

  6. Structure determination of noncanonical RNA motifs guided by 1H NMR chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Sripakdeevong, Parin; Cevec, Mirko; Chang, Andrew T.; Erat, Michèle C.; Ziegeler, Melanie; Zhao, Qin; Fox, George E.; Gao, Xiaolian; Kennedy, Scott D.; Kierzek, Ryszard; Nikonowicz, Edward P.; Schwalbe, Harald; Sigel, Roland K. O.; Turner, Douglas H.; Das, Rhiju

    2014-01-01

    Structured non-coding RNAs underline fundamental cellular processes, but determining their 3D structures remains challenging. We demonstrate herein that integrating NMR 1H chemical shift data with Rosetta de novo modeling can consistently return high-resolution RNA structures. On a benchmark set of 23 noncanonical RNA motifs, including 11 blind targets, Chemical-Shift-ROSETTA for RNA (CS-ROSETTA-RNA) recovered the experimental structures with high accuracy (0.6 to 2.0 Å all-heavy-atom rmsd) in 18 cases. PMID:24584194

  7. Crystal structure of a human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation.

    PubMed

    Apostol, Marcin I; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K

    2013-07-17

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical- to β-sheet-rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide-bond-linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into a β-sheet-rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such nonamyloid oligomers.

  8. Thermodynamic Features of Structural Motifs Formed by β-L-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Szabat, Marta; Gudanis, Dorota; Kotkowiak, Weronika; Gdaniec, Zofia; Kierzek, Ryszard; Pasternak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This is the first report to provide comprehensive thermodynamic and structural data concerning duplex, hairpin, quadruplex and i-motif structures in β-L-RNA series. Herein we confirm that, within the limits of experimental error, the thermodynamic stability of enantiomeric structural motifs is the same as that of naturally occurring D-RNA counterparts. In addition, formation of D-RNA/L-RNA heterochiral duplexes is also observed; however, their thermodynamic stability is significantly reduced in reference to homochiral D-RNA duplexes. The presence of three locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues within the D-RNA strand diminishes the negative effect of the enantiomeric, complementary L-RNA strand in the formation of heterochiral RNA duplexes. Similar behavior is also observed for heterochiral LNA-2′-O-methyl-D-RNA/L-RNA duplexes. The formation of heterochiral duplexes was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The CD curves of homochiral L-RNA structural motifs are always reversed, whereas CD curves of heterochiral duplexes present individual features dependent on the composition of chiral strands. PMID:26908023

  9. Magnesium-binding architectures in RNA crystal structures: validation, binding preferences, classification and motif detection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Heping; Shabalin, Ivan G.; Handing, Katarzyna B.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Minor, Wladek

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of magnesium ions in RNA has long been recognized as a key factor governing RNA folding, and is crucial for many diverse functions of RNA molecules. In this work, Mg2+-binding architectures in RNA were systematically studied using a database of RNA crystal structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Due to the abundance of poorly modeled or incorrectly identified Mg2+ ions, the set of all sites was comprehensively validated and filtered to identify a benchmark dataset of 15 334 ‘reliable’ RNA-bound Mg2+ sites. The normalized frequencies by which specific RNA atoms coordinate Mg2+ were derived for both the inner and outer coordination spheres. A hierarchical classification system of Mg2+ sites in RNA structures was designed and applied to the benchmark dataset, yielding a set of 41 types of inner-sphere and 95 types of outer-sphere coordinating patterns. This classification system has also been applied to describe six previously reported Mg2+-binding motifs and detect them in new RNA structures. Investigation of the most populous site types resulted in the identification of seven novel Mg2+-binding motifs, and all RNA structures in the PDB were screened for the presence of these motifs. PMID:25800744

  10. Universal structure motifs in biominerals: a lesson from nature for the efficient design of bioinspired functional materials.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joe; Böhm, Corinna F; Wolf, Stephan E

    2017-08-06

    Biominerals are typically indispensable structures for their host organism in which they serve varying functions, such as mechanical support and protection, mineral storage, detoxification site, or as a sensor or optical guide. In this perspective article, we highlight the occurrence of both structural diversity and uniformity within these biogenic ceramics. For the first time, we demonstrate that the universality-diversity paradigm, which was initially introduced for proteins by Buehler et al. (Cranford & Buehler 2012 Biomateriomics; Cranford et al. 2013 Adv. Mater.25, 802-824 (doi:10.1002/adma.201202553); Ackbarow & Buehler 2008 J. Comput. Theor. Nanosci.5, 1193-1204 (doi:10.1166/jctn.2008.001); Buehler & Yung 2009 Nat. Mater.8, 175-188 (doi:10.1038/nmat2387)), is also valid in the realm of biomineralization. A nanogranular composite structure is shared by most biominerals which rests on a common, non-classical crystal growth mechanism. The nanogranular composite structure affects various properties of the macroscale biogenic ceramic, a phenomenon we attribute to emergence. Emergence, in turn, is typical for hierarchically organized materials. This is a clear call to renew comparative studies of even distantly related biomineralizing organisms to identify further universal design motifs and their associated emergent properties. Such universal motifs with emergent macro-scale properties may represent an unparalleled toolbox for the efficient design of bioinspired functional materials.

  11. Quasiracemate Crystal Structures of Magainin 2 Derivatives Support the Functional Significance of the Phenylalanine Zipper Motif.

    PubMed

    Hayouka, Zvi; Thomas, Nicole C; Mortenson, David E; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Weisblum, Bernard; Forest, Katrina T; Gellman, Samuel H

    2015-09-23

    Quasiracemic crystallography has been used to explore the significance of homochiral and heterochiral associations in a set of host-defense peptide derivatives. The previously reported racemic crystal structure of a magainin 2 derivative displayed a homochiral antiparallel dimer association featuring a "phenylalanine zipper" notable for the dual roles of phenylalanines in mediating dimerization and formation of an exposed hydrophobic swath. This motif is seen as well in two new quasiracemate crystals that contain the d form of the magainin 2 derivative along with an l-peptide in which one Ala has been replaced by a β-amino acid residue. This structural trend supports the hypothesis that the Phe zipper motif has functional significance.

  12. Structure and Mechanical Characterization of DNA i-Motif Nanowires by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raghvendra Pratap; Blossey, Ralf; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    We studied the structure and mechanical properties of DNA i-motif nanowires by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations. We built up to 230 nm-long nanowires, based on a repeated TC5 sequence from crystallographic data, fully relaxed and equilibrated in water. The unusual C⋅C+ stacked structure, formed by four ssDNA strands arranged in an intercalated tetramer, is here fully characterized both statically and dynamically. By applying stretching, compression, and bending deformations with the steered molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling methods, we extract the apparent Young’s and bending moduli of the nanowire, as well as estimates for the tensile strength and persistence length. According to our results, the i-motif nanowire shares similarities with structural proteins, as far as its tensile stiffness, but is closer to nucleic acids and flexible proteins, as far as its bending rigidity is concerned. Furthermore, thanks to its very thin cross section, the apparent tensile toughness is close to that of a metal. Besides their yet to be clarified biological significance, i-motif nanowires may qualify as interesting candidates for nanotechnology templates, due to such outstanding mechanical properties. PMID:24359754

  13. Self-assembly of multi-stranded RNA motifs into lattices and tubular structures

    DOE PAGES

    Stewart, Jaimie Marie; Subramanian, Hari K. K.; Franco, Elisa

    2017-02-16

    Rational design of nucleic acidmolecules yields selfassembling scaffolds with increasing complexity, size and functionality. It is an open question whether design methods tailored to build DNA nanostructures can be adapted to build RNA nanostructures with comparable features. We demonstrate the formation of RNA lattices and tubular assemblies from double crossover (DX) tiles, a canonical motif in DNA nanotechnology. Tubular structures can exceed 1 m in length, suggesting that this DX motif can produce very robust lattices. Some of these tubes spontaneously form with left-handed chirality. We obtain assemblies by using two methods: a protocol where gel-extracted RNA strands are slowlymore » annealed, and a one-pot transcription and anneal procedure. We then identify the tile nick position as a structural requirement for lattice formation. These results demonstrate that stable RNA structures can be obtained with design tools imported from DNA nanotechnology. These large assemblies could be potentially integrated with a variety of functional RNA motifs for drug or nanoparticle delivery, or for colocalization of cellular components.« less

  14. A conserved structural motif reveals the essential transcriptional repression function of Spen proteins and their role in developmental signaling.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Mariko; Schwabe, John W R

    2003-08-01

    Spen proteins regulate the expression of key transcriptional effectors in diverse signaling pathways. They are large proteins characterized by N-terminal RNA-binding motifs and a highly conserved C-terminal SPOC domain. The specific biological role of the SPOC domain (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain), and hence, the common function of Spen proteins, has been unclear to date. The Spen protein, SHARP (SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein), was identified as a component of transcriptional repression complexes in both nuclear receptor and Notch/RBP-Jkappa signaling pathways. We have determined the 1.8 A crystal structure of the SPOC domain from SHARP. This structure shows that essentially all of the conserved surface residues map to a positively charged patch. Structure-based mutational analysis indicates that this conserved region is responsible for the interaction between SHARP and the universal transcriptional corepressor SMRT/NCoR (silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors/nuclear receptor corepressor. We demonstrate that this interaction involves a highly conserved acidic motif at the C terminus of SMRT/NCoR. These findings suggest that the conserved function of the SPOC domain is to mediate interaction with SMRT/NCoR corepressors, and that Spen proteins play an essential role in the repression complex.

  15. The Structural and Functional Implications of Linked SNARE Motifs in SNAP25

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Bittner, Mary A.; Axelrod, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the functional and structural implications of SNAP25 having two SNARE motifs (SN1 and SN2). A membrane-bound, intramolecular FRET probe was constructed to report on the folding of N-terminal SN1 and C-terminal SN2 in living cells. Membrane-bound constructs containing either or both SNARE motifs were also singly labeled with donor or acceptor fluorophores. Interaction of probes with other SNAREs was monitored by the formation of SDS-resistant complexes and by changes in FRET measured in vitro using spectroscopy and in the plasma membrane of living cells using TIRF microscopy. The probes formed the predicted SDS-resistant SNARE complexes. FRET measurements revealed that syntaxin induced a close association of the N-termini of SN1 and SN2. This association required that the SNARE motifs reside in the same molecule. Unexpectedly, the syntaxin-induced FRET was prevented by VAMP. Both full-length SNAP25 constructs and the combination of its separated, membrane-bound constituent chains supported secretion in permeabilized chromaffin cells that had been allowed to rundown. However, only full-length SNAP25 constructs enabled robust secretion from intact cells or permeabilized cells before rundown. The experiments suggest that the bidentate structure permits specific conformations in complexes with syntaxin and VAMP and facilitates the function of SN1 and SN2 in exocytosis. PMID:18596234

  16. A Conserved Structural Motif Mediates Retrograde Trafficking of Shiga Toxin Types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Selyunin, Andrey S; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) produce two types of Shiga toxin (STx): STx1 and STx2. The toxin A-subunits block protein synthesis, while the B-subunits mediate retrograde trafficking. STEC infections do not have definitive treatments, and there is growing interest in generating toxin transport inhibitors for therapy. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of toxin trafficking is essential for drug development. While STx2 is more toxic in vivo, prior studies focused on STx1 B-subunit (STx1B) trafficking. Here, we show that, compared with STx1B, trafficking of the B-subunit of STx2 (STx2B) to the Golgi occurs with slower kinetics. Despite this difference, similar to STx1B, endosome-to-Golgi transport of STx2B does not involve transit through degradative late endosomes and is dependent on dynamin II, epsinR, retromer and syntaxin5. Importantly, additional experiments show that a surface-exposed loop in STx2B (β4-β5 loop) is required for its endosome-to-Golgi trafficking. We previously demonstrated that residues in the corresponding β4-β5 loop of STx1B are required for interaction with GPP130, the STx1B-specific endosomal receptor, and for endosome-to-Golgi transport. Overall, STx1B and STx2B share a common pathway and use a similar structural motif to traffic to the Golgi, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms of endosomal sorting may be evolutionarily conserved.

  17. Solution Structure of the Cuz1 AN1 Zinc Finger Domain: An Exposed LDFLP Motif Defines a Subfamily of AN1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen-Yu J.; Bhanu, Meera K.; Allan, Martin G.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard; Hanna, John

    2016-01-01

    Zinc binding domains are common and versatile protein structural motifs that mediate diverse cellular functions. Among the many structurally distinct families of zinc finger (ZnF) proteins, the AN1 domain remains poorly characterized. Cuz1 is one of two AN1 ZnF proteins in the yeast S. cerevisiae, and is a stress-inducible protein that functions in protein degradation through direct interaction with the proteasome and Cdc48. Here we report the solution structure of the Cuz1 AN1 ZnF which reveals a compact C6H2 zinc-coordinating domain that resembles a two-finger hand holding a tri-helical clamp. A central phenylalanine residue sits between the two zinc-coordinating centers. The position of this phenylalanine, just before the penultimate zinc-chelating cysteine, is strongly conserved from yeast to man. This phenylalanine shows an exceptionally slow ring-flipping rate which likely contributes to the high rigidity and stability of the AN1 domain. In addition to the zinc-chelating residues, sequence analysis of Cuz1 indicates a second highly evolutionarily conserved motif. This LDFLP motif is shared with three human proteins—Zfand1, AIRAP, and AIRAP-L—the latter two of which share similar cellular functions with Cuz1. The LDFLP motif, while embedded within the zinc finger domain, is surface exposed, largely uninvolved in zinc chelation, and not required for the overall fold of the domain. The LDFLP motif was dispensable for Cuz1's major known functions, proteasome- and Cdc48-binding. These results provide the first structural characterization of the AN1 zinc finger domain, and suggest that the LDFLP motif may define a sub-family of evolutionarily conserved AN1 zinc finger proteins. PMID:27662200

  18. Visualization of conformational distribution of short to medium size segments in globular proteins and identification of local structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Tomii, Kentaro; Yokomizo, Tsuyoshi; Mitomo, Daisuke; Maruyama, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Shinya; Higo, Junichi

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of the conformational distribution of polypeptide segments in a conformational space is the first step for understanding a principle of structural diversity of proteins. Here, we present a statistical analysis of protein local structures based on interatomic C(alpha) distances. Using principal component analysis (PCA) on the intrasegment C(alpha)-C(alpha) atomic distances, the conformational space of protein segments, which we call the protein segment universe, has been visualized, and three essential coordinate axes, suitable for describing the universe, have been identified. Three essential axes specified radius of gyration, structural symmetry, and separation of hairpin structures from other structures. Among the segments of arbitrary length, 6-22 residues long, the conservation of those axes was uncovered. Further application of PCA to the two largest clusters in the universe revealed local structural motifs. Although some of motifs have already been reported, we identified a possibly novel strand motif. We also showed that a capping box, which is one of the helix capping motifs, was separated into independent subclusters based on the C(alpha) geometry. Implications of the strand motif, which may play a role for protein-protein interaction, are discussed. The currently proposed method is useful for not only mapping the immense universe of protein structures but also identification of structural motifs.

  19. Structure of the cathelicidin motif of protegrin-3 precursor: structural insights into the activation mechanism of an antimicrobial protein.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jean-Frédéric; Hoh, François; Strub, Marie-Paule; Aumelas, André; Dumas, Christian

    2002-10-01

    Cathelicidins are a family of antimicrobial proteins isolated from leucocytes and epithelia cells that contribute to the innate host defense mechanisms in mammalians. Located in the C-terminal part of the holoprotein, the cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide is liberated by a specific protease cleavage. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the cathelicidin motif of protegrin-3 solved by MAD phasing using the selenocysteine-labeled protein. Its overall structure represents a fold homologous to the cystatin family and adopts two native states, a monomer, and a domain-swapped dimer. This crystal structure is the first example of a structural characterization of the highly conserved cathelicidin motif and thus provides insights into the possible mechanism of activation of the antimicrobial protegrin peptide.

  20. Overexpression and structural study of the cathelicidin motif of the protegrin-3 precursor.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jean Frédéric; Wojcik, Franck; Yang, Yin-Shan; Strub, Marie-Paule; Strub, Jean Marc; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Martin, Marianne; Lehrer, Robert; Ganz, Tomas; Chavanieu, Alain; Calas, Bernard; Aumelas, André

    2002-01-08

    Numerous precursors of antibacterial peptides with unrelated sequences share a similar prosequence of 96-101 residues, referred to as the cathelicidin motif. The structure of this widespread motif has not yet been reported. The cathelicidin motif of protegrin-3 (ProS) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged protein to facilitate its purification. The His tag was then removed by thrombin cleavage. In addition, the complete proprotegrin-3 (ProS-PG-3) (120 residues) was overexpressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells. As it contained the antibacterial peptide protegrin-3 in its C-terminal part, ProS-PG-3 contained four disulfide bonds. At neutral pH, ProS and ProS-PG-3 adopted two slowly exchanging conformations that existed in a ratio of 55/45. This ratio was progressively modified at acidic pH to reach a 90/10 value at pH 3.0, suggesting that electrostatic interactions are involved in such a conformational change. Therefore, the structural study of the main conformer was undertaken at pH 3.0 by circular dichroism, mass spectrometry, and homo- and heteronuclear NMR. In parallel, a model for the ProS structure was built from the X-ray structure of the chicken cystatin. ProS and the chicken cystatin share two conserved disulfide bonds as well as a high conservation of hydrophobic residues. The ProS model features the conservation of a hydrophobic core made of the interface between the N-terminal helix and the wrapping beta-sheet. Although the full assignment of the main conformer of ProS could not be obtained, available NMR data validated the presence of the N-terminal helix and of a four-stranded beta-sheet, in agreement with the cystatin fold. Moreover, we clearly demonstrated that ProS and ProS-PG-3 share the same global structure, suggesting that the presence of the highly constrained beta-hairpin of protegrin does not significantly modify the structure of the cathelicidin motif of the protegrin precursor.

  1. Ab initio identification of human microRNAs based on structure motifs.

    PubMed

    Brameier, Markus; Wiuf, Carsten

    2007-12-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNA molecules that are directly involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The mature miRNA sequence binds to more or less specific target sites on the mRNA. Both their small size and sequence specificity make the detection of completely new miRNAs a challenging task. This cannot be based on sequence information alone, but requires structure information about the miRNA precursor. Unlike comparative genomics approaches, ab initio approaches are able to discover species-specific miRNAs without known sequence homology. MiRPred is a novel method for ab initio prediction of miRNAs by genome scanning that only relies on (predicted) secondary structure to distinguish miRNA precursors from other similar-sized segments of the human genome. We apply a machine learning technique, called linear genetic programming, to develop special classifier programs which include multiple regular expressions (motifs) matched against the secondary structure sequence. Special attention is paid to scanning issues. The classifiers are trained on fixed-length sequences as these occur when shifting a window in regular steps over a genome region. Various statistical and empirical evidence is collected to validate the correctness of and increase confidence in the predicted structures. Among other things, we propose a new criterion to select miRNA candidates with a higher stability of folding that is based on the number of matching windows around their genome location. An ensemble of 16 motif-based classifiers achieves 99.9 percent specificity with sensitivity remaining on an acceptable high level when requiring all classifiers to agree on a positive decision. A low false positive rate is considered more important than a low false negative rate, when searching larger genome regions for unknown miRNAs. 117 new miRNAs have been predicted close to known miRNAs on human chromosome 19. All candidate structures match the free energy

  2. Recombination sites on hybrid chromosomes in Saccharomyces pastorianus share common sequence motifs and define a complex evolutionary relationship between group I and II lager yeasts.

    PubMed

    Monerawela, Chandre; Bond, Ursula

    2017-08-01

    Saccharomyces pastorianus, referred to as lager yeasts, are hybrids of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus. Isolates within the species are divided into two groups (I and II) based on chromosome structure and composition. Following the hybridisation, the parental chromosomes underwent homeologous recombination, generating a set of hybrid chromosomes unique to the species. Here, we assessed the recombination events in seven lager yeast genomes to more clearly define the evolutionary route of lager yeasts. Meta-analysis of the recombination epicentres, as well as a detailed analysis of recombination events at the MAT locus, reveals a more complex evolutionary relationship between the group I and II lager yeasts than previously considered and identifies several divergent routes of evolution leading to the current S. pastorianus strains. We show that recombination epicentres contain sequential runs of pyrimidines, often flanked by purines, on one strand of the DNA, and identify two common sequence motifs present in >80% of the recombination epicentres, indicating that a common mechanism might account for the recombination events. Taken together, the data support a sequential hybridisation model of evolution for the two types of lager yeasts and suggest that the genomes of this newly emerged species are highly dynamic and continually evolving. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Structure of a (Cys3His) zinc ribbon, a ubiquitous motif in archaeal and eucaryal transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H. T.; Legault, P.; Glushka, J.; Omichinski, J. G.; Scott, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is an essential component in the formation of the transcription initiation complex in eucaryal and archaeal transcription. TFIIB interacts with a promoter complex containing the TATA-binding protein (TBP) to facilitate interaction with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) and the associated transcription factor IIF (TFIIF). TFIIB contains a zinc-binding motif near the N-terminus that is directly involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF and plays a crucial role in selecting the transcription initiation site. The solution structure of the N-terminal residues 2-59 of human TFIIB was determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a nearly tetrahedral Zn(Cys)3(His)1 site confined by type I and "rubredoxin" turns, three antiparallel beta-strands, and disordered loops. The structure is similar to the reported zinc-ribbon motifs in several transcription-related proteins from archaea and eucarya, including Pyrococcus furiosus transcription factor B (PfTFB), human and yeast transcription factor IIS (TFIIS), and Thermococcus celer RNA polymerase II subunit M (TcRPOM). The zinc-ribbon structure of TFIIB, in conjunction with the biochemical analyses, suggests that residues on the beta-sheet are involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF, while the zinc-binding site may increase the stability of the beta-sheet. PMID:11045620

  4. [C7GC4]4 Association into supra molecular i-motif structures

    PubMed Central

    Laisné, Aude; Pompon, Denis; Leroy, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    The self-associative properties of cytidine-rich oligonucleotides into symmetrical i-motif tetramers give to these oligonucleotides the capacity of forming supramolecular structures (sms) that have potential applications in the nanotechnology domain. In order to facilitate sms formation, oligonucleotides containing two cytidine stretches of unequal length (CnXCm) separated by a non-cytidine spacer were synthesized. They were designed to associate into a tetramer including an i-motif core built by intercalation of the C·C+ pairs of the longer C stretch with the two dangling non-intercalated strands of the shorter C stretch at each end. Gel filtration chromatography shows that the non-intercalated C-rich ends give to this structure the capacity of forming extremely stable sms. Using C7GC4 as a model, we find that the sms formation rate varies as the oligonucleotide concentration and increases at high temperature. Competitively with the tetramer involved in sms elongation, CnXCm oligonucleotides form i-motif dimers that compete with sms elongation. The dimer stability is strongly reduced when the pH is moved away from the cytidine pK. This results in an equilibrium shift towards the tetramer and in the acceleration of the sms formation rate. The chromatograms of the sms formed by C7GC4 indicate a broad distribution. In a 1.5 mM solution incubated at 37°C, the equilibrium distribution is centered on a molecular weight corresponding to the assembly of nine tetramers and the upper limit corresponds to 80 tetramers. The lifetime of this structure is about 4 days at 40°C, pH 4.6. PMID:20185569

  5. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  6. Structural Motifs of [Fe(CO2)n](-) Clusters (n = 3-7).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael C; Dodson, Leah G; Weber, J Mathias

    2017-06-01

    We present IR spectra and quantum chemical calculations for anionic iron-CO2 clusters of the form [Fe(CO2)n](-) (n = 3-7). All observed clusters have at least two CO2 units strongly bound to the metal atom. These strongly bound iron-CO2 complexes form the core ions of the clusters and are solvated by additional, weakly bound CO2 molecules. Larger clusters show clear infrared signatures of core ion isomers with three CO2 moieties as well. Dominant structural motifs are based on bidentate CO2 ligands with Fe-O/Fe-C bonds, oxalate ligands, and metal insertion into a CO bond.

  7. Common structure-balance between spacetime structure and massenergy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Daqing; Cao, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    According to Einstein field equation, there is a balance between spacetime structure and massenergy structure. nd the paper consider it as a common structurewhich was brought forward by Daqing Cao in 2011 ecause it is general structure in the universe and everything have the same model of structure in their one system. The Jovian planets is spacetime structure of solar system because they are gas-sphere and they have more density of spacetime (spacetime/massenergy) than the density of massenergy (massenergy/spacetime). The terrestrial planets is massenergy structure of solar system because they are rock-ball and they have more density of massenergy than the density of spacetime. That can explain of that the Jovian planets of big mass is far away from sun. With the idea that the wave is spacetime and the wave effect is spacetime structure, the planets have elliptic orbits and the same direction of their revolution. Because sun is like a massenergy center of the massenergy structure and the terrestrial planets, the paper supposes there is a dark sun-a dark hole who has a spacetime center of spacetime structure and influences on the orbits of the Jovian planets. http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/APR16/Session/M13.8

  8. Fragment Finder: a web-based software to identify similar three-dimensional structural motif

    PubMed Central

    Ananthalakshmi, P.; Kumar, Ch. Kiran; Jeyasimhan, M.; Sumathi, K.; Sekar, K.

    2005-01-01

    FF (Fragment Finder) is a web-based interactive search engine developed to retrieve the user-desired similar 3D structural fragments from the selected subset of 25 or 90% non-homologous protein chains. The search is based on the comparison of the main chain backbone conformational angles (φ and ϕ). Additionally, the queried motifs can be superimposed to find out how similar the structural fragments are, so that the information can be effectively used in molecular modeling. The engine has facilities to view the resultant superposed or individual 3D structure(s) on the client machine. The proposed web server is made freely accessible at the following URL: or . PMID:15980587

  9. Identification of Structural Motifs of Imidazolium Based Ionic Liquids from Jet-Cooled Infrared Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Justin W.; Booth, Ryan S.; Annesley, Christopher; Stearns, Jaime A.

    2016-06-01

    Highly variable and potentially revolutionary, ionic liquids (IL) are a class of molecules with potential for numerous Air Force applications such as satellite propulsion, but the complex nature of IL structure and intermolecular interactions makes it difficult to adequately predict structure-property relationships in order to make new IL-based technology a reality. For example, methylation of imidazolium ionic liquids leads to a substantial increase in viscosity but the underlying physical mechanism is not understood. In addition the role of hydrogen bonding in ILs, especially its relationship to macroscopic properties, is a matter of ongoing research. Here, structural motifs are identified from jet-cooled infrared spectra of different imidazolium based ionic liquids, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl)imide. Measurements of the C-H stretches indicate three structural families present in the gas phase.

  10. Structural basis of HP1/PXVXL motif peptide interactions and HP1 localisation to heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Thiru, Abarna; Nietlispach, Daniel; Mott, Helen R; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Lyon, Debbie; Nielsen, Peter R; Hirshberg, Miriam; Verreault, Alain; Murzina, Natalia V; Laue, Ernest D

    2004-01-01

    HP1 family proteins are adaptor molecules, containing two related chromo domains that are required for chromatin packaging and gene silencing. Here we present the structure of the chromo shadow domain from mouse HP1β bound to a peptide containing a consensus PXVXL motif found in many HP1 binding partners. The shadow domain exhibits a novel mode of peptide recognition, where the peptide binds across the dimer interface, sandwiched in a β-sheet between strands from each monomer. The structure allows us to predict which other shadow domains bind similar PXVXL motif-containing peptides and provides a framework for predicting the sequence specificity of the others. We show that targeting of HP1β to heterochromatin requires shadow domain interactions with PXVXL-containing proteins in addition to chromo domain recognition of Lys-9-methylated histone H3. Interestingly, it also appears to require the simultaneous recognition of two Lys-9-methylated histone H3 molecules. This finding implies a further complexity to the histone code for regulation of chromatin structure and suggests how binding of HP1 family proteins may lead to its condensation. PMID:14765118

  11. Identification of a common hyaluronan binding motif in the hyaluronan binding proteins RHAMM, CD44 and link protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B; Yang, B L; Savani, R C; Turley, E A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified two hyaluronan (HA) binding domains in the HA receptor, RHAMM, that occur near the carboxyl-terminus of this protein. We show here that these two HA binding domains are the only HA binding regions in RHAMM, and that they contribute approximately equally to the HA binding ability of this receptor. Mutation of domain II using recombinant polypeptides of RHAMM demonstrates that K423 and R431, spaced seven amino acids apart, are critical for HA binding activity. Domain I contains two sets of two basic amino acids, each spaced seven residues apart, and mutation of these basic amino acids reduced their binding to HA--Sepharose. These results predict that two basic amino acids flanking a seven amino acid stretch [hereafter called B(X7)B] are minimally required for HA binding activity. To assess whether this motif predicts HA binding in the intact RHAMM protein, we mutated all basic amino acids in domains I and II that form part of these motifs using site-directed mutagenesis and prepared fusion protein from the mutated cDNA. The altered RHAMM protein did not bind HA, confirming that the basic amino acids and their spacing are critical for binding. A specific requirement for arginine or lysine residues was identified since mutation of K430, R431 and K432 to histidine residues abolished binding. Clustering of basic amino acids either within or at either end of the motif enhanced HA binding activity while the occurrence of acidic residues between the basic amino acids reduced binding. The B(X7)B motif, in which B is either R or K and X7 contains no acidic residues and at least one basic amino acid, was found in all HA binding proteins molecularly characterized to date. Recombinant techniques were used to generate chimeric proteins containing either the B(X7)B motifs present in CD44 or link protein, with the amino-terminus of RHAMM (amino acids 1-238) that does not bind HA. All chimeric proteins containing the motif bound HA in transblot analyses

  12. A tyrosine-containing motif mediates ER retention of CD3-epsilon and adopts a helix-turn structure.

    PubMed Central

    Mallabiabarrena, A; Jiménez, M A; Rico, M; Alarcón, B

    1995-01-01

    The CD3-epsilon endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif has been characterized by mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy. Tyr177, Leu180 and Arg183 are involved in ER retention. The motif forms an elongated alpha-helix in which the tyrosine and leucine residues are closely apposed, followed by a beta I' turn that places Arg183 in the vicinity of Leu180. The structure formed by Tyr177 and the leucine in position +3 is reminiscent of the beta-turn structure adopted by tyrosine-containing endocytosis signals. Moreover, substitution of the transferrin receptor (TfR) internalization sequence by the CD3-epsilon motif still allowed the rapid internalization of the TfR and, conversely, the chimeric protein resulting from the substitution of the CD3-epsilon motif by the endocytosis signal of the low density lipoprotein receptor was ER located. These data support the idea of a functional homology between the two types of signal. Images PMID:7774584

  13. URS DataBase: universe of RNA structures and their motifs

    PubMed Central

    Baulin, Eugene; Yacovlev, Victor; Khachko, Denis; Spirin, Sergei; Roytberg, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The Universe of RNA Structures DataBase (URSDB) stores information obtained from all RNA-containing PDB entries (2935 entries in October 2015). The content of the database is updated regularly. The database consists of 51 tables containing indexed data on various elements of the RNA structures. The database provides a web interface allowing user to select a subset of structures with desired features and to obtain various statistical data for a selected subset of structures or for all structures. In particular, one can easily obtain statistics on geometric parameters of base pairs, on structural motifs (stems, loops, etc.) or on different types of pseudoknots. The user can also view and get information on an individual structure or its selected parts, e.g. RNA–protein hydrogen bonds. URSDB employs a new original definition of loops in RNA structures. That definition fits both pseudoknot-free and pseudoknotted secondary structures and coincides with the classical definition in case of pseudoknot-free structures. To our knowledge, URSDB is the first database supporting searches based on topological classification of pseudoknots and on extended loop classification. Database URL: http://server3.lpm.org.ru/urs/ PMID:27242032

  14. URS DataBase: universe of RNA structures and their motifs.

    PubMed

    Baulin, Eugene; Yacovlev, Victor; Khachko, Denis; Spirin, Sergei; Roytberg, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The Universe of RNA Structures DataBase (URSDB) stores information obtained from all RNA-containing PDB entries (2935 entries in October 2015). The content of the database is updated regularly. The database consists of 51 tables containing indexed data on various elements of the RNA structures. The database provides a web interface allowing user to select a subset of structures with desired features and to obtain various statistical data for a selected subset of structures or for all structures. In particular, one can easily obtain statistics on geometric parameters of base pairs, on structural motifs (stems, loops, etc.) or on different types of pseudoknots. The user can also view and get information on an individual structure or its selected parts, e.g. RNA-protein hydrogen bonds. URSDB employs a new original definition of loops in RNA structures. That definition fits both pseudoknot-free and pseudoknotted secondary structures and coincides with the classical definition in case of pseudoknot-free structures. To our knowledge, URSDB is the first database supporting searches based on topological classification of pseudoknots and on extended loop classification.Database URL: http://server3.lpm.org.ru/urs/.

  15. Characterizing the regularity of tetrahedral packing motifs in protein tertiary structure

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan; Lennox, Kristin P.; Dahl, David B.; Vannucci, Marina; Tsai, Jerry W.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: While protein secondary structure is well understood, representing the repetitive nature of tertiary packing in proteins remains difficult. We have developed a construct called the relative packing group (RPG) that applies the clique concept from graph theory as a natural basis for defining the packing motifs in proteins. An RPG is defined as a clique of residues, where every member contacts all others as determined by the Delaunay tessellation. Geometrically similar RPGs define a regular element of tertiary structure or tertiary motif (TerMo). This intuitive construct provides a simple approach to characterize general repetitive elements of tertiary structure. Results: A dataset of over 4 million tetrahedral RPGs was clustered using different criteria to characterize the various aspects of regular tertiary structure in TerMos. Grouping this data within the SCOP classification levels of Family, Superfamily, Fold, Class and PDB showed that similar packing is shared across different folds. Classification of RPGs based on residue sequence locality reveals topological preferences according to protein sizes and secondary structure. We find that larger proteins favor RPGs with three local residues packed against a non-local residue. Classifying by secondary structure, helices prefer mostly local residues, sheets favor at least two local residues, while turns and coil populate with more local residues. To depict these TerMos, we have developed 2 complementary and intuitive representations: (i) Dirichlet process mixture density estimation of the torsion angle distributions and (ii) kernel density estimation of the Cartesian coordinate distribution. The TerMo library and representations software are available upon request. Contact: jtsai@pacific.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21047817

  16. Immunity related genes in dipterans share common enrichment of AT-rich motifs in their 5' regulatory regions that are potentially involved in nucleosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Romano, Jesus; Carlos-Rivera, Francisco J; Salgado, Heladia; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Hector; Valverde-Garduño, Veronica; Rodriguez, Mario H; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding the transcriptional regulation mechanisms in response to environmental challenges is of fundamental importance in biology. Transcription factors associated to response elements and the chromatin structure had proven to play important roles in gene expression regulation. We have analyzed promoter regions of dipteran genes induced in response to immune challenge, in search for particular sequence patterns involved in their transcriptional regulation. Results 5' upstream regions of D. melanogaster and A. gambiae immunity-induced genes and their corresponding orthologous genes in 11 non-melanogaster drosophilid species and Ae. aegypti share enrichment in AT-rich short motifs. AT-rich motifs are associated with nucleosome formation as predicted by two different algorithms. In A. gambiae and D. melanogaster, many immunity genes 5' upstream sequences also showed NFκB response elements, located within 500 bp from the transcription start site. In A. gambiae, the frequency of ATAA motif near the NFκB response elements was increased, suggesting a functional link between nucleosome formation/remodelling and NFκB regulation of transcription. Conclusion AT-rich motif enrichment in 5' upstream sequences in A. gambiae, Ae. aegypti and the Drosophila genus immunity genes suggests a particular pattern of nucleosome formation/chromatin organization. The co-occurrence of such motifs with the NFκB response elements suggests that these sequence signatures may be functionally involved in transcriptional activation during dipteran immune response. AT-rich motif enrichment in regulatory regions in this group of co-regulated genes could represent an evolutionary constrained signature in dipterans and perhaps other distantly species. PMID:18613977

  17. Input-dependent induction of oligonucleotide structural motifs for performing molecular logic.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Ackermann, Damian; Hall, Anna M; Famulok, Michael

    2012-02-22

    The K(+)-H(+)-triggered structural conversion of multiple nucleic acid helices involving duplexes, triplexes, G-quadruplexes, and i-motifs is studied by gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and thermal denaturation. We employ the structural interconversions for perfoming molecular logic operations, as verified by fluorimetry and colorimetry. Short G-rich and C-rich cDNA and RNA single strands are hybridized to produce four A-form and B-form duplexes. Addition of K(+) triggers the unwinding of the duplexes by inducing the folding of G-rich strands into DNA- or RNA G-quadruplex mono- and multimers, respectively. We found a decrease in pH to have different consequences on the resulting structural output, depending on whether the C-rich strand is DNA or RNA: while the protonated C-rich DNA strand folds into at least two isomers of a stable i-motif structure, the protonated C-rich RNA strand binds a DNA/RNA hybrid duplex to form a Y·RY parallel triplex. When using K(+) and H(+) as external stimuli, or inputs, and the induced G-quadruplexes as reporters, these structural interconversions of nucleic acid helices can be employed for performing logic-gate operations. The signaling mode for detecting these conversions relies on complex formation between DNA or RNA G-quadruplexes (G4) and the cofactor hemin. The G4/hemin complexes catalyze the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of peroxidase substrates, resulting in a fluorescence or color change. Depending on the nature of the respective peroxidase substrate, distinct output signals can be generated, allowing one to operate multiple logic gates such as NOR, INH, or AND.

  18. Common recognition principles across diverse sequence and structural families of sialic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bhagavat, Raghu; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids form a large family of 9-carbon monosaccharides and are integral components of glycoconjugates. They are known to bind to a wide range of receptors belonging to diverse sequence families and fold classes and are key mediators in a plethora of cellular processes. Thus, it is of great interest to understand the features that give rise to such a recognition capability. Structural analyses using a non-redundant data set of known sialic acid binding proteins was carried out, which included exhaustive binding site comparisons and site alignments using in-house algorithms, followed by clustering and tree computation, which has led to derivation of sialic acid recognition principles. Although the proteins in the data set belong to several sequence and structure families, their binding sites could be grouped into only six types. Structural comparison of the binding sites indicates that all sites contain one or more different combinations of key structural features over a common scaffold. The six binding site types thus serve as structural motifs for recognizing sialic acid. Scanning the motifs against a non-redundant set of binding sites from PDB indicated the motifs to be specific for sialic acid recognition. Knowledge of determinants obtained from this study will be useful for detecting function in unknown proteins. As an example analysis, a genome-wide scan for the motifs in structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteome identified 17 hits that contain combinations of the features, suggesting a possible function of sialic acid binding by these proteins.

  19. Characterization of the metal ion binding helix-hairpin-helix motifs in human DNA polymerase beta by X-ray structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, H; Sawaya, M R

    1996-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic studies have shown that DNA binding by human polymerase beta (pol beta) occurs primarily through two structurally and sequentially homologous helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motifs, one in the fingers subdomain and the other in the 8-kDa domain [Pelletier, H., Sawaya, M. R., Wolfle, W., Wilson, S. H., & Kraut, J. (1996a) Biochemistry 35, 12742-12761]. In that DNA binding by each HhH motif is facilitated by a metal ion, we set out to determine the identity of the metal ion that most likely binds to the HhH motif in vivo. Crystal soaking experiments were performed on human pol beta-DNA cocrystals with Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, and K+, the four most prevalent metal ions in the cell, and in each case a data set was collected and the resulting structure was refined. Under the conditions tested, the HhH motifs of pol beta have an affinity for these biologically prevalent metal ions in the order Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Na+ < K+, with K+ displaying the strongest binding. Crystals soaked in the presence of Tl+, a commonly used spectroscopic probe for K+, were too X-ray-sensitive to establish the binding behavior of Tl+, but soaking experiments with Ba2+ and Cs+ resulted in relatively stable crystals that gave evidence of metal ion binding in both HhH motifs, confirming that larger monovalent and divalent metal ions are capable of binding to the HhH metal sites. Although Mn2+, which has been categorized as a potent polymerase mutagen, binds to the HhH motifs with a greater affinity than Mg2+, Mn2+ does not bind to the HhH motifs in the presence of equimolar concentrations of Na+. These results suggest that in vivo, where Mn2+ is present only in trace amounts, Mn2+ probably does not have a large effect on DNA binding and may instead manifest a mutagenic effect on pol beta primarily by distorting nucleotide binding or by directly affecting the catalytic step [Pelletier, H., Sawaya, M. R., Wolfle, W., Wilson, S. H., & Kraut, J. (1996b) Biochemistry 35, 12762-12777]. Crystal

  20. Functional structural motifs for protein-ligand, protein-protein, and protein-nucleic acid interactions and their connection to supersecondary structures.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Protein functions are mediated by interactions between proteins and other molecules. One useful approach to analyze protein functions is to compare and classify the structures of interaction interfaces of proteins. Here, we describe the procedures for compiling a database of interface structures and efficiently comparing the interface structures. To do so requires a good understanding of the data structures of the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Therefore, we also provide a detailed account of the PDB exchange dictionary necessary for extracting data that are relevant for analyzing interaction interfaces and secondary structures. We identify recurring structural motifs by classifying similar interface structures, and we define a coarse-grained representation of supersecondary structures (SSS) which represents a sequence of two or three secondary structure elements including their relative orientations as a string of four to seven letters. By examining the correspondence between structural motifs and SSS strings, we show that no SSS string has particularly high propensity to be found interaction interfaces in general, indicating any SSS can be used as a binding interface. When individual structural motifs are examined, there are some SSS strings that have high propensity for particular groups of structural motifs. In addition, it is shown that while the SSS strings found in particular structural motifs for nonpolymer and protein interfaces are as abundant as in other structural motifs that belong to the same subunit, structural motifs for nucleic acid interfaces exhibit somewhat stronger preference for SSS strings. In regard to protein folds, many motif-specific SSS strings were found across many folds, suggesting that SSS may be a useful description to investigate the universality of ligand binding modes.

  1. Zinc fingers as protein recognition motifs: structural basis for the GATA-1/friend of GATA interaction.

    PubMed

    Liew, Chu Kong; Simpson, Raina J Y; Kwan, Ann H Y; Crofts, Linda A; Loughlin, Fionna E; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2005-01-18

    GATA-1 and friend of GATA (FOG) are zinc-finger transcription factors that physically interact to play essential roles in erythroid and megakaryocytic development. Several naturally occurring mutations in the GATA-1 gene that alter the FOG-binding domain have been reported. The mutations are associated with familial anemias and thrombocytopenias of differing severity. To elucidate the molecular basis for the GATA-1/FOG interaction, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of a complex comprising the interaction domains of these proteins. The structure reveals how zinc fingers can act as protein recognition motifs. Details of the architecture of the contact domains and their physical properties provide a molecular explanation for how the GATA-1 mutations contribute to distinct but related genetic diseases.

  2. Viroids: from genotype to phenotype just relying on RNA sequence and structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson-Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures - either global or local - determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs.

