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Sample records for common tibial intramedullary

  1. Tibial lengthening over humeral and tibial intramedullary nails in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daoyun; Chen, Jianmin; Jiang, Yao; Liu, Fanggang

    2011-06-01

    Leg discrepancy is common after poliomyelitis. Tibial lengthening is an effective way to solve this problem. It is believed lengthening over a tibial intramedullary nail can provide a more comfortable lengthening process than by the conventional technique. However, patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis typically have narrow intramedullary canals allowing limited space for inserting a tibial intramedullary nail and Kirschner wires. To overcome this problem, we tried using humeral nails instead of tibial nails in the lengthening procedure. In this study, we used humeral nails in 20 tibial lengthening procedures and compared the results with another group of patients who were treated with tibial lengthening over tibial intramedullary nails. The mean consolidation index, percentage of increase and external fixation index did not show significant differences between the two groups. However, less blood loss and shorter operating time were noted in the humeral nail group. More patients encountered difficulty with the inserted intramedullary nail in the tibial nail group procedure. The complications did not show a statistically significant difference between the two techniques on follow-up. In conclusion, we found the humeral nail lengthening technique was more suitable in leg discrepancy patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis.

  2. Distal Locking Screws for Intramedullary Nailing of Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Agathangelidis, Filon; Petsatodis, Georgios; Kirkos, John; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Recently introduced tibial intramedullary nails allow a number of distal screws to be used to reduce the incidence of malalignment and loss of fixation of distal metaphyseal fractures. However, the number of screws and the type of screw configuration to be used remains obscure. This biomechanical study was performed to address this question. Thirty-six Expert tibial nails (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland) were introduced in composite bone models. The models were divided into 4 groups with different distal locking configurations ranging from 2 to 4 screws. A 7-mm gap osteotomy was performed 72 mm from the tibial plafond to simulate a 42-C3 unstable distal tibial fracture. Each group was divided in 3 subgroups and underwent nondestructive biomechanical testing in axial compression, coronal bending, and axial torsion. The passive construct stiffness was measured and statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance. Although some differences were noted between the stiffness of each group, these were not statistically significant in compression (P=.105), bending (P=.801), external rotation (P=.246), and internal rotation (P=.370). This in vitro study showed that, when using the Expert tibial nail for unstable distal tibial fractures, the classic configuration of 2 parallel distal screws could provide the necessary stability under partial weight-bearing conditions. PMID:26840700

  3. [Treatment of tibial shaft fractures by intramedullary locking nailing].

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Robert; Blacha, Jan; Blicharski, Tomasz; Gagala, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Authors analyzed consecutive series of 56 tibial shaft fractures (43 men and 13 women) treated by intramedullary locking nails in years 1993-2004. Age of patients ranged from 17 to 83 years (mean 38 years). The final result was analyzed in 51 patients (91%). The bone union was observed in 50 patients. Fractures united within 6 months in 45 patients (88%), between 8 and 15 months in 5 patients. Operative treatment of non-union was necessary in one patient. The fractures united in anatomical axis in 45 cases, small (less than 10 degrees) valgus deviation was noticed in four patients, whereas five patients with fractures localized in distal part of the tibia had 11-30 degrees valgus deviation. The limb length inequality more than 1 cm was noticed in one case. There was neither infection nor compartment syndrome. One patient died because of fatal pulmonary embolism.

  4. Extramedullary versus intramedullary tibial alignment technique in total knee arthroplasty: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huan Bei; Ying, Xiao Zhou; Chen, Guang Jun; Yang, Xia Qing; Lin, Duo Duo; Li, Zhi Jie; Liu, Hai Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether the use of an extramedullary or intramedullary tibial cutting guide leads to superior mechanical leg axis and implant positioning. A meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials including 350 knees was performed. For the mechanical axis, frontal tibial component angle and tibial slope, there were no significant differences in the mean values or the number of outliers (±3°) between the extramedullary and intramedullary groups. A reduced tourniquet time was associated with the intramedullary guide. No significant difference in the complication rate was noted between the two groups. Neither extramedullary nor intramedullary tibial alignment was more accurate in facilitating the tibial cut. Use of an intramedullary guide results in a shorter tourniquet time and exhibits a similar complication rate as the extramedullary guide. PMID:26598086

  5. Locked META intramedullary nailing fixation for tibial fractures via a suprapatellar approach

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Beigang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intramedullary nailing is an effective approach for treatment of diaphyseal tibial fractures. However, infrapatellar intramedullary nailing can easily cause angulation and rotation displacement at the fracture ends and increase risk of postoperative infection. Intramedullary nailing via the suprapatellar approach was proved with good reduction and fixation. We used locked intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial fractures via a suprapatellar approach in this study. Materials and Methods: 23 patients undergoing tibial fractures fixation by locked META intramedullary nailing via a suprapatellar approach were enrolled between June 2012 and October 2013. There were 18 males and 5 females. The average age was 35.5 years (range 18-60 years). The intraoperative data including operative time and blood loss and postoperative data consisting of hospital stays, fluoroscopy time, fracture healing time and complications were all recorded. Results: The average operative time, blood loss, fluoroscopy time and hospital stay were 78.2 ± 9.1 min, 90.4 ± 23.4 mL, 38.5 ± 6.5 s and 11 ± 3.4 days respectively. The mean followup period in all the patients was 15.5 months. Callus appeared in the patients at average 8 weeks after surgery. The mean knee and ankle range of motion were significantly improved at the last followup (P < 0.05). The average Hospital for Special Surgery and Olerud–Molander scores was 92 ± 4.3 points and 93.6 ± 3.9 points, respectively. No complications were observed. Conclusion: Locked META intramedullary nail fixation via a suprapatellar approach is safe and effective for patients suffering from tibial fractures and earlier functional recovery. PMID:27293289

  6. Long-term quadriceps femoris functional deficits following intramedullary nailing of isolated tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J; Bealle, D P; Kaufer, H; Johnson, D L

    2001-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed 5 male and 5 female patients, age 35.1+/-16 years, height 171.8+/-12 cm, and weight 75.5+/-18 kg (mean+/-SD) who were more than 1 year post isolated tibial fracture (18+/-6 months) and had been treated with an intramedullary tibial nail. Subjects completed a 12-question visual analog scale, a physical symptom and activity of daily living survey, and were also tested for bilateral isokinetic (60 degrees/s) quadriceps femoris and hamstring strength. Knee pain during activity, stiffness, swelling, and buckling were the primary symptomatic complaints. Perceived functional task deficits were greatest for climbing or descending stairs, pivoting, squatting, and walking on uneven surfaces. Involved lower extremity knee extensor and flexor torque production deficits were 25% and 17%, respectively. Early rehabilitation focuses on maintaining adequate operative site bony fixation while providing controlled, progressive, and regular biomechanical loading to restore functionally competent tissue. Following adequate fracture healing, greater emphasis should be placed on lower extremity functional recovery including commonly performed activities of daily living and other functional tasks that are relevant to the patient's disability level. A cyclic rehabilitation program that progresses the weight-bearing environment to facilitate bone and soft tissue healing and neuromuscular re-education is proposed.

  7. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubbu, Rohan A; Ramasubbu, Benjamin M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial fractures is well documented in adults, with existing protocols outlining detailed treatment strategies. No clear guidelines exist for children. Surgical stabilization of tibial fractures in the pediatric population requires implants that do not disrupt the open epiphyses (growth plate). Both elastic stable intramedullary nails and external fixation can be used. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal method of surgical stabilization in the treatment of open tibial fractures in children. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and Embase were searched from their inception to March 2014 using the following advanced search terms (Key words): “open tibia fracture,” “fracture fixation,” “external fixation,” “intramedullary,” and “bone nail.” Only studies in English and pertaining to children with open fractures treated with elastic stable intramedullary nails or external fixation between 1994 and 2014 were included. Twelve clinical studies were critically appraised. Results: Due to a paucity in the literature coupled with a nonsystematic presentation of results, it proved to be very difficult in extracting relevant results from the studies. This was further added by a variation in outcome measures. Consequently, the results we obtained were difficult to draw conclusions from. Conclusion: There is no conclusive evidence or best practice guidelines for their management. Thus, as is highlighted in this study, more research is needed to determine the optimum treatment strategy for this common pediatric injury. The existing literature is of poor quality; consisting mainly of retrospective reviews of patients’ medical records, charts, and radiographs. Carefully designed, high-quality prospective cohort studies utilizing a nationalized multi-hospital approach are needed to improve understanding before protocols and guidelines can be developed and implemented. PMID:27746486

  8. Fatigue load of current tibial intramedullary nail designs: a simulated study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mark; Liu, Qi; Ellis, Thomas J

    2011-06-14

    Comminuted tibial shaft fractures are traditionally treated with statically locked intramedullary nailing and protected weight bearing until fracture callous is evident. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a simulation of immediate full weight bearing following intramedullary nailing of these fractures does not result in implant failure.A comminuted fracture model was created using 2 pieces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. Ten-millimeter-diameter tibial nails (Synthes, Paoli, Pennsylvania; Styker, Mahwah, New Jersey; Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) were inserted within the PVC pipe and secured proximally and distally with 2 or 3 locking bolts. The constructs were cycled in axial compression for 500,000 cycles or until implant failure. The tests were conducted using a modified staircase method (200 N per step), and the fatigue strength was identified for each of the tibial nail designs. When 2 interlocking bolts were placed proximally and distally, the fatigue strength was between 900 and 1100 N for the Stryker nail, 1100 and 1300 N for the Zimmer nail, 1200 and 1400 N for the Synthes nail, and 1400 and 1600 N for the Smith & Nephew nail. Adding a third interlocking bolt proximally and distally to the Smith & Nephew nail increased the fatigue strength by 13% to between 1700 and 1900 N. In all cases, implant failures occurred through the proximal or distal interlocking bolts.Biomechanical tests suggest that current tibial nail designs may permit immediate full weight bearing of comminuted tibial shaft fractures with minimal risk of implant failure. This may facilitate mobilization in the early postoperative period, especially in the multiply injured patient.

  9. Freehand 'figure 4' technique for tibial intramedullary nailing: introduction of technique and review of 87 cases.

    PubMed

    Granville-Chapman, J; Nawaz, S Z; Trompeter, A; Newman, K J; Elliott, D S

    2014-10-01

    Intramedullary nailing of tibial fractures is commonplace, and freehand operative techniques are increasingly popular. The standard freehand method has the knee of the injured leg flexed over a radiolucent bolster. This requires the theatre fluoroscope to swing from antero-posterior to lateral position several times. Furthermore, guide wire placement, reaming and nail insertion are all performed well above most surgeons' shoulder height. Alternatively the leg is hung over the edge of the table, and the assistant must crouch and hold the leg until the nail is passed beyond the fracture. We describe a freehand figure 4 position technique for tibial nailing which is easier both for the surgeons and the radiographer, and present a series of 87 consecutive cases utilising this method. PMID:24013812

  10. Randomized Trial of Reamed and Unreamed Intramedullary Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background: There remains a compelling biological rationale for both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. Previous small trials have left the evidence for either approach inconclusive. We compared reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing with regard to the rates of reoperations and complications in patients with tibial shaft fractures. Methods: We conducted a multicenter, blinded randomized trial of 1319 adults in whom a tibial shaft fracture was treated with either reamed or unreamed intramedullary nailing. Perioperative care was standardized, and reoperations for nonunion before six months were disallowed. The primary composite outcome measured at twelve months postoperatively included bone-grafting, implant exchange, and dynamization in patients with a fracture gap of <1 cm. Infection and fasciotomy were considered as part of the composite outcome, irrespective of the postoperative gap. Results: One thousand two hundred and twenty-six participants (93%) completed one year of follow-up. Of these, 622 patients were randomized to reamed nailing and 604 patients were randomized to unreamed nailing. Among all patients, fifty-seven (4.6%) required implant exchange or bone-grafting because of nonunion. Among all patients, 105 in the reamed nailing group and 114 in the unreamed nailing group experienced a primary outcome event (relative risk, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 1.15). In patients with closed fractures, forty-five (11%) of 416 in the reamed nailing group and sixty-eight (17%) of 410 in the unreamed nailing group experienced a primary event (relative risk, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.47 to 0.96; p = 0.03). This difference was largely due to differences in dynamization. In patients with open fractures, sixty of 206 in the reamed nailing group and forty-six of 194 in the unreamed nailing group experienced a primary event (relative risk, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.78; p = 0

  11. Tibia-based referencing for standard proximal tibial radiographs during intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Choxi, Ankeet A; Dhulipala, Sravan C; Evans, Jason M; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    Limited information exists to define standard tibial radiographs. The purpose of this study was to define new landmarks on the proximal tibia for standard anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In 10 cadaveric knees, fibular head bisection was considered the anteroposterior image, and femoral condyle overlap the lateral image. In another 10 knees, a "twin peaks" anteroposterior view, showing the sharpest profile of the tibial spines, was used. The "flat plateau" lateral image was obtained by aligning the femoral condyles then applying a varus adjustment with overlap of the tibial plateaus. Medial peritendinous approaches were performed, and an entry reamer used to open the medullary canal. A priori analysis showed good to excellent intra-/inter-observer reliability with the new technique (intra-class correlation coefficient ICC 0.61-0.90). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior radiograph was externally rotated 2.7±2.1° compared to the standard radiograph with fibular head bisection. Portal position and incidence of damage to intra-articular structures did not significantly differ between groups (P>.05). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior view and "flat plateau" lateral view can safely be used for nail entry portal creation in the anatomic safe zone. Tibia-based radiographic referencing is useful for intramedullary nailing cases in which knee or proximal tibiofibular joint anatomy is altered. PMID:24340326

  12. Is it safe to place a tibial intramedullary nail through a traumatic knee arthrotomy?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jennifer M; Bible, Jesse E; Mir, Hassan R

    2014-03-01

    We conducted a study to compare postoperative infection and nonunion rates in tibial intramedullary nails (IMNs) placed through either uninjured knees or traumatic knee arthrotomies (KAs). We reviewed all adult tibial diaphyseal fractures (n = 1378) treated with an IMN between 1998 and 2010. Fourteen of these nails were placed through a traumatic KA. Each patient in the study group was assigned 4 separate matched controls for comparison. Controls were matched on age, sex, diabetes, smoking, and fracture classification (closed or open with Gustilo-Anderson). There were no postoperative infections (knee or fracture site) in the traumatic KA group and 2 (3.5%) in the control group (P = .473). One nonunion (7.1%) was noted in the traumatic KA group, and 9 (16%) were noted in the control group (P = .6694). To our knowledge, this is the first study to report outcomes of placing tibial IMNs through traumatic KAs. In our sample, the practice presented no increased risk either for infection (at the knee or the fracture site) or for nonunion with appropriate surgical debridement. PMID:24660176

  13. ANATOMICAL STUDY ON THE LATERAL SUPRAPATELLAR ACCESS ROUTE FOR LOCKED INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS IN TIBIAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Italo Scanavini; Petersen, Pedro Araujo; Júnior, Rames Mattar; Silva, Jorge dos Santos; Reis, Paulo; Gaiarsa, Guilherme Pelosini; Morandi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intramedullary nails are the gold standard for treating tibial shaft fractures. Knee pain is a frequent complication after the procedure. Alternative routes such as the suprapatellar approach for nail insertion are seen as an option for avoiding late postoperative knee pain. The question is whether this approach might give rise to any injury to intra-articular structures of the knee. Methods: This study analyzed the suprapatellar approach and the risk to adjacent structures by reproducing it in 10 knees of five cadavers. Results: This approach was seen to make it easy to locate the entry point, with lesions only occurring in the Hoffa fat. In three of our cases, there were lesions of the chondral surface, which is an obstacle that is difficult to overcome. Conclusion: There is a need to develop specific material to minimize injury to intra-articular structures when using this route. PMID:27042617

  14. [Effect of intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures on the pressure in the deep posterior compartment of the leg].

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Daniel; Orłowski, Jan; Rylski, Walemar; Pomianowski, Stanisław; Zakrzewski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    In the years of 2003-2005 there was carried out an investigation on 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) based on measuring the pressure in the deep posterior compartment during tibial intramedullary nailing with reaming. The pressure was checked in each part of the operation. The mean increase of the pressure was 7% (+ 1.6 mmHg) and didn't cause any risk of compartment syndrome. In our opinion the intramedullary nailing might be consider as a safe procedure. PMID:18402009

  15. Treatment of recalcitrant, multiply operated tibial nonunions with the RIA graft and rh-BMP2 using intramedullary nails.

    PubMed

    Desai, Pratik P; Bell, Anthony J; Suk, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Nonunions of the tibia continue to present some of the most difficult challenges in orthopaedic fracture care. Whether the consequence of the initial presenting injury, co-morbidity or subsequent attempts at fixation, the biological environment is often compromised. Compounding this problem is a lack of consensus on the best approach to addressing nonunited tibia fractures, placing them at risk for multiple, and sometimes ill-informed attempts at nonunion repair. We present nine cases of recalcitrant tibial nonunions which had previously undergone 4 or more attempts at repair treated with a protocol using RIA graft, rh-BMP2 and intramedullary nail fixation. PMID:21144932

  16. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing for severely displaced distal tibial fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kaiying; Cai, Haiqing; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yunlan

    2016-09-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has became a well-accepted method of osteosynthesis of diaphyseal fractures in the skeletally immature patient for many advantages, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the preliminary results of this minimally invasive treatment for severely displaced distal tibial diaphyseal metaphyseal junction (DTDMJ) fractures.This study was carried out over a 6-year period. Twenty-one severely displaced DTDMJ fractures treated using ESIN were evaluated clinically and radiographically. Complications were assessed: the patients were evaluated with regard to nonunion, malunion, infection, growth arrest, leg length discrepancy, implant irritation, and joint function.Mean age at the time of surgery was 7.8 years (range between 5.3 and 14.8 years), mean body weight 34.1 kg, all fractures were transverse or mild oblique type, including 3 open fractures, 5 multifragmented fractures, and 4 fractures associated with polytrauma; 6 cases were treated with antegrade ESIN of tibia while 15 cases need combined retrograde fibula and antegrade tibia fixation treatments. Follow-ups were ranging from 11 to 36 months, 19 fractures showed both clinical and radiographic evidence of healing within 5 months; all cases had full range motion of knee and ankle with symmetrical foot progress angle. Nail removal was at a mean 7.1 months, at final follow-up, no growth arrest or disturbances occurred. Five patients had complications; leg length discrepancy had decreased yet affected 2 patients, 2 cases showed delayed union, and 1 case developed restricted dorsal extension at the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux.ESIN is the treatment of choice for pediatric severely displaced DTDMJ fractures that cannot be reduced by closed reduction or ones that cannot be casted. The advantages include faster fracture healing, excellent functional and cosmetic results, safe and reliable surgical technique, and lower severe complication rate. PMID:27684849

  17. [Kinesitherapy in the early postoperative period following intramedullary osteosynthesis of tibial fractures].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, D V; Vorob'ev, A V; Shimbaretskiĭ, A N; Komkova, O V

    2010-01-01

    A program of postoperative kinesitherapy oriented to normalize the muscular force of the shin, reduce the time needed to restore the weight-bearing function of the affected leg, and treat pain syndrome has been developed for the patients presenting with fractures, nonunions, and pseudoarthrosis of the tibia that were treated using intramedullary osteosynthesis. The efficacy of the program was evaluated in terms of restoration of the muscular force in the shin and improvement of microcirculation in the affected region. PMID:21089206

  18. [Fracture healing after intramedullary nailing of simple tibial shaft fractures. A clinical comparison of reamed and unreamed procedures].

    PubMed

    Ruchholtz, S; Nast-Kolb, D; Betz, A; Schweiberer, L

    1995-07-01

    From January 1990 to June 1993, 56 patients with simple tibial shaft fractures were treated in the Surgical Department of the University/Municipal Hospital in Munich by primary intramedullary nailing, and 44 of these patients were followed up. The results in 17 who underwent unreamed intramedullary nailing (UTN) were compared with those in 27 in whom reamed procedures (RTN) were applied. There was no difference between the two groups in age, fracture type and localization. Soft tissue trauma prevailed, with 35% I degrees open fractures in the UTN group (RTN group, 3%). UTN patients were operated on an average of 45 h after trauma, and RTN patients, 5 days after trauma. Both groups showed about the same proportion of good and very good results (criteria of Johner and Wruhs), with 83% in the UTN group and 84% in the RTN group. The rate of complications was the same in both groups (11%), and we did not find any kind of infection. Two complications requiring revisions (nonunion, perforation of the nail) after UTN stress the importance of two-dimensional barring in the main fragments (especially when close to the metaphysis) and of reduced weight-bearing for 6 weeks after the operation. The slightly greater intramedullar instability after UTN did not cause a higher rate of nonunions or of fracture healing in a wrong position than RTN. The X-ray findings showed beginning osseous reunion after 13 weeks in the UTN group. This corresponds to earlier painless full weight-bearing after an average of 9.7 weeks, as against 12 weeks in the RTN group.

  19. A new, lateral, continuous, combined, femoral–sciatic nerve approach via a single skin puncture for postoperative analgesia in intramedullary tibial nail insertion

    PubMed Central

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Rava, Carlos; Gouveia, Marildo A

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of anterior knee pain following intramedullary tibial nail insertion is high. Continuous peripheral nerve blockade is an alternative method of pain control to opiods. This case illustrates the use of femoral nerve and sciatic nerve peripheral catheters with an elastomeric infusion pump for major intramedullary nailing surgery. Case report A 36-year-old male with fractures to the left leg bones presented for placement of an intramedullary nail under spinal anesthesia. At the end of the procedure, access to the lateral femoral and sciatic continuous nerve block was achieved by using a stimulator connected to a 110 mm 18G Tuohy needle. Postoperative analgesia was provided with a 40-hour infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine (400 mL) at a rate of 10 mL hour−1 with an elastomeric pump. Anesthetic dispersion and contrast were investigated. The analog scale remained with scores below 3 during the 40 hours after surgery, and boluses were not necessary. Conclusion The use of a femoral and sciatic nerve peripheral catheter offered an alternative to conventional pain control. Continuous femoral–sciatic peripheral blockade via a skin puncture with an infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine with elastomeric pumps is a safe and effective procedure in adults. PMID:23630433

  20. Effect of Pulsed Wave Low-Level Laser Therapy on Tibial Complete Osteotomy Model of Fracture Healing With an Intramedullary Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavinia, Atarodalsadat; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Abbasian, Mohammadreza; Vasheghani Farahani, Mohammadmehdi; Fridoni, Mohammadjavad; Zandpazandi, Sara; Ghoreishi, Seyed Kamran; Abdollahifar, Mohammad Amin; Pouriran, Ramin; Bayat, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractures pose a major worldwide challenge to public health, causing tremendous disability for the society and families. According to recent studies, many in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown the positive effects of PW LLLT on osseous tissue. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of infrared pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PW LLLT) on the fracture healing process in a complete tibial osteotomy in a rat model, which was stabilized by an intramedullary pin. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. We performed complete tibial osteotomies in the right tibias for the population of 15 female rats. The rats were divided randomly into three different groups: I) Control rats with untreated bone defects; II) Rats irradiated by a 0.972 J/cm2 PW LLLT; and III) Rats irradiated by a 1.5 J/cm2 PW LLLT. The right tibias were collected six weeks following the surgery and a three-point bending test was performed to gather results. Immediately after biomechanical examination, the fractured bones were prepared for histological examinations. Slides were examined using stereological method. Results: PW LLLT significantly caused an increase in maximum force (N) of biomechanical repair properties for osteotomized tibias in the first and second laser groups (30.0 ± 15.9 and 32.4 ± 13.8 respectively) compared to the control group (8.6 ± 4.5) LSD test, P = 0.019, P = 0.011 respectively). There was a significant increase in the osteoblast count of the first and second laser groups (0.53 ± 0.06, 0.41 ± 0.06 respectively) compared to control group (0.31 ± 0.04) (LSD test, P = 0001, P = 0.007 respectively). Conclusions: This study confirmed the efficacy of PW LLLT on biomechanical strength, trabecular bone volume, callus volume, and osteoblast number of repairing callus in a complete tibial osteotomy animal model at a relatively late stage of the bone

  1. Tibial developmental field defect is the most common lower limb malformation pattern in VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Cappellacci, Sandra; Grammatico, Paola

    2008-05-15

    VACTERL association is one of the most common recognizable patterns of human malformation and has been recently defined as a multiple polytopic developmental field defect. Limb anomalies are a key component of this condition and characteristically reflect perturbation of radial ray development. However, the pattern of appendicular malformations in VACTERL association is wider and includes a broad spectrum of additional and apparently nonspecific anomalies. We report on the sporadic case of a 4-10/12-year-old boy presenting with multiple costovertebral defects, dextrocardia, bilateral radial ray hypo/aplasia, unilateral kidney agenesis and anal atresia. Homolaterally to the more severe radial ray defect and kidney aplasia, he also has a complex lower limb malformation, consisting of distal tibial aplasia, clubfoot, hallucal deficiency and preaxial polydactyly. Literature review identifies 24 additional patients with VACTERL manifestations and lower limb malformations (excluding cases with isolated secondary deformations). Tibial hypo/aplasia with or without additional tibial field defects, reported in about 2/3 (68%) of the patients, represents the most common finding, while involvement of the fibular ray is rare (20%) and very often accompanies tibial anomalies. The relatively high frequency of tibial ray anomalies in VACTERL patients could easily be explained by the principle of homology of the developmental field theory. Careful search of lower limb anomalies of the "tibial type" is, therefore, indicated in all patients with multiple polytopic developmental field defects. PMID:18386801

  2. [Complications after intramedullary nailing of the tibia].

    PubMed

    Pobłocki, Krzysztof; Domaradzki, Marcin; Gawdzik, Jerzy; Prochacki, Paweł; Rajewski, Rajmund

    2011-01-01

    As demonstrated by the experience, treatment of fractures of the tibial intramedullary nail proved to be the most advantageous method of operating as: put the rod runs in the biomechanical axis of the limb, is inside of the bone, is a minimally invasive procedure (carried out with small cuts). Initially, the method of intramedullary nailing was used for the treatment of fractures of the shaft center of the tibia. However, the development of surgical techniques has meant that the method can also be used to treat fractures of the proximal and distal tibia. The most common complications of surgical treatment by this method, apart from infection include: changing the limb axis, rotation of the factions against each other, and degenerative changes in the knee depend on the introduction of nail art. The aim of this study is to analyze in order to treat patients with lower leg fractures using intramedullary nailing. It was carried out based on the collected medical records and clinical examination, which included 45 patients. It was found that the most common complication observed after treatment was varus tibial fragments (5 cases - 11% of respondents). Less commonly observed disorder in the form of the axis of rotation of the limb (1 case) and anteflexion -1 case. During the test showed that the axis of the limb abnormalities were associated with the initial surgery. There was no significant progression of the axis of the limb abnormalities in the period from the date of surgery to complete primary union. Complications in the form of secondary osteoarthritis of the knee reported in studies of other authors, did not occur in any of the analyzed in the work cases. PMID:22420180

  3. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  4. Intramedullary schwannoma of conus medullaris with syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Mete; Koktekir, Ender; Erdem, Yavuz; Celik, Haydar; Sertbas, Idris; Bayar, Mehmet Akif

    2014-06-14

    Intramedullary schwannomas of the spinal cord are rare tumors. They are most commonly observed in the cervical region; however, few have been described in the conus medullaris. The association of intramedullary schwannomas with syringomyelia is also rare. In this report, we present a case of intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris with syringomyelia, which was treated surgically.

  5. Management of aseptic tibial nonunion.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J

    2011-09-01

    Tibial nonunion remains a significant clinical challenge despite advances in surgical management. New techniques to help manage tibial nonunion include extracorporeal shock wave therapy and percutaneous application of bone marrow aspirate. Management strategies vary based on the type of nonunion: aseptic or infected, and atrophic or hypertrophic. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgical management in patients with stable hypertrophic nonunion. New fixation options include locked plates and intramedullary compression nails. Novel methods of external fixation have been developed for bone graft harvest from the intramedullary canal. Several biologic adjuncts also are available, including bone marrow aspirates, stem cells, and bone morphogenetic protein. PMID:21885702

  6. In Vivo MR Microneurography of the Tibial and Common Peroneal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Felisaz, Paolo F.; Chang, Eric Y.; Montagna, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia

    2014-01-01

    MR microneurography is a noninvasive technique that provides visualization of the microanatomy of peripheral nerves, otherwise available only with histopathology. The objective of this study was to present a protocol to visualize the microstructure of peripheral nerves in vivo, using a 3T MRI scanner with a clinical set of coils and sequences. The tibial and the common peroneal nerves of healthy volunteers were imaged above the medial malleolus and at the level of the fibular head, respectively. The acquired images provided details about the internal structure of peripheral nerves, with visualization of the fascicles, the interfascicular fat, the epineurium, and the perineurium. MR microneurography can be performed in a clinical setting with acceptable imaging times and can be a potentially powerful tool that complements standard MR neurography. PMID:25548670

  7. In Vivo MR Microneurography of the Tibial and Common Peroneal Nerves.

    PubMed

    Felisaz, Paolo F; Chang, Eric Y; Carne, Irene; Montagna, Stefano; Balducci, Francesco; Maugeri, Giulia; Pichiecchio, Anna; Calliada, Fabrizio; Baldi, Maurizia; Bastianello, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    MR microneurography is a noninvasive technique that provides visualization of the microanatomy of peripheral nerves, otherwise available only with histopathology. The objective of this study was to present a protocol to visualize the microstructure of peripheral nerves in vivo, using a 3T MRI scanner with a clinical set of coils and sequences. The tibial and the common peroneal nerves of healthy volunteers were imaged above the medial malleolus and at the level of the fibular head, respectively. The acquired images provided details about the internal structure of peripheral nerves, with visualization of the fascicles, the interfascicular fat, the epineurium, and the perineurium. MR microneurography can be performed in a clinical setting with acceptable imaging times and can be a potentially powerful tool that complements standard MR neurography. PMID:25548670

  8. Study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedually nails in patients with tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T.): Study rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Surgeons agree on the benefits of operative treatment of tibial fractures – the most common of long bone fractures – with an intramedullary rod or nail. Rates of re-operation remain high – between 23% and 60% in prior trials – and the two alternative nailing approaches, reamed or non-reamed, each have a compelling biological rationale and strong proponents, resulting in ongoing controversy regarding which is better. Methods/Design The objective of this trial was to assess the impact of reamed versus non-reamed intramedullary nailing on rates of re-operation in patients with open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft. The study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T) was a multi-center, randomized trial including 29 clinical sites in Canada, the United States and the Netherlands which enrolled 1200 skeletally mature patients with open (Gustilo Types I-IIIB) or closed (Tscherne Types 0–3) fractures of the tibial shaft amenable to surgical treatment with an intramedullary nail. Patients received a statically locked intramedullary nail with either reamed or non-reamed insertion. The first strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail following reaming to enlarge the intramedullary canal (Reamed Group). The second treatment strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail without prior reaming of the intramedullary canal (Non-Reamed Group). Patients, outcome assessors, and data analysts were blinded to treatment allocation. Peri-operative care was standardized, and re-operations before 6 months were proscribed. Patients were followed at discharge, 2 weeks post-discharge, and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post surgery. A committee, blinded to allocation, adjudicated all outcomes. Discussion The primary outcome was re-operation to promote healing, treat infection, or preserve the limb (fasciotomy for compartment syndrome after nailing). The primary

  9. Flexible Intramedullary Nailing of Unstable and/or Open Tibia Shaft Fractures in the Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Nirav K

    2016-06-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are common injuries in the pediatric population, and can be treated conservatively the vast majority of the time. Yet, it is important to recognize that open and/or unstable tibial shaft fractures represent a different entity. Rigid intramedullary devices are generally contraindicated because of the skeletal immaturity of these patients, and external fixation is associated with a high complication rate. As a result, flexible nailing is being utilized with increasing frequency. It is essential for the clinician to understand the pearls and pitfalls associated with the utilization of these flexible nails; particularly in regards to their immediate use in the context of open fractures and the risk of compartment syndrome postoperatively after fixation. PMID:27078231

  10. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord ependymoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Ependymomas are the most commonly occurring intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. With few exceptions these tumors are histologically benign, although they exhibit some biologic variability with respect to growth rate. While unencapsulated, spinal ependymomas are non-infiltrative and present a clear margin of demarcation from the surrounding spinal cord that serves as an effective dissection plane. This video demonstrates the technique of microsurgical resection of an intramedullary ependymoma through a posterior midline myelotomy. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/lcHhymSvSqU. PMID:25175587

  11. [Rare anatomical variation of absence of the sciatic nerve: completely substituted by the tibial and common fibular nerve].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo; Melo, Catarina; Bernardes, António

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: Existem várias publicações referindo variantes anatómicas do nervo ciático, algumas associadas a síndromes clínicos (como sendo a síndrome do músculo piriforme). Neste contexto, pretendemos apresentar uma variante anatómica rara do nervo ciático.Casos clínicos: Dois cadáveres leucodérmicos, masculinos, com 74 e 78 anos, falecidos de morte natural, sem patologia do membro inferior. Em ambos os casos, observou-se ausência do nervo ciático direito, tendo os nervos tibial e fibular comum origem e trajecto independentes, desde a sua origem nas raízes lombo-sagradas até à região poplítea. O nervo ciático contralateral apresentava a anatomia habitual.Discussão: Analisando a literatura, na Medline, realçamos que apresentamos dois casos raros de ausência do nervo ciático, com origem e trajecto independentes dos nervos tibial e fibular comum. Esta variante poderá ter implicações clínicas, nomeadamente ser um factor de risco para o insucesso de bloqueios anestésicos poplíteos e para a síndrome do músculo piriforme.

  12. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27026999

  13. Spinal ependymomas. Part 1: Intramedullary ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Klekamp, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Ependymomas represent the most common intramedullary tumor in adults. Despite their usually well-defined dissection plane, surgical morbidity has been documented to be considerably higher compared with other intramedullary entities. This study presents an analysis of risk factors for surgical morbidity and data on long-term results for intramedullary ependymomas. METHODS Among 1447 patients with tumors of the spinal canal treated between 1980 and 2014, 309 patients presented with intramedullary tumors. One hundred patients with intramedullary ependymomas underwent 102 operations. Mean age was 44 ± 15 years (range 8-74 years). Patients were followed by outpatient visits and questionnaires, with a mean follow-up of 77 ± 91 months. Short-term results were determined for individual symptoms and the McCormick Scale, whereas tumor recurrence rates were calculated with Kaplan-Meier statistics. RESULTS Compared with cervical ependymomas, those of the thoracic spine were associated with more severe motor deficits and gait problems at presentation. A total of 86.3% of patients with intramedullary ependymomas underwent gross-total resection (GTR). A low preoperative McCormick grade and first surgery were the strongest predictors for a GTR. Postoperatively, 67.6% of patients demonstrated a worse neurological state at discharge from the hospital. This deterioration was transient for 40.1% of the patients and permanent for 27.5%. In the long term, the McCormick grade remained unchanged from the preoperative grade in 74.5% of patients, while it was improved in 5.9% of patients and increased after surgery in 19.6% of patients. According to a multivariate analysis, the risk of permanent morbidity increased with a thoracic level of the ependymoma, advanced age, a long clinical history, presence of a tumor hemorrhage, and surgery on a recurrent tumor. In the long term, tumor recurrence rates correlated significantly with the amount of resection (4.2% and 18.5% in 20 years

  14. Spinal Intramedullary Cysticercosis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Bin; Ge, Pengfei; Yang, Hongfa; Bi, Chunhua; Li, Yiping

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, involvement of the central nervous system by taenia solium, is one of the most common parasitic diseases of the CNS. However, spinal involvement by neurocysticercosis is uncommon. Here, we reported a 40-year-old woman with intramedullary cysticercosis in the thoracic spinal cord. MRI revealed two well-defined round intramedullary lesions at T4 and T5 vertebral levels, which were homogeneously hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI with peripheral edema. Since the patient had progressive neurological deficits, surgery was performed to decompress the spinal cord. Histopathology examination of the removed lesion proved it was intramedullary cysticercosis. In this report, we also discussed the principles of diagnosis and treatment of intramedullary cysticercosis in combination of literature review. PMID:21814474

  15. [Difficulties and complications while treating long bone fractures with locked intramedullary nailing].

    PubMed

    Blacha, J; Gaweda, K

    1997-01-01

    Retrospective assessment of results of treatment for femoral or tibial fracture and/or malunion in 33 patients (10 females and 23 males) operated on at Orthopedic Department in Lublin during last 4 years are presented. All patients had locked intramedullary nailing done, all fractures healed. Pitfalls and complications of the method at every stage of treatment are presented on the basis of literature and author's own experience. Means for avoidance of the complications are discussed. The method of locked intramedullary nailing proved to be liberal for technical errors at surgery.

  16. Cervical intramedullary schwannoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nicácio, Jardel Mendonça; Rodrigues, José Carlos; Galles, Marcos Henrique Lima; Faquini, Igor Vilela; de Brito Pereira, Clemente Augusto; Ganau, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Intramedullary schwannomas unrelated with neurofibromatosis are uncommon tumors, but if correctly diagnosed and properly treated they may have a good prognosis. They have a wide range of clinical presentations, commonly presenting as a slowly progressive motor or sensory syndrome. We present a case report of a patient without neurofibromatosis with a surgically treated cervical intramedullary schwannoma. PMID:21139923

  17. Tibial stress injuries: decisive diagnosis and treatment of 'shin splints'.

    PubMed

    Couture, Christopher J; Karlson, Kristine A

    2002-06-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called 'shin splints,' often result when bone remodeling processes adapt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who care for athletic patients need a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are implications for appropriate diagnosis, management, and prevention.

  18. Tibial Stress Injuries: Decisive Diagnosis and Treatment of "Shin Splints."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Christopher J.; Karlson, Kristine A.

    2002-01-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called shin splints, often result when bone remodeling processes adopt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who are caring for athletic patients must have a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are…

  19. The radiographic union scale in tibial (RUST) fractures

    PubMed Central

    Clement, N. D.; Tawonsawatruk, T.; Simpson, C. J.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The radiographic union score for tibial (RUST) fractures was developed by Whelan et al to assess the healing of tibial fractures following intramedullary nailing. In the current study, the repeatability and reliability of the RUST score was evaluated in an independent centre (a) using the original description, (b) after further interpretation of the description of the score, and (c) with the immediate post-operative radiograph available for comparison. Methods A total of 15 radiographs of tibial shaft fractures treated by intramedullary nailing (IM) were scored by three observers using the RUST system. Following discussion on how the criteria of the RUST system should be implemented, 45 sets (i.e. AP and lateral) of radiographs of IM nailed tibial fractures were scored by five observers. Finally, these 45 sets of radiographs were rescored with the baseline post-operative radiograph available for comparison. Results The initial intraclass correlation (ICC) on the first 15 sets of radiographs was 0.67 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). However, the original description was being interpreted in different ways. After agreeing on the interpretation, the ICC on the second cohort improved to 0.75. The ICC improved even further to 0.79, when the baseline post-operative radiographs were available for comparison. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the RUST scoring system is a reliable and repeatable outcome measure for assessing tibial fracture healing. Further improvement in the reliability of the scoring system can be obtained if the radiographs are compared with the baseline post-operative radiographs. Cite this article: Mr J.M. Leow. The radiographic union scale in tibial (RUST) fractures: Reliability of the outcome measure at an independent centre. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:116–121. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000628. PMID:27073210

  20. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord hemangioblastomas account for about 10% of spinal cord tumors. They usually arise from the dorsolateral pia mater and are characterized by their significant vascularity. The principles and techniques of safe resection are different than those employed for the more commonly occurring intramedullary glial tumors (e.g. ependymoma, astrocytoma) and consist of circumferential detachment of the tumor margin from the surrounding normal pia. This video demonstrates the microsurgical techniques of resection of a thoracic spinal cord hemangioblastoma. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/yT5KLi4VyAo. PMID:25175571

  1. Staying Out of Trouble Performing Intramedullary Nailing of Forearm Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric diaphyseal forearm fractures occur commonly and often require reduction with stabilization. Intramedullary flexible nails provide an effective method for stabilizing and maintaining reduction of these fractures. There are a few specific technical pearls that can be implemented to improve efficiency of nail placement and minimize postoperative complications, such as painful hardware and compartment syndrome. PMID:27078233

  2. [Tibial periostitis ("medial tibial stress syndrome")].

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Etienne

    2003-06-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is characterised by complaints along the posteromedial tibia. Runners and athletes involved in jumping activities may develop this syndrome. Increased stress to stabilize the foot especially when excessive pronation is present explain the occurrence this lesion.

  3. Comparison of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail and interlocking intramedullary nail in the treatment of long bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical effects of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail (RSIN) and interlocking intramedullary nail (IIN) for long bone fractures. Methods A retrospective study was performed in 1,704 patients who suffered bone fractures and underwent RSIN or IIN operation in our hospital between March 1999 and March 2013, including 494 with femoral fractures, 572 with humeral fractures, and 638 with tibial fractures. Among them, 634 patients were followed up for more than 1 year. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative complications, healing rate, and the excellent and good rate of functional recovery were compared between two groups. Results Compared with IIN group, RSIN group exhibited significantly shorter operative time and less intraoperative blood loss no matter for humeral, femoral, or tibial fractures (all p < 0.001). The healing rate in patients with more than 1 year follow-up was significantly higher in RSIN group for femoral and tibial fractures (both p < 0.05). In RSIN group, no nail breakage or loosening occurred, but radial nerve injury and incision infection were respectively observed in one patient with humeral fracture. In IIN group, nail breakage or loosening occurred in 7 patients with femoral fractures and 16 patients with tibial fractures, radial nerve injury was observed in 8 patients with humeral fractures, and incision infection was present in 2 patients with humeral fractures and 1 patient with femoral fracture. The complication rate of IIN group was significantly higher than that of RSIN group (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the excellent and good rate of shoulder, elbow, knee, and ankle joint functional recovery between RSIN group and IIN group. Conclusion RSIN may be a reliable and practical alternative method for the treatment of long bone fractures. PMID:25047454

  4. [Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma: Case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Suárez, Javier; Barrio-Fernández, Patricia; Ibáñez-Plágaro, Francisco Javier; Ribas-Ariño, Teresa; Calvo-Calleja, Pablo; Mostaza-Saavedra, Antonio Luis

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastases are very rare and usually associated with lung or breast cancer, with gastric origin being exceptional. Their clinical onset tends to be faster than that of primary intramedullary tumours. The most common early symptoms of intramedullary spinal cord metastasis are motor deficit in one or more limbs, pain, sensory loss, and sphincter disturbances. The appearance of a rapidly progressive Brown-Séquard syndrome in an oncology patient should orientate the diagnosis of this condition. The prognosis is very poor, with a median survival of 4 months. However, recent research has shown that surgery could offer a slight benefit in survival and functionality. The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a gastric carcinoma, as well as a literature review of this topic. It has been found that this case is the fourth one reported in the literature.

  5. Recurrent patellar tendon rupture in a patient after intramedullary nailing of the tibia: reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Jagow, Devin M; Garcia, Branden J; Yacoubian, Stephan V; Yacoubian, Shahan V

    2015-05-01

    Various complications after intramedullary (IM) nailing of the tibia have been reported, the most common of which are anterior knee pain and symptoms similar to patella tendonitis. Complete rupture of the patellar tendon after IM nailing of the tibia has been reported on 2 occasions, in conjunction with predisposing patient factors, such as systemic disease or a proud tibial nail. Patellar tendon ruptures are disabling injuries that can be technically difficult to repair because of the poor quality of remaining tendon tissue, quadriceps muscle atrophy and/or contracture, and scar-tissue formation. Many methods have described the surgical reconstruction of the knee extensor mechanism, which is most commonly performed after total knee arthroplasty. We report the successful surgical and clinical outcome of patellar tendon reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in a patient subject to late and recurrent ruptures after IM nailing of the tibia through a mid-patellar tendon-splitting approach. Seven months after tendon reconstruction, the patient exhibited full knee flexion, an extension lag of 10º, 4/5 quadriceps strength, and return to her baseline ambulatory status.

  6. Tibial Bone Density in Athletes With Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Özgürbüz, Cengizhan; Yüksel, Oğuz; Ergün, Metin; İşlegen, Çetin; Taskiran, Emin; Denerel, Nevzad; Karamizrak, Oğuz

    2011-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common overuse injury of the lower extremity predominantly observed in weight bearing activities. Knowledge about the pathological lesions and their pathophysiology is still limited. Only a single study was found to have investigated tibial bone density in the pain region, revealing lower density in athletes with long standing (range, 5-120 month) MTSS. In a follow-up study, bone density was determined to return to normal levels after recovery. The purpose of the present study was to investigate tibial bone density in athletes with shorter MTSS history (range, 3-10 weeks). A total of 11 athletes (7 males, 4 females) diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome were included in the study. The control group consisted of 11 regularly exercising individuals (7 males, 4 females). Tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Total calcium intake was calculated by evaluating detailed nutrition history. No statistically significant differences were found in the tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities between the groups. No statistically significant difference was found among groups, considering for calcium intake. Tibial bone densities were not lower in athletes with MTSS of 5.0 weeks mean duration (range, 3-10 weeks) compared to the healthy control group. Longitudinal studies with regular tibial bone density measurements in heavily trained athletes are necessary to investigate tibial density alterations in MTSS developing athletes during the course of the symptoms. Key points Tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. No differences were found between the MTSS group (MTSS history 3-10 weeks) and the healthy athletes group. PMID:24149568

  7. Tibial bone density in athletes with medial tibial stress syndrome: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ozgürbüz, Cengizhan; Yüksel, Oğuz; Ergün, Metin; Işlegen, Cetin; Taskiran, Emin; Denerel, Nevzad; Karamizrak, Oğuz

    2011-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common overuse injury of the lower extremity predominantly observed in weight bearing activities. Knowledge about the pathological lesions and their pathophysiology is still limited. Only a single study was found to have investigated tibial bone density in the pain region, revealing lower density in athletes with long standing (range, 5-120 month) MTSS. In a follow-up study, bone density was determined to return to normal levels after recovery. The purpose of the present study was to investigate tibial bone density in athletes with shorter MTSS history (range, 3-10 weeks). A total of 11 athletes (7 males, 4 females) diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome were included in the study. The control group consisted of 11 regularly exercising individuals (7 males, 4 females). Tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Total calcium intake was calculated by evaluating detailed nutrition history. No statistically significant differences were found in the tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities between the groups. No statistically significant difference was found among groups, considering for calcium intake. Tibial bone densities were not lower in athletes with MTSS of 5.0 weeks mean duration (range, 3-10 weeks) compared to the healthy control group. Longitudinal studies with regular tibial bone density measurements in heavily trained athletes are necessary to investigate tibial density alterations in MTSS developing athletes during the course of the symptoms. Key pointsTibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry.No differences were found between the MTSS group (MTSS history 3-10 weeks) and the healthy athletes group.

  8. Intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis of periurethral adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakonar, H H; Thomas, A; Lind, C R P

    2011-04-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis to the conus medullaris is very rare. We report a 44-year-old woman with an intra-axial conus medullaris metastasis from periurethral adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature. We also discuss the clinical features, possible pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment options for intramedullary spinal cord metastasis to the conus medullaris.

  9. Retropatellar nailing and condylar bolts for complex fractures of the tibial plateau: technique, pilot study and rationale.

    PubMed

    Garnavos, Christos

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, condylar compression bolts and intramedullary nailing with the use of a traditional transpatellar tendon approach were employed for the management of non-impacted complex fractures of the tibia plateau. However, there were intra-operative difficulties, related to the surgical approach that could jeopardise fracture reduction and contribute to sub-optimal outcomes. The purpose of this study is to introduce the retropatellar approach for the management of complex tibial plateau fractures with intramedullary nailing and condylar compression bolts that avoid the pitfalls created by the traditional transpatellar approach.

  10. [Suprapatellar approach to tibial medullary nailing with electromagnetic field-guided distal locking].

    PubMed

    Rueger, J M; Rücker, A H; Hoffmann, M

    2015-04-01

    Closed tibial shaft fractures are the domain of intramedullary nailing. With the introduction of new nail designs and technologies, even small, dislocated distal fragments can be anatomically aligned and safely fixed. Unsolved or to a lesser degree controlled are the problems of distal locking in the freehand technique, which can still be difficult and can lead to a significant radiation exposure, and how to control very short proximal tibial fragments in metaphyseal tibial fractures or tibial segmental fractures, where the proximal fracture line also runs through the metaphysis.By using a suprapatellar approach, i.e. a skin incision proximal to the patella with an entry point into the tibial bone from within the knee at the same site as for a standard infrapatellar approach, and then nailing the tibia in a semi-extended position, i.e. the knee is only flexed 10-20°, the intraoperative dislocation of a short proximal fragment can be avoided. The main indications for semi-extended tibial nailing are a short diaphyseal fragment in an isolated tibial shaft fracture, a segmental fracture where the proximal fracture line is metaphyseal and in patients where infrapatellar soft tissues are compromised.The use of the electromagnetic guidance system SureShot® generates reliable and reproducible results, reduces the operating time and is independent from radiation for distal locking.