  3. Viroids: From Genotype to Phenotype Just Relying on RNA Sequence and Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson–Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures – either global or local – determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs. PMID:22719735

  4. Structural basis for the recognition of two consecutive mutually interacting DPF motifs by the SGIP1 μ homology domain

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    FCHo1, FCHo2, and SGIP1 are key regulators of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Their μ homology domains (μHDs) interact with the C-terminal region of an endocytic scaffold protein, Eps15, containing fifteen Asp-Pro-Phe (DPF) motifs. Here, we show that the high-affinity μHD-binding site in Eps15 is a region encompassing six consecutive DPF motifs, while the minimal μHD-binding unit is two consecutive DPF motifs. We present the crystal structures of the SGIP1 μHD in complex with peptides containing two DPF motifs. The peptides bind to a novel ligand-binding site of the μHD, which is distinct from those of other distantly related μHD-containing proteins. The two DPF motifs, which adopt three-dimensional structures stabilized by sequence-specific intramotif and intermotif interactions, are extensively recognized by the μHD and are both required for binding. Thus, consecutive and singly scattered DPF motifs play distinct roles in μHD binding. PMID:26822536

  5. Structural basis for the recognition of two consecutive mutually interacting DPF motifs by the SGIP1 μ homology domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    FCHo1, FCHo2, and SGIP1 are key regulators of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Their μ homology domains (μHDs) interact with the C-terminal region of an endocytic scaffold protein, Eps15, containing fifteen Asp-Pro-Phe (DPF) motifs. Here, we show that the high-affinity μHD-binding site in Eps15 is a region encompassing six consecutive DPF motifs, while the minimal μHD-binding unit is two consecutive DPF motifs. We present the crystal structures of the SGIP1 μHD in complex with peptides containing two DPF motifs. The peptides bind to a novel ligand-binding site of the μHD, which is distinct from those of other distantly related μHD-containing proteins. The two DPF motifs, which adopt three-dimensional structures stabilized by sequence-specific intramotif and intermotif interactions, are extensively recognized by the μHD and are both required for binding. Thus, consecutive and singly scattered DPF motifs play distinct roles in μHD binding.

  6. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substrate recognition in ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADP-ribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Tainer, John A

    2002-02-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing the NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular beta-sheet cores has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosytransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Structural and mutagenic studies of the NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD-binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD-binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  7. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Mark S. . E-mail: msl27@drexel.edu; Schultz, David C.; Negorev, Dmitri; Maul, Gerd G.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2005-06-17

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization.

  8. Ser/Thr Motifs in Transmembrane Proteins: Conservation Patterns and Effects on Local Protein Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; White, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    We combined systematic bioinformatics analyses and molecular dynamics simulations to assess the conservation patterns of Ser and Thr motifs in membrane proteins, and the effect of such motifs on the structure and dynamics of α-helical transmembrane (TM) segments. We find that Ser/Thr motifs are often present in β-barrel TM proteins. At least one Ser/Thr motif is present in almost half of the sequences of α-helical proteins analyzed here. The extensive bioinformatics analyses and inspection of protein structures led to the identification of molecular transporters with noticeable numbers of Ser/Thr motifs within the TM region. Given the energetic penalty for burying multiple Ser/Thr groups in the membrane hydrophobic core, the observation of transporters with multiple membrane-embedded Ser/Thr is intriguing and raises the question of how the presence of multiple Ser/Thr affects protein local structure and dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations of four different Ser-containing model TM peptides indicate that backbone hydrogen bonding of membrane-buried Ser/Thr hydroxyl groups can significantly change the local structure and dynamics of the helix. Ser groups located close to the membrane interface can hydrogen bond to solvent water instead of protein backbone, leading to an enhanced local solvation of the peptide. PMID:22836667

  9. Crystal Structure of a Luteoviral RNA Pseudoknot and Model for a Minimal Ribosomal Frameshifting Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Marshall, William S.; Harp, Joel; Jewett III, Frederic C.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Brown II, Bernard A.; Rich, Alexander; Egli, Martin

    2010-03-08

    To understand the role of structural elements of RNA pseudoknots in controlling the extent of -1-type ribosomal frameshifting, we determined the crystal structure of a high-efficiency frameshifting mutant of the pseudoknot from potato leaf roll virus (PLRV). Correlations of the structure with available in vitro frameshifting data for PLRV pseudoknot mutants implicate sequence and length of a stem-loop linker as modulators of frameshifting efficiency. Although the sequences and overall structures of the RNA pseudoknots from PLRV and beet western yellow virus (BWYV) are similar, nucleotide deletions in the linker and adjacent minor groove loop abolish frameshifting only with the latter. Conversely, mutant PLRV pseudoknots with up to four nucleotides deleted in this region exhibit nearly wild-type frameshifting efficiencies. The crystal structure helps rationalize the different tolerances for deletions in the PLRV and BWYV RNAs, and we have used it to build a three-dimensional model of the PRLV pseudoknot with a four-nucleotide deletion. The resulting structure defines a minimal RNA pseudoknot motif composed of 22 nucleotides capable of stimulating -1-type ribosomal frameshifts.

  10. A grammar based methodology for structural motif finding in ncRNA database search.

    PubMed

    Quest, Daniel; Tapprich, William; Ali, Hesham

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, sequence database searching has been conducted through local alignment heuristics, pattern-matching, and comparison of short statistically significant patterns. While these approaches have unlocked many clues as to sequence relationships, they are limited in that they do not provide context-sensitive searching capabilities (e.g. considering pseudoknots, protein binding positions, and complementary base pairs). Stochastic grammars (hidden Markov models HMMs and stochastic context-free grammars SCFG) do allow for flexibility in terms of local context, but the context comes at the cost of increased computational complexity. In this paper we introduce a new grammar based method for searching for RNA motifs that exist within a conserved RNA structure. Our method constrains computational complexity by using a chain of topology elements. Through the use of a case study we present the algorithmic approach and benchmark our approach against traditional methods.

  11. Comparative modeling of marsupial MHC class I molecules identifies structural polymorphisms affecting functional motifs.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kerry; Church, W Bret; Nicholas, Kevin; Williamson, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are transmembrane glycoproteins that present antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells and are subsequently important for the initiation of an immune response. In this study novel MHC class I sequences from the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) have been characterized. Analysis and comparative modeling of these and existing marsupial molecules reveals potential functional polymorphisms within peptide-binding grooves, MHC assembly motifs and the T cell receptor recognition interface. In addition, we show that a previously identified marsupial-specific insertion is within a region, which is known as a putative NK cell receptor (Ly49A) binding site in the mouse, suggesting that this site may be functionally active in marsupials. Further, the analysis highlighted differences in structural and sequence based grouping of marsupial MHC class I molecules. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Genome-Wide Analyses of Recombination Prone Regions Predict Role of DNA Structural Motif in Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2009-01-01

    HapMap findings reveal surprisingly asymmetric distribution of recombinogenic regions. Short recombinogenic regions (hotspots) are interspersed between large relatively non-recombinogenic regions. This raises the interesting possibility of DNA sequence and/or other cis- elements as determinants of recombination. We hypothesized the involvement of non-canonical sequences that can result in local non-B DNA structures and tested this using the G-quadruplex DNA as a model. G-quadruplex or G4 DNA is a unique form of four-stranded non-B DNA structure that engages certain G-rich sequences, presence of such motifs has been noted within telomeres. In support of this hypothesis, genome-wide computational analyses presented here reveal enrichment of potential G4 (PG4) DNA forming sequences within 25618 human hotspots relative to 9290 coldspots (p<0.0001). Furthermore, co-occurrence of PG4 DNA within several short sequence elements that are associated with recombinogenic regions was found to be significantly more than randomly expected. Interestingly, analyses of more than 50 DNA binding factors revealed that co-occurrence of PG4 DNA with target DNA binding sites of transcription factors c-Rel, NF-kappa B (p50 and p65) and Evi-1 was significantly enriched in recombination-prone regions. These observations support involvement of G4 DNA in recombination, predicting a functional model that is consistent with duplex-strand separation induced by formation of G4 motifs in supercoiled DNA and/or when assisted by other cellular factors. PMID:19198658

  13. Structural and functional insights into the regulation of Helicobacter pylori arginase activity by an evolutionary nonconserved motif.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Meena, Shiv Kumar; Alam, Mashkoor; Nayeem, Shahid M; Deep, Shashank; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2013-01-22

    Urea producing bimetallic arginases are essential for the synthesis of polyamine, DNA, and RNA. Despite conservation of the signature motifs in all arginases, a nonconserved ¹⁵³ESEEKAWQKLCSL¹⁶⁵ motif is found in the Helicobacter pylori enzyme, whose role is yet unknown. Using site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic assays, metal analyses, circular dichroism, heat-induced denaturation, molecular dynamics simulations and truncation studies, we report here the significance of this motif in catalytic function, metal retention, structural integrity, and stability of the protein. The enzyme did not exhibit detectable activity upon deletion of the motif as well as on individual mutation of Glu155 and Trp159 while Cys163Ala displayed significant decrease in the activity. Trp159Ala and Glu155Ala show severe loss of thermostability (14-17°) by a decrease in the α-helical structure. The role of Trp159 in stabilization of the structure with the surrounding aromatic residues is confirmed when Trp159Phe restored the structure and stability substantially compared to Trp159Ala. The simulation studies support the above results and show that the motif, which was previously solvent exposed, displays a loop-cum-small helix structure (Lys161-Cys163) and is located near the active-site through a novel Trp159-Asp126 interaction. This is consistent with the mutational analyses, where Trp159 and Asp126 are individually critical for retaining a bimetallic center and thereby for function. Furthermore, Cys163 of the helix is primarily important for dimerization, which is crucial for stimulation of the activity. Thus, these findings not only provide insights into the role of this motif but also offer a possibility to engineer it in human arginases for therapeutics against a number of carcinomas.

  14. Crystal structure of the human heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 RNA-recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Katherine; Melville, Zephan; Aligholizadeh, Ehson; Roth, Braden M; Varney, Kristen M; Carrier, France; Pozharski, Edwin; Weber, David J

    2017-04-01

    The heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) is upregulated in hypoxic regions of various solid tumors and promotes tumor growth via the coordination of mRNA transcripts associated with pro-survival genes. Thus, hnRNP A18 represents an important therapeutic target in tumor cells. Presented here is the first X-ray crystal structure to be reported for the RNA-recognition motif of hnRNP A18. By comparing this structure with those of homologous RNA-binding proteins (i.e. hnRNP A1), three residues on one face of an antiparallel β-sheet (Arg48, Phe50 and Phe52) and one residue in an unstructured loop (Arg41) were identified as likely to be involved in protein-nucleic acid interactions. This structure helps to serve as a foundation for biophysical studies of this RNA-binding protein and structure-based drug-design efforts for targeting hnRNP A18 in cancer, such as malignant melanoma, where hnRNP A18 levels are elevated and contribute to disease progression.

  15. Stabilization of telomeric i-motif structures by (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-C-methyl-cytidine residues.

    PubMed

    Aviñó, Anna; Dellafiore, Maria; Gargallo, Raimundo; González, Carlos; Iribarren, Adolfo M; Montserrat, Javier; Eritja, Ramon

    2017-04-13

    G-quadruplex and i-motif are tetraplex structures present in telomeres and promoter regions of oncogenes. The possibility of producing nanodevices with pH-sensitive functions has triggered the interest for modified oligonucleotides with improved structural properties. We synthesized C-rich oligonucleotides carrying conformationally restricted (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-C-methyl-cytidine units. The effect of this modified nucleoside on the stability of intramolecular i-motifs related to vertebrate telomere was investigated by means of spectroscopic methods (UV, CD and NMR). The replacement of selected positions of the C-core by the appropriate C-modified residues induces the formation of stable intercalated tetraplexes at pHs near neutrality. The study demonstrates the possibility of enhancing the stability of i-motif by chemical modifications.

  16. Centromeric Alpha-Satellite DNA Adopts Dimeric i-Motif Structures Capped by AT Hoogsteen Base Pairs.

    PubMed

    Garavís, Miguel; Escaja, Núria; Gabelica, Valérie; Villasante, Alfredo; González, Carlos

    2015-06-26

    Human centromeric alpha-satellite DNA is composed of tandem arrays of two types of 171 bp monomers; type A and type B. The differences between these types are concentrated in a 17 bp region of the monomer called the A/B box. Here, we have determined the solution structure of the C-rich strand of the two main variants of the human alpha-satellite A box. We show that, under acidic conditions, the C-rich strands of two A boxes self-recognize and form a head-to-tail dimeric i-motif stabilized by four intercalated hemi-protonated C:C(+) base pairs. Interestingly, the stack of C:C(+) base pairs is capped by T:T and Hoogsteen A:T base pairs. The two main variants of the A box adopt a similar three-dimensional structure, although the residues involved in the formation of the i-motif core are different in each case. Together with previous studies showing that the B box (known as the CENP-B box) also forms dimeric i-motif structures, our finding of this non-canonical structure in the A box shows that centromeric alpha satellites in all human chromosomes are able to form i-motifs, which consequently raises the possibility that these structures may play a role in the structural organization of the centromere. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Crystal structure of a novel RNA motif that allows for precise positioning of a single metal ion.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiroki; Kondo, Jiro

    2017-11-01

    We have determined a crystal structure of an RNA duplex containing a novel metal-binding motif. The motif is composed of two sheared G○A base pairs, two unpaired A residues and four phosphate groups in close proximity. Four A residues make an A-A-A-A stacking column at the minor groove side and two G bases are highly inclined, thereby forming the pocket-shaped motif at the major groove side. In the present structure, a hydrated Sr(2+) ion exists in the pocket and binds to the O6 and N7 atoms of the two G bases and four phosphate groups. According to the previously-reported metal-binding properties to RNA molecules, many of divalent cations, such as Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), Ba(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), may bind to the motif. This metal-binding motif can be used as a modular building block that allows for precise positioning of a single metal ion in functional nucleic acid molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyproline II helix is a key structural motif of the elastic PEVK segment of titin.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Kan, L; Wang, K

    2001-03-27

    Titin is a family of giant elastic proteins that constitute an elastic sarcomere matrix in striated muscle. In the I-band region of the sarcomere, where titin extends and develops passive force upon stretch, titin is composed of tandem repeats of approximately 100 residue immunoglobin domains and approximately 28-residue PEVK modules. We have performed 2D NMR and circular dichroism (CD) studies of the conformations of one representative 28-mer PEVK module from human fetal titin (PEPPKEVVPEKKAPVAPPKKPEVPPVKV). NMR data of synthetic peptides of this module as well as three constituent peptides of 9 to 12 residues in aqueous solutions reveal distinguishing features for left-handed three-residue per turn PPII helices: the lack of NOE NN(i, i+1), very large NOE alphaN(i, i+1)/NN(i, i+1), no medium range NOE alphaN(i, i+2), and dihedral angles phi and psi values of -78 and 146, respectively. Structural determinations indicate the presence of three short stretches of PPII helices of 4, 5, and 6 residues that are interposed with an unordered, and presumably flexible, spacer region to give one "polyproline II helix-coil" or "PhC" motif for roughly every 10 residues. These peptides also display the characteristic PPII CD spectra: positive peak or negative shoulder band at 223 nm, negative CD band near 200 nm, and biphasic thermal titration curves that reflect varied stability of these PPII helices. We propose that this PhC motif is a fundamental feature and that the number, length, stability, and distribution of PPII is important in the understanding of the elasticity and protein interactions of the PEVK region of titin.

  19. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-11-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological-temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network.

  20. 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane as a structural motif to block mutagenicity of nitrosamines.

    PubMed

    Ohwada, Tomohiko; Ishikawa, Satoko; Mine, Yusuke; Inami, Keiko; Yanagimoto, Takahiro; Karaki, Fumika; Kabasawa, Yoji; Otani, Yuko; Mochizuki, Masataka

    2011-04-15

    Nitrosamines are potent carcinogens and toxicants in the rat and potential genotoxins in humans. They are metabolically activated by hydroxylation at an α-carbon atom with respect to the nitrosoamino group, catalyzed by cytochrome P450. However, there has been little systematic investigation of the structure-mutagenic activity relationship of N-nitrosamines. Herein, we evaluated the mutagenicity of a series of 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane N-nitrosamines and related monocyclic nitrosamines by using the Ames assay. Our results show that the N-nitrosamine functionality embedded in the bicyclic 7-azabicylo[2.2.1]heptane structure lacks mutagenicity, that is, it is inert to α-hydroxylation, which is the trigger of mutagenic events. Further, the calculated α-C-H bond dissociation energies of the bicyclic nitrosamines are larger in magnitude than those of the corresponding monocyclic nitrosamines and N-nitrosodimethylamine by as much as 20-30 kcal/mol. These results are consistent with lower α-C-H bond reactivity of the bicyclic nitrosamines. Thus, the 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane structural motif may be useful for the design of nongenotoxic nitrosamine compounds with potential biological/medicinal applications.

  1. SPRITE and ASSAM: web servers for side chain 3D-motif searching in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Nadzirin, Nurul; Gardiner, Eleanor J.; Willett, Peter; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Similarities in the 3D patterns of amino acid side chains can provide insights into their function despite the absence of any detectable sequence or fold similarities. Search for protein sites (SPRITE) and amino acid pattern search for substructures and motifs (ASSAM) are graph theoretical programs that can search for 3D amino side chain matches in protein structures, by representing the amino acid side chains as pseudo-atoms. The geometric relationship of the pseudo-atoms to each other as a pattern can be represented as a labeled graph where the pseudo-atoms are the graph's nodes while the edges are the inter-pseudo-atomic distances. Both programs require the input file to be in the PDB format. The objective of using SPRITE is to identify matches of side chains in a query structure to patterns with characterized function. In contrast, a 3D pattern of interest can be searched for existing occurrences in available PDB structures using ASSAM. Both programs are freely accessible without any login requirement. SPRITE is available at http://mfrlab.org/grafss/sprite/ while ASSAM can be accessed at http://mfrlab.org/grafss/assam/. PMID:22573174

  2. The transcription factor Spn1 regulates gene expression via a highly conserved novel structural motif

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Venugopal; Radebaugh, Catherine A.; Chodaparambil, Jayanth V.; Muthurajan, Uma M.; Almeida, Adam R.; Fischbeck, Julie A.; Luger, Karolin; Stargell, Laurie A.

    2010-01-01

    Spn1 plays essential roles in the regulation of gene expression by RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII), and it is highly conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. Spn1 physically and/or genetically interacts with RNAPII, TBP, TFIIS and a number of chromatin remodeling factors (Swi/Snf and Spt6). The central domain of Spn1 (residues 141-305 out of 410) is necessary and sufficient for performing the essential functions of SPN1 in yeast cells. Here we report the high-resolution (1.85Å) crystal structure of the conserved central domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spn1. The central domain is comprised of eight alpha-helices in a right handed super helical arrangement, and exhibits structural similarity to domain I of TFIIS. A unique structural feature of Spn1 is a highly conserved loop, which defines one side of a pronounced cavity. The loop and the other residues forming the cavity are highly conserved at the amino acid level among all Spn1 family members, suggesting that this is a signature motif for Spn1 orthologs. The locations and the molecular characterization of temperature-sensitive mutations in Spn1 indicate that the cavity is a key attribute of Spn1 that is critical for its regulatory functions during RNAPII-mediated transcriptional activity. PMID:20875428

  3. The transcription factor Spn1 regulates gene expression via a highly conserved novel structural motif.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Venugopal; Radebaugh, Catherine A; Chodaparambil, Jayanth V; Muthurajan, Uma M; Almeida, Adam R; Fischbeck, Julie A; Luger, Karolin; Stargell, Laurie A

    2010-11-19

    Spn1/Iws1 plays essential roles in the regulation of gene expression by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), and it is highly conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. Spn1 physically and/or genetically interacts with RNAPII, TBP (TATA-binding protein), TFIIS (transcription factor IIS), and a number of chromatin remodeling factors (Swi/Snf and Spt6). The central domain of Spn1 (residues 141-305 out of 410) is necessary and sufficient for performing the essential functions of SPN1 in yeast cells. Here, we report the high-resolution (1.85 Å) crystal structure of the conserved central domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spn1. The central domain is composed of eight α-helices in a right-handed superhelical arrangement and exhibits structural similarity to domain I of TFIIS. A unique structural feature of Spn1 is a highly conserved loop, which defines one side of a pronounced cavity. The loop and the other residues forming the cavity are highly conserved at the amino acid level among all Spn1 family members, suggesting that this is a signature motif for Spn1 orthologs. The locations and the molecular characterization of temperature-sensitive mutations in Spn1 indicate that the cavity is a key attribute of Spn1 that is critical for its regulatory functions during RNAPII-mediated transcriptional activity.

  4. Methods for Identifying Ligands that Target Nucleic Acid Molecules and Nucleic Acid Structural Motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disney, Matthew D. (Inventor); Childs-Disney, Jessica L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for identifying a nucleic acid (e.g., RNA, DNA, etc.) motif which interacts with a ligand. The method includes providing a plurality of ligands immobilized on a support, wherein each particular ligand is immobilized at a discrete location on the support; contacting the plurality of immobilized ligands with a nucleic acid motif library under conditions effective for one or more members of the nucleic acid motif library to bind with the immobilized ligands; and identifying members of the nucleic acid motif library that are bound to a particular immobilized ligand. Also disclosed are methods for selecting, from a plurality of candidate ligands, one or more ligands that have increased likelihood of binding to a nucleic acid molecule comprising a particular nucleic acid motif, as well as methods for identifying a nucleic acid which interacts with a ligand.

  5. Identification of family-specific residue packing motifs and their use for structure-based protein function prediction: I. Method development.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Huan, Jun; Prins, Jan; Snoeyink, Jack; Wang, Wei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Protein function prediction is one of the central problems in computational biology. We present a novel automated protein structure-based function prediction method using libraries of local residue packing patterns that are common to most proteins in a known functional family. Critical to this approach is the representation of a protein structure as a graph where residue vertices (residue name used as a vertex label) are connected by geometrical proximity edges. The approach employs two steps. First, it uses a fast subgraph mining algorithm to find all occurrences of family-specific labeled subgraphs for all well characterized protein structural and functional families. Second, it queries a new structure for occurrences of a set of motifs characteristic of a known family, using a graph index to speed up Ullman's subgraph isomorphism algorithm. The confidence of function inference from structure depends on the number of family-specific motifs found in the query structure compared with their distribution in a large non-redundant database of proteins. This method can assign a new structure to a specific functional family in cases where sequence alignments, sequence patterns, structural superposition and active site templates fail to provide accurate annotation.

  6. Defining RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions via two-dimensional combinatorial screening and structure-activity relationships through sequencing.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-10-15

    RNA is an extremely important target for the development of chemical probes of function or small molecule therapeutics. Aminoglycosides are the most well studied class of small molecules to target RNA. However, the RNA motifs outside of the bacterial rRNA A-site that are likely to be bound by these compounds in biological systems is largely unknown. If such information were known, it could allow for aminoglycosides to be exploited to target other RNAs and, in addition, could provide invaluable insights into potential bystander targets of these clinically used drugs. We utilized two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS), a library-versus-library screening approach, to select the motifs displayed in a 3×3 nucleotide internal loop library and in a 6-nucleotide hairpin library that bind with high affinity and selectivity to six aminoglycoside derivatives. The selected RNA motifs were then analyzed using structure-activity relationships through sequencing (StARTS), a statistical approach that defines the privileged RNA motif space that binds a small molecule. StARTS allowed for the facile annotation of the selected RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions in terms of affinity and selectivity. The interactions selected by 2DCS generally have nanomolar affinities, which is higher affinity than the binding of aminoglycosides to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the bacterial rRNA A-site.

  7. Extra! Extra! Read All about It!: Structuring the U.S. History Survey around the Motif of the Newspaper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Erica A.

    2013-01-01

    As a graduate instructor for HIST 152: United States Since 1877, the author structures the entire course around the motif of the newspaper. She models her curriculum after the newspaper both visually and symbolically and uses it as a theme throughout the class. The newspaper is not a gimmick or cliche, but rather a recurring stylistic theme, an…

  8. Extra! Extra! Read All about It!: Structuring the U.S. History Survey around the Motif of the Newspaper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Erica A.

    2013-01-01

    As a graduate instructor for HIST 152: United States Since 1877, the author structures the entire course around the motif of the newspaper. She models her curriculum after the newspaper both visually and symbolically and uses it as a theme throughout the class. The newspaper is not a gimmick or cliche, but rather a recurring stylistic theme, an…

  9. Structural alteration of the metal-organic pyrogallol[4]arene nano-capsule motif by incorporation of large metal centres.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ping; Kumari, Harshita; Kennedy, Stuart; Barnes, Charles L; Teat, Simon J; Dalgarno, Scott J; Atwood, Jerry L

    2014-05-04

    Addition of cadmium(II) nitrate to gallium-coordinated metal-organic C-alkylpyrogallol[4]arene nano-capsules affords a variation of the near spherical hexamer motif, structural changes in which are induced by the markedly different nature of the secondary incorporated metal.

  10. Crystal structure of the G3BP2 NTF2-like domain in complex with a canonical FGDF motif peptide.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Ole

    2015-11-06

    The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of the human Ras GTPase SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), isoform 2, was determined at a resolution of 2.75 Å in complex with a peptide containing a FGDF sequence motif. The overall structure of the protein is highly similar to the homodimeric N-terminal domains of the G3BP1 and Rasputin proteins. Recently, a subset of G3BP interacting proteins was recognized to share a common sequence motif, FGDF. The most studied binding partners, USP10 and viral nsP3, interfere with essential G3BP functions related to assembly of cellular stress granules. Reported molecular modeling suggested that FGDF-motif containing peptides bind in an extended conformation into a hydrophobic groove on the surface of the G3BP NTF2-like domain in a manner similar to the known binding of FxFG nucleoporin repeats. The results in this paper provide evidence for a different binding mode. The FGDF peptide binds and changes conformation of the protruding N-terminal residues by providing hydrophobic interactions to a symmetry related molecule that facilitated crystallization of the G3BP2 isoform.

  11. Direct RNA motif definition and identification from multiple sequence alignments using secondary structure profiles.

    PubMed

    Gautheret, D; Lambert, A

    2001-11-09

    We present here a new approach to the problem of defining RNA signatures and finding their occurrences in sequence databases. The proposed method is based on "secondary structure profiles". An RNA sequence alignment with secondary structure information is used as an input. Two types of weight matrices/profiles are constructed from this alignment: single strands are represented by a classical lod-scores profile while helical regions are represented by an extended "helical profile" comprising 16 lod-scores per position, one for each of the 16 possible base-pairs. Database searches are then conducted using a simultaneous search for helical profiles and dynamic programming alignment of single strand profiles. The algorithm has been implemented into a new software, ERPIN, that performs both profile construction and database search. Applications are presented for several RNA motifs. The automated use of sequence information in both single-stranded and helical regions yields better sensitivity/specificity ratios than descriptor-based programs. Furthermore, since the translation of alignments into profiles is straightforward with ERPIN, iterative searches can easily be conducted to enrich collections of homologous RNAs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. The noncatalytic triad of alpha-amylases: a novel structural motif involved in conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Marx, Jean-Claude; Poncin, Johan; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Ramteke, Pramod W; Feller, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Chloride-activated alpha-amylases contain a noncatalytic triad, independent of the glycosidic active site, perfectly mimicking the catalytic triad of serine-proteases and of other active serine hydrolytic enzymes. Mutagenesis of Glu, His, and Ser residues in various alpha-amylases shows that this pattern is a structural determinant of the enzyme conformation that cannot be altered without losing the intrinsic stability of the protein. (1)H-(15)N NMR spectra of a bacterial alpha-amylase reveal proton signals that are identical with the NMR signature of catalytic triads and especially a deshielded proton involving a protonated histidine and displaying properties similar to that of a low barrier hydrogen bond. It is proposed that the H-bond between His and Glu of the noncatalytic triad is an unusually strong interaction, responsible for the observed NMR signal and for the weak stability of the triad mutants. Furthermore, a stringent template-based search of the Protein Data Bank demonstrated that this motif is not restricted to alpha-amylases, but is also found in 80 structures from 33 different proteins, amongst which SH2 domain-containing proteins are the best representatives.

  13. Structural analysis of Uranyl complexation by the EF-hand motif of calmodulin: effect of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Berthomieu, Catherine; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Brulfert, Florian; Pardoux, Romain; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Lemaire, David; Safi, Samir; Guilbaud, Philippe; Simoni, Eric; Merroun, Mohamed Larbi

    2017-09-04

    Better understanding of uranyl-protein interactions is a prerequisite to predict uranium chemical toxicity in cells. The EF-hand motif of calmodulin site I is about thousand times more affine for uranyl than for calcium, and threonine phosphorylation increases uranyl affinity by two orders of magnitude at pH 7. In this study, we confront X-rays absorption spectroscopy with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and structural models obtained by molecular dynamics simulations to analyze uranyl coordination in native and phosphorylated calmodulin site I. For native site I, Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data evidence a short U-Oeq distance, in addition to distances compatible with mono and bidentate coordination by carboxylate groups. Further analysis of uranyl speciation by TRLFS and thorough investigation of the fluorescence decay kinetics strongly support the presence of a hydroxide uranyl ligand. For phosphorylated site I, EXAFS and FTIR data support monodentate uranyl coordination by the phosphoryl group and strong interaction with monodentate and bidentate carboxylate ligands. This study confirms the important role of a phosphoryl ligand in the stability of uranyl-protein interactions. By evidencing a hydroxide uranyl ligand in calmodulin site I, this study also highlights the possible role of less studied ligands as water or hydroxide anions in the stability of protein-uranyl complexes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Recurring RNA structural motifs underlie the mechanics of L1 stalk movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Srividya; Noller, Harry F.

    2017-02-01

    The L1 stalk of the large ribosomal subunit undergoes large-scale movements coupled to the translocation of deacylated tRNA during protein synthesis. We use quantitative comparative structural analysis to localize the origins of L1 stalk movement and to understand its dynamic interactions with tRNA and other structural elements of the ribosome. Besides its stacking interactions with the tRNA elbow, stalk movement is directly linked to intersubunit rotation, rotation of the 30S head domain and contact of the acceptor arm of deacylated tRNA with helix 68 of 23S rRNA. Movement originates from pivoting at stacked non-canonical base pairs in a Family A three-way junction and bending in an internal G-U-rich zone. Use of these same motifs as hinge points to enable such dynamic events as rotation of the 30S subunit head domain and in flexing of the anticodon arm of tRNA suggests that they represent general strategies for movement of functional RNAs.

  15. Recurring RNA structural motifs underlie the mechanics of L1 stalk movement

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Srividya; Noller, Harry F

    2017-01-01

    The L1 stalk of the large ribosomal subunit undergoes large-scale movements coupled to the translocation of deacylated tRNA during protein synthesis. We use quantitative comparative structural analysis to localize the origins of L1 stalk movement and to understand its dynamic interactions with tRNA and other structural elements of the ribosome. Besides its stacking interactions with the tRNA elbow, stalk movement is directly linked to intersubunit rotation, rotation of the 30S head domain and contact of the acceptor arm of deacylated tRNA with helix 68 of 23S rRNA. Movement originates from pivoting at stacked non-canonical base pairs in a Family A three-way junction and bending in an internal G-U-rich zone. Use of these same motifs as hinge points to enable such dynamic events as rotation of the 30S subunit head domain and in flexing of the anticodon arm of tRNA suggests that they represent general strategies for movement of functional RNAs. PMID:28176782

  16. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Waleń, Tomasz; Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-03-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx.

  17. Differential Transmembrane Domain GXXXG Motif Pairing Impacts Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class II Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Ann M.; Drake, Lisa; Hughes, Kelly T.; Sargent, Elizabeth; Hunt, Danielle; Harton, Jonathan A.; Drake, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules exhibit conformational heterogeneity, which influences their ability to stimulate CD4 T cells and drive immune responses. Previous studies suggest a role for the transmembrane domain of the class II αβ heterodimer in determining molecular structure and function. Our previous studies identified an MHC class II conformer that is marked by the Ia.2 epitope. These Ia.2+ class II conformers are lipid raft-associated and able to drive both tyrosine kinase signaling and efficient antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. Here, we establish that the Ia.2+ I-Ak conformer is formed early in the class II biosynthetic pathway and that differential pairing of highly conserved transmembrane domain GXXXG dimerization motifs is responsible for formation of Ia.2+ versus Ia.2− I-Ak class II conformers and controlling lipid raft partitioning. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the formation of two distinct MHC class II conformers that differ in their inherent ability to signal and drive robust T cell activation, providing new insight into the role of MHC class II in regulating antigen-presenting cell-T cell interactions critical to the initiation and control of multiple aspects of the immune response. PMID:24619409

  18. Intercellular network structure and regulatory motifs in the human hematopoietic system

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, Weijia; Laurenti, Elisa; Turinsky, Andrei L; Wodak, Shoshana J; Bader, Gary D; Dick, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    The hematopoietic system is a distributed tissue that consists of functionally distinct cell types continuously produced through hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation. Combining genomic and phenotypic data with high-content experiments, we have built a directional cell–cell communication network between 12 cell types isolated from human umbilical cord blood. Network structure analysis revealed that ligand production is cell type dependent, whereas ligand binding is promiscuous. Consequently, additional control strategies such as cell frequency modulation and compartmentalization were needed to achieve specificity in HSC fate regulation. Incorporating the in vitro effects (quiescence, self-renewal, proliferation, or differentiation) of 27 HSC binding ligands into the topology of the cell–cell communication network allowed coding of cell type-dependent feedback regulation of HSC fate. Pathway enrichment analysis identified intracellular regulatory motifs enriched in these cell type- and ligand-coupled responses. This study uncovers cellular mechanisms of hematopoietic cell feedback in HSC fate regulation, provides insight into the design principles of the human hematopoietic system, and serves as a foundation for the analysis of intercellular regulation in multicellular systems. PMID:25028490

  19. A combined sequence and structure based method for discovering enriched motifs in RNA from in vivo binding data.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Maya; Paz, Inbal; Kohen, Refael; Mesika, Rona; Yakhini, Zohar; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2017-04-15

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in regulating many processes in the cell. RBPs often recognize their RNA targets in a specific manner. In addition to the RNA primary sequence, the structure of the RNA has been shown to play a central role in RNA recognition by RBPs. In recent years, many experimental approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, were developed and employed to identify and characterize RBP targets and extract their binding specificities. In vivo binding techniques, such as CrossLinking and ImmunoPrecipitation (CLIP)-based methods, enable the characterization of protein binding sites on RNA targets. However, these methods do not provide information regarding the structural preferences of the protein. While methods to obtain the structure of RNA are available, inferring both the sequence and the structure preferences of RBPs remains a challenge. Here we present SMARTIV, a novel computational tool for discovering combined sequence and structure binding motifs from in vivo RNA binding data relying on the sequences of the target sites, the ranking of their binding scores and their predicted secondary structure. The combined motifs are provided in a unified representation that is informative and easy for visual perception. We tested the method on CLIP-seq data from different platforms for a variety of RBPs. Overall, we show that our results are highly consistent with known binding motifs of RBPs, offering additional information on their structural preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sarcosine and betaine crystals upon cooling: structural motifs unstable at high pressure become stable at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, E A; Minkov, V S; Boldyreva, E V

    2015-02-07

    The crystal structures of N-methyl derivatives of the simplest amino acid glycine, namely sarcosine (C3H7NO2) and betaine (C5H11NO2), were studied upon cooling by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and single-crystal polarized Raman spectroscopy. The effects of decreasing temperature and increasing hydrostatic pressure on the crystal structures were compared. In particular, we have studied the behavior upon cooling of those structural motifs in the crystals, which are involved in structural rearrangement during pressure-induced phase transitions. In contrast to their high sensitivity to hydrostatic compression, the crystals of both sarcosine and betaine are stable to cooling down to 5 K. Similarly to most α-amino acids, the crystal structures of the two compounds are most rigid upon cooling in the direction of the main structural motif, namely head-to-tail chains (linked via the strongest N-H···O hydrogen bonds and dipole-dipole interactions in the case of sarcosine, or exclusively by dipole-dipole interactions in the case of betaine). The anisotropy of linear strain in betaine does not differ much upon cooling and on hydrostatic compression, whereas this is not the case for sarcosine. Although the interactions between certain structural motifs in sarcosine and betaine weaken as a result of phase transitions induced by pressure, the same interactions strengthen when volume reduction results from cooling.

  1. Effect of trimerization motifs on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of a noncleavable HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen; Jiang Peifeng; Xu Li; Ostrow, Kristin M.; Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham; Binley, James M.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Whalen, Robert G.

    2009-12-05

    The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a noncleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4-binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of a Novel Globular Domain in RBM10 Containing OCRE, the Octamer Repeat Sequence Motif.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan T; Serrano, Pedro; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-01-05

    The OCtamer REpeat (OCRE) has been annotated as a 42-residue sequence motif with 12 tyrosine residues in the spliceosome trans-regulatory elements RBM5 and RBM10 (RBM [RNA-binding motif]), which are known to regulate alternative splicing of Fas and Bcl-x pre-mRNA transcripts. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure determination showed that the RBM10 OCRE sequence motif is part of a 55-residue globular domain containing 16 aromatic amino acids, which consists of an anti-parallel arrangement of six β strands, with the first five strands containing complete or incomplete Tyr triplets. This OCRE globular domain is a distinctive component of RBM10 and is more widely conserved in RBM10s across the animal kingdom than the ubiquitous RNA recognition components. It is also found in the functionally related RBM5. Thus, it appears that the three-dimensional structure of the globular OCRE domain, rather than the 42-residue OCRE sequence motif alone, confers specificity on RBM10 intermolecular interactions in the spliceosome.

  3. Novel Structural and Functional Motifs in cellulose synthase (CesA) Genes of Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simerjeet; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Gill, Kulvinder; Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the primary determinant of mechanical strength in plant tissues. Late-season lodging is inversely related to the amount of cellulose in a unit length of the stem. Wheat is the most widely grown of all the crops globally, yet information on its CesA gene family is limited. We have identified 22 CesA genes from bread wheat, which include homoeologs from each of the three genomes, and named them as TaCesAXA, TaCesAXB or TaCesAXD, where X denotes the gene number and the last suffix stands for the respective genome. Sequence analyses of the CESA proteins from wheat and their orthologs from barley, maize, rice, and several dicot species (Arabidopsis, beet, cotton, poplar, potato, rose gum and soybean) revealed motifs unique to monocots (Poales) or dicots. Novel structural motifs CQIC and SVICEXWFA were identified, which distinguished the CESAs involved in the formation of primary and secondary cell wall (PCW and SCW) in all the species. We also identified several new motifs specific to monocots or dicots. The conserved motifs identified in this study possibly play functional roles specific to PCW or SCW formation. The new insights from this study advance our knowledge about the structure, function and evolution of the CesA family in plants in general and wheat in particular. This information will be useful in improving culm strength to reduce lodging or alter wall composition to improve biofuel production. PMID:26771740

  4. Conserved XPB Core Structure and Motifs for DNA Unwinding:Implications for Pathway Selection of Transcription or ExcisionRepair

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Li; Arval, Andrew S.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Tainer, John A.

    2005-04-01

    The human xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) helicase is essential for transcription, nucleotide excision repair, and TFIIH functional assembly. Here, we determined crystal structures of an Archaeoglobus fulgidus XPB homolog (AfXPB) that characterize two RecA-like XPB helicase domains and discover a DNA damage recognition domain (DRD), a unique RED motif, a flexible thumb motif (ThM), and implied conformational changes within a conserved functional core. RED motif mutations dramatically reduce helicase activity, and the DRD and ThM, which flank the RED motif, appear structurally as well as functionally analogous to the MutS mismatch recognition and DNA polymerase thumb domains. Substrate specificity is altered by DNA damage, such that AfXPB unwinds dsDNA with 3' extensions, but not blunt-ended dsDNA, unless it contains a lesion, as shown for CPD or (6-4) photoproducts. Together, these results provide an unexpected mechanism of DNA unwinding with Implications for XPB damage verification in nucleotide excision repair.

  5. Novel Structural and Functional Motifs in cellulose synthase (CesA) Genes of Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simerjeet; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Gill, Kulvinder; Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the primary determinant of mechanical strength in plant tissues. Late-season lodging is inversely related to the amount of cellulose in a unit length of the stem. Wheat is the most widely grown of all the crops globally, yet information on its CesA gene family is limited. We have identified 22 CesA genes from bread wheat, which include homoeologs from each of the three genomes, and named them as TaCesAXA, TaCesAXB or TaCesAXD, where X denotes the gene number and the last suffix stands for the respective genome. Sequence analyses of the CESA proteins from wheat and their orthologs from barley, maize, rice, and several dicot species (Arabidopsis, beet, cotton, poplar, potato, rose gum and soybean) revealed motifs unique to monocots (Poales) or dicots. Novel structural motifs CQIC and SVICEXWFA were identified, which distinguished the CESAs involved in the formation of primary and secondary cell wall (PCW and SCW) in all the species. We also identified several new motifs specific to monocots or dicots. The conserved motifs identified in this study possibly play functional roles specific to PCW or SCW formation. The new insights from this study advance our knowledge about the structure, function and evolution of the CesA family in plants in general and wheat in particular. This information will be useful in improving culm strength to reduce lodging or alter wall composition to improve biofuel production.

  6. Interleukin-11 binds specific EF-hand proteins via their conserved structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Alexei S; Sokolov, Andrei S; Vologzhannikova, Alisa A; Permyakova, Maria E; Khorn, Polina A; Ismailov, Ramis G; Denessiouk, Konstantin A; Denesyuk, Alexander I; Rastrygina, Victoria A; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Glazatov, Vladimir V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Mirzabekov, Tajib A; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a hematopoietic cytokine engaged in numerous biological processes and validated as a target for treatment of various cancers. IL-11 contains intrinsically disordered regions that might recognize multiple targets. Recently we found that aside from IL-11RA and gp130 receptors, IL-11 interacts with calcium sensor protein S100P. Strict calcium dependence of this interaction suggests a possibility of IL-11 interaction with other calcium sensor proteins. Here we probed specificity of IL-11 to calcium-binding proteins of various types: calcium sensors of the EF-hand family (calmodulin, S100B and neuronal calcium sensors: recoverin, NCS-1, GCAP-1, GCAP-2), calcium buffers of the EF-hand family (S100G, oncomodulin), and a non-EF-hand calcium buffer (α-lactalbumin). A specific subset of the calcium sensor proteins (calmodulin, S100B, NCS-1, GCAP-1/2) exhibits metal-dependent binding of IL-11 with dissociation constants of 1-19 μM. These proteins share several amino acid residues belonging to conservative structural motifs of the EF-hand proteins, 'black' and 'gray' clusters. Replacements of the respective S100P residues by alanine drastically decrease its affinity to IL-11, suggesting their involvement into the association process. Secondary structure and accessibility of the hinge region of the EF-hand proteins studied are predicted to control specificity and selectivity of their binding to IL-11. The IL-11 interaction with the EF-hand proteins is expected to occur under numerous pathological conditions, accompanied by disintegration of plasma membrane and efflux of cellular components into the extracellular milieu.

  7. The structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere reveals the prevalence of tandemly repeated sequences able to form i-motifs

    PubMed Central

    Garavís, Miguel; Méndez-Lago, María; Gabelica, Valérie; Whitehead, Siobhan L.; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres are the chromosomal loci at which spindle microtubules attach to mediate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. In most eukaryotes, centromeres are made up of highly repetitive DNA sequences (satellite DNA) interspersed with middle repetitive DNA sequences (transposable elements). Despite the efforts to establish complete genomic sequences of eukaryotic organisms, the so-called ‘finished’ genomes are not actually complete because the centromeres have not been assembled due to the intrinsic difficulties in constructing both physical maps and complete sequence assemblies of long stretches of tandemly repetitive DNA. Here we show the first molecular structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere and the ability of the C-rich dodeca satellite strand to form dimeric i-motifs. The finding of i-motif structures in simple and complex centromeric satellite DNAs leads us to suggest that these centromeric sequences may have been selected not by their primary sequence but by their ability to form noncanonical secondary structures. PMID:26289671

  8. The structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere reveals the prevalence of tandemly repeated sequences able to form i-motifs.