  11. Medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reshef, Noam; Guelich, David R

    2012-04-01

    MTSS is a benign, though painful, condition, and a common problem in the running athlete. It is prevalent among military personnel, runners, and dancers, showing an incidence of 4% to 35%. Common names for this problem include shin splints, soleus syndrome, tibial stress syndrome, and periostitis. The exact cause of this condition is unknown. Previous theories included an inflammatory response of the periosteum or periosteal traction reaction. More recent evidence suggests a painful stress reaction of bone. The most proven risk factors are hyperpronation of the foot, female sex, and history of previous MTSS. Patient evaluation is based on meticulous history taking and physical examination. Even though the diagnosis remains clinical, imaging studies, such as plain radiographs and bone scans are usually sufficient, although MRI is useful in borderline cases to rule out more significant pathology. Conservative treatment is almost always successful and includes several options; though none has proven more superior to rest. Prevention programs do not seem to influence the rate of MTSS, though shock-absorbing insoles have reduced MTSS rates in military personnel, and ESWT has shortened the duration of symptoms. Surgery is rarely indicated but has shown some promising results in patients who have not responded to all conservative options.

  12. Tibial Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, John J; Bowman, Eric N; Phillips, Barry B; Weinlein, John C

    2016-10-01

    Tibial stress fractures are common in the athlete. There are various causes of these fractures, the most common being a sudden increase in training intensity. Most of these injuries are treated conservatively; however, some may require operative intervention. Intervention is mostly dictated by location of the fracture and failure of conservative treatment. There are several surgical options available to the treating surgeon, each with advantages and disadvantages. The physician must understand the nature of the fracture and the likelihood for it to heal in a timely manner in order to best treat these fractures in this patient subset. PMID:27637660

  13. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  14. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  15. Dynamic Hydraulic Fluid Stimulation Regulated Intramedullary Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Minyi; Serra-Hsu, Frederick; Bethel, Neville; Lin, Liangjun; Ferreri, Suzanne; Cheng, Jiqi; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Physical signals within bone, i.e. generated from mechanical loading, have the potential to initiate skeletal adaptation. Strong evidence has pointed to bone fluid flow (BFF) as a media between an external load and the bone cells, in which altered velocity and pressure can ultimately initiate the mechanotransduction and the remodeling process within bone. Load-induced BFF can be altered by factors such as intramedullary pressure (ImP) and/or bone matrix strain, mediating bone adaptation. Previous studies have shown that BFF induced by ImP alone, with minimum bone strain, can initiate bone remodeling. However, identifying induced ImP dynamics and bone strain factor in vivo using a non-invasive method still remains challenging. To apply ImP as a means for alteration of BFF, it was hypothesized that non-invasive dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS) can induce local ImP with minimal bone strain to potentially elicit osteogenic adaptive responses via bone-muscle coupling. The goal of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects on local and distant ImP and strain in response to a range of loading frequencies using DHS. Simultaneous femoral and tibial ImP and bone strain values were measured in three 15-month-old female Sprague Dawley rats during DHS loading on the tibia with frequencies of 1Hz to 10Hz. DHS showed noticeable effects on ImP induction in the stimulated tibia in a nonlinear fashion in response to DHS over the range of loading frequencies, where peaked at 2Hz. DHS at various loading frequencies generated minimal bone strain in the tibiae. Maximal bone strain measured at all loading frequencies was less than 8με. No detectable induction of ImP or bone strain was observed in the femur. This study suggested that oscillatory DHS may regulate the local fluid dynamics with minimal mechanical strain in bone, which serves critically in bone adaptation. These results clearly implied DHS’s potential as an effective, non-invasive intervention for osteopenia and

  16. Tibial Tubercle Avulsion.

    PubMed

    Floyd, T; Picetti, G D; Schneider, F R

    1989-08-01

    In brief: Tibial tubercle avulsion is an uncommon injury that has a peak incidence in early adolescence near the time of physeal closure. Because growth arrest and deformation can follow this injury, immediate diagnosis and treatment are essential. In this case a 14-year-old boy sustained a type 2 tibial tubercle avulsion while playing basketball and could not walk without assistance. Closed reduction was not possible because of soft-tissue interposition.

  17. Intramedullary cement osteosynthesis (IMCO): a pilot study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Mirzasadeghi, Alireza; Narayanan, Sri Subanesh; Ng, Min Hwei; Sanaei, Reza; Cheng, Chen Hui; Bajuri, Mohd Yazid; Shukur, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The application of bone substitutes and cements has a long standing history in augmenting fractures as a complement to routine fracture fixation techniques. Nevertheless, such use is almost always in conjunction with definite means of fracture fixation such as intramedullary pins or bone plates. The idea of using biomaterials as the primary fixation bears the possibility of simultaneous fixation and bone enhancement. Intramedullary recruitment of bone cements is suggested in this study to achieve this goal. However, as the method needs primary testings in animal models before human implementation, and since the degree of ambulation is not predictable in animals, this pilot study only evaluates the outcomes regarding the feasibility and safety of this method in the presence of primary bone fixators. A number of two sheep were used in this study. Tibial transverse osteotomies were performed in both animals followed by external skeletal fixation. The medullary canals, which have already been prepared by removing the marrow through proximal and distal drill holes, were then injected with calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The outcomes were evaluated postoperatively by standard survey radiographs, morphology, histology and biomechanical testings. Healing processes appeared uncomplicated until week four where one bone fracture recurred due to external fixator failure. The results showed 56% and 48% cortical thickening, compared to the opposite site, in the fracture site and proximal and distal diaphyses respectively. This bone augmentative effect resulted in 264% increase in bending strength of the fracture site and 148% increase of the same value in the adjacent areas of diaphyses. In conclusion, IMCO, using CPC in tibia of sheep, is safe and biocompatible with bone physiology and healing. It possibly can carry the osteopromotive effect of the CPCs to provide a sustained source of bone augmentation throughout the diaphysis. Although the results must be considered

  18. Snapping scapular syndrome secondary to rib intramedullary fixation device

    PubMed Central

    Zaidenberg, Ezequiel E.; Rossi, Luciano A.; Bongiovanni, Santiago L.; Tanoira, Ignacio; Maignon, Gaston; Ranalletta, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    Background Scapulo-thoracic joint disorders, including bursitis and crepitus, are commonly misdiagnosed problems and can be a source of persistent pain and dysfunction Presentation of the case This article describes an unusual case of a snapping scapula syndrome secondary to a migration through the lateral cortex of a rib splint intramedullary fixation device into the scapulothoracic joint. Discussion Recently, the operative fixation of multiple ribs fractures with intramedullary fixation devices has become popular. Despite the good outcomes with new rib splint designs, concern remains about the potential complications related to potential loss of fracture reduction with migration of the wire resulting in pain or additional injury to the surrounding tissues. Conclusion Surgeons should pay attention to any protrusion of intramedullary rib implants, especially in the evaluation of routine X-rays following surgical treatment. We should be aware of the possibility of this rare cause of snapping scapula syndrome to avoid delayed diagnosis and consider removing the implant will resolve the pain. PMID:26629853

  19. Evaluation of an Intramedullary Bone Stabilization System Using a Light-Curable Monomer in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Zani, Brett G.; Baird, Rose; Stanley, James R.L.; Markham, Peter M.; Wilke, Markus; Zeiter, Stephan; Beck, Aswin; Nehrbass, Dirk; Kopia, Gregory A.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Rabiner, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous intramedullary fixation may provide an ideal method for stabilization of bone fractures, while avoiding the need for large tissue dissections. Tibiae in 18 sheep were treated with an intramedullary photodynamic bone stabilization system (PBSS) comprised of a polyethylene terephthalate (Dacron) balloon filled with a monomer and cured with visible light in situ then harvested at 30, 90 or 180 days. In an additional 40 sheep, a mid-shaft tibial osteotomy was performed and stabilized with external fixators or external fixators combined with the PBSS and evaluated at 8, 12 and 26 weeks. Healing and biocompatibility were evaluated by radiographic analysis, microCT and/or histopathology. In non-fractured sheep tibiae, PBSS implants conformably filled the medullary canal, while active cortical bone remodeling and apposition of new periosteal and/or endosteal bone was observed with no significant macroscopic or microscopic observations. Fractured sheep tibiae exhibited increased bone formation inside the osteotomy gap with no significant difference when fixation was augmented by PBSS implants. Periosteal callus size gradually decreased over time and was similar in both treatment groups. No inhibition of endosteal bone remodeling or vascularization was observed with PBSS implants. Intramedullary application of a light curable PBSS is a biocompatible, feasible method for fracture fixation. PMID:25772144

  20. Biological constraints that limit compensation of a common skeletal trait variant lead to inequivalence of tibial function among healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karl J; Centi, Amanda; Duarte, G Felipe; Galloway, Kathleen; Goldman, Haviva; Hampson, Naomi; Lappe, Joan M; Cullen, Diane M; Greeves, Julie; Izard, Rachel; Nindl, Bradley C; Kraemer, William J; Negus, Charles H; Evans, Rachel K

    2011-12-01

    Having a better understanding of how complex systems like bone compensate for the natural variation in bone width to establish mechanical function will benefit efforts to identify traits contributing to fracture risk. Using a collection of pQCT images of the tibial diaphysis from 696 young adult women and men, we tested the hypothesis that bone cells cannot surmount the nonlinear relationship between bone width and whole bone stiffness to establish functional equivalence across a healthy population. Intrinsic cellular constraints limited the degree of compensation, leading to functional inequivalence relative to robustness, with slender tibias being as much as two to three times less stiff relative to body size compared with robust tibias. Using Path Analysis, we identified a network of compensatory trait interactions that explained 79% of the variation in whole-bone bending stiffness. Although slender tibias had significantly less cortical area relative to body size compared with robust tibias, it was the limited range in tissue modulus that was largely responsible for the functional inequivalence. Bone cells coordinately modulated mineralization as well as the cortical porosity associated with internal bone multicellular units (BMU)-based remodeling to adjust tissue modulus to compensate for robustness. Although anecdotal evidence suggests that functional inequivalence is tolerated under normal loading conditions, our concern is that the functional deficit of slender tibias may contribute to fracture susceptibility under extreme loading conditions, such as intense exercise during military training or falls in the elderly. Thus, we show the natural variation in bone robustness was associated with predictable functional deficits that were attributable to cellular constraints limiting the amount of compensation permissible in human long bone. Whether these cellular constraints can be circumvented prophylactically to better equilibrate function among individuals

  1. Prognostic Factors for Predicting Outcomes After Intramedullary Nailing of the Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J.C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J.C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prediction of negative postoperative outcomes after long-bone fracture treatment may help to optimize patient care. We recently completed the Study to Prospectively Evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial Fractures (SPRINT), a large, multicenter trial of reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures in 1226 patients. Using the SPRINT data, we conducted an investigation of baseline and surgical factors to determine any associations with an increased risk of adverse events within one year of intramedullary nailing. Methods: Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, we investigated fifteen baseline and surgical factors for any associations with an increased risk of negative outcomes. Results: There was an increased risk of negative events in patients with a high-energy mechanism of injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.35), a stainless steel compared with a titanium nail (OR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.13), a fracture gap (OR = 2.40; 95% CI, 1.47 to 3.94), and full weight-bearing status after surgery (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.64). There was no increased risk with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, late or early time to surgery, or smoking status. Open fractures had a higher risk of events among patients treated with reamed nailing (OR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.01 to 5.28) but not in patients treated with unreamed nailing (OR = 1.50; 95% CI, 0.92 to 2.47). Patients with open fractures who had wound management either without any additional procedures or with delayed primary closure had a decreased risk of events compared with patients who required subsequent, more complex reconstruction (OR = 0.18 [95% CI, 0.09 to 0.35] and 0.29 [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.62], respectively). Conclusions: We identified several baseline fracture and surgical characteristics that may increase the risk of adverse events in patients with tibial shaft fractures. Surgeons should consider the

  2. Experiences and Conceptualisation of Spinal Intramedullary Tuberculoma Management

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Ashok; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal intramedullary tuberculoma (SIMT) is rare, accounting for 2/100,000 cases of tuberculosis and only 0.2% of all cases of central nervous system(CNS) tuberculosis. We share our experiences of 11 cases of this entity for improving diagnosis and conceptualize the management of this rare disease. Methods The clinical profile, radiological data and management of 11 cases of SIMT which were managed either conservatively or by surgical intervention during last 27 years (1987-2014) were analysed. Results Male:female ratio was 1.75:1. Five cases had associated pulmonary Koch's. Most common site was thoracic cord. Two cases had concurrent multiple intracranial tuberculoma. Most common presentation was paraparesis. X-ray myelography was performed in two patients in the initial period of study suggesting intramedullary pathology. In the subsequent nine cases who had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), seven showed typical "target sign" and conglomerate ring lesion. Out of 8 surgically managed patients, 6 cases improved rapidly and in 2 patients gradual improvement was seen in follow-up. Most common indication of surgical excision was rapid neurological deterioration followed by diagnosis in doubt. Histopathology confirmed tuberculous etiology of the intramedullary lesion in all. Clinical and radiological improvement was seen in all 3 conservatively managed patients in follow-up. Conclusion MRI findings of SIMT were specific and proven histologically correct. Surgical intervention may be indicated if there is no response to chemotherapy, the diagnosis is in doubt, or there is a rapid deterioration in neurological function because surgical outcome is good in these circumstances. PMID:25883661

  3. Intramedullary spinal neurocysticercosis treated successfully with medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shameem; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2014-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis caused by Taenia solium and is a common parasitic disease of the cental nervous system. It usually presents with seizures, headaches, progressively worsening focal neurologic symptoms, visual disturbances, loss of bladder control, etc. However, acute onset symptoms may also be seen. MRI scans can accurately diagnose spinal or cerebral lesions and is also helpful in monitoring progress while on treatment. Albendazole is currently the drug of choice along with steroids for medical management of neurocysticercosis. The case of intramedullary spinal neurocysticercosis was treated with praziquantel.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. (a) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. (a) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod...

  6. Modified Technique of Tibial Tuberosity Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Gopalakrishna; Raad, Abbas; Kotecha, Amit; Chugh, Sanjiv; Mughal, Ejaz

    2015-08-01

    Tibial tuberosity transfer is a well-established procedure in the treatment of patellar instability and in selected cases of anterior knee pain. Several techniques have been advocated in the literature. Some of the common complications associated with this procedure have been pain and discomfort due to prominent screw heads, necessitating their removal; nonunion and delayed union of the osteotomy; and failure of fixation. Tibial fractures have also been reported in some case reports. We present our technique of tibial tuberosity transfer using two 4-mm cannulated screws for stabilization of the tuberosity fragment. We have used this technique either for isolated tibial tuberosity transfer or as part of a combined procedure along with medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in treating patellar instability. Using this technique, we have encountered no patients with wound problems, nonunion, delayed union, or loss of fixation and only 1 patient with a metal work problem needing a second procedure for its removal. We attribute our good outcomes to the preservation of the soft-tissue attachments to the tuberosity fragment; minimal soft-tissue dissection, which allows rapid bony consolidation of the osteotomy, which in turn allows accelerated rehabilitation; and the use of 4-mm cannulated screws for fixation of the osteotomy, minimizing the potential for metal work problems. PMID:26759775

  7. Full versus surface tibial baseplate cementation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Saragaglia, Dominique; Miehlke, Rolf K

    2013-02-01

    The use of a keel in the tibial component during modern primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become common, and its cementation may affect the future performance of the prosthesis. Although proponents of cementing the entire tibial component argue that this technique provides better initial fixation and may prevent aseptic loosening, reasons exist to apply cement only to the tibial baseplate. In this study, 232 patients who underwent TKA using full or surface cementation of the tibial baseplate were evaluated at an average 5.6-year follow-up to assess survivorship and clinical results. The cumulative survival rate at 8 years was 97.1%. With revision of either component for any reason considered the endpoint, no significant difference was noted between full and surface cemented groups. Knee Society Score, range of motion, and femoro-tibial mechanical angle significantly increased postoperatively. Multivariate analysis revealed that good preoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores were related to good postoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores. Follow-up length was a negative predictor of postoperative Knee Society Score. The use of full or surface cementation of the baseplate was unrelated to the postoperative clinical outcomes. Clinical outcomes did not differ according to the tibial component cementation technique. The results of this study suggest that cementing the keel of the tibial component during primary TKA has no advantage for patients. Longer-term follow-up and proper patient randomization are required to confirm these findings.

  8. High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Seong Joon

    2012-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a widely performed procedure to treat medial knee arthrosis. In general, published studies on HTO report good long-term results with a correct patient selection and a precise surgical technique. The ideal candidate for an HTO is a middle aged patient (60 to 65 years of age), with isolated medial osteoarthritis, with good range of motion and without ligamentous instability. Some issues that need resolution remain; these include the choice between opening and closing wedge tibial osteotomy, the graft selection in opening wedge osteotomies, the type of fixation, the comparison with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and whether HTO significantly affects a subsequent total joint replacement. Precise indication, preoperative planning, and operative technique selection are essential to achieve good results. PMID:22708105

  9. Distal Femoral Complications Following Antegrade Intramedullary Nail Placement

    PubMed Central

    Fantry, Amanda J.; Elia, Gregory; Vopat, Bryan G.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    While antegrade nailing for proximal and diaphyseal femur fractures is a commonly utilized fixation method with benefits including early mobilization and high rates of fracture union, both intraoperative and postoperative complications may occur. Intraoperative errors include leg length discrepancy, anterior cortical perforation, malreduction of the fracture, and neurovascular injury, and postoperative complications include nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. This case series reviews complications affecting the distal femur after intramedullary nailing including fracture surrounding a distal femoral interlocking screw (Case #1), nonunion after dynamization with nail penetration into the knee joint (Case #2), and anterior cortical perforation (Case #3). Prevention of intraoperative and postoperative complications surrounding intramedullary nailing requires careful study of the femoral anatomy and nail design specifications (radius of curvature), consideration of the necessity of distal interlocking screws, the need for close radiographic follow-up after nail placement with X-rays of the entire length of the nail, and awareness of possible nail penetration into the knee joint after dynamization. PMID:25874066

  10. New Technique for Tibiotalar Arthrodesis Using a New Intramedullary Nail Device: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Eisenstein, Emmanuel D.; Rodriguez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Ankle arthrodesis is performed in a variety of methods. We propose a new technique for tibiotalar arthrodesis using a newly designed intramedullary nail. Methods. We proposed development of an intramedullary device for ankle arthrodesis which spared the subtalar joint using a sinus tarsi approach. Standard saw bones models and computer assisted modeling and stress analysis were used to develop different nail design geometries and determine the feasibility of insertion. After the final design was constructed, the device was tested on three cadaveric specimens. Results. Four basic nail geometries were developed. The optimal design was composed of two relatively straight segments, each with a different radius of curvature for their respective tibial and talar component. We successfully implemented this design into three cadaveric specimens. Conclusion. Our newly designed tibiotalar nail provides a new technique for isolated tibiotalar fusion. It utilizes the advantages of a tibiotalar calcaneal nail and spares the subtalar joint. This design serves as the foundation for future research to include compression options across the tibiotalar joint and eventual transition to clinical practice.

  11. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus lugdunensis cause pyogenic osteomyelitis in an intramedullary nail model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gahukamble, Abhay Deodas; McDowell, Andrew; Post, Virginia; Salavarrieta Varela, Julian; Rochford, Edward Thomas James; Richards, Robert Geoff; Patrick, Sheila; Moriarty, Thomas Fintan

    2014-05-01

    Propionibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are opportunistic pathogens implicated in prosthetic joint and fracture fixation device-related infections. The purpose of this study was to determine whether P. acnes and the CoNS species Staphylococcus lugdunensis, isolated from an "aseptically failed" prosthetic hip joint and a united intramedullary nail-fixed tibial fracture, respectively, could cause osteomyelitis in an established implant-related osteomyelitis model in rabbits in the absence of wear debris from the implant material. The histological features of P. acnes infection in the in vivo rabbit model were consistent with localized pyogenic osteomyelitis, and a biofilm was present on all explanted intramedullary (IM) nails. The animals displayed no outward signs of infection, such as swelling, lameness, weight loss, or elevated white blood cell count. In contrast, infection with S. lugdunensis resulted in histological features consistent with both pyogenic osteomyelitis and septic arthritis, and all S. lugdunensis-infected animals displayed weight loss and an elevated white blood cell count despite biofilm detection in only two out of six rabbits. The differences in the histological and bacteriological profiles of the two species in this rabbit model of infection are reflective of their different clinical presentations: low-grade infection in the case of P. acnes and acute infection for S. lugdunensis. These results are especially important in light of the growing recognition of chronic P. acnes biofilm infections in prosthetic joint failure and nonunion of fracture fixations, which may be currently reported as "aseptic" failure.

  12. Progression free survival and functional outcome after surgical resection of intramedullary ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Kalil G; Lubelski, Daniel; Miller, Jacob; Steinmetz, Michael P; Shin, John H; Krishnaney, Ajit; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    We present a 15 year institutional analysis of the factors affecting progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients undergoing attempted resection of adult intramedullary spinal cord ependymomas. Intramedullary spinal cord tumors are rare but important clinical entities, and ependymomas are the most commonly encountered intramedullary tumor. In total, 53 adult patients over the span of 15 years were analyzed for OS, PFS, and the effects of plane of dissection (POD) and gross total resection (GTR) on functional and long term outcomes. The mean age was 45 years and median follow-up was 54 months. The follow-up neurological outcome and modified McCormick scale were used to determine the functional outcome. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to calculate progression and survival. The overall ability to achieve GTR was significantly correlated to identification of an intraoperative POD (p<0.001). There was a trend towards increased PFS with the ability to achieve a GTR. There was no significant difference in the pre- and postoperative functional outcome scores. The ability to achieve a GTR is strongly correlated to the identification of a POD in ependymomas. There is a trend towards an increased probability of PFS in intramedullary spinal cord tumors when GTR is achieved. The resection of these tumors is likely to halt, but not reverse, neurological deterioration. PMID:26234635

  13. Anterior tibial striations.

    PubMed

    Daffner, R H

    1984-09-01

    Radiolucent horizontal striations of the anterior cortex of the tibia were seen in 10 athletes who were evaluated for "shin-splints." There were seven basketball players, two professional dancers, and one hurdler. Each patient's history included vigorous leaping in performance of athletic feats. All the lesions were similar in location and appearance and were accompanied by thickening of the anterior tibial cortex. These striations are considered stress fractures and were not observed in a group of runners who were evaluated for shin-splints.

  14. OSTEOSYNTHESIS WITH INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Alvachian Fernandes, Helio Jorge; Saad, Eduardo Abdalla; Reis, Fernando Baldy dos

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a comprehensive review of the literature emphasizing the use of flexible intramedullary nails in the treatment of fractures in children, focusing the treatment of femoral shaft and forearm fractures and emphasizing the importance of the non-surgical approach. Children's age and weight threshold are not well defined for the use of the method. The removal of implants is a controversial matter in the literature, with a trend towards keeping the implants. PMID:27004183

  15. The science and practice of intramedullary nailing

    SciTech Connect

    Browner, B.; Edwards, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Joining contributors from world authorities on specific closed nailing techniques, this book contains the facts, data, opinions and recommendations on each method. The introductory section outlines the conceptual basis for intramedullary nailing, with essays on basic rationale and scientific principles. The initial chapters trace the history of intramedullary nailing and assess its overall significance to fracture management. An important chapter on radiation protection has been included to specifically address the safety concerns that have arisen from the increased use of the image intensifier in closed nailing methods. The following sections, organized with a regional approach covering the proximal femur, middle and distal femur, tibia, and upper extremity are devoted to individual nailing techniques. Wherever possible, the chapters begin with discussion of the rationale for the design and use of the particular closed nailing system. Every system is then analyzed as to indications for surgery, practical techniques, possible complications and methods for avoiding complications. Special techniques are treated in an individual chapter on intramedullary osteotomies.

  16. Unusual Tibial Stress Fracture in a Basketball Player.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, H

    1990-09-01

    In brief Stress fractures of the proximal middle third of the tibia are common; those of the distal tibia are less common; and longitudinal stress fractures are rare. The basketball player in this case report had a rare longitudinal tibial pilon stress fracture, for which few diagnostic or treatment guidelines existed.

  17. Gross total resection of large cervical intramedullary ependymoma: demonstration of microsurgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Cikla, Ulas; Baggott, Chiristopher; Baskaya, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In adolescents and young adults, ependymomas are the most common intramedullary tumors in the spinal cord.These tumors arise from ependymal cell lining the ventricles and spinal canal. The clinical presentation of intramedullary ependymomas are variable and nonspecific. They usually present with diffuse back or neck pain as a chief complaint. Upper and lower motor neuron deficits, numbness which typically progresses from distal to proximal, are other common symptoms. Gross total resection of ependymomas can achieve long-term tumor control with preservation of function. Here we present a 29-year old man who presented with progressive weakness of the left leg, bowel and bladder incontinence. During surgery, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were used and we achieved gross total resection while preserving the spinal cord. The patient made excellent recovery and all of his preoperative deficitis improved completely. He returned to work on postoperative 2-month. PMID:25269050

  18. Use of Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire and the Short Form-36 among Tibial Fracture Patients was Redundant

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores among patients undergoing operative management of tibial fractures. Study Design and Setting Between July 2000 and September 2005, we enrolled 1319 skeletally mature patients with open or closed fractures of the tibial shaft that were managed with intramedullary nailing. Patients were asked to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment and Short Form-36 at discharge and 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. Results Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were highly correlated at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. The difference in mean standardized change scores for the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, from 3 to 12 months post-surgical fixation, was not statistically significant. Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were able to discriminate between healed and non-healed tibial fractures at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgery. Conclusion In patients with tibial shaft fractures, the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index offered no important advantages over the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary score. These results, along with the usefulness of the Short Form-36 for comparing populations, recommends the Short Form-36 for assessing physical function in studies of patients with tibial fractures. PMID:19364637

  19. Comparison of unreamed nailing and external fixation of tibial diastases--mechanical conditions during healing and biological outcome.

    PubMed

    Klein, P; Opitz, M; Schell, H; Taylor, W R; Heller, M O; Kassi, J-P; Kandziora, F; Duda, G N

    2004-09-01

    Locked intramedullary nailing and external fixation are alternatives for the stabilization of tibial shaft fractures. The goal of this study was to determine to what extent the mechanical conditions at the fracture site influence the healing process after unreamed tibial nailing compared to external fixation. A standardized tibial diastasis was stabilized with either a locked unreamed tibial nail or a monolateral fixator in a sheep model. Interfragmentary movements and ground reaction parameters were monitored in vivo throughout the healing period. After sacrifice, the tibiae were examined mechanically and histologically. Bending angles and axial torsion at the fracture site were larger in the nail group within the first five weeks post-operatively. Unlike the fixator group, the operated limb in the nail group did not return to full weight bearing during the treatment period. Mechanical and histomorphometrical observations showed significantly inferior bone healing in the nail group compared to the fixator group. In this study, unreamed nailing of a tibial diastasis did not provide rotational stability of the osteosynthesis and resulted in a significant delay in bone healing.

  20. Lesser Trochanter Migration following Intramedullary Fixation of an Intertrochanteric Femur Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Montoli, Carlo; Pasquali, Cecilia; Paiusco, Elia; Pellecchia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intertrochanteric femur fractures are commonly observed in the elderly and may be associated with a complete fracture of the lesser trochanter in over 50% of cases. The migration of the lesser trochanter secondary to the psoas muscle contracture is a rare event. This case report presents a rare case of sudden groin pain three-week status after intramedullary fixation of a intertrochanteric femur fracture. PMID:27006846

  1. Lesser Trochanter Migration following Intramedullary Fixation of an Intertrochanteric Femur Fracture.

    PubMed

    Montoli, Carlo; Pasquali, Cecilia; Paiusco, Elia; Pellecchia, Vincenzo; Vulcano, Ettore

    2016-01-01

    Intertrochanteric femur fractures are commonly observed in the elderly and may be associated with a complete fracture of the lesser trochanter in over 50% of cases. The migration of the lesser trochanter secondary to the psoas muscle contracture is a rare event. This case report presents a rare case of sudden groin pain three-week status after intramedullary fixation of a intertrochanteric femur fracture. PMID:27006846

  2. Rigid Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures for Patients Age 12 and Younger: Indications and Technique.

    PubMed

    Martus, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are common injuries in the pediatric and adolescent age groups. Rigid intramedullary nailing is an excellent treatment option for older children and adolescents, particularly for length-unstable fractures and larger patients (>49 kg). Appropriate indications, contraindications, and preoperative assessment are described. The rigid nailing surgical technique is detailed including positioning, operative steps, pearls, and pitfalls. Complications and the reported outcomes of lateral trochanteric entry nailing are reviewed from the published series. PMID:27100036

  3. Plating versus intramedullary fixation for mid-shaft clavicle fractures: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Jv; Li, Xu; Wang, Hai-Li; Chen, Zhao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plate fixation and intramedullary fixation are the most commonly used surgical treatment options for mid-shaft clavicle fractures; the latter method has demonstrated better performance in some studies. Objectives. Our aim was to critically review and summarize the literature comparing the outcomes of mid-shaft clavicle fracture treatment with plate fixation or intramedullary fixation to identify the better approach. Search Methods. Potential academic articles were identified from the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1966-2015.5), PubMed (1966-2015.5), EMBASE (1980-2015.5) and ScienceDirect (1966-2015.5). Gray studies were identified from the references of the included literature. Selection Criteria. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs comparing plate fixation and intramedullary fixation for mid-shaft clavicle fracture were included. Data Collection and Analysis. Two reviewers performed independent data abstraction. The I (2) statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. A fixed- or random-effects model was used for the meta-analysis. Results. Six RCTs and nine non-RCTs were retrieved, including 513 patients in the intramedullary fixation group and 521 patients in the plating group. No significant differences in terms of the union rate and shoulder function were found between the groups. Patients in the intramedullary fixation group had a shorter operative time, less blood loss, smaller wound size, and shorter union time than those in the plating group. With respect to complications, significant differences were identified for all complications and major complications (wound infection, nonunion, implant failures, transient brachial plexopathy, and pain after 6 months). Similar secondary complications (symptomatic hardware, hardware irritation, prominence, numbness, hypertrophic callus) were observed in both groups. Conclusions. Intramedullary fixation may be superior to plate fixation in the treatment of mid-shaft clavicle fractures, with similar

  4. Compartment syndrome complicating tibial tubercle avulsion.

    PubMed

    Pape, J M; Goulet, J A; Hensinger, R N

    1993-10-01

    Avulsion of the tibial tubercle is an uncommon physeal injury. Complications from this fracture are infrequent. Adolescent boys developed compartment syndrome after tibial tubercle avulsion. Injury to the soft tissue surrounding the tibial tubercle avulsion may be more extensive than is usually appreciated. The anatomy of the proximal tibia and the tibial tubercle with nearby branches of the anterior tibial recurrent artery suggest a predisposing factor for the development of compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome should be added to the list of possible complications of tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

  5. Radiographic results of an accelerometer-based, handheld surgical navigation system for the tibial resection in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Cross, Michael; Deshmane, Prashant; Jerabek, Seth; Kang, Michael; Mayman, David J

    2011-10-05

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), intramedullary and extramedullary tibial alignment guides are not proven to be highly accurate in obtaining alignment perpendicular to the mechanical axis in the coronal plane. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of an accelerometer-based, handheld surgical navigation system in obtaining a postoperative tibial component alignment within 2° of the intraoperative goal in both the coronal and sagittal planes. A total of 151 TKAs were performed by 2 surgeons using a handheld surgical navigation system to perform the tibial resection. Postoperatively, standing anteroposterior hip-to-ankle radiographs and lateral knee-to-ankle radiographs were performed to determine the varus/valgus alignment and the posterior slope of the tibial components relative to the mechanical axis in both the coronal and sagittal planes. Findings showed that 95.3% of the tibial components were placed within 2° of the intraoperative goal in the coronal plane and 96.1% of the components were placed within 2° of the intraoperative goal in the sagittal plane. Overall, mean postoperative lower-extremity alignment was -0.3°±2.1°, with 97% of patients having an alignment within 3° of a neutral mechanical axis. The handheld surgical navigation system improves the accuracy of the tibial resection and subsequent tibial component alignment in TKA. It is able to combine the accuracy of computer-assisted surgery systems with the ease of use and familiarity of conventional, extramedullary alignment systems, and the ability to adjust both the coronal and sagittal alignments intraoperatively may prove clinically useful in TKA.

  6. A novel surgical technique for transverse sternal bone defects using flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Böcker, W; Euler, E; Schieker, M; Kettler, M; Mutschler, W

    2006-12-01

    Transverse sternal bone defects as a result of surgery or trauma remain an important clinical condition with serious sequelae. Patients sometimes complain of local pain during movement and breathing. Usually, defects are filled with prosthetic materials which remain permanently IN SITU. Small defects can be treated with autogenous bone grafts, whereas large defects are difficult to stabilize with common osteosynthetic techniques. Here, we report a new surgical technique using flexible intramedullary nailing ("Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing"--ESIN or "Embrochage Centro-Medullaire Elastique Stable"--ECMES) to stabilize a sternal defect after surgical removal of an osteochondral lesion. The defect was bridged by two elastic titanium nails and an autogenous corticocancellous bone graft. This new surgical technique showed a good clinical and functional outcome. PMID:17151979

  7. Tibial Plateau Fractures in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Rozell, Joshua C; Vemulapalli, Krishna C; Gary, Joshua L; Donegan, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are common in the elderly population following a low-energy mechanism. Initial evaluation includes an assessment of the soft tissues and surrounding ligaments. Most fractures involve articular depression leading to joint incongruity. Treatment of these fractures may be complicated by osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and medical comorbidities. Optimal reconstruction should restore the mechanical axis, provide a stable construct for mobilization, and reestablish articular congruity. This is accomplished through a variety of internal or external fixation techniques or with acute arthroplasty. Regardless of the treatment modality, particular focus on preservation and maintenance of the soft tissue envelope is paramount. PMID:27551570

  8. Intramedullary mature teratoma of the conus medullaris

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kadir; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Olguner, Semih Kivanc; Sarac, Mustafa Emre; Vural, Sakir Berat

    2016-01-01

    Teratoma is a tumor that derivatives from all three primitive germ layers and spinal intramedullary teratomas are very rare lesions. The primary treatment modality for these tumors is surgical resection, and total resection should be the aim. However, subtotal resection is a valid alternative to prevent traumatizing adjacent functional neural tissue. In this report, we presented a case of a 12-year-old male patient with spinal teratoma of the conus medullaris. We describe the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of this rare disease. PMID:27114670

  9. Intramedullary mature teratoma of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Kadir; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Olguner, Semih Kivanc; Sarac, Mustafa Emre; Vural, Sakir Berat

    2016-01-01

    Teratoma is a tumor that derivatives from all three primitive germ layers and spinal intramedullary teratomas are very rare lesions. The primary treatment modality for these tumors is surgical resection, and total resection should be the aim. However, subtotal resection is a valid alternative to prevent traumatizing adjacent functional neural tissue. In this report, we presented a case of a 12-year-old male patient with spinal teratoma of the conus medullaris. We describe the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of this rare disease.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  11. Hemorrhagic intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the cervical spinal cord presenting with acute-onset quadriparesis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gluf, Wayne M.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Context Hemangioblastomas of the spinal cord are uncommon vascular tumors. Patients commonly present with subtle neurologic findings that are thought to represent growth of the lesion over time. Hemorrhage of an intramedullary hemangioblastoma presenting as acute neurologic deficit is an extremely rare occurrence. Although the cervical spine is the most common location for hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord, there have been no previously published cases in the literature of intramedullary hemorrhage from such a lesion. Findings A 22-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed spinal cord hemangioblastoma presented with sudden-onset dense quadriparesis due to intramedullary hemorrhage in the cervical spinal cord. The patient did not have any clinical findings of von-Hippel Lindau disease. Laminoplasty from C5 to T2 and posterior midline myelotomy for resection of the intramedullary tumor with hematoma evacuation were completed without complication. Conclusion Intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord is uncommon, and hemorrhage from a cervical spinal cord lesion has not previously been reported. Symptoms from these usually indolent lesions are commonly associated with tumor growth, edema, or associated syrinx, whereas devastating acute neurologic deficit from hemorrhage is exceedingly rare. Microsurgical resection should be done in cases of symptomatic lesions and considered in isolated symptomatic lesions without the known diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25029412

  12. Tibial stress fractures in an active duty population: long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Dickens, Jonathan F; Rue, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tibial stress fractures are a common overuse injury among military recruits. The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, long-term effects that tibial stress fractures have on military personnel with respect to physical activity level, completion of military training, recurrence of symptoms, and active duty service. Twenty-six military recruits included in a previous tibial stress fracture study were contacted 10 years after initial injury and asked a series of questions related to any long-term consequences of their tibial stress fracture. Of the 13 patients available for contact, no patients reported any necessary limited duty while on active duty, and no patient reported being separated or discharged from the military as a result of stress fracture. Tibial stress fractures in military recruits are most often an isolated injury and do not affect ability to complete military training or reflect a long-term need for decreased physical activity.

  13. [Infection following centro-medullary nailing of diaphyseal femoral and tibial fractures].

    PubMed

    Lortat-Jacob, A; Sutour, J M; Beaufils, P

    1986-01-01

    The authors have treated 51 cases of infection arising after intramedullary nailing of the femur or tibia. In 3 cases amputation was required, 48 united, but 10 were still draining. The final result was obtained after an average of 15 months. An average of four procedures per patient were needed. All the cases were septic non-unions at the onset of treatment, except 18 cases which had already united. In these cases, simple removal of the femoral nail led to rapid healing. In contrast, healing was less easy to obtain in the tibia. In 33 septic non-unions, 12 femoral and 21 tibial, the best results at the femoral level were obtained by retaining the nail in situ. At the tibial level, retention of the nail was rarely followed by bony union. Removal of the nail and the use of external fixation gave good results for the infection, but rarely resulted in bony union (1 case out of 14). The failures were treated by further operation of bone resection and grafting. The authors recommend, in cases of tibial septic non-union after nailing that primary removal of the nail should be associated with bony resection and external fixation, followed by reconstructive grafting, either by open cancellous grafting extending to the fibula or conventional tibio fibular grafting. In 8 cases, 7 in the femur and 1 in the tibia, the infection extended throughout the entire diaphysis and in 3 of these cases, a large diaphyseal resection was required. PMID:3823510

  14. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus lugdunensis Cause Pyogenic Osteomyelitis in an Intramedullary Nail Model in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gahukamble, Abhay Deodas; McDowell, Andrew; Post, Virginia; Salavarrieta Varela, Julian; Rochford, Edward Thomas James; Richards, Robert Geoff; Patrick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are opportunistic pathogens implicated in prosthetic joint and fracture fixation device-related infections. The purpose of this study was to determine whether P. acnes and the CoNS species Staphylococcus lugdunensis, isolated from an “aseptically failed” prosthetic hip joint and a united intramedullary nail-fixed tibial fracture, respectively, could cause osteomyelitis in an established implant-related osteomyelitis model in rabbits in the absence of wear debris from the implant material. The histological features of P. acnes infection in the in vivo rabbit model were consistent with localized pyogenic osteomyelitis, and a biofilm was present on all explanted intramedullary (IM) nails. The animals displayed no outward signs of infection, such as swelling, lameness, weight loss, or elevated white blood cell count. In contrast, infection with S. lugdunensis resulted in histological features consistent with both pyogenic osteomyelitis and septic arthritis, and all S. lugdunensis-infected animals displayed weight loss and an elevated white blood cell count despite biofilm detection in only two out of six rabbits. The differences in the histological and bacteriological profiles of the two species in this rabbit model of infection are reflective of their different clinical presentations: low-grade infection in the case of P. acnes and acute infection for S. lugdunensis. These results are especially important in light of the growing recognition of chronic P. acnes biofilm infections in prosthetic joint failure and nonunion of fracture fixations, which may be currently reported as “aseptic” failure. PMID:24599975

  15. [Intramedullary nailing of lower leg fractures with minimal soft tissue injuries].

    PubMed

    Ruchholtz, S; Nast-Kolb, D; Schweiberer, L

    1996-06-01

    The importance of intramedullary nailing (IM) for closed and type I tibial shaft fractures is evaluated on the basis of a review of the recent literature (1991-1996) and the data on 61 patients that underwent a reamed (RTN; n = 31) or an unreamed (UTN; n = 26) procedure. There was no difference between the two groups in age, fracture type or localization. Soft tissue trauma prevailed with 38% type I open fractures in the UTN group (RTN group, 3%). Both groups showed about the same proportion of good and very good results (criteria of Johner and Wruhs; 89% RTN and 88% UTN), which corresponds to the results of other authors (83%-96% RTN; 79%-96% UTN). The rate of nonunions is about the same with 6% (RTN) and 4% (UTN), respectively, and there were no infections. In accordance with the literature, we found earlier osseous reunion after unreamed nailing (RTN = 18 weeks vs UTN = 12 weeks). This corresponds to early, painless, full weight-bearing after an average of 10.3 as opposed to 13.8 weeks in the RTN group. Except for earlier osseous reunion reamed and unreamed TN proved to be equivalent procedures. As a precondition, if more endostium is affected, reaming should be performed after stabilization of the soft tissue damage, and fractures of the metaphysis should be interlocked in two dimensions (using all interlocking possibilities) if treated with the more unstable UTN, along with reduced weight-bearing for at least 6 weeks. The implant should be chosen in compliance with individual demands, taking the higher intramedullary stability of the RTN into consideration and the endostium-preserving insertion of the UTN.

  16. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache.

  17. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache. PMID:27469385

  18. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache. PMID:27469385

  19. Early outcomes of proximal humerus fracture fixation with locking plate and intramedullary fibular strut graft.

    PubMed

    Tan, Edwin; Lie, Denny; Wong, M K

    2014-09-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are commonly encountered in elderly patients. Surgical treatment demonstrates high complication rates, including varus construct collapse and screw cutout. In this study, the authors evaluate the clinical outcome of locking plate fixation with intramedullary fibular strut graft augmentation as a primary surgical treatment in the prevention of early collapse and screw cutout. A total of 9 patients were evaluated. Surgery was performed for displaced proximal humerus fractures between April and December 2011. Patients were either class 2, 3, or 4, according to Neer classification. Mean patient age was 75.4 years. Preoperative and immediate, 6-week, and 3-month postoperative radiographs were evaluated. Head-shaft angles were measured to assess for varus collapse and displacement. Range of motion, complication rates, and functional recovery were also evaluated. Patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation with placement of an intramedullary fibular strut graft. Fixation was achieved with a Philos plate (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland). Reduction and fixation were evaluated with radiographs. Passive exercises and range of motion were allowed immediately postoperatively, and all patients achieved active abduction and forward flexion 6 weeks postoperatively. Shoulder radiographs taken 12 weeks postoperatively revealed no loss of reduction or screw cutout. The introduction of the locking plate has improved outcomes. The addition of an intramedullary strut graft has shown improved preliminary results. Maintained reduction was observed in all 9 patients in the early postoperative period, and good functional motion was achieved. No incidence of screw cutout was recorded.

  20. Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

    PubMed

    McKoy, Brodie E; Stanitski, Carl L

    2003-07-01

    Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures are uncommon, and these injuries typically occur in mature-appearing adolescent boys involved in jumping sports, particularly basketball. The developmental anatomy of the tibial tuberosity and the changes surrounding normal physiologic epiphysiodesis render this structure susceptible to acute avulsion fractures. Possible associated injuries include patellar and quadriceps avulsions, collateral and cruciate ligament tears, and meniscal damage. The treatment of this injury is based on the amount of displacement and associated injuries. Nondisplaced fractures are treated nonoperatively with cast immobilization. Displaced fractures require open reduction and internal fixation. Even in Type III injuries, the outcome is usually excellent.

  1. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; De Winter, Theodorus C

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise, with pain on palpation of the tibia over a length of at least 5 cm. Histological studies fail to provide evidence that MTSS is caused by periostitis as a result of traction. It is caused by bony resorption that outpaces bone formation of the tibial cortex. Evidence for this overloaded adaptation of the cortex is found in several studies describing MTSS findings on bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis is made based on physical examination, although only one study has been conducted on this subject. Additional imaging such as bone, CT and MRI scans has been well studied but is of limited value. The prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic subjects means that results should be interpreted with caution. Excessive pronation of the foot while standing and female sex were found to be intrinsic risk factors in multiple prospective studies. Other intrinsic risk factors found in single prospective studies are higher body mass index, greater internal and external ranges of hip motion, and calf girth. Previous history of MTSS was shown to be an extrinsic risk factor. The treatment of MTSS has been examined in three randomized controlled studies. In these studies rest is equal to any intervention. The use of neoprene or semi-rigid orthotics may help prevent MTSS, as evidenced by two large prospective studies.

  2. Radiation-free distal locking of intramedullary nails: evaluation of a new electromagnetic computer-assisted guidance system.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Karampinas, Panagiotis; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios-Stergios; Lampropoulou-Adamidou, Kalliopi; Vlamis, John

    2013-06-01

    Distal locking of intramedullary nails (IMNs) is a difficult part of intramedullary nailing (IMN) that could be time-consuming and expose the surgeon, the surgery personnel and the patient to a considerable amount of radiation as fluoroscopy is usually guiding the procedure. Utilization of electromagnetic fields for that purpose offers an attractive alternative. The SURESHOT™ Distal Targeting System (Smith & Nephew, Inc., Memphis, TN, USA) is a novel commercially available radiation-free aiming system that utilizes computerized electromagnetic field tracking technology for the distal locking of IMNs. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the system we conducted the present study. Nineteen patients (six females-thirteen males, mean age 39.5 years, range 17-85 years) with closed diaphyseal fracture of the femur (eight patients) or the tibia (eleven patients) were treated with IMN using the SURESHOT™ Distal Targeting System for the distal interlocking. All targeting attempts were successful at first try and followed by correct positioning of the screws. Mean time for distal locking of tibial IMNs (two screws) was 219sec (range 200-250sec). Mean time for distal locking of femoral IMNs (two screws) was 249 (range 220-330sec). In the current study the SURESHOT™ Distal Targeting System proved to be accurate, fast and easy to learn.

  3. Close Intramedullary Interlocking Nailing Versus Locking Compression Plating In the Treatment of Closed Fracture Shaft of the Tibia.

    PubMed

    Kundu, I K; Datta, N K; Chowdhury, A Z; Das, K P; Tarik, M M; Faisal, M A

    2016-07-01

    Fracture of tibial shaft is the commonest site of long bone fractures due to its superficial location involving young or middle-age people. Proper management is an important issue regarding the future effective movements. In this study patients were grouped in closed Intra medullary interlocking nailing and locking compression plating. Post-operative follow up at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 3 months thereafter up to 6 months were done. Each of the patients was evaluated clinically and radiologically by tucker criteria of Tuker et al. Patients were assessed for pain on full weight bearing and kneeling, shortening and range of motion of knee and ankle joints. Radiological assessment for union of fracture, alignment of fracture and angulations and position of nail and screws and infection were observed during follow up. A total number of 32 patients were selected but only 27 patients were available for follow up for a period of 6 months. They were grouped into Group A, consisting of 15 patients who took the treatment in the form of closed intramedullary interlocking nailing and Group B, consisting of 12 patients those underwent ORIF with locking compression plating. In both of the groups Motor Vehicle Accident was the main mechanism of trauma. Fracture involving the middle 3rd of the tibia is common in both the groups. During post-operative follow up, four patients in Group A complained anterior knee pain, one patient in Group B had superficial infection, most of the patients had no restriction of movement in the ankle and knee joints and a single patient in Group B showed 1.5cm shortening of the lower limb. Period of hospital stay and fracture union time were less in Group A, which was statistically significant. Both groups showed excellent result with minimum complications. So this study permits to conclude that close IM interlocking nailing and open reduction and internal fixation by locking compression plating is equally effective for the management of close

  4. The treatment of intramedullary osteomyelitis of the femur and tibia using the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator system and antibiotic cement rods.

    PubMed

    Kanakaris, N; Gudipati, S; Tosounidis, T; Harwood, P; Britten, S; Giannoudis, P V

    2014-06-01

    Intramedullary infection in long bones represents a complex clinical challenge, with an increasing incidence due to the increasing use of intramedullary fixation. We report a prospective case series using an intramedullary reaming device, the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator (RIA) system, in association with antibiotic cement rods for the treatment of lower limb long bone infections. A total of 24 such patients, 16 men and eight women, with a mean age of 44.5 years (17 to 75), 14 with femoral and 10 with tibial infection, were treated in a staged manner over a period of 2.5 years in a single referral centre. Of these, 21 patients had had previous surgery, usually for fixation of a fracture (seven had sustained an open fracture originally and one had undergone fasciotomies). According to the Cierny-Mader classification system, 18 patients were classified as type 1A, four as 3A (discharging sinus tract), one as type 4A and one as type 1B. Staphylococcus species were isolated in 20 patients (83.3%). Local antibiotic delivery was used in the form of impregnated cement rods in 23 patients. These were removed at a mean of 2.6 months (1 to 5). Pathogen-specific antibiotics were administered systemically for a mean of six weeks (3 to 18). At a mean follow-up of 21 months (8 to 36), 23 patients (96%) had no evidence of recurrent infection. One underwent a planned trans-tibial amputation two weeks post-operatively due to peripheral vascular disease and chronic recalcitrant osteomyelitis of the tibia and foot. The combination of RIA reaming, the administration of systemic pathogen-specific antibiotics and local delivery using impregnated cement rods proved to be a safe and efficient form of treatment in these patients. PMID:24891579

  5. Coexistence of Spinal Intramedullary Tuberculoma and Multiple Intracranial Tuberculomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Yoon; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Kim, In-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Spinal intramedullary tuberculoma remains a very rare entity of central nervous system tuberculosis. This is the same with the coexistence of spinal intramedullary and intracranial tuberculomas that remains extremely rare with less than 20 cases reported at present. Authors describe this uncommon case by analyzing a 65-year-old female patient who had past history of kidney transplantation due to stage 5 chronic kidney disease and pulmonary tuberculosis on medication. The patient experiences progressive paraplegia and numbness on both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intramedullary mass at T9-10 level and multiple intracranial enhancing nodules. Microsurgical resection of spinal intramedullary mass was performed and the lesion was histopathologically confirmed as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Efficient diagnosis and management of this rare disease are reviewed along with previously reported cases.