    PubMed

    Garavís, Miguel; Méndez-Lago, María; Gabelica, Valérie; Whitehead, Siobhan L; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2015-08-20

    Centromeres are the chromosomal loci at which spindle microtubules attach to mediate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. In most eukaryotes, centromeres are made up of highly repetitive DNA sequences (satellite DNA) interspersed with middle repetitive DNA sequences (transposable elements). Despite the efforts to establish complete genomic sequences of eukaryotic organisms, the so-called 'finished' genomes are not actually complete because the centromeres have not been assembled due to the intrinsic difficulties in constructing both physical maps and complete sequence assemblies of long stretches of tandemly repetitive DNA. Here we show the first molecular structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere and the ability of the C-rich dodeca satellite strand to form dimeric i-motifs. The finding of i-motif structures in simple and complex centromeric satellite DNAs leads us to suggest that these centromeric sequences may have been selected not by their primary sequence but by their ability to form noncanonical secondary structures.

  9. Helix-packing motifs in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Walters, R F S; DeGrado, W F

    2006-09-12

    The fold of a helical membrane protein is largely determined by interactions between membrane-imbedded helices. To elucidate recurring helix-helix interaction motifs, we dissected the crystallographic structures of membrane proteins into a library of interacting helical pairs. The pairs were clustered according to their three-dimensional similarity (rmsd motifs whose structural features can be understood in terms of simple principles of helix-helix packing. Thus, the universe of common transmembrane helix-pairing motifs is relatively simple. The largest cluster, which comprises 29% of the library members, consists of an antiparallel motif with left-handed packing angles, and it is frequently stabilized by packing of small side chains occurring every seven residues in the sequence. Right-handed parallel and antiparallel structures show a similar tendency to segregate small residues to the helix-helix interface but spaced at four-residue intervals. Position-specific sequence propensities were derived for the most populated motifs. These structural and sequential motifs should be quite useful for the design and structural prediction of membrane proteins.

  10. Structure of PEP carboxykinase from the succinate-producing Actinobacillus succinogenes: a new conserved active-site motif.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Yvonne A; Prasad, Lata; Laivenieks, Maris; Zeikus, J Gregory; Delbaere, Louis T J

    2005-07-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes can produce, via fermentation, high concentrations of succinate, an important industrial commodity. A key enzyme in this pathway is phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), which catalyzes the production of oxaloacetate from phosphoenolpyruvate and carbon dioxide, with the concomitant conversion of adenosine 5'-diphosphate to adenosine 5'-triphosphate. 1.85 and 1.70 A resolution structures of the native and a pyruvate/Mn(2+)/phosphate complex have been solved, respectively. The structure of the complex contains sulfhydryl reducing agents covalently bound to three cysteine residues via disulfide bonds. One of these cysteine residues (Cys285) is located in the active-site cleft and may be analogous to the putative reactive cysteine of PCK from Trypanosoma cruzi. Cys285 is also part of a previously unreported conserved motif comprising residues 280-287 and containing the pattern NXEXGXY(/F)A(/G); this new motif appears to have a structural role in stabilizing and positioning side chains that bind substrates and metal ions. The first few residues of this motif connect the two domains of the enzyme and a fulcrum point appears to be located near Asn280. In addition, an active-site Asp residue forms two coordinate bonds with the Mn(2+) ion present in the structure of the complex in a symmetrical bidentate manner, unlike in other PCK structures that contain a manganese ion.

  11. Design, Synthesis and Qualitative Structure Activity Relationship Evaluations of Quinoline-Based Bisarylimidazoles as Antibacterial Motifs.

    PubMed

    Al-Qawasmeh, Raed A; Huthail, Basil B; Sinnokrot, Mutasem O; Semreen, Mohammad H; Odeh, Raed A; Abu-Zarga, Musa H; Tarazi, Hamadeh; Yousef, Imad A; Al-Tel, Taleb H

    2016-01-01

    their antibacterial activity. In this respect, it was found that, hydrophobic and electron-withdrawing moieties, such as halogens, were required on each end of the isoquinoline-based bisaryl imidazole hybrid motifs to produce broad-spectrum activity against the tested strains. Thus, molecules containing halophenyl or pyridyl arms were found more potent than molecules containing thiophene and/or electron-releasing groups on the phenyl arms, which showed much less antibacterial activity against the tested strains. In summary, 4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-2-phenylquinoline systems can be assembled efficiently through the Pfitzinger ring expansion- condensation strategy. This approach appears to hold considerable synthetic utility. The particular value of such a synthetic route resides on the conciseness and efficiency through which imidazo-quinoline construction can be synthesized from structurally simple and accessible acetophenone precursors.

  12. Tuning structural motifs and alloying of bulk immiscible Mo-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles by gas-phase synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Gopi; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Ten Brink, Gert H.; Palasantzas, George; Kooi, Bart J.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as key materials for important modern applications in nanoplasmonics, catalysis, biodiagnostics, and nanomagnetics. Consequently the control of bimetallic structural motifs with specific shapes provides increasing functionality and selectivity for related applications. However, producing bimetallic NPs with well controlled structural motifs still remains a formidable challenge. Hence, we present here a general methodology for gas phase synthesis of bimetallic NPs with distinctively different structural motifs ranging at a single particle level from a fully mixed alloy to core-shell, to onion (multi-shell), and finally to a Janus/dumbbell, with the same overall particle composition. These concepts are illustrated for Mo-Cu NPs, where the precise control of the bimetallic NPs with various degrees of chemical ordering, including different shapes from spherical to cube, is achieved by tailoring the energy and thermal environment that the NPs experience during their production. The initial state of NP growth, either in the liquid or in the solid state phase, has important implications for the different structural motifs and shapes of synthesized NPs. Finally we demonstrate that we are able to tune the alloying regime, for the otherwise bulk immiscible Mo-Cu, by achieving an increase of the critical size, below which alloying occurs, closely up to an order of magnitude. It is discovered that the critical size of the NP alloy is not only affected by controlled tuning of the alloying temperature but also by the particle shape.Nowadays bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as key materials for important modern applications in nanoplasmonics, catalysis, biodiagnostics, and nanomagnetics. Consequently the control of bimetallic structural motifs with specific shapes provides increasing functionality and selectivity for related applications. However, producing bimetallic NPs with well controlled structural motifs still

  13. The solution structure of an HMG-I(Y)-DNA complex defines a new architectural minor groove binding motif.

    PubMed

    Huth, J R; Bewley, C A; Nissen, M S; Evans, J N; Reeves, R; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1997-08-01

    The solution structure of a complex between a truncated form of HMG-I(Y), consisting of the second and third DNA binding domains (residues 51-90), and a DNA dodecamer containing the PRDII site of the interferon-beta promoter has been solved by multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The stoichiometry of the complex is one molecule of HMG-I(Y) to two molecules of DNA. The structure reveals a new architectural minor groove binding motif which stabilizes B-DNA, thereby facilitating the binding of other transcription factors in the opposing major groove. The interactions involve a central Arg-Gly-Arg motif together with two other modules that participate in extensive hydrophobic and polar contracts. The absence of one of these modules in the third DNA binding domain accounts for its-100 fold reduced affinity relative to the second one.

  14. Structural motif screening reveals a novel, conserved carbohydrate-binding surface in the pathogenesis-related protein PR-5d

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aromatic amino acids play a critical role in protein-glycan interactions. Clusters of surface aromatic residues and their features may therefore be useful in distinguishing glycan-binding sites as well as predicting novel glycan-binding proteins. In this work, a structural bioinformatics approach was used to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for coplanar aromatic motifs similar to those found in known glycan-binding proteins. Results The proteins identified in the screen were significantly associated with carbohydrate-related functions according to gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, and predicted motifs were found frequently within novel folds and glycan-binding sites not included in the training set. In addition to numerous binding sites predicted in structural genomics proteins of unknown function, one novel prediction was a surface motif (W34/W36/W192) in the tobacco pathogenesis-related protein, PR-5d. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the surface motif is exclusive to a subfamily of PR-5 proteins from the Solanaceae family of plants, and is absent completely in more distant homologs. To confirm PR-5d's insoluble-polysaccharide binding activity, a cellulose-pulldown assay of tobacco proteins was performed and PR-5d was identified in the cellulose-binding fraction by mass spectrometry. Conclusions Based on the combined results, we propose that the putative binding site in PR-5d may be an evolutionary adaptation of Solanaceae plants including potato, tomato, and tobacco, towards defense against cellulose-containing pathogens such as species of the deadly oomycete genus, Phytophthora. More generally, the results demonstrate that coplanar aromatic clusters on protein surfaces are a structural signature of glycan-binding proteins, and can be used to computationally predict novel glycan-binding proteins from 3 D structure. PMID:20678238

  15. Structure of human peptidyl-prolyl cis–trans isomerase FKBP22 containing two EF-hand motifs

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Sergei P; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Nix, Jay; Chapman, Michael S; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2014-01-01

    The FK506-binding protein (FKBP) family consists of proteins with a variety of protein–protein interaction domains and versatile cellular functions. It is assumed that all members are peptidyl-prolyl cis–trans isomerases with the enzymatic function attributed to the FKBP domain. Six members of this family localize to the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Four of them, FKBP22 (encoded by the FKBP14 gene), FKBP23 (FKBP7), FKBP60 (FKBP9), and FKBP65 (FKBP10), are unique among all FKBPs as they contain the EF-hand motifs. Little is known about the biological roles of these proteins, but emerging genetics studies are attracting great interest to the ER resident FKBPs, as mutations in genes encoding FKBP10 and FKBP14 were shown to cause a variety of matrix disorders. Although the structural organization of the FKBP-type domain as well as of the EF-hand motif has been known for a while, it is difficult to conclude how these structures are combined and how it affects the protein functionality. We have determined a unique 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure for human FKBP22, which can serve as a prototype for other EF hand-containing FKBPs. The EF-hand motifs of two FKBP22 molecules form a dimeric complex with an elongated and predominantly hydrophobic cavity that can potentially be occupied by an aliphatic ligand. The FKBP-type domains are separated by a cleft and their putative active sites can catalyze isomerazation of two bonds within a polypeptide chain in extended conformation. These structural results are of prime interest for understanding biological functions of ER resident FKBPs containing EF-hand motifs. PMID:24272907

  16. Structural Integrity of the Greek Key Motif in βγ-Crystallins Is Vital for Central Eye Lens Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Vendra, Venkata Pulla Rao; Agarwal, Garima; Chandani, Sushil; Talla, Venu; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Balasubramanian, Dorairajan

    2013-01-01

    Background We highlight an unrecognized physiological role for the Greek key motif, an evolutionarily conserved super-secondary structural topology of the βγ-crystallins. These proteins constitute the bulk of the human eye lens, packed at very high concentrations in a compact, globular, short-range order, generating transparency. Congenital cataract (affecting 400,000 newborns yearly worldwide), associated with 54 mutations in βγ-crystallins, occurs in two major phenotypes nuclear cataract, which blocks the central visual axis, hampering the development of the growing eye and demanding earliest intervention, and the milder peripheral progressive cataract where surgery can wait. In order to understand this phenotypic dichotomy at the molecular level, we have studied the structural and aggregation features of representative mutations. Methods Wild type and several representative mutant proteins were cloned, expressed and purified and their secondary and tertiary structural details, as well as structural stability, were compared in solution, using spectroscopy. Their tendencies to aggregate in vitro and in cellulo were also compared. In addition, we analyzed their structural differences by molecular modeling in silico. Results Based on their properties, mutants are seen to fall into two classes. Mutants A36P, L45PL54P, R140X, and G165fs display lowered solubility and structural stability, expose several buried residues to the surface, aggregate in vitro and in cellulo, and disturb/distort the Greek key motif. And they are associated with nuclear cataract. In contrast, mutants P24T and R77S, associated with peripheral cataract, behave quite similar to the wild type molecule, and do not affect the Greek key topology. Conclusion When a mutation distorts even one of the four Greek key motifs, the protein readily self-aggregates and precipitates, consistent with the phenotype of nuclear cataract, while mutations not affecting the motif display ‘native state

  17. Structure of the central RNA recognition motif of human TIA-1 at 1.95 A resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit O.; Swenson, Matthew C.; Benning, Matthew M.; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2008-03-21

    T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) regulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing in the nucleus, and mRNA translation in the cytoplasm, by recognizing uridine-rich sequences of RNAs. As a step towards understanding RNA recognition by this regulatory factor, the X-ray structure of the central RNA recognition motif (RRM2) of human TIA-1 is presented at 1.95 A resolution. Comparison with structurally homologous RRM-RNA complexes identifies residues at the RNA interfaces that are conserved in TIA-1-RRM2. The versatile capability of RNP motifs to interact with either proteins or RNA is reinforced by symmetry-related protein-protein interactions mediated by the RNP motifs of TIA-1-RRM2. Importantly, the TIA-1-RRM2 structure reveals the locations of mutations responsible for inhibiting nuclear import. In contrast with previous assumptions, the mutated residues are buried within the hydrophobic interior of the domain, where they would be likely to destabilize the RRM fold rather than directly inhibit RNA binding.

  18. NMR characterisation of a highly conserved secondary structural RNA motif of Halobacterium halobium 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    King, John; Shammas, Christos; Nareen, Misbah; Lelli, Moreno; Ramesh, Vasudevan

    2013-05-28

    The highly conserved 29-mer RNA motif corresponding to the peptidyl transferase central circle region of the domain V of Halobacterium halobium 23S rRNA has been characterised by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure has a good all atom average RMSD of 1.28 Å and a stable A-form helical conformation. The NMR structure differs from the X-ray crystal structure of an analogous motif, contained within the Escherichia coli ribosome, as none of the bases are flipped out and a number of non-canonical base pairs are formed in the solution structure. Thus in the observed NMR structure, the predicted A7 to U30 base pair is not seen and a non-canonical U6 to U30 base pair was formed in its place. Similarly the predicted A9 to U26 base pair was also not observed and another non-canonical A9 to A27 base pair was formed. It was also seen from the conformational analysis that the steps near the bulges had the greatest deviation from the canonical Watson-Crick base pair step parameters. Despite these differences, the 29-mer structure provides a working model of the RNA within the ribosome in a more natural solution state than that observed in the intact ribosome crystal structures, particularly around the A27 residue. The NMR structure determination of the 29-mer RNA motif provides a solid foundation for determining the NMR structure of the RNA-amicetin complex in the next step. To extend the above study, a fully (13)C and (15)N isotopically labelled 37-mer RNA version of the Halobacterium halobium RNA sample has been characterised using ultra high field 1 GHz spectroscopy. The results have been used to demonstrate the advantages conferred by the use of a 1 GHz spectrometer frequency over 800 MHz in terms of superior sensitivity and greater spectral dispersion achieved in the spectrum of the RNA.

  19. A Viroid RNA with a Specific Structural Motif Inhibits Chloroplast Development[W

    PubMed Central

    Rodio, Maria-Elena; Delgado, Sonia; De Stradis, Angelo; Gómez, María-Dolores; Flores, Ricardo; Di Serio, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) is a chloroplast-replicating RNA that propagates in its natural host, peach (Prunus persica), as a complex mixture of variants, some of which are endowed with specific structural and pathogenic properties. This is the case of variant PC-C40, with an insertion of 12 to 13 nucleotides that folds into a hairpin capped by a U-rich loop, which is responsible for an albino-variegated phenotype known as peach calico (PC). We have applied a combination of ultrastructural, biochemical, and molecular approaches to dissect the pathogenic effects of PC-C40. Albino sectors of leaves infected with variant PC-C40 presented palisade cells that did not completely differentiate into a columnar layer and altered plastids with irregular shape and size and with rudimentary thylakoids, resembling proplastids. Furthermore, impaired processing and accumulation of plastid rRNAs and, consequently, of the plastid translation machinery was observed in the albino sectors of leaves infected with variant PC-C40 but not in the adjacent green areas or in leaves infected by mosaic-inducing or latent variants (including PC-C40Δ, in which the 12- to 13-nucleotide insertion was deleted). Protein gel blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that the altered plastids support the import of nucleus-encoded proteins, including a chloroplast RNA polymerase, the transcripts of which were detected. RNA gel blot and in situ hybridizations revealed that PLMVd replicates in the albino leaf sectors and that it can invade the shoot apical meristem and induce alterations in proplastids, bypassing the RNA surveillance system that restricts the entry of a nucleus-replicating viroid and most RNA viruses. Therefore, a non-protein-coding RNA with a specific structural motif can interfere with an early step of the chloroplast developmental program, leading ultimately to an albino-variegated phenotype resembling that of certain variegated mutants in which plastid rRNA maturation is also impaired

  20. Motivated Proteins: A web application for studying small three-dimensional protein motifs

    PubMed Central

    Leader, David P; Milner-White, E James

    2009-01-01

    Background Small loop-shaped motifs are common constituents of the three-dimensional structure of proteins. Typically they comprise between three and seven amino acid residues, and are defined by a combination of dihedral angles and hydrogen bonding partners. The most abundant of these are αβ-motifs, asx-motifs, asx-turns, β-bulges, β-bulge loops, β-turns, nests, niches, Schellmann loops, ST-motifs, ST-staples and ST-turns. We have constructed a database of such motifs from a range of high-quality protein structures and built a web application as a visual interface to this. Description The web application, Motivated Proteins, provides access to these 12 motifs (with 48 sub-categories) in a database of over 400 representative proteins. Queries can be made for specific categories or sub-categories of motif, motifs in the vicinity of ligands, motifs which include part of an enzyme active site, overlapping motifs, or motifs which include a particular amino acid sequence. Individual proteins can be specified, or, where appropriate, motifs for all proteins listed. The results of queries are presented in textual form as an (X)HTML table, and may be saved as parsable plain text or XML. Motifs can be viewed and manipulated either individually or in the context of the protein in the Jmol applet structural viewer. Cartoons of the motifs imposed on a linear representation of protein secondary structure are also provided. Summary information for the motifs is available, as are histograms of amino acid distribution, and graphs of dihedral angles at individual positions in the motifs. Conclusion Motivated Proteins is a publicly and freely accessible web application that enables protein scientists to study small three-dimensional motifs without requiring knowledge of either Structured Query Language or the underlying database schema. PMID:19210785

  1. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  2. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  3. Molecular recognition of carbohydrates with artificial receptors: mimicking the binding motifs found in the crystal structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Mazik, Monika; Cavga, Hüseyin; Jones, Peter G

    2005-06-29

    The binding motifs found in the crystal structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes have been successfully mimicked with simple acyclic pyridine- and pyrimidine-based receptors. A full discussion of the recognition motifs observed in the crystal structures of complexes of receptors 1 and 3 with glucopyranosides 4a and 4b is provided. A remarkable similarity of these motifs to those observed in the crystal structures of sugar-binding proteins and those found by molecular modeling is shown. In addition, the recognition properties of the new pyrimidine receptor 3 toward monosaccharides 4-6 are described. This molecule has been established as a highly effective receptor for beta-glucopyranosides.

  4. Crystal Structure of (+)-[delta]-Cadinene Synthase from Gossypium arboreum and Evolutionary Divergence of Metal Binding Motifs for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gennadios, Heather A.; Gonzalez, Veronica; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Li, Amang; Yu, Fanglei; Miller, David J.; Allemann, Rudolf K.; Christianson, David W.

    2009-09-11

    (+)-{delta}-Cadinene synthase (DCS) from Gossypium arboreum (tree cotton) is a sesquiterpene cyclase that catalyzes the cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate in the first committed step of the biosynthesis of gossypol, a phytoalexin that defends the plant from bacterial and fungal pathogens. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of unliganded DCS at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and the structure of its complex with three putative Mg{sup 2+} ions and the substrate analogue inhibitor 2-fluorofarnesyl diphosphate (2F-FPP) at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. These structures illuminate unusual features that accommodate the trinuclear metal cluster required for substrate binding and catalysis. Like other terpenoid cyclases, DCS contains a characteristic aspartate-rich D{sup 307}DTYD{sup 311} motif on helix D that interacts with Mg{sub A}{sup 2+} and Mg{sub C}{sup 2+}. However, DCS appears to be unique among terpenoid cyclases in that it does not contain the 'NSE/DTE' motif on helix H that specifically chelates Mg{sub B}{sup 2+}, which is usually found as the signature sequence (N,D)D(L,I,V)X(S,T)XXXE (boldface indicates Mg{sub B}{sup 2+} ligands). Instead, DCS contains a second aspartate-rich motif, D{sup 451}DVAE{sup 455}, that interacts with Mg{sub B}{sup 2+}. In this regard, DCS is more similar to the isoprenoid chain elongation enzyme farnesyl diphosphate synthase, which also contains two aspartate-rich motifs, rather than the greater family of terpenoid cyclases. Nevertheless, the structure of the DCS-2F-FPP complex shows that the structure of the trinuclear magnesium cluster is generally similar to that of other terpenoid cyclases despite the alternative Mg{sub B}{sup 2+} binding motif. Analyses of DCS mutants with alanine substitutions in the D{sup 307}DTYD{sup 311} and D{sup 451}DVAE{sup 455} segments reveal the contributions of these segments to catalysis.

  5. The structure of FKBP38 in complex with the MEEVD tetratricopeptide binding-motif of Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Blundell, Katie L. I. M.; Pal, Mohinder; Roe, S. Mark; Pearl, Laurence H.

    2017-01-01

    Tetratricopeptide (TPR) domains are known protein interaction domains. We show that the TPR domain of FKBP8 selectively binds Hsp90, and interactions upstream of the conserved MEEVD motif are critical for tight binding. In contrast FKBP8 failed to bind intact Hsp70. The PPIase domain was not essential for the interaction with Hsp90 and binding was completely encompassed by the TPR domain alone. The conformation adopted by Hsp90 peptides, containing the conserved MEEVD motif, in the crystal structure were similar to that seen for the TPR domains of CHIP, AIP and Tah1. The carboxylate clamp interactions with bound Hsp90 peptide were a critical component of the interaction and mutation of Lys 307, involved in the carboxylate clamp, completely disrupted the interaction with Hsp90. FKBP8 binding to Hsp90 did not substantially influence its ATPase activity. PMID:28278223

  6. Structural basis for the interaction of a vascular endothelial growth factor mimic peptide motif and its corresponding receptors.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Ricardo J; Anobom, Cristiane D; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Kalil, Jorge; Valente, Ana P; Pasqualini, Renata; Almeida, Fabio C L; Arap, Wadih

    2005-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is central to the survival and development of the vascular and nervous systems. We screened phage display libraries and built a peptide-based ligand-receptor map of binding sites within the VEGF family. We then validated a cyclic peptide, CPQPRPLC, as a VEGF-mimic that binds specifically to neuropilin-1 and VEGF receptor-1. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to understand the structural basis of the interaction between our mimic peptide and the VEGF receptors. We show that: (1) CPQPRPLC has multiple interactive conformations; (2) receptor binding is mediated by the motif Arg-Pro-Leu; and (3) the Pro residue within Arg-Pro-Leu participates in binding to neuropilin-1 but not to VEGF receptor-1, perhaps representing an evolutionary gain-of-function. Therefore, Arg-Pro-Leu is a differential ligand motif to VEGF receptors and a candidate peptidomimetic lead for VEGF pathway modulation.

  7. Development of a motif-based topology-independent structure comparison method to identify evolutionarily related folds.

    PubMed

    Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2016-12-01

    Structure conservation, functional similarities, and homologous relationships that exist across diverse protein topologies suggest that some regions of the protein fold universe are continuous. However, the current structure classification systems are based on hierarchical organizations, which cannot accommodate structural relationships that span fold definitions. Here, we describe a novel, super-secondary-structure motif-based, topology-independent structure comparison method (SmotifCOMP) that is able to quantitatively identify structural relationships between disparate topologies. The basis of SmotifCOMP is a systematically defined super-secondary-structure motif library whose representative geometries are shown to be saturated in the Protein Data Bank and exhibit a unique distribution within the known folds. SmotifCOMP offers a robust and quantitative technique to compare domains that adopt different topologies since the method does not rely on a global superposition. SmotifCOMP is used to perform an exhaustive comparison of the known folds and the identified relationships are used to produce a nonhierarchical representation of the fold space that reflects the notion of a continuous and connected fold universe. The current work offers insight into previously hypothesized evolutionary relationships between disparate folds and provides a resource for exploring novel ones. Proteins 2016; 84:1859-1874. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Identification of common motifs in the regulation of light harvesting: The case of cyanobacteria IsiA.

    PubMed

    Wahadoszamen, Md; D'Haene, Sandrine; Ara, Anjue Mane; Romero, Elisabet; Dekker, Jan P; Grondelle, Rienk van; Berera, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    When cyanobacteria are grown under iron-limited or other oxidative stress conditions the iron stress inducible pigment-protein IsiA is synthesized in variable amounts. IsiA accumulates in aggregates inside the photosynthetic membrane that strongly dissipate chlorophyll excited state energy. In this paper we applied Stark fluorescence (SF) spectroscopy at 77K to IsiA aggregates to gain insight into the nature of the emitting and energy dissipating state(s). Our study shows that two emitting states are present in the system, one emitting at 684 nm and the other emitting at about 730 nm. The new 730 nm state exhibits strongly reduced fluorescence (F) together with a large charge transfer character. We discuss these findings in the light of the energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the regulation of photosynthesis in plants, cyanobacteria and diatoms. Our results suggest that photosynthetic organisms have adopted common mechanisms to cope with the deleterious effects of excess light under unfavorable growth conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of a novel alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase of Escherichia coli O128:b12 and functional investigation of its common motif.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Liu, Xian-Wei; Shao, Jun; Shen, Jie; Jia, Qiang; Yi, Wen; Song, Jing K; Woodward, Robert; Chow, Christine S; Wang, Peng George

    2008-01-08

    The wbsJ gene from Escherichia coli O128:B12 encodes an alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase responsible for adding a fucose onto the galactose residue of the O-antigen repeating unit via an alpha1,2 linkage. The wbsJ gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST) at its N-terminus. GST-WbsJ fusion protein was purified to homogeneity via GST affinity chromatography followed by size exclusion chromatography. The enzyme showed broad acceptor specificity with Galbeta1,3GalNAc (T antigen), Galbeta1,4Man and Galbeta1,4Glc (lactose) being better acceptors than Galbeta-O-Me and galactose. Galbeta1,4Fru (lactulose), a natural sugar, was furthermore found to be the best acceptor for GST-WbsJ with a reaction rate four times faster than that of lactose. Kinetic studies showed that GST-WbsJ has a higher affinity for lactose than lactulose with apparent Km values of 7.81 mM and 13.26 mM, respectively. However, the kcat/appKm value of lactose (6.36 M(-1) x min(-1)) is two times lower than that of lactulose (13.39 M(-1) x min(-1)). In addition, the alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase activity of GST-WbsJ was found to be independent of divalent metal ions such as Mn2+ or Mg2+. This activity was competitively inhibited by GDP with a Ki value of 1.41 mM. Site-directed mutagenesis and a GDP-bead binding assay were also performed to investigate the functions of the highly conserved motif H152xR154R155xD157. In contrast to alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases, none of the mutants of WbsJ within this motif exhibited a complete loss of enzyme activity. However, residues R154 and D157 were found to play critical roles in donor binding and enzyme activity. The results suggest that the common motif shared by both alpha1,2-fucosyltransferases and alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases have similar functions. Enzymatic synthesis of fucosylated sugars in milligram scale was successfully performed using Galbeta-O-Me and Galbeta1,4Glcbeta-N3 as acceptors.

  10. [Psychopathological study of lie motif in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Koichiro; Kato, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    The theme of a statement is called "lie motif" by the authors when schizophrenic patients say "I have lied to anybody". We tried to analyse of the psychopathological characteristics and anthropological meanings of the lie motifs in schizophrenia, which has not been thematically examined until now, based on 4 cases, and contrasting with the lie motif (Lügenmotiv) in depression taken up by A. Kraus (1989). We classified the lie motifs in schizophrenia into the following two types: a) the past directive lie motif: the patients speak about their real lie regarding it as a 'petty fault' in their distant past with self-guilty feeling, b) the present directive lie motif: the patients say repeatedly 'I have lied' (about their present speech and behavior), retreating from their previous commitments. The observed false confessions of innocent fault by the patients seem to belong to the present directed lie motif. In comparison with the lie motif in depression, it is characteristic for the lie motif in schizophrenia that the patients feel themselves to already have been caught out by others before they confess the lie. The lie motif in schizophrenia seems to come into being through the attribution process of taking the others' blame on ones' own shoulders, which has been pointed out to be common in the guilt experience in schizophrenia. The others' blame on this occasion is due to "the others' gaze" in the experience of the initial self-centralization (i.e. non delusional self-referential experience) in the early stage of schizophrenia (S. Kato 1999). The others' gaze is supposed to bring about the feeling of amorphous self-revelation which could also be regarded as the guilt feeling without content, to the patients. When the guilt feeling is bound with a past concrete fault, the patients tell the past directive lie motif. On the other hand, when the patients cannot find a past fixed content, and feel their present actions as uncertain and experience them as lies, the

  11. Solution NMR structure of Apo-calmodulin in complex with the IQ motif of human cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Chagot, Benjamin; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-02-11

    The function of the human voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.5 is regulated in part by intracellular calcium signals. The ubiquitous calcium sensor protein calmodulin (CaM) is an important part of the complex calcium-sensing apparatus in Na(V)1.5. CaM interacts with an IQ (isoleucine-glutamine) motif in the large intracellular C-terminal domain of the channel. Using co-expression and co-purification, we have been able to isolate a CaM-IQ motif complex and to determine its high-resolution structure in absence of calcium using multi-dimensional solution NMR. Under these conditions, the Na(V)1.5 IQ motif interacts with the C-terminal domain (C-lobe) of CaM, with the N-terminal domain remaining free in solution. The structure reveals that the C-lobe adopts a semi-open conformation with the IQ motif bound in a narrow hydrophobic groove. Sequence similarities between voltage-gated sodium channels and voltage-gated calcium channels suggest that the structure of the CaM-Na(V)1.5 IQ motif complex can serve as a general model for the interaction between CaM and ion channel IQ motifs under low-calcium conditions. The structure also provides insight into the biochemical basis for disease-associated mutations that map to the IQ motif in Na(V)1.5.

  12. 47 CFR 74.22 - Use of common antenna structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of common antenna structure. 74.22 Section... Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.22 Use of common antenna structure. The simultaneous use of a common antenna structure by more than one station authorized under this part, or by one or more...

  13. 47 CFR 74.22 - Use of common antenna structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of common antenna structure. 74.22 Section... Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.22 Use of common antenna structure. The simultaneous use of a common antenna structure by more than one station authorized under this part, or by one or more...

  14. 47 CFR 74.22 - Use of common antenna structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of common antenna structure. 74.22 Section... Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.22 Use of common antenna structure. The simultaneous use of a common antenna structure by more than one station authorized under this part, or by one or more...

  15. 47 CFR 74.22 - Use of common antenna structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of common antenna structure. 74.22 Section... Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.22 Use of common antenna structure. The simultaneous use of a common antenna structure by more than one station authorized under this part, or by one or more...

  16. 47 CFR 74.22 - Use of common antenna structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of common antenna structure. 74.22 Section... Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.22 Use of common antenna structure. The simultaneous use of a common antenna structure by more than one station authorized under this part, or by one or more...

  17. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  18. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  19. Generalized structural motif model for studying the thermodynamic stability of fullerenes: from C60 to graphene passing through giant fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando

    2017-08-02

    We present an extension of the structural motif model [Cioslowski et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2000, 122, 8265], originally proposed to predict the relative stability of medium-sized neutral fullerenes (C60-C102), to account for the correct graphene limit, thus widening its range of applicability to giant and supergiant icosahedral fullerenes. The new model has been parameterized using the density functional theory (DFT) energies of 426 distinct fullerenes ranging from C60 to C180, most of which correspond to the lowest-energy isomers of each cage size. While the original model is inapplicable for fullerenes larger than C150, the new model performs very well for these systems, with typical deviations of 3.4 kcal mol(-1) from the DFT energies. Based on the optimized parameters, we have obtained the actual energy contributions for all motifs, which we show are closely related to the number and separation of pentagonal rings, in contrast to the original version of the model. We also point out that, in general, motif models result in large deviations for largely aspherical fullerenes and propose a way to correct the errors.

  20. Access to a CuII–O–CuII Motif: Spectroscopic Properties, Solution Structure, and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Peter; Kärgel, Anne; Greco, Claudio; Dokic, Jadranka; Braun, Beatrice; Pfaff, Florian F.; Mebs, Stefan; Ray, Kallol; Limberg, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We report a complex with a rare CuII–O–CuII structural motif that is stable at room temperature, which allows its in-depth characterization by a variety of spectroscopic methods. Interest in such compounds is fueled by the recent discovery that a CuII–O–CuII species on the surface of Cu-ZSM-5 is capable of oxidizing methane to methanol and this in turn ties into mechanistic discussions on the methane oxidation at the dicopper site within the particulate methane monooxygenase. For the synthesis of our Cu2O complex we have developed a novel, neutral ligand system, FurNeu, exhibiting two N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)amino binding pockets connected by a dibenzofuran spacer. The reaction of FurNeu with CuCl yielded [FurNeu](Cu2(μ-Cl))(CuCl2), 1, demonstrating the geometric potential of the ligand to stabilize Cu–X–Cu moieties. A CuI precursor with weakly coordinating anions was chosen in the next step, namely [Cu(NCCH3)4]OTf, which led to the formation of [FurNeu](Cu(NCCH3))2(OTf)2, 3. Treatment of 3 with O2 or PhIO led to identical green solutions, whose UV/Vis spectra were markedly different from the one displayed by [FurNeu](Cu)2(OTf)4, 4, prepared independently from FurNeu and Cu(OTf)2. Further investigations including PhIO consumption experiments, NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy, HR-ESI mass spectrometry and protonation studies led to the identification of the green product as [FurNeu](Cu2(μ-O))(OTf)2, 5. DOSY NMR spectroscopy confirmed its monomeric character. Over longer periods of time 5 decomposes to give [Cu(picoloyl)2], formed through an oxidative N-dealkylation reaction followed by further oxidation of the ligand. Due to its slow decomposition reaction all attempts to crystallize 5 failed. However, its structure in solution could be determined by EXAFS analysis in combination with DFT calculations, which revealed a Cu–O–Cu angle that amounts to 105.17°. Moreover, TDDFT calculations helped to rationalize the UV/Vis absorptions

  1. Access to a Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) motif: spectroscopic properties, solution structure, and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Haack, Peter; Kärgel, Anne; Greco, Claudio; Dokic, Jadranka; Braun, Beatrice; Pfaff, Florian F; Mebs, Stefan; Ray, Kallol; Limberg, Christian

    2013-10-30

    We report a complex with a rare Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) structural motif that is stable at room temperature, which allows its in-depth characterization by a variety of spectroscopic methods. Interest in such compounds is fueled by the recent discovery that a Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) species on the surface of Cu-ZSM-5 is capable of oxidizing methane to methanol, and this in turn ties into mechanistic discussions on the methane oxidation at the dicopper site within the particulate methane monooxygenase. For the synthesis of our Cu2O complex we have developed a novel, neutral ligand system, FurNeu, exhibiting two N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)amino binding pockets connected by a dibenzofuran spacer. The reaction of FurNeu with CuCl yielded [FurNeu](Cu2(μ-Cl))(CuCl2), 1, demonstrating the geometric potential of the ligand to stabilize Cu-X-Cu moieties. A Cu(I) precursor with weakly coordinating anions was chosen in the next step, namely [Cu(NCCH3)4]OTf, which led to the formation of [FurNeu](Cu(NCCH3))2(OTf)2, 3. Treatment of 3 with O2 or PhIO led to identical green solutions, whose UV-vis spectra were markedly different from the one displayed by [FurNeu](Cu)2(OTf)4, 4, prepared independently from FurNeu and Cu(OTf)2. Further investigations including PhIO consumption experiments, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy, HR-ESI mass spectrometry, and protonation studies led to the identification of the green product as [FurNeu](Cu2(μ-O))(OTf)2, 5. DOSY NMR spectroscopy confirmed its monomeric character. Over longer periods of time 5 decomposes to give [Cu(picoloyl)2], formed through an oxidative N-dealkylation reaction followed by further oxidation of the ligand. Due to its slow decomposition reaction, all attempts to crystallize 5 failed. However, its structure in solution could be determined by EXAFS analysis in combination with DFT calculations, which revealed a Cu-O-Cu angle that amounts to 105.17°. Moreover, TDDFT calculations helped to rationalize the UV-vis absorptions of 5

  2. Synergy between NMR measurements and MD simulations of protein/RNA complexes: application to the RRMs, the most common RNA recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Krepl, Miroslav; Cléry, Antoine; Blatter, Markus; Allain, Frederic H.T.; Sponer, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins represent an abundant class of proteins playing key roles in RNA biology. We present a joint atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) and experimental study of two RRM-containing proteins bound with their single-stranded target RNAs, namely the Fox-1 and SRSF1 complexes. The simulations are used in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy to interpret and expand the available structural data. We accumulate more than 50 μs of simulations and show that the MD method is robust enough to reliably describe the structural dynamics of the RRM–RNA complexes. The simulations predict unanticipated specific participation of Arg142 at the protein–RNA interface of the SRFS1 complex, which is subsequently confirmed by NMR and ITC measurements. Several segments of the protein–RNA interface may involve competition between dynamical local substates rather than firmly formed interactions, which is indirectly consistent with the primary NMR data. We demonstrate that the simulations can be used to interpret the NMR atomistic models and can provide qualified predictions. Finally, we propose a protocol for ‘MD-adapted structure ensemble’ as a way to integrate the simulation predictions and expand upon the deposited NMR structures. Unbiased μs-scale atomistic MD could become a technique routinely complementing the NMR measurements of protein–RNA complexes. PMID:27193998

  3. Knowledge discovery of multilevel protein motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, D.; Glasgow, J.; Fortier, S.

    1994-12-31

    A new category of protein motif is introduced. This type of motif captures, in addition to global structure, the nested structure of its component parts. A dataset of four proteins is represented using this scheme. A structured machine discovery procedure is used to discover recurrent amino acid motifs and this knowledge is utilized for the expression of subsequent protein motif discoveries. Examples of discovered multilevel motifs are presented.

  4. Crystal violet as an i-motif structure probe for reversible and label-free pH-driven electrochemical switch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi Yuan; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2014-06-15

    A simple pH-induced electrochemical switch based on an i-motif structure is developed by using crystal violet as a selective electrochemical probe for the i-motif structure. Thiol-modified cytosine-rich single-strand oligonucleotide (C-rich ssDNA) can be self-assembled on the gold electrode surface via gold-sulfur interaction. Crystal violet is employed as an electrochemical probe for the i-motif structure because of its capability of binding with the i-motif structure through an end-stacking mode. In acidic aqueous solution, crystal violet may approach the electrode surface owing to the formation of the i-motif structure, resulting in an obvious signal, so-called "ON" state. Whereas in neutral or basic aqueous solution, the i-motif structure unfolds to dissociative single strand, which causes crystal violet to leave from the electrode surface, and a weak signal is obtained, so-called "OFF" state. In addition, in the range of pH 4.6-7.3, the increase in current has a good linear relationship (R=0.989) with pH value in the testing solutions. This pH-driven electrochemical switch has the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, high selectivity, and good reversibility. Furthermore, it provides a possible platform for pH measurement.

  5. Crystal Structure of FadA Adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum Reveals a Novel Oligomerization Motif, the Leucine Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Yamada, Mitsunori; Ikegami, Akihiko; Shoham, Menachem; Han, Yiping W.

    2009-04-07

    Many bacterial appendages have filamentous structures, often composed of repeating monomers assembled in a head-to-tail manner. The mechanisms of such linkages vary. We report here a novel protein oligomerization motif identified in the FadA adhesin from the Gram-negative bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the secreted form of FadA (mFadA) reveals two antiparallel {alpha}-helices connected by an intervening 8-residue hairpin loop. Leucine-leucine contacts play a prominent dual intra- and intermolecular role in the structure and function of FadA. First, they comprise the main association between the two helical arms of the monomer; second, they mediate the head-to-tail association of monomers to form the elongated polymers. This leucine-mediated filamentous assembly of FadA molecules constitutes a novel structural motif termed the 'leucine chain.' The essential role of these residues in FadA is corroborated by mutagenesis of selected leucine residues, which leads to the abrogation of oligomerization, filament formation, and binding to host cells.

  6. A common structure for the potexviruses.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Amy; Bian, Wen; Maris, Alexander; Azzo, Caitlin; Groom, Joseph; Williams, Dewight; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L; Wall, Joseph S; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-02-05

    We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to confirm the symmetry of three potexviruses, potato virus X, papaya mosaic virus, and narcissus mosaic virus, and to determine their low-resolution structures. All three viruses have slightly less than nine subunits per turn of the viral helix. Our data strongly support the view that all potexviruses have approximately the same symmetry. The structures are dominated by a large domain at high radius in the virion, with a smaller domain, which includes the putative RNA-binding site, extending to low radius.

  7. A common structure for the potexviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; Bian, Wen; Maris, Alexander; Azzo, Caitlin; Groom, Joseph; Williams, Dewight; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-02-05

    We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to confirm the symmetry of three potexviruses, potato virus X, papaya mosaic virus, and narcissus mosaic virus, and to determine their low-resolution structures. All three viruses have slightly less than nine subunits per turn of the viral helix. Our data strongly support the view that all potexviruses have approximately the same symmetry. The structures are dominated by a large domain at high radius in the virion, with a smaller domain, which includes the putative RNA-binding site, extending to low radius.