  6. Re-evaluation of low intensity pulsed ultrasound in treatment of tibial fractures (TRUST): randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Einhorn, Thomas A; Schemitsch, Emil; Heckman, James D; Tornetta, Paul; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Makosso-Kallyth, Sun; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Jones, Clifford B; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS), compared with sham treatment, accelerates functional recovery and radiographic healing in patients with operatively managed tibial fractures. Design A concealed, randomized, blinded, sham controlled clinical trial with a parallel group design of 501 patients, enrolled between October 2008 and September 2012, and followed for one year. Setting 43 North American academic trauma centers. Participants Skeletally mature men or women with an open or closed tibial fracture amenable to intramedullary nail fixation. Exclusions comprised pilon fractures, tibial shaft fractures that extended into the joint and required reduction, pathological fractures, bilateral tibial fractures, segmental fractures, spiral fractures >7.5 cm in length, concomitant injuries that were likely to impair function for at least as long as the patient’s tibial fracture, and tibial fractures that showed <25% cortical contact and >1 cm gap after surgical fixation. 3105 consecutive patients who underwent intramedullary nailing for tibial fracture were assessed, 599 were eligible and 501 provided informed consent and were enrolled. Interventions Patients were allocated centrally to self administer daily LIPUS (n=250) or use a sham device (n=251) until their tibial fracture showed radiographic healing or until one year after intramedullary fixation. Main outcome measures Primary registry specified outcome was time to radiographic healing within one year of fixation; secondary outcome was rate of non-union. Additional protocol specified outcomes included short form-36 (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) scores, return to work, return to household activities, return to ≥80% of function before injury, return to leisure activities, time to full weight bearing, scores on the health utilities index (mark 3), and adverse events related to the device. Results SF-36 PCS data were acquired from 481/501 (96%) patients, for whom

  7. Ovine Model for Critical-Size Tibial Segmental Defects

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Chris; Oliver, Rema A; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2014-01-01

    A segmental tibial defect model in a large animal can provide a basis for testing materials and techniques for use in nonunions and severe trauma. This study reports the rationale behind establishing such a model and its design and conclusions. After ethics approval of the study, aged ewes (older than 5 y; n = 12) were enrolled. A 5-cm mid diaphyseal osteoperiosteal defect was made in the left tibia and was stabilized by using an 8-mm stainless-steel cross-locked intramedullary nail. Sheep were euthanized at 12 wk after surgery and evaluated by using radiography, microCT, and soft-tissue histology techniques. Radiology confirmed a lack of hard tissue callus bridging across the defect. Volumetric analysis based on microCT showed bone growth across the 16.5-cm3 defect of 1.82 ± 0.94 cm3. Histologic sections of the bridging tissues revealed callus originating from both the periosteal and endosteal surfaces, with fibrous tissue completing the bridging in all instances. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the quality of the healing response. Clinical, radiographic, and histologic union was not achieved by 12 wk. This model may be effective for the investigation of surgical techniques and healing adjuncts for nonunion cases, where severe traumatic injury has led to significant bone loss. PMID:25402178

  8. Recurrent intramedullary epidermoid cyst of conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Christina; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2011-12-13

    Spinal intramedullary epidermoid cyst is a rare condition. Recurrent epidermoid cyst in the spine cord is known to occur. The authors describe a case of recurrent conus medullaris epidermoid cyst in a 24-year-old female. She initially presented at 7 years of age with bladder disturbance in the form of diurnal enuresis and recurrent urinary tract infection. MRI lumbar spine revealed a 4 cm conus medullaris epidermoid cyst. Since the initial presentation, the cyst had recurred seven times in the same location and she underwent surgical intervention in the form of exploration and debulking. This benign condition, owing to its anatomical location, has posed a surgical and overall management challenge. This occurrence is better managed in a tertiary-care centre requiring multi-disciplinary treatment approach.

  9. Medial tibial stress syndrome: conservative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R Michael; Lavallee, Mark E

    2009-10-07

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), commonly known as "shin splints," is a frequent injury of the lower extremity and one of the most common causes of exertional leg pain in athletes (Willems T, Med Sci Sports Exerc 39(2):330-339, 2007; Korkola M, Amendola A, Phys Sportsmed 29(6):35-50, 2001; Hreljac A, Med Sci Sports Exerc 36(5):845-849, 2004). Although often not serious, it can be quite disabling and progress to more serious complications if not treated properly. Often, the cause of MTSS is multi-factorial and involves training errors and various biomechanical abnormalities. Few advances have been made in the treatment of MTSS over the last few decades. Current treatment options are mostly based on expert opinion and clinical experience. The purpose of this article is to review published literature regarding conservative treatment options for MTSS and provide recommendations for sports medicine clinicians for improved treatment and patient outcomes.

  10. Retrograde Pedal/Tibial Artery Access for Treatment of Infragenicular Arterial Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular intervention has emerged as an accepted modality for treating patients with critical limb ischemia. However, this therapy poses multiple challenges to the interventionalist due to the presence of widespread multilevel disease, long and complex occlusive lesions, and the common involvement of the tibial vessels. Retrograde pedal/tibial access is a relatively new technique that allows the treatment of tibial occlusive lesions when conventional endovascular techniques fail. This article reviews the technical details and published data regarding this technique and evaluates its use in this difficult-to-treat patient population. PMID:23805338

  11. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (p<0.05). Although the intensity of practice was diminished in some instances, no time off from competitive sports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  12. Idiopathic Transverse Myelitis Mimicking an Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Andrew A.; Olszewski, Nathan P.; Lipinski, Lindsay J.; Qiu, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses for spinal cord lesions include spinal tumors and inflammatory processes. The distinction between these pathologies can be difficult if solely based on imaging. We report for the first time to our knowledge a case of idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM) mimicking a discrete cervical spinal lesion in a 66-year-old man who presented with gait instability and neck pain. The patient's symptoms failed to resolve after an initial course of steroid therapy. Surgical biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ITM. Subsequent treatment with dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms as well as the intramedullary enhancement. ITM is most common in the cervical and thoracic spine, spanning 3-4 spinal segments. It usually occupies more than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord and tends to be central, uniform, and symmetric. It exhibits patchy and peripheral contrast enhancement. These criteria are useful guidelines that help distinguish ITM from neoplastic spinal lesions. A decision to perform biopsy must take into consideration the patient's clinical symptoms, the rate of progression of neurological deficits, and the imaging characteristics of the lesion. Surgical biopsy for questionable lesions should be reserved for patients with progressive neurological deficits refractory to empirical medical therapy. PMID:27672469

  13. Idiopathic Transverse Myelitis Mimicking an Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumor.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; Olszewski, Nathan P; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Qiu, Jingxin; Fabiano, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses for spinal cord lesions include spinal tumors and inflammatory processes. The distinction between these pathologies can be difficult if solely based on imaging. We report for the first time to our knowledge a case of idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM) mimicking a discrete cervical spinal lesion in a 66-year-old man who presented with gait instability and neck pain. The patient's symptoms failed to resolve after an initial course of steroid therapy. Surgical biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ITM. Subsequent treatment with dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms as well as the intramedullary enhancement. ITM is most common in the cervical and thoracic spine, spanning 3-4 spinal segments. It usually occupies more than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord and tends to be central, uniform, and symmetric. It exhibits patchy and peripheral contrast enhancement. These criteria are useful guidelines that help distinguish ITM from neoplastic spinal lesions. A decision to perform biopsy must take into consideration the patient's clinical symptoms, the rate of progression of neurological deficits, and the imaging characteristics of the lesion. Surgical biopsy for questionable lesions should be reserved for patients with progressive neurological deficits refractory to empirical medical therapy. PMID:27672469

  14. Idiopathic Transverse Myelitis Mimicking an Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Andrew A.; Olszewski, Nathan P.; Lipinski, Lindsay J.; Qiu, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses for spinal cord lesions include spinal tumors and inflammatory processes. The distinction between these pathologies can be difficult if solely based on imaging. We report for the first time to our knowledge a case of idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM) mimicking a discrete cervical spinal lesion in a 66-year-old man who presented with gait instability and neck pain. The patient's symptoms failed to resolve after an initial course of steroid therapy. Surgical biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ITM. Subsequent treatment with dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms as well as the intramedullary enhancement. ITM is most common in the cervical and thoracic spine, spanning 3-4 spinal segments. It usually occupies more than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord and tends to be central, uniform, and symmetric. It exhibits patchy and peripheral contrast enhancement. These criteria are useful guidelines that help distinguish ITM from neoplastic spinal lesions. A decision to perform biopsy must take into consideration the patient's clinical symptoms, the rate of progression of neurological deficits, and the imaging characteristics of the lesion. Surgical biopsy for questionable lesions should be reserved for patients with progressive neurological deficits refractory to empirical medical therapy.

  15. Isolated intramedullary spinal cysticercosis in a 10-year-old female showing dramatic response with albendazole

    PubMed Central

    Azfar, Shah F.; Kirmani, Sanna; Badar, Farheen; Ahmad, Ibne

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system caused by larvae of Taenia solium. Spinal cysticercosis is an uncommon site of cysticercal infection, and isolated intramedullary involvement is even rarer. We present a case of 10-year-old girl who presented with gradual onset paraparesis with sensory loss and bowel and bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spine revealed a cystic lesion with mural nodule (scolex) which was diagnostic for cysticercosis. Patient was treated with antihelminthic, which led to marked clinico-radiological improvement. PMID:21977090

  16. Feasibility of purely endoscopic intramedullary fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Frake, Paul C; Goodman, Joseph F; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of this study hypothesized that fractures of the mandibular condyle can be repaired using short-segment intramedullary implants and purely endoscopic surgical technique, using a basic science, human cadaver model in an academic center. Endoscopic instrumentation was used through a transoral mucosal incision to place intramedullary implants of 2 cm in length into osteotomized mandibular condyles. The surgical maneuvers that required to insert these implants, including condyle positioning, reaming, implant insertion, and seating of the mandibular ramus, are described herein. Primary outcome was considered as successful completion of the procedure. Ten cadaveric mandibular condyles were successfully repaired with rigid intramedullary internal fixation without the use of external incisions. Both insertion of a peg-type implant and screwing a threaded implant into the condylar head were possible. The inferior portion of the implant remained exposed, and the ramus of the mandible was manipulated into position on the implant using retraction at the sigmoid notch. The results of this study suggest that purely endoscopic repair of fractures of the mandibular condyle is possible by using short-segment intramedullary titanium implants and a transoral endoscopic approach without the need for facial incisions or punctures. The biomechanical advantages of these intramedullary implants, including improved strength and resistance to mechanical failure compared with miniplates, have been recently established. The combination of improved implant design and purely endoscopic technique may allow for improved fixation and reduced surgical- and implant-related morbidity in the treatment of condylar fractures. PMID:25534058

  17. Adult cervical intramedullary teratoma: first reported immature case.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hong Joo; Shin, Bong-Kyung; Kim, Joo Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Taek-Hyun; Chung, Hung-Seob; Park, Youn-Kwan

    2010-08-01

    Intramedullary teratomas, particularly adult cervicothoracic lesions, are extremely rare. Up to now only 6 cases of intramedullary cervical teratomas have been reported in adults, and all of these were histologically mature. The authors present the case of a 35-year-old man with progressive myelopathic symptoms who was admitted through an outpatient clinic and was surgically treated. The characteristics, diagnosis, epidemiology, and treatment of cervical intramedullary teratomas in adults are also reviewed. Postoperative MR imaging showed that the tumor had been near totally removed, and severely adherent tissue remained ventrocranially with tiny focal enhancement on follow-up MR imaging. Pathological examinations revealed immature teratoma without any malignant component. Adjuvant therapy was not performed. Although no change in neurological findings and symptoms was apparent postoperatively, lesion regrowth was demonstrated on MR imaging 4 months after surgery. At 8 months postoperatively, myelopathic symptoms had developed and a huge intramedullary tumor recurred according to MR imaging. This case is the seventh reported instance of intramedullary cervical teratoma in an adult, and the first case report of the immature type with malignant features.

  18. A review of tibial spine fractures in bicycle injury.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J N; Tehranzadeh, J

    1987-01-01

    Nine tibial spine fractures were studied. Three of these nine cases included younger patients who fell from a bicycle and sustained an isolated avulsion fracture of the tibial spine. In all three cases, the medial tibial spines of the right knees were fractured. The other remaining five medial tibial fractures included two motorcycle and two automobile accidents, together with one basketball injury. One of the nine tibial spine fractures involved the lateral tibial spine.

  19. Mechanical bond strength of the cement-tibial component interface in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Gavin T; Peters, Christopher L; Hines, Jerod L; Bachus, Kent N

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically test the cement-tibial component interface using titanium and cobalt-chrome sample prostheses with several commercially available surface textures. The results of this study indicate that the type of metal substrate and surface preparation of contemporary tibial baseplates may influence the strength of the metal-cement interface and as such influence tibial component survival. The results indicate that, in general, metal-cement interface strength increases with increasing surface roughness and common surface treatments such as AlO2 grit-blasting (Ra = 6.76 microm) produce interface strengths similar to plasma-spray, porous-coated specimens. Macrosurfaced tibial components, although comparable in tension, may be vulnerable to metal-cement interface failure with rotational loading.

  20. The effect of tibial curvature and fibular loading on the tibia index.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Rudd, Rodney W; Kerrigan, Jason R; Crandall, Jeff R

    2004-06-01

    The tibia index (TI) is commonly used to predict leg injury based on measurements taken by an anthropomorphic test device (ATD). The TI consists of an interaction formula that combines axial loading and bending plus a supplemental compressive force criterion. Current ATD lower limbs lack geometric biofidelity with regard to tibial curvature and fibular load-sharing. Due to differences in tibial curvature, the midshaft moments induced by axial loading are different in humans and ATDs. Midshaft tibial loading in the human is also reduced by load-sharing through the fibula, which is not replicated in current ATDs. In this study, tibial curvature and fibular load-sharing are quantified through CT imaging and biomechanical testing, and equations are presented to correct ATD measurements to reflect the loading that would be experienced by a human tibia.

  1. Microsurgical technique in excision of intramedullary craniocervical ependymomas. Video report.

    PubMed

    El Refaee, Ehab; Matthes, Marc; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2014-09-01

    We present the microsurgical technique in excision of intramedullary craniocervical ependymomas. A 27-year-old female came presenting with neck pain and parasthesia in her both arms and hands, where MRI was performed showing intramedullary lesion that extend in the medulla just beyond the foramen magnum to the level of C5-6 disc. Tumor was totally excised using irrigation-dissection microscopic technique with favorable outcome. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/Yj1yvZOaz58. PMID:25175578

  2. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction: An Overlooked Cause of Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Bubra, Preet Singh; Keighley, Geffrey; Rateesh, Shruti; Carmody, David

    2015-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of adult acquired flatfoot. Degenerative changes in this tendon, lead to pain and weakness and if not identified and treated will progress to deformity of the foot and degenerative changes in the surrounding joints. Patients will complain of medial foot pain, weakness, and a slowly progressive foot deformity. A “too many toes” sign may be present and patients will be unable to perform a single heal raise test. Investigations such X-ray, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging will help stage the disease and decide on management. The optimal manage may change based on the progression of deformity and stage of disease. Early identification and prompt initiation of treatment can halt progression of the disease. The purpose of this article is to examine the causes, signs, symptoms, examinations, investigations and treatment options for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. PMID:25810985

  3. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  4. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  5. Tibial tubercle avulsion fractures in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Jakoi, Andre; Freidl, Michael; Old, Andrew; Javandel, Mitra; Tom, James; Realyvasquez, Juan

    2012-08-01

    Tibial tubercle avulsion fractures most commonly occur in adolescent boys and usually result from pushing off or landing while jumping. These fractures are relatively uncommon but can have a significant functional effect. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome with return to play in 8 adolescent basketball players with at least 4 years of postoperative reconditioning. Results with return to play at the preinjury level are favorable after treatment of acute tibial avulsion fractures in adolescent basketball players. Long-term outcome was excellent in all patients regardless of fracture type. Open reduction and internal fixation using 1 or 2 cancellous bone screws achieved union in all cases.

  6. Validation of a standardised gait score to predict the healing of tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Macri, F; Marques, L F; Backer, R C; Santos, M J; Belangero, W D

    2012-04-01

    There is no absolute method of evaluating healing of a fracture of the tibial shaft. In this study we sought to validate a new clinical method based on the systematic observation of gait, first by assessing the degree of agreement between three independent observers regarding the gait score for a given patient, and secondly by determining how such a score might predict healing of a fracture. We used a method of evaluating gait to assess 33 patients (29 men and four women, with a mean age of 29 years (15 to 62)) who had sustained an isolated fracture of the tibial shaft and had been treated with a locked intramedullary nail. There were 15 closed and 18 open fractures (three Gustilo and Anderson grade I, seven grade II, seven grade IIIA and one grade IIIB). Assessment was carried out three and six months post-operatively using videos taken with a digital camera. Gait was graded on a scale ranging from 1 (extreme difficulty) to 4 (normal gait). Bivariate analysis included analysis of variance to determine whether the gait score statistically correlated with previously validated and standardised scores of clinical status and radiological evidence of union. An association was found between the pattern of gait and all the other variables. Improvement in gait was associated with the absence of pain on weight-bearing, reduced tenderness over the fracture, a higher Radiographic Union Scale in Tibial Fractures score, and improved functional status, measured using the Brazilian version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire (all p < 0.001). Although further study is needed, the analysis of gait in this way may prove to be a useful clinical tool. PMID:22434473

  7. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intramedullary fixation rod. 888.3020 Section 888.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  9. Comparative Study Using Intramedullary K-wire Fixation Over Titanium Elastic Nail in Paediatric Shaft Femur Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Tushar; Singh, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fracture shaft femur is common paediatric trauma leading to significant morbidity. Conservative treatments available are associated with prolonged periods of immobilization. Use of flexible intramedullary implant allows early rehabilitation in diaphyseal fractures of femur in children. Aim: The aim of the present study is to compare fixation of diaphyseal femur fracture by titanium elastic nail and intramedullary K-wires in children. Setting and Design: Prospective randomized study in a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods: Fifty-two children between 6 years and 14 years of age with femoral shaft fracture were assigned either in Group I or Group II based on computer generated random numbers. In Group I closed percutaneous intramedullary K- wire fixation and in Group II closed percutaneous intramedullary titanium elastic nail was used to fix the fractures. Partial weight bearing was allowed after 6 weeks of surgery and full weight bearing at clinico-radiological union. Results: Average time of radiological union was 6 to 10 weeks in both groups. In both the groups two cases had entry site irritation which resolved with early implant removal. One case in both the groups had unacceptable mal-alignment. Both the groups had few cases of limb-length discrepancy, which was in acceptable limit, except two cases of TENS. There was no statistically significant difference between the results of both the groups. But, using K-wires significantly reduced the cost of treatment. Conclusion: Most of such fractures in our society are neglected because of high cost of treatment. Providing a cheaper alternative in form of K-wires may be beneficial for the patients from low socio-economic status. PMID:25584251

  10. Gentamicin release from biodegradable poly-l-lactide based composites for novel intramedullary nails.

    PubMed

    Morawska-Chochół, Anna; Domalik-Pyzik, Patrycja; Chłopek, Jan; Szaraniec, Barbara; Sterna, Jacek; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Boguń, Maciej; Kucharski, Rafael; Mielczarek, Przemysław

    2014-12-01

    One of the major problems in orthopedic surgery is infection associated with implantation. The treatment is a very difficult and long-term process. A solution to this issue can be the use of implants which additionally constitute an antibiotic carrier preventing the development of an infection. Prototypes of biodegradable intramedullary nails made of three different composites with a poly(L-lactide) matrix were designed. The nails served as gentamicin sulfate (GS) carrier - an antibiotic commonly used in the treatment of osteomyelitis. The matrix was reinforced with carbon fibers (CF), alginate fibers (Alg) and magnesium alloy wires (Mg), as well as modified with bioactive particles of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in various systems. In this way, novel, multi-phase and multifunctional degradable intramedullary nails were obtained. The tests demonstrated strong dependence between the type of the modifying phase introduced into the composite, and the rate of drug release. Introduction of gentamicin into the nail structure strengthened and prolonged antibacterial activity of the nails. PMID:25491796

  11. Case report: comprehensive management of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krenner, Bernard John

    2002-01-01

    Activity or exercise-induced leg pain is a common complication among competitive and "weekend warrior" athletes. Shin splints is a term that has been used to describe all lower leg pain as a result of activity. There are many different causes of "shin splints," one of which is medial tibial stress syndrome, and the treating clinician must be aware of potentially serious causes of activity related leg pain. Restoring proper biomechanics to the entire kinetic chain and rehabilitation of the injured area should be the primary aim of treatment to optimize shock absorption. The role inflammation plays in medial tibial stress syndrome is controversial, but in this case, seemed to be a causative factor as symptomatology was dramatically decreased with the addition of proteolytic enzymes. Medial tibial stress syndrome can be quite difficult to treat and keeping athletes away from activities that will slow healing or aggravate the condition can be challenging. "Active" rest is the best way in which to allow proper healing while allowing the athlete to maintain their fitness.

  12. Relative movements between Kinemax Plus tibial inserts and the tibial base-plates.

    PubMed

    Ash, H E; Scholes, S C; Parkin, R; Unsworth, A

    2003-01-01

    Tests were performed on six large Kinemax Plus knee bearings (snap-fit design) to evaluate the amount of movement between 10- and 15-mm-thick tibial inserts and the tibial base plates. The knee bearings were tested up to 1 x 10(6) cycles on the Durham six-station knee wear simulator which subjected the bearings to similar motion and loading profiles that would be experienced by the natural knee during walking. Although passive internal/external (I/E) rotation was allowed, no active I/E rotation was applied. The movement of the tibial inserts was measured with dial gauges (accuracy +/-0.01 mm) before and after the bearings were tested on the simulator, when unloaded, and throughout the tests while the bearings were being dynamically loaded in the simulator. Movement occurred between the tibial insert and the tibial base plate after initial assembly due to the snap-fit mechanism used to locate the tibial insert within the tibial base plate. However this decreased appreciably when the bearings were loaded in the simulator. The amount of movement did not change with time when the bearings were continuously loaded in the simulator. However, after each test the amount of movement of the tibial inserts, when unloaded, was only 65 per cent (anterior-posterior) and 46 per cent (medial-lateral) of the values before the test. This was thought to be due to creep of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) inserts. The movement between the tibial insert and tibial base plate in situ is likely to be much less than that observed by a surgeon at the time of assembly due to loading of the knee bearing in the body. However, the amount of movement when the tibial inserts are loaded may still be great enough to produce a second interface where wear of the tibial insert may take place. PMID:12666776

  13. Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Susan M; Stanitski, Carl L

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 18 patients with 19 acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures was performed. Mean age at injury was 13 years 8 months. Mean follow-up time was 2 years 8 months. A group of four preadolescent patients ages 9 to 12 years at injury was identified. Participation in athletics, particularly basketball, resulted in 77% of fractures. There were one type IA, three type IB, two type IIA, six type IIB, two type IIIA, four type IIIB, and one type IV fractures. Fifteen fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation and four by closed reduction and cylinder cast immobilization. Three cases (15.7%) of extensor mechanism disruption were noted, two patellar tendon avulsions and one quadriceps avulsion. Final outcome was good in all patients regardless of fracture type or treatment. There were no complications.

  14. Flexible Intramedullary Nailing of Pediatric Humeral Fractures: Indications, Techniques, and Tips.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Derek M

    2016-06-01

    Most proximal and diaphyseal pediatric humeral fractures can be treated successfully by closed means; however, certain patient factors or fracture characteristics may make surgical stabilization with flexible intramedullary nails (FIN) a better choice. Common indications for FIN of pediatric humeral fractures include unstable proximal-third fractures in children nearing skeletal maturity, unstable distal metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures, shaft fractures in polytraumatized patients or patients with ipsilateral both-bone forearm fractures (floating elbow), and prophylactic stabilization of benign diaphyseal bone cysts or surgical stabilization of pathologic fractures. FIN can be safely inserted in an antegrade or retrograde manner depending on the fracture location and configuration. Careful dissection at the location of rod insertion can prevent iatrogenic nerve injuries. Rapid fracture union and return to full function can be expected in most cases. Implant prominence is the most common complication.

  15. Fat embolism syndrome after nailing an isolated open tibial fracture in a stable patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fat embolism syndrome is a potentially fatal complication of long bone fractures. It is usually seen in the context of polytrauma or a femoral fracture. There are few reports of fat embolism syndrome occurring after isolated long bone fractures other than those of the femur. Case presentation We describe a case of fat embolism syndrome in a 33-year-old Caucasian man. He was being seen for an isolated Gustilo’s grade II open tibial fracture. He was deemed clinically stable, so we proceeded to treat the fracture with intramedullary reamed nailing. He developed fat embolism syndrome intraoperatively and was treated successfully. Conclusion This case caused us to question the use of injury severity scoring for isolated long bone fractures. It suggests that parameters that have been described in the literature other than that the patient is apparently clinically stable should be used to establish the best time for nailing a long bone fracture, thereby improving patient safety. PMID:24731759

  16. Tibial shaft fractures in amateur footballers

    PubMed Central

    Lenehan, B; Fleming, P; Walsh, S; Kaar, K

    2003-01-01

    Background: Footballers constitute a unique group of patients with tibial shaft fractures. They tend to have excellent general health and well developed musculature in the leg, and their fractures are generally closed injuries caused by low velocity trauma. However, little has been reported on the outcome after tibial shaft fractures in this group. Objective: To identify patterns of injury, response to treatment, and functional outcome in such a group. Method: Fifty consecutive tibial shaft fractures in adult footballers treated at Merlin Park Regional Hospital over a five year period were analysed. Results: Most of the fractures were type A injuries (AO/ASIF classification). The incidence of complications was low. All patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. However, only 54% of patients returned to playing competitive football. Conclusion: Tibial shaft fractures in amateur footballers are associated with good results when traditional outcome criteria are used, but many patients do not regain their previous level of function. PMID:12663363

  17. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    PubMed

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated.

  18. Simultaneous bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fracture.

    PubMed

    Maar, D C; Kernek, C B; Pierce, R O

    1988-11-01

    Bilateral simultaneous tibial tubercle avulsion fractures are extremely rare. The present case was a 16-year-old boy who sustained bilateral simultaneous tibial tubercle avulsion fractures (Watson-Jones Type III) from jumping while playing basketball. Both fractures were treated successfully by open reduction and internal fixation with screws. Three years later, the patient had the screws removed because of knee pain and tenderness over the screws.

  19. Atypical tibial tuberosity fracture in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Jalgaonkar, Azal A; Dachepalli, Sunil; Al-Wattar, Zaid; Rao, Sudhir; Kochhar, Tony

    2011-06-01

    Avulsion fractures of the tibial tuberosity are typically sustained by adolescent males during sporting activities. Tibial tuberosity avulsions with simultaneous proximal tibial epiphyseal fractures are rare injuries. We present an unusual case of Ogden type IIIA avulsion fracture of tibial tuberosity with a Salter Harris type IV posterior fracture of proximal tibial epiphysis in a 13-year-old boy. We believe that the patient sustained the tibial tuberosity avulsion during the take-off phase of a jump while playing basketball due to sudden violent contraction of the quadriceps as the knee was extending. This was then followed by the posterior Salter Harris type IV fracture of proximal tibial physis as he landed on his leg with enormous forces passing through the knee. Although standard radiographs were helpful in diagnosing the complex fracture pattern, precise configuration was only established by computed tomography (CT) scan. The scan also excluded well-recognized concomitant injuries including ligament and meniscal injuries. Unlike other reported cases, our patient did not have compartment syndrome. Anatomic reduction and stabilization with a partially threaded transepiphyseal cannulated screw and a metaphyseal screw followed by early mobilization ensured an excellent recovery by the patient.Our case highlights the importance of vigilance and a high index of suspicion for coexisting fractures or soft tissue injuries when treating avulsion fractures of tibial tuberosity. A CT scan is justified in such patients to recognize complex fracture configurations, and surgical treatment should be directed appropriately to both the fractures followed by early rehabilitation. Patients with such injuries warrant close monitoring for compartment syndrome during the perioperative period.

  20. Intramedullary spinal cord and leptomeningeal metastases from intracranial low-grade oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nipun; Nolan, Craig; Hirano, Miki; Young, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a patient with an intracranial low-grade oligodendroglioma who developed recurrence with an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and multiple spinal leptomeningeal metastases. The intramedullary spinal cord metastasis showed mild enhancement similar to the original intracranial primary, while the multiple spinal leptomeningeal metastases revealed no enhancement. This is the seventh reported case of symptomatic intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a low-grade oligodendroglioma.

  1. Type III tibial avulsion fracture with associated anterior cruciate ligament injury: Report of two cases in adults.

    PubMed

    Levy, H J; Fowble, V A

    2001-05-01

    Tibial spine avulsion fractures are more common in children than adults. Many reports have provided classification and treatment options, including fixation for displaced type III fractures. However, long-term follow-up on injury to the anterior cruciate ligament and knee joint stability in adults is not well documented. We present 2 cases of type III tibial avulsion fractures in adults with associated interstitial injury to the anterior cruciate ligament. Primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed in both patients.

  2. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  3. Injury to the anterior tibial system during percutaneous plating of a proximal tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Gary, Joshua L; Sciadini, Marcus F

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures has grown in popularity in recent years. This article describes a patient with a Schatzker type VI proximal tibial fracture (AO/OTA type 41.C3) and previous compartment syndrome treated with definitive fixation 8 weeks after initial injury with a precontoured proximal tibial plate and a distal targeting device. Brisk bleeding occurred during percutaneous insertion of a cortical screw at the midshaft of the tibia. Surgical exploration revealed sidewall tearing of the anterior tibial artery and vein, which were clipped at the screw insertion site. After the bleeding was controlled, the patient had a strong palpable posterior tibial pulse with no palpable dorsalis pedis pulse, and the foot remained well perfused. Function of the deep peroneal nerve was normal postoperatively. Previous concerns regarding the percutaneous treatment of proximal tibial fractures have focused on the risks of damage to the superficial peroneal nerve from distal screws. Based on cadaveric studies, percutaneously and laterally based screw placement in the distal tibial metaphysis threatens injury to the anterior tibial system. However, with alterations to the normal anatomy caused by severe trauma, previously described safe zones may be changed and neurovascular structures may be exposed to risk in locations that were previously thought safe. PMID:22784915

  4. [Results following percutaneous intramedullary pin fixation in distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Kirchner, R; Hüttl, T; Krüger-Franke, M; Rosemeyer, B

    1994-01-01

    42 distal radius fractures have been submitted to further examination after percutaneous intramedullary pin fixation. The outcome were 95.3% of very good to good anatomic results and 90.5% of satisfying functional results. This showed the close link between the radiological-anatomical and functional results. The success of the treatment was very acceptable, although the Morbus Sudeck as the major complication--with 7.2%--was still relatively frequently observed. It could be seen that particularly fractures at the risk of dislocation with smash zone constituted an indication for the percutaneous intramedullary pin fixation, that is to say all fractures for which a retention is primarily difficult. It constitutes a supplement, as well as an extension to the therapy of the distal radius fractures. PMID:7516105

  5. Aseptic nonunion of the tibia treated by intramedullary osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Rollo, G; Montanari, A; Zinghi, G F

    1996-01-01

    The authors report 52 cases of aseptic nonunion of the tibia treated by intramedullary osteosynthesis. The means of synthesis used were the Küntscher nail, the Eiffel Tower Rush nail, and the Grosse-Kempf nail. Which means of synthesis was used depended on the site and the features of the nonunion. Healing occurred in all of the cases after an average of 5 months. Mean follow-up was 4.5 years.

  6. Intramedullary decompression with condylectomy for intractable plantar keratoma.

    PubMed

    Roven, M D

    1985-07-01

    A previously unreported method to relieve excessive plantargrade pressure which may create an intractable plantar keratoma associated with metatarsal head pain is presented. This method is referred to as an intramedullary metatarsal decompression with condylectomy and is performed through a dorsal minimum incision. The rotary action of the bur is demonstrated. This method has proved less traumatic than previous procedures, permitting immediate ambulation with little postoperative pain or edema. In a series of cases, I have compared this method with control studies on the same patient in which intramedullary metatarsal decompression was performed on one foot and a neck osteotomy on the opposite foot. Results with intramedullary metatarsal decompression have been comparable but have fewer postoperative sequelae. Exuberant bone callus formation dorsally and at the osteotomy site, lateral displacement of bone segments, frequency of transfer lesions, delayed healing or nonunion of the osteotomy site, and the possibility of synostosis when two adjacent bones were osteotomized are all decreased. A short review of the rationale, selection of cases, and criteria for orthotics is presented. The concept and simplified method of treatment applied in a series of cases is described. PMID:4028490

  7. Do microfractures improve high tibial osteotomy outcome?

    PubMed

    Pascale, Walter; Luraghi, Simone; Perico, Laura; Pascale, Valerio

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if microfractures improve the outcome of high tibial osteotomy in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritis in genu varum. Forty patients presenting with Outerbridge grade III and IV chondropathies on the femoral and/or the tibial joint surface underwent high tibial osteotomy with Puddu plates (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, Florida) for primary medial compartment osteoarthritis in genu varum at our institution. Patients were randomly assigned to either the high tibial osteotomy plus microfractures group (A; n=20) or the high tibial osteotomy alone group (B; n=20). Final assessment was conducted 5 years postoperatively, including clinical response measured by the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm score, and patient satisfaction score. All patients were blinded to the treatment received and followed the same rehabilitation protocol. A statistically significant improvement between pre- and postoperative values was observed for Lysholm and IKDC scores in both groups, without any statistically significant difference between them. Regarding the satisfaction score, there were no differences between the 2 groups in terms of preoperative self-assessment (P>.05), whereas postoperative subjective satisfaction at 5-year follow-up was significantly higher in group A than in group B (P=.0036).Our study results provide further evidence that medial tibial osteotomy is an effective surgical option for treating a varus knee associated with medial degenerative arthritis in patients wishing to continue accustomed levels of physical activity. In particular, patient satisfaction was higher among those who underwent the combined treatment involving high tibial osteotomy to correct femorotibial angle and microfractures. PMID:21717984

  8. Intramedullary enterogenous cyst of the conus medullaris presenting as lower limb pain.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Tyagi, Devendra K; Sawant, Hemant V

    2011-01-01

    Enterogenous cysts account for 0.7-1.3% of spinal axis tumors. Cervical and thoracic segments are most often affected and they are rare in the lumbar region. Intramedullary variant which comprises less than 5% of enterogenous cysts are densely adherent to the surrounding tissue and preclude total excision. Partial excision is associated with recurrence and is the most common unfavorable outcome in these cysts. Hence, such patients need follow-up with serial imaging. We describe a case of conus medullaris enterogenous cyst presenting as lower limb pain. Due to dense adhesion of the cyst to the surrounding neural tissue, subtotal excision was done. The patient is symptom and tumor free at one year interval. We describe our case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare but difficult to cure tumor.

  9. A modification of Chopart's amputation with ankle and subtalar arthrodesis by using an intramedullary nail.

    PubMed

    DeGere, Michael W; Grady, John F

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on 7 patients who underwent a new technique for Chopart amputation that includes ankle and subtalar arthrodesis using an intramedullary nail. This method affords rigid control to the rearfoot and appears to avoid the most common complications historically associated with Chopart amputations. All 6 surviving patients achieved successful outcomes within 1 year of their surgery. All are community ambulators who are able to walk short distances within the home without a prosthesis. One patient, who had undergone a previous vascular bypass, died in the early postoperative period after developing an infection that required an above-knee amputation. A second patient developed an infection that resolved with intravenous antibiotics. This new technique reintroduces the Chopart-level amputation as a valuable intermediate between the transmetatarsal and below-knee amputation levels. PMID:16012435

  10. The distribution of extracellular matrix vesicles in healing of rat tibial bone three days after intramedullary injury.

    PubMed

    Amir, D; Schwartz, Z; Weinberg, H; Sela, J

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of extracellular matrix vesicles on the third day of bone healing was studied by morphometric analysis of transmission electron micrographs. Detection and grouping of the vesicles was performed according to type, diameter, and distance from the calcified front. The different types were selected as follows: vesicles with electron-lucent contents ("empty"), vesicles with amorphous electron-opaque contents ("amorphic"), vesicles containing crystalline depositions ("crystal"), and vesicles containing crystalline structures with ruptured membranes ("rupture"). The majority of vesicles were between 0.07 micron and 0.12 micron in diameter and were located at less than 3 micron from the calcified front. The distribution of the "empty", "amorphic", "crystal", and "rupture" vesicles was 23.2%, 74%, 2.5%, and 0.3% respectively. Their sequence of arrangement according to diameter was as follows: "empty", "amorphic", "crystal", and "rupture", the empty vesicles constituting the smallest and the "rupture" the largest type. Distances from the calcified front were similar for the "empty", "amorphic", and "crystal" vesicles, while the "rupture" type was located nearest to the front. The present observations support the widely acknowledged hypothesis on the role of extracellular matrix vesicles in mineralization. It is thought that the secretion of "empty" vesicles from the cell is followed by intravascular accumulation of amorphous Ca and Pi to form a hydroxyapatite crystal that, in turn, ruptures the vesicle's membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Idiopathic Spontaneous Intramedullary Hemorrhage: A Report of a Rare Case of Repeated Intramedullary Hemorrhage with Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Sam

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with acute voiding difficulty, numbness and weakness of both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an intramedullary hemorrhagic mass that extended from T9 to T10. T8-T10 laminotomy and surgical removal of the hemorrhagic mass was performed. The pathological diagnosis was hematoma. Her neurological status remained the same after the operation. At 5 days post-operation, the patient suddenly became paraplegic, and MRI that was immediately performed revealed a recurrent intramedullary hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation was performed. Again, histological examination showed only hematoma, without any evidence of abnormal vessels or a tumor. A postoperative MRI revealed no abnormal lesions other than those resulting from postoperative changes. At a 9-month follow up, the patient could walk a short distance with the aid of a walker. Because spontaneous intramedullary hemorrhage with unknown etiology is very rare, it is essential to perform a meticulous inspection of the hemorrhagic site to find the underlying cause. Repeated hemorrhage can occur; therefore, close observation of patients after surgery is important in cases without an apparent etiology. Urgent surgical evacuation is important to improve outcomes in these cases. PMID:26834818

  12. Flexor Digitorum Longus Tendon Transfer and Modified Kidner Technique in Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maskill, James T; Pomeroy, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    The modified Kidner procedure and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer are common procedures used today when addressing posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. These techniques are often used in conjunction with a combination of osteotomies to correct flatfoot deformity, and have been proved to be reliable and predictable. PMID:26590720

  13. Comparing methods of quantifying tibial acceleration slope.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Adriana M; Andrews, David M

    2010-05-01

    Considerable variability in tibial acceleration slope (AS) values, and different interpretations of injury risk based on these values, have been reported. Acceleration slope variability may be due in part to variations in the quantification methods used. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify differences in tibial AS values determined using end points at various percentage ranges between impact and peak tibial acceleration, as a function of either amplitude or time. Tibial accelerations were recorded from 20 participants (21.8 +/- 2.9 years, 1.7 m +/- 0.1 m, 75.1 kg +/- 17.0 kg) during 24 unshod heel impacts using a human pendulum apparatus. Nine ranges were tested from 5-95% (widest range) to 45-55% (narrowest range) at 5% increments. AS(Amplitude) values increased consistently from the widest to narrowest ranges, whereas the AS(Time) values remained essentially the same. The magnitudes of AS(Amplitude) values were significantly higher and more sensitive to changes in percentage range than AS(Time) values derived from the same impact data. This study shows that tibial AS magnitudes are highly dependent on the method used to calculate them. Researchers are encouraged to carefully consider the method they use to calculate AS so that equivalent comparisons and assessments of injury risk across studies can be made.

  14. [Tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis by retrograde intramedullary nail--a case report].

    PubMed

    Lipiński, Łukasz; Synder, Marek; Sibiński, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    We described a case of 64 year old overweight women, who was treated with revision tibio-talo-calcaneal artrodesis with the use of retrograde intramedullary nail. The procedure was performed after failed primary arthrodesis with the use of lateral approach and fibula osteotomy. Stabilization with intramedullary nail gave good clinical and functional result with a good bone healing. PMID:22235644

  15. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture☆

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome. PMID:26229779

  16. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2016-03-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  17. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  18. Posttraumatic saphenous neuroma after open tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Heare, Austin; Mitchell, Justin J; Bravman, Jonathan T

    2015-11-01

    Neuralgia and neuroma secondary to iatrogenic saphenous nerve injury have been described in the setting of orthopedic surgical interventions. However, postoperative neuropathic pain caused by saphenous neuroma in the setting of orthopedic trauma has not been reported. We present a case of a 43-year-old woman with a symptomatic saphenous neuroma after an open, laterally angulated tibial fracture. The diagnosis was confirmed in the clinical setting, and treatment consisted of neurolysis and partial neurectomy, resulting in complete pain relief and functional recovery. This case demonstrates the diagnosis and treatment strategy for a symptomatic posttraumatic saphenous neuroma in the setting of a healed, open distal one-third tibial fracture.

  19. Insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Manco, L.G.; Schneider, R.; Pavlov, H.

    1983-06-01

    An insufficiency fracture of the tibial plateau may be the cause of knee pain in patients with osteoporosis. The diagnosis is usually not suspected until a bone scan is done, as initial radiographs are often negative or inconclusive and clinical findings are nonspecific and may simulate osteoarthritis or spontaneous osteonecrosis. In five of 165 patients referred for bone scans due to nontraumatic knee pain, a characteristic pattern of intense augmented uptake of radionuclide confined to the tibial plateau led to a presumptive diagnosis of insufficiency fracture, later confirmed on radiographs.

  20. Fracture of tibial tuberosity in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Campos, André Siqueira; de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão; Gameiro, Vinícius Schott

    2013-01-01

    The fracture of tibial tuberosity is a rare lesion and still more unusual in adults. We describe a case in an adult who suffered a left knee injury due to a fall from height. No risk factors were identified. The lesion was treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation. The rehabilitation method was successful, resulting in excellent function and rage of motion of the knee. The aim of this study was to present an unusual case of direct trauma of the tibial tuberosity in an adult and the therapy performed. PMID:24293543

  1. Tibial fracture in a basketball player: treatment dilemmas and complications.

    PubMed

    Garl, T C; Alexander, L; Ahlfeld, S K; Rink, L; Bomba, B J

    1997-06-01

    A 19-year-old male basketball player suffered a spiral fracture of the tibia with an intact fibula, an uncommon injury in basketball. Treatment options for these injuries include cast immobilization, external fixation, and internal fixation using an intramedullary rod or plates and screws. Numerous complications can occur in these injuries, possibly including interference with healing by the intact fibula. The player was treated with an intramedullary rod, but delayed union ensued. Treatment of the patient's delayed union with closed exchange intramedullary nailing and fibular osteotomy enabled him to return to basketball participation.

  2. Chronic shin splints. Classification and management of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Detmer, D E

    1986-01-01

    A clinical classification and treatment programme has been developed for chronic medial tibial stress syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome has been reported to be either tibial stress fracture or microfracture, tibial periostitis, or distal deep posterior chronic compartment syndrome. Three chronic types exist and may coexist: Type I (tibial microfracture, bone stress reaction or cortical fracture); type II (periostalgia from chronic avulsion of the periosteum at the periosteal-fascial junction); and type III (chronic compartment syndrome syndrome). Type I disease is treated nonoperatively. Operations for resistant types II and III medial tibial stress syndrome were performed in 41 patients. Bilaterality was common (type II, 50% type III, 88%). Seven had coexistent type II/III; one had type I/II. Preoperative symptoms averaged 24 months in type II, 6 months in type III, and 33 months in types II/III. Mean age was 22 years (15 to 51). Resting compartment pressures were normal in type II (mean 12 mm Hg) and elevated in type III and type II/III (mean 23 mm Hg). Type II and type II/III patients received fasciotomy plus periosteal cauterisation. Type III patients had fasciotomy only. All procedures were performed on an outpatient basis using local anaesthesia. Follow up was complete and averaged 6 months (2 to 14 months). Improved performance was as follows: type II, 93%, type III, 100%; type II/III, 86%. Complete cures were as follows: type II, 78%; type III, 75%; and type II/III, 57%. This experience suggests that with precise diagnosis and treatment involving minimal risk and cost the athlete has a reasonable chance of return to full activity.

  3. Intramedullary Nailing Versus Plate Fixation for the Treatment Displaced Midshaft Clavicular Fractures: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nasir; Sermer, Corey; Prusick, Parker J.; Banfield, Laura; Atrey, Amit; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    The two commonly performed surgical techniques used to repair displaced midshaft clavicle fractures are plate fixation or intramedullary nailing; however, despite recent evidence, the optimal method to treat such fractures remains a continued topic of debate. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to evaluate long term function, complications, and operative duration in adult patients receiving intramedullary nailing in comparison to plating. Seven RCTs and three quasi-randomized trials were included. No significant difference was found in long-term function between the two groups (MD: −0.66, 95% CI: −2.03 to 0.71, I2 = 62%, p = 0.34). Patients who received plating had a 2.19 times increased risk of treatment failure, but this failed to reach significance (95% CI: 0.93 to 5.15, I2 = 0%, p = 0.07). The risk of non-operative complications was 2.11 times higher in patients who received plating and this reached statistical significance (95% CI: 1.38 to 3.23, I2 = 53%, p = 0.0006). Finally, plating significantly prolonged operative duration by 20.16 minutes (95% CI: 16.87 to 23.44, I2 = 56%, p < 0.00001). Our results suggest that intramedullary nailing and plating provide equivalent long-term functional outcomes; however, plating may lead to a higher risk of treatment failure and non-operative complications. PMID:27762393

  4. A simple method of intramedullary fixation for proximal interphalangeal arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Canales, Michael B; Razzante, Mark C; Ehredt, Duane J; Clougherty, Coleman O

    2014-01-01

    Lesser digital arthrodesis has become one of the most widely used techniques in foot and ankle surgery. When performing digital arthrodesis, surgeons have an abundance of options for implantable devices. We provide information on a simple method of achieving successful arthrodesis. An intramedullary Kirschner wire is implanted into the proximal phalanx with the intermediate phalanx compressed over the wire for rigid internal fixation to avoid the use of an external device. We have had results similar to those from the published data of more expensive implants. PMID:24846156

  5. A simple method of intramedullary fixation for proximal interphalangeal arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Canales, Michael B; Razzante, Mark C; Ehredt, Duane J; Clougherty, Coleman O

    2014-01-01

    Lesser digital arthrodesis has become one of the most widely used techniques in foot and ankle surgery. When performing digital arthrodesis, surgeons have an abundance of options for implantable devices. We provide information on a simple method of achieving successful arthrodesis. An intramedullary Kirschner wire is implanted into the proximal phalanx with the intermediate phalanx compressed over the wire for rigid internal fixation to avoid the use of an external device. We have had results similar to those from the published data of more expensive implants.

  6. An intramedullary cement spacer in total hip arthroplasty .

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, R G; Thevarajan, K; Kok, C S; Sivapathasundaram, N; George, S V

    1998-02-01

    Revision arthroplasty of the hip is often complicated by infection, bone loss, and perioperative fracture of the femur. A simple, inexpensive spacer that keeps tissue planes intact and prevents soft tissue contracture during the interoperative period of a 2-stage revision is described. This can provide intramedullary support to a fractured or weak femur and enable local antibiotic delivery, as well as permit limited mobilization of the patient. It can be easily fabricated during surgery using universally available materials and can be tailored for specific requirements. Such a spacer was used in 5 cases. The experience is presented, and the technique and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:9526214

  7. [Post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery secondary to tibial shaft fracture. Case report].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Salazar, J; Tovar-López, J; Hernández-Rodríguez, G; De la Concha-Ureta, H

    2016-01-01

    Arterial pseudoaneurysm of the lower limb is an infrequent entity, particularly in the infrapopliteal segment. It is commonly associated to vascular repairs or follows a localized arterial lesion, a fracture or a surgical procedure. There is little information in Mexico about this entity in cases involving the anterior tibial artery, and secondary to trauma and osteosynthesis. Given that sudden bleeding due to rupture of the pseudoaneurysm is a possible catastrophic outcome for the viability of the segment, it is important to timely detect and diagnose the pseudoaneurysm. Treatment indications contained in the international literature are controversial. Solution-oriented approaches may be either surgical or endovascular. Current reports show that the best treatment option is an autologous saphenous vein graft, which maintains blood flow and minimizes the risk of peripheral ischemia. The purpose of this paper is to report the case of a patient who sustained the above mentioned complication and provide a literature review. This topic should be further investigated, as this condition may go unnoticed in a large number of cases, given that its symptoms are silent. PMID:27627775

  8. [Post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery secondary to tibial shaft fracture. Case report].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Salazar, J; Tovar-López, J; Hernández-Rodríguez, G; De la Concha-Ureta, H

    2016-01-01

    Arterial pseudoaneurysm of the lower limb is an infrequent entity, particularly in the infrapopliteal segment. It is commonly associated to vascular repairs or follows a localized arterial lesion, a fracture or a surgical procedure. There is little information in Mexico about this entity in cases involving the anterior tibial artery, and secondary to trauma and osteosynthesis. Given that sudden bleeding due to rupture of the pseudoaneurysm is a possible catastrophic outcome for the viability of the segment, it is important to timely detect and diagnose the pseudoaneurysm. Treatment indications contained in the international literature are controversial. Solution-oriented approaches may be either surgical or endovascular. Current reports show that the best treatment option is an autologous saphenous vein graft, which maintains blood flow and minimizes the risk of peripheral ischemia. The purpose of this paper is to report the case of a patient who sustained the above mentioned complication and provide a literature review. This topic should be further investigated, as this condition may go unnoticed in a large number of cases, given that its symptoms are silent.

  9. Effect of interstitial low level laser therapy on tibial defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Hwang, Donghyun; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    Tibial defect is very common musculoskeletal disorder which makes patient painful and uncomfortable. Many studies about bone regeneration tried to figure out fast bone healing on early phase. It is already known that low level laser therapy (LLLT) is very convenient and good for beginning of bone disorder. However, light scattering and absorption obstruct musculoskeletal therapy which need optimal photon energy delivery. This study has used an interstitial laser probe (ILP) to overcome the limitations of light penetration depth and scattering. Animals (mouse, C57BL/6) were divided into three groups: laser treated test group 1 (660 nm; power 10 mW; total energy 5 J) and test group 2 (660 nm; power 20 mW; total energy 10 J); and untreated control group. All animals were taken surgical operation to make tibial defect on right crest of tibia. The test groups were treated every 48 hours with ILP. Bone volume and X-ray attenuation coefficient were measured on 0, 14th and 28th day with u-CT after treatment and were used to evaluate effect of LLLT. Results show that bone volume of test groups has been improved more than control group. X-ray attenuation coefficients of each groups have slightly different. The results suggest that LLLT combined with ILP may affect on early phase of bone regeneration and may be used in various musculoskeletal disease in deep tissue layer.

  10. Conversion Total Knee Arthroplasty after Failed High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Lee, Chung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical results of high tibial osteotomy (HTO) deteriorate over time despite the initial satisfactory results. Several knees may require a conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) because of failure such as the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis and the loss of the correction angle. It is important to know the long-term survival rate and common reason of failure in HTO to inform patients of postoperative expectations before surgery and to prevent surgical errors during surgery. In addition, it has been reported that clinical and radiological results, revision rate, and complication rate were poorer than those in patients without a previous HTO. There are few review articles that describe why conversion TKA after HTO is surgically difficult and the results are poor. Surgeons have to avoid the various complications and surgical errors in this specific situation. We would like to present the considering factors and technical difficulties during conversion TKA after HTO with a review of the literature. We could conclude through the review that the correction of deformity, lower amount of tibial bone resection, and sufficient polyethylene insert thickness, restoration of the joint line height, and adequate ligament balancing can be helpful in overcoming the technical challenges encountered during TKA following HTO. PMID:27274465

  11. Bone Transport for Limb Reconstruction Following Severe Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Fürmetz, Julian; Soo, Chris; Behrendt, Wolf; Thaller, Peter H; Siekmann, Holger; Böhme, Jörg; Josten, Christoph

    2016-03-21

    A common treatment of tibial defects especially after infections is bone transport via external fixation. We compare complications and outcomes of 25 patients treated with a typical Ilizarov frame or a hybrid system for bone reconstruction of the tibia. Average follow up was 5.1 years. Particular interest was paid to the following criteria: injury type, comorbidities, development of osteitis and outcome of the different therapies. The reason for segmental resection was a second or third grade open tibia fractures in 24 cases and in one case an infection after plate osteosynthesis. Average age of the patients was 41 years (range 19 to 65 years) and average defect size 6.6 cm (range 3.0 to 13.4 cm). After a mean time of 113 days 23 tibial defects were reconstructed, so we calculated an average healing index of 44.2 days/cm. Two patients with major comorbidities needed a below knee amputation. The presence of osteitis led to a more complicated course of therapy. In the follow up patients with an Ilizarov frame had better results than patients with hybrid systems. Bone transport using external fixation is suitable for larger defect reconstruction. With significant comorbidities, however, a primary amputation or other methods must be considered. PMID:27114814

  12. Application of an antibiotic intramedullary nail in the management of a large metacarpal bone defect.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Elliot S; Warganich, Tibor; Nielsen, Evan S; Najibi, Soheil

    2013-12-01

    Contaminated wounds and infected nonunions of the hand are not amenable to primary internal fixation and grafting. Antibiotic-impregnated cement intramedullary nails have been used in the lower extremity in the treatment of these fractures but have not been described in the hand. This technique combines the advantages of local antibiotic delivery with the mechanical stability afforded by an intramedullary nail. We describe an alternative technique for the management of skeletal defects in a contaminated wound bed in the hand using readily available operating room equipment. The antibiotic-impregnated cement intramedullary nail can be placed temporarily until definitive internal fixation and grafting occur. PMID:24240621

  13. Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of the Tibial Plateau Through the Anterolateral Approach.

    PubMed

    Hake, Mark E; Goulet, James A

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are challenging injuries to treat. The lateral tibial plateau is fractured more commonly than the medial plateau and the workhorse approach for these fractures is the anterolateral approach. This approach allows visualization of the lateral joint, metaphysis, and can be extensile if there is shaft extension. We present our technique for performing the anterolateral approach while treating a Schatzker III tibial plateau fracture. Special attention is given to performing a submeniscal arthrotomy to view the joint surface and judge the reduction. A femoral distractor is placed to assist with elevation the joint surface and visualization of the lateral plateau. A cortical window is created using a triple reamer from the sliding hip screw set. The reduction is performed and supported with cancellous bone chips. Finally, a lateral locking plate with rafting screws is placed. Knowledge of this approach and the strategies needed to address lateral and some bicondlar tibial plateau fractures are crucial to good patient outcomes. PMID:27441932

  14. Interlocking intramedullary nail stabilization of a femoral fracture in a dog with osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Muir, P; Johnson, K A

    1996-10-01

    Complications developed in a dog that underwent intramedullary pin and cerclage wire fixation of a comminuted femoral fracture. The fracture was unstable, the intramedullary pin protruded through the skin over the hip, and Staphylococcus sp was isolated from the fracture site. The loose pin was removed, and the fracture was restabilized with a 6.0-mm interlocking intramedullary nail and 3 interlocking screws. Cephalexin was given orally for 6 weeks. Eight weeks after the second surgery, the fracture was healed radiographically. Seventeen months later, the dog had a persistent mild lameness that was associated with low-grade osteomyelitis. The lameness resolved after the implants were removed, and antibiotics were administered. In human beings, interlocking intramedullary nail stabilization is an accepted treatment for open and contaminated fractures. Chronic infection of bone may be attributable to bacteria in biofilm surrounding implants, necessitating implant removal for resolution.

  15. Biomechanical Solutions in Tibial Malleolus Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, C.; Budescu, E.; Cotoros, V.

    This paper presents a biomechanical analysis of three solutions with implants in fracture fixation of tibial malleolus, on the mechanical strength testing. Samples were tested in mechanical traction, the forces revealed the minimum threshold from which start the phenomenon of bone destruction and maximum forces that destroyed the fractured fragments achieved by fixation elements. Experimental tests showed the best technical solution of the three, namely that consists of two Kirschner pins, cortical screws and wire tightening.

  16. Intramedullary versus extramedullary fixation in the management of subtrochanteric femur fractures: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengcheng; Wu, Xing; Shi, Hui; Liu, Run; Shu, Hexi; Gong, JinPeng; Yang, Yong; Sun, Qi; Wu, Jiezhou; Nie, Xiaoyang; Cai, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Intramedullary and extramedullary fixation methods are used in the management of subtrochanteric femur fractures. However, whether intramedullary or extramedullary fixation is the primary treatment for subtrochanteric femur fractures in adults remains debatable. Level of evidence Meta-analyses of prospective studies, level I. Materials and methods The Cochrane library, Embase, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases were searched separately for all relevant studies published before January 1, 2015. No language restriction was applied. Prospective randomized controlled trials that compared intramedullary or extramedullary internal fixation to repair subtrochanteric femur fractures in adults were included. We determined intraoperative data, postoperative complications, fracture fixation complications, wound infection, hospital stay days, and final outcome measures to assess the relative effects of different internal fixation methods for the treatment of subtrochanteric femur fractures in adults. Results Six studies were included in our meta-analysis. The relative risks (RRs) of revision rate was 83% lower (RR, 0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05 to 0.60; P=0.006), fixation failure rate was 64% lower (RR, 0.36, 95% CI, 0.12 to 1.08; P=0.07), non-union rate was 77% lower (RR, 0.23, 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.81; P=0.02) in the intramedullary group compared with the extramedullary group. No significant differences were found between the intramedullary group and extramedullary group for intraoperative data, postoperative complications, wound infection, hospital stay days or final outcome measures. Conclusion In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that there was no significant difference in intraoperative data, postoperative complications, wound infection, hospital stay days or final outcome measures between intramedullary and extramedullary internal fixation. However, a significant decrease occurred in the rate of fracture fixation complications for patients

  17. Tibial cyst formation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Ibon López; Solsona, Sergi Sastre

    2014-10-01

    The patient was a 31-year-old man who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the right knee 2 years prior using a hamstring autograft, with tibial fixation achieved using a bioabsorbable interference screw. Evaluation of the region by radiography revealed widening of the tibial tunnel, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic formation in the tibial tunnel and the fragmentation of the bioabsorbable interference screw. PMID:25098192

  18. Bactericidal properties of silver films on intramedullary implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, C.; Walker, C.; Cortes, E.; Hettinger, Jeffrey; Krchnavek, R.; Caputo, G. A.; Ostrum, R.

    2011-03-01

    We report on investigations of silver films on titanium and stainless steel substrates as anti-bacterial coatings for intramedullary nails used in orthopedic trauma. Silver films are deposited using a magnetron sputtering technique from a single elemental target. The deposition parameter (energy, pressure, and temperature) dependence of the silver film microstructure and adhesion will be presented. Preliminary measurements of the effectiveness of the silver films as a bactericide on S. aureus bacteria demonstrate that the films are effective destroying the bacteria. The process of this investigation will be presented. Preliminary transmission electron microscopy measurements will also presented which image healthy and damaged bacteria helping to identify the fundamental mechanism leading to the effectiveness of silver as an anti-bacterial coating. We acknowledge the support of Rowan University, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

  19. Antegrade versus retrograde intramedullary nailing of proximal third femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Kevin M; Ali, Ashley; Boudreau, John A; Cannada, Lisa K; Watson, John T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively review the results of proximal third femur fractures treated with retrograde nailing (RGN) and compare those results to a cohort from the same period treated with antegrade nailing (AGN). Adult patients with femur fractures within 10 cm of the lesser trochanter who were treated with intramedullary nails were reviewed. Two groups, patients treated with AGN (n = 35) and RGN (n = 34), were compiled. Demographic information, comorbidities, associated injuries, radiographic outcomes, complications, and secondary procedures were compared. There were two malunions in the AGN group and three in the RGN group. The AGN group had two nonunions while the RGN group had one. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that a higher body mass index (BMI) (p = .011) and a higher AO/OTA fracture classification (p = .019) were the only factors predictive of malunion. Regardless of starting point, there were no differences between groups in the number of secondary procedures, nonunions, malunions, or time until union.

  20. Contribution of angular motion and gravity to tibial acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, M A; Hennig, E M

    1991-03-01

    A bone-mounted accelerometer and high-speed cinematography were used to compare the axial tibial acceleration caused by ground impact with the total tibial axial acceleration as measured by a transducer. Due to the effects of gravity and tibial angular motion, the magnitude of the peak acceleration at foot strike was 43% below and 18% above the peak axial acceleration due to impact for running and walking, respectively. Depending on the distance of the accelerometer from the tibial center of rotation which is located at the ankle joint, different axial acceleration signals should be expected during comparable locomotor activities.

  1. The effect of muscle fatigue on in vivo tibial strains.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Radeva-Petrova, Denitsa R; Finestone, Aharon; Nyska, Meir; Mendelson, Stephen; Benjuya, Nisim; Simkin, Ariel; Burr, David

    2007-01-01

    Stress fracture is a common musculoskeletal problem affecting athletes and soldiers. Repetitive high bone strains and strain rates are considered to be its etiology. The strain level necessary to cause fatigue failure of bone ex vivo is higher than the strains recorded in humans during vigorous physical activity. We hypothesized that during fatiguing exercises, bone strains may increase and reach levels exceeding those measured in the non-fatigued state. To test this hypothesis, we measured in vivo tibial strains, the maximum gastrocnemius isokinetic torque and ground reaction forces in four subjects before and after two fatiguing levels of exercise: a 2km run and a 30km desert march. Strains were measured using strain-gauged staples inserted percutaneously in the medial aspect of their mid-tibial diaphysis. There was a decrease in the peak gastrocnemius isokinetic torque of all four subjects' post-march as compared to pre-run (p=0.0001), indicating the presence of gastrocnemius muscle fatigue. Tension strains increased 26% post-run (p=0.002, 95 % confidence interval (CI) and 29% post-march (p=0.0002, 95% CI) as compared to the pre-run phase. Tension strain rates increased 13% post-run (p=0.001, 95% CI) and 11% post-march (p=0.009, 95% CI) and the compression strain rates increased 9% post-run (p=0.0004, 95% CI) and 17% post-march (p=0.0001, 95% CI). The fatigue state increases bone strains well above those recorded in rested individuals and may be a major factor in the stress fracture etiology.

  2. Challenges in early operative approaches to intramedullary spinal cord tumors: Harvey Cushing's perspective.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Jallo, George I; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-10-01

    Although Harvey Cushing was mostly known for his contributions to brain tumor surgery, he was also a pioneer in the development of spinal cord surgery. This lesser known facet of Cushing's career can provide a fresh and unique perspective into how the founders of neurosurgery surmounted early challenges in the field. The authors bring to light and examine for the first time Cushing's unpublished writing "Technique of Laminectomy" along with his first 3 documented intramedullary spinal cord tumor (IMSCT) cases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The authors draw lessons from the challenges in pathological classification, preoperative diagnosis, tumor localization, and surgical technique of that time. Although Cushing's attempts at exploration and resection of IMSCT as described here were of limited success, his ability to adapt his clinical and surgical technique to the challenges of the time, as well as develop skills to successfully manipulate the spinal cord during these exploratory procedures without the patients incurring neurological damage, postoperative infection, or complications, is a testament to his determination to advance the field and his meticulous operative technique. In spite of the limitations imposed on the pioneer neurosurgeons, Harvey Cushing and his contemporaries persevered through many of the challenges and built an essential part of neurosurgery's common story. PMID:26115026

  3. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunnel drill system was used to produce intraoperative deep-limited bone tunnel. During follow-up, the location of the bone block and the healing situation were checked by knee X-ray and spiral CT scan. Blood loss, operation time and nerve vascular injuries were evaluated. Results: Mean intraoperative blood loss was 123.53 ± 74.05 ml in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 332 ± 114.26 ml in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 6.12, P < 0.05). Mean operation time was 235.27 ± 58.88 min in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 346.37 ± 59.67 min in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 5.19, P < 0.05). Posterior drawer test were negative in 15 cases, slight positive in 2 with improved tibial inlay technique compared with 14 negative cases and 2 positive cases of traditional tibial Inlay technique. The X-ray and spiral CT scan showed the location of the bone block were perfect and healed well with the patent who received improved tibial inlay technology after 12 weeks postoperatively. Conclusion: Accurate depth-limited bone tunnel can be produced by the tibia tunnel drill system with minor trauma, less bleeding and reducing of nerves or vessels and the recent clinical effects of PCL reconstruction were pretty good. PMID:25419349

  4. Can Tibial Cementation Be Enhanced in Knee Arthroplasty Surgery?

    PubMed

    Westerman, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Aseptic loosening of the tibial component continues to be a significant mode of failure in total knee arthroplasty surgery. Surface cemented components preserve tibial bone stock, but are reliant on a strong bone-cement interface. This study compares standard surface cemented tibial component design to a tibial component with the addition of an undersurface cement containment skirt. The hypothesis was that the addition of a 2-mm underside skirt would allow cement containment and pressurization during implantation, which might improve the overall survival. Two identical tibial components were used, out of which one had the 2-mm underside skirt removed for the purposes of this study. Overall, 12 tibial Sawbones were prepared identically and transducers placed in the medial and lateral plateau. Each component was implanted six times, according to the manufacturer's operative technique. The series of implantation experiments showed no difference in cement pressurization (p = 0.86) regardless of the tibial component design used, with a wide variation in pressure measurements occurring in both groups. The tibial component skirt has not demonstrated any enhancement in cement pressurization. The cement containment skirt might still be advantageous by increasing the cement mantle thickness without causing excessive bone penetration; however, the biological effects cannot be predicted without further clinical evaluation.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF TIBIAL SLOPE ANGLE AND PATELLAR HEIGHT AFTER MEDIAL-OPENING TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Mozella, Alan; Vieira Costa, Marcos Areias; de Araujo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure the variation in posterior tibial slope angle and patellar height in patients who underwent proximal tibial valgus-producing osteotomy using the medial-opening wedge technique. Methods: Anteroposterior panoramic radiographs of the lower limbs and lateral radiographs of the knee obtained before and after tibial valgus-producing osteotomy on 46 patients with unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee were analyzed. Results: In 23 patients, an external fixator was used to gradually apply a medial-opening wedge; and in the other 23, a blocked plate with a stop bar was applied as a fixation method. Patients with tricompartmental knee disease and those who underwent osteotomy to treat fracture sequelae were excluded from this study. After surgery, the mean increase in the tibial slope was 1.7 degrees (p < 0.01) in the group in which the blocked plate with a stop bar was used; and 2.7 degrees (p < 0.05) in the group in which the external fixator was used. There was no statistical difference between the groups regarding the increase in the posterior tibial slope. Conclusion: The patellar height did not present any change in the cases in which the plate was used, when measured using the Insall-Salvati method, but it presented a decrease in 11 cases (47.8%) when the Caton-Deschamps method was applied. The same tendency was observed regarding change in the patellar height in the cases in which the external fixator was used, such that a decrease was observed in eight cases (34.7%) only when measured using the Caton-Deschamps method. PMID:27047847

  6. Knee joint arthroplasty after tibial osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Fosco, Matteo; Cenni, Elisabetta; Tigani, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    A total of 29 consecutive knee joint arthroplasties in 24 patients who underwent previous high tibial osteotomy (HTO) for medial unicompartment osteoarthritis of the knee and followed up for a mean of 97 months were compared with a control group of 28 patients with 29 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without previous HTO. Results for the osteotomy group were satisfactory in 96.5% of cases. In one patient loosening of the implant occurred after 37 months, which required prosthesis revision. Three patients underwent a further operation of secondary patella resurfacing for patella pain. The group without osteotomy reported a similar percentage of satisfactory results. PMID:19882155

  7. Tibial sesamoid fracture in a softball player.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeanine L; Losito, James M

    2007-01-01

    A single case of a tibial sesamoid fracture in a softball player is reported here. A review of the literature confirms that this is an unusual and difficult problem to treat in the athletic population given the significant loads placed on the sesamoids during athletic activity. In the case presented, conservative care was not effective, and the athlete underwent surgical excision of the fractured sesamoid. With use of a postoperative orthosis and cleat modification, surgical management was successful and allowed the athlete to return to her athletic endeavors without restrictions in 8 weeks.

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of tibial spine malunion with resorbable screws.

    PubMed

    Estes, A Reed; Oladeji, Lasun O

    2015-05-01

    Anterior tibial spine fractures are rare and were thought to occur mainly in children; however, recent literature indicates that the incidence in adults is much greater than previously thought. Because the tibial spine is an attachment point for the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), an avulsion may produce ACL laxity, predisposing to further issues. We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with a tibial spine fracture that failed conservative management. He developed a malunion with impingement anteriorly of the tibial spine on the notch and residual instability of the ACL. In this report, we present a novel approach for arthroscopic reduction of a tibial spine fracture using 8 resorbable poly-L-lactic/polyglycolic acid nails. PMID:25950547

  9. Cadaveric limb analysis of tendon length discrepancy of posterior tibial tendon transfer through the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Alexander J; Haffner, Kyle E; Mendicino, Samuel S

    2013-01-01

    The posterior tibial tendon transfer through the interosseous membrane, as popularized by Watkins in 1954, is a procedure for treating reducible eversion and dorsiflexory paresis used by lower extremity foot and ankle surgeons. The posterior tibial tendon has been transferred to various locations on the midfoot for equinus and equinovarus deformities. Dorsiflexory paresis is a common symptom in equinovarus deformity, clubfoot deformity, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, leprosy, mononeuropathy, trauma to the common peroneal nerve, cerebrovascular accident, and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. The main difficulty with this procedure, often discussed by surgeons, is inadequate tendon length, making anchoring to the cuneiforms or cuboid difficult. The goal of our cadaveric study was threefold. First, we sought to determine whether the tendon length is sufficient when transferring the posterior tibial tendon to the dorsum of the foot through the interosseous membrane for a dynamic or a static transfer. Second, we wished to describe the surgical technique designed to obtain the maximal length. Finally, we sought to discuss the strategies used when the tendon length for transfer is insufficient. PMID:23369302

  10. Evaluation of the posterior tibial slope on MR images in different population groups using the tibial proximal anatomical axis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Behrooz; Konan, Sujith; Mannan, Ken; Scott, Gareth

    2012-12-01

    We measured the posterior tibial slope for the medial and lateral tibial plateau separately in MR images of 143 knees (71 women, 72 men) and compared the measurements between genders and different ethnic groups. For the whole population the mean medial slope was 5.7 degrees and the mean lateral slope 5.6 degrees. There was a significant difference between the medial and lateral posterior tibial slope in the Asian patients compared with other ethnic groups (p < 0.001). We have shown that measurement of the posterior tibial slope (PTS) could be reliably performed on MR images, revealing a gender difference. These findings might have clinical relevance when performing reconstructive surgery at the knee in determining ideal placement of the tibial component.

  11. UNSTABLE FEMORAL FRACTURES TREATED WITH TITANIUM ELASTIC INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS, IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Jamil Faissal; Schelle, Gisele; Valenza, Weverley; Pavelec, Anna Carolina; Souza, Camila Deneka Arantes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. Method: This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary nails at the Cajuru University Hospital, Curitiba-PR, between April 2002 and March 2008, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. The epidemiological data, angular deviations, leg shortening and bone consolidation were evaluated. Results: The medical files of 113 cases operated between April 2002 and March 2008 were reassessed. From these, 24 cases of unstable femoral diaphysis fractures treated with elastic titanium intramedullary nails with retrograde insertion were included in the study. There were two bilateral fractures and two exposed fractures. Seven patients were female and 17 were male, and the mean age was 8.3 years. The following were presented at the end of the study: shortening, varus or valgus displacement, final retrocurvatum or antecurvatum of zero, and absence of delayed consolidation or pseudarthrosis. Conclusions: The elastic titanium intramedullary nails were easily placed and removed. We believe that using elastic titanium intramedullary nails is a good option for fixation of unstable femoral fractures in children. PMID:27047868

  12. UPPER LIMB TRACTION DEVICE FOR ANTEROGRADE INTRAMEDULLARY LOCKED NAIL OF HUMERAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Mário Chaves; Gomes, Felipe Antônio; Linhares, Daniel Campos; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, José Carlos Souza; de Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia in adults are mostly treated surgically, usually by means of intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis. Some comminuted and/or highly deviated shaft fractures may present a veritable technical challenge. Fracture (or orthopedic) tables, which enable vertical, horizontal and rotational instrumental stabilization of the limb, greatly facilitate reduction and implant placement maneuvers and are widely used by orthopedic surgeons. Humeral shaft fractures are mostly treated nonsurgically. However, some cases with indications that are well defined in the literature require surgical treatment. They can be fixed by means of plates or intramedullary nails, using anterograde or retrograde routes. In the humerus, fracture reduction and limb stabilization maneuvers for implantation of intramedullary nails are done manually, usually by two assistants. Because muscle fatigue may occur, this option may be less efficient. The aim of this paper is to present an external upper-limb traction device for use in anterograde intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis of humeral shaft fractures that enables vertical, horizontal and rotational stabilization of the upper limb, in a manner similar to the device used for the lower limbs. The device is portable, of simple construction, and can be installed on any operating table equipped with side rails. It was used for surgical treatment of 29 humeral shaft fractures using an anterograde locked intramedullary nail. Our experience was extremely positive. We did not have any complications relating to its use and we believe that it notably facilitated the surgical procedures. PMID:27022560

  13. UPPER LIMB TRACTION DEVICE FOR ANTEROGRADE INTRAMEDULLARY LOCKED NAIL OF HUMERAL SHAFT FRACTURES.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Mário Chaves; Gomes, Felipe Antônio; Linhares, Daniel Campos; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, José Carlos Souza; de Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi

    2010-01-01

    Diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia in adults are mostly treated surgically, usually by means of intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis. Some comminuted and/or highly deviated shaft fractures may present a veritable technical challenge. Fracture (or orthopedic) tables, which enable vertical, horizontal and rotational instrumental stabilization of the limb, greatly facilitate reduction and implant placement maneuvers and are widely used by orthopedic surgeons. Humeral shaft fractures are mostly treated nonsurgically. However, some cases with indications that are well defined in the literature require surgical treatment. They can be fixed by means of plates or intramedullary nails, using anterograde or retrograde routes. In the humerus, fracture reduction and limb stabilization maneuvers for implantation of intramedullary nails are done manually, usually by two assistants. Because muscle fatigue may occur, this option may be less efficient. The aim of this paper is to present an external upper-limb traction device for use in anterograde intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis of humeral shaft fractures that enables vertical, horizontal and rotational stabilization of the upper limb, in a manner similar to the device used for the lower limbs. The device is portable, of simple construction, and can be installed on any operating table equipped with side rails. It was used for surgical treatment of 29 humeral shaft fractures using an anterograde locked intramedullary nail. Our experience was extremely positive. We did not have any complications relating to its use and we believe that it notably facilitated the surgical procedures.

  14. Tibial Fixation Properties of a Continuous-Loop ACL Hamstring Graft Construct with Suspensory Fixation in Porcine Bone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick A; DeBerardino, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to compare tibial fixation strength of suspensory fixation for a quadrupled semitendinosus continuous loop all-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) construct versus a doubled semitendinosus and gracilis graft fixated with an interference screw. Biomechanical testing was conducted using human hamstring allografts and porcine tibias. Constructs were cycled from 50 to 250 N for 500 cycles followed by a pull to failure. The average load to failure of tibial suspensory fixation of the all-inside continuous loop construct (1,012 N) was statistically different compared with the tibial interference screw group (612 N) (p < 0.001). The cyclic displacement of the continuous loop construct (2.5 mm) was not statistically different from the interference screw construct (1.9 mm). For both the groups, approximately half the overall cyclic displacement occurred with the first cycle. Tibial side suspensory fixation of a novel all-inside continuous loop hamstring graft provided suitable strength for tibial fixation for ACL reconstruction. The continuous loop construct had a significantly higher load to failure compared with the use of an interference screw, and cyclic loading was comparable. Use of hamstring soft tissue grafts is very common for ACL reconstruction. An all-inside ACL reconstruction is based on a continuous loop construct utilizing a single semitendinosus graft that is quadrupled employing suspensory fixation on both the femoral and tibial side. Suspensory fixation on the femoral side been previously reported, but this is the first report of strength of this method of suspensory fixation on the tibia. PMID:25347056

  15. Intramedullary screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Massada, Marta Maria Teixeira de Oliveira; Pereira, Manuel Alexandre Negrais Pinho Gonçalves; de Sousa, Ricardo Jorge Gomes; Costa, Paulo Guimarães; Massada, José Leandro da Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to review the short- and long-term clinical and radiological results of intramedullary compression screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes. Methods Eleven male and six female active patients with fifth metatarsal zone II and zone III fractures fixed with a 4.5-mm cannulated compression screw were evaluated by chart review, review of radiographs, and clinical evaluation. Fifteen of the patients were high-level athletes (soccer: n=11; basketball: n=1; track and field: n=3) and two were recreational-level athletes. Mean follow-up from surgery to evaluation was 54 (38-70) months. Results Mean time to healing as shown on radiographs and mean time to return to full activity after surgery were 7.3 and 7.5 weeks, respectively. All patients were able to return to their previous levels of activity. There were no reports of union delay, nonunion or refracture to date. Conclusion In our patients, cannulated screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures was a reliable procedure with low morbidity associated that provided athletes a quick return to activity. Level of Evidence I, Case Series. PMID:24453614

  16. Cervicomedullary intramedullary peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor with intratumoral bleed: Report of one case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pradeep; Das, Kuntal K; Mehrotra, Anant; Srivastava, Arun K; Sahu, Rabi N; Jaiswal, Awadhesh; Pandey, Rakesh; Behari, Sanjay; Bhaisora, Kamlesh S; Sardhara, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) are highly malignant, yet relatively uncommon neoplasms of the central nervous system. Although a host of different parts of the nervous system can be affected, intramedullary location of PNET is extremely rare. Most reports on intramedullary PNET have reported central PNET (cPNET); peripheral PNET (pPNET) affecting intramedullary spinal location is extremely rare. Till now, seven such cases of intramedullary pPNET have been described in medical literature in English. Here, we report an 11-year-old boy with cervicomedullary junction intramedullary pPNET who presented with intratumoral bleed, wherein the clinical presentation and radiological features gave us no clue preoperatively about the underlying diagnosis. In this report, we additionally review certain salient aspects of this dreaded disease in light of the existing evidence. PMID:27217659

  17. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation PMID:27357222

  18. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods - 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results - 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation - The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation. PMID:27357222

  19. Solitary fibrous tumour with intramedullary component: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Duc, Christophe; San Millán Ruíz, Diego; Morard, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare WHO grade I mesenchymal neoplasms that were first described in the visceral pleura. A wide variety of locations of SFT have been reported but only twelve cases of intramedullary solitary fibrous tumour. We report a case of thoracic spinal cord SFT. A 49-year-old woman presented with clinical signs of dorsal myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural mass at level T9-T10 which showed imaging features consistent both for an intra- and an extramedullary location of a solid tumour. Imaging findings were confirmed during surgery which was successful in resecting the extramedullary component. The intramedullary component could only be partially resected. Solitary fibrous tumour is a rare pathological entity in the central nervous system. The course of intramedullary SFT is unknown and careful long-term follow-up is recommended.

  20. Intramedullary nailing of the femur with an inflatable self-locking nail: comparison with locked nailing.

    PubMed

    Lepore, Luciano; Lepore, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    We report a comparative study between an inflatable expandable nail and a traditional locked intramedullary implant in closed fractures of the femoral shaft. We matched each of 43 patients who had undergone intramedullary fixation with an inflatable expandable nail with a patient of the same sex, age (within 2 years), and fracture who had undergone statically locked intramedullary fixation with traditional nails. The mean duration of surgery was significantly shorter in the patients who were treated with the inflatable expandable nail. There were no differences in average blood loss, transfusion requirements, or hospitalization. Five of the patients who underwent traditional nailing required dynamization to achieve union. The inflatable expandable nail allows effective management of diaphyseal fractures of the femur. Interlocking is not necessary, operative times are reduced, and exposure to ionizing radiation is minimized. At present, however, the inflatable expandable nail used in the this investigation is markedly more expensive than traditional devices. PMID:14648267

  1. Intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris complicated by dense adhesion to neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Ohtonari, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Nobuharu; Ota, Taisei; Ota, Shinzo; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    2009-11-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with an intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris manifesting as an 8-month history of mild bladder dysfunction, sexual impotence, and paresthesia in the buttocks. Subtotal removal of the lesion was achieved, as part of the tumor showed dense adhesion to the rostral neural tissue, with only postoperative transient deterioration of bladder dysfunction. Intramedullary schwannoma, especially involving the conus medullaris and the proximal spinal cord, is relatively rare and the pathogenesis and pathophysiology are unclear. Complete resection is often advised to avoid recurrence, but tumor adhesion to neural tissue sometimes renders complete resection difficult, and may create the risk of unacceptable operative morbidity. The present case shows that transient neurological deterioration may occur even with just subtotal removal, leaving the adherent part. Therefore, recognition of the particular features and the strategy for treatment in intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris is essential for making appropriate decisions on the degree of removal.

  2. Management of extra-articular fractures of the distal tibia: intramedullary nailing versus plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Casstevens, Chris; Le, Toan; Archdeacon, Michael T; Wyrick, John D

    2012-11-01

    Intramedullary nailing and plate fixation represent two viable approaches to internal fixation of extra-articular fractures of the distal tibia. Although both techniques have demonstrated success in maintaining reduction and promoting stable union, they possess distinct advantages and disadvantages that require careful consideration during surgical planning. Differences in soft-tissue health and construct stability must be considered when choosing between intramedullary nailing and plating of the distal tibia. Recent advances in intramedullary nail design and plate-and-screw fixation systems have further increased the options for management of these fractures. Current evidence supports careful consideration of the risk of soft-tissue complications, residual knee pain, and fracture malalignment in the context of patient and injury characteristics in the selection of the optimal method of fixation.

  3. The anatomical tibial axis: reliable rotational orientation in knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Cobb, J P; Dixon, H; Dandachli, W; Iranpour, F

    2008-08-01

    The rotational alignment of the tibia is an unresolved issue in knee replacement. A poor functional outcome may be due to malrotation of the tibial component. Our aim was to find a reliable method for positioning the tibial component in knee replacement. CT scans of 19 knees were reconstructed in three dimensions and orientated vertically. An axial plane was identified 20 mm below the tibial spines. The centre of each tibial condyle was calculated from ten points taken round the condylar cortex. The tibial tubercle centre was also generated as the centre of the circle which best fitted eight points on the outside of the tubercle in an axial plane at the level of its most prominent point. The derived points were identified by three observers with errors of 0.6 mm to 1 mm. The medial and lateral tibial centres were constant features (radius 24 mm (SD 3), and 22 mm (SD 3), respectively). An anatomical axis was created perpendicular to the line joining these two points. The tubercle centre was found to be 20 mm (SD 7) lateral to the centre of the medial tibial condyle. Compared with this axis, an axis perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was internally rotated by 6 degrees (SD 3). An axis based on the tibial tubercle and the tibial spines was also internally rotated by 5 degrees (sd 10). Alignment of the knee when based on this anatomical axis was more reliable than either the posterior surfaces or any axis involving the tubercle which was the least reliable landmark in the region.

  4. Robotic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Intramedullary Spinal Cord Metastases: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rafael; Sallabanda, Kita; Santa-Olalla, Iciar; Avilés, Lijia; Sallabanda, Morena; Rivin, Eleonor; Samblás, José

    2016-01-01

    Modern technologies allow the delivery of high radiation doses to intramedullary spinal cord metastases while lowering the dose to the neighboring organs at risk. Whether this dosimetric advantage translates into clinical benefit is not well known. This study evaluates the acute and late toxicity outcomes in a patient treated with robotic radiosurgery for an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. A 50-year-old woman diagnosed in May 2006 with invasive ductal carcinoma of the right breast T2N3M1 (two liver metastases) received chemotherapy with a complete response. Subsequently, she underwent adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy, along with tamoxifen. After several distant relapses, treated mainly with systemic therapy, the patient developed an intramedullary lesion at the C3-C4 level and was referred to our CyberKnife unit for assessment. A total dose of 14 Gy prescribed to the 74% isodose line was administered to the intramedullary lesion in one fraction. One hundred and two treatment beams were used covering 95.63% of the target volume. The mean dose was 15.93 Gy and the maximum dose, 18.92 Gy. Maximum dose to the spinal cord was 13.96 Gy, V12 ~ 0.13 cc and V8 ~ 0.43 cc. Three months after treatment, magnetic resonance imaging showed a reduction in size and enhancement of the intramedullary lesion with no associated toxicity. During this period, the patient showed a good performance status without neurological deficits. Currently, with a follow-up of 37 months, the patient has the ability to perform activities of daily life. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases is a rare and aggressive disease, often treatment-refractory. Our case demonstrates that radiation therapy delivery with robotic radiosurgery allows the achievement of a high local control without adding toxicity. PMID:27330877

  5. Isolated, extra-articular neck and shaft fractures of the 4th and 5th metacarpals: a comparison of transverse and bouquet (intra-medullary) pinning in 67 patients.

    PubMed

    Sletten, I N; Nordsletten, L; Husby, T; Ødegaard, R A; Hellund, J C; Kvernmo, H D

    2012-06-01

    Although extra-articular metacarpal fractures are common, there is no consensus on the mode of treatment. We evaluated the outcome in 67 patients operated for isolated, extra-articular fractures in the neck or shaft of the ulnar two metacarpals 28 months post-operatively. There were 22 bouquet (intra-medullary) pinnings and 45 transverse pinnings; 11 were lost to follow-up. Overall, hand function was good, and no difference was detected between the two methods (QuickDASH, grip strength, range of motion, VAS pain and VAS satisfaction). Many patients suffered complications: 12% had a superficial infection (all treated with transverse pinning with wires left exposed); 39% had some impairment in skin sensation; 29% reported cold intolerance; and 10% had other complications. Due to the potential risk of a secondary fracture of the neighbouring metacarpal after transverse pinning, we recommend bouquet (intra-medullary) pinning. We also recommend burying wires beneath the skin surface to avoid infection.

  6. Arthroscopic Fixation of Tibial Spine Avulsion Fracture in Open Physis

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Arthroscopic fixation of tibial spine fracture in patients with open physis without damaging the growth plate is very important. We have described a very simple and effective technique for the first time in this article. Case report: A 16-year-old boy sustained avulsion fractures of tibial spine while playing. He was treated arthroscopically with excellent results. Conclusion: Arthroscopic fixation of tibial spine fracture in patients with open physis with two cannulated screws perpendicular to each other is a very simple technique providing strong construct, and allowing early mobilization without risk of damage to the growth plate. PMID:27703945

  7. Intramedullary cyst formation after removal of multiple intradural spinal arachnoid cysts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zekaj, Edvin; Saleh, Christian; Servello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Background: A rare cause of spinal cord compression is spinal arachnoid cysts. Symptoms are caused by spinal cord compression, however, asymptomatic patients have been also reported. Treatment options depend upon symptom severity and clinical course. Case Description: We report the case of a 47-year-old patient who developed an intramedullary arachnoid cyst after removal of an intradural extramedullary cyst. Conclusion: Surgery should be considered early in a symptomatic disease course. Longstanding medullary compression may reduce the possibility of neurological recovery as well as secondary complications such as intramedullary cyst formation. PMID:27512608

  8. Intramedullary Tuberculoma of Dorsal Spinal Cord: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Dhiraj Vithal; Jagtap, Sanjay Anand; Patil, Hitendra Gulabrao; Biraris, Sandeep Ramesh; Chandanwale, Ajay S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Intramedullary tuberculoma (IMT)are extremely rare lesions should be distinguished from other space occupying lesions like neoplasms. Although it is a treatable condition delaying diagnosis leads to significant morbidity. Case Report: We report a case of intramedullary thoracic tuberculoma with paraparesis showing deterioration of neurological status during medical treatment. Surgical resection had shown the excellent result. Conclusion: The possibility of IMT should be seriously considered when an intraspinal mass is found with evidence of tuberculosis. Anti-tuberculous therapy (ATT) is the mainstay of treatment and had shown good results. Surgical removal is to be considered in cases of worsening neurological status while the patient is on ATT. PMID:27299042

  9. Fixation of a human rib by an intramedullary telescoping splint anchored by bone cement.

    PubMed

    Liovic, Petar; Šutalo, Ilija D; Marasco, Silvana F

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept for rib fixation is presented that involves the use of a bioresorbable polymer intramedullary telescoping splint. Bone cement is used to anchor each end of the splint inside the medullary canal on each side of the fracture site. In this manner, rib fixation is achieved without fixation device protrusion from the rib, making the splint completely intramedullary. Finite element analysis is used to demonstrate that such a splint/cement composite can preserve rib fixation subjected to cough-intensity force loadings. Computational fluid dynamics and porcine rib experiments were used to study the anchor formation process required to complete the fixation. PMID:26733094

  10. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) ameliorates healing of tibial fracture non-union unresponsive to conventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Nicolas; Antonic, Vlado; Smolen, Daniel; Slezak, Paul; Schaden, Wolfgang; Mittermayr, Rainer; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Tibial non-unions are common cause of demanding revision surgeries and are associated with a significant impact on patients' quality of life and health care costs. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has been shown to improve osseous healing in vitro and in vivo. The main objective of present study was to evaluate the efficacy of ESWT in healing of tibial non-unions unresponsive to previous surgical and non-surgical measures. A retrospective multivariant analysis of a prospective open, single-centre, clinical trial of tibia non-union was conducted. 56 patients with 58 eligible fractures who met the FDA criteria were included. All patients received 3000-4000 impulses of electrohydraulic shockwaves at an energy flux density of 0.4mJ/mm(2) (-6dB). On average patients underwent 1.9 times (±1.3SD) surgical interventions prior to ESWT displaying the rather negatively selected cohort and its limited therapy responsiveness. In 88.5% of patients receiving ESWT complete bone healing was observed after six months irrespective of underlying pathology. The multivariant analysis showed that time of application is important for therapy success. Patients achieving healing received ESWT earlier: mean number of days between last surgical intervention and ESWT (healed - 355.1 days±167.4SD vs. not healed - 836.7 days±383.0SD; p<0.0001). ESWT proved to be a safe, effective and non-invasive treatment modality in tibial non-unions recalcitrant to standard therapies. The procedure is well tolerated, time-saving, lacking side effects, with potential to significantly decrease health care costs. Thus, in our view, ESWT should be considered the treatment of first choice in established tibial non-unions.

  11. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) ameliorates healing of tibial fracture non-union unresponsive to conventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Nicolas; Antonic, Vlado; Smolen, Daniel; Slezak, Paul; Schaden, Wolfgang; Mittermayr, Rainer; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Tibial non-unions are common cause of demanding revision surgeries and are associated with a significant impact on patients' quality of life and health care costs. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has been shown to improve osseous healing in vitro and in vivo. The main objective of present study was to evaluate the efficacy of ESWT in healing of tibial non-unions unresponsive to previous surgical and non-surgical measures. A retrospective multivariant analysis of a prospective open, single-centre, clinical trial of tibia non-union was conducted. 56 patients with 58 eligible fractures who met the FDA criteria were included. All patients received 3000-4000 impulses of electrohydraulic shockwaves at an energy flux density of 0.4mJ/mm(2) (-6dB). On average patients underwent 1.9 times (±1.3SD) surgical interventions prior to ESWT displaying the rather negatively selected cohort and its limited therapy responsiveness. In 88.5% of patients receiving ESWT complete bone healing was observed after six months irrespective of underlying pathology. The multivariant analysis showed that time of application is important for therapy success. Patients achieving healing received ESWT earlier: mean number of days between last surgical intervention and ESWT (healed - 355.1 days±167.4SD vs. not healed - 836.7 days±383.0SD; p<0.0001). ESWT proved to be a safe, effective and non-invasive treatment modality in tibial non-unions recalcitrant to standard therapies. The procedure is well tolerated, time-saving, lacking side effects, with potential to significantly decrease health care costs. Thus, in our view, ESWT should be considered the treatment of first choice in established tibial non-unions. PMID:27158008

  12. [Tibial abscess caused by histoplasma capsulatum].

    PubMed

    de Fernández, M I; Negroni, R; Arechavala, A

    2001-01-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis is the most serious form of the disease produced by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Histoplasmosis was first described by Darling in 1906, and it is endemic in certain areas of Central and Southeastern regions of USA, and most Latin America countries, including the Pampa húmeda and Mesopotamia regions in Argentina, but in other continents it has a limited regional distribution. Lung involvement predominates in 90% of cases, but H. capsulatum may involve bone and soft tissues. Bone lesions without other signs of infection are very rare, and are often misdiagnosed as cancer. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis in a man with a myelodysplasia who presented a left tibial abscess, without any clinical evidence of pulmonary involvement. The patient was successfully treated with itraconazole.

  13. Intramedullary solitary fibrous tumor of dorsal spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ciappetta, Pasqualino; D'Urso, Pietro Ivo; Cimmino, Antonia; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Rossi, Roberta; Colamaria, Antonio; D'Urso, Oscar Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are rare neoplasms of mesenchymal origin involving soft tissues, mainly serosal sites; the spinal cord location is uncommon. We report a case of SFT occurring in the thoracic spinal cord, discussing histological, ultrastructural and molecular aspects. A 75-year-old woman with an MRI suggesting a dorsal intracanalar lesion was admitted to our institution. T5-T7 laminectomies were performed and an intramedullary tumor was discovered. The tumor arose within the spinal cord and was completely removed. Tumor samples were processed for histological, ultrastructural and molecular analysis (comparative genomic hybridization [CGH], methylation status of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase [MGMT], p16, deleted in colorectal cancer [DCC] and death-associated protein kinase 1 [DAPK1]). The histological examination demonstrated a proliferation of spindle-shaped cells with a collagen-matrix background. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin and CD34 and negative for S-100 and epithelial membrane antigen. A histological diagnosis of SFT was made. The ultrastructural examination showed undifferentiated cells within a collagenous matrix and sparse extravascular basement membrane. CGH analysis revealed deletion of 9p21 and losses on 2q, 3p, 16q and 19q and gains on 7q; furthermore, no aberrant methylation pattern was found in the promoter region of MGMT, p16, DCC and DAPK1 genes. On the second-year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact. The occurrence of SFT within the spinal cord parenchyma and its histological characteristics demonstrate that SFTs are not restricted to serosal surfaces. The course of spinal cord SFT is unknown and long-term follow-up is necessary. The histological, ultrastructural and molecular findings are important for the diagnosis and the authors provide a literature review of these aspects.

  14. Anterolateral Biplanar Proximal Tibial Opening-Wedge Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moulton, Samuel G; Nitri, Marco; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Proximal tibial anterolateral opening-wedge osteotomies have been reported to achieve successful biplanar lower-extremity realignment. Indications for a proximal tibial anterolateral osteotomy include symptomatic genu recurvatum with genu valgus alignment, usually in patients with a flat sagittal-plane tibial slope. The biplanar approach is able to simultaneously address both components of a patient's malalignment with a single procedure. The correction amount is verified with spacers and intraoperative imaging, while correction of the patient's heel height is simultaneously measured. A plate is secured into the osteotomy site, and the site is filled with bone allograft. The anterolateral tibial osteotomy has been reported to be an effective surgical procedure for correcting concomitant genu recurvatum and genu valgus malalignment. PMID:27656374

  15. Rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Graceffa, Angelo; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Baldini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical techniques, correlated to different anatomical landmarks, have been proposed to allow a satisfactory rotational alignment of the tibial component in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unfortunately, an accurate landmark has not yet been established although many computer models using CT reconstructions and standard radiologic studies have been performed. In this review article, the authors propose a new anatomical rotational reference for a correct positioning of the tibial component during primary TKA; the authors compared the results of their studies with the current literature on rotational alignment references and previously proposed surgical techniques. The authors also analyzed the correlation between classic and newer tibial baseplate designs and different tibial rotational landmarks. PMID:26855939

  16. PHILOS humerus plate for a distal tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Twaij, Haider; Damany, Dev

    2013-01-04

    This report discusses the use of an alternative implant in the emergency fixation of a distal tibial fracture. We planned to fix the shear-type medial malleolar fracture in a closed, tri-malleolar fracture with a locking distal tibial plate. Intra-operatively, it was noted that the required plate was unavailable. A PHILOS humeral plate seemed to fit the contours of the distal tibia. The broad end of the PHILOS, when placed distally, gave options to place locking screws in the medial malleolar fragment. The fracture was stable after fixation. The patient made a full post-operative recovery and follow-up at 4 months was satisfactory. Despite adequate planning, there will be instances where one has to improvise. An understanding of the principles of fracture management can aid in finding solutions. PHILOS humeral plate may be used to stabilize a distal tibial fracture if an appropriate distal tibial locking plate is not available.

  17. The medial tibial stress syndrome. A cause of shin splints.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, S J; Gould, R N; Lee, Y F; Schmidt, D A; Hargens, A R

    1982-01-01

    The medial tibial stress syndrome is a symptom complex seen in athletes who complain of exercise-induced pain along the distal posterior-medial aspect of the tibia. Intramuscular pressures within the posterior compartments of the leg were measured in 12 patients with this disorder. These pressures were not elevated and therefore this syndrome is a not a compartment syndrome. Available information suggests that the medial tibial stress syndrome most likely represents a periostitis at this location of the leg.