  8. Oxidation-induced Structural Changes of Ceruloplasmin Foster NGR Motif Deamidation That Promotes Integrin Binding and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbariga, Marco; Curnis, Flavio; Spitaleri, Andrea; Andolfo, Annapaola; Zucchelli, Chiara; Lazzaro, Massimo; Magnani, Giuseppe; Musco, Giovanna; Corti, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine deamidation occurs spontaneously in proteins during aging; deamidation of Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) sites can lead to the formation of isoAsp-Gly-Arg (isoDGR), a motif that can recognize the RGD-binding site of integrins. Ceruloplasmin (Cp), a ferroxidase present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contains two NGR sites in its sequence: one exposed on the protein surface (568NGR) and the other buried in the tertiary structure (962NGR). Considering that Cp can undergo oxidative modifications in the CSF of neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the effect of oxidation on the deamidation of both NGR motifs and, consequently, on the acquisition of integrin binding properties. We observed that the exposed 568NGR site can deamidate under conditions mimicking accelerated Asn aging. In contrast, the hidden 962NGR site can deamidate exclusively when aging occurs under oxidative conditions, suggesting that oxidation-induced structural changes foster deamidation at this site. NGR deamidation in Cp was associated with gain of integrin-binding function, intracellular signaling, and cell pro-adhesive activity. Finally, Cp aging in the CSF from Alzheimer disease patients, but not in control CSF, causes Cp deamidation with gain of integrin-binding function, suggesting that this transition might also occur in pathological conditions. In conclusion, both Cp NGR sites can deamidate during aging under oxidative conditions, likely as a consequence of oxidative-induced structural changes, thereby promoting a gain of function in integrin binding, signaling, and cell adhesion. PMID:24366863

  9. Exploiting powder X-ray diffraction for direct structure determination in structural biology: the P2X4 receptor trafficking motif YEQGL.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kotaro; Young, Mark T; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-06-01

    We report the crystal structure of the 5-residue peptide acetyl-YEQGL-amide, determined directly from powder X-ray diffraction data recorded on a conventional laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer. The YEQGL motif has a known biological role, as a trafficking motif in the C-terminus of mammalian P2X4 receptors. Comparison of the crystal structure of acetyl-YEQGL-amide determined here and that of a complex formed with the μ2 subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein complex AP2 reported previously, reveals differences in conformational properties, although there are nevertheless similarities concerning aspects of the hydrogen-bonding arrangement and the hydrophobic environment of the leucine sidechain. Our results demonstrate the potential for exploiting modern powder X-ray diffraction methodology to achieve complete structure determination of materials of biological interest that do not crystallize as single crystals of suitable size and quality for single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  10. The Thiamine-Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a cofactor for enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production including the well known decarboxylation of a-keto acid dehydrogenases followed by transketolation. TPP-dependent enzymes constitute a structurally and functionally diverse group exhibiting multimeric subunit organization, multiple domains and two chemically equivalent catalytic centers. Annotation of functional TPP-dependcnt enzymes, therefore, has not been trivial due to low sequence similarity related to this complex organization. Our approach to analysis of structures of known TPP-dependent enzymes reveals for the first time features common to this group, which we have termed the TPP-motif. The TPP-motif consists of specific spatial arrangements of structural elements and their specific contacts to provide for a flip-flop, or alternate site, enzymatic mechanism of action. Analysis of structural elements entrained in the flip-flop action displayed by TPP-dependent enzymes reveals a novel definition of the common amino acid sequences. These sequences allow for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes, thus advancing functional proteomics. Further details of three-dimensional structures of TPP-dependent enzymes will be discussed.

  11. The 3'-5' exonuclease site of DNA polymerase III from gram-positive bacteria: definition of a novel motif structure.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M H; Spacciapoli, P; Li, D H; Brown, N C

    1995-11-07

    The primary structure of the 3'-5' exonuclease (Exo) site of the Gram+ bacterial DNA polymerase III (Pol III) was examined by site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis Pol III (BsPol III). It was found to differ significantly from the conventional three-motif substructure established for the Exo site of DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli (EcPol I) and the majority of other DNA polymerase-exonucleases. Motifs I and II were conventionally organized and anchored functionally by the predicted carboxylate residues. However, the conventional downstream motif, motif III, was replaced by motif III epsilon, a novel 55-amino-acid (aa) segment incorporating three essential aa (His565, Asp533 and Asp570) which are strictly conserved in three Gram+ Pol III and in the Ec Exo epsilon (epsilon). Despite its unique substructure, the Gram+ Pol III-specific Exo site was conventionally independent of Pol, the site of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside 5-triphosphate (dNTP) binding and polymerization. The entire Exo site, including motif III epsilon, could be deleted without profoundly affecting the enzyme's capacity to polymerize dNTPs. Conversely, Pol and all other sequences downstream of the Exo site could be deleted with little apparent effect on Exo activity. Whether the three essential aa within the unique motif III epsilon substructure participate in the conventional two-metal-ion mechanism elucidated for the model Exo site of EcPol I, remains to be established.

  12. Prevalent Sequences in the Human Genome Can Form Mini i-Motif Structures at Physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Mir, Bartomeu; Serrano, Israel; Buitrago, Diana; Orozco, Modesto; Escaja, Núria; González, Carlos

    2017-10-11

    We report here the solution structure of several repetitive DNA sequences containing d(TCGTTCCGT) and related repeats. At physiological pH, these sequences fold into i-motif like quadruplexes in which every two repeats a globular structure is stabilized by two hemiprotonated C:C(+) base pairs, flanked by two minor groove tetrads resulting from the association of G:C or G:T base pairs. The interaction between the minor groove tetrads and the nearby C:C(+) base pairs affords a strong stabilization, which results in effective pHT values above 7.5. Longer sequences with more than two repeats are able to fold in tandem, forming a rosary bead-like structure. Bioinformatics analysis shows that these sequences are prevalent in the human genome, and are present in development-related genes.

  13. Structure of the Tsg101 UEV domain in complex with the PTAP motif of the HIV-1 p6 protein.

    PubMed

    Pornillos, Owen; Alam, Steven L; Davis, Darrell R; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2002-11-01

    The structural proteins of HIV and Ebola display PTAP peptide motifs (termed 'late domains') that recruit the human protein Tsg101 to facilitate virus budding. Here we present the solution structure of the UEV (ubiquitin E2 variant) binding domain of Tsg101 in complex with a PTAP peptide that spans the late domain of HIV-1 p6(Gag). The UEV domain of Tsg101 resembles E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, and the PTAP peptide binds in a bifurcated groove above the vestigial enzyme active site. Each PTAP residue makes important contacts, and the Ala 9-Pro 10 dipeptide binds in a deep pocket of the UEV domain that resembles the X-Pro binding pockets of SH3 and WW domains. The structure reveals the molecular basis of HIV PTAP late domain function and represents an attractive starting point for the design of novel inhibitors of virus budding.

  14. Structural Basis for Phosphorylation and Lysine Acetylation Cross-talk in a Kinase Motif Associated with Myocardial Ischemia and Cardioprotection*

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Benjamin L.; Shepherd, Nicholas E.; Trefely, Sophie; Hoffman, Nolan J.; White, Melanie Y.; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Hambly, Brett D.; Larsen, Martin R.; James, David E.; Cordwell, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia and cardioprotection by ischemic pre-conditioning induce signal networks aimed at survival or cell death if the ischemic period is prolonged. These pathways are mediated by protein post-translational modifications that are hypothesized to cross-talk with and regulate each other. Phosphopeptides and lysine-acetylated peptides were quantified in isolated rat hearts subjected to ischemia or ischemic pre-conditioning, with and without splitomicin inhibition of lysine deacetylation. We show lysine acetylation (acetyl-Lys)-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, AKT, and PKA kinases during ischemia. Phosphorylation and acetyl-Lys sites mapped onto tertiary structures were proximal in >50% of proteins investigated, yet they were mutually exclusive in 50 ischemic pre-conditioning- and/or ischemia-associated peptides containing the KXXS basophilic protein kinase consensus motif. Modifications in this motif were modeled in the C terminus of muscle-type creatine kinase. Acetyl-Lys increased proximal dephosphorylation by 10-fold. Structural analysis of modified muscle-type creatine kinase peptide variants by two-dimensional NMR revealed stabilization via a lysine-phosphate salt bridge, which was disrupted by acetyl-Lys resulting in backbone flexibility and increased phosphatase accessibility. PMID:25008320

  15. Structure-Specific Nucleic Acid Recognition by L-motifs And Their Diverse Roles in Expression And Regulation Of The Genome

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    The high-mobility group (HMG) domain containing proteins regulate transcription, DNA replication and recombination. They adopt L-shaped folds and are structure-specific DNA binding motifs. Here, I define the L-motif super-family that consists of DNA-binding HMG-box proteins and the L-motif of the histone mRNA binding domain of Stem-Loop Binding Protein (SLBP). The SLBP L-motif and HMG-box domains adopt similar L-shaped folds with three α-helices and two or three small hydrophobic cores that stabilize the overall fold, but have very different and distinct modes of nucleic acid recognition. A comparison of the structure, dynamics, protein-protein and nucleic acid interactions, and regulation by PTMs of the SLBP and the HMG-box L-motifs reveals the versatile and diverse modes by which L-motifs utilize their surfaces for structure-specific recognition of nucleic acids to regulate gene expression. PMID:25748361

  16. Structural Characterization of the Viral and cRNA Panhandle Motifs from the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brinson, Robert G.; Szakal, Andrea L.; Marino, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) has emerged as a virus of great concern to the aquaculture industry since it can lead to highly contagious and lethal infections in farm-raised salmon populations. While little is known about the transcription/replication cycle of ISAV, initial evidence suggests that it follows molecular mechanisms similar to those found in other orthomyxoviruses, which include the highly pathogenic influenza A (inf A) virus. During the life cycle of orthomyxoviruses, a panhandle structure is formed by the pairing of the conserved 5′ and 3′ ends of each genomic RNA. This structural motif serves both as a promoter of the viral RNA (vRNA)-dependent RNA polymerase and as a regulatory element in the transcription/replication cycle. As a first step toward characterizing the structure of the ISAV panhandle, here we have determined the secondary structures of the vRNA and the cRNA panhandles on the basis of solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermal melting data. The vRNA panhandle is distinguished by three noncanonical U·G pairs and one U·U pair in two stem helices that are linked by a highly stacked internal loop. For the cRNA panhandle, a contiguous stem helix with a protonated C·A pair near the terminus and tandem downstream U·U pairs was found. The observed noncanonical base pairs and base stacking features of the ISAV RNA panhandle motif provide the first insight into structural features that may govern recognition by the viral RNA polymerase. PMID:21994446

  17. Metal Ion Induced Pairing of Cytosine Bases: Formation of I-Motif Structures Identified by IR Ion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    While the Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or presence of cations. Pairing of two cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H^+-C) gives rise to the so-called i-motif, occurring particularly in the telomeric region of DNA, and particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently suggested to form cytosine dimers in a C-Ag^+-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated cytosine dimer, which was later confirmed by IR spectroscopy.^1 Here we investigate whether Ag^+ is unique in this behavior. Using infrared action spectroscopy employing the free-electron laser FELIX and a tandem mass spectrometer in combination with quantum-chemical computations, we investigate a series of C-M^+-C complexes, where M is Cu, Li and Na. The complexes are formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from a solution of cytosine and the metal chloride salt in acetonitrile/water. The complexes of interest are mass-isolated in the cell of a FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, where they are irradiated with the tunable IR radiation from FELIX in the 600 - 1800 wn range. Spectra in the H-stretching range are obtained with a LaserVision OPO. Both experimental spectra as well as theoretical calculations indicate that while Cu behaves as Ag, the alkali metal ions induce a clearly different dimer structure, in which the two cytosine units are parallelly displaced. In addition to coordination to the ring nitrogen atom, the alkali metal ions coordinate to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of both cytosine bases, indicating that the alkali metal ion coordination favorably competes with hydrogen bonding between the two cytosine sub-units of the i-motif like structure. 1. Berdakin, Steinmetz, Maitre, Pino, J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 3804

  18. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M; Christiansen, Camilla; Andersen, Joakim M; Rannes, Julie B; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch degrading enzymes and critically important for their function. The affinity towards a variety of starch granules as well as soluble poly- and oligosaccharides of barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) wild-type and mutants of two SBSs (SBS1 and SBS2) was investigated using Langmuir binding analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, affinity gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance to unravel functional roles of the SBSs. SBS1 was critical for binding to different starch types as Kd increased by 7-62-fold or was not measurable upon mutation. By contrast SBS2 was particularly important for binding to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert to localize AMY1 to the starch granule surface and that SBS2 works synergistically with the active site in the degradation of amylopectin.

  19. Novel selenoproteins identified in silico and in vivo by using a conserved RNA structural motif.

    PubMed

    Lescure, A; Gautheret, D; Carbon, P; Krol, A

    1999-12-31

    Selenocysteine is incorporated into selenoproteins by an in-frame UGA codon whose readthrough requires the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS), a conserved hairpin in the 3'-untranslated region of eukaryotic selenoprotein mRNAs. To identify new selenoproteins, we developed a strategy that obviates the need for prior amino acid sequence information. A computational screen was used to scan nucleotide sequence data bases for sequences presenting a potential SECIS secondary structure. The computer-selected hairpins were then assayed in vivo for their functional capacities, and the cDNAs corresponding to the SECIS winners were identified. Four of them encoded novel selenoproteins as confirmed by in vivo experiments. Among these, SelZf1 and SelZf2 share a common domain with mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase-2. The three proteins, however, possess distinct N-terminal domains. We found that another protein, SelX, displays sequence similarity to a protein involved in bacterial pilus formation. For the first time, four novel selenoproteins were discovered based on a computational screen for the RNA hairpin directing selenocysteine incorporation.

  20. Trans-cleaving hammerhead ribozymes with tertiary stabilizing motifs: in vitro and in vivo activity against a structured viroid RNA

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Alberto; Flores, Ricardo; Gago, Selma

    2011-01-01

    Trans-cleaving hammerheads with discontinuous or extended stem I and with tertiary stabilizing motifs (TSMs) have been tested previously against short RNA substrates in vitro at low Mg2+ concentration. However, the potential of these ribozymes for targeting longer and structured RNAs in vitro and in vivo has not been examined. Here, we report the in vitro cleavage of short RNAs and of a 464-nt highly structured RNA from potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) by hammerheads with discontinuous and extended formats at submillimolar Mg2+. Under these conditions, hammerheads derived from eggplant latent viroid and peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) with discontinuous and extended formats, respectively, where the most active. Furthermore, a PLMVd-derived hammerhead with natural TSMs showed activity in vivo against the same long substrate and interfered with systemic PSTVd infection, thus reinforcing the idea that this class of ribozymes has potential to control pathogenic RNA replicons. PMID:21097888

  1. Structure-function analysis of the human JC polyomavirus establishes the LSTc pentasaccharide as a functional receptor motif

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Ursula; Maginnis, Melissa S.; Palma, Angelina S.; Ströh, Luisa J.; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Feizi, Ten; Atwood, Walter J.; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The human JC polyomavirus (JCV) causes a fatal demyelinating disease, Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), in immunocompromised individuals. Current treatment options for PML are inadequate. Sialylated oligosaccharides and the serotonin receptor are known to be necessary for JCV entry, but the molecular interactions underlying JCV attachment remain unknown. Using glycan array screening and viral infectivity assays, we identify a linear sialylated pentasaccharide with the sequence NeuNAc-α2,6-Gal-β1,4-GlcNAc-β1,3-Gal-β1,4-Glc (LSTc) present on host glycoproteins and glycolipids as a specific JCV recognition motif. The crystal structure of the JCV capsid protein VP1 was solved alone and in complex with LSTc. It reveals extensive interactions with the terminal sialic acid of the LSTc motif and specific recognition of an extended conformation of LSTc. Mutations in the JCV oligosaccharide binding sites abolish cell attachment, viral spread and infectivity, further validating the importance of this interaction. Our findings provide a powerful platform for the development of antiviral compounds. PMID:20951965

  2. Cryo-EM near-atomic structure of a dsRNA fungal virus shows ancient structural motifs preserved in the dsRNA viral lineage

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Daniel; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Garriga, Damiá; Brilot, Axel F.; González, José M.; Havens, Wendy M.; Carrascosa, José L.; Trus, Benes L.; Verdaguer, Nuria; Ghabrial, Said A.; Castón, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses evolve so rapidly that sequence-based comparison is not suitable for detecting relatedness among distant viruses. Structure-based comparisons suggest that evolution led to a small number of viral classes or lineages that can be grouped by capsid protein (CP) folds. Here, we report that the CP structure of the fungal dsRNA Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV) shows the progenitor fold of the dsRNA virus lineage and suggests a relationship between lineages. Cryo-EM structure at near-atomic resolution showed that the 982-aa PcV CP is formed by a repeated α-helical core, indicative of gene duplication despite lack of sequence similarity between the two halves. Superimposition of secondary structure elements identified a single “hotspot” at which variation is introduced by insertion of peptide segments. Structural comparison of PcV and other distantly related dsRNA viruses detected preferential insertion sites at which the complexity of the conserved α-helical core, made up of ancestral structural motifs that have acted as a skeleton, might have increased, leading to evolution of the highly varied current structures. Analyses of structural motifs only apparent after systematic structural comparisons indicated that the hallmark fold preserved in the dsRNA virus lineage shares a long (spinal) α-helix tangential to the capsid surface with the head-tailed phage and herpesvirus viral lineage. PMID:24821769

  3. Cryo-EM near-atomic structure of a dsRNA fungal virus shows ancient structural motifs preserved in the dsRNA viral lineage.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Garriga, Damiá; Brilot, Axel F; González, José M; Havens, Wendy M; Carrascosa, José L; Trus, Benes L; Verdaguer, Nuria; Ghabrial, Said A; Castón, José R

    2014-05-27

    Viruses evolve so rapidly that sequence-based comparison is not suitable for detecting relatedness among distant viruses. Structure-based comparisons suggest that evolution led to a small number of viral classes or lineages that can be grouped by capsid protein (CP) folds. Here, we report that the CP structure of the fungal dsRNA Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV) shows the progenitor fold of the dsRNA virus lineage and suggests a relationship between lineages. Cryo-EM structure at near-atomic resolution showed that the 982-aa PcV CP is formed by a repeated α-helical core, indicative of gene duplication despite lack of sequence similarity between the two halves. Superimposition of secondary structure elements identified a single "hotspot" at which variation is introduced by insertion of peptide segments. Structural comparison of PcV and other distantly related dsRNA viruses detected preferential insertion sites at which the complexity of the conserved α-helical core, made up of ancestral structural motifs that have acted as a skeleton, might have increased, leading to evolution of the highly varied current structures. Analyses of structural motifs only apparent after systematic structural comparisons indicated that the hallmark fold preserved in the dsRNA virus lineage shares a long (spinal) α-helix tangential to the capsid surface with the head-tailed phage and herpesvirus viral lineage.

  4. Identification of common and cell type specific LXXLL motif EcR cofactors using a bioinformatics refined candidate RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During Drosophila development, titers of the steroid ecdysone trigger and maintain temporal and tissue specific biological transitions. Decades of evidence reveal that the ecdysone response is both unique to specific tissues and distinct among developmental timepoints. To achieve this diversity in response, the several isoforms of the Ecdysone Receptor, which transduce the hormone signal to the genome level, are believed to interact with tissue specific cofactors. To date, little is known about the identity of these cofactor interactions; therefore, we conducted a bioinformatics informed, RNAi luciferase reporter screen against a subset of putative candidate cofactors identified through an in silico proteome screen. Candidates were chosen based on criteria obtained from bioinformatic consensus of known nuclear receptor cofactors and homologs, including amino acid sequence motif content and context. Results The bioinformatics pre-screen of the Drosophila melanogaster proteome was successful in identifying an enriched putative candidate gene cohort. Over 80% of the genes tested yielded a positive hit in our reporter screen. We have identified both cell type specific and common cofactors which appear to be necessary for proper ecdysone induced gene regulation. We have determined that certain cofactors act as co-repressors to reduce target gene expression, while others act as co-activators to increase target gene expression. Interestingly, we find that a few of the cofactors shared among cell types have a reversible roles to function as co-repressors in certain cell types while in other cell types they serve as co-activators. Lastly, these proteins are highly conserved, with higher order organism homologs also harboring the LXXLL steroid receptor interaction domains, suggesting a highly conserved mode of steroid cell target specificity. Conclusions In conclusion, we submit these cofactors as novel components of the ecdysone signaling pathway in order to

  5. The solution structure of horseshoe crab antimicrobial peptide tachystatin B with an inhibitory cystine-knot motif.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Naoki; Kouno, Takahide; Nakahara, Taku; Takaya, Kenji; Osaki, Tsukasa; Kawabata, Shun-Ichiro; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2007-04-01

    Tachystatin B is an antimicrobial and a chitin-binding peptide isolated from the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus) consisting of two isopeptides called tachystatin B1 and B2. We have determined their solution structures using NMR experiments and distance geometry calculations. The 20 best converged structures of tachystatin B1 and B2 exhibited root mean square deviations of 0.46 and 0.49 A, respectively, for the backbone atoms in Cys(4)-Arg(40). Both structures have identical conformations, and they contain a short antiparallel beta-sheet with an inhibitory cystine-knot (ICK) motif that is distributed widely in the antagonists for voltage-gated ion channels, although tachystatin B does not have neurotoxic activity. The structural homology search provided several peptides with structures similar to that of tachystatin B. However, most of them have the advanced functions such as insecticidal activity, suggesting that tachystatin B may be a kind of ancestor of antimicrobial peptide in the molecular evolutionary history. Tachystatin B also displays a significant structural similarity to tachystatin A, which is member of the tachystatin family. The structural comparison of both tachystatins indicated that Tyr(14) and Arg(17) in the long loop between the first and second strands might be the essential residues for binding to chitin. Copyright 2007 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. SMN2 exon 7 splicing is inhibited by binding of hnRNP A1 to a common ESS motif that spans the 3' splice site.

    PubMed

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Schroeder, Lisbeth Dahl; Vested, Anne; Palmfeldt, Johan; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2011-02-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy is caused by homozygous loss of SMN1 with phenotypic modulation by SMN2. SMN2 expresses only limited amounts of full-length transcript due to skipping of exon 7 caused by disruption of an SF2/ASF binding ESE. Additionally, hnRNP A1 has been reported to inhibit inclusion of SMN2 exon 7. We previously reported high similarity between the sequence spanning the 3' ss of SMN1 and SMN2 exon 7 and an hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which regulates MCAD exon 5 splicing. We show here that this 3' ss motif indeed functions as a crucial hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which inhibits inclusion of SMN1/2 exon 7 and is antagonized by the SMN1 ESE, but not by the inactive SMN2 sequence. Pull-down experiments revealed a specific interaction between hnRNP A1 and the 3' ss AG-dinucleotide, which could be disrupted by mutations shown to improve splicing in reporter minigenes. Genomic analyses revealed that in the human genome, 3' ss matching the SMN1/2 ESS motif region are much less abundant than 3' ss with a disrupted ESS motif. This indicates that this ESS may be a general splicing inhibitory motif, which binds hnRNP A1 and inhibits exon inclusion by binding to 3' ss harboring this ESS motif.

  7. The 'WS motif' common to v-mpl and members of the cytokine receptor superfamily is dispensable for myeloproliferative leukemia virus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bénit, L; Charon, M; Cocault, L; Wendling, F; Gisselbrecht, S

    1993-03-01

    Several motifs are conserved in the extracellular domain of the cloned chains of the recently described cytokine receptor superfamily. One of them, usually close to the transmembrane region, is the 'WS motif'. Its function remains unknown, but it has been recently shown that the integrity of this motif is essential for interleukin 2 receptor beta-chain and erythropoietin receptor activity [Miyazaki, T., Maruyama, M., Yamada, G., Hatakeyama, M. & Taniguchi, T. (1991). EMBO J., 10, 3191-3197; Watowich, S.S., Yoshimura, A., Longmore, G.D., Hilton, D.J., Hoshimura, Y. & Lodish, H.R. (1992). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 89, 2140-2144]. This WS motif is present in the v-mpl oncogene, which has been transduced in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPLV). v-mpl encodes a truncated transmembrane protein that belongs to this growth factor receptor family. We demonstrate that determinants of MPLV pathogenesis are encoded by the env-mpl fusion gene and that the complete deletion of the WS motif does not abolish MPLV oncogenic properties.

  8. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Kostsin, Dzmitry G.; Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Morita, Masashi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  9. The MiiA motif is a common marker present in polytopic surface proteins of oral and urinary tract invasive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J

    2017-04-01

    Many surface virulence factors of bacterial pathogens show mosaicism and confounding phylogenetic origin. The Streptococcus gordonii platelet-binding GspB protein, the Streptococcus sanguinis SrpA adhesin and the Streptococcus pneumoniae DiiA protein, share an imperfect 27-residue motif. Given the disparate domain architectures of these proteins and its association to invasive disease, this motif was named MiiA from Multiarchitecture invasion-involved motif A. MiiA is predicted to adopt a beta-sheet folding, probably related to the Ig-like fold, with a symmetrical positioning of two conserved aspartic residues. A specific hidden Markov model profiling MiiA was built, which specifically detected the motif in proteins from 58 species, mainly in cell-wall proteins from Gram-positive bacteria. These proteins contained one to ten MiiA motifs, which were embedded within larger repeat units of 70-82 residues. MiiA motifs combined to other domains and elements such as coiled-coils and low-complexity regions. The species carrying MiiA-proteins included commensals from the urogenital tract and the oral cavity, which can cause opportunistic endocarditis and sepsis. Intra-protein MiiA repeats showed a complex mixture of orthologal, paralogal and inter-species relationships, suggestive of a multistep origin. Presence of these repeats in proteins involved in oligosaccharide recognition and lifestyle of species suggest a putative function for MiiA repeats in sugars binding, probably those present in receptors of epithelial and blood cells. MiiA modules appear to have been transferred horizontally between species co-habiting in the same niche to create their own MiiA-containing determinants. The present work provides a global study and a catalog of potential MiiA virulence factors that should be analyzed experimentally.

  10. Synthesis, structure, and properties of SrC(NH)3 , a nitrogen-based carbonate analogue with the trinacria motif.

    PubMed

    Missong, Ronja; George, Janine; Houben, Andreas; Hoelzel, Markus; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-10-05

    Strontium guanidinate, SrC(NH)3 , the first compound with a doubly deprotonated guanidine unit, was synthesized from strontium and guanidine in liquid ammonia and characterized by X-ray and neutron diffraction, IR spectroscopy, and density-functional theory including harmonic phonon calculations. The compound crystallizes in the hexagonal space group P63 /m, constitutes the nitrogen analogue of strontium carbonate, SrCO3 , and its structure follows a layered motif between Sr(2+) ions and complex anions of the type C(NH)3 (2-) ; the anions adopt the peculiar trinacria shape. A comparison of theoretical phonons with experimental IR bands as well as quantum-chemical bonding analyses yield a first insight into bonding and packing of the formerly unknown anion in the crystal. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A Structurally-Tunable 3-Hydroxyflavone Motif for Visible Light-Induced Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecules (CORMs)**

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey N; Richards, Jason M; Esquer, Hector J; Benninghoff, Abby D; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Molecules that can be used to deliver a controlled amount of carbon monoxide (CO) have the potential to facilitate investigations into the roles of this gaseous molecule in biology and advance therapeutic treatments. This has led to the development of light-induced CO-releasing molecules (photoCORMs). A goal in this field of research is the development of molecules that exhibit a combination of controlled CO release, favorable biological properties (e.g., low toxicity and trackability in cells), and structural tunability to affect CO release. Herein, we report a new biologically-inspired organic photoCORM motif that exhibits several features that are desirable in a next-generation photoCORM. We show that 3-hydroxyflavone-based compounds are easily synthesized and modified to impart changes in absorption features and quantum yield for CO release, exhibit low toxicity, are trackable in cells, and can exhibit both O2-dependent and -independent CO release reactivity. PMID:26491637

  12. A Structurally-Tunable 3-Hydroxyflavone Motif for Visible Light-Induced Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecules (CORMs).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey N; Richards, Jason M; Esquer, Hector J; Benninghoff, Abby D; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2015-10-01

    Molecules that can be used to deliver a controlled amount of carbon monoxide (CO) have the potential to facilitate investigations into the roles of this gaseous molecule in biology and advance therapeutic treatments. This has led to the development of light-induced CO-releasing molecules (photoCORMs). A goal in this field of research is the development of molecules that exhibit a combination of controlled CO release, favorable biological properties (e.g., low toxicity and trackability in cells), and structural tunability to affect CO release. Herein, we report a new biologically-inspired organic photoCORM motif that exhibits several features that are desirable in a next-generation photoCORM. We show that 3-hydroxyflavone-based compounds are easily synthesized and modified to impart changes in absorption features and quantum yield for CO release, exhibit low toxicity, are trackable in cells, and can exhibit both O2-dependent and -independent CO release reactivity.

  13. Modelling a 3D structure for EgDf1 from shape Echinococcus granulosus: putative epitopes, phosphorylation motifs and ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, M.; Esteves, A.; Vega, M.; Tabares, G.; Ehrlich, R.; Tapia, O.

    1998-07-01

    EgDf1 is a developmentally regulated protein from the parasite Echinococcus granulosus related to a family of hydrophobic ligand binding proteins. This protein could play a crucial role during the parasite life cycle development since this organism is unable to synthetize most of their own lipids de novo. Furthermore, it has been shown that two related protein from other parasitic platyhelminths (Fh15 from Fasciola hepatica and Sm14 from Schistosoma mansoni) are able to confer protective inmunity against experimental infection in animal models. A three-dimensional structure would help establishing structure/function relationships on a knowledge based manner. 3D structures for EgDf1 protein were modelled by using myelin P2 (mP2) and intestine fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) as templates. Molecular dynamics techniques were used to validate the models. Template mP2 yielded the best 3D structure for EgDf1. Palmitic and oleic acids were docked inside EgDf1. The present theoretical results suggest definite location in the secondary structure of the epitopic regions, consensus phosphorylation motifs and oleic acid as a good ligand candidate to EgDf1. This protein might well be involved in the process of supplying hydrophobic metabolites for membrane biosynthesis and for signaling pathways.

  14. The structure of the translational initiation factor IF1 from E.coli contains an oligomer-binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Sette, M; van Tilborg, P; Spurio, R; Kaptein, R; Paci, M; Gualerzi, C O; Boelens, R

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the translational initiation factor IF1 from Escherichia coli has been determined with multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Using 1041 distance and 78 dihedral constraints, 40 distance geometry structures were calculated, which were refined by restrained molecular dynamics. From this set, 19 structures were selected, having low constraint energy and few constraint violations. The ensemble of 19 structures displays a root-mean-square deviation versus the average of 0.49 A for the backbone atoms and 1.12 A for all atoms for residues 6-36 and 46-67. The structure of IF1 is characterized by a five-stranded beta-barrel. The loop connecting strands three and four contains a short 3(10) helix but this region shows considerably higher flexibility than the beta-barrel. The fold of IF1 is very similar to that found in the bacterial cold shock proteins CspA and CspB, the N-terminal domain of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and the staphylococcal nuclease, and can be identified as the oligomer-binding motif. Several proteins of this family are nucleic acid-binding proteins. This suggests that IF1 plays its role in the initiation of protein synthesis by nucleic acid interactions. Specific changes of NMR signals of IF1 upon titration with 30S ribosomal subunit identifies several residues that are involved in the interaction with ribosomes. PMID:9135158

  15. Effect of packing motifs on the energy ranking and electronic properties of putative crystal structures of tricyano-1,4-dithiino[c]-isothiazole.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Farren; Wang, Xiaopeng; Marom, Noa

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of putative structures of tricyano-1,4-dithiino[c]-isothiazole (TCS3), generated within the sixth crystal structure prediction blind test. Typical packing motifs are identified and characterized in terms of distinct patterns of close contacts and regions of electrostatic and dispersion interactions. We find that different dispersion-inclusive density functional theory (DFT) methods systematically favor specific packing motifs, which may affect the outcome of crystal structure prediction efforts. The effect of crystal packing on the electronic and optical properties of TCS3 is investigated using many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). We find that a structure with Pna21 symmetry and a bilayer packing motif exhibits intermolecular bonding patterns reminiscent of π-π stacking and has markedly different electronic and optical properties than the experimentally observed P21/n structure with a cyclic dimer motif, including a narrower band gap, enhanced band dispersion and broader optical absorption. The Pna21 bilayer structure is close in energy to the observed structure and may be feasible to grow.

  16. Cancer-Associated Mutations Mapped on High-Resolution Structures of the U2AF2 RNA Recognition Motifs.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Eliezra; Agrawal, Anant A; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Kielkopf, Clara L

    2017-09-12

    Acquired point mutations of pre-mRNA splicing factors recur among cancers, leukemias, and related neoplasms. Several studies have established that somatic mutations of a U2AF1 subunit, which normally recognizes 3' splice site junctions, recur among myelodysplastic syndromes. The U2AF2 splicing factor recognizes polypyrimidine signals that precede most 3' splice sites as a heterodimer with U2AF1. In contrast with those of the well-studied U2AF1 subunit, descriptions of cancer-relevant U2AF2 mutations and their structural relationships are lacking. Here, we survey databases of cancer-associated mutations and identify recurring missense mutations in the U2AF2 gene. We determine ultra-high-resolution structures of the U2AF2 RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2) at 1.1 Å resolution and map the structural locations of the mutated U2AF2 residues. Comparison with prior, lower-resolution structures of the tandem U2AF2 RRMs in the RNA-bound and apo states reveals clusters of cancer-associated mutations at the U2AF2 RRM-RNA or apo-RRM1-RRM2 interfaces. Although the role of U2AF2 mutations in malignant transformation remains uncertain, our results show that cancer-associated mutations correlate with functionally important surfaces of the U2AF2 splicing factor.

  17. Identification of family-specific residue packing motifs and their use for structure-based protein function prediction: II. Case studies and applications.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Huan, Jun; Prins, Jan; Snoeyink, Jack; Wang, Wei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes several case studies concerning protein function inference from its structure using our novel approach described in the accompanying paper. This approach employs family-specific motifs, i.e. three-dimensional amino acid packing patterns that are statistically prevalent within a protein family. For our case studies we have selected families from the SCOP and EC classifications and analyzed the discriminating power of the motifs in depth. We have devised several benchmarks to compare motifs mined from unweighted topological graph representations of protein structures with those from distance-labeled (weighted) representations, demonstrating the superiority of the latter for function inference in most families. We have tested the robustness of our motif library by inferring the function of new members added to SCOP families, and discriminating between several families that are structurally similar but functionally divergent. Furthermore we have applied our method to predict function for several proteins characterized in structural genomics projects, including orphan structures, and we discuss several selected predictions in depth. Some of our predictions have been corroborated by other computational methods, and some have been validated by independent experimental studies, validating our approach for protein function inference from structure.

  18. Novel Structural Motifs in Low Energy Phases of LiAlH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Flores-Livas, José A.; Huan, Tran Doan; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Goedecker, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    We identify a class of novel low energy phases of the hydrogen storage material LiAlH4 by using the ab initio minima hopping crystal structure prediction method. These phases are, unlike previous predictions and known structures of similar materials, characterized by polymeric networks consisting of Al atoms interlinked with H atoms. The most stable structure is a layered ionic crystal with P21/c symmetry, and it has lower free energy than the previously reported structure over a wide range of temperatures. Furthermore, we carry out x-ray diffraction, phonon, and GW band-structure analysis in order to characterize this phase. Its experimental synthesis would have profound implications for the study of dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation processes and the stability problem of LiAlH4 for hydrogen storage applications.

  19. CCN2/CTGF regulates neovessel formation via targeting structurally conserved cystine knot motifs in multiple angiogenic regulators

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Liya; Shenoy, Anitha K.; Liu, Jianwen; Kim, Seungbum; Nelson, Nikole; Xia, Huiming; Hauswirth, William W.; Petersen, Bryon E.; Schultz, Gregory S.; Scott, Edward W.

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels are formed during development and tissue repair through a plethora of modifiers that coordinate efficient vessel assembly in various cellular settings. Here we used the yeast 2-hybrid approach and demonstrated a broad affinity of connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) to C-terminal cystine knot motifs present in key angiogenic regulators Slit3, von Willebrand factor, platelet-derived growth factor-B, and VEGF-A. Biochemical characterization and histological analysis showed close association of CCN2/CTGF with these regulators in murine angiogenesis models: normal retinal development, oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), and Lewis lung carcinomas. CCN2/CTGF and Slit3 proteins worked in concert to promote in vitro angiogenesis and downstream Cdc42 activation. A fragment corresponding to the first three modules of CCN2/CTGF retained this broad binding ability and gained a dominant-negative function. Intravitreal injection of this mutant caused a significant reduction in vascular obliteration and retinal neovascularization vs. saline injection in the OIR model. Knocking down CCN2/CTGF expression by short-hairpin RNA or ectopic expression of this mutant greatly decreased tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. These results provided mechanistic insight into the angiogenic action of CCN2/CTGF and demonstrated the therapeutic potential of dominant-negative CCN2/CTGF mutants for antiangiogenesis.—Pi, L., Shenoy, A. K., Liu, J., Kim, S., Nelson, N., Xia, H., Hauswirth, W. W., Petersen, B. E., Schultz, G. S., Scott, E. W. CCN2/CTGF regulates neovessel formation via targeting structurally conserved cystine knot motifs in multiple angiogenic regulators. PMID:22611085

  20. Exact calculation of loop formation probability identifies folding motifs in RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2016-12-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction is widely used to analyze RNA sequences. In an RNA partition function calculation, free energy nearest neighbor parameters are used in a dynamic programming algorithm to estimate statistical properties of the secondary structure ensemble. Previously, partition functions have largely been used to estimate the probability that a given pair of nucleotides form a base pair, the conditional stacking probability, the accessibility to binding of a continuous stretch of nucleotides, or a representative sample of RNA structures. Here it is demonstrated that an RNA partition function can also be used to calculate the exact probability of formation of hairpin loops, internal loops, bulge loops, or multibranch loops at a given position. This calculation can also be used to estimate the probability of formation of specific helices. Benchmarking on a set of RNA sequences with known secondary structures indicated that loops that were calculated to be more probable were more likely to be present in the known structure than less probable loops. Furthermore, highly probable loops are more likely to be in the known structure than the set of loops predicted in the lowest free energy structures. © 2016 Sloma and Mathews; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Crystal structure and novel recognition motif of rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum: structural insights for recognition specificity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Arvai, A S; Clancy, S B; Tainer, J A

    2001-01-05

    Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme inactivates the small GTP-binding protein family Rho by ADP-ribosylating asparagine 41, which depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton. C3 thus represents a major family of the bacterial toxins that transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to specific amino acids in acceptor proteins to modify key biological activities in eukaryotic cells, including protein synthesis, differentiation, transformation, and intracellular signaling. The 1.7 A resolution C3 exoenzyme structure establishes the conserved features of the core NAD-binding beta-sandwich fold with other ADP-ribosylating toxins despite little sequence conservation. Importantly, the central core of the C3 exoenzyme structure is distinguished by the absence of an active site loop observed in many other ADP-ribosylating toxins. Unlike the ADP-ribosylating toxins that possess the active site loop near the central core, the C3 exoenzyme replaces the active site loop with an alpha-helix, alpha3. Moreover, structural and sequence similarities with the catalytic domain of vegetative insecticidal protein 2 (VIP2), an actin ADP-ribosyltransferase, unexpectedly implicates two adjacent, protruding turns, which join beta5 and beta6 of the toxin core fold, as a novel recognition specificity motif for this newly defined toxin family. Turn 1 evidently positions the solvent-exposed, aromatic side-chain of Phe209 to interact with the hydrophobic region of Rho adjacent to its GTP-binding site. Turn 2 evidently both places the Gln212 side-chain for hydrogen bonding to recognize Rho Asn41 for nucleophilic attack on the anomeric carbon of NAD ribose and holds the key Glu214 catalytic side-chain in the adjacent catalytic pocket. This proposed bipartite ADP-ribosylating toxin turn-turn (ARTT) motif places the VIP2 and C3 toxin classes into a single ARTT family characterized by analogous target protein recognition via turn 1 aromatic and turn 2 hydrogen-bonding side-chain moieties. Turn 2 centrally anchors

  2. Characterizing Structural Stability of Amyloid Motif Fibrils Mediated by Water Molecules.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunsung; Chang, Hyun Joon; Lee, Myeongsang; Na, Sungsoo

    2017-02-04

    In biological systems, structural confinements of amyloid fibrils can be mediated by the role of water molecules. However, the underlying effect of the dynamic behavior of water molecules on structural stabilities of amyloid fibrils is still unclear. By performing molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the dynamic features and the effect of interior water molecules on conformations and mechanical characteristics of various amyloid fibrils. We find that a specific mechanism induced by the dynamic properties of interior water molecules can affect diffusion of water molecules inside amyloid fibrils, inducing their different structural stabilities. The conformation of amyloid fibrils induced by interior water molecules show the fibrils' different mechanical features. We elucidate the role of confined and movable interior water molecules in structural stabilities of various amyloid fibrils. Our results offer insights not only in further understanding of mechanical features of amyloids as mediated by water molecules, but also in the fine-tuning of the functional abilities of amyloid fibrils for applications.

  3. Common and distinctive features of GNRA tetraloops based on a GUAA tetraloop structure at 1.4 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Correll, Carl C; Swinger, Kerren

    2003-03-01

    GNRA tetraloops (N is A, C, G, or U; R is A or G) are basic building blocks of RNA structure that often interact with proteins or other RNA structural elements. Understanding sequence-dependent structural variation among different GNRA tetraloops is an important step toward elucidating the molecular basis of specific GNRA tetraloop recognition by proteins and RNAs. Details of the geometry and hydration of this motif have been based on high-resolution crystallographic structures of the GRRA subset of tetraloops; less is known about the GYRA subset (Y is C or U). We report here the structure of a GUAA tetraloop determined to 1.4 A resolution to better define these details and any distinctive features of GYRA tetraloops. The tetraloop is part of a 27-nt structure that mimics the universal sarcin/ricin loop from Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA in which a GUAA tetraloop replaces the conserved GAGA tetraloop. The adenosines of the GUAA tetraloop form an intermolecular contact that is a commonplace RNA tertiary interaction called an A-minor motif. This is the first structure to reveal in great detail the geometry and hydration of a GUAA tetraloop and an A-minor motif. Comparison of tetraloop structures shows a common backbone geometry for each of the eight possible tetraloop sequences and suggests a common hydration. After backbone atom superposition, equivalent bases from different tetraloops unexpectedly depart from coplanarity by as much as 48 degrees. This variation displaces the functional groups of tetraloops implicated in protein and RNA binding, providing a recognition feature.

  4. Common and distinctive features of GNRA tetraloops based on a GUAA tetraloop structure at 1.4 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    CORRELL, CARL C.; SWINGER, KERREN

    2003-01-01

    GNRA tetraloops (N is A, C, G, or U; R is A or G) are basic building blocks of RNA structure that often interact with proteins or other RNA structural elements. Understanding sequence-dependent structural variation among different GNRA tetraloops is an important step toward elucidating the molecular basis of specific GNRA tetraloop recognition by proteins and RNAs. Details of the geometry and hydration of this motif have been based on high-resolution crystallographic structures of the GRRA subset of tetraloops; less is known about the GYRA subset (Y is C or U). We report here the structure of a GUAA tetraloop determined to 1.4 Å resolution to better define these details and any distinctive features of GYRA tetraloops. The tetraloop is part of a 27-nt structure that mimics the universal sarcin/ricin loop from Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA in which a GUAA tetraloop replaces the conserved GAGA tetraloop. The adenosines of the GUAA tetraloop form an intermolecular contact that is a commonplace RNA tertiary interaction called an A-minor motif. This is the first structure to reveal in great detail the geometry and hydration of a GUAA tetraloop and an A-minor motif. Comparison of tetraloop structures shows a common backbone geometry for each of the eight possible tetraloop sequences and suggests a common hydration. After backbone atom superposition, equivalent bases from different tetraloops unexpectedly depart from coplanarity by as much as 48°. This variation displaces the functional groups of tetraloops implicated in protein and RNA binding, providing a recognition feature. PMID:12592009

  5. Structure of the GAF domain, a ubiquitous signaling motif and a new class of cyclic GMP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yew-Seng J.; Burden, Lisa M.; Hurley, James H.