  18. TIBIAL TUBERCLE AVULSION FRACTURE IN A MALE ADOLESCENT.

    PubMed

    Matoković, Damir; Šimić-Klarić, Andrea; Rajić, Marijana Tomić; Crnković, Helena Tesari; Jurinić, Mislav; Jovanović, Savo

    2015-06-01

    Tibial tuberosity fractures are rare in childhood, most frequently due to excessive quadriceps muscle contraction. On performing long jump, a 15-year-old boy sustained tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture type II according to Watson-Jones. The patient was treated operatively with fragment repositioning and screw fixation. Ten months after the injury and rehabilitation, he resumed his sports activities with full range knee motion. PMID:26415319

  19. Management and outcomes of intramedullary spinal cord tumors: A single center experience from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Saqib K.; Waqas, Muhammad; Shakaib, Baila; Enam, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative neurophysiology, high magnification microscopes, and ultrasonic aspirators are considered essential aid for the safe resection of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs). Most centers in developing countries such as Pakistan still lack these facilities. The purpose of this study was to review the management of IMSCTs at our hospital and to determine factors associated with the outcomes of surgery. Methods: This was a retrospective review of medical records of adult patients undergoing surgery for IMSCT over 12 years. The institutional ethical review committee approved this study. Data were collected regarding demographics, clinical and radiological features, and surgical details. Modified McCormick Scale was used to grade patients’ neurological status at admission, discharge, and follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 22. Results: Forty three cases were reviewed. Mean age was 33.8 ± 15.1 years whereas median follow-up was 5 months (range: 0.25–96 months). Most patients had ependymoma (n = 16; 73%). Cervical region was the most commonly involved (n = 15; 34.9%). Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 30 cases (69.8%). The preoperative McCormick grade was significantly associated with follow-up McCormick grade (P value = 0.002). Eight patients (18.6%) underwent intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, out of which GTR was achieved in all cases, and none had disease progression or recurrence. Ten patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Thirty five patients (81.4%) had progression free survival at last follow-up. Conclusions: We achieved a GTR rate of 68.9% for IMSCTs with limited resources. In few cases, where intraoperative electrophysiology was used, the rate of GTR was 100%. Preoperative neurological status was associated with better postoperative McCormick score.

  20. Early and late intramedullary nailing of femur fracture: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Alobaidi, Ahmad S.; Al-Hassani, Ammar; El-Menyar, Ayman; Abdelrahman, Husham; Tuma, Mazin; Al-Thani, Hassan; Aldosari, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Femur fracture (FF) is a common injury, and intramedullary nailing (IMN) is the standard surgical fixation. However, the time of intervention remains controversial. We aimed to describe the reamed IMN (rIMN) timing and hospital outcomes in trauma patients presenting with FF. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted for all patients admitted with FF and they underwent fixation at level 1 trauma unit between January 2010 and January 2012. Patients were divided into Group I with early rIMN (<12 h) and Group II with late rIMN (≥12 h). Patients’ demographics, clinical presentations, mechanism of injury, pulmonary complications, organ failure, length of stay, and mortality were described. Results: A total of 307 eligible patients with FF were identified (156 patients in Group I and 151 patients in Group II). Patients in Group II were older (36 ± 18 vs. 29 ± 9; P = 0.001) and had higher rate of polytrauma (35% vs. 18%, P = 0.001), head injury (5% vs. 12%, P = 0.68) and bilateral FF (10.7% vs. 5.1%; P = 0.07) in comparison to Group I. Group II had longer stay in Intensive Care Unit (7 [1–56] vs. 2 [1–17] days; P = 0.009) and hospital (13 [2–236] vs. 9 [1–367]; P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in terms of sepsis, renal failure, fat embolism, adult respiratory distress syndrome and death. Conclusions: Based on this analysis, we believe that early rIMN is safe in appropriately selected cases. In patients with traumatic FFs, early rIMN is associated with low hospital complications and shorter hospital stay. The rate of pulmonary complications is almost the same in the early and late group. Further prospective randomized studies with large sample size would be ideal using the information garnered from the present study. PMID:27722116

  1. Advanced interlocking systems to improve heavy-load-bearing characteristics of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Leopold; Eichler, Johannes; Ryll, E Jonathan S; Fischerauer, Stefan; Raschke, Michael J; Kolbitsch, Andreas; Castellani, Christoph; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2016-11-01

    Flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) is a minimally invasive and widespread standard method for osteosynthesis of pediatric long bone fractures. In the case of unstable fractures of the lower extremity, interlocking systems need to be used to prevent axial shortening and subsequent perforation of the nail at its insertion site. In the present study, four different screw-fixed interlocking systems for FINs (Hofer TwinPlug with two 3-mm titanium interlocking screws, Hofer FixPlug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw, Hofer Plug with 3.5-mm titanium interlocking screw, and Hofer Plug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw) in comparison with the commonly used Ender stainless steel nails (locked with 3.5-mm screw) were experimentally investigated in cadaveric lamb tibiae, regarding their load characteristics and failure modes in the case of heavy loading. The specimens were subjected to sequential axial cyclic loading of 5000cycles with stepwise increase of the load amplitude until failure. Migration of locking screws and internal damage of bone tissue was quantified by micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Ender nails failed on average at a peak load of 800 N, TwinPlugs at 1367 N, FixPlugs at 1222 N, Plugs 3.5mm at 1225 N and Plugs 3.0mm at 971 N. TwinPlugs, FixPlugs, and Plugs 3.5mm failed in a slow manner over several hundred loading cycles, whereas Ender nails and Plugs 3.0mm exhibited abrupt failure without any prior indication. Our results confirm that axial stability of FIN can be further improved by screw-fixed plugs by simultaneously avoiding shortcomings of an eye-locked system, which the Ender nails are. Considering biomechanical results, plug interlocking systems with 3.5-mm screws should be favored over conventional Ender nails and plugs with 3-mm screws.

  2. Advanced interlocking systems to improve heavy-load-bearing characteristics of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Leopold; Eichler, Johannes; Ryll, E Jonathan S; Fischerauer, Stefan; Raschke, Michael J; Kolbitsch, Andreas; Castellani, Christoph; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2016-11-01

    Flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) is a minimally invasive and widespread standard method for osteosynthesis of pediatric long bone fractures. In the case of unstable fractures of the lower extremity, interlocking systems need to be used to prevent axial shortening and subsequent perforation of the nail at its insertion site. In the present study, four different screw-fixed interlocking systems for FINs (Hofer TwinPlug with two 3-mm titanium interlocking screws, Hofer FixPlug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw, Hofer Plug with 3.5-mm titanium interlocking screw, and Hofer Plug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw) in comparison with the commonly used Ender stainless steel nails (locked with 3.5-mm screw) were experimentally investigated in cadaveric lamb tibiae, regarding their load characteristics and failure modes in the case of heavy loading. The specimens were subjected to sequential axial cyclic loading of 5000cycles with stepwise increase of the load amplitude until failure. Migration of locking screws and internal damage of bone tissue was quantified by micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Ender nails failed on average at a peak load of 800 N, TwinPlugs at 1367 N, FixPlugs at 1222 N, Plugs 3.5mm at 1225 N and Plugs 3.0mm at 971 N. TwinPlugs, FixPlugs, and Plugs 3.5mm failed in a slow manner over several hundred loading cycles, whereas Ender nails and Plugs 3.0mm exhibited abrupt failure without any prior indication. Our results confirm that axial stability of FIN can be further improved by screw-fixed plugs by simultaneously avoiding shortcomings of an eye-locked system, which the Ender nails are. Considering biomechanical results, plug interlocking systems with 3.5-mm screws should be favored over conventional Ender nails and plugs with 3-mm screws. PMID:27524031

  3. Management and outcomes of intramedullary spinal cord tumors: A single center experience from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Saqib K.; Waqas, Muhammad; Shakaib, Baila; Enam, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative neurophysiology, high magnification microscopes, and ultrasonic aspirators are considered essential aid for the safe resection of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs). Most centers in developing countries such as Pakistan still lack these facilities. The purpose of this study was to review the management of IMSCTs at our hospital and to determine factors associated with the outcomes of surgery. Methods: This was a retrospective review of medical records of adult patients undergoing surgery for IMSCT over 12 years. The institutional ethical review committee approved this study. Data were collected regarding demographics, clinical and radiological features, and surgical details. Modified McCormick Scale was used to grade patients’ neurological status at admission, discharge, and follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 22. Results: Forty three cases were reviewed. Mean age was 33.8 ± 15.1 years whereas median follow-up was 5 months (range: 0.25–96 months). Most patients had ependymoma (n = 16; 73%). Cervical region was the most commonly involved (n = 15; 34.9%). Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 30 cases (69.8%). The preoperative McCormick grade was significantly associated with follow-up McCormick grade (P value = 0.002). Eight patients (18.6%) underwent intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, out of which GTR was achieved in all cases, and none had disease progression or recurrence. Ten patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Thirty five patients (81.4%) had progression free survival at last follow-up. Conclusions: We achieved a GTR rate of 68.9% for IMSCTs with limited resources. In few cases, where intraoperative electrophysiology was used, the rate of GTR was 100%. Preoperative neurological status was associated with better postoperative McCormick score. PMID:27656322

  4. Understanding the etiology of the posteromedial tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Burr, David B; Finestone, Aharon S; Voloshin, Arkady

    2015-09-01

    Previous human in vivo tibial strain measurements from surface strain gauges during vigorous activities were found to be below the threshold value of repetitive cyclical loading at 2500 microstrain in tension necessary to reduce the fatigue life of bone, based on ex vivo studies. Therefore it has been hypothesized that an intermediate bone remodeling response might play a role in the development of tibial stress fractures. In young adults tibial stress fractures are usually oblique, suggesting that they are the result of failure under shear strain. Strains were measured using surface mounted unstacked 45° rosette strain gauges on the posterior aspect of the flat medial cortex just below the tibial midshaft, in a 48year old male subject while performing vertical jumps, staircase jumps and running up and down stadium stairs. Shear strains approaching 5000 microstrain were recorded during stair jumping and vertical standing jumps. Shear strains above 1250 microstrain were recorded during runs up and down stadium steps. Based on predictions from ex vivo studies, stair and vertical jumping tibial shear strain in the test subject was high enough to potentially produce tibial stress fracture subsequent to repetitive cyclic loading without necessarily requiring an intermediate remodeling response to microdamage. PMID:25933941

  5. Improving clinical examination in acute tibial fractures by enhancing visual cues: the case for always 'cutting back' a tibial back-slab and marking the dorsalis pedis pulse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alasdair; Kimber, Cheryl; Bramwell, Donald; Jaarsma, Ruurd

    2016-08-01

    Look, feel, move is a simple and widely taught sequence to be followed when undertaking a clinical examination in orthopaedics (Maher et al., 1994; McRae, 1999; Solomon et al., 2010). The splinting of an acute tibial fracture with a posterior back-slab is also common practice; with the most commonly taught design involving covering the dorsum of the foot with bandaging (Charnley, 1950; Maher et al., 1994; McRae, 1989). We investigated the effect of the visual cues provided by exposing the dorsum of the foot and marking the dorsalis pedis pulse. We used a clinical simulation in which we compared the quality of the recorded clinical examination undertaken by 30 nurses. The nurses were randomly assigned to assess a patient with either a traditional back-slab or one in which the dorsal bandaging had been cut back and the dorsalis pedis pulse marked. We found that the quality of the recorded clinical examination was significantly better in the cut-back group. Previous studies have shown that the cut-back would not alter the effectiveness of the back-slab as a splint (Zagorski et al., 1993). We conclude that all tibial back-slabs should have the bandaging on the dorsum of the foot cut back and the location of the dorsalis pedis pulse marked. This simple adaptation will improve the subsequent clinical examinations undertaken and recorded without reducing the back-slab's effectiveness as a splint.

  6. [Intramedullary bronchogenic cyst. Apropos of 1 case. Discussion of the endo-ectodermal adhesion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Duthel, R; Brunon, J; Michel, D; Boucheron, S

    1983-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 40-year-old man who has presented for many years an intermittent progressive spastic paraplegia. Plain films of the spine show very important dysraphic abnormalities of the inferior dorsal column and the myelography shows a complete block suggesting an intramedullary space-occupying lesion at four levels above the vertebral abnormalities. The operation permits a total removal of an intramedullary "bronchogenic cyst". In the post-operative course, the neurologic deficit improves, six months later a spastic paraparesia remains. The review of the literature shows that this is an exceptional observation. Intramedullary bronchogenic cysts must be regarded as similar to intramedullary enterogenic cysts. They are not teratomas but dysembryoplasiae due to failure of the ento-ectoblastic separation between the second and the third weeks of life. These cysts form a part of the "ento-ectodermal adhesion syndrome" of Prob et al. The preoperative diagnosis is possible on the association of intermittent progressive syndrome of medullary compression and dysraphic spondylotic changes. The total surgical removal of the cyst, by micro-surgical techniques, is able to preserve the neurologic evolution with an excellent result if the operation is performed before definitive neurologic deficits occur.

  7. Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for Fractures in Children – Specific Applications

    PubMed Central

    COSMA, DAN; VASILESCU, DANA ELENA

    2014-01-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is a new minimally invasive technique for the treatment of pediatric fractures. It approximates the physiological healing process of bone, without opening the fracture site. Also, the operative stress is minimal because of the minimally invasive nature of the procedure, and the volume of implants is small, offering a very good stability without plaster cast immobilization. PMID:26528014

  8. [Distal tibia peri-implant fracture with an intramedullary nail: a case report].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Cabrera, J M; González-Alconada, R; García-Mota, M D

    2013-01-01

    Peri-implant fractures of the distal tibia after intramedullary nailing are rare. We present a case of a fracture of the distal tibia at the site of the distal interlocking screw. We found two cases reported in the world literature. There are no cases reported in the Spanish literature.

  9. Intramedullary non-specific inflammatory lesion of thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are several non-neoplastic lesions which mimick intramedullary spinal cord neoplasm in their radiographic and clinical presentation. These can be classified as either infectious (TB, fungal, bacterial, parasytic, syphilis, CMV, HSV) and non-infectious (sarcoid, MS, myelitis, ADEM, SLE) inflammatory lesions, idiopathic necrotizing myelopathy, unusual vascular lesions and radiation myelopathy. Although biopsy may be indicated in many cases, an erroneous diagnosis of intramedullary neoplasm can often be eliminated pre-operatively. Case description the authors report a very rare case of intramedullary non-specific inflammatory lesion of unknown origin, without signs of infection or demyelinization, in a woman who showed no other evidence of systemic disease. Conclusions Intramedullary lesions that mimick a tumor can be various and difficult to interpret. Preoperative MRI does not allow a certain diagnosis because these lesions have a very similar signal intensity pattern. Specific tests for infective pathologies are useful for diagnosis, but histological examination is essential for establishing a certain diagnosis. In our case the final histological examination and the specific tests that we performed have not cleared our doubts regarding the nature of the lesion that remains controversial. PMID:20074378

  10. Intramedullary spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis: unique symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings: case report.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomohiro; Koyanagi, Izumi; Kaneko, Takahisa; Yoneta, Akihiro; Keira, Yoshiko; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Hyperhidrosis is caused by a sympathetic dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system. Intramedullary spinal cord lesions can be a cause of hyperhidrosis. The authors report a rare case of intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis. This 16-year-old boy presented with abnormal sweating on the right side of the neck, chest, and the right arm that had been occurring for 6 years. Neurological examination revealed mild motor weakness of the right lower extremity and slightly decreased sensation in the left lower extremity. Hyperhidrosis was observed in the right C3-T8 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intramedullary tumor at the right side of the spinal cord at the T2-3 level. The tumor showed partial enhancement after Gd administration. The patient underwent removal of the tumor via hemilaminectomy of T2-3. Only subtotal resection was achieved because the margins of the tumor were unclear. Histopathological examination revealed ganglioglioma. Hyperhidrosis gradually improved after surgery. Hyperhidrosis is a rare clinical manifestation of intramedullary spinal cord tumors, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The location of the tumor origin, around the right gray matter of the lateral spinal cord, may account for the hyperhidrosis as the initial symptom in this patient. Physicians should examine the spinal cord using MRI studies when a patient has hyperhidrosis with some motor or sensory symptoms of the extremities.

  11. Antegrade Unreamed Locked Intramedullary Nailing in Open Fractures of Shaft of Humerus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasbir; Lal, Mukand; Chandel, Desh Raj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Open fractures of shaft of humerus have been treated conservatively as well as operatively. Plate osteosynthesis has been considered as the gold standard treatment. Intramedullary nailing also has same success rate in closed fractures. The results of 30 open fractures of shaft humerus fixed with locked unreamed antegrade intramedullary nailing were evaluated. Aim The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of locked intramedullary nailing in open fractures of shaft humerus in terms of bone union, secondary procedure required, complication, shoulder dysfunction and infection. Materials and Methods Of consecutive 365 humeral shaft fractures, 63 fractures were open. Thirty-two patients were operated with plate osteosynthesis, while 31 patients who were treated with locked unreamed intramedullary nails fulfilling the inclusion criteria entered the study. Results Twenty eight of thirty patients united in mean duration of 10.5 weeks. There were two non-unions both of them united with bone grafting and plate osteosynthesis. Seven patients had superficial infection which healed with antibiotic course, while two patients had deep infection, which healed with repeat debridement. Eleven patients had preoperative radial nerve palsy, nine of which healed completely in average of six months. Twenty eight patients had excellent functional outcome at final follow-up while two patients had good outcome. Conclusion Antegrade nailing is associated with good union rates and low infection rates and is a good option in open fractures and in polytrauma patients. PMID:27790533

  12. A Medial Meniscal Root Pullout Repair With the Use of a Tibial Tunnel Suturing Technique.

    PubMed

    Apivatgaroon, Adinun; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2016-06-01

    A meniscal root tear is one of the common knee injuries that can lead to degenerative changes in the knee joint. Meniscal root repairs can restore proper biomechanics of the knee joint. We have developed a suturing technique that uses a tibial tunnel for a pullout suture medial meniscal root repair. This is a straightforward technique that helps to promote simple suturing of the medial meniscal root, avoid iatrogenic injuries to the articular cartilage, and produce an additional working portal during a meniscal root repair. PMID:27656383

  13. Shape optimization of tibial prosthesis components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    NASA technology and optimal design methodologies originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) are adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopaedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the shape tailoring of the tibial components of a total knee replacement implant for optimal interaction within the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation, to improve the mechanical integrity of the implant/interface/bone system, and to prevent failures of the implant components. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is demonstrated and evaluated. The methodology and evolution of the existing aerospace technology from which this pilot optimization code was developed is also presented and discussed. Both symmetric and unsymmetric in-plane loading conditions are investigated. The results of the optimization process indicate a trend toward wider and tapered posts as well as thicker backing trays. Unique component geometries were obtained for the different load cases.

  14. Intramedullary neurenteric cyst of the conus medullaris without associated spinal malformation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Hariri, Behrouz; Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hassani, Hajar; Taheri, Behrouz; Abbassioun, Kazem

    2012-01-01

    Spinal neurenteric (NE) cysts are rare congenital anomalies that may occur either alone or in the context of a complex malformative disorder. They are usually intradural-extramedullary lesions. Intramedullary NE cysts not associated with other congenital anomalies are very rare and only a few cases have been reported in the conus medullaris region. Intramedullary neurenteric cysts not associated with other spinal anomalies are very rare especially in the conus medullaris region. MRI is useful to define the cyst and the osseous anomalies associated with this lesion. The goal of treatment of an intramedullary neurenteric cyst is total excision at the first operation, if possible. Life-long follow-up with annual MRI is recommended due to the risk of cyst recurrence. We report an intramedullary NE cyst of the conus medullaris without associated malformation and the relevant literature is briefly reviewed.

  15. TIBIAL PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURE COMBINED WITH TIBIAL STEM STRESS FRACTURE FROM TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Rebelo, Edgar; Completo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty complications related to the prosthetic material are very rare, except for polyethylene wear. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman who came to the emergency service of our hospital with a periprosthetic tibial fracture (Mayo Clinic type I). Careful examination showed that this fracture was concomitantly associated with a tibial stem fatigue fracture. The prosthesis and the stem were sent to an independent biomechanics laboratory for evaluation. A finite-element CAD system was used to make a reconstruction, so as to ascertain whether there had been any manufacturing defect and what the causes of the event might have been. After evaluation of several hypotheses, it was concluded that the fracture in the prosthetic material had been caused by overloading at the plate/stem transition zone secondary to previous bone failure (fracture). From the evaluation of this case, the need to make appropriate assessment of bone mineralization can again be emphasized. In cases of doubt, a longer stem should be used. PMID:27047838

  16. Results of a modified posterolateral approach for the isolated posterolateral tibial plateau fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guan-Yi; Xiao, Bai-Ping; Luo, Cong-Feng; Zhuang, Yun-Qiang; Xu, Rong-Ming; Ma, Wei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are few posterolateral approaches that do not require the common peroneal nerve (CPN) dissection. With the nerve exposure, it would pose a great challenge and sometimes iatrogenic damage over the surgical course. The purpose was to present a case series of patients with posterolateral tibial plateau fractures treated by direct exposure and plate fixation through a modified posterolateral approach without exposing the common peroneal nerve (CPN). Materials and Methods: 9 consecutive cases of isolated posterior fractures of the posterolateral tibial plateau were operated by open reduction and plate fixation through the modified posterolateral approach without exposing the CPN between June 2009 and January 2012. Articular reduction quality was assessment according to the immediate postoperative radiographs. At 24 month followup, all patients had radiographs and were asked to complete a validated outcome measure and the modified Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Knee Scale. Results: All patients were followedup, with a mean period of 29 months (range 25–40 months). Bony union was achieved in all patients. In six cases, the reduction was graded as best and in three cases the reduction was graded as middle according to the immediate postoperative radiographs by the rank order system. The average range of motion arc was 127° (range 110°–134°) and the mean postoperative HSS was 93 (range 85–97) at 24 months followup. None of the patients sustained neurovascular complication. Conclusions: The modified posterolateral approach through a long skin incision without exposing the CPN could help to expand the surgical options for an optimal treatment of this kind of fracture, and plating of posterolateral tibial plateau fractures would result in restoration and maintenance of alignment. This approach demands precise knowledge of the anatomic structures of this region. PMID:27053799

  17. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of a displaced tibial eminence fracture.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Ronald A; Murphy, Kevin P; Machen, M Shaun; Kuklo, Timothy R

    2003-02-01

    This study describes a new arthroscopic method using a whip-stitch technique for treating a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture. A 12-year-old girl who sustained a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture was treated with arthroscopic fixation using the Arthrosew disposable suture device (Surgical Dynamics, Norwalk, CT) to place a whip stitch into the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The Arthrex ACL guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to reduce the avulsed tibial spine fragment. Sutures were then passed through the tibial tunnel and secured over a bony bridge with the knee in 20 degrees of flexion. At 9 months, the patient has a full range of motion with normal Lachman and anterior drawer testing, and she has returned to competitive basketball. Radiographs show complete fracture healing. KT-1000 and isokinetic testing at 9-month follow-up show only minimal side-to-side differences. The Arthrosew device provides a significant advantage in the treatment of type III and IV fractures of the tibial eminence by obtaining arthroscopic fixation within the substance of the ACL, thus obviating arthrotomy and hardware placement. This technique also restores the proper length and tension to the ACL, and provides a simplified, reproducible method of treatment for this injury.

  18. Tibial high-density polyethylene wear in conforming tibiofemoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Plante-Bordeneuve, P; Freeman, M A

    1993-07-01

    We have studied 27 tibial prostheses retrieved from knee replacements after 1 to 9 years. In 22 the femoral components were of cobalt-chrome, in five polyacetal. The design of the components gave a nominal contact area of 320 mm2 on each condyle. The tibial component was of high-density polyethylene (HDP) at least 6 mm thick, and not heat-treated. In the metal/HDP prostheses the average wear rate was 0.025 mm/year. The relative wear on the medial and lateral sides was related to the leg axis. None of the retrieved prostheses showed any severe disruption of their surface. The polyacetal/HDP prostheses showed similar wear with a statistically insignificant trend towards slower penetration. We conclude that the rate of wear of HDP in a conforming tibiofemoral bearing with a fixed tibial component at least 6 mm thick and not heat-treated is slow enough to be safe in clinical practice.

  19. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  4. Tibial fracture exacerbates traumatic brain injury outcomes and neuroinflammation in a novel mouse model of multitrauma.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Sun, Mujun; Wright, David K; Brady, Rhys D; Liu, Shijie; Beynon, Sinead; Schmidt, Shannon F; Kaye, Andrew H; Hamilton, John A; O'Brien, Terence J; Grills, Brian L; McDonald, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Multitrauma is a common medical problem worldwide, and often involves concurrent traumatic brain injury (TBI) and bone fracture. Despite the high incidence of combined TBI and fracture, preclinical TBI research commonly employs independent injury models that fail to incorporate the pathophysiologic interactions occurring in multitrauma. Here, we developed a novel mouse model of multitrauma, and investigated whether bone fracture worsened TBI outcomes. Male mice were assigned into four groups: sham-TBI+sham-fracture (SHAM); sham-TBI+fracture (FX); TBI+sham-fracture (TBI); and TBI+fracture (MULTI). The injury methods included a closed-skull weight-drop TBI model and a closed tibial fracture. After a 35-day recovery, mice underwent behavioral testing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MULTI mice displayed abnormal behaviors in the open-field compared with all other groups. On MRI, MULTI mice had enlarged ventricles and diffusion abnormalities compared with all other groups. These changes occurred in the presence of heightened neuroinflammation in MULTI mice at 24 hours and 35 days after injury, and elevated edema and blood-brain barrier disruption at 24 hours after injury. Together, these findings indicate that tibial fracture worsens TBI outcomes, and that exacerbated neuroinflammation may be an important factor that contributes to these effects, which warrants further investigation.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment for tibial "Peel off" tears in anterior cruciate ligament-case report.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Han, Kye Young; Yu, In Sang; Koh, Kyoung Hwan

    2013-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury was very common, and its reconstruction is one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic surgeries. A standard treatment option for ACL complete rupture in active young patients is debridement of remnant tissue and reconstruction with various types of tendon graft. However, "A tibial peel off tear" of ACL without bony avulsion can be treated using preservation of original ACL and trans-osseous pullout suture repair. The IKDC subjective score was 90, the objective score was A, and the Lysholm score was 95 at 24 months after surgery. KT-2000 arthrometer showed 2 mm side-to-side difference. Pivot shift test and Lachman test were negative, and there was no limitation in range of motion. Patient returned to full activities including sports and satisfied with the surgical results. In the postoperative MRI at 6 months after the surgery, the continuity of ACL was well maintained without any Cyclops lesion. We believe that trans-osseous pullout suture repair could be included as an alternative method in this "tibial peel off" type ACL injury instead of the usual removal of remnant tissue and reconstruction with a graft. PMID:23412240

  6. Double tibial osteotomy for bow leg patients: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Khalilollah; Fouladi, Arash; Chinigarzadeh, Mozhdeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: High tibia osteotomy (HTO) is a common surgical operation for correction of genu varum deformity. In some patients, there are concurrent tibia vara and genu varum (bow leg). This study aimed to consider the possibility of better correction of bow leg deformity after double level tibial osteotomy (DLTO). Materials and Methods: A case series of 10 patients of genu varum in addition to tibia vara (bow leg) deformity who were referred to orthopedic ward of an academic hospital of Isfahan- Iran during 2009–2011 were included in the study. The mean age was 17.3 ± 3.1 years and all of them underwent DLTO. The results of treatment have been assessed based on clinical and radiological parameters before and after surgery. Results: The mean pre- and post operative values for Tibia-Femoral Angle, Medial Proximal of Tibia Angle (MPTA), and Lateral Distal of Tibia Angle (LDTA) were 18.13 ± 3.05° vs. 3.93 ± 0.66°, 79.13 ± 3.4° vs. 89.7 ± 1.8° and 96.40 ± 1.8° vs. 88.73 ± 3.0° respectively (P < 0.05). Improvement of all radiological parameters was meaningful. Seventy three percent of patients had normal mechanical axis of limb after surgery. The remaining cases had varus deformity in distal femur that was corrected by valgus supracondylar osteotomy in an additional operation. Limited range of motion (ROM) near knee and ankle was not observed. Conclusion: DLTO correct bow leg deformity in the point of alignment of limb and paralleling of knee and ankle joint more effectively. This method can be used in metabolic and congenital bow leg which deformities are present in throughout of the lower limb. We described this technique for the first time. PMID:24523802

  7. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Nishimura, G; Haga, Y; Aoki, K; Hasegawa, T

    1998-12-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. PMID:9880644

  8. Humeral shaft fracture treatment in the elite throwing athlete: a unique application of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Davis, Shane M; Ho, Hoang-Anh; Fronek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Humeral shaft stress fractures are being increasingly recognized as injuries that can significantly impact throwing mechanics if residual malalignment exists. While minimally displaced and angulated injuries are treated nonoperatively in a fracture brace, the management of significantly displaced humeral shaft fractures in the throwing athlete is less clear. Currently described techniques such as open reduction and internal fixation with plate osteosynthesis and rigid antegrade/retrograde locked intramedullary nailing have significant morbidity due to soft tissue dissection and damage. We present a case report of a high-level baseball pitcher whose significantly displaced humeral shaft stress fracture failed to be nonoperatively managed and was subsequently treated successfully with unlocked, retrograde flexible intramedullary nailing. The athlete was able to return to pitching baseball in one year and is currently pitching in Major League Baseball. We were able to recently collect 10-year follow-up data. PMID:24369515

  9. Humeral Shaft Fracture Treatment in the Elite Throwing Athlete: A Unique Application of Flexible Intramedullary Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher S.; Davis, Shane M.; Fronek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Humeral shaft stress fractures are being increasingly recognized as injuries that can significantly impact throwing mechanics if residual malalignment exists. While minimally displaced and angulated injuries are treated nonoperatively in a fracture brace, the management of significantly displaced humeral shaft fractures in the throwing athlete is less clear. Currently described techniques such as open reduction and internal fixation with plate osteosynthesis and rigid antegrade/retrograde locked intramedullary nailing have significant morbidity due to soft tissue dissection and damage. We present a case report of a high-level baseball pitcher whose significantly displaced humeral shaft stress fracture failed to be nonoperatively managed and was subsequently treated successfully with unlocked, retrograde flexible intramedullary nailing. The athlete was able to return to pitching baseball in one year and is currently pitching in Major League Baseball. We were able to recently collect 10-year follow-up data. PMID:24369515

  10. Intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis from prostate carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zengbao; Xu, Siyi; Zhong, Chunlong; Gao, Yang; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Yan; Guo, Yang; Wang, Yong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao

    2014-03-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastases (ISCMs) are rare and account for 4-8.5% of central nervous system metastases. Only one case of biopsy-proven ISCM due to prostate cancer has previously been reported. The current study presents an additional unique case of a 74-year-old male who developed symptoms from an intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis as the first manifestation of prostate adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this scenario is even more rare and has not previously been reported. The tumor was radically resected, followed by androgen blockade treatment. The patient's neurological deficit significantly improved, with no tumor recurrence during the follow-up period. In addition, the present study provides an overview of the previous literature concerning ISCMs from prostate cancer, and discusses the treatment options.

  11. Intra-medullary tubercular abscess with spinal dysraphism: An unusual case.

    PubMed

    Bhanage, Ashok; Katkar, Anand; Ghate, Prajakta; Ratta, Bhagwant

    2015-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary tubercular abscess itself is a rare entity. Very few cases have been reported. We report a case of a 4-month-old female with a dermal sinus in lower back since birth, intermittent fever for 2 months, acute onset paraparesis and bowel bladder involvement showing an intramedullary contrast enhancing lesion extending from D11 to S2 level with low lying conus, and a subcutaneous tract in lower back at S2 level extending from skin up to the sacral canal on magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Drainage of abscess and biopsy revealed tubercular infection on histopathology. The patient made a good recovery with anti-tubercular treatment and physiotherapy. The source of tubercular infection could not be established. The baby had received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination at birth and the possibility of vaccination associated tubercular infection could not be ruled out. PMID:25878753

  12. Intra-medullary tubercular abscess with spinal dysraphism: An unusual case

    PubMed Central

    Bhanage, Ashok; Katkar, Anand; Ghate, Prajakta; Ratta, Bhagwant

    2015-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary tubercular abscess itself is a rare entity. Very few cases have been reported. We report a case of a 4-month-old female with a dermal sinus in lower back since birth, intermittent fever for 2 months, acute onset paraparesis and bowel bladder involvement showing an intramedullary contrast enhancing lesion extending from D11 to S2 level with low lying conus, and a subcutaneous tract in lower back at S2 level extending from skin up to the sacral canal on magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Drainage of abscess and biopsy revealed tubercular infection on histopathology. The patient made a good recovery with anti-tubercular treatment and physiotherapy. The source of tubercular infection could not be established. The baby had received Bacillus Calmette–Guérin vaccination at birth and the possibility of vaccination associated tubercular infection could not be ruled out. PMID:25878753

  13. MECHANICAL STUDY ON DORSAL STABILITY OF INTRAMEDULLARY OSTEOSYNTHESIS ASSOCIATED WITH EXTERNAL FIXATION (ULSON'S METHOD)

    PubMed Central

    Sardenberg, Trajano; Muller, Sérgio Swain; Medeiros, Daniel Ricardo; Baptistão, Pablo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the Ulson intramedullary fixation method, with external fixation in which the level of the external locking of the Kirschner wires is varied, and without external fixation. Methods: Eighteen porcine tibias were used. Transverse osteotomy was performed in the region of the tuberosity, and two intramedullary Kirschner wires were inserted into each specimen, using three different assembly patterns: Group I: locking with external minifixator at a height of 3.0 cm; Group II: locking at a height of 4.5 cm; Group III: without external locking. Mechanical shear tests were then conducted, to determine the maximum load, proportionality limit and coefficient of rigidity. Results: There were no significant differences in maximum load or proportionality limit between the groups. The coefficient of rigidity was higher in Group II. Conclusion: The locking height for the Kirschner wires in Ulson's method, within the limits evaluated, did not harm the stability of the fracture fixation system. PMID:27027069

  14. Humeral shaft fracture treatment in the elite throwing athlete: a unique application of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Davis, Shane M; Ho, Hoang-Anh; Fronek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Humeral shaft stress fractures are being increasingly recognized as injuries that can significantly impact throwing mechanics if residual malalignment exists. While minimally displaced and angulated injuries are treated nonoperatively in a fracture brace, the management of significantly displaced humeral shaft fractures in the throwing athlete is less clear. Currently described techniques such as open reduction and internal fixation with plate osteosynthesis and rigid antegrade/retrograde locked intramedullary nailing have significant morbidity due to soft tissue dissection and damage. We present a case report of a high-level baseball pitcher whose significantly displaced humeral shaft stress fracture failed to be nonoperatively managed and was subsequently treated successfully with unlocked, retrograde flexible intramedullary nailing. The athlete was able to return to pitching baseball in one year and is currently pitching in Major League Baseball. We were able to recently collect 10-year follow-up data.

  15. Results of bypasses to the anterior tibial artery through the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Calio, F G; Bertagni, A; Martinelli, V

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of anatomically tunneled grafts to the anterior tibial artery for distal revascularization in terms of patency and limb salvage rates as well as local morbidity, which can lengthen the postoperative hospital stay. Twenty-three patients received 24 bypasses to the anterior tibial artery, with grafts tunneled through the interosseous membrane. The mean age was 67 years; 10 patients were diabetic, 12 were smokers, 9 presented with significant coronary artery disease, and 2 with chronic renal insufficiency. The donor vessel was the common femoral artery in 17 cases, the superficial femoral artery in 4, and the infra-articular popliteal artery in 3. The graft material consisted in the reversed saphenous vein in 4 cases, the non-reversed devalvulated ex situ saphenous vein in 11, composite polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) + inversed saphenous vein in 6, and PTFE alone in 3 cases. No postoperative mortality was observed, nor was there postoperative graft occlusion or need for major amputation. The average postoperative length of stay in the hospital was 9.7 days. Two local surgical wound complications were observed, which did not necessitate a postoperative hospital stay exceeding 15 days. Cumulative primary patency and limb salvage rates at 3 years were 50% and 70%, respectively. Anatomic tunneling of grafts to the anterior tibial artery yields patency and limb salvage rates comparable to those reported in the literature for distal bypasses and, considered overall, an acceptably low local morbidity and short hospital stay. Definitive superiority over externally tunneled grafts, however, is not definitely demonstrated by this study and should be prospectively tested.

  16. Hybrid External Fixation for Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) 43-C Tibial Plafond Fractures.

    PubMed

    Abd-Almageed, Emad; Marwan, Yousef; Esmaeel, Ali; Mallur, Amarnath; El-Alfy, Barakat

    2015-01-01

    Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) type 43-C tibial plafond/pilon fractures represent a challenge for the treating orthopedic surgeon. We assessed the outcomes of using hybrid external fixation for this fracture type. The present prospective cohort study was started in August 2009 and ended by July 2012. Thirty consecutive patients (mean age 37.4 ± 10.7 years) with a type C tibial plafond fracture who had presented to our tertiary care orthopedic hospital were included. Motor vehicle accidents and fall from height were the cause of the fracture in 14 (46.7%) and 13 (43.3%) patients, respectively. A type C3 fracture was present in 25 patients (83.3%), and type C1 and C2 fractures were present in 2 (6.7%) and 3 (10.0%) patients, respectively. Nine fractures (30.0%) were open. Hybrid external fixation was used for all fractures. All fractures were united; clinical healing was achieved by a mean of 18.1 ± 2.2 weeks postoperatively and radiologic healing at a mean of 18.9 ± 1.9 weeks. The fixator was removed at a mean of 20.4 ± 2.0 weeks postoperatively. At a mean follow-up point of 13.4 ± 2.6 months, the mean modified Mazur ankle score was 84.6 ± 10.4. It was not associated with wound classification (p = .256). The most commonly seen complication was ankle osteoarthritis (17 patients; 56.7%); however, it was mild in >50.0% of the affected patients. In conclusion, using hybrid external fixation for type C tibial plafond fractures resulted in good outcomes. However, this should be investigated further in studies with a higher level of evidence.

  17. Outcome at 12 to 22 years of 1502 tibial shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Connelly, C L; Bucknall, V; Jenkins, P J; Court-Brown, C M; McQueen, M M; Biant, L C

    2014-10-01

    Fractures of the tibial shaft are common injuries, but there are no long-term outcome data in the era of increased surgical management. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the clinical and functional outcome of this injury at 12 to 22 years. Secondary aims were to determine the short- and long-term mortality, and if there were any predictors of clinical or functional outcome or mortality. From a prospective trauma database of 1502 tibial shaft fractures in 1474 consecutive adult patients, we identified a cohort of 1431 tibial diaphyseal fractures in 1403 patients, who fitted our inclusion criteria. There were 1024 men, and mean age at injury was 40.6 years. Fractures were classified according to the AO system, and open fractures graded after Gustilo and Anderson. Requirement of fasciotomy, time to fracture union, complications, incidence of knee and ankle pain at long-term follow-up, changes in employment and the patients' social deprivation status were recorded. Function was assessed at 12 to 22 years post-injury using the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment and short form-12 questionnaires. Long-term functional outcome data was available for 568 of the surviving patients, 389 were deceased and 346 were lost to follow-up. Most fractures (90.7%, n = 1363) united without further intervention. Fasciotomies were performed in 11.5% of patients; this did not correlate with poorer functional outcome in the long term. Social deprivation was associated with a higher incidence of injury but had no impact on long-term function. The one-year mortality in those over 75 years of age was 29 (42%). At long-term follow-up, pain and function scores were good. However, 147 (26%) reported ongoing knee pain, 62 (10%) reported ankle pain and 97 (17%) reported both. Such joint pain correlated with poorer functional outcome. PMID:25274924

  18. Tuberculous meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Yagi, Hideki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    Early-stage TB meningitis has no specific symptoms in patients, potentially leading to delayed diagnosis and consequently worsening prognosis. The authors present the fatal case with a delayed diagnosis of tuberculous (TB) meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. The medical records, operative reports, and radiographical imaging studies of a single patient were retrospectively reviewed. A 77-year-old man who underwent thoracic intramedullary hemangioblastoma resection for 2 times. The postoperative course was uneventful, but 1.5 months after surgery, the patient suffered from dementia with memory loss and diminished motivation and speech in the absence of a fever. No abnormalities were detected on blood test, brain computed tomography and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. A sputum sample was negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-G) In-Tube Test and the tuberculin skin test was also negative. The patient was diagnosed with senile dementia by a psychiatrist. However, the patient's symptoms progressively worsened. Despite the absence of TB meningitis findings, we suspected TB meningitis from the patient's history, and administered a four-drug regimen. However the patient died 29 days after admission, subsequently M. tuberculosis was detected in the CSF sample. This case is a rare case of TB meningitis initially mistaken for dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. Symptoms of dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection should first be suspected as one of TB meningitis, even if the tests for meningitis are negative. We propose that anti-tuberculosis therapy should be immediately initiated in cases of suspected TB meningitis prior to positive identification on culture. PMID:26663944

  19. Pediatric intramedullary cavernous malformation of the conus medullaris: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hamidi, Mehrdokht; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2011-03-01

    Cavernous malformations of the conus medullaris are rare lesions; only 9 cases have been reported in the literature. Most cases are described in adults and only one case has been reported in pediatric age group. In this report, the authors describe a 16-year-old male presenting with acute myelopathy due to an intramedullary cavernous malformation of the conus medullaris. The clinical, radiological and surgical features of this patient are presented and discussed and relevant literature of this rare lesion is reviewed.

  20. Surgical management of spinal intramedullary tumors: radical and safe strategy for benign tumors.

    PubMed

    Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for spinal intramedullary tumors remains one of the major challenges for neurosurgeons, due to their relative infrequency, unknown natural history, and surgical difficulty. We are sure that safe and precise resection of spinal intramedullary tumors, particularly encapsulated benign tumors, can result in acceptable or satisfactory postoperative outcomes. General surgical concepts and strategies, technical consideration, and functional outcomes after surgery are discussed with illustrative cases of spinal intramedullary benign tumors such as ependymoma, cavernous malformation, and hemangioblastoma. Selection of a posterior median sulcus, posterolateral sulcus, or direct transpial approach was determined based on the preoperative imaging diagnosis and careful inspection of the spinal cord surface. Tumor-cord interface was meticulously delineated in cases of benign encapsulated tumors. Our retrospective functional analysis of 24 consecutive cases of spinal intramedullary ependymoma followed for at least 6 months postoperatively demonstrated a mean grade on the modified McCormick functional schema of 1.8 before surgery, deteriorating significantly to 2.6 early after surgery (< 1 month after surgery), and finally returning to 1.7 in the late postoperative period (> 6 months after surgery). The risk of functional deterioration after surgery should be taken into serious consideration. Functional deterioration after surgery, including neuropathic pain even long after surgery, significantly affects patient quality of life. Better balance between tumor control and functional preservation can be achieved not only by the surgical technique or expertise, but also by intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, vascular image guidance, and postoperative supportive care. Quality of life after surgery should inarguably be given top priority. PMID:25797779

  1. Early postoperative failure of a new intramedullary fixation device for midshaft clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David J; Weaver, DeWayne L; Balog, Todd P; Arrington, Edward D

    2013-11-01

    The Sonoma CRx device (Sonoma Orthopedic Products, Santa Rosa, California) is a recently introduced intramedullary device with a flexible shaft that becomes rigid once actuated to allow deployment within the sigmoidal contour of the clavicular shaft. Medial intramedullary cortical purchase is obtained by grippers and lateral purchase through a locking bicortical buttressing screw. This article describes 2 cases of early hardware failure using this device. In both cases, early postoperative radiographs demonstrate adequate initial fracture reduction and implant position. Both patients sustained repeat injuries, one under low physiologic load and the other after returning to mixed martial arts 4 months postoperatively. Implant failure was noted after reinjury in both cases. Complete healing and full return to function was documented for both patients at 2 years. Proper patient selection and counseling regarding the limitations of this intramedullary fixation device are important. Biomechanical comparison of this implant to plate fixation under physiologic loads of combined axial compression and torsion may shed light on differences in fixation stability. PMID:24200452

  2. Minimally invasive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the proximal phalanx: intramedullary screw☆

    PubMed Central

    Aita, Marcio Aurélio; Mos, Paulo Augusto Castro; de Paula Cardoso Marques Leite, Gisele; Alves, Rafael Saleme; Credídio, Marcos Vinicius; da Costa, Eduardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical-functional parameters and quality of life of patients undergoing minimally invasive surgical treatment for extra-articular fractures of the proximal phalanx, using an intramedullary screw (Acutrak®). Methods Between January 2011 and September 2014, a prospective study was conducted on 41 patients (48 fingers) with unstable extra-articular fractures of the proximal phalanx, who underwent minimally invasive surgical treatment using an intramedullary screw (Acutrak®). These patients were evaluated 12 months after the surgery by means of the DASH quality-of-life questionnaire, VAS pain scale, measurement of range of motion (ROM, in degrees) and radiographic assessment. Results All the patients achieved adequate reduction and consolidation of their fractures. There were statistically significant improvements in quality of life on the DASH scale, pain on the VAS scale and range of motion. Conclusion The minimally invasive technique for treating unstable extra-articular fractures of the proximal phalanx using an intramedullary screw (Acutrak®) is effective and safe, and it presents satisfactory clinical-functional results. PMID:26962488

  3. [Treatment of pathological fractures of long tubular bones in childhood using elastic stable intramedullary nailing].

    PubMed

    Knorr, P; Schmittenbecher, P P; Dietz, H G

    1996-06-01

    Pathological or spontaneous fractures in childhood are rare and are mostly caused by benign bone diseases; the fractures must be treated on an individual basis, as there are no constant rules. Since the new method of osteosynthesis called "elastic stable intramedullary nailing" (ESIN) or "embrochage centro-medullaire elastique stable" (ECMES) has demonstrated the best results in the treatment of normal fractures in childhood, this method is rapidly being used in the treatment of spontaneous or pathological fractures. We report our experience in the treatment of spontaneous fractures in childhood with "elastic stable intramedullary nailing", in nine patients with ten fractures. The pathological diagnosis was in 5 cases a juvenile bone cyst; in addition, there were cases of histiocytosis X, lymphangiomatosis, hemangiomatosis and osteoporosis (one each). The location was the femur (two cases) and humerus (seven cases). All fractures healed completely without pseudarthrosis; as complications we saw one incidence of osteomyelitis, one of a second fracture after "elastic stable intramedullary nailing" and one coxa vara in a child with histiocytosis X of the proximal femur. In the 5 children with juvenile bone cysts the nails are still in situ; in two cases the nails had to be changed. PMID:8767136

  4. Retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through ipsilateral traumatic amputation sites.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Chi, Benjamin B; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-06-01

    The technique of retrograde intramedullary fixation of fractures through open traumatic amputations has not been previously described. We performed a retrospective case series at a tertiary-care military hospital setting. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. All were male, and all were injured through improvised explosive device. Outcome measures included the incidence of fracture nonunion, osteomyelitis or acute infection, heterotopic ossification (HO), as well as successful prosthesis fitting and ambulation. Average time to fixation after injury and amputation closure was 11.7 and 12.2 days, respectively. Follow-up averaged 20.2 months. The radiographic union rate was 100%, and time to osseous union averaged 7.5 months. One patient had an amputation site infection requiring revision, but none of the nails was removed for infectious reasons. HO occurred in 7 patients, and 2 patients required revision for symptomatic HO. All patients were successfully fitted with prostheses and able to ambulate. To our knowledge, this is the only series in the literature to specifically describe retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through the zone of traumatic amputation sites. The infectious risk is relatively low, whereas the union rate (100%) and successful prosthesis fitting are high. For patients with similar injuries, retrograde intramedullary fixation through the zone of amputation is a viable treatment option.

  5. Smart intramedullary rod for correction of pediatric bone deformity: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Firoozbakhsh, Keikhosrow; Moneim, Moheb S; Yi, In Sok; Umeda, Yuji; Theele, Daniel; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2004-07-01

    We were interested in determining if a smart intramedullary rod made of nitinol shape-memory alloy is capable of correcting deformed immature long bones. Because of limitations in our study design the process was reversed in that we examined the smart rod's ability to create a deformity rather than to correct one. Smart rods of different lengths and diameters were heat-treated to resume a radius of curvature of 30 to 110 mm. The low and high temperature phases of the smart rods were set, respectively, at 0 degrees C to 4 degrees C and 36 degrees C to 38 degrees C. The preshaped smart intramedullary rods were implanted in the cooled martensite phase in the medullary canal of the tibia in eight rabbits, where they restored their austenite form, causing a continuous bending force. On a weekly basis anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the surgically treated tibia and the contralateral tibia were obtained for comparison. Rabbits were euthanized 6 weeks after surgery and computed tomography scans of both tibias were used for image analysis. Smart rods with a larger radius of curvature showed only minimal signs of remodeling; however, rods with a radius of curvature of 50 and 70 mm generated enough force history to create bone remodeling and deformation. The amount of bone deformation was highly magnified when unicortical corticotomy on the tension side was done. Based on this preliminary study the technology of the smart intramedullary rod may provide a valuable alternative method to correct pediatric skeletal deformities.

  6. Prebending of a titanium elastic intramedullary nail in the treatment of distal radius fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Cai, Haoqi; Wang, Zhigang; Cai, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to introduce a method to treat distal radius diaphyseal metaphyseal junction fractures by prebending an elastic intramedullary nail and to evaluate the factors influencing fracture apposition. Fifty-two consecutive patients (4 to 15 years old) with a distal radius diaphyseal metaphyseal junction fracture were included. The nail was inserted and advanced into the proximal radial fragment as normal. After bending the nail distally about 90° at the site predetermined to lie at the distal segment, the elastic intramedullary nail was advanced until the prebent part completely entered the marrow cavity. The fracture angular deformity was fully corrected in anterior-posterior and lateral views. The apposition rate was 90% to 100% in lateral view, >50% in anterior-posterior view. The operation time was 16.73 ± 6.253 minutes. The average time of fracture healing was 5 months (range, 4-7 months). During 12 to 19 months of follow-up, firm fracture healing and good remodeling were observed, and there was no impaired forearm rotation function or secondary fracture. Our study showed the treatment of distal radius diaphyseal metaphyseal junction fractures by prebent intramedullary nail could make up for the deficiency of Kirschner wires and steel plates and keep the fracture stable. Fracture type and the anatomical features of the distal radius were associated with fracture apposition. PMID:24833151

  7. In Vivo Caprine Model for Osteomyelitis and Evaluation of Biofilm-Resistant Intramedullary Nails

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nhiem; Tran, Phong A.; Jarrell, John D.; Engiles, Julie B.; Thomas, Nathan P.; Young, Matthew D.; Hayda, Roman A.; Born, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Bone infection remains a formidable challenge to the medical field. The goal of the current study is to evaluate antibacterial coatings in vitro and to develop a large animal model to assess coated bone implants. A novel coating consisting of titanium oxide and siloxane polymer doped with silver was created by metal-organic methods. The coating was tested in vitro using rapid screening techniques to determine compositions which inhibited Staphylococcus aureus growth, while not affecting osteoblast viability. The coating was then applied to intramedullary nails and evaluated in vivo in a caprine model. In this pilot study, a fracture was created in the tibia of the goat, and Staphylococcus aureus was inoculated directly into the bone canal. The fractures were fixed by either coated (treated) or non-coated intramedullary nails (control) for 5 weeks. Clinical observations as well as microbiology, mechanical, radiology, and histology testing were used to compare the animals. The treated goat was able to walk using all four limbs after 5 weeks, while the control was unwilling to bear weight on the fixed leg. These results suggest the antimicrobial potential of the hybrid coating and the feasibility of the goat model for antimicrobial coated intramedullary implant evaluation. PMID:23841085

  8. Implementation of boundary conditions in modeling the femur is critical for the evaluation of distal intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Bayoglu, Riza; Okyar, A Fethi

    2015-11-01

    In previous numerical and experimental studies of the intramedullary nail-implanted human femur several simplifications to model the boundary and loading conditions during pre-clinical testing have been proposed. The distal end of the femur was fixed in the majority of studies dealing with the biomechanics of the lower extremity, be it numerical or experimental, which resulted in obviously non-physiological deflections. Per contra, Speirs et al. (2007) proclaimed physiological deflections as a result of constraining the femur in a novel statically determinate fashion in combination with using a complex set of muscle forces. In tandem with this, we have shown that not only the deflections but also the stress and strain predictions turn out to be much lower in magnitude, as a result of using the latter approach. To illustrate the dramatic change in results, we compared these results with those of two other models employing commonly used boundary and loading conditions in retrograde stabilization of a distal diaphyseal fracture. The model used herewith resulted in more realistic femoral cortical strains, lower stresses on both the nail and the screws, as well as such deflections in the overall structure. PMID:26341599

  9. Implementation of boundary conditions in modeling the femur is critical for the evaluation of distal intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Bayoglu, Riza; Okyar, A Fethi

    2015-11-01

    In previous numerical and experimental studies of the intramedullary nail-implanted human femur several simplifications to model the boundary and loading conditions during pre-clinical testing have been proposed. The distal end of the femur was fixed in the majority of studies dealing with the biomechanics of the lower extremity, be it numerical or experimental, which resulted in obviously non-physiological deflections. Per contra, Speirs et al. (2007) proclaimed physiological deflections as a result of constraining the femur in a novel statically determinate fashion in combination with using a complex set of muscle forces. In tandem with this, we have shown that not only the deflections but also the stress and strain predictions turn out to be much lower in magnitude, as a result of using the latter approach. To illustrate the dramatic change in results, we compared these results with those of two other models employing commonly used boundary and loading conditions in retrograde stabilization of a distal diaphyseal fracture. The model used herewith resulted in more realistic femoral cortical strains, lower stresses on both the nail and the screws, as well as such deflections in the overall structure.

  10. Comparison of volumetric bone mineral density in the tibial region of interest for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Klein, Scott A; Nyland, John; Caborn, David N M; Kocabey, Yavuz; Nawab, Akbar

    2005-12-01

    Adequate tibial bone mineral density (BMD) is essential to soft tissue graft fixation during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare volumetric bone plug density measurements at the tibial region of interest for ACL reconstruction using a standardized immersion technique and Archimedes' principle. Cancellous bone cores were harvested from the proximal, middle, and distal metaphyseal regions of the lateral tibia and from the standard tibial tunnel location used for ACL reconstruction of 18 cadaveric specimens. Proximal tibial cores displayed 32.6% greater BMD than middle tibial cores and 31.8% greater BMD than distal tibial cores, but did not differ from the BMD of the tibial tunnel cores. Correlational analysis confirmed that the cancellous BMD in the tibial tunnel related to the cancellous BMD of the proximal and distal lateral tibial metaphysis. In conjunction with its adjacent cortical bone, the cancellous BMD of the region used for standard tibial tunnel placement provides an effective foundation for ACL graft fixation. In tibia with poor BMD, bicortical fixation that incorporates cortical bone from the distal tibial tunnel region is recommended. PMID:16237489

  11. Induction of Tibial Dyschondroplasia by Carbamate and Thiocarbamate Pesticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a major poultry leg problem the natural etiology of which is unknown. Certain dithiocarbamate pesticides such as tetramethyl thiuram disulfide (thiram) have been shown to induce the disease in chickens. Since many different carbamate and thiocarbamate chemicals are ...

  12. Morphological characteristics of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Gao; Zhi-Jun, Pan; Qiang, Zheng; Hang, Li

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of posterolateral tibial plateau fractures is controversial, and information regarding this specific fracture pattern is lacking. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the frequency and morphological features of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures. A retrospective radiographic and chart review was performed on a consecutive series of patients who sustained tibial plateau fractures between May 2008 and August 2012. The articular surface area, maximum posterior cortical height, sagittal fracture angle, and amount of displacement were measured on computed tomography scans using the Picture and Archiving Communication System. Thirty-six (15%) of 242 injuries demonstrated a posterolateral fracture fragment comprising a mean 14.3% of the articular surface of the total tibial plateau (range, 8% to 32%). Mean major articular fragment angle was 23° (range, 62° to -43°), mean maximum posterior cortical height was 29 mm (range, 18 to 42 mm), and mean sagittal fracture angle was 77° (range, 58° to 97°). The posterolateral plateau articular fracture fragment has morphological characteristics of a conically shaped fragment with a relatively small articular surface area and sagittal fracture angle. Recognizing these morphological features will help the clinician formulate an effective surgical plan.

  13. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer for Posterior Tibial Tendon Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Cobb procedure is useful for addressing stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and is often accompanied by a medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and/or lateral column lengthening. The Cobb procedure can also be combined with selected medial column arthrodesis and realignment osteotomies along with equinus correction when indicated. PMID:26590721

  14. Synchronisation of tibial rotational alignment with femoral component in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan

    2008-04-01

    The rotational axis of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty described by Insall is generally accepted, but rotational mismatch between the femoral and the tibial components can occur because the alignment of each component is determined separately. We developed a connecting instrument to synchronise the axis of the tibia to the axis of the femur. We compared the rotational axis of the tibial component using our method and medial one third of tibial tuberosity (Insall's reference) in 70 consecutive TKAs. The rotational axis of the tibial component from the femoro-tibial synchronisation was rotated internally 13.8 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees (range, 2 degrees - 24 degrees ) more than the axis of Insall's reference. Eighty three percent of patellae tracked centrally and the patellae tilt measured 2.2 degrees on average. More attention should be given to the rotational congruency between the femoro-tibial components, because the recent prosthetic design has more conforming articular surfaces.

  15. Fracture healing after reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing in sheep tibia.

    PubMed

    Högel, F; Schlegel, U; Südkamp, N; Müller, C

    2011-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing is a well-established method for stabilisation of long-bone shaft fractures. It is still a controversy as to whether the procedure should be done by an unreamed or reamed technique. In the present animal study, 24 sheep were treated with intramedullary nailing. Midshaft fractures (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthese (AO) type 42-A2/3) were created. Eight sheep were treated with an unreamed nailing technique (UN), a further eight sheep underwent tibia nailing by the reamed technique using the conventional AO reaming system (RC) and in a further eight sheep, reamed nailing was performed using an experimental reaming system (RE). Intra-operatively, the intramedullary pressure was measured and, during a healing time of 10 weeks, the growth of callus formation was labelled with fluorescence markers after 4 and 6 weeks. After 10 weeks, the animals were euthanised and the quality of fracture healing was determined by recording stiffness in torsion, antero-posterior and mediolateral bending and the load at yield. In addition, the callus formation at the fracture zone was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and macroradiographs. The results showed a decrease of intramedullary pressure when reamed nailing was performed with the RE (72.5 mmHg) system compared with the conventional AO reaming system (227 mmHg). Mechanical testing did not reveal any significant differences either for torsional or bending stiffness or for load at yield for any of the three procedures. Histological evaluation showed a similar callus formation for the UN group and the RE group. Callus formation in the UN (65 mm(2)) and RE (63 mm(2)) groups showed a higher increase during the first 6 weeks than those treated with the conventional AO reaming system (27 mm(2)). This means that, especially during the first weeks of fracture healing, damage to the bone by the reaming process can be reduced by reaming with a reaming device with lowered cutting flutes and smaller drive

  16. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and flatfoot: analysis with simulated walking.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kota; Kitaoka, Harold B; Fujii, Tadashi; Crevoisier, Xavier; Berglund, Lawrence J; Zhao, Kristin D; Kaufman, Kenton R; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-02-01

    Many biomechanical studies investigated pathology of flatfoot and effects of operations on flatfoot. The majority of cadaveric studies are limited to the quasistatic response to static joint loads. This study examined the unconstrained joint motion of the foot and ankle during stance phase utilizing a dynamic foot-ankle simulator in simulated stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Muscle forces were applied on the extrinsic tendons of the foot using six servo-pneumatic cylinders to simulate their action. Vertical and fore-aft shear forces were applied and tibial advancement was performed with the servomotors. Three-dimensional movements of multiple bones of the foot were monitored with a magnetic tracking system. Twenty-two fresh-frozen lower extremities were studied in the intact condition, then following sectioning peritalar constraints to create a flatfoot and unloading the posterior tibial muscle force. Kinematics in the intact condition were consistent with gait analysis data for normals. There were altered kinematics in the flatfoot condition, particularly in coronal and transverse planes. Calcaneal eversion relative to the tibia averaged 11.1±2.8° compared to 5.8±2.3° in the normal condition. Calcaneal-tibial external rotation was significantly increased in flatfeet from mean of 2.3±1.7° to 8.1±4.0°. There were also significant changes in metatarsal-tibial eversion and external rotation in the flatfoot condition. The simulated PTTD with flatfoot was consistent with previous data obtained in patients with PTTD. The use of a flatfoot model will enable more detailed study on the flatfoot condition and/or effect of surgical treatment.

  17. Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy Brandon; Amer, Luke D; Warren, Christopher P; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R Michael

    2008-01-01

    Cementless fixation in total knee replacement has seen limited use since reports of early failure surfaced in the late 80s and early 90s. However the emergence of improved biomaterials, particularly porous titanium and tantalum, has led to a renewed interest in developing a cementless tibial component to enhance long-term survivorship of the implants. Cement is commonly employed to minimize micromotion in new implants but represents a weak interface between the implant and bone. The elimination of cement and application of these new biomaterials, which theoretically provide improved stability and ultimate osseointegration, would likely result in greater knee replacement success. Additionally, the removal of cement from the procedure would help minimize surgical durations and get rid of the time needed for curing, thereby the chance of infection. The purpose of this biomechanical study was twofold. The first goal was to assess whether vibration analysis techniques can be used to evaluate and characterize initial mechanical stability of cementless implants more accurately than the traditional method of micromotion determination, which employs linear variable differential transducers (LVDTs). Second, an evaluative study was performed to determine the comparative mechanical stability of five designs of cementless tibial components under mechanical loading designed to simulate in vivo forces. The test groups will include a cemented Triathlon Keeled baseplate control group, three different 2-peg cementless baseplates with smooth, mid, and high roughnesses and a 4-peg cement/ess baseplate with mid-roughness.

  18. Surgical Treatment of the Accessory Navicular (Os Tibiale Externum) in Dancers: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, A B M Boni; Diemer, Willemijn M

    2016-01-01

    This study is to draw attention to a relatively common anatomical anomaly and its possible operative treatment in dancers. The accessory navicular, or os tibiale externum, is an accessory bone on the medial side of the navicular of the foot at the insertion of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT). It can cause obvious hyperpronation, medial foot pain, and a limited and painful relevé in dancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the operative treatment of the accessory navicular exclusively in dancers. Six dancers (10 feet) were treated in our clinic for a symptomatic accessory navicular Type II. Five of them (eight feet) underwent surgery, two unilaterally and three bilaterally (at the same time). All five had an excellent result at mean follow-up of 4.7 years, given that they fully resumed their professional dance activities without restriction, discomfort, or residual symptoms. One patient stopped dancing for unrelated reasons and became symptom free without further (surgical) treatment. Although no conclusions can be drawn from a retrospective case series and other treatment modalities were not considered, simple excision of a symptomatic accessory navicular Type II seems to be a good choice in dancers. PMID:27661622

  19. Evaluation of Patellar Position before and After Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: Radiographic and Computed Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Moghtadaei, Mehdi; Otoukesh, Babak; Bodduhi, Bahram; Ahmadi, Keyvan; Yeganeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Genovarum is a common orthopedic problem. Its optimal prompt treatment is an issue of importance. Aim: This study was conducted to determine the radiographic changes in patella bone before and after open wedge high tibial osteotomy. Material and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 43 patients were enrolled and underwent open wedge high tibial osteotomy and the radiographic and CT-scan indices including Q-Angle, Congruence Angle, Insall-Salvati index, and TTTG were measured and compared before and after surgery. Results: The result revealed that all indices including Q-Angle, Congruence Angle, Insull-Salvati index, and TTTG were not significantly differed across the study (P > 0.05). There was no difference between DLFA values before and after the operation (P> 0.05), while MPTA values were significantly different before and after operation (p <0.001). Conclusions: Totally it may be concluded that imaging indices are not differed after open wedge high tibial osteotomy and monitoring for them is not necessary and they would have no prognostic role. PMID:27703292

  20. Use of the F-Tool for the removal of a bent intramedullary femoral nail with a sagittal plane deformity.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Michael J; Leclair, Walter; Li, Xinning

    2012-03-01

    Locked intramedullary nailing is the current standard of treatment for femoral shaft fractures and has low complication rates. Bent femoral intramedullary nails resulting from secondary trauma are rare and technically challenging. This article describes a case of a 36-year-old man who presented with a bent femoral intramedullary nail following a motorcross accident. The patient had a previous femoral shaft fracture treated with an intramedullary nail. Previous reports outlined methods to remove bent femoral nails through the fracture site and proximally; however, this article describes a novel technique combining the use of a Midas Rex MR7 high-speed burr (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) and the F-Tool (Synthes, West Chester, Pennsylvania) to facilitate nail extraction.The patient was placed in the lateral decubitus position. After limited exposure at the fracture site, the intramedullary nail was weakened at the apex of the deformity with a Midas Rex MR7 high-speed burr. We then used the F-Tool to straighten the nail to facilitate removal through the original proximal insertion site. The F-Tool allows forces to be concentrated at the apex of the deformity and minimizes soft tissue damage. Additional advantages of our technique include limited exposure and the ability to remove the nail in 1 piece.

  1. Patient positioning on the operative table for more accurate reduction during elastic stable intramedullary nailing of the femur: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Valaikaite, Raimonda; Salvo, Davide; Ceroni, Dimitri

    2015-04-15

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing is currently considered a clinical practice standard for the treatment of femoral fractures in children in the age-appropriate group. Malreduction, particularly in rotation, due to the closed reduction technique has been reported. We describe a new technique of positioning on a standard operating table that permits better control of rotational alignment during femoral elastic stable intramedullary nailing.

  2. Tibial torsion in non-arthritic Indian adults: A computer tomography study of 100 limbs

    PubMed Central

    Mullaji, Arun B; Sharma, Amit K; Marawar, Satyajit V; Kohli, AF

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of normal tibial torsion is mandatory during total knee replacement (TKR), deformity correction and fracture management of tibia. Different values of tibial torsion have been found in different races due to biological and mechanical factors. Value of normal tibial torsion in Indian limbs is not known, hence this study to determine the norm of tibial torsional value in normal Indian population. Materials and Methods: Computer tomography (CT) scans were performed in 100 non-arthritic limbs of 50 Indian adults (42 males, eight females; age 26-40 years). Value of tibial torsion was measured using dorsal tangent to tibial condyles proximally and bimalleolar axis distally. Results: Normal tibial torsion was found to be 21.6 ± 7.6 (range 4.8 to 39.5) with none of the values in internal rotation. Right tibia was externally rotated by 2 degrees as compared to the left side (P 0.029). No significant difference was found in male and female subjects. Value of tibial torsion was less than in Caucasian limbs, but was comparable to Japanese limbs when studies using similar measurement technique were compared. Conclusions: Indian limbs have less tibial torsion than Caucasian limbs but the value of tibial torsion is comparable to Japanese limbs. PMID:19753157

  3. High-resolution direct microstimulation mapping of spinal cord motor pathways during resection of an intramedullary tumor.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Ravi; Curtis, Corinne M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the use of advanced microsurgical techniques, resection of intramedullary tumors may result in significant postoperative deficits because of the vicinity or invasion of important functional tracts. Intraoperative monitoring of somatosensory evoked potentials and transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials has been used previously to limit such complications. Electromyography offers an opportunity for the surgeon to map the eloquent tissue associated with the tumor using intraoperative motor fiber stimulation. Similar to the use of cortical simulation in the resection of supratentorial gliomas, this technique can potentially advance the safety of intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. The authors describe the use of intraoperative motor fiber tract stimulation to map the corticospinal tracts associated with an intramedullary tumor. This technique led to protection of these tracts during resection of the tumor. PMID:25431960

  4. Is Subtalar Joint Cartilage Resection Necessary for Tibiotalocalcaneal Arthrodesis via Intramedullary Nail? A Multicenter Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Levene, Maxwell J; Martin, Scott M; Fleming, Justin J; Clements, J Randolph; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with intramedullary nailing is traditionally performed with formal preparation of both the subtalar and ankle joints. However, we believe that subtalar joint preparation is not necessary to achieve satisfactory outcomes in patients undergoing tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with a retrograde intramedullary nail. The primary aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients who had undergone tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with an intramedullary nail without formal subtalar joint cartilage resection. A multicenter medical record review was performed to identify consecutive patients. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale, and osseous union at the tibiotalar joint was defined as bony trabeculation across the arthrodesis site on all 3 radiographic views. Progression of joint deterioration was evaluated across time at the subtalar joint, using a modified grading system developed by Takakura et al. Forty consecutive patients (aged 61.9 ± 12.9 years; 17 men) met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Compared with the pain reported preoperatively (6.4 ± 2.7), a statistically significant decline was seen in the pain experienced after surgery (1.2 ± 1.8; p < .001). The mean time to consolidated arthrodesis at the ankle joint was 3.8 ± 1.5 months. A statistically significant increase in deterioration at the subtalar joint was observed across time [t(36) = -6.200, p < .001]. Compared with previously published data of subtalar joint cartilage resection, the present study has demonstrated a similar decline in pain, with a high rate of union, and also a decrease in operative time when preparation of the subtalar joint was not performed.

  5. [Treatment of unstable fractures of the proximal end of the humerus using elastic curved intramedullary wires].

    PubMed

    Zifko, B; Zifko, B; Poigenfürst, J

    1987-04-01

    At the Accident Hospital Lorenz Böhler and the Accident Hospital Meidling in Vienna, 48 patients with proximal humeral fractures were treated by closed reduction, intramedullary fixation with elastic pins and immobilization for two weeks in a Velpeau type stockinette (Gilchrist) between February 1985 and February 1986. The pins have a diameter of 2 mm. At there lower end there is a 20 mm long elastic curve which is ment to anker the pin in the entry hole to the intramedullary cavity, preventing sliding out of the implant. At the upper end the last 20 mm of the wire are angulated for 15 degrees. AO-classification was used. 39 patients had surgical neck-fractures. There were 34 displaced fractures (AO-type A 2/2), six dislocation- and more segment fractures and three epiphyseal separations of the adductiontype. The functional results of 36 patients were evaluated according to Neer's table. 29 patients had more than 80 points, four patients had more than 70 points and three had poor results. Reason for poor results was in one case a fracture with dislocation of the greater tuberosity which should have been treated by open reduction and the age in a 82 year old patient, who had a poor functional result after twelve weeks of treatment despite good fracture healing. There were no problems with wound healing, infections, myositis ossificans or Sudeck disease. Closed reductions of unstable surgical neck fractures and intramedullary fixation causes least damage to the soft tissues of the shoulder, leading to early good functional results. PMID:3603877

  6. Is Subtalar Joint Cartilage Resection Necessary for Tibiotalocalcaneal Arthrodesis via Intramedullary Nail? A Multicenter Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Levene, Maxwell J; Martin, Scott M; Fleming, Justin J; Clements, J Randolph; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with intramedullary nailing is traditionally performed with formal preparation of both the subtalar and ankle joints. However, we believe that subtalar joint preparation is not necessary to achieve satisfactory outcomes in patients undergoing tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with a retrograde intramedullary nail. The primary aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients who had undergone tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with an intramedullary nail without formal subtalar joint cartilage resection. A multicenter medical record review was performed to identify consecutive patients. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale, and osseous union at the tibiotalar joint was defined as bony trabeculation across the arthrodesis site on all 3 radiographic views. Progression of joint deterioration was evaluated across time at the subtalar joint, using a modified grading system developed by Takakura et al. Forty consecutive patients (aged 61.9 ± 12.9 years; 17 men) met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Compared with the pain reported preoperatively (6.4 ± 2.7), a statistically significant decline was seen in the pain experienced after surgery (1.2 ± 1.8; p < .001). The mean time to consolidated arthrodesis at the ankle joint was 3.8 ± 1.5 months. A statistically significant increase in deterioration at the subtalar joint was observed across time [t(36) = -6.200, p < .001]. Compared with previously published data of subtalar joint cartilage resection, the present study has demonstrated a similar decline in pain, with a high rate of union, and also a decrease in operative time when preparation of the subtalar joint was not performed. PMID:26810128

  7. High abundance of CD271(+) multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) in intramedullary cavities of long bones.

    PubMed

    Cox, George; Boxall, Sally A; Giannoudis, Peter V; Buckley, Conor T; Roshdy, Tarek; Churchman, Sarah M; McGonagle, Dennis; Jones, Elena

    2012-02-01

    Aspiration of iliac crest bone marrow (ICBM) remains the most frequent technique used in harvesting multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) for bone regeneration. Although this tissue type is easily accessed by a surgeon, it has a low frequency of MSCs, which is significant given the high cell numbers required for bone regeneration strategies. Lipoaspirates possess higher MSC frequencies, albeit cells with a differentiation profile less suited to orthopaedic interventions. Intra-medullary cavities of long bones have previously been shown to harbour MSCs in animals, however evaluation of their frequency, differentiation capacity and phenotype in humans had not previously been performed. Long bone fatty bone marrow (LBFBM) was collected prior to harvesting bone graft. Basic cellular compositions of donor-matched LBFBM and ICBM aspirates, including the numbers of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells and CD31(+) endothelial cells, were similar. MSCs were enumerated using colony-forming-unit-fibroblast assays and flow cytometry for the presence of a resident LBFBM CD45(-/low) CD271(+) MSC population and revealed a trend for higher MSC numbers (average 5 fold, n=6) per millilitre of LBFBM compared to donor-matched ICBM. Functional characteristics of resident MSCs, including their growth rates, differentiation potentials and surface phenotypes (CD73(+)CD105(+)CD90(+)) before and after culture-amplification, were similar. Enhanced numbers of MSCs could be recovered following brief enzymatic treatment of solid fragments of LBFBM. Our findings therefore reveal that the intramedullary cavity of the human femur is a depot of MSCs, which, although closely associated with fat, have a differentiation profile equivalent to ICBM. This anatomical site is frequently accessed by the orthopaedic/trauma surgeon and aspiration of the intramedullary cavity represents a 'low-tech' method of harvesting potentially large numbers of MSCs for regenerative therapies and research.

  8. Intramedullary arthrodesis of the knee in the treatment of sepsis after TKR.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Bono, James V; Figgie, Mark P; Sculco, Thomas P; Laskin, Richard S; Windsor, Russell E

    2007-02-01

    Infection is a devastating complication following total knee replacement (TKR). In the majority of cases, single- or two-stage revision has excellent results in eradicating infection and restoring function. Rarely, recurrent infection requires alternative treatments such as resection, amputation, or arthrodesis. A review of infections following TKR treated at two joint replacement centers identified 29 cases of resistant knee sepsis treated with a long intramedullary fusion nail. Clinical outcome and radiographs were reviewed at an average follow-up of 48 months (13-114). After the initial intramedullary arthrodesis union occurred in 24 of 29 patients (83%). The average time to fusion was 6 months (3-18 months). Failures included two cases of nail breakage, one of which subsequently achieved fusion following revision nailing, and three cases of recurrent infection requiring nail removal and permanent resection. At a minimum 2-year follow-up, 28% of the patients that achieved fusion complained of pain in the fused knee, 28% complained of ipsilateral hip pain, and two patients complained of contralateral knee pain. Four of the 25 fused patients (16%) remained nonambulatory after fusion, 17 required walking aids (68%) and only four ambulated unassisted. There was no association between age, number of previous procedures, the use of two-stage versus single stage technique, or infecting organism and failure of arthrodesis. Intramedullary arthrodesis is a viable treatment for refractory infection after TKR. Patients undergoing fusion should be informed of the potential for nonunion, recurrence of infection, pain in the ipsilateral extremity, and the long-term need for walking aids.

  9. Transfer function between tibial acceleration and ground reaction force.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, M A; Lake, M J; Hennig, E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to capture the relationship between ground reaction force (GRF) and tibial axial acceleration. Tibia acceleration and GRF were simultaneously recorded from five subjects during running. The acceleration of the bone was measured with a transducer mounted onto an intracortical pin. The signals were analyzed in the frequency domain to characterize the relationship between GRF and tibial acceleration. The results confirmed that for each subject this relationship could be represented by a frequency transfer function. The existence of a more general relationship for all five subjects was also confirmed by the results. The transfer functions provided information about transient shock transmissibility for the entire impact phase of running.

  10. Rates of tibial osteotomies in Canada and the United States.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Heck, D; Hawker, G; Dittus, R; Freund, D; Joyce, D; Paul, J; Young, W; Coyte, P

    1995-10-01

    This study determined the temporal trends and factors associated with the rates of performance of tibial osteotomies from 1985 to 1990 in Ontario, Canada and the United States. The Health Care Financing Administration, Ontario Health Insurance Plan, and National Hospital Discharge Survey databases were used to determine the number of osteotomies from 1985 to 1990. Osteotomy rates decreased in both countries approximately by 11% to 14% per year in patients 65 years and older and by 3% to 4% per year in patients younger than 65 years. Men received twice as many osteotomies as women in both countries. In the United States, the average rate of tibial osteotomies was 2 to 3 times lower than in Ontario. PMID:7554639

  11. [Minimally invasive treatment of tibial plateau fracture under arthroscopy monitoring].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixin; Ma, Shaoyun; Li, Xianpeng

    2014-05-01

    Twenty six patients with fracture of tibial plateau was under arthroscopy assisted reduction, the joint surface of bone graft, and USES the steel plate fixation treatment. Average surgery time was 65 min (70-120 min), average fracture healing time was 15 weeks (12-17 weeks), joint surface anatomical reattachment rate was 92.9%. Using break knee function criteria evaluation of curative effect: 18 cases great 6 cases wed, 2 cases ok, fine rate was 92.3%. No infection, deep venous thrombosis and small leg fascia chamber syndrome and other complications. Conclusion is that treatment of tibial plateau fractures under arthroscope has advantages of small trauma, check intuitively and reset accurately, functional recovery of patients are satisfied, the treatment has certain clinical application value.

  12. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits

    PubMed Central

    LOIA, MARCO CORGIAT; VANNI, STEFANIA; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty). PMID:27602350

  13. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits

    PubMed Central

    LOIA, MARCO CORGIAT; VANNI, STEFANIA; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty).

  14. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits.

    PubMed

    Loia, Marco Corgiat; Vanni, Stefania; Rosso, Federica; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Dettoni, Federico; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty). PMID:27602350

  15. Anatomic femorotibial changes associated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Jennifer A; Allen, David A; Bergman, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    This prospective study evaluated anatomic femorotibial changes utilizing the relationship between the intercondylar notch and the intercondylar eminence following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). We hypothesized that TPLO results in anatomic alteration of the femorotibial joint. Pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) scans of cranial cruciate deficient stifle joints treated with TPLO were performed on 25 client-owned dogs. Computed tomography scans were performed at 3 different stifle angles: extension, 135° walking angle, and 90° of flexion. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy did not result in a significant medial or lateral shift of the intercondylar eminence relative to the intercondylar notch. There was a significant cranial shift of the intercondylar eminence with the stifle in extension following TPLO. In addition, TPLO resulted in a significantly narrowed femorotibial joint space. The biomechanical effects of TPLO and medial meniscal release need to be further defined. PMID:26345618

  16. Simultaneous bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fracture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Metin; Taşkiran, Emin; Ozgürbüz, Cengizhan

    2003-05-01

    A 16-year-old male basketball player had sustained an injury upon landing after a forceful jump. Plain radiography demonstrated bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fracture involving partially proximal physis. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed at once. Continuous passive motion was started immediately after operation, and the patient was ambulated with hinged knee extension braces. After 27 months follow-up his knees completely regained normal range of motion except a 3 degrees extension loss in the left knee. He resumed all daily functional activities (Lysholm functional score of 99), but he slightly lost his level of activity (Tegner activity level from 7 to 6). No angular deformity at all on the frontal plane was determined upon radiological examination. Tibial slope angles were symmetrical and within the normal range. There were visible small bone fragments inside the left patellar tendon.

  17. Total knee arthroplasty with concurrent femoral and tibial osteotomies in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Russell; Luedke, Colten

    2014-01-01

    Three total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with concurrent femoral and/or tibial osteotomies in 2 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta were performed from 2004 to 2009. The 2 patients were followed for a mean of 6 years. One patient with concurrent TKA, and femoral and tibial osteotomies developed a nonunion of the tibial site that responded to open reduction and internal fixation with iliac crest bone graft. The second patient underwent right TKA with bi-level tibial osteotomies, which healed uneventfully, allowing pain free, unassisted ambulation. The same patient then elected to undergo left TKA with bi-level tibial osteotomies. Intraoperatively he sustained a minor tibial plateau fracture requiring the use of a stemmed component and postoperatively, he developed a nonunion at the proximal site and valgus malunion of the distal site. Revision of fixation was performed at both osteotomy sites, and both healed within 3 months. Both patients are now pain free and ambulate without assistance.

  18. Nonunion of the ulna after elastic stable intramedullary nailing for unstable forearm fractures: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Moez S; Garg, Neeraj K; Bruce, Colin E; Bass, Alfie

    2009-09-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) for displaced forearm fractures in children has shown good results over the last two decades. To our knowledge, nonunion as complications after ESIN fixation of displaced forearm fractures is not well reported in English literature. In our institute, and over a period of 10 years, we identified three cases of nonunion of the ulna after ESIN fixation of unstable and displaced forearm both bone fractures. Two patients had closed fractures and one patient had an open fracture. There was no deep infection in any case. All cases after revision surgery went into union. PMID:19581817

  19. Transplantar intramedullary locking nailing in childhood congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia: A report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Chalopin, A; Pesenti, S; Peltier, E; Bin, K; Launay, F; Jouve, J-L

    2016-06-01

    The treatment objectives in congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia are bone consolidation and a restored lower-limb axis. They are difficult to achieve, and various surgical techniques have been described, with varying results in terms of bone consolidation and complications. The present study reports clinical and radiographic results in 3 patients managed by the same original technique of transplantar intramedullary nailing using a custom-made proximal locking nail, without surgical approach or resection of the pseudarthrosis site. Good assembly stability allowed immediate weight-bearing. The technique is relatively noninvasive, offering a first-line alternative in under-3 year-olds. PMID:27036507

  20. Intradural Intramedullary Mixed Type Hemangioma: Optimizing the Surgical Management through Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Situmeang, Adrian; Safri, Ahmad Yanuar; Fadhly, Zulfa Indah K.

    2015-01-01

    Intradural intramedullary mixed type hemangioma is a rare histotype of primary spinal cord tumors, though it can carry a severe clinical burden leading to limb dysfunction or motor and sensory disturbances. Timely intervention with radical resection is the hallmark of treatment but achieving it is not an easy task even for experienced neurosurgeons. We herein present an exemplificative case presenting with sudden paraplegia in which total resection was achieved under intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring. A thorough discussion on the operative technique and the role of neuromonitoring in allowing a safe surgical management of primary spinal cord tumors is presented. PMID:26839729

  1. The medial tibial syndrome. The role of surgery.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, A J; Schepsis, A; McArthur, C

    1994-11-01

    Among authors over the past 35 years, medial tibial syndrome, or "shin splints," has been interpreted to mean many different things. We present a review of the literature to attempt to ascribe one definition to this clinical entity, and to clearly define its symptoms, signs, pathophysiology, biomechanics, and treatment. In addition, we describe our results with five patients whose seven affected limbs eventually required surgery for this condition, and we compare them to the results in the literature.

  2. Bicondylar tibial plateau fracture after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael J; McCoy, Brett W; Hussain, Waqas M; Saluan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The authors present a report of a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture in an adolescent athlete after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. The procedure was performed via arthroscopic transtibial PCL reconstruction with quadrupled semi-tendinosus and gracilis autograft. The patient recovered uneventfully postoperatively and was able to participate in high-level sports activity, such as baseball and track, with no limitations, no subjective complaints, and no episodes of instability. He continued to be asymptomatic up to 3.5 years postoperatively. Almost 4 years postoperatively, the patient reinjured the left knee during recreational noncontact football and was seen emergently. Plain radiographs, magnetic resonance image scan, and computed tomography scan at the time of injury showed a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture with intra-articular involvement. Operative intervention was undertaken for open reduction and internal fixation of the bicondylar tibial plateau fracture. A plate was placed along the medial aspect of the tibia with locking and nonlocking screws, and the joint line was restored appropriately. The patient recovered uneventfully and at the most recent follow-up had full active and passive range of motion, had no subjective or objective evidence of instability, and had returned to full activity with no restrictions. The patient had no history of multiple fractures or any medical or pharmacologic history that predisposed him to decreased bone density. This case shows a unique possible complication after transtibial PCL reconstruction in an adolescent patient.

  3. Morphogenesis of Fusarium sp-induced tibial dyschondroplasia in chickens.

    PubMed

    Haynes, J S; Walser, M M; Lawler, E M

    1985-11-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia was induced in female broiler chicks by the incorporation of 2% Fusarium roseum "Alaska" culture into their starter ration. Chicks were placed on this diet at one day of age and maintained until they were killed at four days or one week. Proximal tibial physes were grossly thickened into cone-shaped masses of cartilage by one week of age. Microscopically, lesions were in both ages of treated chickens and were characterized by thickening of the transitional zone which was especially prominent in the center of the growth plate. This zone was unmineralized, avascular, and contained chondrocytes which were crenated and densely eosinophilic. The cartilage matrix was pale and contained some patchy eosinophilic foci. Four growth plates with tibial dyschondroplasia and four normal growth plates from each of the four-day and one-week-old age groups were evaluated based on the following parameters: number of metaphyseal vascular sprouts, distance between the proliferative/transitional junction and the tip of the metaphyseal vascular sprouts, width of the tips of the metaphyseal sprouts, distance between tips of adjacent metaphyseal vascular sprouts, and number of perforating vessels in the proliferative zone. The distance between the proliferative/transitional junction and the metaphyseal sprout tips was greatly increased (p less than 0.01) in the affected four-day and one-week-old chickens compared to age-matched controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Dual locked plating of unstable bicondylar tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Ufuk; Parmaksizoglu, Atilla Sancar

    2015-07-01

    The operative treatment of displaced bicondylar tibial plateau fractures is challenging. The displaced condyles must be reduced, depressed plateaus must be elevated and adequately supported and early rehabilitation must be encouraged in order to obtain good clinical results. This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated with dual locked plates using raft screws with MIPO technique and autologous bone grafting. We hypothesized that in this group of patients dual locked plating reduces the complication rates by avoiding loss of reduction due to the accomplished rigid fixation. Twenty-two consecutive patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fractures (AO Type C) were included in this study. The mean follow up was 26 months. Bone healing was achieved in all patients with 3 cases of superficial and 1 case of deep infection. Secondary loss of reduction, secondary loss of alignment, early post-traumatic arthritis were not observed in this study. The Lysholm knee score showed an average of 80.5 points (range: 61.5-90) at the final follow up assessment. Optimal fixation of the fracture with dual locked plating which allows immediate motion and partial weight bearing may be an alternative concept to prevent secondary loss of reduction to obtain a good clinical outcome. PMID:26021666

  5. Leg tissue mass composition affects tibial acceleration response following impact.

    PubMed

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M

    2012-02-01

    To date, there has not been a direct examination of the effect that tissue composition (lean mass/muscle, fat mass, bone mineral content) differences between males and females has on how the tibia responds to impacts similar to those seen during running. To evaluate this, controlled heel impacts were imparted to 36 participants (6 M and 6 F in each of low, medium and high percent body fat [BF] groups) using a human pendulum. A skin-mounted accelerometer medial to the tibial tuberosity was used to determine the tibial response parameters (peak acceleration, acceleration slope and time to peak acceleration). There were no consistent effects of BF or specific tissue masses on the un-normalized tibial response parameters. However, females experienced 25% greater peak acceleration than males. When normalized to lean mass, wobbling mass, and bone mineral content, females experienced 50%, 62% and 70% greater peak acceleration, respectively, per gram of tissue than males. Higher magnitudes of lean mass and bone mass significantly contributed to decreased acceleration responses in general.

  6. The impact of tibial torsion measurements on gait analysis kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Santos, Nadia Maria; Godoy, Wagner De; Bernal, Milena Moreira Barreto; Paes, Ângela Tavares; Ramalho, Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure and compare tibial torsion values as assessed by goniometry and three-dimensional kinematics. In addition, the impact of each one of these measurements on kinematic and kinetic results for normal gait was determined. Methods: Twenty-three healthy and fully ambulatory patients were assessed, 11 women and 12 men, from 20 to 40 years old. Data were collected at a laboratory for the three-dimensional analysis of movement with 10 cameras and two force plates. Tibial torsion measurements were obtained using goniometry and three-dimensional kinematics based on the Plug-in Gait model. Afterwards, both procedures were compared, and the impact of each result was assessed on the kinematic and kinetic modeling of the knee and ankle. Results: Pearson's linear correlation coefficient (r=0,504) showed a moderate correlation between the three-dimensional kinematics and goniometry, and between the changes in the measurements. Regarding the processed kinematic and kinetic results for every torsion position, no significant differences were noticed among any of the studied variables (p>0.05). Conclusion: Although statistical correlation among tibial torsion angles by goniometry and three-dimensional kinematic were moderate, kinematic and kinetic analysis of the joints did not reveal any significant changes. Level of Evidence I, Diagnostic Studies - Investigating a Diagnostic Test. PMID:25328438

  7. Bicondylar tibial plateau fracture after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael J; McCoy, Brett W; Hussain, Waqas M; Saluan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The authors present a report of a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture in an adolescent athlete after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. The procedure was performed via arthroscopic transtibial PCL reconstruction with quadrupled semi-tendinosus and gracilis autograft. The patient recovered uneventfully postoperatively and was able to participate in high-level sports activity, such as baseball and track, with no limitations, no subjective complaints, and no episodes of instability. He continued to be asymptomatic up to 3.5 years postoperatively. Almost 4 years postoperatively, the patient reinjured the left knee during recreational noncontact football and was seen emergently. Plain radiographs, magnetic resonance image scan, and computed tomography scan at the time of injury showed a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture with intra-articular involvement. Operative intervention was undertaken for open reduction and internal fixation of the bicondylar tibial plateau fracture. A plate was placed along the medial aspect of the tibia with locking and nonlocking screws, and the joint line was restored appropriately. The patient recovered uneventfully and at the most recent follow-up had full active and passive range of motion, had no subjective or objective evidence of instability, and had returned to full activity with no restrictions. The patient had no history of multiple fractures or any medical or pharmacologic history that predisposed him to decreased bone density. This case shows a unique possible complication after transtibial PCL reconstruction in an adolescent patient. PMID:25760514

  8. Current Arthroscopic Concepts in Repairing Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial-Sided Avulsions.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Chaitu; Felder, Jerrod; Elliott, Michael; Brunkhorst, Joseph; Miller, Mark; Johnson, Darren L

    2015-09-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are extremely rare and most commonly occur in the trauma setting. They can lead to instability, pain, diminished function, and eventual arthrosis. Several techniques of arthroscopic PCL repair for tibial-sided bony avulsions have been described in the literature; however, no single technique has emerged as the gold standard to predictably restore posterior knee stability, PCL function, and knee biomechanics. The authors believe that the best results will come from procedures that re-create the normal human anatomy and knee kinematics. In this article, 3 arthroscopic methods of PCL avulsion repairs performed at 2 academic institutions are analyzed. The techniques described here provide good options for the treatment of these injuries.

  9. Temporary intra-operative reduction techniques for tibial fracture fixation: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Beazley, J C; Hull, P

    2010-12-01

    Accurate intra-operative reduction and maintenance of reduction is essential for successful fixation of tibial fractures. Although many tibial fractures can be reduced with minimal manipulation, numerous techniques have been described to facilitate fixation of more difficult fractures. These include use of a traction table, manual traction techniques, temporary distracters, reduction clamps and temporary unicortical plating. This article reviews the literature and assesses the options available for the temporary reduction and maintenance of reduction of tibial fractures prior to definitive fixation.

  10. Tibial rotational osteotomy for idiopathic torsion. A comparison of the proximal and distal osteotomy levels.

    PubMed

    Krengel, W F; Staheli, L T

    1992-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 52 rotational tibial osteotomies (RTOs) performed on 35 patients with severe idiopathic tibial torsion. Thirty-nine osteotomies were performed at the proximal or midtibial level. Thirteen were performed at the distal tibial level with a technique previously described by one of the authors. Serious complications occurred in five (13%) of the proximal and in none of the distal RTOs. For severe and persisting idiopathic tibial torsion, the authors recommend correction by RTO at the distal level. Proximal level osteotomy is indicated only when a varus or valgus deformity required concurrent correction.

  11. The high variability of tibial rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Goodman, Stuart B; Patel, Jay J; Delp, Scott L; Giori, Nicholas J

    2006-11-01

    Although various techniques are advocated to establish tibial rotational alignment during total knee arthroplasty, it is unknown which is most repeatable. We evaluated the precision and accuracy of five tibial rotational alignment techniques to determine whether computer-assisted navigation systems can reduce variability of tibial component rotational alignment when compared to traditional instrumentation. Eleven orthopaedic surgeons used four computer-assisted techniques that required identification of anatomical landmarks and one that used traditional extramedullary instrumentation to establish tibial rotational alignment axes on 10 cadaver legs. Two computer-assisted techniques (axes between the most medial and lateral border of the tibial plateau, and between the posterior cruciate ligament [PCL] and the anterior tibial crest) and the traditional technique were least variable, with standard deviations of 9.9 degrees, 10.8 degrees, and 12.1 degrees, respectively. Computer-assisted techniques referencing the tibial tubercle (axes between the PCL and the medial border or medial 1/3 of the tubercle) were most variable, with standard deviations of 27.4 degrees and 28.1 degrees. The axis between the medial border of the tibial tubercle and the PCL was internally rotated compared to the other techniques. None of the techniques consistently established tibial rotational alignment, and navigation systems that establish rotational alignment by identifying anatomic landmarks were not more reliable than traditional instrumentation.

  12. Posterior tibial nerve as a tendon transfer for drop foot reconstruction: a devastating complication.

    PubMed

    Armangil, Mehmet; Basat, H Çağdaş; Bilgin, S Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic peripheral nerve injuries can result from numerous medical procedures, particularly transection, stretching, compression, injections, heat, radiation, and the use of anticoagulant agents. Late diagnosis may lead to atrophy of the motor endplate and result in poor outcomes. We report a case in which the posterior tibial nerve was accidentally sectioned as the posterior tibial tendon for transfer to the anterior tibial tendon in the reconstruction of drop foot. This iatrogenic complication ultimately required foot amputation. Physicians must be aware of the anatomy of the posterior tibial nerve in order to avoid such complications. PMID:25803264

  13. Posterior tibial tendon tears in young competitive athletes: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Porter, D A; Baxter, D E; Clanton, T O; Klootwyk, T E

    1998-09-01

    Unlike the Achilles tendon, the posterior tibial tendon does not typically undergo acute rupture. We report two cases of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in young, athletic individuals (<30 years old) that required operative intervention before the patients could return to competitive sports. We believe that these are the first two reports of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in this population without the patient having a prior history of steroid injections in the tendon. The tears we observed and described at surgical exploration were chronic and degenerative in nature. We also comment on our approach to treatment of posterior tibial tendon injuries in the athletic population.

  14. Interference screw fixation and short harvest using flexor digitorum longus (FDL) transfer for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: a technique.

    PubMed

    Bussewitz, Bradly W; Hyer, Christopher F

    2010-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is a common clinical entity treated by foot and ankle specialists, and numerous surgical treatments are available to the modern foot and ankle surgeon. Fixation methods are constantly evolving as new products are developed and new uses for existing products are attempted. Interference screw fixation is the gold standard fixation for tendon autograft and allograft in orthopedic sports medicine. The technique that we describe in this article uses a less extensive harvest of the flexor digitorum longus tendon and a sound fixation method using an interference screw positioned in the tarsal navicular. PMID:20797592

  15. Estimation of bone perfusion as a function of intramedullary pressure in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.S.; Lehner, C.E.; Pearson, D.W.; Kanikula, T.M.; Adler, G.G.; Venci, R.; Lanphier, E.H.; De Luca, P.M.

    1985-05-01

    It has been reported previously that following decompression (i.e. diving ascents) the intramedullary pressure (IMP) in bone can rise dramatically and possibly by the mechanism which can induce dysbaric osteonecrosis or the ''silent bends''. If the blood supply for the bone transverses the marrow compartment, than an increase in IMP could cause a temporary decrease in perfusion or hemostasis and hence ischemia leading to bone necrosis. To test this hypothesis, the authors measured the perfusion of bone in sheep as a function of IMP. The bone perfusion was estimated by measuring the perfusion-limited clearance of Ar-41 (E..gamma..=1293 keV, T/sub 1/2/=1.83 h) from the bone mineral matrix of sheep's tibia. The argon gas was formed in vivo by the fast neutron activation of Ca-44 to Ar-41 following the Ca-44(n,..cap alpha..) reaction. Clearance of Ar-41 was measured by time gated gamma-ray spectroscopy. These results indicate that an elevation of intramedullary pressure can decrease perfusion in bone and may cause bone necrosis.

  16. Intraoperative and pathological findings of intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with spinal ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    Amputation neuromas typically arise in injured peripheral nerves; rarely, however, they arise in the spinal cord. We report a rare case of intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with ependymoma in the cervical spinal cord. A 73-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of progressive gait disturbance. Neurological examination revealed complete motor deficit of her hands and legs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an enhancing mass within the spinal cord at the C6/7 level. The patient underwent C5-C7 laminectomy surgery. During resection of the spinal tumor, we found a whitish string resembling an aberrant nerve root or schwannoma with adhesion to the tumor on the ventral side of the spinal cord. After resecting the tumor, the surgical specimen was cut and separated into a soft greyish tumor (spinal tumor) and the tough whitish string. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed the former was a spinal ependymoma and the latter was a neuroma. An intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with a spinal ependymoma is rare, and this is the first known case in which intraoprerative findings were clearly shown. Neurosurgeons should be aware that spinal ependymomas might coexist with neuromas.