    2000-01-01

    GAF domains are ubiquitous motifs present in cyclic GMP (cGMP)-regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, certain adenylyl cyclases, the bacterial transcription factor FhlA, and hundreds of other signaling and sensory proteins from all three kingdoms of life. The crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YKG9 protein was determined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structure revealed a fold that resembles the PAS domain, another ubiquitous signaling and sensory transducer. YKG9 does not bind cGMP, but the isolated first GAF domain of phosphodiesterase 5 binds with Kd = 650 nM. The cGMP binding site of the phosphodiesterase GAF domain was identified by homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, and consists of conserved Arg, Asn, Lys and Asp residues. The structural and binding studies taken together show that the cGMP binding GAF domains form a new class of cyclic nucleotide receptors distinct from the regulatory domains of cyclic nucleotide-regulated protein kinases and ion channels. PMID:11032796

  6. Common structure and toxic function of amyloid oligomers implies a common mechanism of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Glabe, Charles G; Kayed, Rakez

    2006-01-24

    Recent findings indicate that soluble amyloid oligomers may represent the primary pathologic species in degenerative diseases. These amyloid oligomers share common structural features and the ability to permeabilize membranes, suggesting that they also share a common primary mechanism of pathogenesis. Membrane permeabilization by amyloid oligomers may initiate a common group of downstream pathologic processes, including intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis, production of reactive oxygen species, altered signaling pathways, and mitochondrial dysfunction that represent key effectors of cellular dysfunction and cell death in amyloid-associated degenerative disease, such as sporadic inclusion-body myositis.

  7. On squaring triangles – Structural motifs in Cu–In–Sb compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, C.J. Lidin, S.

    2015-11-15

    Two new ternary Cu–In–Sb compounds Cu{sub 7}In{sub 2.5}Sb{sub 0.5} and Cu{sub 2}In{sub 0.75}Sb{sub 0.25} are presented. Both compounds are Ni{sub 2}In type superstructures with vacancies in the pseudohexagonal network. Additionally, the pseudocubic nature of the compounds and Ni{sub 2}In type (super)structures, in general, is discussed. Remarkably, a large number of pseudo-five-fold and pseudo-three-fold axes contribute to generate a pseudocubic symmetry in the crystal structure that is reflected in pseudocubic axial ratios in Ni{sub 2}In type superstructures. We find that they belong to the family of tetrahedrally close packed structures which implies that pseudocubic axial relationships simply are to be expected. - Graphical abstract: Evolution of pseudocubic clusters in Sb-doped Cu{sub 7}In{sub 3} and the Cu–In–Sb 2:1 phase. - Highlights: • Two new ternary compounds Cu{sub 7}In{sub 2.5}Sb{sub 0.5} and Cu{sub 2}In{sub 0.75}Sn{sub 0.25}. • First ternary Ni{sub 2}In superstructures with vacancies in the pseudohexagonal network. • Pseudocubic clusters in the pseudohexagonal structures. • Pseudocubic c/a ratios due to the relation to tetrahedrally close packed structures.

  8. The i-Motif in the bcl-2 P1 Promoter Forms an Unexpectedly Stable Structure with a Unique 8:5:7 Loop Folding Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, Samantha; Akiyama, Yoshitsugu; Hecht, Sidney M.; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the bcl-2 proto-oncogene is highly complex, with the majority of transcription driven by the P1 promoter site and the interaction of multiple regulatory proteins. A guanine- and cytosine-rich (GC-rich) region directly upstream of the P1 site has been shown to be integral to bcl-2 promoter activity, as deletion or mutation of this region significantly increases transcription. This GC-rich element consists of six contiguous runs of guanines and cytosines that have the potential to adopt DNA secondary structures, the G-quadruplex and i-motif, respectively. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the polypurine-rich strand of the bcl-2 promoter can form a mixture of three different G-quadruplex structures. In this current study, we demonstrate that the complementary polypyrimidine-rich strand is capable of forming one major intramolecular i-motif DNA secondary structure with a transition pH of 6.6. Characterization of the i-motif folding pattern using mutational studies coupled with circular dichroic spectra and thermal stability analyses revealed an 8:5:7 loop conformation as the predominant structure at pH 6.1. The folding pattern was further supported by chemical footprinting with bromine. In addition, a novel assay involving the sequential incorporation of a fluorescent thymine analog at each thymine position provided evidence of a capping structure within the top loop region of the i-motif. The potential of the GC-rich element within the bcl-2 promoter region to form DNA secondary structures suggests that the transition from the B-DNA to non-B-DNA conformation may play an important role in bcl-2 transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the two adjacent large lateral loops in the i-motif structure provide an unexpected opportunity for protein and small molecule recognition. PMID:19908860

  9. Laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the structures and encapsulation motifs of functional molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebata, Takayuki; Kusaka, Ryoji; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-01-22

    Extensive laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies have been recently carried out with the aim to reveal the structure and dynamics of encapsulation complexes in the gas phase. The characteristics of the encapsulation complexes are governed by the fact that (i) most of the host molecules are flexible and (ii) the complexes form high dimensional structures by using weak non-covalent interactions. These characteristics result in the possibility of the coexistence of many conformers in close energetic proximity. The combination of supersonic jet/laser spectroscopy and high level quantum chemical calculations is essential in tackling these challenging problems. In this report we describe our recent studies on the structures and dynamics of the encapsulation complexes formed by calix[4]arene (C4A), dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), and benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) 'hosts' interacting with N{sub 2}, acetylene, water, and ammonia 'guest' molecules. The gaseous host-guest complexes are generated under jet-cooled conditions. We apply various laser spectroscopic methods to obtain the conformer- and isomer-specified electronic and IR spectra. The experimental results are complemented with quantum chemical calculations ranging from density functional theory to high level first principles calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. We discuss the possible conformations of the bare host molecules, the structural changes they undergo upon complexation, and the key interactions that are responsible in stabilizing the specific complexes.

  10. Laser Spectroscopic and Theoretical Studies of the Structures and Encapsulation Motifs of Functional Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebata, Takayuki; Kusaka, Ryoji; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-02-01

    Extensive laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies have been recently carried out with the aim to reveal the structure and dynamics of encapsulation complexes in the gas phase. The characteristics of the encapsulation complexes are governed by the fact that (i) most of the host molecules are flexible and (ii) the complexes form high dimensional structures by using weak non-covalent interactions. These characteristics result in the possibility of the coexistence of many conformers in close energetic proximity. The combination of supersonic jet/laser spectroscopy and high level quantum chemical calculations is essential in tackling these challenging problems. In this report we describe our recent studies on the structures and dynamics of the encapsulation complexes formed by calix[4]arene (C4A), dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), and benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) "hosts" interacting with N2, acetylene, water, and ammonia "guest" molecules. The gaseous host-guest complexes are generated under jet-cooled conditions. We apply various laser spectroscopic methods to obtain the conformer- and isomer-specified electronic and IR spectra. The experimental results are complemented with quantum chemical calculations ranging from density functional theory to high level first principles calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. We discuss the possible conformations of the bare host molecules, the structural changes they undergo upon complexation, and the key interactions that are responsible in stabilizing the specific complexes

  11. Structural motif of polyglutamine amyloid fibrils discerned with mixed-isotope infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Lauren E.; Carr, Joshua K.; Fluitt, Aaron M.; Hoganson, Andrew J.; Moran, Sean D.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Skinner, James L.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2014-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences are found in a variety of proteins, and mutational expansion of the polyQ tract is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. We study the amyloid fibril structure and aggregation kinetics of K2Q24K2W, a model polyQ sequence. Two structures have been proposed for amyloid fibrils formed by polyQ peptides. By forming fibrils composed of both 12C and 13C monomers, made possible by protein expression in Escherichia coli, we can restrict vibrational delocalization to measure 2D IR spectra of individual monomers within the fibrils. The spectra are consistent with a β-turn structure in which each monomer forms an antiparallel hairpin and donates two strands to a single β-sheet. Calculated spectra from atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations of the two proposed structures confirm the assignment. No spectroscopically distinct intermediates are observed in rapid-scan 2D IR kinetics measurements, suggesting that aggregation is highly cooperative. Although 2D IR spectroscopy has advantages over linear techniques, the isotope-mixing strategy will also be useful with standard Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. PMID:24550484

  12. Selective Targeting of G-Quadruplex Structures by a Benzothiazole-Based Binding Motif.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Ina; Karg, Beatrice; Dickerhoff, Jonathan; Sievers-Engler, Adrian; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Weisz, Klaus

    2017-03-09

    A benzothiazole derivative was identified as potent ligand for DNA G-quadruplex structures. Fluorescence titrations revealed selective binding to quadruplexes of different topologies including parallel, antiparallel and (3+1) hybrid structures. The parallel c-MYC sequence was found to constitute the preferred target with dissociation constants in the micromolar range. Binding of the benzothiazole-based ligand to c-MYC was structurally and thermodynamically characterized in detail by employing a comprehensive set of spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. Job plot analyses and mass spectral data indicate non-cooperative ligand binding to form 1:1 and 2:1 complex stoichiometries. Whereas stacking interactions are suggested by optical methods, NMR chemical shift perturbations also indicate significant rearrangements of both 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences upon ligand binding. Additional isothermal calorimetry studies yield a thermodynamic profile of the ligand-quadruplex association and reveal enthalpic contributions to be the major driving force for binding. The structural and thermodynamic information obtained in the present work provides the basis for the rational development of benzothiazole derivatives as promising quadruplex binding agents.

  13. Joint Estimation of Multiple Precision Matrices with Common Structures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonyul; Liu, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of inverse covariance matrices, known as precision matrices, is important in various areas of statistical analysis. In this article, we consider estimation of multiple precision matrices sharing some common structures. In this setting, estimating each precision matrix separately can be suboptimal as it ignores potential common structures. This article proposes a new approach to parameterize each precision matrix as a sum of common and unique components and estimate multiple precision matrices in a constrained l1 minimization framework. We establish both estimation and selection consistency of the proposed estimator in the high dimensional setting. The proposed estimator achieves a faster convergence rate for the common structure in certain cases. Our numerical examples demonstrate that our new estimator can perform better than several existing methods in terms of the entropy loss and Frobenius loss. An application to a glioblastoma cancer data set reveals some interesting gene networks across multiple cancer subtypes. PMID:26568704

  14. A conserved secondary structural motif in 23S rRNA defines the site of interaction of amicetin, a universal inhibitor of peptide bond formation.

    PubMed Central

    Leviev, I G; Rodriguez-Fonseca, C; Phan, H; Garrett, R A; Heilek, G; Noller, H F; Mankin, A S

    1994-01-01

    The binding site and probable site of action have been determined for the universal antibiotic amicetin which inhibits peptide bond formation. Evidence from in vivo mutants, site-directed mutations and chemical footprinting all implicate a highly conserved motif in the secondary structure of the 23S-like rRNA close to the central circle of domain V. We infer that this motif lies at, or close to, the catalytic site in the peptidyl transfer centre. The binding site of amicetin is the first of a group of functionally related hexose-cytosine inhibitors to be localized on the ribosome. Images PMID:8157007

  15. Combined structural, biochemical and cellular evidence demonstrates that both FGDF motifs in alphavirus nsP3 are required for efficient replication

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Tim; Liu, Lifeng; Panas, Marc D.; Thaa, Bastian; Dickson, Nicole; Götte, Benjamin; Achour, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings have highlighted the role of the Old World alphavirus non-structural protein 3 (nsP3) as a host defence modulator that functions by disrupting stress granules, subcellular phase-dense RNA/protein structures formed upon environmental stress. This disruption mechanism was largely explained through nsP3-mediated recruitment of the host G3BP protein via two tandem FGDF motifs. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of G3BP-1 in complex with a 25-residue peptide derived from Semliki Forest virus nsP3 (nsP3-25). The structure reveals a poly-complex of G3BP-1 dimers interconnected through the FGDF motifs in nsP3-25. Although in vitro and in vivo binding studies revealed a hierarchical interaction of the two FGDF motifs with G3BP-1, viral growth curves clearly demonstrated that two intact FGDF motifs are required for efficient viral replication. Chikungunya virus nsP3 also binds G3BP dimers via a hierarchical interaction, which was found to be critical for viral replication. These results highlight a conserved molecular mechanism in host cell modulation. PMID:27383630

  16. Structural complexity of Dengue virus untranslated regions: cis-acting RNA motifs and pseudoknot interactions modulating functionality of the viral genome

    PubMed Central

    Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Rausch, Jason W.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Dengue virus (DENV) genome contains multiple cis-acting elements required for translation and replication. Previous studies indicated that a 719-nt subgenomic minigenome (DENV-MINI) is an efficient template for translation and (−) strand RNA synthesis in vitro. We performed a detailed structural analysis of DENV-MINI RNA, combining chemical acylation techniques, Pb2+ ion-induced hydrolysis and site-directed mutagenesis. Our results highlight protein-independent 5′–3′ terminal interactions involving hybridization between recognized cis-acting motifs. Probing analyses identified tandem dumbbell structures (DBs) within the 3′ terminus spaced by single-stranded regions, internal loops and hairpins with embedded GNRA-like motifs. Analysis of conserved motifs and top loops (TLs) of these dumbbells, and their proposed interactions with downstream pseudoknot (PK) regions, predicted an H-type pseudoknot involving TL1 of the 5′ DB and the complementary region, PK2. As disrupting the TL1/PK2 interaction, via ‘flipping’ mutations of PK2, previously attenuated DENV replication, this pseudoknot may participate in regulation of RNA synthesis. Computer modeling implied that this motif might function as autonomous structural/regulatory element. In addition, our studies targeting elements of the 3′ DB and its complementary region PK1 indicated that communication between 5′–3′ terminal regions strongly depends on structure and sequence composition of the 5′ cyclization region. PMID:23531545

  17. Combined structural, biochemical and cellular evidence demonstrates that both FGDF motifs in alphavirus nsP3 are required for efficient replication.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Tim; Liu, Lifeng; Panas, Marc D; Thaa, Bastian; Dickson, Nicole; Götte, Benjamin; Achour, Adnane; McInerney, Gerald M

    2016-07-01

    Recent findings have highlighted the role of the Old World alphavirus non-structural protein 3 (nsP3) as a host defence modulator that functions by disrupting stress granules, subcellular phase-dense RNA/protein structures formed upon environmental stress. This disruption mechanism was largely explained through nsP3-mediated recruitment of the host G3BP protein via two tandem FGDF motifs. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of G3BP-1 in complex with a 25-residue peptide derived from Semliki Forest virus nsP3 (nsP3-25). The structure reveals a poly-complex of G3BP-1 dimers interconnected through the FGDF motifs in nsP3-25. Although in vitro and in vivo binding studies revealed a hierarchical interaction of the two FGDF motifs with G3BP-1, viral growth curves clearly demonstrated that two intact FGDF motifs are required for efficient viral replication. Chikungunya virus nsP3 also binds G3BP dimers via a hierarchical interaction, which was found to be critical for viral replication. These results highlight a conserved molecular mechanism in host cell modulation.

  18. Structure for common access and support of fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, Michael M.

    2000-01-01

    A structure provides common support and access to multiple fuel cells externally mounted thereto. The structure has openings leading to passages defined therein for providing the access. Various other fuel cell power system components are connected at the openings, such as reactant and coolant sources.

  19. A colorimetric strategy based on a water-soluble conjugated polymer for sensing pH-driven conformational conversion of DNA i-motif structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihua; Liu, Xingfen; Yang, Qing; Fan, Quli; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Wei

    2010-03-15

    Using a water-soluble conjugated polymer (CP) as a sensing probe, we developed a rapid colorimetric detection strategy for pH-driven conformational conversion of DNA i-motif structure. Two sensing configurations were designed: one used CP only to detect the conversion between i-motif and random-coiled state of a C-rich single-strand DNA, the other used CP and a complementary single-strand DNA to investigate the conversion of duplex to i-motif equilibrium. All the conversions would lead to color change observed directly with naked eyes within a few minutes. The limitation of detection (LOD) is as low as 40 nM. More importantly, reversible conformational conversions by adjusting the pH of the system could also be detected.

  20. Crystal structure and MD simulation of mouse EndoV reveal wedge motif plasticity in this inosine-specific endonuclease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Ronander, Mia Elise; Solvoll, Anne Marthe; Blicher, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun; Dalhus, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Endonuclease V (EndoV) is an enzyme with specificity for deaminated adenosine (inosine) in nucleic acids. EndoV from Escherichia coli (EcEndoV) acts both on inosines in DNA and RNA, whereas the human homolog cleaves only at inosines in RNA. Inosines in DNA are mutagenic and the role of EndoV in DNA repair is well established. In contrast, the biological function of EndoV in RNA processing is largely unexplored. Here we have characterized a second mammalian EndoV homolog, mouse EndoV (mEndoV), and show that mEndoV shares the same RNA selectivity as human EndoV (hEndoV). Mouse EndoV cleaves the same inosine-containing substrates as hEndoV, but with reduced efficiencies. The crystal structure of mEndoV reveals a conformation different from the hEndoV and prokaryotic EndoV structures, particularly for the conserved tyrosine in the wedge motif, suggesting that this strand separating element has some flexibility. Molecular dynamics simulations of mouse and human EndoV reveal alternative conformations for the invariant tyrosine. The configuration of the active site, on the other hand, is very similar between the prokaryotic and mammalian versions of EndoV.

  1. Structure-activity relationship study on a simple cationic peptide motif for cellular delivery of antisense peptide nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Albertshofer, Klaus; Siwkowski, Andrew M; Wancewicz, Edward V; Esau, Christine C; Watanabe, Tanya; Nishihara, Kenji C; Kinberger, Garth A; Malik, Leila; Eldrup, Anne B; Manoharan, Muthiah; Geary, Richard S; Monia, Brett P; Swayze, Eric E; Griffey, Richard H; Bennett, C Frank; Maier, Martin A

    2005-10-20

    Improving cellular uptake and biodistribution remains one of the major obstacles for a successful and broad application of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as antisense therapeutics. Recently, we reported the identification and functional characterization of an antisense PNA, which redirects splicing of murine CD40 pre-mRNA. In this context, it was discovered that a simple octa(l-lysine) peptide covalently linked to the PNA is capable of promoting free uptake of the conjugate into BCL1 cells as well as primary murine macrophages. On the basis of this peptide motif, the present study aimed at identifying the structural features, which define effective peptide carriers for cellular delivery of PNA. While the structure-activity relationship study revealed some clear correlations, only a few modifications actually led to an overall improvement as compared to the parent octa(l-lysine) conjugate. In a preliminary PK/tissue distribution study in healthy mice, the parent conjugate exhibited relatively broad tissue distribution and only modest elimination via excretion within the time frame of the study.

  2. Structural Transformation of the Tandem Ubiquitin-Interacting Motifs in Ataxin-3 and Their Cooperative Interactions with Ubiquitin Chains

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ai-Xin; Zhou, Chen-Jie; Peng, Yu; Gao, Xue-Chao; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Fu, Qing-Shan; Hong, Jing; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) is a short peptide with dual function of binding ubiquitin (Ub) and promoting ubiquitination. We elucidated the structures and dynamics of the tandem UIMs of ataxin-3 (AT3-UIM12) both in free and Ub-bound forms. The solution structure of free AT3-UIM12 consists of two α-helices and a flexible linker, whereas that of the Ub-bound form is much more compact with hydrophobic contacts between the two helices. NMR dynamics indicates that the flexible linker becomes rigid when AT3-UIM12 binds with Ub. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR titration demonstrate that AT3-UIM12 binds diUb with two distinct affinities, and the linker plays a critical role in association of the two helices in diUb binding. These results provide an implication that the tandem UIM12 interacts with Ub or diUb in a cooperative manner through an allosteric effect and dynamics change of the linker region, which might be related to its recognitions with various Ub chains and ubiquitinated substrates. PMID:20949063

  3. Measurement of creatinine in human plasma using a functional porous polymer structure sensing motif

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; An, Seong Soo A; Yi, Dong Kee

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new method for detecting creatinine was developed. This novel sensor comprised of two ionic liquids, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) chloride, in the presence of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). PLGA and BMIM chloride formed a functional porous polymer structure (FPPS)-like structure. Creatinine within the FPPS rapidly hydrolyzed and released OH−, which in turn converted DCFH-DA to DCFH, developing an intense green color or green fluorescence. The conversion of DCFH to DCF+ resulted in swelling of FPPS and increased solubility. This DCF+-based sensor could detect creatinine levels with detection limit of 5 µM and also measure the creatinine in blood. This novel method could be used in diagnostic applications for monitoring individuals with renal dysfunction. PMID:26347475

  4. Structures and Encapsulation Motifs of Functional Molecules Probed by Laser Spectroscopic and Theoretical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kusaka, Ryoji; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Ebata, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    We report laser spectroscopic and computational studies of host/guest hydration interactions between functional molecules (hosts) and water (guest) in supersonic jets. The examined hosts include dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) and calix[4]arene (C4A). The gaseous complexes between the functional molecular hosts and water are generated under jet-cooled conditions. Various laser spectroscopic methods are applied for these species: the electronic spectra are observed by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), mass-selected resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and ultraviolet-ultraviolet hole-burning (UV-UV HB) spectroscopy, whereas the vibrational spectra for each individual species are observed by infrared-ultraviolet double resonance (IR-UV DR) spectroscopy. The obained results are analyzed by first principles electronic structure calculations. We discuss the conformations of the host molecules, the structures of the complexes, and key interactions forming the specific complexes. PMID:22319310

  5. A Data-Mining Scheme for Identifying Peptide Structural Motifs Responsible for Different MS/MS Fragmentation Intensity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingying; Tseng, George C.; Yuan, Shinsheng; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has become an integral part of proteomics, intensity patterns in MS/MS spectra are rarely weighted heavily in most widely used algorithms because they are not yet fully understood. Here a knowledge mining approach is demonstrated to discover fragmentation intensity patterns and elucidate the chemical factors behind such patterns. Fragmentation intensity information from 28 330 ion trap peptide MS/MS spectra of different charge states and sequences went through unsupervised clustering using a penalized K-means algorithm. Without any prior chemistry assumptions, four clusters with distinctive fragmentation patterns were obtained. A decision tree was generated to investigate peptide sequence motif and charge state status that caused these fragmentation patterns. This data-mining scheme is generally applicable for any large data sets. It bypasses the common prior knowledge constraints and reports on the overall peptide fragmentation behavior. It improves the understanding of gas-phase peptide dissociation and provides a foundation for new or improved protein identification algorithms. PMID:18052120

  6. Structural motifs in (t-butoxy) zirconium phosphinates, arsinates, and phosphates.

    PubMed

    Kumara Swamy, K C; Veith, Michael; Huch, Volker; Mathur, Sanjay

    2003-09-22

    Reaction of zirconium tetrakis(tert-butoxide) (1) with dicylohexylphosphinic acid in toluene leads to the dinuclear compound [Zr(mu,mu'-O(2)P(cycl-C(6)H(11))(2))(O-t-Bu)(3)](2) (2) in which the zirconium is pentacoordinated. An analogous reaction using diphenylphosphinic acid in tetrahydrofuran also leads to a dinuclear complex [Zr(mu,mu'-O(2)PPh(2))(THF)((O-t-Bu)(3)](2).C(6)H(5)CH(3) (3.C(6)H(5)CH(3)), in which zirconium is hexacoordinated. A novel exchange of tert-butoxy and phenoxy groups occurs when 1 is treated with diphenyl phosphate [(PhO)(2)PO(2)H] leading to the isolation of the exchange product [Zr(mu,mu'-O(2)P(O-t-Bu)(OPh))(mu-OPh)(O-t-Bu)(2)](2) (4). In contrast to the above, trinuclear zirconium compounds Zr(3(mu,mu'-O(2)AsMe(2))(2)(mu2,mu'-O(2)AsMe(2))(O-t-Bu)(7)(mu-O-t-Bu)(2) (5) and Zr(3(mu,mu'-O(2)P(O-t-Bu)(2))(5)(O-t-Bu)(7).(1)/(2)C(6)H(5)CH(3) (6.(1)/(2)C(6)H(5)CH(3)) have been isolated from the reaction of 1 with cacodylic acid and di-tert-butyl phosphate, respectively. The X-ray structures of 2, 3, 5, and 6 have been determined; although the X-ray structural analysis of 4 could not be satisfactorily finished, it reveals the disposition of the substituents. The solution state NMR data suggest that these compounds undergo structural changes in solution. Possible relationships among the various structures are discussed.

  7. Institutional property rights structure, common pool resource (CPR), tragedy of the urban commons: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, G.; Ho, C. S.; Ali, H. M.

    2014-02-01

    There have been a plethora of researches on the significance of public open space (POS) in contributing to societies' sustainability. However, by virtue of identified maladaptive policy-based-property rights structure, such a shared good becomes vulnerable to tragedy of the urban commons (overexploitation) that subsequently leads to burgeoning number of mismanaged POS e.g., degraded and unkempt urban public spaces. By scrutinising the literatures within property rights domain and commons resources, an objective is highlighted in this paper which is to insightfully discourse institutional property rights structure pertaining to the mechanism, roles and interrelationship between property-rights regimes, bundle of property rights and resource domains; types of goods on how they act upon and tie in the POS with the social quandary. In summary, urban POS tragedy can potentially be triggered by the institutional structure especially if the ownership is left under open-access resource regime and ill-defined property rights which both successively constitute the natures of Common Pool Resource (CPR) within the commons, POS. Therefore, this paper sparks an idea to policy makers that property rights structure is a determinant in sustainably governing the POS in which adaptive assignment of property regimes and property rights are impelled.

  8. Conserved structural motifs in the central pair complex of eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed

    Carbajal-González, Blanca I; Heuser, Thomas; Fu, Xiaofeng; Lin, Jianfeng; Smith, Brandon W; Mitchell, David R; Nicastro, Daniela

    2013-02-01

    Cilia and flagella are conserved hair-like appendages of eukaryotic cells that function as sensing and motility generating organelles. Motility is driven by thousands of axonemal dyneins that require precise regulation. One essential motility regulator is the central pair complex (CPC) and many CPC defects cause paralysis of cilia/flagella. Several human diseases, such as immotile cilia syndrome, show CPC abnormalities, but little is known about the detailed three-dimensional (3D) structure and function of the CPC. The CPC is located in the center of typical [9+2] cilia/flagella and is composed of two singlet microtubules (MTs), each with a set of associated projections that extend toward the surrounding nine doublet MTs. Using cryo-electron tomography coupled with subtomogram averaging, we visualized and compared the 3D structures of the CPC in both the green alga Chlamydomonas and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus at the highest resolution published to date. Despite the evolutionary distance between these species, their CPCs exhibit remarkable structural conservation. We identified several new projections, including those that form the elusive sheath, and show that the bridge has a more complex architecture than previously thought. Organism-specific differences include the presence of MT inner proteins in Chlamydomonas, but not Strongylocentrotus, and different overall outlines of the highly connected projection network, which forms a round-shaped cylinder in algae, but is more oval in sea urchin. These differences could be adaptations to the mechanical requirements of the rotating CPC in Chlamydomonas, compared to the Strongylocentrotus CPC which has a fixed orientation.

  9. i-motif structures in long cytosine-rich sequences found upstream of the promoter region of the SMARCA4 gene.

    PubMed

    Benabou, Sanae; Aviñó, Anna; Lyonnais, S; González, C; Eritja, Ramon; De Juan, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2017-09-01

    Cytosine-rich oligonucleotides are capable of forming complex structures known as i-motif with increasingly studied biological properties. The study of sequences prone to form i-motifs located near the promoter region of genes may be difficult because these sequences not only contain repeats of cytosine tracts of disparate length but also these may be separated by loops of varied nature and length. In this work, the formation of intramolecular i-motif structures by a long sequence located upstream of the promoter region of the SMARCA4 gene has been demonstrated. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism, Gel Electrophoresis, Size-Exclusion Chromatography, and multivariate analysis have been used. Not only the wild sequence (5'-TC3T2GCTATC3TGTC2TGC2TCGC3T2G2TCATGA2C4-3') has been studied but also several other truncated and mutated sequences. Despite the apparent complex sequence, the results showed that the wild sequence may form a relatively stable and homogeneous unimolecular i-motif structure, both in terms of pH or temperature. The model ligand TMPyP4 destabilizes the structure, whereas the presence of 20% (w/v) PEG200 stabilized it slightly. This finding opens the door to the study of the interaction of these kind of i-motif structures with stabilizing ligands or proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Electronic structure properties as signatures of morphological motifs in organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldey, Matthew; Galli, Giulia

    The effect of polymer morphologies upon the efficiency of organic solar cells is difficult to determine experimentally; however, theoretical models may directly probe how structural changes affect electronic properties, such as band locations and band gaps and hence provide key insight into solar energy conversion processes. Using density functional and many body perturbation theory (G0W0) calculations, we investigated the dependence of the electronic states on order parameters such as backbone dihedrals of organic donor polymers. We focused on the donor polymers PTB7 and PID2 and the acceptor PC71BM for which recent experiments reported promising photoconversion efficiencies of 8.22% for ternary blend cells. Our results suggest that accurate predictions of the device performance must include a description of local disorder in the active layer. In particular, we found multiple possible configurations of the donor polymer with relative energies 0.06-0.3 eV/monomer above the lowest energy conformer whose electronic structure differ significantly. Using the lowest energy conformations found at zero T, calculated electronic energy levels are in good agreement with experimental values, with errors within 0.2 eV.

  11. Potent antimicrobial agents against azole-resistant fungi based on pyridinohydrazide and hydrazomethylpyridine structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Backes, Gregory L; Jursic, Branko S; Neumann, Donna M

    2015-07-01

    Schiff base derivatives have recently been shown to possess antimicrobial activity, and these derivatives include a limited number of salicylaldehyde hydrazones. To further explore this structure-activity relationship between salicylaldehyde hydrazones and antifungal activity, we previously synthesized and analyzed a large series of salicylaldehyde and formylpyridinetrione hydrazones for their ability to inhibit fungal growth of both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant species of Candida. While many of these analogs showed excellent growth inhibition with low mammalian cell toxicity, their activity did not extend to azole-resistant species of Candida. To further dissect the structural features necessary to inhibit azole-resistant fungal species, we synthesized a new class of modified salicylaldehyde derivatives and subsequently identified a series of modified pyridine-based hydrazones that had potent fungicidal antifungal activity against multiple Candida spp. Here we would like to present our synthetic procedures as well as the results from fungal growth inhibition assays, mammalian cell toxicity assays, time-kill assays and synergy studies of these novel pyridine-based hydrazones on both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant fungal species.

  12. Structural investigation of hemicellulosic polysaccharides from Argania spinosa: characterisation of a novel xyloglucan motif.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bimalendu; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Lange, Catherine; Condamine, Eric; Driouich, Azeddine; Lerouge, Patrice

    2004-01-22

    Hemicellulose polymers were isolated from Argania spinosa leaf cell walls by sequential extractions with alkali. The structure of the two main polymers, xylan and xyloglucan, was investigated by enzyme degradation with specific endoglycosidases followed by analysis of the resulting fragments by high performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The results show that A. spinosa xylan is composed of a beta-(1-->4)-linked-D-xylopyranose backbone substituted with 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid residues. Xyloglucan oligosaccharide subunits were generated by treatment with an endo-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucanase of the xyloglucan-rich hemicellulosic fractions. MALDI-TOF mass spectra and HPAE-PAD chromatography of the pool of endoglucanase-generated xyloglucan oligomers indicated that A. spinosa cell wall contains a XXXG-type xyloglucan. In addition to XXXG, XXFG, XLXG/XXLG, XLFG fragments previously characterised in various plants, a second group of XXXG-type fragments was detected. The primary structure of the major subunit was determined by a combination of sugar analysis, methylation analysis, post-source decay (PSD) fragment analysis of MALDI-TOF MS and 1H NMR spectroscopy. This fragment, termed XUFG, contains a novel beta-D-Xylp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Xylp side chain linked to C-6 of the second glucose unit from the nonreducing end of the cellotetraose sequence.

  13. Specificity of Lipoprotein Chaperones for the Characteristic Lipidated Structural Motifs of their Cognate Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mejuch, Tom; van Hattum, Hilde; Triola, Gemma; Jaiswal, Mamta; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein-binding chaperones mediate intracellular transport of lipidated proteins and determine their proper localisation and functioning. Understanding of the exact structural parameters that determine recognition and transport by different chaperones is of major interest. We have synthesised several lipid-modified peptides, representative of different lipoprotein classes, and have investigated their binding to the relevant chaperones PDEδ, UNC119a, UNC119b, and galectins-1 and -3. Our results demonstrate that PDEδ recognises S-isoprenylated C-terminal peptidic structures but not N-myristoylated peptides. In contrast, UNC119 proteins bind only mono-N-myristoylated, but do not recognise doubly lipidated and S-isoprenylated peptides at the C terminus. For galectins-1 and -3, neither binding to N-acylated, nor to C-terminally prenylated peptides could be determined. These results shed light on the specificity of the chaperone-mediated cellular lipoprotein transport systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Conserved Intramolecular Interactions Maintain Myosin Interacting-Heads Motifs Explaining Tarantula Muscle Super-Relaxed State Structural Basis.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Qi, Dan; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Zhu, Jingui; Bilbao, Aivett; Gillilan, Richard E; Hu, Songnian; Padrón, Raúl

    2016-03-27

    Tarantula striated muscle is an outstanding system for understanding the molecular organization of myosin filaments. Three-dimensional reconstruction based on cryo-electron microscopy images and single-particle image processing revealed that, in a relaxed state, myosin molecules undergo intramolecular head-head interactions, explaining why head activity switches off. The filament model obtained by rigidly docking a chicken smooth muscle myosin structure to the reconstruction was improved by flexibly fitting an atomic model built by mixing structures from different species to a tilt-corrected 2-nm three-dimensional map of frozen-hydrated tarantula thick filament. We used heavy and light chain sequences from tarantula myosin to build a single-species homology model of two heavy meromyosin interacting-heads motifs (IHMs). The flexibly fitted model includes previously missing loops and shows five intramolecular and five intermolecular interactions that keep the IHM in a compact off structure, forming four helical tracks of IHMs around the backbone. The residues involved in these interactions are oppositely charged, and their sequence conservation suggests that IHM is present across animal species. The new model, PDB 3JBH, explains the structural origin of the ATP turnover rates detected in relaxed tarantula muscle by ascribing the very slow rate to docked unphosphorylated heads, the slow rate to phosphorylated docked heads, and the fast rate to phosphorylated undocked heads. The conservation of intramolecular interactions across animal species and the presence of IHM in bilaterians suggest that a super-relaxed state should be maintained, as it plays a role in saving ATP in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal structure of a new hybrid compound based on an iodido-plumbate(II) anionic motif.

    PubMed

    Mokhnache, Oualid; Boughzala, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Crystals of the one-dimensional organic-inorganic lead iodide-based compound catena-poly[bis-(piperazine-1,4-diium) [[tetra-iodido-plumbate(II)]-μ-iodido] iodide monohydrate], (C4N2H12)2[PbI5]I·H2O, were obtained by slow evaporation at room temperature of a solution containing lead iodide and piperazine in a 1:2 molar ratio. Inorganic lead iodide chains, organic (C4N2H12)(2+) cations, water mol-ecules of crystallization and isolated I(-) anions are connected through N-H⋯·I, N-H⋯OW and OW-H⋯I hydrogen-bond inter-actions. Zigzag chains of corner-sharing [PbI6](4-) octa-hedra with composition [PbI4/1I2/2](3-) running parallel to the a axis are present in the structure packing.

  16. Uncommon Structural Motifs Dominate the Antigen Binding Site in Human Autoantibodies Reactive with Basement Membrane Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mary H.; Buckley, Elizabeth S.; Chen, Benny J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients’ IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20–36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  17. Unusual conformation of the SxN motif in the crystal structure of penicillin-binding protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    SciTech Connect

    Fedarovich, Alena; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2010-07-19

    PBPA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a class B-like penicillin-binding protein (PBP) that is not essential for cell growth in M. tuberculosis, but is important for proper cell division in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We have determined the crystal structure of PBPA at 2.05 {angstrom} resolution, the first published structure of a PBP from this important pathogen. Compared to other PBPs, PBPA has a relatively small N-terminal domain, and conservation of a cluster of charged residues within this domain suggests that PBPA is more related to class B PBPs than previously inferred from sequence analysis. The C-terminal domain is a typical transpeptidase fold and contains the three conserved active-site motifs characterisitic of penicillin-interacting enzymes. While the arrangement of the SxxK and KTG motifs is similar to that observed in other PBPs, the SxN motif is markedly displaced away from the active site, such that its serine (Ser281) is not involved in hydrogen bonding with residues of the other two motifs. A disulfide bridge between Cys282 (the 'x' of the SxN motif) and Cys266, which resides on an adjacent loop, may be responsible for this unusual conformation. Another interesting feature of the structure is a relatively long connection between {beta}5 and {alpha}11, which restricts the space available in the active site of PBPA and suggests that conformational changes would be required to accommodate peptide substrate or {beta}-lactam antibiotics during acylation. Finally, the structure shows that one of the two threonines postulated to be targets for phosphorylation is inaccessible (Thr362), whereas the other (Thr437) is well placed on a surface loop near the active site.

  18. R22(8) motifs in Aminopyrimidine sulfonate/carboxylate interactions: Crystal structures of pyrimethaminium benzenesulfonate monohydrate (2:2:1) and 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidinium sulfosalicylate dihydrate (4:2:2)

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Kasthuri; Muthiah, Packianathan Thomas; Lynch, Daniel E

    2007-01-01

    Background Pyrimethamine [2,4-diamino-5-(p-chlorophenyl)-6-ethylpyrimidine] is an antifolate drug used in anti-malarial chemotherapy. Pyrimidine and aminopyrimidine derivatives are biologically important compounds owing to their natural occurrence as components of nucleic acids. Results In the crystal structures of two organic salts, namely pyrimethaminium benzenesulfonate monohydrate 1 and 2-amino-4, 6-dimethylpyrimidinium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate dihydrate 2, pyrimethamine (PMN) and 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (AMPY) are protonated at one of the nitrogens in the pyrimidine rings. In both the PMN and AMPY sulfonate complexes, the protonated pyrimidine rings are hydrogen bonded to the sulfonate groups, forming a hydrogen-bonded bimolecular ring motif with graph-set notation R22(8). The sulfonate group mimics the carboxylate anion's mode of association, which is more commonly seen when binding with 2-aminopyrimidines. In compound 1, the PMN moieties are centrosymmetrically paired through a complementary DADA array of hydrogen bonds. In compound 2, two types of bimolecular cyclic hydrogen bonded R22(8) motifs (one involving the carboxylate group and the other involving sulfonate group) coexist. Furthermore, this compound is stabilized by intra and intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Conclusion The crystal structures of pyrimethaminium benzenesulfonate monohydrate and 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidinium sulfosalicylate dihydrate have been investigated in detail. In compound 1, the R22(8) motif involving the sulfonate group is present. The role the sulfonic acid group plays in mimicking the carboxylate anions is thus evident. In compound 2, two types of bimolecular cyclic hydrogen bonded R22(8) motifs (one involving the carboxylate group and the other involving sulfonate group) coexist. In both the compounds base pairing also occurs. Thus homo and hetero synthons are present. PMID:17999751

  19. Triamidoamine thorium-arsenic complexes with parent arsenide, arsinidiide and arsenido structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Balázs, Gábor; Wooles, Ashley J.; Scheer, Manfred; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    Despite a major expansion of uranium–ligand multiple bond chemistry in recent years, analogous complexes involving other actinides (An) remain scarce. For thorium, under ambient conditions only a few multiple bonds to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and chalcogenides are reported, and none to arsenic are known; indeed only two complexes with thorium–arsenic single bonds have been structurally authenticated, reflecting the challenges of stabilizing polar linkages at the large thorium ion. Here, we report thorium parent–arsenide (ThAsH2), –arsinidiides (ThAs(H)K and ThAs(H)Th) and arsenido (ThAsTh) linkages stabilized by a bulky triamidoamine ligand. The ThAs(H)K and ThAsTh linkages exhibit polarized-covalent thorium–arsenic multiple bonding interactions, hitherto restricted to cryogenic matrix isolation experiments, and the AnAs(H)An and AnAsAn linkages reported here have no precedent in f-block chemistry. 7s, 6d and 5f orbital contributions to the Th–As bonds are suggested by quantum chemical calculations, and their compositions unexpectedly appear to be tensioned differently compared to phosphorus congeners. PMID:28276437

  20. Triamidoamine thorium-arsenic complexes with parent arsenide, arsinidiide and arsenido structural motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Balázs, Gábor; Wooles, Ashley J.; Scheer, Manfred; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2017-03-01

    Despite a major expansion of uranium-ligand multiple bond chemistry in recent years, analogous complexes involving other actinides (An) remain scarce. For thorium, under ambient conditions only a few multiple bonds to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and chalcogenides are reported, and none to arsenic are known; indeed only two complexes with thorium-arsenic single bonds have been structurally authenticated, reflecting the challenges of stabilizing polar linkages at the large thorium ion. Here, we report thorium parent-arsenide (ThAsH2), -arsinidiides (ThAs(H)K and ThAs(H)Th) and arsenido (ThAsTh) linkages stabilized by a bulky triamidoamine ligand. The ThAs(H)K and ThAsTh linkages exhibit polarized-covalent thorium-arsenic multiple bonding interactions, hitherto restricted to cryogenic matrix isolation experiments, and the AnAs(H)An and AnAsAn linkages reported here have no precedent in f-block chemistry. 7s, 6d and 5f orbital contributions to the Th-As bonds are suggested by quantum chemical calculations, and their compositions unexpectedly appear to be tensioned differently compared to phosphorus congeners.

  1. Structural Analysis of a Repetitive Protein Sequence Motif in Strepsirrhine Primate Amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Paine, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Strepsirrhines are members of a primate suborder that has a distinctive set of features associated with the development of the dentition. Amelogenin (AMEL), the better known of the enamel matrix proteins, forms 90% of the secreted organic matrix during amelogenesis. Although AMEL has been sequenced in numerous mammalian lineages, the only reported strepsirrhine AMEL sequences are those of the ring-tailed lemur and galago, which contain a set of additional proline-rich tandem repeats absent in all other primates species analyzed to date, but present in some non-primate mammals. Here, we first determined that these repeats are present in AMEL from three additional lemur species and thus are likely to be widespread throughout this group. To evaluate the functional relevance of these repeats in strepsirrhines, we engineered a mutated murine amelogenin sequence containing a similar proline-rich sequence to that of Lemur catta. In the monomeric form, the MQP insertions had no influence on the secondary structure or refolding properties, whereas in the assembled form, the insertions increased the hydrodynamic radii. We speculate that increased AMEL nanosphere size may influence enamel formation in strepsirrhine primates. PMID:21437261

  2. Structure and property based design of factor Xa inhibitors: pyrrolidin-2-ones with aminoindane and phenylpyrrolidine P4 motifs.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert J; Adams, Carl; Blows, Mike; Brown, David; Burns-Kurtis, Cynthia L; Chan, Chuen; Chaudry, Laiq; Convery, Máire A; Davies, David E; Exall, Anne M; Foster, Graham; Harling, John D; Hortense, Eric; Irvine, Stephanie; Irving, Wendy R; Jackson, Steve; Kleanthous, Savvas; Pateman, Anthony J; Patikis, Angela N; Roethka, Theresa J; Senger, Stefan; Stelman, Gary J; Toomey, John R; West, Robert I; Whittaker, Caroline; Zhou, Ping; Watson, Nigel S

    2011-03-15

    The rational design, syntheses and evaluation of potent sulfonamidopyrrolidin-2-one-based factor Xa inhibitors incorporating aminoindane and phenylpyrrolidine P4 motifs are described. These series delivered highly potent anticoagulant compounds with excellent oral pharmacokinetic profiles; however, significant time dependant P450 inhibition was an issue for the aminoindane series, but this was not observed with the phenylpyrrolidine motif, which produced candidate quality molecules with potential for once-daily oral dosing in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction of Individual Structural Domains of hnRNP LL with the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif DNA.

    PubMed

    Roy, Basab; Talukder, Poulami; Kang, Hyun-Jin; Tsuen, Shujian S; Alam, Mohammad P; Hurley, Laurence H; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-08-31

    The recently discovered role of the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2 gene) promoter i-motif DNA in modulation of gene expression via interaction with the ribonucleoprotein hnRNP L-like (hnRNP LL) has prompted a more detailed study of the nature of this protein-DNA interaction. The RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of hnRNP LL were expressed individually, and both RRM1 and RRM2 were found to bind efficiently to the BCL2 i-motif DNA, as well as being critical for transcriptional activation, whereas RRM3-4 bound only weakly to this DNA. Binding was followed by unfolding of the DNA as monitored by changes in the CD spectrum. Mutational analysis of the i-motif DNA revealed that binding involved primarily the lateral loops of the i-motif. The kinetics of binding of the DNA with RRM1 was explored by recording CD spectra at predetermined times following admixture of the protein and DNA. The change in molar ellipticity was readily apparent after 30 s and largely complete within 1 min. A more detailed view of protein-DNA interaction was obtained by introducing the fluorescence donor 6-CNTrp in RRM1 at position 137, and the acceptor 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one (Cf) in lieu of cytidine22 in the i-motif DNA. The course of binding of the two species was monitored by FRET, which reflected a steady increase in energy transfer over a period of several minutes. The FRET signal could be diminished by the further addition of (unlabeled) RRM2, no doubt reflecting competition for binding to the i-motif DNA. These experiments using the individual RRM domains from hnRNP LL confirm the role of this transcription factor in activation of BCL2 transcription via the i-motif in the promoter element.

  4. Structural basis for transcription-coupled repair: the N terminus of Mfd resembles UvrB with degenerate ATPase motifs.

    PubMed

    Assenmacher, Nora; Wenig, Katja; Lammens, Alfred; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2006-01-27

    The transcription repair coupling factor Mfd removes stalled RNA polymerase from DNA lesions and links transcription to UvrABC-dependent nucleotide excision repair in prokaryotes. We report the 2.1A crystal structure of the UvrA-binding N terminus (residues 1-333) of Escherichia coli Mfd (Mfd-N). Remarkably, Mfd-N reveals a fold that resembles the three N-terminal domains of the repair enzyme UvrB. Domain 1A of Mfd adopts a typical RecA fold, domain 1B matches the damage-binding domain of the UvrB, and domain 2 highly resembles the implicated UvrA-binding domain of UvrB. However, Mfd apparently lacks a functional ATP-binding site and does not contain the DNA damage-binding motifs of UvrB. Thus, our results suggest that Mfd might form a UvrA recruitment factor at stalled transcription complexes that architecturally but not catalytically resembles UvrB.

  5. Streptococcus salivarius Fimbriae Are Composed of a Glycoprotein Containing a Repeated Motif Assembled into a Filamentous Nondissociable Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Céline; Vadeboncoeur, Christian; Chandad, Fatiha; Frenette, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius, a gram-positive bacterium found in the human oral cavity, expresses flexible peritrichous fimbriae. In this paper, we report purification and partial characterization of S. salivarius fimbriae. Fimbriae were extracted by shearing the cell surface of hyperfimbriated mutant A37 (a spontaneous mutant of S. salivarius ATCC 25975) with glass beads. Preliminary experiments showed that S. salivarius fimbriae did not dissociate when they were incubated at 100°C in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. This characteristic was used to separate them from other cell surface components by successive gel filtration chromatography procedures. Fimbriae with molecular masses ranging from 20 × 106 to 40 × 106 Da were purified. Examination of purified fimbriae by electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures up to 1 μm long and 3 to 4 nm in diameter. Biochemical studies of purified fimbriae and an amino acid sequence analysis of a fimbrial internal peptide revealed that S. salivarius fimbriae were composed of a glycoprotein assembled into a filamentous structure resistant to dissociation. The internal amino acid sequence was composed of a repeated motif of two amino acids alternating with two modified residues: A/X/T-E-Q-M/φ, where X represents a modified amino acid residue and φ represents a blank cycle. Immunolocalization experiments also revealed that the fimbriae were associated with a wheat germ agglutinin-reactive carbohydrate. Immunolabeling experiments with antifimbria polyclonal antibodies showed that antigenically related fimbria-like structures were expressed in two other human oral streptococcal species, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus constellatus. PMID:11292790

  6. Lessons from a tarantula: new insights into muscle thick filament and myosin interacting-heads motif structure and function.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Koubassova, Natalia; Pinto, Antonio; Gillilan, Richard; Tsaturyan, Andrey; Padrón, Raúl

    2017-09-04

    The tarantula skeletal muscle X-ray diffraction pattern suggested that the myosin heads were helically arranged on the thick filaments. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained relaxed tarantula thick filaments revealed four helices of heads allowing a helical 3D reconstruction. Due to its low resolution (5.0 nm), the unambiguous interpretation of densities of both heads was not possible. A resolution increase up to 2.5 nm, achieved by cryo-EM of frozen-hydrated relaxed thick filaments and an iterative helical real space reconstruction, allowed the resolving of both heads. The two heads, "free" and "blocked", formed an asymmetric structure named the "interacting-heads motif" (IHM) which explained relaxation by self-inhibition of both heads ATPases. This finding made tarantula an exemplar system for thick filament structure and function studies. Heads were shown to be released and disordered by Ca(2+)-activation through myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation, leading to EM, small angle X-ray diffraction and scattering, and spectroscopic and biochemical studies of the IHM structure and function. The results from these studies have consequent implications for understanding and explaining myosin super-relaxed state and thick filament activation and regulation. A cooperative phosphorylation mechanism for activation in tarantula skeletal muscle, involving swaying constitutively Ser35 mono-phosphorylated free heads, explains super-relaxation, force potentiation and post-tetanic potentiation through Ser45 mono-phosphorylated blocked heads. Based on this mechanism, we propose a swaying-swinging, tilting crossbridge-sliding filament for tarantula muscle contraction.

  7. Structural Analysis of a β-Helical Protein Motif Stabilized by Targeted Replacements with Conformationally Constrained Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ballano, Gema; Zanuy, David; Jiménez, Ana I.; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Alemán, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Here we study conformational stabilization induced in a β-helical nanostructure by position-specific mutations. The nanostructure is constructed through the self-assembly of the β-helical building block excised from E. coli galactoside acetyltransferase (PDB code 1krr, chain A; residues 131-165). The mutations involve substitutions by cyclic, conformationally constrained amino acids. Specifically, a complete structural analysis of the Pro-Xaa-Val sequence [with Xaa being Gly, Ac3c (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) and Ac5c (1-aminocyclopentane-1-carboxylic acid)], corresponding to the 148-150 loop region in the wild-type (Gly) and mutated (Ac3c and Ac5c) 1krr, has been performed using Molecular Dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography. Simulations have been performed for the wild-type and mutants of three different systems, namely the building block, the nanoconstruct and the isolated Pro-Xaa-Val tripeptide. Furthermore, the crystalline structures of five peptides of Pro-Xaa-Val or Xaa-Val sequences have been solved by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared with theoretical predictions. Both the theoretical and crystallographic studies indicate that the Pro-Acnc-Val sequences exhibit a high propensity to adopt turn-like conformations, and this propensity is little affected by the chemical environment. Overall, the results indicate that replacement of Gly149 by Ac3c or Ac5c significantly reduce the conformational flexibility of the target site enhancing the structural specificity of the building block and the nanoconstruct derived from the 1krr β-helical motif. PMID:18811190

  8. Ligand structural motifs can decouple glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activation from target promoter occupancy.

    PubMed

    Blind, Raymond D; Pineda-Torra, Inés; Xu, Yong; Xu, H Eric; Garabedian, Michael J

    2012-04-20

    Glucocorticoid (GC) induction of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a classic model used to investigate steroid-regulated gene expression. Classic studies analyzing GC-induction of the TAT gene demonstrated that despite having very high affinity for GR, some steroids cannot induce maximal TAT enzyme activity, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we used RT-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine TAT mRNA accumulation and GR recruitment to the TAT promoter (TAT-GRE) in rat hepatoma cells induced by seven GR ligands: dexamethasone (DEX), cortisol (CRT), corticosterone (CCS), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), aldosterone (ALD), progesterone (PRG) and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17P). As expected, DEX, CRT, CCS and ALD all induced both TAT mRNA and GR recruitment to the TAT-GRE, while PRG and 17P did not. However, while DOC could not induce significant TAT mRNA, it did induce robust GR occupancy of the TAT-GRE. DOC also induced recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase p300 to the TAT-GRE as efficiently as DEX. These DOC-induced effects recapitulated at another GR target gene (sulfonyltransferase 1A1), and DOC also failed to promote the multiple changes in gene expression required for glucocorticoid-dependent 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Structural simulations and protease sensitivity assays suggest that DOC and DEX induce different conformations in GR. Thus, although steroids that bind GR with high affinity can induce GR and p300 occupancy of target promoters, they may not induce a conformation of GR capable of activating transcription.

  9. Structure of GrlR and the Implication of its EDED Motif in Mediating the Regulation of Type III Secretion System in EHEC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobichen,C.; Li, M.; Yerushalmi, G.; Tan, Y.; Mok, Y.; Rosenshine, I.; Leung, K.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a common cause of severe hemorrhagic colitis. EHEC's virulence is dependent upon a type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded by 41 genes. These genes are organized in several operons clustered in the locus of enterocyte effacement. Most of the locus of enterocyte effacement genes, including grlA and grlR, are positively regulated by Ler, and Ler expression is positively and negatively modulated by GrlA and GrlR, respectively. However, the molecular basis for the GrlA and GrlR activity is still elusive. We have determined the crystal structure of GrlR at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. It consists of a typical {beta}-barrel fold with eight {beta}-strands containing an internal hydrophobic cavity and a plug-like loop on one side of the barrel. Strong hydrophobic interactions between the two {beta}-barrels maintain the dimeric architecture of GrlR. Furthermore, a unique surface-exposed EDED (Glu-Asp-Glu-Asp) motif is identified to be critical for GrlA-GrlR interaction and for the repressive activity of GrlR. This study contributes a novel molecular insight into the mechanism of GrlR function.

  10. Spectroscopic Signatures and Structural Motifs in Isolated and Hydrated Xanthine: a Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vipin Bahadur

    2016-06-01

    The conformational landscapes of xanthine and its hydrated complex have been investigated by MP2 and DFT methods. The ground state geometry optimization yield five lowest energy conformers of xanth1-(H2O)1 complex at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory for the first time. We investigated the low-lying excited states of bare xanthine by means of coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (CC2) and TDDFT methods and a satisfactory interpretation of the electronic absorption spectra1 is obtained. The difference between the S0-S1 transition energy due to the most stable and the second most stable stable conformation of xanthine was found to be 859 wn. One striking feature is the coexistence of the blue and red shift of the vertical excitation energy of the optically bright state S1 of xanthine upon forming complex with a water at C2=O and C6=O carbonyl sites, respectively. The lowest singlet ππ* excited-state of the xanth1-(H2O)1 complex involving C2=O carbonyl are strongly blue shifted which is in agreement with the result of R2PI spectra of singly hydrated xanthine. While for the most stable and the second most stable xanth1-(H2O)1 complexes involving C6=O carbonyl, the lowest singlet ππ* excited-state is red shifted. The effect of hydration on S1 excited state due to bulk water environment was mimicked by a combination of polarizable continuum solvent model (PCM) and conductor like screening model (COSMO), which also shows a blue shift in accordance with the result of electronic absorption spectra in aqueous solution. This hypsochromic shift, is expected to be the result of the changes in the π-electron delocalization extent of molecule because of hydrogen bond formation. The optimized structure of xanthine dimer, computed the first time by MP2 and DFT methods. The binding energy of this dimer linked by double N-H…O=C hydrogen bonds was found to be 88 kj/mole at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Computed IR spectra is found in remarkable agreement

  11. Crystal structure of a trimeric form of the KV7.1 (KCNQ1) A-domain tail coiled-coil reveals structural plasticity and context dependent changes in a putative coiled-coil trimerization motif

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiang; Minor, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    Coiled-coils are widespread protein–protein interaction motifs typified by the heptad repeat (abcdefg)n in which “a” and “d” positions are hydrophobic residues. Although identification of likely coiled-coil sequences is robust, prediction of strand order remains elusive. We present the X-ray crystal structure of a short form (residues 583–611), “Q1-short,” of the coiled-coil assembly specificity domain from the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) determined at 1.7 Å resolution. Q1-short lacks one and half heptads present in a previously studied tetrameric coiled-coil construct, Kv7.1 585–621, “Q1-long.” Surprisingly, Q1-short crystallizes as a trimer. In solution, Q1-short self-assembles more poorly than Q1-long and depends on an R-h-x-x-h-E motif common to trimeric coiled-coils. Addition of native sequences that include “a” and “d” positions C-terminal to Q1-short overrides the R-h-x-x-h-E motif influence and changes assembly state from a weakly associated trimer to a strongly associated tetramer. These data provide a striking example of a naturally occurring amino sequence that exhibits context-dependent folding into different oligomerization states, a three-stranded versus a four-stranded coiled-coil. The results emphasize the degenerate nature of coiled-coil energy landscapes in which small changes can have drastic effects on oligomerization. Discovery of these properties in an ion channel assembly domain and prevalence of the R-h-x-x-h-E motif in coiled-coil assembly domains of a number of different channels that are thought to function as tetrameric assemblies raises the possibility that such sequence features may be important for facilitating the assembly of intermediates en route to the final native state. PMID:19693805

  12. Structural and functional analysis of VQ motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis as interacting proteins of WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Chi, Ying-Jun; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Jian-Ye; Wang, Fei; Fan, Baofang; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2012-06-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by a large gene superfamily with a broad range of roles in plants. Recently, several groups have reported that proteins containing a short VQ (FxxxVQxLTG) motif interact with WRKY proteins. We have recently discovered that two VQ proteins from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 and SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN2, act as coactivators of WRKY33 in plant defense by specifically recognizing the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulating the DNA-binding activity of WRKY33. In this study, we have analyzed the entire family of 34 structurally divergent VQ proteins from Arabidopsis. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assays showed that Arabidopsis VQ proteins interacted specifically with the C-terminal WRKY domains of group I and the sole WRKY domains of group IIc WRKY proteins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified structural features of these two closely related groups of WRKY domains that are critical for interaction with VQ proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of a majority of Arabidopsis VQ genes was responsive to pathogen infection and salicylic acid treatment. Functional analysis using both knockout mutants and overexpression lines revealed strong phenotypes in growth, development, and susceptibility to pathogen infection. Altered phenotypes were substantially enhanced through cooverexpression of genes encoding interacting VQ and WRKY proteins. These findings indicate that VQ proteins play an important role in plant growth, development, and response to environmental conditions, most likely by acting as cofactors of group I and IIc WRKY transcription factors.

  13. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA “intrinsic properties” (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome. PMID:26291518

  14. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  15. NMR structure of a 4 × 4 nucleotide RNA internal loop from an R2 retrotransposon: Identification of a three purine–purine sheared pair motif and comparison to MC-SYM predictions

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Yelena V.; Kennedy, Scott D.; Shankar, Neelaabh; Parisien, Marc; Major, Francois; Turner, Douglas H.

    2011-01-01

    The NMR solution structure is reported of a duplex, 5′GUGAAGCCCGU/3′UCACAGGAGGC, containing a 4 × 4 nucleotide internal loop from an R2 retrotransposon RNA. The loop contains three sheared purine–purine pairs and reveals a structural element found in other RNAs, which we refer to as the 3RRs motif. Optical melting measurements of the thermodynamics of the duplex indicate that the internal loop is 1.6 kcal/mol more stable at 37°C than predicted. The results identify the 3RRs motif as a common structural element that can facilitate prediction of 3D structure. Known examples include internal loops having the pairings: 5′GAA/3′AGG, 5′GAG/3′AGG, 5′GAA/3′AAG, and 5′AAG/3′AGG. The structural information is compared with predictions made with the MC-Sym program. PMID:21778280

  16. The heparan sulfate motif (GlcNS6S-IdoA2S)3, common in heparin, has a strict topography and is involved in cell behavior and disease.

    PubMed

    Smits, Nicole C; Kurup, Sindhulakshmi; Rops, Angelique L; ten Dam, Gerdy B; Massuger, Leon F; Hafmans, Theo; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Spillmann, Dorothe; Li, Jin-ping; Kennel, Stephen J; Wall, Jonathan S; Shworak, Nicholas W; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; van der Vlag, Johan; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2010-12-24

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a structurally complex polysaccharide that interacts with a broad spectrum of extracellular effector ligands and thereby is thought to regulate a diverse array of biologic processes. The specificity of HS-ligand interactions is determined by the arrangement of sulfate groups on HS, which creates distinct binding motifs. Biologically important HS motifs are expected to exhibit regulated expression, yet there is a profound lack of tools to identify such motifs; consequently, little is known of their structures and functions. We have identified a novel phage display-derived antibody (NS4F5) that recognizes a highly regulated HS motif (HS(NS4F5)), which we have rigorously identified as (GlcNS6S-IdoA2S)(3). HS(NS4F5) exhibits a restricted expression in healthy adult tissues. Blocking HS(NS4F5) on cells in culture resulted in reduced proliferation and enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis. HS(NS4F5) is up-regulated in tumor endothelial cells, consistent with a role in endothelial cell activation. Indeed, TNF-α stimulated endothelial expression of HS(NS4F5), which contributed to leukocyte adhesion. In a mouse model of severe systemic amyloid protein A amyloidosis, HS(NS4F5) was expressed within amyloid deposits, which were successfully detected by microSPECT imaging using NS4F5 as a molecularly targeted probe. Combined, our results demonstrate that NS4F5 is a powerful tool for elucidating the biological function of HS(NS4F5) and can be exploited as a probe to detect novel polysaccharide biomarkers of disease processes.

  17. The Heparan Sulfate Motif (GlcNS6S-IdoA2S)3, Common in Heparin, Has a Strict Topography and Is Involved in Cell Behavior and Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Nicole C.; Kurup, Sindhulakshmi; Rops, Angelique L.; ten Dam, Gerdy B.; Massuger, Leon F.; Hafmans, Theo; Turnbull, Jeremy E.; Spillmann, Dorothe; Li, Jin-ping; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.; Shworak, Nicholas W.; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; van der Vlag, Johan; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.

    2010-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a structurally complex polysaccharide that interacts with a broad spectrum of extracellular effector ligands and thereby is thought to regulate a diverse array of biologic processes. The specificity of HS-ligand interactions is determined by the arrangement of sulfate groups on HS, which creates distinct binding motifs. Biologically important HS motifs are expected to exhibit regulated expression, yet there is a profound lack of tools to identify such motifs; consequently, little is known of their structures and functions. We have identified a novel phage display-derived antibody (NS4F5) that recognizes a highly regulated HS motif (HSNS4F5), which we have rigorously identified as (GlcNS6S-IdoA2S)3. HSNS4F5 exhibits a restricted expression in healthy adult tissues. Blocking HSNS4F5 on cells in culture resulted in reduced proliferation and enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis. HSNS4F5 is up-regulated in tumor endothelial cells, consistent with a role in endothelial cell activation. Indeed, TNF-α stimulated endothelial expression of HSNS4F5, which contributed to leukocyte adhesion. In a mouse model of severe systemic amyloid protein A amyloidosis, HSNS4F5 was expressed within amyloid deposits, which were successfully detected by microSPECT imaging using NS4F5 as a molecularly targeted probe. Combined, our results demonstrate that NS4F5 is a powerful tool for elucidating the biological function of HSNS4F5 and can be exploited as a probe to detect novel polysaccharide biomarkers of disease processes. PMID:20837479

  18. Localization of Proteins to the 1,2-Propanediol Utilization Microcompartment by Non-native Signal Sequences Is Mediated by a Common Hydrophobic Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jakobson, Christopher M.; Kim, Edward Y.; Slininger, Marilyn F.; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs. PMID:26283792

  19. Localization of proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment by non-native signal sequences is mediated by a common hydrophobic motif.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Kim, Edward Y; Slininger, Marilyn F; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-10-02

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs.

  20. Transcription factor and microRNA-regulated network motifs for cancer and signal transduction networks.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Tzeng, Ke-Rung; Ciou, Jin-Shuei; Tsai, Jeffrey Jp; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon; Huang, Chien-Hung; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2015-01-01

    Molecular networks are the basis of biological processes. Such networks can be decomposed into smaller modules, also known as network motifs. These motifs show interesting dynamical behaviors, in which co-operativity effects between the motif components play a critical role in human diseases. We have developed a motif-searching algorithm, which is able to identify common motif types from the cancer networks and signal transduction networks (STNs). Some of the network motifs are interconnected which can be merged together and form more complex structures, the so-called coupled motif structures (CMS). These structures exhibit mixed dynamical behavior, which may lead biological organisms to perform specific functions. In this study, we integrate transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs), miRNA targets and network motifs information to build the cancer-related TF-miRNA-motif networks (TMMN). This allows us to examine the role of network motifs in cancer formation at different levels of regulation, i.e. transcription initiation (TF → miRNA), gene-gene interaction (CMS), and post-transcriptional regulation (miRNA → target genes). Among the cancer networks and STNs we considered, it is found that there is a substantial amount of crosstalking through motif interconnections, in particular, the crosstalk between prostate cancer network and PI3K-Akt STN.To validate the role of network motifs in cancer formation, several examples are presented which demonstrated the effectiveness of the present approach. A web-based platform has been set up which can be accessed at: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/pathway/. It is very likely that our results can supply very specific CMS missing information for certain cancer types, it is an indispensable tool for cancer biology research.

  1. Transcription factor and microRNA-regulated network motifs for cancer and signal transduction networks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular networks are the basis of biological processes. Such networks can be decomposed into smaller modules, also known as network motifs. These motifs show interesting dynamical behaviors, in which co-operativity effects between the motif components play a critical role in human diseases. We have developed a motif-searching algorithm, which is able to identify common motif types from the cancer networks and signal transduction networks (STNs). Some of the network motifs are interconnected which can be merged together and form more complex structures, the so-called coupled motif structures (CMS). These structures exhibit mixed dynamical behavior, which may lead biological organisms to perform specific functions. Results In this study, we integrate transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs), miRNA targets and network motifs information to build the cancer-related TF-miRNA-motif networks (TMMN). This allows us to examine the role of network motifs in cancer formation at different levels of regulation, i.e. transcription initiation (TF → miRNA), gene-gene interaction (CMS), and post-transcriptional regulation (miRNA → target genes). Among the cancer networks and STNs we considered, it is found that there is a substantial amount of crosstalking through motif interconnections, in particular, the crosstalk between prostate cancer network and PI3K-Akt STN. Conclusions To validate the role of network motifs in cancer formation, several examples are presented which demonstrated the effectiveness of the present approach. A web-based platform has been set up which can be accessed at: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/pathway/. It is very likely that our results can supply very specific CMS missing information for certain cancer types, it is an indispensable tool for cancer biology research. PMID:25707690

  2. Structure prediction of LDLR-HNP1 complex based on docking enhanced by LDLR binding 3D motif.

    PubMed

    Esmaielbeiki, Reyhaneh; Naughton, Declan P; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2012-04-01

    Human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including defensins, have come under intense scrutiny owing to their key multiple roles as antimicrobial agents. Not only do they display direct action on microbes, but also recently they have been shown to interact with the immune system to increase antimicrobial activity. Unfortunately, since mechanisms involved in the binding of AMPs to mammalian cells are largely unknown, their potential as novel anti-infective agents cannot be exploited yet. Following the reported interaction of Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 dimer (HNP1) with a low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), a computational study was conducted to discover their putative mode of interaction. State-of-the-art docking software produced a set of LDLR-HNP1 complex 3D models. Creation of a 3D motif capturing atomic interactions of the LDLR binding interface allowed selection of the most plausible configurations. Eventually, only two models were in agreement with the literature. Binding energy estimations revealed that only one of them is particularly stable, but also interaction with LDLR weakens significantly bonds within the HNP1 dimer. This may be significant since it suggests a mechanism for internalisation of HNP1 in mammalian cells. In addition to a novel approach for complex structure prediction, this study proposes a 3D model of the LDLR-HNP1 complex which highlights the key residues which are involved in the interactions. The putative identification of the receptor binding mechanism should inform the future design of synthetic HNPs to afford maximum internalisation, which could lead to novel anti-infective drugs.

  3. Crystal structure of a common GPCR-binding interface for G protein and arrestin

    PubMed Central

    Szczepek, Michal; Beyrière, Florent; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Elgeti, Matthias; Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Bartl, Franz J.; von Stetten, David; Heck, Martin; Sommer, Martha E.; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Scheerer, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals to activate intracellular heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαβγ) and arrestins. For G protein signalling, the Gα C-terminus (GαCT) binds to a cytoplasmic crevice of the receptor that opens upon activation. A consensus motif is shared among GαCT from the Gi/Gt family and the ‘finger loop’ region (ArrFL1–4) of all four arrestins. Here we present a 2.75 Å crystal structure of ArrFL-1, a peptide analogue of the finger loop of rod photoreceptor arrestin, in complex with the prototypical GPCR rhodopsin. Functional binding of ArrFL to the receptor was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, competitive binding assays and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. For both GαCT and ArrFL, binding to the receptor crevice induces a similar reverse turn structure, although significant structural differences are seen at the rim of the binding crevice. Our results reflect both the common receptor-binding interface and the divergent biological functions of G proteins and arrestins. PMID:25205354

  4. Prediction of common folding structures of homologous RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Han, K; Kim, H J

    1993-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm and a computer program for simultaneously folding homologous RNA sequences. Given an alignment of M homologous sequences of length N, the program performs phylogenetic comparative analysis and predicts a common secondary structure conserved in the sequences. When the structure is not uniquely determined, it infers multiple structures which appear most plausible. This method is superior to energy minimization methods in the sense that it is not sensitive to point mutation of a sequence. It is also superior to usual phylogenetic comparative methods in that it does not require manual scrutiny for covariation or secondary structures. The most plausible 1-5 structures are produced in O(MN2 + N3) time and O(N2) space, which are the same requirements as those of widely used dynamic programs based on energy minimization for folding a single sequence. This is the first algorithm probably practical both in terms of time and space for finding secondary structures of homologous RNA sequences. The algorithm has been implemented in C on a Sun SparcStation, and has been verified by testing on tRNAs, 5S rRNAs, 16S rRNAs, TAR RNAs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and RRE RNAs of HIV-1. We have also applied the program to cis-acting packaging sequences of HIV-1, for which no generally accepted structures yet exist, and propose potentially stable structures. Simulation of the program with random sequences with the same base composition and the same degree of similarity as the above sequences shows that structures common to homologous sequences are very unlikely to occur by chance in random sequences. PMID:7681944

  5. The non-canonical hydroxylase structure of YfcM reveals a metal ion-coordination motif required for EF-P hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kan; Katz, Assaf; Rajkovic, Andrei; Ishii, Ryohei; Branson, Owen E; Freitas, Michael A; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Ibba, Michael; Nureki, Osamu

    2014-10-29

    EF-P is a bacterial tRNA-mimic protein, which accelerates the ribosome-catalyzed polymerization of poly-prolines. In Escherichia coli, EF-P is post-translationally modified on a conserved lysine residue. The post-translational modification is performed in a two-step reaction involving the addition of a β-lysine moiety and the subsequent hydroxylation, catalyzed by PoxA and YfcM, respectively. The β-lysine moiety was previously shown to enhance the rate of poly-proline synthesis, but the role of the hydroxylation is poorly understood. We solved the crystal structure of YfcM and performed functional analyses to determine the hydroxylation mechanism. In addition, YfcM appears to be structurally distinct from any other hydroxylase structures reported so far. The structure of YfcM is similar to that of the ribonuclease YbeY, even though they do not share sequence homology. Furthermore, YfcM has a metal ion-coordinating motif, similar to YbeY. The metal ion-coordinating motif of YfcM resembles a 2-His-1-carboxylate motif, which coordinates an Fe(II) ion and forms the catalytic site of non-heme iron enzymes. Our findings showed that the metal ion-coordinating motif of YfcM plays an essential role in the hydroxylation of the β-lysylated lysine residue of EF-P. Taken together, our results suggested the potential catalytic mechanism of hydroxylation by YfcM.

  6. Narcissistic Personality Disorder and the Structure of Common Mental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Nicholas R; Rodriguez-Seijas, Craig; Krueger, Robert F; Campbell, W Keith; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah S

    2016-09-12

    Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) shows high rates of comorbidity with mood, anxiety, substance use, and other personality disorders. Previous bivariate comorbidity investigations have left NPD multivariate comorbidity patterns poorly understood. Structural psychopathology research suggests that two transdiagnostic factors, internalizing (with distress and fear subfactors) and externalizing, account for comorbidity among common mental disorders. NPD has rarely been evaluated within this framework, with studies producing equivocal results. We investigated how NPD related to other mental disorders in the internalizing-externalizing model using diagnoses from a nationally representative sample (N = 34,653). NPD was best conceptualized as a distress disorder. NPD variance accounted for by transdiagnostic factors was modest, suggesting its variance is largely unique in the context of other common mental disorders. Results clarify NPD multivariate comorbidity, suggest avenues for classification and clinical endeavors, and highlight the need to understand vulnerable and grandiose narcissism subtypes' comorbidity patterns and structural relations.

  7. Conserved structural motifs at the C-terminus of baculovirus protein IE0 are important for its functions in transactivation and supporting hr5-mediated DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Luria, Neta; Lu, Liqun; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2012-05-01

    IE0 and IE1 are transactivator proteins of the most studied baculovirus, the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). IE0 is a 72.6 kDa protein identical to IE1 with the exception of its 54 N-terminal amino acid residues. To gain some insight about important structural motifs of IE0, we expressed the protein and C‑terminal mutants of it under the control of the Drosophila heat shock promoter and studied the transactivation and replication functions of the transiently expressed proteins. IE0 was able to promote replication of a plasmid bearing the hr5 origin of replication of AcMNPV in transient transfections with a battery of eight plasmids expressing the AcMNPV genes dnapol, helicase, lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, p35, ie-2 and lef-7. IE0 transactivated expression of the baculovirus 39K promoter. Both functions of replication and transactivation were lost after introduction of selected mutations at the basic domain II and helix-loop-helix conserved structural motifs in the C-terminus of the protein. These IE0 mutants were unable to translocate to the cell nucleus. Our results point out the important role of some structural conserved motifs to the proper functioning of IE0.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Solution Structures of Lacticin Q and Aureocin A53 Reveal a Structural Motif Conserved among Leaderless Bacteriocins with Broad-Spectrum Activity.

    PubMed

    Acedo, Jeella Z; van Belkum, Marco J; Lohans, Christopher T; Towle, Kaitlyn M; Miskolzie, Mark; Vederas, John C

    2016-02-02

    Lacticin Q (LnqQ) and aureocin A53 (AucA) are leaderless bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis QU5 and Staphylococcus aureus A53, respectively. These bacteriocins are characterized by the absence of an N-terminal leader sequence and are active against a broad range of Gram-positive bacteria. LnqQ and AucA consist of 53 and 51 amino acids, respectively, and have 47% identical sequences. In this study, their three-dimensional structures were elucidated using solution nuclear magnetic resonance and were shown to consist of four α-helices that assume a very similar compact, globular overall fold (root-mean-square deviation of 1.7 Å) with a highly cationic surface and a hydrophobic core. The structures of LnqQ and AucA resemble the shorter two-component leaderless bacteriocins, enterocins 7A and 7B, despite having low levels of sequence identity. Homology modeling revealed that the observed structural motif may be shared among leaderless bacteriocins with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive organisms. The elucidated structures of LnqQ and AucA also exhibit some resemblance to circular bacteriocins. Despite their similar overall fold, inhibition studies showed that LnqQ and AucA have different antimicrobial potency against the Gram-positive strains tested, suggesting that sequence disparities play a crucial role in their mechanisms of action.

  9. Structure of the Small Dictyostelium discoideum Myosin Light Chain MlcB Provides Insights into MyoB IQ Motif Recognition*

    PubMed Central

    Liburd, Janine; Chitayat, Seth; Crawley, Scott W.; Munro, Kim; Miller, Emily; Denis, Chris M.; Spencer, Holly L.; Côté, Graham P.; Smith, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum MyoB is a class I myosin involved in the formation and retraction of membrane projections, cortical tension generation, membrane recycling, and phagosome maturation. The MyoB-specific, single-lobe EF-hand light chain MlcB binds the sole IQ motif of MyoB with submicromolar affinity in the absence and presence of Ca2+. However, the structural features of this novel myosin light chain and its interaction with its cognate IQ motif remain uncharacterized. Here, we describe the NMR-derived solution structure of apoMlcB, which displays a globular four-helix bundle. Helix 1 adopts a unique orientation when compared with the apo states of the EF-hand calcium-binding proteins calmodulin, S100B, and calbindin D9k. NMR-based chemical shift perturbation mapping identified a hydrophobic MyoB IQ binding surface that involves amino acid residues in helices I and IV and the functional N-terminal Ca2+ binding loop, a site that appears to be maintained when MlcB adopts the holo state. Complementary mutagenesis and binding studies indicated that residues Ile-701, Phe-705, and Trp-708 of the MyoB IQ motif are critical for recognition of MlcB, which together allowed the generation of a structural model of the apoMlcB-MyoB IQ complex. We conclude that the mode of IQ motif recognition by the novel single-lobe MlcB differs considerably from that of stereotypical bilobal light chains such as calmodulin. PMID:24790102

  10. Mechanisms of Zero-Lag Synchronization in Cortical Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Mirasso, Claudio; Sporns, Olaf; Breakspear, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Zero-lag synchronization between distant cortical areas has been observed in a diversity of experimental data sets and between many different regions of the brain. Several computational mechanisms have been proposed to account for such isochronous synchronization in the presence of long conduction delays: Of these, the phenomenon of “dynamical relaying” – a mechanism that relies on a specific network motif – has proven to be the most robust with respect to parameter mismatch and system noise. Surprisingly, despite a contrary belief in the community, the common driving motif is an unreliable means of establishing zero-lag synchrony. Although dynamical relaying has been validated in empirical and computational studies, the deeper dynamical mechanisms and comparison to dynamics on other motifs is lacking. By systematically comparing synchronization on a variety of small motifs, we establish that the presence of a single reciprocally connected pair – a “resonance pair” – plays a crucial role in disambiguating those motifs that foster zero-lag synchrony in the presence of conduction delays (such as dynamical relaying) from those that do not (such as the common driving triad). Remarkably, minor structural changes to the common driving motif that incorporate a reciprocal pair recover robust zero-lag synchrony. The findings are observed in computational models of spiking neurons, populations of spiking neurons and neural mass models, and arise whether the oscillatory systems are periodic, chaotic, noise-free or driven by stochastic inputs. The influence of the resonance pair is also robust to parameter mismatch and asymmetrical time delays amongst the elements of the motif. We call this manner of facilitating zero-lag synchrony resonance-induced synchronization, outline the conditions for its occurrence, and propose that it may be a general mechanism to promote zero-lag synchrony in the brain. PMID:24763382

  11. 1H-NMR analysis of CD3-epsilon reveals the presence of turn-helix structures around the ITAM motif in an otherwise random coil cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Borroto, A; Jiménez, M A; Alarcón, B; Rico, M

    1997-01-01

    The conformation adopted in solution by the cytoplasmic tail of CD3-epsilon has been analyzed by 1H-nmr. The cytoplasmic tail is mostly random coil expect for the amino acids conforming the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), YxxL/IxxxxxxxY xxL. Although the N-terminal Y xxL sequence of the motif is poorly folded, adopting 6-residue turn-like conformations with the Tyr side chain in two different orientations, the C-terminal Y xxL sequence is placed in a more complex structure involving a set of nonclassical alpha-helix turns and beta-turns that comprises 11 amino acids. This structure is not modified by phosphorylation of the tyrosine residue. The differences in the conformation adopted around the two tyrosines of the ITAM motif suggest that they may play different roles pertaining to either binding signal transducing proteins or, alternatively, proteins involved in other processes such as endoplasmic reticulum location.

  12. Analysis of astrovirus serotype 1 RNA, identification of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motif, and expression of a viral structural protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, T L; Greenberg, H B; Herrmann, J E; Smith, L S; Matsui, S M

    1994-01-01

    We report the results from sequence analysis and expression studies of the gastroenteritis agent astrovirus serotype 1. We have cloned and sequenced 5,944 nucleotides (nt) of the estimated 7.2-kb RNA genome and have identified three open reading frames (ORFs). ORF-3, at the 3' end, is 2,361 nt in length and is fully encoded in both the genomic and subgenomic viral RNAs. Expression of ORF-3 in vitro yields an 87-kDa protein that is immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for viral capsids. This protein comigrates with an authentic 87-kDa astrovirus protein immunoprecipitated from infected cells, indicating that this region encodes a viral structural protein. The adjacent upstream ORF (ORF-2) is 1,557 nt in length and contains a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motif. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motifs from four astrovirus serotypes are compared. Partial sequence (2,018 nt) of the most 5' ORF (ORF-1) reveals a 3C-like serine protease motif. The ORF-1 sequence is incomplete. These results indicate that the astrovirus genome is organized with nonstructural proteins encoded at the 5' end and structural proteins at the 3' end. ORF-2 has no start methionine and is in the -1 frame compared with ORF-1. We present sequence evidence for a ribosomal frameshift mechanism for expression of the viral polymerase. Images PMID:8254779

  13. An Appraisal of Human Mitochondrial DNA Instability: New Insights into the Role of Non-Canonical DNA Structures and Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Pedro H.; Lobato da Silva, Cláudia; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations are frequently observed in aged postmitotic tissues and are the cause of a wide range of human disorders. Presently, the molecular bases underlying mtDNA deletion formation remain a matter of intense debate, and it is commonly accepted that several mechanisms contribute to the spectra of mutations in the mitochondrial genome. In this work we performed an extensive screening of human mtDNA deletions and evaluated the association between breakpoint density and presence of non-canonical DNA elements and over-represented sequence motifs. Our observations support the involvement of helix-distorting intrinsically curved regions and long G-tetrads in eliciting instability events. In addition, higher breakpoint densities were consistently observed within GC-skewed regions and in the close vicinity of the degenerate sequence motif YMMYMNNMMHM. A parallelism is also established with hot spot motifs previously identified in the nuclear genome, as well as with the minimal binding site for the mitochondrial transcription termination factor mTERF. This study extends the current knowledge on the mechanisms driving mitochondrial rearrangements and opens up exciting avenues for further research. PMID:23555828

  14. Syntax at hand: common syntactic structures for actions and language.

    PubMed

    Roy, Alice C; Curie, Aurore; Nazir, Tatjana; Paulignan, Yves; des Portes, Vincent; Fourneret, Pierre; Deprez, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that the motor and the linguistic systems share common syntactic representations would open new perspectives on language evolution. Here, crossing disciplinary boundaries, we explore potential parallels between the structure of simple actions and that of sentences. First, examining Typically Developing (TD) children displacing a bottle with or without knowledge of its weight prior to movement onset, we provide kinematic evidence that the sub-phases of this displacing action (reaching + moving the bottle) manifest a structure akin to linguistic embedded dependencies. Then, using the same motor task, we reveal that children suffering from specific language impairment (SLI), whose core deficit affects syntactic embedding and dependencies, manifest specific structural motor anomalies parallel to their linguistic deficits. In contrast to TD children, SLI children performed the displacing-action as if its sub-phases were juxtaposed rather than embedded. The specificity of SLI's structural motor deficit was confirmed by testing an additional control group: Fragile-X Syndrome patients, whose language capacity, though delayed, comparatively spares embedded dependencies, displayed slower but structurally normal motor performances. By identifying the presence of structural representations and dependency computations in the motor system and by showing their selective deficit in SLI patients, these findings point to a potential motor origin for language syntax.

  15. Disruption of Src homology 3-binding motif within non-structural protein 1 of influenza B virus unexpectedly enhances viral replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Sadewasser, Anne; Saenger, Sandra; Paki, Katharina; Schwecke, Torsten; Wolff, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    The influenza virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional virulence factor that plays a crucial role during infection by blocking the innate antiviral immune response of infected cells. In contrast to the well-studied NS1 protein of influenza A virus, knowledge about structure and functions of the influenza B virus homologue B/NS1, which shares less than 25 % sequence identity, is still limited. Here, we report on a reverse genetic analysis to study the role of a highly conserved class II Src homology 3 domain-binding motif matching the consensus PxxPx(K/R) that we identified at positions 122-127 of the B/NS1 protein. Surprisingly, glycine substitutions in the Src homology 3 domain-binding motif increased virus replication up to three orders of magnitude in human lung cells. Enhanced mutant virus propagation was accompanied by increased gene expression and apoptosis induction linking this motif to the control of programmed cell death. A MS-based interactome study revealed that the glycine substitutions facilitate binding of B/NS1 to heat shock protein 90-beta (HSP90β). Moreover, recruitment of the viral polymerase basic protein 2 to the B/NS1-HSP90β complex was observed. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 reduced mutant virus propagation suggesting that the mutation-induced involvement of HSP90β enhanced viral replication. This study not only functionally characterizes a conserved motif within the B/NS1 protein, but also illustrates a rare example in which mutation of a highly conserved sequence within a viral protein does not result in high fitness costs, but rather increases viral replication via recruitment of a host factor.

  16. Commonality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Albert E., Jr.

    Commonality analysis is an attempt to understand the relative predictive power of the regressor variables, both individually and in combination. The squared multiple correlation is broken up into elements assigned to each individual regressor and to each possible combination of regressors. The elements have the property that the appropriate sums…

  17. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features.

  18. BayesMotif: de novo protein sorting motif discovery from impure datasets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein sorting is the process that newly synthesized proteins are transported to their target locations within or outside of the cell. This process is precisely regulated by protein sorting signals in different forms. A major category of sorting signals are amino acid sub-sequences usually located at the N-terminals or C-terminals of protein sequences. Genome-wide experimental identification of protein sorting signals is extremely time-consuming and costly. Effective computational algorithms for de novo discovery of protein sorting signals is needed to improve the understanding of protein sorting mechanisms. Methods We formulated the protein sorting motif discovery problem as a classification problem and proposed a Bayesian classifier based algorithm (BayesMotif) for de novo identification of a common type of protein sorting motifs in which a highly conserved anchor is present along with a less conserved motif regions. A false positive removal procedure is developed to iteratively remove sequences that are unlikely to contain true motifs so that the algorithm can identify motifs from impure input sequences. Results Experiments on both implanted motif datasets and real-world datasets showed that the enhanced BayesMotif algorithm can identify anchored sorting motifs from pure or impure protein sequence dataset. It also shows that the false positive removal procedure can help to identify true motifs even when there is only 20% of the input sequences containing true motif instances. Conclusion We proposed BayesMotif, a novel Bayesian classification based algorithm for de novo discovery of a special category of anchored protein sorting motifs from impure datasets. Compared to conventional motif discovery algorithms such as MEME, our algorithm can find less-conserved motifs with short highly conserved anchors. Our algorithm also has the advantage of easy incorporation of additional meta-sequence features such as hydrophobicity or charge of the motifs which

  19. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  20. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  1. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  2. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H.