  17. Cervical intramedullary granuloma of Brucella: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Tasdemir, Nebahat; Cakmak, Erkan; Kemaloglu, Mustafa Serdar; Bukte, Yasar; Geyik, Mehmet Faruk

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to present a unique case of intramedullary brucellar granuloma (IBG) and to discuss the diagnosis and management. To our knowledge, only one case of thoracic IBG has been reported previously, and our case is the first in cervical spine. A 35-year-old female patient was admitted with headache, pain and weakness in her four extremities. She had no gastrointestinal symptoms and fever. She had been diagnosed with Brucella meningitis 3 months ago and a triple therapy of doxycyclin, rifampicin and trimetoprim/sulfametoxazol (TMP/SMZ) had been started. Medical history revealed that she had ingested raw cheese and taken her medication improperly. Loss of strength was detected in her four extremities, which led us to assume the formation of a mass lesion at cervical level. Therefore, we performed a magnetic resonance imaging scan and found enhancement of an intramedullary mass lesion at cervical 1-2 level. Diagnosis of neurobrucellosis was confirmed by titer of >1/160 Brucella antibodies both in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Based on these findings, brucellar granuloma of cervical spine was diagnosed and a combination therapy of doxycyclin, TMP/SMZ and rifampicin was administered for additional 6 months. At the ninth month of treatment, the patient recovered both radiologically and clinically. Our case is unique, in terms of cervical IBG formation. The excellent response to antimicrobial therapy in our patient suggests that, a trial of medical treatment for 6 months may be effective in such cases. PMID:17103231

  18. Corrosion behavior, biocompatibility and biomechanical stability of a prototype magnesium-based biodegradable intramedullary nailing system.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Manuel; Schilling, Markus; Eifler, Rainer; Hering, Britta; Reifenrath, Janin; Besdo, Silke; Windhagen, Henning; Willbold, Elmar; Weizbauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Implants made of degradable magnesium alloys are a potential alternative to conventional orthopaedic implant materials, e.g. stainless steel or titanium. Intramedullary nails made of the magnesium alloy LAE442 were subjected to cyclic fatigue tests in both distilled water and Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) at 37.5°C until implant failure or a limit of 500,000cycles was reached. In distilled water, four of the five nails were still intact after the end of the biomechanical test. In HBSS, a breakage within the first 70,000 bending cycles was observed. Additionally, the degradation rate of this alloy was determined in HBSS according to the weight loss method (0.24±0.12mmyear(-1)) and based on gas release (0.21±0.03mmyear(-1)) with a standard eudiometer. A cytotoxicity test with L929 cells was carried out in accordance with EN ISO 10993-5/12. This test demonstrated sufficient cell viability of the diluted extracts (50%, 25% and 12.5%). The relative metabolic activity of the 100% extract was reduced slightly below 70%, which is classified as a threshold value for cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this in vitro study indicates that intramedullary nails made of LAE442 may not have the required fatigue resistance for load-bearing applications and the development of a corrosion-protective coating may be necessary to prevent early failure of the implant. PMID:26652357

  19. X-ray-based machine vision system for distal locking of intramedullary nails.

    PubMed

    Juneho, F; Bouazza-Marouf, K; Kerr, D; Taylor, A J; Taylor, G J S

    2007-05-01

    In surgical procedures for femoral shaft fracture treatment, current techniques for locking the distal end of intramedullary nails, using two screws, rely heavily on the use of two-dimensional X-ray images to guide three-dimensional bone drilling processes. Therefore, a large number of X-ray images are required, as the surgeon uses his/her skills and experience to locate the distal hole axes on the intramedullary nail. The long-term effects of X-ray radiation and their relation to different types of cancer still remain uncertain. Therefore, there is a need to develop a surgical technique that can limit the use of X-rays during the distal locking procedure. A robotic-assisted orthopaedic surgery system has been developed at Loughborough University to assist orthopaedic surgeons by reducing the irradiation involved in such operations. The system simplifies the current approach as it uses only two near-orthogonal X-ray images to determine the drilling trajectory of the distal locking holes, thereby considerably reducing irradiation to both the surgeon and patient. Furthermore, the system uses robust machine vision features to reduce the surgeon's interaction with the system, thus reducing the overall operating time. Laboratory test results have shown that the proposed system is very robust in the presence of variable noise and contrast in the X-ray images.

  20. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing for the treatment of complicated juvenile bone cysts of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Knorr, P; Schmittenbecher, P P; Dietz, H-G

    2003-02-01

    Juvenile bone cysts usually are asymptomatic and may manifest as pathological fractures. Since the new method of flexible intramedullary nailing (" Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing" - ESIN or " Embrochage Centro- Médullaire Elastique Stable" - ECMES) has demonstrated superb results in the treatment of non-pathologic fractures of the long bones in childhood, this method is rapidly gaining popularity for the treatment of spontaneous or pathological fractures. Given the self-limiting natural history of juvenile bone cysts with eventual spontaneous healing, our goal is to stabilise the pathological fracture and the biomechanically weakened humerus. We treated 15 patients with 16 pathological fractures (one re-fracture) due to juvenile bone cysts of the proximal humerus. All fractures healed completely without pseudarthrosis. Complications were a secondary fracture in otherwise correctly positioned nails. Five of the 15 implants remain in situ, in 6 cases a repeat osteosynthesis was necessary, in one case the nails had to be changed because of the re-fracture. Ten of the 15 juvenile bone cysts healed over a period of 3 years, the nails were removed and so far there have been no further fractures in this group. In the other 5 cases, the juvenile bone cysts have progressively filled with sclerotic bone, and the nails remain in situ. PMID:12664415

  1. Corrosion behavior, biocompatibility and biomechanical stability of a prototype magnesium-based biodegradable intramedullary nailing system.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Manuel; Schilling, Markus; Eifler, Rainer; Hering, Britta; Reifenrath, Janin; Besdo, Silke; Windhagen, Henning; Willbold, Elmar; Weizbauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Implants made of degradable magnesium alloys are a potential alternative to conventional orthopaedic implant materials, e.g. stainless steel or titanium. Intramedullary nails made of the magnesium alloy LAE442 were subjected to cyclic fatigue tests in both distilled water and Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) at 37.5°C until implant failure or a limit of 500,000cycles was reached. In distilled water, four of the five nails were still intact after the end of the biomechanical test. In HBSS, a breakage within the first 70,000 bending cycles was observed. Additionally, the degradation rate of this alloy was determined in HBSS according to the weight loss method (0.24±0.12mmyear(-1)) and based on gas release (0.21±0.03mmyear(-1)) with a standard eudiometer. A cytotoxicity test with L929 cells was carried out in accordance with EN ISO 10993-5/12. This test demonstrated sufficient cell viability of the diluted extracts (50%, 25% and 12.5%). The relative metabolic activity of the 100% extract was reduced slightly below 70%, which is classified as a threshold value for cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this in vitro study indicates that intramedullary nails made of LAE442 may not have the required fatigue resistance for load-bearing applications and the development of a corrosion-protective coating may be necessary to prevent early failure of the implant.

  2. Percutaneous reduction and flexible intramedullary nailing for monteggia fracture in a skeletally mature patient

    PubMed Central

    Beutel, Bryan G.; Klifto, Christopher S.; Chu, Alice

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Monteggia lesions are defined as a fracture of the proximal ulna with an associated radial head dislocation. Management of these injuries varies depending upon the patient population, ranging from non-operative treatment with closed reduction and immobilization to surgical fixation. Percutaneous techniques of radial head reduction are often reserved for skeletally immature patients. PRESENTATION OF CASE In this case report, a 14-year-old female presented with left elbow pain three days after a fall. Radiographs and CT images from an outside hospital revealed a displaced left radial head fracture and a non-displaced proximal olecranon fracture, consistent with a Monteggia equivalent fracture. The patient underwent percutaneous reduction and internal fixation of the radial head with a flexible intramedullary nail (Metaizeau technique), and open reduction and internal fixation of the olecranon. She developed a 25 degree left elbow flexion contracture and, five months after her index procedure, underwent arthroscopic release and removal of hardware. The radial head reduction was near anatomic and she regained full extension. DISCUSSION This report demonstrates that percutaneous reduction with intramedullary nailing and fixation techniques can be performed successfully in skeletally mature patients. CONCLUSION Given their less invasive nature, we recommend attempting percutaneous interventions in some skeletally mature individuals for fracture reduction and fixation. PMID:25460489

  3. Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with retrograde intramedullary nailing: 29 patients’ clinical and functional evaluation☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Thiago Barbosa; Júnior, Márcio Oliveira Calábria; de Castro, Régis Vieira; Martins, Jefferson Soares; Costa, Edegmar Nunes; Albieri, Alexandre Daher; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinically and functionally the pos-operative results of patients submitted to tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis for the treatment of traumatic arthropathy and neuropathy. Methods Retrospective study of 29 patients undergoing ankle arthrodesis with intramedullary retrograde nail. All patients were evaluated for fusion time, AOFAS and VAS scores, satisfaction, and complications of surgery. The mean follow-up was 36 months (range 6–60 months). Results The union rate was 82%, and the consolidation occurred on average at 16 weeks (10–24 weeks). The pos-operative AOFAS score improved in 65.5% (average of 57.7 on neurological cases and 75.7 on cases pos-traumatic) and VAS score improved 94.1% (average of 2.3 on neurological cases and 4,2 on post-traumatic cases), and 86% of patients were satisfied with the procedure performed. Complications occurred in 11 patients (38%), including pseudoarthrosis (17.24%), infection (17.24%), material failure (13.8%) and fracture (13.8%). Conclusion Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with retrograde intramedullary nail proved to be a good option for saving the ankle joint, with improvement of clinical and functional scores (AOFAS = 65.5% and VAS = 94.1%). PMID:26229773

  4. Intramedullary Sarcoidosis Presenting with Delayed Spinal Cord Swelling after Cervical Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Du Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown etiology that may affect any organ in the body. The nervous system is involved in 5-16% of cases of sarcoidosis. Here, we report a case of intramedullary sarcoidosis presenting with delayed spinal cord swelling after laminoplasty for the treatment of compressive cervical myelopathy. A 56-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of upper extremity pain and gait disturbance. The patient had undergone laminoplasty for compressive cervical myelopathy 3 months previously. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large solitary intramedullary lesion with associated extensive cord swelling, signal changes, and heterogeneous enhancement of spinal cord from C2 to C7. Spinal cord biopsy revealed non-necrotizing granulomas with signs of chronic inflammation. The final diagnosis of sarcoidosis was based upon laboratory data, imaging findings, histological findings, and the exclusion of other diagnoses. Awareness of such presentations and a high degree of suspicion of sarcoidosis may help arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:25535524

  5. Influence of the intramedullary nail preparation method on nail's mechanical properties and degradation rate.

    PubMed

    Morawska-Chochół, Anna; Chłopek, Jan; Szaraniec, Barbara; Domalik-Pyzik, Patrycja; Balacha, Ewa; Boguń, Maciej; Kucharski, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    When it comes to the treatment of long bone fractures, scientists are still investigating new materials for intramedullary nails and different manufacturing methods. Some of the most promising materials used in the field are resorbable polymers and their composites, especially since there is a wide range of potential manufacturing and processing methods. The aim of this work was to select the best manufacturing method and technological parameters to obtain multiphase, and multifunctional, biodegradable intramedullary nails. All composites were based on a poly(l-lactide) matrix. Either magnesium alloy wires or carbon and alginate fibres were introduced in order to reinforce the nails. The polylactide matrix was also modified with tricalcium phosphate and gentamicin sulfate. The composite nails were manufactured using three different methods: forming from solution, injection moulding and hot pressing. The effect of each method of manufacturing on mechanical properties and degradation rate of the nails was evaluated. The study showed that injection moulding provides higher uniformity and homogeneity of the particle-modified polylactide matrix, whereas hot pressing favours applying higher volume fractions of fibres and their better impregnation with the polymer matrix. Thus, it was concluded that the fabrication method should be individually selected dependently on the nail's desired phase composition.

  6. [Intramedullary Abscess of the Cervical Spinal Cord Caused by Advanced Periodontitis:Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Atsushi; Ishigaki, Daiya; Isu, Toyohiko; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-08-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old man with an intramedullary abscess of the cervical spinal cord caused by advanced periodontitis. He suddenly developed severe neck pain and rapidly progressive palsy of the left upper arm. T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed a hyperintense area extending from C1 to C6. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI showed a ring-enhanced lesion at the C3-4 level that was hyperintense on diffusion-weighted MRI. The patient underwent drainage of the abscess through laminectomy. Cultures of the abscess contents revealed Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus micros. Antibiotics administered to the patient to treat the infection with these anaerobic bacteria improved the neurological deficit eight weeks after surgery. The patient was also diagnosed with advanced periodontitis due to Fusobacterium nucleatum that might have caused the intramedullary abscess of the cervical spinal cord. PMID:27506846

  7. Refracture of proximal fifth metatarsal (Jones) fracture after intramedullary screw fixation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Wright, R W; Fischer, D A; Shively, R A; Heidt, R S; Nuber, G W

    2000-01-01

    This study details six instances of refracture of clinically and radiographically healed fractures of the base of the fifth metatarsal after intramedullary screw fixation. Four professional football players, one college basketball player, and one recreational athlete underwent intramedullary screw fixation of fifth metatarsal fractures. The athletes were released to full activities an average of 8.5 weeks (range, 5.5 to 12) after fixation, when healing was clinically and radiographically documented. Three football players developed refracture within 1 day of return to full activity. The other three athletes refractured at 2.5, 4, and 4.5 months after return to activity. Two football players underwent repeat fixation with larger screws and returned to play in the same season. The college basketball player underwent bone grafting and returned to play in subsequent seasons. The other three athletes underwent nonoperative management and healed uneventfully over 6 to 8 weeks. On the basis of this series, we recommend that 1) screw fixation using a large-diameter screw should be given careful consideration for patients with large body mass for whom early return to activity is important; 2) functional bracing, shoe modification, or an orthosis should be considered for return to play; 3) if refracture occurs, exchange to a larger screw may allow return to play in the same season; and 4) alternative imaging should be considered to help document complete healing.

  8. Minimizing Alteration of Posterior Tibial Slope During Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: a Protocol with Experimental Validation in Paired Cadaveric Knees

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; DeBerardino, Thomas; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO) is a reliable procedure in addressing uni- compartmental arthritis with associated coronal deformities. With osteotomy of the proximal tibia, there is a risk of altering the tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Surgical techniques continue to evolve with trends towards procedure reproducibility and simplification. We evaluated a modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique in 18 paired cadaveric knees with the goals of maintaining sagittal slope, increasing procedure efficiency, and decreasing use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Methods Nine paired cadaveric knees (18 legs) underwent iBalance medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomies. In each pair, the right knee underwent an HTO using the modified technique, while all left knees underwent the traditional technique. Independent observers evaluated postoperative factors including tibial slope, placement of hinge pin, and implant placement. Specimens were then dissected to evaluate for any gross muscle, nerve or vessel injury. Results Changes to posterior tibial slope were similar using each technique. The change in slope in traditional iBalance technique was -0.3° ±2.3° and change in tibial slope using the modified iBalance technique was -0.4° ±2.3° (p=0.29). Furthermore, we detected no differences in posterior tibial slope between preoperative and postoperative specimens (p=0.74 traditional, p=0.75 modified). No differences in implant placement were detected between traditional and modified techniques. (p=0.85). No intraoperative iatrogenic complications (i.e. lateral cortex fracture, blood vessel or nerve injury) were observed in either group after gross dissection. Discussion & Conclusions Alterations in posterior tibial slope are associated with HTOs. Both traditional and modified iBalance techniques appear reliable in coronal plane corrections without changing posterior tibial slope. The present modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique may increase the

  9. The Intramedullary Nailing of Adult Femoral Shaft Fracture by the Way of Open Reduction is a Disadvantage or Not?

    PubMed

    Burç, Halil; Atay, Tolga; Demirci, Demir; Baykal, Y Barbaros; Kirdemir, Vecihi; Yorgancigil, Hüseyin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is that to evaluate superiority and results of open technique in the treatment of femoral shaft fracture with interlocking intramedullary nailing. The retrospective study is designed to evaluate results of our technique. In this study, the patients that were admitted to the Orthopedics and Traumatology Department of University Hospital that is third level of trauma center. We claim that open technique is not a disadvantage during union process over closed technique in treatment of femoral shaft fracture with interlocking nailing. In this study, 44 patients that were consulted for adult femoral shaft fracture between January 2008 to July 2010 were included. Patients with open fractures, gunshot wounds, neurovascular injuries, and patients that did not have isolated femoral diaphysis fractures were excluded from the study. Clinical and radiological results of the patients were checked periodically. The open interlocking intramedullary nailing was used in treatment. Complete union rate was 90.9 % in 40 patients who were treated with open interlocking intramedullary nailing for adult femoral shaft fracture, and nonunion rate was 9.1 % in four patients. Mean union time was 18.3 weeks (12-36 weeks). Evaluation of 44 patients according to Thoresen criteria was excellent in 22 patients, good in 6 patients, and bad in 4 patients. We think that open technique is an acceptable technique because all results of our study were similar to results of closed intramedullary nailing technique in literature and some advantages of open technique over closed technique.

  10. Stability assessment of a moderately conforming all-polyethylene tibial component in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective RSA study with 2 years of follow-up of the Kinemax Plus design.

    PubMed

    Adalberth, G; Nilsson, K G; Byström, S; Kolstad, K; Mallmin, H; Milbrink, J

    1999-01-01

    The magnitude and pattern of the migration of an all-polyethylene tibial component with moderately conforming articular surfaces in total knee arthroplasty was analyzed in 20 patients > or =60 years during a 2-year follow-up using radiostereometry (RSA). Most of the migration occurred during the initial 4 months, whereafter the migration diminished, reaching a mean maximum migration of 0.75 mm at 2 years. Similar patterns were found for rotation of the implant. Maximum subsidence at 2 years was 0.7 mm and was most commonly located at the posteromedial part of the tibial component. These results indicate that an all-polyethylene tibial component with moderately conforming articular geometry and with a thickness of 10-12 mm demonstrated migration patterns compatible with a favorable prognosis in regard to future aseptic loosening.

  11. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the tibial-remnant preserving technique using a hamstring graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Min, Kyung-Dae; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Jun-Bum; Kim, Seong-Tae

    2006-03-01

    We propose that the tibial remnant of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is able to enhance the revascularization and cellular proliferation of the graft, to preserve proprioceptive function, and to be able to acquire anatomic placement of the graft without roof impingement. Therefore, it seems reasonable to assume that preserving the tibial remnant as much as possible as a source of reinnervation, if technically possible without causing impingement, would be of potential benefit to the patient. Our surgical technique was developed to maximize the preservation of the tibial remnant. The distally attached semitendinosus and gracilis tendons are harvested using the tendon stripper. After satisfactory placement of 2 guide pins convergently, a closed-end socket in the lateral femoral condyle is created using an adequately sized curved curette. For anatomic placement of the graft, the tibial tunnel should be positioned within the boundaries of the normal ACL tibial remnant. The reamer must be advanced very carefully to minimize injury to the residual remnant at the intra-articular margin of the tibial tunnel. Penetration should stop at the base of the stump. The folded grafts are then pulled intra-articularly through the tibial tunnel, the tibial remnant, and the femoral socket by pulling sutures under arthroscopic visualization. The ACL tibial remnant is compacted by the tendon passage. The graft is secured proximally by tying sutures in the lateral femoral condyle and distally at the tibia with double staples by a belt-buckle method. The advantages of our technique include maximal preservation of the tibial remnant, no roof impingement caused by intrasynovial anatomic placement of the graft, the simplicity of the procedure, the minimal need for hardware or special instruments, the economic benefit, and the potential prevention of tibial tunnel enlargement by preventing synovial fluid leakage. PMID:16517320

  12. Analysis of the Tibial Epiphysis in the Skeletally Immature Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L.; Almardawi, Ranyah; Mitchell, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    corresponding to the maximum and safe lengths are more acute than commonly thought, measuring approximately 40° and 30°, respectively. All prepubescent knees and intermediate-risk females should receive careful attention before ACL reconstruction due to the relative smaller size of their tibial epiphyses. Clinical Relevance: Physeal-sparing ACL reconstruction is gaining acceptance as a surgical option for complete ACL tear in skeletally immature knees. Iatrogenic growth disturbance after violation of an open growth remains a real concern for surgeons tasked with providing operative management for the unstable pediatric knee. Inadvertent iatrogenic growth plate injury to the tibial physis has been shown to occur more commonly than surgeons would intend during physeal-sparing ACL reconstruction. PMID:27482528

  13. Operative treatment in case of a closed rupture of the anterior tibial tendon.

    PubMed

    Otte, Stephanie; Klinger, Hans-Michael; Lorenz, Frank; Haerer, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    Closed rupture of the tibial anterior tendon is a rare clinical entity. Case reports in the literature reveal a total of only 49 cases up to the year 2000. According to these reports, the age group affected is 50 to 70 years old, and there are more men than women affected. Although the functional limitation is quite considerable, late diagnosis is common. An appropriate clinical examination, including an exact history taking, should lead to the right diagnosis. Ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful. 'Restitutio ad integrum' can only be achieved by operative treatment. If technically possible, reinsertion of the tendon directly into bone or direct tendon repair is preferred. After delayed diagnosis, a secondary reconstruction through tendon transfer or transplantation is often necessary. A 64-year-old woman presented with pain and swelling in the area of the ankle joint 5 months after falling. She showed insecurity in walking, and the heel-walk could not be demonstrated. The distal neurovascular function was intact. The area of the retinaculum showed a swelling, and the tendon was not palpable in comparison with the other forefoot. An intact tendon could not be seen by ultrasound, and MRI confirmed these findings. A complete rupture was noted during the operative revision. The proximal and the distal tendon stumps were found to be thickened and knotted, the proximal stump was also atrophic. An augmented tenoplasty was performed. Afterwards, the tendon was tense in the neutral position. The lower leg was put in a plaster cast for 6 weeks, followed by physiotherapy. Ten months after the operation, the tendon was palpable in the correct position, the dorsal extension was powerful, and the patient did not experience any difficulty. Rupture of the anterior tibial tendon is a rare clinical entity and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain in the area of the ankle joint. An early operative treatment is advantageous.

  14. Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging for Determining the Mechanical Properties of Human Posterior Tibial Tendon: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Justin S.; Heden, Gregory J.; Szivek, John A.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Latt, L. Daniel; Witte, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, they could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. The goal of this cadaveric study was, therefore, to develop and validate ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties. Five human cadaver feet were mounted in a materials testing system (MTS), while the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) was attached to a force actuator. A portable ultrasound scanner collected 2-D data during loading cycles. Young’s modulus was calculated from the strain, loading force, and cross-sectional area of the PTT. Average Young’s modulus for the five tendons was (0.45 ± 0.16 GPa) using UEI, which was consistent with simultaneous measurements made by the MTS across the whole tendon (0.52 ± 0.18 GPa). We also calculated the scaling factor (0.12 ± 0.01) between the load on the PTT and the inversion force at the forefoot, a measurable quantity in vivo. This study suggests that UEI could be a reliable in vivo technique for estimating the mechanical properties of the PTT, and as a clinical tool, help guide treatment decisions for advanced PTTD and other tendinopathies. PMID:25532163

  15. Metachronous Bilateral Posterior Tibial Artery Aneurysms in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Bonatti, Hugo; Sabri, Saher; Arslan, Bulent; Harthun, Nancy L.

    2011-04-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is a life-threatening genetic connective tissue disorder. We report a 24-year-old woman with EDS-IV who presented with metachronous bilateral aneurysms/pseudoaneurysms of the posterior tibial arteries 15 months apart. Both were treated successfully with transarterial coil embolization from a distal posterior tibial approach.

  16. Strong Association Between Tibial Plateau Bone Mineral Density and Cartilage Damage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tibial bone mineral density (BMD) is associated with radiographic features of osteoarthritis (OA), but no study has looked at its relationship with a direct measure of cartilage damage. We hypothesize that a relative increase in medial and lateral tibial BMD will be associated with cartilage damage...

  17. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, it could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. Ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a real-time, noninvasive technique to objectively measure mechanical properties in soft tissue. It consists of acquiring a sequence of ultrasound frames and applying speckle tracking to estimate displacement and strain at each pixel. The goals of my dissertation were to 1) use acoustic simulations to investigate the performance of UEI during tendon deformation with different geometries; 2) develop and validate UEI as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties in human cadaver experiments; 3) design a platform for UEI to measure mechanical properties of the PTT in vivo and determine whether there are detectable and quantifiable differences between healthy and diseased tendons. First, ultrasound simulations of tendon deformation were performed using an acoustic modeling program. The effects of different tendon geometries (cylinder and curved cylinder) on the performance of UEI were investigated. Modeling results indicated that UEI accurately estimated the strain in the cylinder geometry, but underestimated in the curved cylinder. The simulation also predicted that the out-of-the-plane motion of the PTT would cause a non-uniform strain pattern within incompressible homogeneous isotropic material. However, to average within a small region of interest determined by principal component analysis (PCA

  18. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries. PMID:22574840

  19. Multiple Looping Technique for Tibial Fixation in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Song, Sang Jun; Roh, Young Hak; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may be negatively affected by insufficient tibial tunnel fixation due to relatively lower bone density of the proximal tibia. We introduce a new technique of tibial fixation for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using free tendon Achilles allograft that is less affected by the bone density of the tibial metaphysis. PMID:25973367

  20. Mid-term results of tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Yong, C K; Choon, David S K

    2005-07-01

    We studied the factors influencing the mid-term outcomes of tibial plateau fractures treated conservatively (n=21) and surgically (n=27) from December 1994 to December 1997. Joint stability was an important prognostic determinant. In the surgical group, the most important factor was good anatomical reduction. Functional outcomes were comparable between the conservative and surgical groups. We concluded that conservative treatment is a valid option for fractures with minimal displacement and surgical treatment is justified for severely displaced or depressed fractures. Attention must be paid to the recognition and restoration of joint stability and articular surface congruency for a satisfactory outcome.

  1. Fracture of the os tibiale externum in a decathlete.

    PubMed

    Lepore, L; Francobandiera, C; Maffulli, N

    1990-01-01

    The upsurge in popularity in sports activities has produced a large number of lower extremity injuries. This article describes acute fracture of the os tibiale externum in a 28-year-old decathlete. The injury was treated conservatively, and excellent functional recovery was obtained. This is the second case of traumatic fracture of this accessory bone of the foot described in the English literature. When dealing with the feet of an athlete, supernumerary bones must be taken into consideration as a possible cause of serious discomfort. PMID:1977791

  2. Tibial-talar dislocation without fracture: treatment principles and outcome.

    PubMed

    Finkemeier, C; Engebretsen, L; Gannon, J

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of tibial-talar dislocations without fracture is unknown and has been sparsely reported in the literature. The diagnosis of the injury is straightforward with the appropriate examination and roentgenograms. Good to excellent results can be achieved with open or closed dislocations treated by closed reduction and immobilization for 4-6 weeks. Although open dislocations require irrigation, debridement, and possibly delayed closure, controversy exists with regard to acute ligament repair. Because good to excellent results are possible without acute ligament repair, and delayed repair on reconstruction can be accomplished with good outcomes, we recommend treating these injuries without ligament repair.

  3. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Cervical Spinal Intramedullary Metastasis and Multiple Brain Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kawamura, Toshiki; Ohshima, Yukihiko; Takeuchi, Arisa; Mori, Toshie; Ishiguchi, Tuneo

    2016-01-01

    A case of cervical (C) spinal intramedullary metastasis and multiple small brain metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma was presented. Spinal metastasis caused posterior neck and left shoulder pain, dysesthesia in both legs, and motor weakness in both legs and left arm, though the brain metastases were asymptomatic. Both the spinal and brain metastases were successfully treated by frameless stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT)/stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The patient's symptoms were almost entirely relieved within two months. A 76-year-old woman was diagnosed as having a thyroid tumor and lung metastasis by roentgenography and computed tomography. Biopsy of the thyroid tumor extending into the mediastinum revealed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She underwent surgical resection of thyroid with dissection of the mediastinum lymph node area. Internal oral radioisotope therapy was not effective for the multiple small lung metastases. She did well for 15 months, but later developed posterior neck and left shoulder pain and dysesthesia in the right leg and then dysesthesia and motor weakness in both legs. Then she experienced weakness in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed a small cervical spinal intramedullary mass lesion at the level of C6 and C7 on the left side as well as nine small brain lesions. The cervical spinal intramedullary metastatic tumor was treated by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) SRT and the nine small brain metastatic tumors were treated by dynamic conformal arc (DCA) SRS uneventfully. A total dose of 39 Gy (100% dose) was delivered in 13 fractions for the spinal lesion (prescription, D95=95% dose; maximum dose=46.3 Gy). Single fraction SRS of 22 Gy (prescription, D95=100% dose) was performed for each of the nine small brain tumors. The spinal tumor was decreased in size on follow-up MRI two months after SRT. Three of the nine brain lesions had disappeared and six were decreased in size on

  4. A case of long-term survival after multimodal local treatments of intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Minomo, Shojiro; Tokoro, Akihiro; Utsumi, Tomoki; Ishihara, Masahiro; Akira, Masanori; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer is rare, and it has a short prognosis. We report a 53-year-old man diagnosed with cT4N0M0, stage IIIA squamous cell lung cancer. Ten months after left pneumonectomy (pT4N0M0), an intramedullary spinal cord tumor developed at the axis level. The intramedullary spinal cord tumor was resected, and he was diagnosed with metastatic squamous cell lung cancer. Radiotherapies and another tumor resection were conducted, as he had a good performance status and the discrete lesion was associated with the risk of brain stem compression. Multimodal local treatments for intramedullary spinal cord metastasis caused the tumor to shrink, and he lived for 25 months after the spinal metastasis occurred. PMID:27621899

  5. A case of long-term survival after multimodal local treatments of intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tokoro, Akihiro; Utsumi, Tomoki; Ishihara, Masahiro; Akira, Masanori; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer is rare, and it has a short prognosis. We report a 53-year-old man diagnosed with cT4N0M0, stage IIIA squamous cell lung cancer. Ten months after left pneumonectomy (pT4N0M0), an intramedullary spinal cord tumor developed at the axis level. The intramedullary spinal cord tumor was resected, and he was diagnosed with metastatic squamous cell lung cancer. Radiotherapies and another tumor resection were conducted, as he had a good performance status and the discrete lesion was associated with the risk of brain stem compression. Multimodal local treatments for intramedullary spinal cord metastasis caused the tumor to shrink, and he lived for 25 months after the spinal metastasis occurred. PMID:27621899

  6. Combined Tibial Tubercle Avulsion Fracture and Patellar Avulsion Fracture: An Unusual Variant in an Adolescent Patient.

    PubMed

    Stepanovich, Matthew T; Slakey, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic extensor dysfunction of the knee in children is a rare injury, with the majority resulting from tibial tubercle avulsion fracture or patellar sleeve fracture. We report a rare case of combined patellar avulsion fracture and tibial tubercle fracture. With open anatomic reduction, both injuries were successfully treated. While many variations of tibial tubercle fracture have been reported, the authors believe this to be the first report in the English-language literature of this particular combined injury to the knee extensor mechanism in an adolescent. Advanced imaging with computed tomography provided vital information to aid with operative planning, especially since the majority of the unossified tubercle was not seen on plain radiographs, and all fracture fragments were originally believed to be from the tibial tubercle. Computed tomography distinguished the patellar fracture from the tibial tubercle fragments, verifying preoperatively the complexity of the injury. PMID:26761925

  7. Unintended Rotational Changes of the Distal Tibia After Biplane Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki-Mo; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jeong Lae; Han, Seung-Beom

    2016-01-01

    This study involved 35 knees undergoing biplane medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) to assess the axial rotation of the distal tibia. The distal tibiae were internally rotated by 3.0° ± 7.1° after OWHTO. The opening width showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.743 (P < .001), and the tuberosity osteotomy angle showed that of -0.678 (P < .001) with distal tibial rotation. However, changes in hip-knee-ankle angle, medial proximal tibial angle, and posterior tibial slope were not significantly correlated with the change in distal tibial rotation. In conclusion, there was an unintended tendency of increasing internal rotation of the distal tibia after biplane medial OWHTO, and this tendency was positively related to the opening width and tuberosity osteotomy angle.

  8. Comparison of cementing techniques of the tibial component in total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming Guo; Wood, David; Nivbrant, Bo

    2008-01-01

    A few studies have shown that cementing the stem enhances fixation of the tibial baseplate in total knee replacement (TKR). Even the horizontal technique has been shown to provide good fixation. We used radiostereometry to study migration of the tibial component in 30 knees operated with Profix TKR. The knees were randomised for either complete (both under the baseplate and around the stem) or horizontal (only under the baseplate) cementing of the tibial component. At two years the tibial baseplate rotated externally a median of 0.18° in the uncemented stem group and internally a median of 0.23° in the cemented stem group. The tibial baseplate subsided 0.14 mm in the cemented stem group, and no translation was seen in the uncemented stem group. The differences in migration were small and probably without clinical significance. The findings do not favour either of the cementing techniques in TKR. PMID:18704414

  9. Comparison of cementing techniques of the tibial component in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Saari, Tuuli; Li, Ming Guo; Wood, David; Nivbrant, Bo

    2009-10-01

    A few studies have shown that cementing the stem enhances fixation of the tibial baseplate in total knee replacement (TKR). Even the horizontal technique has been shown to provide good fixation. We used radiostereometry to study migration of the tibial component in 30 knees operated with Profix TKR. The knees were randomised for either complete (both under the baseplate and around the stem) or horizontal (only under the baseplate) cementing of the tibial component. At two years the tibial baseplate rotated externally a median of 0.18 degrees in the uncemented stem group and internally a median of 0.23 degrees in the cemented stem group. The tibial baseplate subsided 0.14 mm in the cemented stem group, and no translation was seen in the uncemented stem group. The differences in migration were small and probably without clinical significance. The findings do not favour either of the cementing techniques in TKR. PMID:18704414

  10. Anatomical study of the human anterior cruciate ligament stump's tibial insertion footprint.

    PubMed

    Tállay, András; Lim, Mui-Hong; Bartlett, John

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study is to define the topographical relationship of the anatomical bundles of the human anterior cruciate ligament's (ACL) stump over the tibial insertion site. Between January and April 2007, a total of 36 resected tibial plateaus were retrieved from patients who underwent total knee replacements. These samples had intact cruciate ligaments with no major osteophyte around the ACL tibial insertion footprint. The anatomical bundles of the ACL were identified and mapped, based on the topographical relationship over the tibial insertion footprint. Measurements of the dimensions of the ACL tibial footprint and tibial plateau were performed. The mean width and midsagittal depth of the tibia plateau was 78.7 +/- 6.5 and 46.4 +/- 5.0 mm, respectively. The mean width and midsagittal depth of the ACL tibial footprint was 10.3 +/- 1.9 and 19.5 +/- 2.6 mm, respectively. Out of the 36 freshly dissected ACL stumps, it was not possible to distinguish separate bundles in 14 (38.9%) cases. The average distance between the centers of the two bundles was 9.3 +/- 1.8 mm. The mean AP alignment of the tibial footprint was 89.6 degrees +/- 26.4 degrees , with a very wide range of 23 degrees -158 degrees . Of the 22 specimens with separate anatomical bundles, the alignment of the tibial footprint was AM-PL in six (27.3%), sagittal (85 degrees -95 degrees ) in five (22.7), AL-PM in nine (40.9%), and lateral-medial (L-M) in two (9.1%) cases. This study provides new information about the topographical anatomy of the ACL tibial insertion footprint. Based on gross anatomy, separate anatomical bundles of the ACL can be distinguished in 61.1% [22] of the specimens. The topographical alignment of the separate bundles is varied on a very wide range.

  11. Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis as a first manifestation of a renal cell carcinoma: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schijns, O E; Kurt, E; Wessels, P; Luijckx, G J; Beuls, E A

    2000-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 70-year-old woman who developed a Brown-Sequard-syndrome within 6 weeks caused by an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of an occult renal cell carcinoma. Intramedullary metastases are rare and represent only 4-8.5% of central nervous system metastases. An important feature of intramedullary metastases is the rapid progression of neurological deficits which necessitates rapid treatment. There are only eight earlier reports of intramedullary metastasis due to renal cell carcinoma (Schiff D, O'Neill BP. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases: clinical features and treatment outcome. Neurology 1996;47:906-12; Belz P. Ein Fall von intramedullaerer Grawitz-Metastase im Lumbalmark. Frankfurt Z Pathol 1912;10:431-44; Gaylor JB, Howie JW. Brown-Sequard-syndrome. A case of unusual aetiology. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1938;1:301-5; Kawakami Y, Mair WGP. Haematomyelia due to secondary renal carcinoma. Acta Neuro Pathol 1973;26:85-92; Strang RR. Metastatic tumor of the cervical spinal cord. Med J Aust 1962;1:205-6; Von Pfungen. Uber einige Fälle von Haematomyelie nichttraumatischen Ursprungs. Wien Klin Rdsch 1906;20:44-50; Weitzner S. Coexistent intramedullary metastasis and syringomyelia of cervical spinal cord. Report of a case. Neurology 1960;674-8). To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on a patient in whom symptoms from the metastasis of a renal cell carcinoma preceded the detection of the primary tumor. This report presents the clinical, neuroradiological and histopathological findings of an intramedullary metastasis of a renal cell carcinoma and provides an overview of the literature on intramedullary spinal cord metastases.

  12. 75% success rate after open debridement, exchange of tibial insert, and antibiotics in knee prosthetic joint infections

    PubMed Central

    Thórhallsdóttir, Valdís Gudrún; Robertsson, Otto; W-Dahl, Annette; Stefánsdóttir, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a leading cause of early revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Open debridement with exchange of tibial insert allows treatment of infection with retention of fixed components. We investigated the success rate of this procedure in the treatment of knee PJIs in a nationwide material, and determined whether the results were affected by microbiology, antibiotic treatment, or timing of debridement. Patients and methods 145 primary TKAs revised for the first time, due to infection, with debridement and exchange of the tibial insert were identified in the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (37%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (23%). Failure was defined as death before the end of antibiotic treatment, revision of major components due to infection, life-long antibiotic treatment, or chronic infection. Results The overall healing rate was 75%. The type of infecting pathogen did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Staphylococcal infections treated without a combination of antibiotics including rifampin had a higher failure rate than those treated with rifampin (RR = 4, 95% CI: 2–10). In the 16 cases with more than 3 weeks of symptoms before treatment, the healing rate was 62%, as compared to 77% in the other cases (p = 0.2). The few patients with a revision model of prosthesis at primary operation had a high failure rate (5 of 8). Interpretation Good results can be achieved by open debridement with exchange of tibial insert. It is important to use an antibiotic combination including rifampin in staphylococcal infections. PMID:25753311

  13. Quantification of the role of tibial posterior slope in knee joint mechanics and ACL force in simulated gait.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hashemi, J

    2015-07-16

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee joint injury with higher prevalence in female athletes. In search of contributing mechanisms, clinical imaging studies of ACL-injured individuals versus controls have found greater medial-lateral posterior tibial slope (PTS) in injured population irrespective of the sex and in females compared to males, with stronger evidence on the lateral plateau slope. To quantify these effects, we use a lower extremity musculoskeletal model including a detailed finite element (FE) model of the knee joint to compute the role of changes in medial and/or lateral PTS by ±5° and ±10° on knee joint biomechanics, in general, and ACL force, in particular, throughout the stance phase of gait. The model is driven by reported kinematics/kinetics of gait in asymptomatic subjects. Our predictions showed, at all stance periods, a substantial increase in the anterior tibial translation (ATT) and ACL force as PTS increased with reverse trends as PTS decreased. At mid-stance, for example, ACL force increased from 181 N to 317 N and 460 N as PTS increased by 5° and 10°, respectively, while dropped to 102 N and 0 N as PTS changed by -5° and -10°, respectively. These effects are caused primarily by change in PTS at the tibial plateau that carries a larger portion of joint contact force. Steeper PTS is a major risk factor, especially under activities with large compression, in markedly increasing ACL force and its vulnerability to injury. Rehabilitation and ACL injury prevention programs could benefit from these findings.

  14. Closed Intramedullary Derotational Osteotomy and Hip Arthroscopy for Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement From Femoral Retroversion

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Martin, Hal D.

    2014-01-01

    Femoral retroversion is an uncommon cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may require surgical treatment beyond arthroscopic or open femoroplasty. We present the case of a young adult with bilateral severe femoral retroversion in whom such treatment failed. We discuss the rationale, surgical technique, and outcome of this patient, who underwent bilateral closed intramedullary derotational proximal femoral osteotomies and interlocked nailing with adjunctive pre- and post-osteotomy hip arthroscopies. Clinical improvement with normal foot progression angles, radiographic union, and resolution of bilateral cam femoroacetabular impingement from femoral retroversion was achieved. This surgery permits rapid institution of weight-bearing ambulation and an early rehabilitative program. Femoral retroversion may be an underappreciated and insufficiently treated cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may be readily detected and successfully remedied with this less invasive procedure. PMID:24749047

  15. Unlocked and locked elastic stable intramedullary nailing in an ovine tibia fracture model: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Berger, Leopold; Fischerauer, Stefan; Weiß, Barbara; Celarek, Anna; Castellani, Christoph; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina; Tschegg, Elmar

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, four different systems of elastic stable intramedullary nails (unlocked, Ender stainless steel nails locked with 3-mm screws, titanium nails locked with end caps, titanium nails locked with plugs and 3-mm screws) were implanted in cadaveric ovine tibiae. Fractures were simulated by a transverse diaphyseal osteotomy. The specimens were subjected to simultaneous axial and torsional fatigue loading of 5000 and 1000 cycles, respectively. The unlocked systems failed at an axial load of 200 N peak amplitude. End caps systems withstood axial loads up to 800 N for 1000 cycles, and ender nails and plugs lasted up to 1000 N for 1000 cycles. All systems showed a decrease of axial stiffness with higher loads and endured cycles. Ender nails and nails locked with plugs failed by penetration of the distal epiphysis rather than by loosening of the interlocking system. Overall, the titanium nails locked with plugs and 3-mm screws exhibited superior test results.

  16. Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumors: Part I-Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Samartzis, Dino; Gillis, Christopher C; Shih, Patrick; O'Toole, John E; Fessler, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Broad narrative review. Objectives Intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCT) are rare neoplasms that can potentially lead to severe neurologic deterioration, decreased function, poor quality of life, or death. As such, a better understanding of these lesions is needed. The following article, part one of a two-part series, addresses IMSCT with regards to their epidemiology, histology, pathophysiology, imaging characteristics, and clinical manifestations. Methods The authors performed an extensive review of the peer-reviewed literature addressing the aforementioned objectives. Results Numerous IMSCT exist with varying epidemiology. Each IMSCT has its own hallmark characteristics and may vary with regards to how aggressively they invade the spinal cord. These lesions are often difficult to detect and are often misdiagnosed. Furthermore, radiographically and clinically, these lesions may be difficult to distinguish from one another. Conclusions Awareness and understanding of IMSCT is imperative to facilitate an early diagnosis and plan management. PMID:26430598

  17. Intramedullary spinal cord tumors: a review of current and future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Matthew K; Geraghty, Joseph R; Engelhard, Herbert H; Linninger, Andreas A; Mehta, Ankit I

    2015-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord tumors have low incidence rates but are associated with difficult treatment options. The majority of patients with these tumors can be initially treated with an attempted resection. Unfortunately, those patients who cannot undergo gross-total resection or have subtotal resection are left with few treatment options, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These adjuvant treatments, however, are associated with the potential for significant adverse side effects and still leave patients with a poor prognosis. To successfully manage these patients and improve both their quality of life and prognosis, novel treatment options must be developed to supplement subtotal resection. New research is underway investigating alternative therapeutic approaches for these patients, including directed, localized drug delivery and nanomedicine techniques. These and other future investigations will hopefully lead to promising new therapies for these devastating diseases. PMID:26235012

  18. Spinal cord compression due to primary intramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord presenting as paraplegia: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Das, Deepak; Das, Srikanta; Mohanta, Itibrata; Tripathy, Soubhagya Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord compression can be due to various causes but spinal intramedullary tuberculoma is a rare cause. We report a case that had an intramedullary spinal cord tuberculomas in which the diagnosis was made histologically, without evidence of symptoms of systemic tuberculosis. This lesion, located in the thoracic region, mimicked as an intramedullary tumor radiologically. Case Description: The patient was a 25-year-old male who presented with a history of progressive paraparesis. Initial diagnosis was made as an intramedullary tumor by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The treatment of the patient involved is complete surgical excision of intramedullary lesion followed by appropriate antituberculous therapy. Postoperatively, his neurological symptoms were dramatically improved. With combination of both surgical and medical treatments, excellent clinical outcome was obtained. Conclusion: This case illustrates the risk of misdiagnosis and the importance of histological confirmation of a pathological lesion as spinal cord tuberculoma prior to surgical therapy, which should be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis of the intramedullary spinal cord tumors. PMID:25883834

  19. Bending strength and holding power of tibial locking screws.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Lin, S J; Chiang, H; Hou, S M

    2001-04-01

    The bending strength and holding power of two types of specially designed tibial locking devices, a both-ends-threaded screw and an unthreaded bolt, were studied and compared with four types of commercially available tibial interlocking screws: Synthes, Howmedica, Richards, and Osteo AG. To test bending strength, the devices were inserted into a high molecular weight polyethylene tube and loaded at their midpoint by a materials testing machine to simulate a three point bending test. Single loading yielding strength and cyclic loading fatigue life were measured. To test holding power, the devices were inserted into tubes made of polyurethane foam, and their tips were loaded axially to measure pushout strength. The devices were tested with two different densities of foam materials and two different sizes of pilot holes. Insertion torque and stripping torque of the screws were measured first. Pushout tests were performed with each screw inserted with a tightness equal to 60% of its stripping torque. Test results showed that the yielding strength and the fatigue life were related closely to the inner diameter of the screws. The stripping torque predicted the pushout strength more reliably than did the insertion torque. All tested devices showed greater holding power in the foam with the higher density and with the smaller pilot holes. The both-ends-threaded screw had the highest pushout strength and a satisfactory fatigue strength. The unthreaded bolt had the highest fatigue strength but only fair holding power. Clinical studies of the use of these two types of locking devices are worthwhile.

  20. Surgical Technique of Anterolateral Approach for Tibial Plateau Fracture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-cheng; Ren, Dong; Zhou, Bing

    2015-11-01

    A 66-year-old woman had sustained crush injury 3 hours prior to her presentation to our hospital. The diagnosis was defined as lateral tibial plateau fracture of the right knee (Schatzker III). Supine position was set up and a pad was put under the affected hip. After sterilization of the surgical field the sterilized sheets were placed beneath the leg in order to be higher than the other side. A rolled sheet was put under the knee joint so that the knee joint was flexed around 30° to 40°. After the surgical field was draped the skin was incised. Iliotibial band was incised by blade (not by electrotomy) and sharp dissection was performed in the Gerdy's tubercle. Capsulotomy was made by cutting the tibial meniscal ligament. Then the meniscus was tagged superiorly and the articular surface was clearly visualized. A window was made in the lateral cortex beneath the plateau, so the impacted fragment was elevated through the window. The metaphyseal void was filled by bone allograft. The placement of the raft-screw plate must be ensured that the raft screws passing the plate could purchase the subchondral bone. After perfect placement of the plate was defined, the femoral distractor was removed and the knee joint was relaxed. It was ensured that the alignment of the lower leg was normal, and then the other screws were inserted. Following placing drainage in the wound the iliotibial band was closed and the subcutaneous soft tissue and skin were closed in layer. PMID:26791810

  1. Induction of tibial dyschondroplasia in turkeys by tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram).

    PubMed

    Simsa, S; Hasdai, A; Dan, H; Ornan, E M

    2007-08-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a prevalent skeletal abnormality associated with rapid growth rate in many avian species; it causes enormous economic losses and is an animal welfare problem. Tibial dyschondroplasia is characterized by the presence of a nonvascularized, nonmineralized lesion that extends from the epiphyseal growth plate into the metaphysis of the proximal tibiotarsal bones. The mechanisms underlying TD development are not known, although they have been extensively studied in broilers using different induction models. However, an effective model for TD induction in turkeys has never been described. The objective of this study was to establish such a model by using tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram), an agent that is frequently used in broilers to induce TD. We found that dramatically longer exposures to much higher concentrations of thiram were required to induce TD in turkeys vs. broilers. In contrast to broilers, in which 50 mg/kg of thiram induces a high incidence of severe TD within 10 d, in turkeys, an exposure to 400 mg/kg of thiram for 11 wk was necessary for the development of severe TD lesions. These results show different mechanisms for TD induction in these 2 closely related species, suggesting differences in TD etiology between them.