    2014-06-18

    The structure of VapB, a member of the Vap protein family that is involved in virulence of the bacterial pathogen R. equi, was determined by SAD phasing and reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel similar to avidin, suggestive of a binding function. Made up of two Greek-key motifs, the topology of VapB is unusual or even unique. Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  3. Motif Yggdrasil: sampling sequence motifs from a tree mixture model.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Samuel A; Lagergren, Jens

    2007-06-01

    In phylogenetic foot-printing, putative regulatory elements are found in upstream regions of orthologous genes by searching for common motifs. Motifs in different upstream sequences are subject to mutations along the edges of the corresponding phylogenetic tree, consequently taking advantage of the tree in the motif search is an appealing idea. We describe the Motif Yggdrasil sampler; the first Gibbs sampler based on a general tree that uses unaligned sequences. Previous tree-based Gibbs samplers have assumed a star-shaped tree or partially aligned upstream regions. We give a probabilistic model (MY model) describing upstream sequences with regulatory elements and build a Gibbs sampler with respect to this model. The model allows toggling, i.e., the restriction of a position to a subset of nucleotides, but does not require aligned sequences nor edge lengths, which may be difficult to come by. We apply the collapsing technique to eliminate the need to sample nuisance parameters, and give a derivation of the predictive update formula. We show that the MY model improves the modeling of difficult motif instances and that the use of the tree achieves a substantial increase in nucleotide level correlation coefficient both for synthetic data and 37 bacterial lexA genes. We investigate the sensitivity to errors in the tree and show that using random trees MY sampler still has a performance similar to the original version.

  4. Alliance: a common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory.

    PubMed

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Haken, Hermann; Kyselo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorically different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, structural approach. Dynamical systems theory and synergetics on the one hand and enactivist theory on the other together can provide this structural approach, which contributes in specific ways to a clarification of the alliance factor. Systems theory offers concepts and tools for the modeling of the individual self and, building on this, of alliance processes. In the enactive perspective, the self is conceived as a socially enacted autonomous system that strives to maintain identity by observing a two-fold goal: to exist as an individual self in its own right (distinction) while also being open to others (participation). Using this conceptualization, we formalized the therapeutic alliance as a phase space whose potential minima (attractors) can be shifted by the therapist to approximate therapy goals. This mathematical formalization is derived from probability theory and synergetics. We draw the conclusion that structural theory provides powerful tools for the modeling of how therapeutic change is staged by the formation, utilization, and dissolution of the therapeutic alliance. In addition, we point out novel testable hypotheses and future applications.

  5. Alliance: a common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    PubMed Central

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Haken, Hermann; Kyselo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorically different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, structural approach. Dynamical systems theory and synergetics on the one hand and enactivist theory on the other together can provide this structural approach, which contributes in specific ways to a clarification of the alliance factor. Systems theory offers concepts and tools for the modeling of the individual self and, building on this, of alliance processes. In the enactive perspective, the self is conceived as a socially enacted autonomous system that strives to maintain identity by observing a two-fold goal: to exist as an individual self in its own right (distinction) while also being open to others (participation). Using this conceptualization, we formalized the therapeutic alliance as a phase space whose potential minima (attractors) can be shifted by the therapist to approximate therapy goals. This mathematical formalization is derived from probability theory and synergetics. We draw the conclusion that structural theory provides powerful tools for the modeling of how therapeutic change is staged by the formation, utilization, and dissolution of the therapeutic alliance. In addition, we point out novel testable hypotheses and future applications. PMID:25954215

  6. Specific Ca2+-binding motif in the LH1 complex from photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum as revealed by optical spectroscopy and structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Kimura, Yukihiro; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang, Peng; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Native and Ca(2+)-depleted light-harvesting-reaction center core complexes (LH1-RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum exhibit maximal LH1-Q(y) absorption at 915 and 889 nm, respectively. To understand the structural origins of the spectral variation, we performed spectroscopic and structure modeling investigations. For the 889 nm form of LH1-RC, bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) in the native form was found by means of near-infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy, a higher degree of macrocycle distortion and a stronger hydrogen bond with the beta-Trp(-8) residue. SWISS-MODEL structure modeling suggests the presence of a specific coordination motif of Ca(2+) at the C-terminus of the alpha-subunit of LH1, while MODELLER reveals the tilt of alpha- and beta-polypeptides with reference to the structural template, as well as a change in the concentric orientation of BChl a molecules, both of which may be connected to the long-wavelength LH1-Q(y) absorption of the 915 nm form. The carotenoid spirilloxanthin shows a twisted all-trans configuration in both forms of LH1 as evidenced by the resonance Raman spectroscopic results. With regard to the thermal stability, the 915 nm form was shown by the use of temperature-dependent fluorescence spectroscopy to be approximately 20 K more stable than the 889 nm form, which may be ascribed to the specific Ca(2+)-binding motif of LH1.

  7. Two structurally distinct {kappa}B sequence motifs cooperatively control LPS-induced KC gene transcription in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, Y.; Fukumoto, S.; Hamilton, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    The mouse KC gene is an {alpha}-chemokine gene whose transcription is induced in mononuclear phagocytes by LPS. DNA sequences necessary for transcriptional control of KC by LPS were identified in the region flanking the transcription start site. Transient transfection analysis in macrophages using deletion mutants of a 1.5-kb sequence placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene identified an LPS-responsive region between residues -104 and +30. This region contained two {kappa}B sequence motifs. The first motif (position -70 to -59, {kappa}B1) is highly conserved in all three human GRO genes and in the mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) gene. The second {kappa}B motif (position -89 to -78, {kappa}B2) was conserved only between the mouse and the rat KC genes. Consistent with previous reports, the highly conserved {kappa}B site ({kappa}B1) was essential for LPS inducibility. Surprisingly, the distal {kappa}B site ({kappa}B2) was also necessary for optimal response; mutation of either {kappa}B site markedly reduced sensitivity to LPS in RAW264.7 cells and to TNF-{alpha} in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Although both {kappa}B1 and {kappa}B2 sequences were able to bind members of the Rel homology family, including NF{kappa}B1 (P50), RelA (65), and c-Rel, the {kappa}B1 site bound these factors with higher affinity and functioned more effectively than the {kappa}B2 site in a heterologous promoter. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional control of the KC gene requires cooperation between two {kappa}B sites and is thus distinct from that of the three human GRO genes and the mouse MIP-2 gene. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  8. MSDmotif: exploring protein sites and motifs

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Adel; Henrick, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein structures have conserved features – motifs, which have a sufficient influence on the protein function. These motifs can be found in sequence as well as in 3D space. Understanding of these fragments is essential for 3D structure prediction, modelling and drug-design. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the source of this information however present search tools have limited 3D options to integrate protein sequence with its 3D structure. Results We describe here a web application for querying the PDB for ligands, binding sites, small 3D structural and sequence motifs and the underlying database. Novel algorithms for chemical fragments, 3D motifs, ϕ/ψ sequences, super-secondary structure motifs and for small 3D structural motif associations searches are incorporated. The interface provides functionality for visualization, search criteria creation, sequence and 3D multiple alignment options. MSDmotif is an integrated system where a results page is also a search form. A set of motif statistics is available for analysis. This set includes molecule and motif binding statistics, distribution of motif sequences, occurrence of an amino-acid within a motif, correlation of amino-acids side-chain charges within a motif and Ramachandran plots for each residue. The binding statistics are presented in association with properties that include a ligand fragment library. Access is also provided through the distributed Annotation System (DAS) protocol. An additional entry point facilitates XML requests with XML responses. Conclusion MSDmotif is unique by combining chemical, sequence and 3D data in a single search engine with a range of search and visualisation options. It provides multiple views of data found in the PDB archive for exploring protein structures. PMID:18637174

  9. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  10. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Anton I; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access.

  11. Vaccinia Protein F12 Has Structural Similarity to Kinesin Light Chain and Contains a Motor Binding Motif Required for Virion Export

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Gareth W.; Hollinshead, Michael; Ferguson, Brian J.; Murphy, Brendan J.; Carpentier, David C. J.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) uses microtubules for export of virions to the cell surface and this process requires the viral protein F12. Here we show that F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain (KLC), a subunit of the kinesin-1 motor that binds cargo. F12 and KLC share similar size, pI, hydropathy and cargo-binding tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). Moreover, molecular modeling of F12 TPRs upon the crystal structure of KLC2 TPRs showed a striking conservation of structure. We also identified multiple TPRs in VACV proteins E2 and A36. Data presented demonstrate that F12 is critical for recruitment of kinesin-1 to virions and that a conserved tryptophan and aspartic acid (WD) motif, which is conserved in the kinesin-1-binding sequence (KBS) of the neuronal protein calsyntenin/alcadein and several other cellular kinesin-1 binding proteins, is essential for kinesin-1 recruitment and virion transport. In contrast, mutation of WD motifs in protein A36 revealed they were not required for kinesin-1 recruitment or IEV transport. This report of a viral KLC-like protein containing a KBS that is conserved in several cellular proteins advances our understanding of how VACV recruits the kinesin motor to virions, and exemplifies how viruses use molecular mimicry of cellular components to their advantage. PMID:20195521

  12. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  13. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S J; Bayse, Craig A; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-05-13

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used (77)Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of (77)Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs' reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20-25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs' flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed.

  14. FastMotif: spectral sequence motif discovery.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoló; Vlassis, Nikos

    2015-08-15

    Sequence discovery tools play a central role in several fields of computational biology. In the framework of Transcription Factor binding studies, most of the existing motif finding algorithms are computationally demanding, and they may not be able to support the increasingly large datasets produced by modern high-throughput sequencing technologies. We present FastMotif, a new motif discovery algorithm that is built on a recent machine learning technique referred to as Method of Moments. Based on spectral decompositions, our method is robust to model misspecifications and is not prone to locally optimal solutions. We obtain an algorithm that is extremely fast and designed for the analysis of big sequencing data. On HT-Selex data, FastMotif extracts motif profiles that match those computed by various state-of-the-art algorithms, but one order of magnitude faster. We provide a theoretical and numerical analysis of the algorithm's robustness and discuss its sensitivity with respect to the free parameters. The Matlab code of FastMotif is available from http://lcsb-portal.uni.lu/bioinformatics. vlassis@adobe.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A comprehensive analysis of the La-motif protein superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet-Antonelli, Cécile; Deragon, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    The extremely well-conserved La motif (LAM), in synergy with the immediately following RNA recognition motif (RRM), allows direct binding of the (genuine) La autoantigen to RNA polymerase III primary transcripts. This motif is not only found on La homologs, but also on La-related proteins (LARPs) of unrelated function. LARPs are widely found amongst eukaryotes and, although poorly characterized, appear to be RNA-binding proteins fulfilling crucial cellular functions. We searched the fully sequenced genomes of 83 eukaryotic species scattered along the tree of life for the presence of LAM-containing proteins. We observed that these proteins are absent from archaea and present in all eukaryotes (except protists from the Plasmodium genus), strongly suggesting that the LAM is an ancestral motif that emerged early after the archaea-eukarya radiation. A complete evolutionary and structural analysis of these proteins resulted in their classification into five families: the genuine La homologs and four LARP families. Unexpectedly, in each family a conserved domain representing either a classical RRM or an RRM-like motif immediately follows the LAM of most proteins. An evolutionary analysis of the LAM-RRM/RRM-L regions shows that these motifs co-evolved and should be used as a single entity to define the functional region of interaction of LARPs with their substrates. We also found two extremely well conserved motifs, named LSA and DM15, shared by LARP6 and LARP1 family members, respectively. We suggest that members of the same family are functional homologs and/or share a common molecular mode of action on different RNA baits. PMID:19299548

  16. A comprehensive analysis of the La-motif protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Bousquet-Antonelli, Cécile; Deragon, Jean-Marc

    2009-05-01

    The extremely well-conserved La motif (LAM), in synergy with the immediately following RNA recognition motif (RRM), allows direct binding of the (genuine) La autoantigen to RNA polymerase III primary transcripts. This motif is not only found on La homologs, but also on La-related proteins (LARPs) of unrelated function. LARPs are widely found amongst eukaryotes and, although poorly characterized, appear to be RNA-binding proteins fulfilling crucial cellular functions. We searched the fully sequenced genomes of 83 eukaryotic species scattered along the tree of life for the presence of LAM-containing proteins. We observed that these proteins are absent from archaea and present in all eukaryotes (except protists from the Plasmodium genus), strongly suggesting that the LAM is an ancestral motif that emerged early after the archaea-eukarya radiation. A complete evolutionary and structural analysis of these proteins resulted in their classification into five families: the genuine La homologs and four LARP families. Unexpectedly, in each family a conserved domain representing either a classical RRM or an RRM-like motif immediately follows the LAM of most proteins. An evolutionary analysis of the LAM-RRM/RRM-L regions shows that these motifs co-evolved and should be used as a single entity to define the functional region of interaction of LARPs with their substrates. We also found two extremely well conserved motifs, named LSA and DM15, shared by LARP6 and LARP1 family members, respectively. We suggest that members of the same family are functional homologs and/or share a common molecular mode of action on different RNA baits.

  17. Structure of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri YaeQ reveals a new compact protein fold built around a variation of the PD-(D/E)XK nuclease motif.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, Cristiane R; Nagem, Ronaldo A P; Barbosa, João A R G; Farah, Chuck S

    2007-11-15

    The YaeQ family of proteins are found in many Gram-negative and a few Gram-positive bacteria. We have determined the first structure of a member of the YaeQ family by X-ray crystallography. Comparisons with other structures indicate that YaeQ represents a new compact protein fold built around a variation of the PD-(D/E)XK nuclease motif found in type II endonucleases and enzymes involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. We show that catalytically important residues in the PD-(D/E)XK nuclease superfamily are spatially conserved in YaeQ and other highly conserved YaeQ residues may be poised to interact with nucleic acid structures.

  18. Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming

    2011-09-06

    Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

  19. Structure-based functional analysis of effector protein SifA in living cells reveals motifs important for Salmonella intracellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Namakchian, Mahsa; Kassler, Kristin; Sticht, Heinrich; Hensel, Michael; Deiwick, Jörg

    2017-09-08

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica survives and replicates inside the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) of mammalian host cells. SifA is a key effector protein translocated by a type III secretion system and involved in formation of Salmonella-induced filaments (SIF), extensive tubular endosomal compartments. Recruitment of LAMP1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1)-positive membranes to SIF ensures integrity and dynamics of the membrane network. The binding of SifA to the host protein SKIP (SifA and kinesin interacting protein) was proposed as crucial for this function. Due to structural mimicry SifA has further been proposed to interact with G-proteins. We conducted a mutational study of SifA to identify domains and amino acid residues specifically relevant for intracellular replication and SIF formation. Mutations were designed based on the available structural data of SifA and its interface with SKIP, or modeled for SifA as putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor. We developed a live cell imaging-based approach for volume quantification of the SIF network that allowed determination of subtle changes in SIF network and performed a comprehensive analysis of mutant forms of SifA by this approach. We found that the SifA catalytic loop of WxxxE effectors is as important for SIF formation and intracellular proliferation as the SKIP interaction motif, or the CAAX motif for membrane anchoring of SifA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystal Structures of the Scaffolding Protein LGN Reveal the General Mechanism by Which GoLoco Binding Motifs Inhibit the Release of GDP from Gαi *

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Li, Jianchao; Zhu, Jinwei; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie; Wang, Wenning

    2012-01-01

    GoLoco (GL) motif-containing proteins regulate G protein signaling by binding to Gα subunit and acting as guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. GLs of LGN are also known to bind the GDP form of Gαi/o during asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the C-terminal GL domain of LGN binds four molecules of Gαi·GDP. The crystal structures of Gαi·GDP in complex with LGN GL3 and GL4, respectively, reveal distinct GL/Gαi interaction features when compared with the only high resolution structure known with GL/Gαi interaction between RGS14 and Gαi1. Only a few residues C-terminal to the conserved GL sequence are required for LGN GLs to bind to Gαi·GDP. A highly conserved “double Arg finger” sequence (RΨ(D/E)(D/E)QR) is responsible for LGN GL to bind to GDP bound to Gαi. Together with the sequence alignment, we suggest that the LGN GL/Gαi interaction represents a general binding mode between GL motifs and Gαi. We also show that LGN GLs are potent guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. PMID:22952234

  1. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. I: Spike Generating Models on Converging Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    In neural systems, synaptic plasticity is usually driven by spike trains. Due to the inherent noises of neurons and synapses as well as the randomness of connection details, spike trains typically exhibit variability such as spatial randomness and temporal stochasticity, resulting in variability of synaptic changes under plasticity, which we call efficacy variability. How the variability of spike trains influences the efficacy variability of synapses remains unclear. In this paper, we try to understand this influence under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) when the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded (synaptic homeostasis). Specifically, we systematically study, analytically and numerically, how four aspects of statistical features, i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations, as well as their interactions influence the efficacy variability in converging motifs (simple networks in which one neuron receives from many other neurons). Neurons (including the post-synaptic neuron) in a converging motif generate spikes according to statistical models with tunable parameters. In this way, we can explicitly control the statistics of the spike patterns, and investigate their influence onto the efficacy variability, without worrying about the feedback from synaptic changes onto the dynamics of the post-synaptic neuron. We separate efficacy variability into two parts: the drift part (DriftV) induced by the heterogeneity of change rates of different synapses, and the diffusion part (DiffV) induced by weight diffusion caused by stochasticity of spike trains. Our main findings are: (1) synchronous firing and burstiness tend to increase DiffV, (2) heterogeneity of rates induces DriftV when potentiation and depression in STDP are not balanced, and (3) heterogeneity of cross-correlations induces DriftV together with heterogeneity of rates. We anticipate our work

  2. Diversification and population structure in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; Soler, Alvaro; Cortés, Andrés J

    2012-01-01

    Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13) for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican), Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru). The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of cultivated beans.

  3. Diversification and Population Structure in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew W.; Soler, Alvaro; Cortés, Andrés J.

    2012-01-01

    Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13) for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican), Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru). The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of cultivated beans

  4. DNA Motif Databases and Their Uses.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Gary D

    2015-09-03

    Transcription factors (TFs) recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. The specificity of a TF is usually represented as a position weight matrix (PWM). Several databases of DNA motifs exist and are used in biological research to address important biological questions. This overview describes PWMs and some of the most commonly used motif databases, as well as a few of their common applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Conserved Patterns of Microbial Immune Escape: Pathogenic Microbes of Diverse Origin Target the Human Terminal Complement Inhibitor Vitronectin via a Single Common Motif

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of many microbes relies on their capacity to resist innate immunity, and to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host microbes have developed highly efficient and sophisticated complement evasion strategies. Here we show that different human pathogens including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, acquire the human terminal complement regulator vitronectin to their surface. By using truncated vitronectin fragments we found that all analyzed microbial pathogens (n = 13) bound human vitronectin via the same C-terminal heparin-binding domain (amino acids 352–374). This specific interaction leaves the terminal complement complex (TCC) regulatory region of vitronectin accessible, allowing inhibition of C5b-7 membrane insertion and C9 polymerization. Vitronectin complexed with the various microbes and corresponding proteins was thus functionally active and inhibited complement-mediated C5b-9 deposition. Taken together, diverse microbial pathogens expressing different structurally unrelated vitronectin-binding molecules interact with host vitronectin via the same conserved region to allow versatile control of the host innate immune response. PMID:26808444

  6. Conserved Patterns of Microbial Immune Escape: Pathogenic Microbes of Diverse Origin Target the Human Terminal Complement Inhibitor Vitronectin via a Single Common Motif.

    PubMed

    Hallström, Teresia; Singh, Birendra; Kraiczy, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of many microbes relies on their capacity to resist innate immunity, and to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host microbes have developed highly efficient and sophisticated complement evasion strategies. Here we show that different human pathogens including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, acquire the human terminal complement regulator vitronectin to their surface. By using truncated vitronectin fragments we found that all analyzed microbial pathogens (n = 13) bound human vitronectin via the same C-terminal heparin-binding domain (amino acids 352-374). This specific interaction leaves the terminal complement complex (TCC) regulatory region of vitronectin accessible, allowing inhibition of C5b-7 membrane insertion and C9 polymerization. Vitronectin complexed with the various microbes and corresponding proteins was thus functionally active and inhibited complement-mediated C5b-9 deposition. Taken together, diverse microbial pathogens expressing different structurally unrelated vitronectin-binding molecules interact with host vitronectin via the same conserved region to allow versatile control of the host innate immune response.

  7. FACT Disrupts Nucleosome Structure by Binding H2A-H2B with Conserved Peptide Motifs.

    PubMed

    Kemble, David J; McCullough, Laura L; Whitby, Frank G; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P

    2015-10-15

    FACT, a heterodimer of Spt16 and Pob3, is an essential histone chaperone. We show that the H2A-H2B binding activity that is central to FACT function resides in short acidic regions near the C termini of each subunit. Mutations throughout these regions affect binding and cause correlated phenotypes that range from mild to lethal, with the largest individual contributions unexpectedly coming from an aromatic residue and a nearby carboxylate residue within each domain. Spt16 and Pob3 bind overlapping sites on H2A-H2B, and Spt16-Pob3 heterodimers simultaneously bind two H2A-H2B dimers, the same stoichiometry as the components of a nucleosome. An Spt16:H2A-H2B crystal structure explains the biochemical and genetic data, provides a model for Pob3 binding, and implies a mechanism for FACT reorganization that we confirm biochemically. Moreover, unexpected similarity to binding of ANP32E and Swr1 with H2A.Z-H2B reveals that diverse H2A-H2B chaperones use common mechanisms of histone binding and regulating nucleosome functions.

  8. FACT disrupts nucleosome structure by binding H2A-H2B with conserved peptide motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kemble, David J.; McCullough, Laura L.; Whitby, Frank G.; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY FACT, a heterodimer of Spt16 and Pob3, is an essential histone chaperone. We show that the H2A-H2B binding activity that is central to FACT function resides in short acidic regions near the C-termini of each subunit. Mutations throughout these regions impact binding and cause correlated phenotypes that range from mild to lethal, with the largest individual contributions unexpectedly coming from an aromatic residue and a nearby carboxylate residue within each domain. Spt16 and Pob3 bind overlapping sites on H2A-H2B, and Spt16-Pob3 heterodimers simultaneously bind two H2A-H2B dimers, the same stoichiometry as the components of a nucleosome. An Spt16:H2A-H2B crystal structure explains the biochemical and genetic data, provides a model for Pob3 binding, and implies a mechanism for FACT reorganization that we confirm biochemically. Moreover, unexpected similarity to binding of ANP32E and Swr1 with H2A.Z-H2B reveals that diverse H2A-H2B chaperones use common mechanisms of histone binding and regulating nucleosome functions. PMID:26455391

  9. Characterization of Spindle Checkpoint Kinase Mps1 Reveals Domain with Functional and Structural Similarities to Tetratricopeptide Repeat Motifs of Bub1 and BubR1 Checkpoint Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Semin; Thebault, Philippe; Freschi, Luca; Beaufils, Sylvie; Blundell, Tom L.; Landry, Christian R.; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Elowe, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Kinetochore targeting of the mitotic kinases Bub1, BubR1, and Mps1 has been implicated in efficient execution of their functions in the spindle checkpoint, the self-monitoring system of the eukaryotic cell cycle that ensures chromosome segregation occurs with high fidelity. In all three kinases, kinetochore docking is mediated by the N-terminal region of the protein. Deletions within this region result in checkpoint failure and chromosome segregation defects. Here, we use an interdisciplinary approach that includes biophysical, biochemical, cell biological, and bioinformatics methods to study the N-terminal region of human Mps1. We report the identification of a tandem repeat of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif in the N-terminal kinetochore binding region of Mps1, with close homology to the tandem TPR motif of Bub1 and BubR1. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that TPR Mps1 was acquired after the split between deutorostomes and protostomes, as it is distinguishable in chordates and echinoderms. Overexpression of TPR Mps1 resulted in decreased efficiency of both chromosome alignment and mitotic arrest, likely through displacement of endogenous Mps1 from the kinetochore and decreased Mps1 catalytic activity. Taken together, our multidisciplinary strategy provides new insights into the evolution, structural organization, and function of Mps1 N-terminal region. PMID:22187426

  10. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  11. Two novel Pao-like retrotransposons (Kamikaze and Yamato) from the silkworm species Bombyx mori and B. mandarina: common structural features of Pao-like elements.

    PubMed

    Abe, H; Ohbayashi, F; Sugasaki, T; Kanehara, M; Terada, T; Shimada, T; Kawai, S; Mita, K; Kanamori, Y; Yamamoto, M T; Oshiki, T

    2001-04-01

    To characterize the structural features common to Pao-like retrotransposons, we analyzed two lambda phage clones which contain the Pao-like elements from the silkworm species Bombyx mori and B. mandarinia, and copies of Pao itself and ninja of Drosophila simulans, amplified by PCR. We previously identified two randomly amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), W-Kamikaze and W-Yamato, from B. mori and B. mandarina, which are part of two novel Pao-like retrotransposons, Kamikaze and Yamato, respectively. Complete characterization of these and other elements of this group reported here shows that Pao-like elements have common features that distinguish them from the other groups of LTR-retrotransposons. While the elements of the Ty1-copia group encode only one cysteine and histidine (Cys) motif in their gag-like region, the Pao-like elements specify three Cys motifs. The highly conserved D(35)E motif in the integrase domain of the retrotransposon polyprotein seems to be conserved in Pao-like elements, but the number of amino acid residues between D and E varies and is greater than 35. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the reverse transcriptase domain revealed the Pao-like elements are members of neither the Ty1-copia nor the gypsy-Ty3 groups. Therefore, we confirmed that the long-terminal-repeat (LTR) retrotransposons should be divided into three major groups (or families), namely the Ty1-copia, gypsy-Ty3, and Pao-like groups.

  12. The Dynamic Character of the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif Provides a Mechanism for Modulation of Gene Expression by Compounds That Bind Selectively to the Alternative DNA Hairpin Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that DNA predominantly exists in duplex form in cells. However, under torsional stress imposed by active transcription, DNA can assume nonduplex structures. The BCL2 promoter region forms two different secondary DNA structures on opposite strands called the G-quadruplex and the i-motif. The i-motif is a highly dynamic structure that exists in equilibrium with a flexible hairpin species. Here we identify a pregnanol derivative and a class of piperidine derivatives that differentially modulate gene expression by stabilizing either the i-motif or the flexible hairpin species. Stabilization of the i-motif structure results in significant upregulation of the BCL2 gene and associated protein expression; in contrast, stabilization of the flexible hairpin species lowers BCL2 levels. The BCL2 levels reduced by the hairpin-binding compound led to chemosensitization to etoposide in both in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, we show antagonism between the two classes of compounds in solution and in cells. For the first time, our results demonstrate the principle of small molecule targeting of i-motif structures in vitro and in vivo to modulate gene expression. PMID:24559410

  13. Structure-Function Analyses of a Staphylococcus epidermidis Autoinducing Peptide Reveals Motifs Critical for AgrC-type Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Paharik, Alexandra E; Horswill, Alexander R; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-07-15

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is frequently implicated in human infections associated with indwelling medical devices due to its ubiquity in the skin flora and formation of robust biofilms. The accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system plays a prominent role in the establishment of biofilms and infection by this bacterium. Agr activation is mediated by the binding of a peptide signal (or autoinducing peptide, AIP) to its cognate AgrC receptor. Many questions remain about the role of QS in S. epidermidis infections, as well as in mixed-microbial populations on a host, and chemical modulators of its agr system could provide novel insights into this signaling network. The AIP ligand provides an initial scaffold for the development of such probes; however, the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for activation of S. epidermidis AgrC receptors by AIPs are largely unknown. Herein, we report the first SAR analyses of an S. epidermidis AIP by performing systematic alanine and d-amino acid scans of the S. epidermidis AIP-I. On the basis of these results, we designed and identified potent, pan-group inhibitors of the AgrC receptors in the three S. epidermidis agr groups, as well as a set of AIP-I analogs capable of selective AgrC inhibition in either specific S. epidermidis agr groups or in another common staphylococcal species, S. aureus. In addition, we uncovered a non-native peptide agonist of AgrC-I that can strongly inhibit S. epidermidis biofilm growth. Together, these synthetic analogs represent new and readily accessible probes for investigating the roles of QS in S. epidermidis colonization and infections.

  14. Bioinformatics study of cancer-related mutations within p53 phosphorylation site motifs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaona; Huang, Qiang; Yu, Long; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2014-07-29

    p53 protein has about thirty phosphorylation sites located at the N- and C-termini and in the core domain. The phosphorylation sites are relatively less mutated than other residues in p53. To understand why and how p53 phosphorylation sites are rarely mutated in human cancer, using a bioinformatics approaches, we examined the phosphorylation site and its nearby flanking residues, focusing on the consensus phosphorylation motif pattern, amino-acid correlations within the phosphorylation motifs, the propensity of structural disorder of the phosphorylation motifs, and cancer mutations observed within the phosphorylation motifs. Many p53 phosphorylation sites are targets for several kinases. The phosphorylation sites match 17 consensus sequence motifs out of the 29 classified. In addition to proline, which is common in kinase specificity-determining sites, we found high propensity of acidic residues to be adjacent to phosphorylation sites. Analysis of human cancer mutations in the phosphorylation motifs revealed that motifs with adjacent acidic residues generally have fewer mutations, in contrast to phosphorylation sites near proline residues. p53 phosphorylation motifs are mostly disordered. However, human cancer mutations within phosphorylation motifs tend to decrease the disorder propensity. Our results suggest that combination of acidic residues Asp and Glu with phosphorylation sites provide charge redundancy which may safe guard against loss-of-function mutations, and that the natively disordered nature of p53 phosphorylation motifs may help reduce mutational damage. Our results further suggest that engineering acidic amino acids adjacent to potential phosphorylation sites could be a p53 gene therapy strategy.

  15. A universal RNA structural motif docking the elbow of tRNA in the ribosome, RNAse P and T-box leaders.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jean; Jossinet, Fabrice; Gautheret, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The structure and function of conserved motifs constituting the apex of Stem I in T-box mRNA leaders are investigated. We point out that this apex shares striking similarities with the L1 stalk (helices 76-78) of the ribosome. A sequence and structure analysis of both elements shows that, similarly to the head of the L1 stalk, the function of the apex of Stem I lies in the docking of tRNA through a stacking interaction with the conserved G19:C56 base pair platform. The inferred structure in the apex of Stem I consists of a module of two T-loops bound together head to tail, a module that is also present in the head of the L1 stalk, but went unnoticed. Supporting the analysis, we show that a highly conserved structure in RNAse P formerly described as the J11/12-J12/11 module, which is precisely known to bind the elbow of tRNA, constitutes a third instance of this T-loop module. A structural analysis explains why six nucleotides constituting the core of this module are highly invariant among all three types of RNA. Our finding that major RNA partners of tRNA bind the elbow with a same RNA structure suggests an explanation for the origin of the tRNA L-shape.

  16. A universal RNA structural motif docking the elbow of tRNA in the ribosome, RNAse P and T-box leaders

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jean; Jossinet, Fabrice; Gautheret, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The structure and function of conserved motifs constituting the apex of Stem I in T-box mRNA leaders are investigated. We point out that this apex shares striking similarities with the L1 stalk (helices 76–78) of the ribosome. A sequence and structure analysis of both elements shows that, similarly to the head of the L1 stalk, the function of the apex of Stem I lies in the docking of tRNA through a stacking interaction with the conserved G19:C56 base pair platform. The inferred structure in the apex of Stem I consists of a module of two T-loops bound together head to tail, a module that is also present in the head of the L1 stalk, but went unnoticed. Supporting the analysis, we show that a highly conserved structure in RNAse P formerly described as the J11/12–J12/11 module, which is precisely known to bind the elbow of tRNA, constitutes a third instance of this T-loop module. A structural analysis explains why six nucleotides constituting the core of this module are highly invariant among all three types of RNA. Our finding that major RNA partners of tRNA bind the elbow with a same RNA structure suggests an explanation for the origin of the tRNA L-shape. PMID:23580544

  17. Three RNA recognition motifs participate in RNA recognition and structural organization by the pro-apoptotic factor TIA-1.

    PubMed

    Bauer, William J; Heath, Jason; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Kielkopf, Clara L

    2012-01-27

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) regulates developmental and stress-responsive pathways through distinct activities at the levels of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. The TIA-1 polypeptide contains three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs). The central RRM2 and C-terminal RRM3 associate with cellular mRNAs. The N-terminal RRM1 enhances interactions of a C-terminal Q-rich domain of TIA-1 with the U1-C splicing factor, despite linear separation of the domains in the TIA-1 sequence. Given the expanded functional repertoire of the RRM family, it was unknown whether TIA-1 RRM1 contributes to RNA binding as well as documented protein interactions. To address this question, we used isothermal titration calorimetry and small-angle X-ray scattering to dissect the roles of the TIA-1 RRMs in RNA recognition. Notably, the fas RNA exhibited two binding sites with indistinguishable affinities for TIA-1. Analyses of TIA-1 variants established that RRM1 was dispensable for binding AU-rich fas sites, yet all three RRMs were required to bind a polyU RNA with high affinity. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses demonstrated a "V" shape for a TIA-1 construct comprising the three RRMs and revealed that its dimensions became more compact in the RNA-bound state. The sequence-selective involvement of TIA-1 RRM1 in RNA recognition suggests a possible role for RNA sequences in regulating the distinct functions of TIA-1. Further implications for U1-C recruitment by the adjacent TIA-1 binding sites of the fas pre-mRNA and the bent TIA-1 shape, which organizes the N- and C-termini on the same side of the protein, are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Three RNA recognition motifs participate in RNA recognition and structural organization by the pro-apoptotic factor TIA-1

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, William J.; Heath, Jason; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) regulates developmental and stress-responsive pathways through distinct activities at the levels of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. The TIA-1 polypeptide contains three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs). The central RRM2 and C-terminal RRM3 associate with cellular mRNAs. The N-terminal RRM1 enhances interactions of a C-terminal Q-rich domain of TIA-1 with the U1-C splicing factor, despite linear separation of the domains in the TIA-1 sequence. Given the expanded functional repertoire of the RRM family, it was unknown whether TIA-1 RRM1 contributes to RNA binding as well as documented protein interactions. To address this question, we used isothermal titration calorimetry and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to dissect the roles of the TIA-1 RRMs in RNA recognition. Notably, the fas RNA exhibited two binding sites with indistinguishable affinities for TIA-1. Analyses of TIA-1 variants established that RRM1 was dispensable for binding AU-rich fas sites, yet all three RRMs were required to bind a polyU RNA with high affinity. SAXS analyses demonstrated a `V' shape for a TIA-1 construct comprising the three RRMs, and revealed that its dimensions became more compact in the RNA-bound state. The sequence-selective involvement of TIA-1 RRM1 in RNA recognition suggests a possible role for RNA sequences in regulating the distinct functions of TIA-1. Further implications for U1-C recruitment by the adjacent TIA-1 binding sites of the fas pre-mRNA and the bent TIA-1 shape, which organizes the N- and C-termini on the same side of the protein, are discussed. PMID:22154808

  19. The science commons in health research: structure, function, and value.

    PubMed

    Cook-Deegan, Robert

    The "science commons," knowledge that is widely accessible at low or no cost, is a uniquely important input to scientific advance and cumulative technological innovation. It is primarily, although not exclusively, funded by government and nonprofit sources. Much of it is produced at academic research centers, although some academic science is proprietary and some privately funded R&D enters the science commons. Science in general aspires to Mertonian norms of openness, universality, objectivity, and critical inquiry. The science commons diverges from proprietary science primarily in being open and being very broadly available. These features make the science commons particularly valuable for advancing knowledge, for training innovators who will ultimately work in both public and private sectors, and in providing a common stock of knowledge upon which all players-both public and private-can draw readily. Open science plays two important roles that proprietary R&D cannot: it enables practical benefits even in the absence of profitable markets for goods and services, and its lays a shared foundation for subsequent private R&D. The history of genomics in the period 1992-2004, covering two periods when genomic startup firms attracted significant private R&D investment, illustrates these features of how a science commons contributes value. Commercial interest in genomics was intense during this period. Fierce competition between private sector and public sector genomics programs was highly visible. Seemingly anomalous behavior, such as private firms funding "open science," can be explained by unusual business dynamics between established firms wanting to preserve a robust science commons to prevent startup firms from limiting established firms' freedom to operate. Deliberate policies to create and protect a large science commons were pursued by nonprofit and government funders of genomics research, such as the Wellcome Trust and National Institutes of Health. These

  20. NMR Structure of the C-Terminal Transmembrane Domain of the HDL Receptor, SR-BI, and a Functionally Relevant Leucine Zipper Motif.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Jensen, Davin R; Hanson, Paul J; Lange, Philip T; Proudfoot, Sarah C; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Sahoo, Daisy

    2017-03-07

    The interaction of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), is critical for lowering plasma cholesterol levels and reducing the risk for cardiovascular disease. The HDL/SR-BI complex facilitates delivery of cholesterol into cells and is likely mediated by receptor dimerization. This work describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to generate the first high-resolution structure of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of SR-BI. This region of SR-BI harbors a leucine zipper dimerization motif, which when mutated impairs the ability of the receptor to bind HDL and mediate cholesterol delivery. These losses in function correlate with the inability of SR-BI to form dimers. We also identify juxtamembrane regions of the extracellular domain of SR-BI that may interact with the lipid surface to facilitate cholesterol transport functions of the receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural basis of Robo proline-rich motif recognition by the srGAP1 Src homology 3 domain in the Slit-Robo signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yushu; Liu, Yiwei; Gao, Jia; Gao, Feng; Bartlam, Mark; Wu, Jane Y; Rao, Zihe

    2006-09-22

    The Slit-Robo (sr) GTPase-activating protein (GAPs) are important components in the intracellular pathway mediating Slit-Robo signaling in axon guidance and cell migration. We report the first crystal structure of the srGAP1 SH3 domain at 1.8-A resolution. The unusual side chain conformation of the conserved Phe-13 in the P1 pocket renders the ligand binding pocket shallow and narrow, which contributes toward the low binding affinity. Moreover, the opposing electrostatic charge and the hydrophobic properties of the P3 specificity pocket are consistent with the observed binding characteristics of the srGAP1 SH3 domain to its ligand. Surface plasmon resonance experiments indicate that the srGAP1 SH3 domain interacts with its natural ligand inaCtoN orientation. The srGAP1 SH3 domain can bind to both the CC2 and CC3 motifs in vitro. The N-terminal two acidic residues in the CC3 motif recognition site are necessary for srGAP1 SH3 domain binding. A longer CC3 peptide (CC3-FL) binds with greater affinity than its shorter counterpart, suggesting that the residues surrounding the proline-rich core are important for protein-peptide interactions. Our study reveals previously unknown properties of the srGAP-Robo interaction. Our data provide a structural basis for the srGAP-Robo interaction, consistent with the role of the Robo intracellular domain in interacting with other downstream signaling molecules and mediating versatile and dynamic responses to axon guidance and cell migration cues.

  2. Structure-Based Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii Profilin: A Parasite-Specific Motif Is Required for Recognition by Toll-Like Receptor 11

    SciTech Connect

    K Kucera; A Koblansky; L Saunders; K Frederick; E De La Cruz; S Ghosh; Y Modis

    2011-12-31

    Profilins promote actin polymerization by exchanging ADP for ATP on monomeric actin and delivering ATP-actin to growing filament barbed ends. Apicomplexan protozoa such as Toxoplasma gondii invade host cells using an actin-dependent gliding motility. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 11 generates an innate immune response upon sensing T. gondii profilin (TgPRF). The crystal structure of TgPRF reveals a parasite-specific surface motif consisting of an acidic loop, followed by a long {beta}-hairpin. A series of structure-based profilin mutants show that TLR11 recognition of the acidic loop is responsible for most of the interleukin (IL)-12 secretion response to TgPRF in peritoneal macrophages. Deletion of both the acidic loop and the {beta}-hairpin completely abrogates IL-12 secretion. Insertion of the T. gondii acidic loop and {beta}-hairpin into yeast profilin is sufficient to generate TLR11-dependent signaling. Substitution of the acidic loop in TgPRF with the homologous loop from the apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum does not affect TLR11-dependent IL-12 secretion, while substitution with the acidic loop from Plasmodium falciparum results in reduced but significant IL-12 secretion. We conclude that the parasite-specific motif in TgPRF is the key molecular pattern recognized by TLR11. Unlike other profilins, TgPRF slows nucleotide exchange on monomeric rabbit actin and binds rabbit actin weakly. The putative TgPRF actin-binding surface includes the {beta}-hairpin and diverges widely from the actin-binding surfaces of vertebrate profilins.

  3. Exploratory Study on the RNA-Binding Structural Motifs by Library Screening Targeting pre-miRNA-29 a.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Takeo; Murata, Asako; Aikawa, Haruo; Harada, Yasue; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-16

    The metabolic stream of microRNA (miRNA) production, the so-called maturation process of miRNAs, became one of important metabolic paths for drug-targeting to modulate the expression of genes related to a number of diseases. We carried out discovery studies on small molecules binding to the precursor of miR-29a (pre-miR-29a) from a chemical library containing 41,119 compounds (AQ library) by the fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assay using the xanthone derivative X2SdiMe as a fluorescent indicator. The FID assay provided 1075 compounds, which showed an increase of fluorescence. These compounds were subsequently submitted to a binding analysis in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay on a pre-miR-29a immobilized surface. 21 hit compounds were identified with a good reproducibility in the binding. These compounds have not been reported to bind to RNA until now and can be classified into two groups on the basis of the kinetics in the binding. To gain more information on the motif structures that could be necessary for the binding to pre-miR-29a, 19 substructures were selected from the hit compounds. The substructure library (SS library) which consisted of 362 compounds was prepared from the AQ library. An SPR assay of the SS library on pre-miR-29a-immobilized surface suggested that five substructures could potentially be important structural motifs to bind to pre-miR-29a. These studies demonstrate that the combination of FID-based screening of chemical library and subsequent SPR assay would be one way for obtaining practical solutions for the discovery of molecules which bind to the target pre-miRNAs.

  4. Thiazole orange as a fluorescent probe: Label-free and selective detection of silver ions based on the structural change of i-motif DNA at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bei Hua; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Na; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-08-15

    Silver ions have been widely applied to many fields and have harmful effects on environments and human health. Herein, a label-free optical sensor for Ag(+) detection is constructed based on thiazole orange (TO) as a fluorescent probe for the recognition of i-motif DNA structure change at neutral pH. Ag(+) can fold a C-rich single stranded DNA sequence into i-motif DNA structure at neutral pH and that folding is reversible by chelation with cysteine (Cys). The DNA folding process can be indicated by the fluorescence change of TO, which is non-fluorescent in free molecule state and emits strong fluorescence after the incorporation with i-motif DNA. Thus, a rapid, sensitive, and selective method for the detection of Ag(+) and Cys is developed with a detection limit of 17 and 280nM, respectively. It is worth noting that the mechanism underlying the increase of the fluorescence of thiazole orange in the presence of i-motif structure is explained. Moreover, a fluorescent DNA logic gate is successfully designed based on the Ag(+)/Cys-mediated reversible fluorescence changes. The proposed detection strategy is label-free and economical. In addition, this system shows a great promise for i-motif/TO complex to analyze Ag(+) in the real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A variety of DNA-binding and multimeric proteins contain the histone fold motif.

    PubMed Central

    Baxevanis, A D; Arents, G; Moudrianakis, E N; Landsman, D

    1995-01-01

    The histone fold motif has previously been identified as a structural feature common to all four core histones and is involved in both histone-histone and histone-DNA interactions. Through the use of a novel motif searching method, a group of proteins containing the histone fold motif has been established. The proteins in this group are involved in a wide variety of functions related mostly to DNA metabolism. Most of these proteins engage in protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions, as do their core histone counterparts. Among these, CCAAT-specific transcription factor CBF and its yeast homologue HAP are two examples of multimeric complexes with different component subunits that contain the histone fold motif. The histone fold proteins are distantly related, with a relatively small degree of absolute sequence similarity. It is proposed that these proteins may share a similar three-dimensional conformation despite the lack of significant sequence similarity. PMID:7651829

  6. A Discriminative Approach for Unsupervised Clustering of DNA Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Wingender, Edgar; Borlak, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Algorithmic comparison of DNA sequence motifs is a problem in bioinformatics that has received increased attention during the last years. Its main applications concern characterization of potentially novel motifs and clustering of a motif collection in order to remove redundancy. Despite growing interest in motif clustering, the question which motif clusters to aim at has so far not been systematically addressed. Here we analyzed motif similarities in a comprehensive set of vertebrate transcription factor classes. For this we developed enhanced similarity scores by inclusion of the information coverage (IC) criterion, which evaluates the fraction of information an alignment covers in aligned motifs. A network-based method enabled us to identify motif clusters with high correspondence to DNA-binding domain phylogenies and prior experimental findings. Based on this analysis we derived a set of motif families representing distinct binding specificities. These motif families were used to train a classifier which was further integrated into a novel algorithm for unsupervised motif clustering. Application of the new algorithm demonstrated its superiority to previously published methods and its ability to reproduce entrained motif families. As a result, our work proposes a probabilistic approach to decide whether two motifs represent common or distinct binding specificities. PMID:23555204

  7. Common antigenic structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Kreiter, V. P.; Pressman, D.

    1974-01-01

    Spent culture media of all the human cell lines tested have been found to contain the antigenic activity present on the 11,000-Dalton HL-A common portion fragment of the HL-A antigen molecule that appears to be a characteristic, invariant portion of HL-A antigen molecules. From the culture medium of one of these lines, RPMI 1788, a lymphoid cell line, the substance carrying HL-A common activity was isolated, which was shown to be identical to the HL-A common portion fragment with respect to molecular size, electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric focusing patterns, and certain antigenic characteristics. By an isolation procedure involving differential ultrafiltration, gel filtration, and column electrophoresis, 8 litres of the culture medium yielded 1.5–2.0 A280 units of the substance representing 15–20 per cent of the HL-A common antigenic activity originally present. A single protein band with a Rf of 0.47 was obtained by disc electrophoresis. The molecular size was shown to be about 11,000 Daltons by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulphate—acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon isoelectric focusing two bands were obtained which corresponded exactly to those obtained with HL-A common portion fragment prepared from papain-solubilized HL-A antigen preparations by acid dissociation. The isoelectric point of the major band was 5.0. The reactions of this substance with rabbit antisera against human lymphoid cell membrane and against the substance were essentially identical to the reactions of HL-A common portion fragment with these same antisera. ImagesFIG. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4476726

  8. Mining, compressing and classifying with extensible motifs

    PubMed Central

    Apostolico, Alberto; Comin, Matteo; Parida, Laxmi

    2006-01-01

    Background Motif patterns of maximal saturation emerged originally in contexts of pattern discovery in biomolecular sequences and have recently proven a valuable notion also in the design of data compression schemes. Informally, a motif is a string of intermittently solid and wild characters that recurs more or less frequently in an input sequence or family of sequences. Motif discovery techniques and tools tend to be computationally imposing, however, special classes of "rigid" motifs have been identified of which the discovery is affordable in low polynomial time. Results In the present work, "extensible" motifs are considered such that each sequence of gaps comes endowed with some elasticity, whereby the same pattern may be stretched to fit segments of the source that match all the solid characters but are otherwise of different lengths. A few applications of this notion are then described. In applications of data compression by textual substitution, extensible motifs are seen to bring savings on the size of the codebook, and hence to improve compression. In germane contexts, in which compressibility is used in its dual role as a basis for structural inference and classification, extensible motifs are seen to support unsupervised classification and phylogeny reconstruction. Conclusion Off-line compression based on extensible motifs can be used advantageously to compress and classify biological sequences. PMID:16722593

  9. Phylogenetic reconstruction using secondary structures and sequence motifs of ITS2 rDNA of Paragonimus westermani (Kerbert, 1878) Braun, 1899 (Digenea: Paragonimidae) and related species

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    motifs allowed an accurate in-silico distinction of lung flukes. Conclusion Data indicate that ITS2 motifs (≤ 50 bp in size) can be considered a promising tool for trematode species identification. RNA secondary structure analysis could be a valuable tool for distinguishing new species and completing Paragonimus systematics, more so because ITS2 secondary structure contains more information than the usual primary sequence alignment. PMID:19958489

  10. Phylogenetic reconstruction using secondary structures and sequence motifs of ITS2 rDNA of Paragonimus westermani (Kerbert, 1878) Braun, 1899 (Digenea: Paragonimidae) and related species.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Pramod Kumar; Tandon, Veena; Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Goswami, Lalit Mohan; Chatterjee, Anupam

    2009-12-03

    Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics that give "morphological" information, not found in the primary sequence. In several mountainous regions of Northeastern India, foci of Paragonimus (lung fluke) infection reportedly involve species that are known to prevail in neighbouring countries. The present study was undertaken to demonstrate the sequence analysis of the ribosomal DNA (ITS2) of the infective (metacercarial) stage of the lung fluke collected from the edible crab hosts that are abundant in a mountain stream of the area (Miao, Changlang District in Arunachal Pradesh) and to construct its phylogeny. Using the approach of molecular morphometrics that is based on ITS2 secondary structure homologies, phylogenetic relationships of the various isolates of Paragonimus species that are prevalent in the neighbouring Near-eastern countries have been discussed. Initially, ten predicted RNA secondary structures were reconstructed and the topology based only on the predicted RNA secondary structure of the ITS2 region resolved most relationships among the species studied. We obtained three similar topologies for seven species of the genus Paragonimus on the basis of traditional primary sequence analysis using MEGA and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The latter approach allowed us to include both primary sequence and RNA molecular morphometrics; each data partition was allowed to have a different evolution rate. Paragonimus westermani was found to group with P. siamensis of Thailand; this was best supported by both the molecular morphometrics and combined analyses. P. heterotremus, P. proliferus, P. skrjabini, P. bangkokensis and P. harinasutai formed a separate clade in the molecular phylogenies, and were reciprocally monophyletic with respect to other species. ITS2 sequence motifs allowed an

  11. Protospacer recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shiraz A.; Erdmann, Susanne; Mojica, Francisco J.M.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) were originally characterized for CRISPR-Cas systems that were classified on the basis of their CRISPR repeat sequences. A few short 2–5 bp sequences were identified adjacent to one end of the protospacers. Experimental and bioinformatical results linked the motif to the excision of protospacers and their insertion into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, evidence accumulated from different virus- and plasmid-targeting assays, suggesting that these motifs were also recognized during DNA interference, at least for the recently classified type I and type II CRISPR-based systems. The two processes, spacer acquisition and protospacer interference, employ different molecular mechanisms, and there is increasing evidence to suggest that the sequence motifs that are recognized, while overlapping, are unlikely to be identical. In this article, we consider the properties of PAM sequences and summarize the evidence for their dual functional roles. It is proposed to use the terms protospacer associated motif (PAM) for the conserved DNA sequence and to employ spacer acqusition motif (SAM) and target interference motif (TIM), respectively, for acquisition and interference recognition sites. PMID:23403393

  12. Investigation on critical structural motifs of ligands for triggering glucocorticoid receptor nuclear migration through molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Lin; Jang, Soonmin; Wang, Shih-Min; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Li, Feng-Yin

    2016-06-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a transcription factor regulating gene expression in a ligand-dependent fashion, is known for flexibility in adapting various ligands with their structures ranging from steroid to non-steroid. However, in our previous study, GR shows a stringent discrimination against a set of steroid ligands with highly similar structures for triggering its nuclear migration. In order to resolve this puzzle, we employed molecular docking simulations to investigate the origin of this structural discrimination. By analyzing the docking orientations and the related ligand-GR interaction patterns, we found that the hydrophilicity mismatch between the docking ligand and the GR ligand-binding site is the main cause combined with the steric hindrance and structural rigidness of these steroid ligands. Furthermore, we utilized this knowledge to rationalize how the structure-binding interaction of non-steroid ligands triggers GR nuclear migration with their structures available in Protein Data Bank.

  13. Crystal structures of Cg1458 reveal a catalytic lid domain and a common catalytic mechanism for the FAH family.

    PubMed

    Ran, Tingting; Gao, Yanyan; Marsh, May; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Meitian; Mao, Xiang; Xu, Langlai; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu

    2013-01-01

    Cg1458 was recently characterized as a novel soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase. However, sequence alignment identified that Cg1458 has no similarity with other oxaloacetate decarboxylases and instead belongs to the FAH (fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase) family. Differences in the function of Cg1458 and other FAH proteins may suggest a different catalytic mechanism. To help elucidate the catalytic mechanism of Cg1458, crystal structures of Cg1458 in both the open and closed conformations have been determined for the first time up to a resolution of 1.9 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) and 2.0 Å respectively. Comparison of both structures and detailed biochemical studies confirmed the presence of a catalytic lid domain which is missing in the native enzyme structure. In this lid domain, a glutamic acid-histidine dyad was found to be critical in mediating enzymatic catalysis. On the basis of structural modelling and comparison, as well as large-scale sequence alignment studies, we further determined that the catalytic mechanism of Cg1458 is actually through a glutamic acid-histidine-water triad, and this catalytic triad is common among FAH family proteins that catalyse the cleavage of the C-C bond of the substrate. Two sequence motifs, HxxE and Hxx…xxE have been identified as the basis for this mechanism.

  14. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs.

    PubMed

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H

    2014-07-01

    Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  15. Structural characterization and cytolytic activity of a potent antimicrobial motif in longicin, a defensin-like peptide in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Morshedur; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Battur, Banzragch; Liao, Min; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; You, Myungjo; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2010-02-01

    Longicin, a defensin-like peptide, was recently identified in the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Longicin and one of its synthetic partial analogs (P4) displayed antimicrobial/fungicidal/parasiticidal activity. In the present study, we compared longicin-derived synthetic analogs in order to characterize the antimicrobial motif (P4) by analyzing some structural features using various bioinformatic tools and/or CD spectroscopy. According to the chemicophysical characteristics, P4 is suggested to be a cationic peptide with hydrophobic and amphipathic character. The predicted secondary structure indicated the existence of a beta-sheet, which was also observed in the modeled tertiary structure. CD spectroscopic results also showed the existence of a beta-sheet and transition to a helical conformation in the presence of membrane-mimicking conditions. These structural observations on P4 suggested that the antimicrobial activity could be due to the beta-sheet as well as the alpha-helix. In addition, a sequence homology search showed that molecules identified in other ticks and organisms also have the P4 analogous domain at their C-terminal, which indicates P4 as a conserved domain. The peptide P4 also showed low cytolytic activity. Based on the present result and previously reported studies, the peptide P4 could be suggested as a novel antimicrobial domain indicating future therapeutic agent against bacteria.

  16. iMotifs: an integrated sequence motif visualization and analysis environment

    PubMed Central

    Piipari, Matias; Down, Thomas A.; Saini, Harpreet; Enright, Anton; Hubbard, Tim J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Short sequence motifs are an important class of models in molecular biology, used most commonly for describing transcription factor binding site specificity patterns. High-throughput methods have been recently developed for detecting regulatory factor binding sites in vivo and in vitro and consequently high-quality binding site motif data are becoming available for increasing number of organisms and regulatory factors. Development of intuitive tools for the study of sequence motifs is therefore important. iMotifs is a graphical motif analysis environment that allows visualization of annotated sequence motifs and scored motif hits in sequences. It also offers motif inference with the sensitive NestedMICA algorithm, as well as overrepresentation and pairwise motif matching capabilities. All of the analysis functionality is provided without the need to convert between file formats or learn different command line interfaces. The application includes a bundled and graphically integrated version of the NestedMICA motif inference suite that has no outside dependencies. Problems associated with local deployment of software are therefore avoided. Availability: iMotifs is licensed with the GNU Lesser General Public License v2.0 (LGPL 2.0). The software and its source is available at http://wiki.github.com/mz2/imotifs and can be run on Mac OS X Leopard (Intel/PowerPC). We also provide a cross-platform (Linux, OS X, Windows) LGPL 2.0 licensed library libxms for the Perl, Ruby, R and Objective-C programming languages for input and output of XMS formatted annotated sequence motif set files. Contact: matias.piipari@gmail.com; imotifs@googlegroups.com PMID:20106815

  17. Nucleosomes, Linker DNA, and Linker Histone form a Unique Structural Motif that Directs the Higher-Order Folding and Compaction of Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednar, Jan; Horowitz, Rachel A.; Grigoryev, Sergei A.; Carruthers, Lenny M.; Hansen, Jeffrey C.; Koster, Abraham J.; Woodcock, Christopher L.

    1998-11-01

    The compaction level of arrays of nucleosomes may be understood in terms of the balance between the self-repulsion of DNA (principally linker DNA) and countering factors including the ionic strength and composition of the medium, the highly basic N termini of the core histones, and linker histones. However, the structural principles that come into play during the transition from a loose chain of nucleosomes to a compact 30-nm chromatin fiber have been difficult to establish, and the arrangement of nucleosomes and linker DNA in condensed chromatin fibers has never been fully resolved. Based on images of the solution conformation of native chromatin and fully defined chromatin arrays obtained by electron cryomicroscopy, we report a linker histone-dependent architectural motif beyond the level of the nucleosome core particle that takes the form of a stem-like organization of the entering and exiting linker DNA segments. DNA completes ≈ 1.7 turns on the histone octamer in the presence and absence of linker histone. When linker histone is present, the two linker DNA segments become juxtaposed ≈ 8 nm from the nucleosome center and remain apposed for 3-5 nm before diverging. We propose that this stem motif directs the arrangement of nucleosomes and linker DNA within the chromatin fiber, establishing a unique three-dimensional zigzag folding pattern that is conserved during compaction. Such an arrangement with peripherally arranged nucleosomes and internal linker DNA segments is fully consistent with observations in intact nuclei and also allows dramatic changes in compaction level to occur without a concomitant change in topology.

  18. Structural and immunochemical relatedness suggests a conserved pathogenicity motif for secondary cell wall polysaccharides in Bacillus anthracis and infection-associated Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Saile, Elke; Klee, Silke R.; Hoffmaster, Alex; Kannenberg, Elmar L.

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis (Ba) and human infection-associated Bacillus cereus (Bc) strains Bc G9241 and Bc 03BB87 have secondary cell wall polysaccharides (SCWPs) comprising an aminoglycosyl trisaccharide repeat: →4)-β-d-ManpNAc-(1→4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpNAc-(1→, substituted at GlcNAc residues with both α- and β-Galp. In Bc G9241 and Bc 03BB87, an additional α-Galp is attached to O-3 of ManNAc. Using NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and immunochemical methods, we compared these structures to SCWPs from Bc biovar anthracis strains isolated from great apes displaying “anthrax-like” symptoms in Cameroon (Bc CA) and Côte d’Ivoire (Bc CI). The SCWPs of Bc CA/CI contained the identical HexNAc trisaccharide backbone and Gal modifications found in Ba, together with the α-Gal-(1→3) substitution observed previously at ManNAc residues only in Bc G9241/03BB87. Interestingly, the great ape derived strains displayed a unique α-Gal-(1→3)-α-Gal-(1→3) disaccharide substitution at some ManNAc residues, a modification not found in any previously examined Ba or Bc strain. Immuno-analysis with specific polyclonal anti-Ba SCWP antiserum demonstrated a reactivity hierarchy: high reactivity with SCWPs from Ba 7702 and Ba Sterne 34F2, and Bc G9241 and Bc 03BB87; intermediate reactivity with SCWPs from Bc CI/CA; and low reactivity with the SCWPs from structurally distinct Ba CDC684 (a unique strain producing an SCWP lacking all Gal substitutions) and non-infection-associated Bc ATCC10987 and Bc 14579 SCWPs. Ba-specific monoclonal antibody EAII-6G6-2-3 demonstrated a 10–20 fold reduced reactivity to Bc G9241 and Bc 03BB87 SCWPs compared to Ba 7702/34F2, and low/undetectable reactivity to SCWPs from Bc CI, Bc CA, Ba CDC684, and non-infection-associated Bc strains. Our data indicate that the HexNAc motif is conserved among infection-associated Ba and Bc isolates (regardless of human or great ape origin), and that the number, positions and structures of Gal

  19. Stochastic motif extraction using hidden Markov model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yukiko; Asogawa, Minoru; Konagaya, Akihiko

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we study the application of an HMM (hidden Markov model) to the problem of representing protein sequences by a stochastic motif. A stochastic protein motif represents the small segments of protein sequences that have a certain function or structure. The stochastic motif, represented by an HMM, has conditional probabilities to deal with the stochastic nature of the motif. This HMM directive reflects the characteristics of the motif, such as a protein periodical structure or grouping. In order to obtain the optimal HMM, we developed the {open_quotes}iterative duplication method{close_quotes} for HMM topology learning. It starts from a small fully-connected network and iterates the network generation and parameter optimization until it achieves sufficient discrimination accuracy. Using this method, we obtained an HMM for a leucine zipper motif. Compared to the accuracy of a symbolic pattern representation with accuracy of 14.8 percent, an HMM achieved 79.3 percent in prediction. Additionally, the method can obtain an HMM for various types of zinc finger motifs, and it might separate the mixed data. We demonstrated that this approach is applicable to the validation of the protein databases; a constructed HMM b as indicated that one protein sequence annotated as {open_quotes}lencine-zipper like sequence{close_quotes} in the database is quite different from other leucine-zipper sequences in terms of likelihood, and we found this discrimination is plausible.

  20. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  1. Structure of bacteriophage phi29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-22

    The tailed bacteriophage 29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 Å in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure is about 150 Å long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless 29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  2. Determination of a complex crystal structure in the absence of single crystals: analysis of powder X-ray diffraction data, guided by solid-state NMR and periodic DFT calculations, reveals a new 2'-deoxyguanosine structural motif.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Colan E; Reddy, G N Manjunatha; Masiero, Stefano; Brown, Steven P; Williams, P Andrew; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2017-05-01

    Derivatives of guanine exhibit diverse supramolecular chemistry, with a variety of distinct hydrogen-bonding motifs reported in the solid state, including ribbons and quartets, which resemble the G-quadruplex found in nucleic acids with sequences rich in guanine. Reflecting this diversity, the solid-state structural properties of 3',5'-bis-O-decanoyl-2'-deoxyguanosine, reported in this paper, reveal a hydrogen-bonded guanine ribbon motif that has not been observed previously for 2'-deoxyguanosine derivatives. In this case, structure determination was carried out directly from powder XRD data, representing one of the most challenging organic molecular structures (a 90-atom molecule) that has been solved to date by this technique. While specific challenges were encountered in the structure determination process, a successful outcome was achieved by augmenting the powder XRD analysis with information derived from solid-state NMR data and with dispersion-corrected periodic DFT calculations for structure optimization. The synergy of experimental and computational methodologies demonstrated in the present work is likely to be an essential feature of strategies to further expand the application of powder XRD as a technique for structure determination of organic molecular materials of even greater complexity in the future.

  3. Substrate recognition by the Lyn protein-tyrosine kinase. NMR structure of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling region of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Gaul, B S; Harrison, M L; Geahlen, R L; Burton, R A; Post, C B

    2000-05-26

    The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) plays a central role in transmembrane signal transduction in hematopoietic cells by mediating responses leading to proliferation and differentiation. An initial signaling event following activation of the B cell antigen receptor is phosphorylation of the CD79a (Ig-alpha) ITAM by Lyn, a Src family protein-tyrosine kinase. To elucidate the structural basis for recognition between the ITAM substrate and activated Lyn kinase, the structure of an ITAM-derived peptide bound to Lyn was determined using exchange-transferred nuclear Overhauser NMR spectroscopy. The bound substrate structure has an irregular helix-like character. Docking based on the NMR data into the active site of the closely related Lck kinase strongly favors ITAM binding in an orientation similar to binding of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase rather than that of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. The model of the complex provides a rationale for conserved ITAM residues, substrate specificity, and suggests that substrate binds only the active conformation of the Src family tyrosine kinase, unlike the ATP cofactor, which can bind the inactive form.

  4. A Review of Functional Motifs Utilized by Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sobhy, Haitham

    2016-01-01

    Short linear motifs (SLiM) are short peptides that facilitate protein function and protein-protein interactions. Viruses utilize these motifs to enter into the host, interact with cellular proteins, or egress from host cells. Studying functional motifs may help to predict protein characteristics, interactions, or the putative cellular role of a protein. In virology, it may reveal aspects of the virus tropism and help find antiviral therapeutics. This review highlights the recent understanding of functional motifs utilized by viruses. Special attention was paid to the function of proteins harboring these motifs, and viruses encoding these proteins. The review highlights motifs involved in (i) immune response and post-translational modifications (e.g., ubiquitylation, SUMOylation or ISGylation); (ii) virus-host cell interactions, including virus attachment, entry, fusion, egress and nuclear trafficking; (iii) virulence and antiviral activities; (iv) virion structure; and (v) low-complexity regions (LCRs) or motifs enriched with residues (Xaa-rich motifs). PMID:28248213

  5. The Leader AZIMUTH Check: Factor Structure of Common Competencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    information and distort the factor structure (King, Fogg , & Downey, 2005; Schriesheim & Eisenbach, 1995). Simply put, factor analysis will clump...Research Institute. King, C.V., Fogg , R.J., & Downey, R.G. (2004, April). The positives and negatives of negatively worded items in scales. Paper

  6. Common neighbour structure and similarity intensity in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Liu, Kecheng

    2017-10-01

    Complex systems as networks always exhibit strong regularities, implying underlying mechanisms governing their evolution. In addition to the degree preference, the similarity has been argued to be another driver for networks. Assuming a network is randomly organised without similarity preference, the present paper studies the expected number of common neighbours between vertices. A symmetrical similarity index is accordingly developed by removing such expected number from the observed common neighbours. The developed index can not only describe the similarities between vertices, but also the dissimilarities. We further apply the proposed index to measure of the influence of similarity on the wring patterns of networks. Fifteen empirical networks as well as artificial networks are examined in terms of similarity intensity and degree heterogeneity. Results on real networks indicate that, social networks are strongly governed by the similarity as well as the degree preference, while the biological networks and infrastructure networks show no apparent similarity governance. Particularly, classical network models, such as the Barabási-Albert model, the Erdös-Rényi model and the Ring Lattice, cannot well describe the social networks in terms of the degree heterogeneity and similarity intensity. The findings may shed some light on the modelling and link prediction of different classes of networks.

  7. Structural changes common to catalysis in the Tpx peroxiredoxin subfamily.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrea; Sankaran, Banumathi; Poole, Leslie B; Karplus, P Andrew

    2009-11-06

    Thiol peroxidases (Tpxs) are dimeric 2-Cys peroxiredoxins from bacteria that preferentially reduce alkyl hydroperoxides. Catalysis requires two conserved residues, the peroxidatic cysteine and the resolving cysteine, which are located in helix alpha(2) and helix alpha(3), respectively. The partial unraveling of helices alpha(2) and alpha(3) during catalysis allows for the formation of an intramolecular disulfide between these two residues. Here, we present three structures of Escherichia coli Tpx representing the fully folded (peroxide binding site intact), locally unfolded (disulfide bond), and partially locally unfolded (transitional state) conformations. We also compare known Tpx crystal structures and analyze the sequence-conservation patterns among nearly 300 Tpx sequences. Twelve fully conserved Tpx-specific residues cluster at the active site and dimer interface, and an additional 37 highly conserved residues are mostly located in a cradle providing the environment for helix alpha(2). Using the structures determined here as representative fully folded, transitional, and locally unfolded Tpx conformations, we describe in detail the structural changes associated with catalysis in the Tpx subfamily. Key insights include the description of a conserved hydrophobic collar around the active site, a set of conserved packing interactions between helices alpha(2) and alpha(3) that allow the local unfolding of alpha(2) to trigger the partial unfolding of alpha(3), a conserved dimer interface that anchors the ends of helices alpha(2) and alpha(3) to stabilize the active site during structural transitions, and a conserved set of residues constituting a cradle that stabilizes the two discrete conformations of helix alpha(2) involved in catalysis. The involvement of the dimer interface in stabilizing active-site folding and in forming the hydrophobic collar implies that Tpx is an obligate homodimer and explains the high conservation of interface residues.

  8. Structural changes common to catalysis in the Tpx peroxiredoxin subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Andrea; Sankaran, Banumathi; Poole, Leslie B.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Thiol peroxidases (Tpxs) are dimeric 2-Cys peroxiredoxins from bacteria that preferentially reduce alkyl hydroperoxides. Catalysis requires two conserved residues, the peroxidatic cysteine and the resolving cysteine, which are located in helix α2 and helix α3, respectively. The partial unraveling of helices α2 and α3 during catalysis allows for the formation of an intramolecular disulfide between these two residues. Here we present three structures of Escherichia coli Tpx representing the fully folded (FF, peroxide binding site intact), locally unfolded (LU, disulfide bond), and partially locally unfolded (PLU, transitional state) conformations. We also compare known Tpx crystal structures and analyze the sequence-conservation patterns among nearly 300 Tpx sequences. Twelve fully conserved Tpx-specific residues cluster at the active site and dimer interface, and an additional 37 highly conserved residues are mostly located in a cradle providing the environment for helix α2. Using the structures determined here as representative FF, transitional, and LU Tpx conformations, we describe in detail the structural changes associated with catalysis in the Tpx subfamily. Key insights include the description of a conserved hydrophobic collar around the active site, a set of conserved packing interactions between helices α2 and α3 that allow the local unfolding of α2 to trigger the partial unfolding of α3, a conserved dimer interface that anchors the ends of helices α2 and α3 to stabilize the active site during structural transitions, and a conserved set of residues constituting a cradle that stabilizes the two discrete conformations of helix α2 involved in catalysis. The involvement of the dimer interface in stabilizing active-site folding and in forming the hydrophobic collar implies that Tpx is an obligate homodimer and explains the high conservation of interface residues. PMID:19699750

  9. The structure of Plasmodium vivax phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein suggests a functional motif containing a left-handed helix

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Tracy; Neely, Helen; Boni, Erica; Mueller, Natasha; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of a putative Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) homolog from the eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium vivax has been studied to a resolution of 1.3 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protozoan protein is topologically similar to previously studied members of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) sequence family, but exhibits a distinctive left-handed α-helical region at one side of the canonical phospholipid-binding site. Re-examination of previously determined PEBP structures suggests that the P. vivax protein and yeast carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor may represent a structurally distinct subfamily of the diverse PEBP-sequence family. PMID:17329808

  10. What Determines the Assembly of Transcriptional Network Motifs in Escherichia coli?

    PubMed Central

    Camas, Francisco M.; Poyatos, Juan F.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are constituted by a collection of building blocks known as network motifs. Why do motifs appear? An adaptive model of motif emergence was recently questioned in favor of neutralist scenarios. Here, we provide a new picture of motif assembly in Escherichia coli which partially clarifies these contrasting explanations. This is based on characterizing the linkage between motifs and sensing or response specificity of their constituent transcriptional factors (TFs). We find that sensing specificity influences the distribution of autoregulation, while the tendency of a TF to establish feed-forward loops (FFLs) depends on response specificity, i.e., regulon size. Analysis of the latter pattern reveals that coregulation between large regulon-size TFs is common under a network neutral model, leading to the assembly of a great number of FFLs and bifans. In addition, neutral exclusive regulation also leads to a collection of single input modules -the fourth basic motif. On the whole, and even under the conservative neutralist scenario considered, a substantial group of regulatory structures revealed adaptive. These structures visibly function as fully-fledged working units. PMID:18987754

  11. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  12. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  13. Common antigen structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y.; Tanigaki, N.; Yagi, Y.; Pressman, D.

    1973-01-01

    Antigenic determinants recognizable by rabbits were found to be present on the molecular fragments (48,000 Daltons) which were obtained by papain-solubilization of the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells and which carried the HL-A determinants. Results were obtained which suggest that these antigenic determinants are present in common on these molecular fragments carrying HL-A determinants regardless of their HL-A specificity and are restricted to the molecular fragments which carry HL-A determinants. The study was made by use of radioimmune methods involving the binding of radioiodine-labelled soluble HL-A antigen preparations by anti-HL-A alloantisera and by rabbit antisera raised against the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells. PMID:4119543

  14. Structure and property based design of factor Xa inhibitors: biaryl pyrrolidin-2-ones incorporating basic heterocyclic motifs.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert J; Borthwick, Alan D; Brown, David; Burns-Kurtis, Cynthia L; Campbell, Matthew; Chan, Chuen; Charbaut, Marie; Convery, Máire A; Diallo, Hawa; Hortense, Eric; Irving, Wendy R; Kelly, Henry A; King, N Paul; Kleanthous, Savvas; Mason, Andrew M; Pateman, Anthony J; Patikis, Angela N; Pinto, Ivan L; Pollard, Derek R; Senger, Stefan; Shah, Gita P; Toomey, John R; Watson, Nigel S; Weston, Helen E; Zhou, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Structure and property based drug design was exploited in the synthesis of sulfonamidopyrrolidin-2-one-based factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors, incorporating basic biaryl P4 groups, producing highly potent inhibitors with significant anticoagulant activities and encouraging oral pharmacokinetic profiles.

  15. Structure and property based design of factor Xa inhibitors: pyrrolidin-2-ones with biaryl P4 motifs.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert J; Borthwick, Alan D; Brown, David; Burns-Kurtis, Cynthia L; Campbell, Matthew; Chan, Chuen; Charbaut, Marie; Chung, Chun-wa; Convery, Máire A; Kelly, Henry A; Paul King, N; Kleanthous, Savvas; Mason, Andrew M; Pateman, Anthony J; Patikis, Angela N; Pinto, Ivan L; Pollard, Derek R; Senger, Stefan; Shah, Gita P; Toomey, John R; Watson, Nigel S; Weston, Helen E

    2008-01-01

    Structure and property based drug design was exploited in the synthesis of sulfonamidopyrrolidin-2-one-based factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors, incorporating biaryl P4 groups, producing highly potent inhibitors with encouraging oral pharmacokinetic profiles and significant but sub-optimal anticoagulant activities.

  16. The structure of Plasmodium vivax phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein suggests a functional motif containing a left-handed helix

    SciTech Connect

    Arakaki, Tracy; Neely, Helen; Boni, Erica; Mueller, Natasha; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structure of a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein from P. vivax, a homolog of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), has been solved to a resolution of 1.3 Å. The inferred interaction surface near the anion-binding site is found to include a distinctive left-handed α-helix. The structure of a putative Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) homolog from the eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium vivax has been studied to a resolution of 1.3 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protozoan protein is topologically similar to previously studied members of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) sequence family, but exhibits a distinctive left-handed α-helical region at one side of the canonical phospholipid-binding site. Re-examination of previously determined PEBP structures suggests that the P. vivax protein and yeast carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor may represent a structurally distinct subfamily of the diverse PEBP-sequence family.

  17. Instituting Change in Classroom Discourse Structure: Human and Computer-Based Motif Analysis. WCER Working Paper No. 2009-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Mitchell J.; Kim, Suyeon; Grant, Timothy S.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the structure of discussions in a middle school mathematics classroom before (Year 1) and after (Year 2) teacher participation in professional development activities aimed at enhancing students' participation and the co-construction of mathematical ideas. Changes in the role of teacher and student were accompanied by identifiable…

  18. Childhood maltreatment and the structure of common psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Katherine M.; Eaton, Nicholas R.; Krueger, Robert F.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Wall, Melanie M.; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that various types of childhood maltreatment frequently co-occur and confer risk for multiple psychiatric diagnoses. This non-specific pattern of risk may mean that childhood maltreatment increases vulnerability to numerous specific psychiatric disorders through diverse, specific mechanisms or that childhood maltreatment engenders a generalised liability to dimensions of psychopathology. Although these competing explanations have different implications for intervention, they have never been evaluated empirically. Aims We used a latent variable approach to estimate the associations of childhood maltreatment with underlying dimensions of internalising and externalising psychopathology and with specific disorders after accounting for the latent dimensions. We also examined gender differences in these associations. Method Data were drawn from a nationally representative survey of 34 653 US adults. Lifetime DSM-IV psychiatric disorders were assessed using the AUDADIS-IV. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse and neglect were assessed using validated measures. Analyses controlled for other childhood adversities and sociodemographics. Results The effects were fully mediated through the latent liability dimensions, with an impact on underlying liability levels to internalising and externalising psychopathology rather than specific psychiatric disorders. Important gender differences emerged with physical abuse associated only with externalising liability in men, and only with internalising liability in women. Neglect was not significantly associated with latent liability levels. Conclusions The association between childhood maltreatment and common psychiatric disorders operates through latent liabilities to experience internalising and externalising psychopathology, indicating that the prevention of maltreatment may have a wide range of benefits in reducing the prevalence of many common mental disorders. Different forms of abuse have

  19. Structure of the Single-lobe Myosin Light Chain C in Complex with the Light Chain-binding Domains of Myosin-1C Provides Insights into Divergent IQ Motif Recognition.

    PubMed

    Langelaan, David N; Liburd, Janine; Yang, Yidai; Miller, Emily; Chitayat, Seth; Crawley, Scott W; Côté, Graham P; Smith, Steven P

    2016-09-09

    Myosin light chains are key regulators of class 1 myosins and typically comprise two domains, with calmodulin being the archetypal example. They bind IQ motifs within the myosin neck region and amplify conformational changes in the motor domain. A single lobe light chain, myosin light chain C (MlcC), was recently identified and shown to specifically bind to two sequentially divergent IQ motifs of the Dictyostelium myosin-1C. To provide a molecular basis of this interaction, the structures of apo-MlcC and a 2:1 MlcC·myosin-1C neck complex were determined. The two non-functional EF-hand motifs of MlcC pack together to form a globular four-helix bundle that opens up to expose a central hydrophobic groove, which interacts with the N-terminal portion of the divergent IQ1 and IQ2 motifs. The N- and C-terminal regions of MlcC make critical contacts that contribute to its specific interactions with the myosin-1C divergent IQ motifs, which are contacts that deviate from the traditional mode of calmodulin-IQ recognition.

  20. Structure of the Single-lobe Myosin Light Chain C in Complex with the Light Chain-binding Domains of Myosin-1C Provides Insights into Divergent IQ Motif Recognition *

    PubMed Central

    Langelaan, David N.; Liburd, Janine; Yang, Yidai; Miller, Emily; Chitayat, Seth; Crawley, Scott W.; Côté, Graham P.; Smith, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chains are key regulators of class 1 myosins and typically comprise two domains, with calmodulin being the archetypal example. They bind IQ motifs within the myosin neck region and amplify conformational changes in the motor domain. A single lobe light chain, myosin light chain C (MlcC), was recently identified and shown to specifically bind to two sequentially divergent IQ motifs of the Dictyostelium myosin-1C. To provide a molecular basis of this interaction, the structures of apo-MlcC and a 2:1 MlcC·myosin-1C neck complex were determined. The two non-functional EF-hand motifs of MlcC pack together to form a globular four-helix bundle that opens up to expose a central hydrophobic groove, which interacts with the N-terminal portion of the divergent IQ1 and IQ2 motifs. The N- and C-terminal regions of MlcC make critical contacts that contribute to its specific interactions with the myosin-1C divergent IQ motifs, which are contacts that deviate from the traditional mode of calmodulin-IQ recognition. PMID:27466369

  1. Circular code motifs in transfer and 16S ribosomal RNAs: a possible translation code in genes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2012-04-01

    In 1996, a common trinucleotide circular code, called X, is identified in genes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (Arquès and Michel, 1996). This circular code X is a set of 20 trinucleotides allowing the reading frames in genes to be retrieved locally, i.e. anywhere in genes and in particular without start codons. This reading frame retrieval needs a window length l of 12 nucleotides (l ≥ 12). With a window length strictly less than 12 nucleotides (l < 12), some words of X, called ambiguous words, are found in the shifted frames (the reading frame shifted by one or two nucleotides) preventing the reading frame in genes to be retrieved. Since 1996, these ambiguous words of X were never studied. In the first part of this paper, we identify all the ambiguous words of the common trinucleotide circular code X. With a length l varying from 1 to 11 nucleotides, the type and the occurrence number (multiplicity) of ambiguous words of X are given in each shifted frame. Maximal ambiguous words of X, words which are not factors of another ambiguous words, are also determined. Two probability definitions based on these results show that the common trinucleotide circular code X retrieves the reading frame in genes with a probability of about 90% with a window length of 6 nucleotides, and a probability of 99.9% with a window length of 9 nucleotides (100% with a window length of 12 nucleotides, by definition of a circular code). In the second part of this paper, we identify X circular code motifs (shortly X motifs) in transfer RNA and 16S ribosomal RNA: a tRNA X motif of 26 nucleotides including the anticodon stem-loop and seven 16S rRNA X motifs of length greater or equal to 15 nucleotides. Window lengths of reading frame retrieval with each trinucleotide of these X motifs are also determined. Thanks to the crystal structure 3I8G (Jenner et al., 2010), a 3D visualization of X motifs in the ribosome shows several spatial configurations involving mRNA X motifs, A-tRNA and E-tRNA X

  2. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  3. The crystal structure of the Split End protein SHARP adds a new layer of complexity to proteins containing RNA recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Arieti, Fabiana; Gabus, Caroline; Tambalo, Margherita; Huet, Tiphaine; Round, Adam; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The Split Ends (SPEN) protein was originally discovered in Drosophila in the late 1990s. Since then, homologous proteins have been identified in eukaryotic species ranging from plants to humans. Every family member contains three predicted RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region of the protein. We have determined the crystal structure of the region of the human SPEN homolog that contains these RRMs—the SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), at 2.0 Å resolution. SHARP is a co-regulator of the nuclear receptors. We demonstrate that two of the three RRMs, namely RRM3 and RRM4, interact via a highly conserved interface. Furthermore, we show that the RRM3–RRM4 block is the main platform mediating the stable association with the H12–H13 substructure found in the steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a long, non-coding RNA previously shown to play a crucial role in nuclear receptor transcriptional regulation. We determine that SHARP association with SRA relies on both single- and double-stranded RNA sequences. The crystal structure of the SHARP–RRM fragment, together with the associated RNA-binding studies, extend the repertoire of nucleic acid binding properties of RRM domains suggesting a new hypothesis for a better understanding of SPEN protein functions. PMID:24748666

  4. Structural Fine-Tuning of MIT-Interacting Motif 2 (MIM2) and Allosteric Regulation of ESCRT-III by Vps4 in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Rieko; Obita, Takayuki; Onoue, Kousuke; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki

    2016-06-05

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) facilitates roles in membrane remodeling, such as multivesicular body biogenesis, enveloped virus budding and cell division. In yeast, Vps4 plays a crucial role in intraluminal vesicle formation by disassembling ESCRT proteins. Vps4 is recruited by ESCRT-III proteins to the endosomal membrane through the interaction between the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain of Vps4 and the C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM) of ESCRT-III proteins. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of Vps4-MIT in a complex with Vps20, a member of ESCRT-III, and revealed that Vps20 adopts a unique MIM2 conformation. Based on structural comparisons with other known MIM2s, we have refined the consensus sequence of MIM2. We have shown that another ESCRT-III protein, Ist1, binds to Vps4-MIT via its C-terminal MIM1 with higher affinity than Vps2, but lacks MIM2 by surface plasmon resonance. Surprisingly, the Ist1 MIM1 competed with the MIM2 of Vfa1, a regulator of Vps4, for binding to Vps4-MIT, even though these MIMs bind in non-overlapping sites on the MIT. These findings provide insight into the allosteric recognition of MIMs of ESCRT-III by Vps4 and also the regulation of ESCRT machinery at the last step of membrane remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The crystal structure of the Split End protein SHARP adds a new layer of complexity to proteins containing RNA recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Arieti, Fabiana; Gabus, Caroline; Tambalo, Margherita; Huet, Tiphaine; Round, Adam; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    The Split Ends (SPEN) protein was originally discovered in Drosophila in the late 1990s. Since then, homologous proteins have been identified in eukaryotic species ranging from plants to humans. Every family member contains three predicted RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region of the protein. We have determined the crystal structure of the region of the human SPEN homolog that contains these RRMs-the SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), at 2.0 Å resolution. SHARP is a co-regulator of the nuclear receptors. We demonstrate that two of the three RRMs, namely RRM3 and RRM4, interact via a highly conserved interface. Furthermore, we show that the RRM3-RRM4 block is the main platform mediating the stable association with the H12-H13 substructure found in the steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a long, non-coding RNA previously shown to play a crucial role in nuclear receptor transcriptional regulation. We determine that SHARP association with SRA relies on both single- and double-stranded RNA sequences. The crystal structure of the SHARP-RRM fragment, together with the associated RNA-binding studies, extend the repertoire of nucleic acid binding properties of RRM domains suggesting a new hypothesis for a better understanding of SPEN protein functions.

  6. Structure and property based design of factor Xa inhibitors: pyrrolidin-2-ones with monoaryl P4 motifs.

    PubMed

    Kleanthous, Savvas; Borthwick, Alan D; Brown, David; Burns-Kurtis, Cynthia L; Campbell, Matthew; Chaudry, Laiq; Chan, Chuen; Clarte, Marie-Olive; Convery, Máire A; Harling, John D; Hortense, Eric; Irving, Wendy R; Irvine, Stephanie; Pateman, Anthony J; Patikis, Angela N; Pinto, Ivan L; Pollard, Derek R; Roethka, Theresa J; Senger, Stefan; Shah, Gita P; Stelman, Gary J; Toomey, John R; Watson, Nigel S; West, Robert I; Whittaker, Caroline; Zhou, Ping; Young, Robert J

    2010-01-15

    Structure and property based drug design was exploited in the synthesis of sulfonamidopyrrolidin-2-one-based factor Xa inhibitors, incorporating neutral and basic monoaryl P4 groups, ultimately producing potent inhibitors with effective levels of anticoagulant activity and extended oral pharmacokinetic profiles. However, time dependant inhibition of Cytochrome P450 3A4 was a particular issue with this series. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The p53 cofactor Strap exhibits an unexpected TPR motif and oligonucleotide-binding (OB)-fold structure.

    PubMed

    Adams, Cassandra J; Pike, Ashley C W; Maniam, Sandra; Sharpe, Timothy D; Coutts, Amanda S; Knapp, Stefan; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Bullock, Alex N

    2012-03-06

    Activation of p53 target genes for tumor suppression depends on the stress-specific regulation of transcriptional coactivator complexes. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is activated upon DNA damage by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and Chk2 kinases and is a key regulator of the p53 response. In addition to antagonizing Mdm2, Strap facilitates the recruitment of p53 coactivators, including JMY and p300. Strap is a predicted TPR-repeat protein, but shows only limited sequence identity with any protein of known structure. To address this and to elucidate the molecular mechanism of Strap activity we determined the crystal structure of the full-length protein at 2.05 Å resolution. The structure of Strap reveals an atypical six tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein that also contains an unexpected oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain. This previously unseen domain organization provides an extended superhelical scaffold allowing for protein-protein as well as protein-DNA interaction. We show that both of the TPR and OB-fold domains localize to the chromatin of p53 target genes and exhibit intrinsic regulatory activity necessary for the Strap-dependent p53 response.

  8. The poly dA helix: a new structural mo