  2. Results of high tibial osteotomy: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, Annunziato

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate long-term follow-up and survival analysis studies regarding high tibial osteotomies (HTO) for the treatment of medial knee arthritis. Despite the good number of studies available, comparison and pooling of the results are challenging because of the different evaluation systems and techniques used. However, in general, published studies on HTO report good long-term results with a correct patient selection and a precise surgical technique. Based on our findings, the ideal candidate for an HTO is a young patient (<60 years of age), with isolated medial osteoarthritis, with good range of motion and without ligamentous instability. Furthermore, the literature review shows that the outcomes gradually deteriorate with time. Nevertheless, some issues remain that need resolution; these include the choice between opening or closing wedge tibial osteotomy, the graft selection in opening wedge osteotomies, the type of fixation, the comparison with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and whether HTO significantly affects a subsequent total joint replacement. PMID:19838706

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE REPRODUCIBILITY OF TIBIAL PLATEAU FRACTURES’ CLASSIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Giordano, Vincenzo; Pallottino, Alexandre; Sassine, Tannous; Canedo, Rodrigo; Pina, Juliana; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the inter-observer agreement of three tibial plateau fracture classifications: Schatzker, AO Group, and Hohl. Methods: Nine physicians of different levels of expertise (six Orthopaedic Residents – OR – and three Orthopaedic Attendings – OA) classified 50 tibial plateau fractures. Results: There was a low to moderate agreement between OR and OA on the three classification systems. A straight correlation was found between the year of Residence and an increase on the level of agreement on the AO group and Hohl classifications. This was partially seen on the Schatzker classification. Kappa ranged from 0.344 to 0.577, 0.36 to 0.499, and 0.278 to 0.465 for the Hohl, AO group, and Schatzker systems, respectively. Conclusion: With a level of 0.1, there was a significant agreement on the three classifications among the physicians. When comparing ORs to OAs, the three studied classifications show low to moderate consistency, with the Hohl classification showing the highest level of agreement between OR. PMID:27004176

  4. Perioperative complications of a modular stem fixed-bearing total ankle replacement with intramedullary guidance.

    PubMed

    Bleazey, Scott T; Brigido, Stephen A; Protzman, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Despite improved total ankle replacement outcomes, investigators have demonstrated that the incidence of complications after total ankle replacement is a function of the surgeon's experience with the technique. We hypothesized that the use of an intramedullary guide during a modular stem fixed-bearing total ankle replacement would decrease the incidence of perioperative complications and produce a similar incidence of complications across time. Because all patients were mobilized early, we also evaluated the influence of early mobilization on wound development. The medical records were reviewed to identify complications, and the radiographs were evaluated to determine the component alignment of the initial 58 consecutive ankles. Major wound complications were defined as complications requiring soft tissue coverage by a plastic surgeon. Minor wound complications were defined as those that could be treated without a return to the operating room. The procedures were separated into 2 groups: the initial 29 procedures (group A) and latter 29 procedures (group B). Eight ankles (14%) had wound complications. The incidence of complications was similar across time [r(s) (56) = -0.06, p = .64]. The incidence of complications and component misalignment was similar for groups A and B (p ≥ .19). All wounds were diagnosed within 15 days of surgery. None of the ankles developed wounds after physical therapy began. These results have demonstrated that the modular stem fixed-bearing total ankle replacement with intramedullary guidance can produce a similar incidence of complications over time, regardless of surgeon experience. Additionally, early mobilization did not appear to influence the incidence of wound complications and should be advocated, when appropriate.

  5. Closed antegrade intramedullary pinning for reduction and fixation of metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyong-Nyun; Park, Yoo-Jung; Kim, Gab-Lae; Park, Yong-Wook

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the results of the metatarsal fractures treated with a closed antegrade intramedullary pinning technique. The records of 35 consecutive patients with metatarsal fractures operated on from August 2005 to June 2010 by the authors were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients were not contactable and 1 patient refused to participate. Accordingly, the study cohort was composed of 30 patients (24 male, 6 female) with 46 metatarsal head, neck, or shaft fractures. Inclusion criteria were metatarsal head, neck, or shaft fractures with a displacement of more than 3 to 4 mm or an angulation of more than 10° in the sagittal plane. Fractures combined with Lisfranc injury or metatarsal base fractures were excluded, as were bicortical comminuted fractures or long oblique fractures. Times to bone union, limitations of motion at affected metatarsophalangeal joints, and residual pain were evaluated at 6 weeks after surgery and at final follow-up. American Orthropedic Foot and Ankle Society scale was evaluated at final follow-up. Fracture union was obtained at an average of 7.1 (range 6 to 10) weeks. Two patients had moderate limitation of metatarsophalangeal joint at 6 weeks but recovered to full range at final follow-up. Average American Orthropedic Foot and Ankle Society score at final follow-up was 96.7 (range 83 to 100) points. Closed antegrade intramedullary pinning was found to be a useful method for treating displaced metatarsal fractures and to allow immediate joint motion and partial weightbearing in a stiff-soled shoe.

  6. Ultrasound Guidance in Performing a Tendoscopic Surgery to Treat Posterior Tibial Tendinitis: A Useful Tool?

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Fukuda, Aki; Kato, Ko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old man with a pronation-external rotation type of fracture was surgically treated using a fibular plate. Five years later, he underwent resection of bone hyperplasia because of the ankle pain and limitation of range of motion. Thereafter, the left ankle became intermittently painful, which persisted for about one year. He presented at the age of 43 with persistent ankle pain. Physical and image analysis findings indicated a diagnosis of posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis, which we surgically treated using tendoscopy. Endoscopic findings showed tenosynovitis and fibrillation on the tendon surface. We cleaned and removed the synovium surrounding the tendon and deepened the posterior tibial tendon groove to allow sufficient space for the posterior tibial tendon. Full weight-bearing ambulation was permitted one day after surgery and he returned to his occupation in the construction industry six weeks after surgery. The medial aspect of the ankle was free of pain and symptoms at a review two years after surgery. Although tendoscopic surgery for stage 1 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction has been reported, tendoscopic surgery to treat posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis has not. Our experience with this patient showed that tendoscopic surgery is useful not only for stage 1 posterior tibial dysfunction, but also for posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis. PMID:27478666

  7. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene tibial components in primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The choice of either all-polyethylene (AP) tibial components or metal-backed (MB) tibial components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized controlled trials that have evaluated MB and AP tibial components in primary TKA. Methods The search strategy included a computerized literature search (Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and a manual search of major orthopedic journals. A meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized or quasi-randomized trials that compared the performance of tibial components in primary TKA was performed using a fixed or random effects model. We assessed the methodological quality of studies using Detsky quality scale. Results 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 2000 and 2009 met the inclusion quality standards for the systematic review. The mean standardized Detsky score was 14 (SD 3). We found that the frequency of radiolucent lines in the MB group was significantly higher than that in the AP group. There were no statistically significant differences between the MB and AP tibial components regarding component positioning, knee score, knee range of motion, quality of life, and postoperative complications. Interpretation Based on evidence obtained from this study, the AP tibial component was comparable with or better than the MB tibial component in TKA. However, high-quality RCTs are required to validate the results. PMID:21895503

  8. Tibial translation and muscle activation during rehabilitation exercises 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tagesson, S; Oberg, B; Kvist, J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different rehabilitation exercises with respect to dynamic anterior tibial translation and muscle activation 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Another aim was to compare the ACL-reconstructed knee with the ACL-injured and the uninjured knees for differences in anterior tibial translation and muscle activation during the exercises. Sagittal tibial translation and muscle activation were measured during the Lachman test (static translation) and during seven rehabilitation exercises (dynamic translation) in 19 patients. Results obtained 5 weeks after ACL reconstruction were compared with those obtained before the ACL reconstruction (ACL-deficient and uninjured knee). After ACL reconstruction the seated knee extension produced more anterior tibial translation than the straight leg raise and standing on one leg. The ACL reconstruction reduced the static and the dynamic tibial translation and the tibial translations measured in ACL-reconstructed knees were similar to those measured in uninjured knees. After ACL reconstruction, the patients used a joint stiffening strategy that used more hamstring activation and reduced the dynamic tibial translation. Although all exercises tested are suitable for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, to protect the graft from excessive strain, the straight leg raise and squat on one leg are preferable for quadriceps training in the early phase of rehabilitation.

  9. Direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact.

    PubMed

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2010-01-19

    Anterior tibial loading is a major factor involved in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanism during ski impact landing. We sought to investigate the direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact of intact knee joints without quadriceps activation. Twelve porcine knee specimens were procured. Four specimens were used as non-impact control while the remaining eight were mounted onto a material-testing system at 70 degrees flexion and subjected to simulated landing impact, which was successively repeated with incremental actuator displacement. Four specimens from the impacted group underwent pre-impact MRI for tibial plateau angle measurements while the other four were subjected to histology and microCT for cartilage morphology and volume assessment. The tibial plateau angles ranged from 29.4 to 38.8 degrees . There was a moderate linear relationship (Y=0.16X; R(2)=0.64; p<0.001) between peak axial impact compressive load (Y) and peak anterior tibial load (X). The anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group sustained surface cartilage fraying, superficial clefts and tidemark disruption, compared to the control group. MicroCT scans displayed visible cartilage deformation for both anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group. Due to the tibial plateau angle, increased axial impact compressive load can directly elevate anterior tibial load and hence contribute to ACL failure during simulated landing impact. Axial impact compressive load resulted in shear cartilage damage along anterior-posterior tibial plateau regions, due to its contribution to anterior tibial loading. This mechanism plays an important role in elevating ACL stress and cartilage deformation during impact landing.

  10. Pial and arachnoid welding for restoration of normal cord anatomy after excision of intramedullary spinal cord tumors.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ari George; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Chacko, Geeta; Babu, Krothapalli Srinivasa

    2007-08-01

    A significant postoperative problem in patients undergoing excision of intramedullary tumors is painful dysesthesiae, attributed to various causes, including edema, arachnoid scarring and cord tethering. The authors describe a technique of welding the pia and arachnoid after the excision of intramedullary spinal cord tumors used in seven cases. Using a fine bipolar forcep and a low current, the pial edges of the myelotomy were brought together and welded under saline irrigation. A similar method was used for closing the arachnoid while the dura was closed with a running 5-0 vicryl suture. Closing the pia and arachnoid restores normal cord anatomy after tumor excision and may reduce the incidence of postoperative painful dysesthesiae.

  11. Treatment of tibial eminence fractures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Tarabichi, Majd; Harris, David; Wright, Rick

    2015-06-01

    Fractures of the tibial eminence are rare, accounting for less than 1% of the injuries involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Most agree that nondisplaced fractures can be managed nonoperatively, but debate exists over the ideal treatment of displaced fractures. This systematic review evaluates the outcome of nonoperatively and operatively managed displaced tibial eminence fractures. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were queried. Inclusion criteria included reported outcomes of displaced tibial eminence fractures, minimum 2-year follow-up, and English language. Outcomes reported were pooled and included the following: clinical instability (Lachman/anterior drawer, pivot shift, and KT 1000), patient-reported pain and/or instability, return to sport, Lysholm, Tegner, and the need for ACL reconstruction. Comparison was made in the outcomes of nonoperatively and operatively treated fractures and between suture and screw fixation techniques. Overall 16 studies met the inclusion criteria. The pooled mean age was 23 years and mean follow-up was 35 months. Clinical instability was seen in 70% of nonoperatively treated patients and 14% of operatively treated patients (p < 0.0001). Patient-reported instability was higher in nonoperatively treated patients (54 vs. 1.2%, p < 0.0001), as was the rate of ACL reconstruction (10 vs. 1.0%, p = 0.036). In comparing suture fixation to screw fixation, patient-reported instability and the rate of ACL reconstruction were equivalent. Patients treated with screw fixation had a higher incidence of clinically measured instability (Lachman and KT arthrometer) and an increased rate of hardware removal (3.9 vs. 64.9%, p < 0.05). Surgically managed patients report less instability, are higher functioning, and require fewer ACL reconstructions when compared with nonoperatively treated patients. Suture fixation was associated with improvements in clinical measures of stability and decreased need for hardware

  12. Clinical Outcomes of High Tibial Osteotomy for Knee Instability

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Chase S.; Liechti, Daniel J.; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years there has been an increasing interest in high tibial osteotomy (HTO) to treat patients with chronic knee instability due to posterolateral corner (PLC), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiencies with concurrent malalignment in the coronal and/or sagittal plane. Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the use of HTO for the treatment of knee ligament instability with concurrent malalignment. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted for the treatment of combined knee ligament instability and malalignment with HTO using the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and MEDLINE (1980 to present); the queries were performed in July 2015. Terms searched included the following: high or proximal tibial osteotomy, unstable, instability, laxity, subluxation, tibial slope, and malalignment, in the knee joint. Inclusion criteria were as follows: HTO to treat instability of the knee joint in the sagittal and/or coronal plane, minimum 2-year follow-up with reported outcomes measures, English language, and human studies. Animal, basic science, and cadaveric studies were excluded as well as editorials, reviews, expert opinions, surveys, special topics, letters to the editor, and correspondence. Results: The search resulted in 460 studies. After applying exclusion criteria and removing duplicates, 13 studies were considered. Of the studies reviewed, knee ligament pathologies, previous surgeries, and measurement of knee stability were heterogeneous. However, all studies reported an improvement in knee stability after HTO. Most studies reported improvement in outcome scores. However, other studies did not provide preoperative scores for comparison. Reported complication rates ranged from 0% to 47%. Conclusion: Although HTO has been highly advocated and used in treating patients with ligamentous knee instability, there

  13. Medial tibial pain. A prospective study of its cause among military recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Giladi, M; Stein, M; Kashtan, H; Margulies, J; Chisin, R; Steinberg, R; Swissa, A; Aharonson, Z

    1986-12-01

    In a prospective study of 295 infantry recruits during 14 weeks of basic training, 41% had medial tibial pain. Routine scintigraphic evaluation in cases of medial tibial bone pain showed that 63% had abnormalities. A stress fracture was found in 46%. Only two patients had periostitis. None had ischemic medial compartment syndrome. Physical examination could not differentiate between cases with medial tibial bone pain secondary to stress fractures and those with scintigraphically normal tibias. When both pain and swelling were localized in the middle one-third of the tibia, the lesion most likely proved to be a stress fracture.

  14. Simultaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tibial tubercle in adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tulic, Goran; Sopta, Jelena; Bumbasirevic, Marko; Todorovic, Aleksandar; Vucetic, Cedomir

    2010-01-01

    Acute avulsion of the tibial tubercle is an uncommon injury, accounting for less than 1% of all physeal injuries. Simultaneous bilateral avulsion fractures of the tibial tubercle are extremely rare. Only 10 cases have been reported in the literature to date. We report a case of a 15-year-old boy who suffered from the bilateral avulsion fractures of the tibial tubercle during basketball in take-off phase of the high jump. He went through surgery and 4 years after index procedures he has no deformities, the knee is painless and he participates in sport activities on daily basis.

  15. Shaft Fractures of Both Forearm Bones: The Outcomes of Surgical Treatment with Plating Only and Combined Plating and Intramedullary Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Yi, Jin Woong; Lee, Jung Bum; Lim, Byoung Gu

    2015-01-01

    Background Plate fixation is the most commonly used technique for the treatment of shaft fractures of both forearm bones (SFBFBs). However, all fractures are difficult to treat with plate fixation because of soft tissue injuries, fracture patterns, or the patient's condition. The purpose of this study is to compare the functional results of plate fixation only and combined plate and intramedullary (IM) nail fixation in SFBFBs. Methods Fifty-nine cases of SFBFBs that were surgically treated from June 2007 to July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. In this study, 47 cases that were followed up for more than 12 months were included. All SFBFBs were divided into two groups according to the methods used for internal fixation: plate fixation only (group A) and combined plate and IM nail fixation (group B). The fixation methods were determined intraoperatively. Plate fixation was considered as the first option in all cases, but combined plate and IM nail fixation was selected as the second option if it was difficult to be fixed with plate only. Groups A and B comprised of 31 and 16 cases, respectively. The functional results were evaluated by the Grace and Eversmann rating system and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results In groups A and B, a radiologic union was achieved in 30/31 and 14/16 cases and average union time was 11.1 and 17.8 weeks, respectively. According to the Grace and Eversmann rating system, group A had excellent results in 15 cases, good in 14, acceptable in one, and unacceptable in one. Group B had excellent results in three cases, good in nine, acceptable in two, and unacceptable in two. The average DASH score was 7.1 points (range, 0 to 19.2 points) in group A and 15.1 points (range, 0 to 29.6 points) in group B. Three cases of nonunion with unacceptable results achieved a bony union by additional procedures and the functional results of these cases improved to good or excellent. Conclusions The functional

  16. A Meta-Analysis for Postoperative Complications in Tibial Plafond Fracture: Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Versus Limited Internal Fixation Combined With External Fixator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Xiang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Zhu, Qing-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of tibial plafond fractures is challenging to foot and ankle surgeons. Open reduction and internal fixation and limited internal fixation combined with an external fixator are 2 of the most commonly used methods of tibial plafond fracture repair. However, conclusions regarding the superior choice remain controversial. The present meta-analysis aimed to quantitatively compare the postoperative complications between open reduction and internal fixation and limited internal fixation combined with an external fixator for tibial plafond fractures. Nine studies with 498 fractures in 494 patients were included in the present study. The meta-analysis found no significant differences in bone healing complications (risk ratio [RR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68 to 2.01, p = .58], nonunion (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.36, p = .82), malunion or delayed union (RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.57 to 2.69, p = .59), superficial (RR 1.56, 95% CI 0.43 to 5.61, p = .50) and deep (RR 1.89, 95% CI 0.62 to 5.80) infections, arthritis symptoms (RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.58, p = .18), or chronic osteomyelitis (RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.05 to 1.84, p = .20) between the 2 groups.

  17. Tibial inlay posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    McAllister, David R; Hussain, Suleman M

    2010-12-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries occur much less frequently than other ligament injuries of the knee such as anterior cruciate ligament injuries. There is general agreement for nonoperative treatment for lower grade injuries such as type I PCL injuries. However, for more severe injuries which may require surgery, there is no consensus on an optimal reconstruction method. Multiple arthroscopic and open techniques exist to reconstruct the PCL. Limited clinical outcomes data reveals good short-term clinical results with different reconstruction options. Biomechanical data has helped further the understanding regarding the performance of different reconstructions. This article will present a surgical technique for single bundle tibial inlay reconstruction of the PCL along with the objective biomechanical data that supports this reconstruction.

  18. Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa complicated with chronic tibial osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Egemen; Ege, Ahmet; Keser, Selcuk; Bayar, Ahmet

    2008-10-01

    Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa represents an infrequent clinical entity with cutaneous changes characterized by dermal fibrosis, hyperkeratotic verrucous and papillamotous lesions resulting from chronic non-filarial lymphedema secondary to infections, surgeries, tumor obstruction, radiation, congestive heart failure, and obesity. Although recurrent streptococcal lymphangitis is believed to play a critical role in the origin of elephantiasis nostras verrucosa, the exact pathogenesis of the disorder is not yet clear. Therapeutic efforts should aim to reduce lymph stasis, which will also lead to improvement of the cutaneous changes but unfortunately there is no specific treatment for advanced cases. In this report, we present a patient who was treated by below knee amputation as a result of elephantiasis nostras verrucosa complicated with chronic tibial osteomyelitis.

  19. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  20. Biomechanical properties of a structurally optimized carbon-fibre/epoxy intramedullary nail for femoral shaft fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2016-03-01

    Intramedullary nails are the golden treatment option for diaphyseal fractures. However, their high stiffness can shield the surrounding bone from the natural physiologic load resulting in subsequent bone loss. Their stiff structure can also delay union by reducing compressive loads at the fracture site, thereby inhibiting secondary bone healing. Composite intramedullary nails have recently been introduced to address these drawbacks. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the mechanical properties of a previously developed composite IM nail made of carbon-fibre/epoxy whose structure was optimized based on fracture healing requirements using the selective stress shielding approach. Following manufacturing, the cross-section of the composite nail was examined under an optical microscope to find the porosity of the structure. Mechanical properties of the proposed composite intramedullary nail were determined using standard tension, compression, bending, and torsion tests. The failed specimens were then examined to obtain the modes of failure. The material showed high strength in tension (403.9±7.8MPa), compression (316.9±10.9MPa), bending (405.3±8.1MPa), and torsion (328.5±7.3MPa). Comparing the flexural modulus (41.1±0.9GPa) with the compressive modulus (10.0±0.2GPa) yielded that the material was significantly more flexible in compression than in bending. This customized flexibility along with the high torsional stiffness of the nail (70.7±2.0Nm(2)) has made it ideal as a fracture fixation device since this unique structure can stabilize the fracture while allowing for compression of fracture ends. Negligible moisture absorption (~0.5%) and low porosity of the laminate structure (< 3%) are other advantages of the proposed structure. The findings suggested that the carbon-fibre/epoxy intramedullary nail is flexible axially while being relatively rigid in bending and torsion and is strong enough in all types of physiologic loading, making it a potential

  1. Biomechanical properties of a structurally optimized carbon-fibre/epoxy intramedullary nail for femoral shaft fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2016-03-01

    Intramedullary nails are the golden treatment option for diaphyseal fractures. However, their high stiffness can shield the surrounding bone from the natural physiologic load resulting in subsequent bone loss. Their stiff structure can also delay union by reducing compressive loads at the fracture site, thereby inhibiting secondary bone healing. Composite intramedullary nails have recently been introduced to address these drawbacks. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the mechanical properties of a previously developed composite IM nail made of carbon-fibre/epoxy whose structure was optimized based on fracture healing requirements using the selective stress shielding approach. Following manufacturing, the cross-section of the composite nail was examined under an optical microscope to find the porosity of the structure. Mechanical properties of the proposed composite intramedullary nail were determined using standard tension, compression, bending, and torsion tests. The failed specimens were then examined to obtain the modes of failure. The material showed high strength in tension (403.9±7.8MPa), compression (316.9±10.9MPa), bending (405.3±8.1MPa), and torsion (328.5±7.3MPa). Comparing the flexural modulus (41.1±0.9GPa) with the compressive modulus (10.0±0.2GPa) yielded that the material was significantly more flexible in compression than in bending. This customized flexibility along with the high torsional stiffness of the nail (70.7±2.0Nm(2)) has made it ideal as a fracture fixation device since this unique structure can stabilize the fracture while allowing for compression of fracture ends. Negligible moisture absorption (~0.5%) and low porosity of the laminate structure (< 3%) are other advantages of the proposed structure. The findings suggested that the carbon-fibre/epoxy intramedullary nail is flexible axially while being relatively rigid in bending and torsion and is strong enough in all types of physiologic loading, making it a potential

  2. Effect of Modularity on the Fatigue Performance of Tibial Tray Designs in TKA Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ahilan Anantha; Ghyar, Rupesh; Ravi, Bhallamudi

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue performance of tibial tray in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of critical importance in terms of longevity of the prosthesis. Standards have been proposed by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to ensure its long-term structural integrity. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of modularity in the tibial tray following the testing standards, using finite element analysis. Goodman and Sines criteria were used to compare the fatigue safety factor (FSF) of four modular designs versus the two conventional designs. Cruciate-retaining (CR) type modular tibial tray designs were better than posterior-stabilized (PS) type tibial tray designs. More cutouts in the tray and absence of keel were reasons for poor fatigue performance.

  3. Successful stabilisation of a type III paediatric tibial eminence fracture using a tensioned wire technique.

    PubMed

    Archer, Matthew; Parkin, Tom; Latimer, Mark David

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with a type III tibial eminence fracture. The fracture fragment was reduced arthroscopically. Two 1.6 mm retrograde K-wires were inserted from the tibial metaphysis across the physis and into the fracture fragment using a standard anterior cruciate ligament tibial tunnel guide. Once the wires were clearly visible within the joint the tips were bent over by ∼120°. The wires were then tensioned around a single small fragment screw inserted into the tibial metaphysis. An exceptionally strong fixation was achieved. The boy was mobilised without a brace. The wires were removed at 12 weeks and he returned to full activity at 14 weeks. PMID:27646317

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Tibial Components with Modular Stems Used in Primary TKA

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Thomas; Broome, Brandon; Osuji, Obi; Harman, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the known potential for fretting and corrosion at modular junctions in orthopaedic implants, this retrospective study evaluated radiographic and clinical outcomes of 85 primary TKA patients implanted with modular stemmed tibial components and followed up for an average of 82 months. There was low incidence of tibial radiolucent lines, excellent functional outcomes, and no complications associated with stem modularity. The findings were comparable to the historical control study involving 107 TKA with a nonmodular tibial stem design. When using surface cemented tibial components combined with a constrained polyethylene bearing, modular stems appear to be a viable option for primary TKA when adequate fixation and rotational stability are maintained. PMID:24669319

  5. A geometric morphometric analysis of the medial tibial condyle of African hominids.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2013-10-01

    Although the hominid knee has been heavily scrutinized, shape variation of the medial tibial condyle has yet to be described. Humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas differ in the shape of their medial femoral condyles and in their capacity for external and internal rotation of the tibia relative to the femur. I hypothesize that these differences should be reflected in the shape of the medial tibial condyle of these hominids. Here I use geometric morphometric techniques to uncover shape differences between the medial tibial condyles of humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Humans are distinguished from the other two species by having a much more oval-shaped medial tibial condyle, while those of chimpanzees and gorillas are more triangular in outline. Gorillas (especially males) are distinguished by having more concavely-curved condyles (mediolateral direction), which is interpreted as an effect of heavy loading through the medial compartment of the knee in conjunction with differences in the degree of arboreality.

  6. Effect of Modularity on the Fatigue Performance of Tibial Tray Designs in TKA Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ahilan Anantha; Ghyar, Rupesh; Ravi, Bhallamudi

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue performance of tibial tray in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of critical importance in terms of longevity of the prosthesis. Standards have been proposed by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to ensure its long-term structural integrity. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of modularity in the tibial tray following the testing standards, using finite element analysis. Goodman and Sines criteria were used to compare the fatigue safety factor (FSF) of four modular designs versus the two conventional designs. Cruciate-retaining (CR) type modular tibial tray designs were better than posterior-stabilized (PS) type tibial tray designs. More cutouts in the tray and absence of keel were reasons for poor fatigue performance. PMID:27649765

  7. Retrospective evaluation of the Duracon periapatite-coated tibial tray: midterm results and factors affecting success.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brad J

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the retrospective radiographic outcome of a series of 63 consecutive total knee arthroplasties using an uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated Duracon cruciate-retaining tibial baseplate (Stryker Howmedica Osteonics Corp, Mahwah, NJ). Sixty-three knees were assessed at a mean follow-up of 65 months. The knees were primarily diagnosed with osteoarthritis with a mean age of 61 years. Radiographic analysis showed 6 knees with tibial baseplate radiolucencies, with all of these resolving or improving over the course of the study. All tibial baseplates were implanted with the concomitant use of autologous bone slurry. There were no reoperations for aseptic loosening, fracture, or patellofemoral problems. This intermediate study demonstrates excellent radiographic outcomes for uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated Duracon cruciate-retaining tibial baseplates and evaluates other factors felt to be important in the success of a cementless implant.

  8. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for exposure of the difficult total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Ohl, M D

    1990-11-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy provides a safe and reliable means of extensile exposure of the knee. A technique was developed using a long osteoperiosteal segment including the tibial tubercle and upper tibial crest leaving lateral muscular attachments intact to this bone fragment. The bone fragment was reattached to its bed with two cobalt-chromium wires passed through the fragment and through the medial tibial cortex. The procedure was used in 71 knees to expose the joint for total knee arthroplasty, and the follow-up period was one to five years. All healed uneventfully, and no significant complications occurred. Mean postoperative flexion was 97 degrees. No extension lag occurred, and mean flexion contracture was 2.5 degrees. Excellent exposure can be achieved by means of a viable bone flap below the knee. Early rehabilitation and weight bearing can be done with low potential for complications. PMID:2225644

  9. Arterial blood pressure wave forms in radial and posterior tibial arteries in critically ill newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; Hack, W W; Ree, E F; Lafeber, H N; Westerhof, N

    1993-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document arterial blood pressure wave forms at two sites along the arterial tree of the neonate: in the radial and posterior tibial arteries. Using a high-fidelity catheter tip-transducer system, peripheral arterial blood pressure wave forms in 26 critically newborn infants were studied. In 14 infants the radial artery and in 12 infants the posterior tibial artery was cannulated. Radial artery blood pressure waves resembled those of proximal aortic rather than those of the radial artery in adults. Quantitative analysis of the waves was performed to reassure this finding. Blood pressure waves obtained from posterior tibial artery resembled those of femoral artery rather than those of posterior tibial artery waves in adults. We conclude that radial and posterior tibial artery wave forms in neonates appear to have a central appearance. This phenomenon might be explained by the close proximity of the radial and posterior tibial artery to the central aorta and femoral artery respectively, due to the small and short limbs of the neonate. The finding allows an "easy central pressure look" at both ends of the neonatal aorta.

  10. Arthroscopic management of proximal tibial fractures: technical note and case series presentation

    PubMed Central

    BENEA, HOREA; TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE; MARTIN, ARTUR; BARDAS, CIPRIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The purpose of this article is to describe a new surgical method of arthroscopy assisted treatment of intraarticular proximal tibial fractures (ARIF – arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation), analyzing its efficiency and safety on a series of patients. Tibial plateau fractures affect the proximal tibial metaphyseal and articular surface, representing 1.2% of all fractures and up to 8% of all fractures in elderly. Patients and method Our case series consists of 6 patients with Schatzker types I-III tibial plateau fractures, treated in the Orthopedic and Traumatology Clinic of Cluj-Napoca from July 2012 to August 2014. Patients included in the study presented Schatzker type I-III tibial plateau fracture. Results The results obtained with the arthroscopic method were excellent in 5 cases (mean Rasmussen score 27.60 points) and good in 1 case (mean score 23.75). The radiological consolidation appeared after a mean of 12 weeks. No major complication was noted. Conclusions Diagnosis and treatment of associated lesions, shortening of hospitalization length and postoperative rehabilitation, but also the lower rate of complications, can make arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation the method of choice for the operative treatment of selected Schatzker I-III types of proximal tibial fractures. PMID:26528076

  11. Manufacturing lot affects polyethylene tibial insert volume, thickness, and surface geometry.

    PubMed

    Teeter, Matthew G; Milner, Jaques S; MacDonald, Steven J; Naudie, Douglas D R

    2013-08-01

    To perform wear measurements on retrieved joint replacement implants, a reference geometry of the implant's original state is required. Since implants are rarely individually scanned before implantation, a different, new implant of the same kind and size is frequently used. However, due to manufacturing variability, errors may be introduced into these measurements, as the dimensions between the retrieved and reference components may not be exactly the same. The hypothesis of this study was that new polyethylene tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots would demonstrate greater variability than those from the same lot. In total, 12 new tibial inserts of the same model and size were obtained, 5 from the same lot and the remainder from different lots. The geometry of each tibial insert was obtained using microcomputed tomography. Measurements of tibial insert volume, thickness, and three-dimensional surface deviations were obtained and compared between tibial inserts from the same and different manufacturing lots. Greater variability was found for the tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots for all types of measurements, including a fourfold difference in volume variability (p < 0.001) and a maximum of 0.21 mm difference in thickness (p < 0.001). Investigators should be aware of this potential confounding error and take steps to minimize it, such as by averaging together the geometries of multiple new components from different manufacturing lots for use as the reference geometry.

  12. Magnitude of cement-device interfacial stresses with and without tibial stemming: impact of BMI.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Ananthkrishnan; Hedley, Anthony Keith; Kester, Mark A

    2011-03-01

    Patients expect their total knee arthroplasty to relieve pain and to be long lasting. With patients becoming more active, weighing more, and living longer, this expectation becomes increasingly more difficult to fulfill. Patients who are obese and active put greater loads on their implants and may have a greater risk of failure. Although much attention has been paid to decreasing polyethylene wear, a major cause of implant failure, very little research focus has been directed to elucidate other measures to reduce failure, such as the efficacy of prophylactic stemming of the tibial tray. This study explored whether additional mechanical support for tibial base plates would help reduce bone cement stresses in heavy patients, who, like patients with a high activity level, put added stress on their implants. A tibial base plate with a 12-mm-diameter x 50-mm-long stem was compared with the same tibial base plate with a 15-mm-diameter x 20-mm-long end cap using finite element analysis. The results indicate that the tibial base plate with a prophylactic stem significantly reduced compressive and shear stresses on the cement-device interface and therefore may help to reduce the possibility of tibial loosening in these at-risk patients. Further, such studies will aid the surgeon in educating patients and in selecting the appropriate implant strategy. PMID:21618932

  13. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Mendes, Mariane Henseler Damaceno; Claudino, Stephanie; Baracho, Filipe; Borges, Paulo César; da Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1) standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2) inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3) control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength. Results There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05). Conclusion There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw. PMID:26229913

  14. [The geometry of the keel determines the behaviour of the tibial tray against torsional forces in total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    García David, S; Cortijo Martínez, J A; Navarro Bermúdez, I; Maculé, F; Hinarejos, P; Puig-Verdié, L; Monllau, J C; Hernández Hermoso, J A

    2014-01-01

    The keel design of the tibial tray is essential for the transmission of the majority of the forces to the peripheral bone structures, which have better mechanical proprieties, thus reducing the risk of loosening. The aim of the present study was to compare the behaviour of different tibial tray designs submitted to torsional forces. Four different tibial components were modelled. The 3-D reconstruction was made using the Mimics software. The solid elements were generated by SolidWorks. The finite elements study was done by Unigraphics. A torsional force of 6 Nm. applied to the lateral aspects of each tibial tray was simulated. The GENUTECH® tibial tray, with peripheral trabecular bone support, showed a lower displacement and less transmitted tensions under torsional forces. The results suggest that a tibial tray with more peripheral support behaves mechanically better than the other studied designs. PMID:25037111

  15. [The geometry of the keel determines the behaviour of the tibial tray against torsional forces in total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    García David, S; Cortijo Martínez, J A; Navarro Bermúdez, I; Maculé, F; Hinarejos, P; Puig-Verdié, L; Monllau, J C; Hernández Hermoso, J A

    2014-01-01

    The keel design of the tibial tray is essential for the transmission of the majority of the forces to the peripheral bone structures, which have better mechanical proprieties, thus reducing the risk of loosening. The aim of the present study was to compare the behaviour of different tibial tray designs submitted to torsional forces. Four different tibial components were modelled. The 3-D reconstruction was made using the Mimics software. The solid elements were generated by SolidWorks. The finite elements study was done by Unigraphics. A torsional force of 6 Nm. applied to the lateral aspects of each tibial tray was simulated. The GENUTECH® tibial tray, with peripheral trabecular bone support, showed a lower displacement and less transmitted tensions under torsional forces. The results suggest that a tibial tray with more peripheral support behaves mechanically better than the other studied designs.

  16. [Severe orthostatic hypotension and intramedullary tumor: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Derrey, S; Maltête, D; Ahtoy, P; Fregey, P; Proust, F

    2009-12-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with bilateral neuropathic pain of the upper limbs, motor palsy of the right arm, urinary dysfunction, and postural dizziness. MRI showed an intramedullary cervical tumor with a solid portion extended from C1 to C3 surrounded by a cystic portion. A macroscopic complete resection was performed and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ependymoma. Postoperatively, the patient's neuropathic pain and postural dizziness worsened, with syncopal attack while upright because of severe orthostatic hypotension (OH). On physical examination, her supine systolic blood pressure was 130 mmHg and fell to 80 mmHg while sitting with no change in heart rate. We found motor palsy of the left arm, bilateral ataxia, and urinary retention. Three months later, the patient was still bedridden, notably because of the OH. After 6 months, with the association of preventative measures of OH and high doses of a direct alpha1-adrenoreceptor agonist, a vasoconstricting agent, the patient recovered an independent gait permitting her to walk unassisted. The main causes of OH include medication, nonneurogenic causes such as cardiac insufficiency, and central or peripheral neurogenic causes such as diabetic insufficiency. Brainstem tumors are known to provide severe OH but this symptom has been seldom described in a purely spinal cord lesion. We report an interesting case of severe OH that had complicated the surgical treatment of a high cervical spinal cord ependymoma and we review the literature. PMID:19592056

  17. Hemorrhagic intramedullary solitary fibrous tumor of the conus medullaris: case report.

    PubMed

    Walker, Corey T; Amene, Chiazo S; Pannell, Jeffrey S; Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Rennert, Robert C; Hansen, Lawrence A; Khalessi, Alexander A

    2015-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of spinal tumors is guided by anatomical location and imaging characteristics. Diagnosis of rare tumors is made challenging by abnormal features. The authors present the case of a 47-year-old woman who presented with progressive subacute right lower-extremity weakness and numbness of the right thigh. Physical examination further revealed an extensor response to plantar reflex on the right and hyporeflexia of the right Achilles and patellar reflexes. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine demonstrated an 8-mm intramedullary exophytic nodule protruding into a hematoma within the conus medullaris. Spinal angiography was performed to rule out an arteriovenous malformation, and resection with hematoma evacuation was completed. Pathological examination of the resected mass demonstrated a spindle cell neoplasm with dense bundles of collagen. Special immunostaining was performed and a diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) was made. SFTs are mesenchymally derived pleural neoplasms, which rarely present at other locations of the body, but have been increasingly described to occur as primary neoplasms of the spine and CNS. The authors believe that this case is unique in its rare location at the level of the conus, and also that this is the first report of a hemorrhagic SFT in the spine. Therefore, with this report the authors add to the literature the fact that this variant of an increasingly understood but heterogeneous tumor can occur, and therefore should be considered in the differential of clinically similar tumors. PMID:26115022

  18. Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumors: Part II-Management Options and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Samartzis, Dino; Gillis, Christopher C; Shih, Patrick; O'Toole, John E; Fessler, Richard G

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Broad narrative review. Objectives Intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCT) are uncommon lesions that can affect any age group or sex. However, numerous IMSCT exist and the clinical course of each tumor varies. The following article addresses the various management options and outcomes in patients with IMSCT. Methods An extensive review of the peer-reviewed literature was performed, addressing management options and clinical outcomes of patients with IMSCT. Results Early diagnosis and intervention are essential to obtain optimal functional outcome. Each IMSCT have specific imaging characteristics, which help in the clinical decision-making and prognostication. A comprehension of the tumor pathology and the clinical course associated with each tumor can allow for the proper surgical and nonsurgical management of these tumors, and reduce any associated morbidity and mortality. Recent advances in the operative management of such lesions have increased the success rate of tumor removal while minimizing iatrogenic-related trauma to the patient and, in tandem, improving patient outcomes. Conclusions Awareness and understanding of IMSCT is imperative to design proper management and obtain optimal patient outcomes. Meticulous operative technique and the use of surgical adjuncts are essential to accomplish proper tumor removal, diminish the risk of recurrence, and preserve neurologic function. Operative management of IMSCT should be individualized and based on tumor type, location, and dimensional extensions. To assist with preoperative and intraoperative decision-making, a general algorithm is provided. PMID:26933620

  19. Hemorrhagic intramedullary solitary fibrous tumor of the conus medullaris: case report.

    PubMed

    Walker, Corey T; Amene, Chiazo S; Pannell, Jeffrey S; Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Rennert, Robert C; Hansen, Lawrence A; Khalessi, Alexander A

    2015-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of spinal tumors is guided by anatomical location and imaging characteristics. Diagnosis of rare tumors is made challenging by abnormal features. The authors present the case of a 47-year-old woman who presented with progressive subacute right lower-extremity weakness and numbness of the right thigh. Physical examination further revealed an extensor response to plantar reflex on the right and hyporeflexia of the right Achilles and patellar reflexes. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine demonstrated an 8-mm intramedullary exophytic nodule protruding into a hematoma within the conus medullaris. Spinal angiography was performed to rule out an arteriovenous malformation, and resection with hematoma evacuation was completed. Pathological examination of the resected mass demonstrated a spindle cell neoplasm with dense bundles of collagen. Special immunostaining was performed and a diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) was made. SFTs are mesenchymally derived pleural neoplasms, which rarely present at other locations of the body, but have been increasingly described to occur as primary neoplasms of the spine and CNS. The authors believe that this case is unique in its rare location at the level of the conus, and also that this is the first report of a hemorrhagic SFT in the spine. Therefore, with this report the authors add to the literature the fact that this variant of an increasingly understood but heterogeneous tumor can occur, and therefore should be considered in the differential of clinically similar tumors.

  20. Intramedullary nailing of acute femoral shaft fractures using manual traction without a fracture table.

    PubMed

    Karpos, P A; McFerran, M A; Johnson, K D

    1995-02-01

    Intramedullary (IM) nails were prospectively placed in 32 consecutive femoral shaft fractures without the use of a fracture table. All fractures were reduced using manual traction. Pathologic and nonacute fractures and those requiring a reconstruction nail were excluded. The results are compared with results of two prior study groups from this institution that underwent IM nailing with or without a fracture table using a femoral distractor. Ten patients had unstable spine or pelvis fractures. Four nailings followed exploratory laparotomy. Twelve patients underwent two or more procedures on the lower extremities under the same preparation and drape. Six fractures were open. Sixty-seven percent of results were anatomic, 27% had < 5 mm lengthening/shortening or < 5 degree varus/valgus, and 7% had > 5 mm lengthening/shortening or > 5 degree varus/valgus. Average operative time was 95 min. No complications occurred that were attributable to the technique. Compared with the prior study groups, no statistical difference in the fracture types or results was found. However, operative time was significantly less in the manual traction group (p < .05). We feel that this technique is a safe, simple, and effective alternative to using a fracture table. The technique is especially useful in the polytrauma patient, significantly decreasing anesthetic time.

  1. Local Intramedullary Delivery of Vancomycin Can Prevent the Development of Long Bone Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline; Canden, Ahranee; Burr, Michael; Agarwal, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections require intravenously delivered vancomycin; however, systemically delivered vancomycin has its problems. To determine the feasibility and safety of locally delivering vancomycin hydrochloride (~25 mg/Kg) to the medullary canal of long bones, we conducted a pharmacokinetics study using a rat tibia model. We found that administering the vancomycin intraosseously resulted in very low concentrations of vancomycin in the blood plasma and the muscle surrounding the tibia, reducing the risk for systemic toxicity, which is often seen with traditional intravenous administration of vancomycin. Additionally, we were able to inhibit the development of osteomyelitis in the tibia if the treatment was administered locally at the same time as a bacterial inoculum (i.e., Log10 7.82 CFU/mL or 6.62x107 CFU/mL), when compared to an untreated group. These findings suggest that local intramedullary vancomycin delivery can achieve sufficiently high local concentrations to prevent development of osteomyelitis while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27472197

  2. Prophylactic bilateral intramedullary femoral nails for bisphosphonate-associated signs of impending subtrochanteric hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Richard S; Beebe, Kathleen S; Benevenia, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    In the short and midterm, bisphosphonates have proven highly efficacious in the prevention of low-energy fractures, but long-term results and adverse effects have yet to be definitively identified. Of particular concern are emerging reports of long-term bisphosphonate users presenting with unusual low-energy subtrochanteric femur fractures. Perhaps associated with hyperactive bone remodeling leading to an eventually weakened bony architecture, the efficacy of longer-term bisphosphonate use has come into question, especially in those with >5 years of therapy.This article describes a case of a 65-year-old woman with a 10-year history of bisphosphonate use who presented with prodromal thigh pain and characteristic radiographic findings indicative of potential impending subtrochanteric insufficiency fracture. Supported by reports in the literature, unique characteristics of a certain clinical picture warn of potential bisphosphonate-associated subtrochanteric hip fracture; to our knowledge, we present the first reported prophylactic bilateral femoral intramedullary nailing to prevent fragility fracture. A deeper look into the biochemistry behind associated bony weakness caused by long-term incorporation of bisphosphonates is needed, especially if an endpoint to the therapy is to be determined. However, with mounting clinical evidence supporting the risk of bisphosphonate-associated fragility fracture, a characteristic radiographic appearance and clinical presentation cannot be ignored. In the interim, elective surgery may be an efficacious alternative in the treatment of an expected, readily preventable fracture.

  3. Clinical and functional comparison of endoprosthetic replacement with intramedullary nailing for treating proximal femur metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hua; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Baojun; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes of modular endoprosthetic replacement (EPR) compared to proximal femur intramedullary nailing (IMN) for the treatment of proximal femur metastases. Methods: We retrospectively studied the records of patients with proximal femur metastatic lesions treated with surgical stabilization between January 2007 and December 2014 in terms of operation time, blood loss, postoperative score, soreness, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) and survival time. Results: There were 34 patients treated with surgical stabilization. The mean follow-up period was 12.1?.6 months (range: 10-47 months). Thirteen were treated with EPR and 21 were stabilized with IMN (20 males, 14 females; mean age: 68.7 years). The median survival time was 11.0 months for both groups (P=0.147). The operation time, blood loss and Harris score of IMN group were lower than those of EPR group (P=0.001, P=0.001, P=0.002, respectively). Conclusions: Both EPR and IMN for treating proximal femur metastasis achieved effective clinical outcomes. Therefore, the suitable surgical methods depended on the general conditions and medical requirements of patients, as well as the technical advantages of the doctor. PMID:27199518

  4. [Severe orthostatic hypotension and intramedullary tumor: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Derrey, S; Maltête, D; Ahtoy, P; Fregey, P; Proust, F

    2009-12-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with bilateral neuropathic pain of the upper limbs, motor palsy of the right arm, urinary dysfunction, and postural dizziness. MRI showed an intramedullary cervical tumor with a solid portion extended from C1 to C3 surrounded by a cystic portion. A macroscopic complete resection was performed and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ependymoma. Postoperatively, the patient's neuropathic pain and postural dizziness worsened, with syncopal attack while upright because of severe orthostatic hypotension (OH). On physical examination, her supine systolic blood pressure was 130 mmHg and fell to 80 mmHg while sitting with no change in heart rate. We found motor palsy of the left arm, bilateral ataxia, and urinary retention. Three months later, the patient was still bedridden, notably because of the OH. After 6 months, with the association of preventative measures of OH and high doses of a direct alpha1-adrenoreceptor agonist, a vasoconstricting agent, the patient recovered an independent gait permitting her to walk unassisted. The main causes of OH include medication, nonneurogenic causes such as cardiac insufficiency, and central or peripheral neurogenic causes such as diabetic insufficiency. Brainstem tumors are known to provide severe OH but this symptom has been seldom described in a purely spinal cord lesion. We report an interesting case of severe OH that had complicated the surgical treatment of a high cervical spinal cord ependymoma and we review the literature.

  5. Intramedullary dermoid cyst with relatively atypical symptoms: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraspinal dermoid cysts are rare and benign tumors that occur primarily due to the defective closure of the neural tube, an ectodermal derivative, during the process of development. They are slow-growing tumors manifesting in the second and third decades of life. Case presentation We present here a case of a 14-year-old Sindhi boy with a six-month history of paraparesis of the lower limbs and a progressive loss of power of grade 3/5, and hypoesthesia in the L4/L5 dermatomes of his right lower limb. A plain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a well-demarcated intraspinal intramedullary cyst containing an abscess at the level of T12 and L1 causing localized cord compression, which was producing the symptoms. Near total excision of the cyst was successfully performed and was sent for biopsy, which revealed keratinocytes and keratin flakes. With one month of follow-up, along with physiotherapeutic management, the patient gradually improved and was able to walk without support. Conclusions Critical evaluation of every case with aggravating symptoms should be carried out, and neurological and radiological examinations should be conducted to ensure the well-being of patients. PMID:23590721

  6. Outcome of limb reconstruction system in open tibial diaphyseal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Anand; Verma, Ankit; Agrawal, Mukul; Jain, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Arunangshu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial diaphyseal fractures with bone loss is a matter of debate. The treatment options range from external fixators, nailing, ring fixators or grafting with or without plastic reconstruction. All the procedures have their own set of complications, like acute docking problems, shortening, difficulty in soft tissue management, chronic infection, increased morbidity, multiple surgeries, longer hospital stay, mal union, nonunion and higher patient dissatisfaction. We evaluated the outcome of the limb reconstruction system (LRS) in the treatment of open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss as a definative mode of treatment to achieve union, as well as limb lengthening, simultaneously. Materials and Methods: Thirty open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss of at least 4 cm or more with a mean age 32.5 years were treated by using the LRS after debridement. Distraction osteogenesis at rate of 1 mm/day was done away from the fracture site to maintain the limb length. On the approximation of fracture ends, the dynamized LRS was left for further 15-20 weeks and patient was mobilized with weight bearing to achieve union. Functional assessment was done by Association for the Study and Application of the Methods of Illizarov (ASAMI) criteria. Results: Mean followup period was 15 months. The mean bone loss was 5.5 cm (range 4-9 cm). The mean duration of bone transport was 13 weeks (range 8-30 weeks) with a mean time for LRS in place was 44 weeks (range 24-51 weeks). The mean implant index was 56.4 days/cm. Mean union time was 52 weeks (range 31-60 weeks) with mean union index of 74.5 days/cm. Bony results as per the ASAMI scoring were excellent in 76% (19/25), good in 12% (3/25) and fair in 4% (1/25) with union in all except 2 patients, which showed poor results (8%) with only 2 patients having leg length discrepancy more than 2.5 cm. Functional results were excellent in 84% (21/25), good in 8% (2/25), fair in 8% (2/25). Pin tract

  7. Prevalence and influence of tibial tunnel widening after isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patella-bone-tendon-bone-graft: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Struewer, Johannes; Efe, Turgay; Frangen, Thomas Manfred; Schwarting, Tim; Buecking, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-01-01

    degenerative changes in sense of a grade II OA in 54% of patients. Prevalence of a grade III or grade IV OA was found in 20%. Correlation analysis showed no significant relationship between the amount of tibial tunnel enlargement (P>0.05), long-term clinical results, anterior joint laxity or prevalence of osteoarthritis. Tunnel widening remains a radiological phenomenon which is most commonly observed within the short to midterm intervals after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and subsequently stabilises on mid and long- term follow-up. It does not adversely affect long-term clinical outcome and stability. Furthermore, tunnel widening doesn't constitute an increasing prevalence of osteoarthritis. PMID:22802989

  8. A Finite-Element Study of Metal Backing and Tibial Resection Depth in a Composite Tibia Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Susumu; Rogge, Renee D; Small, Scott R; Berend, Michael E; Ritter, Merrill A

    2016-04-01

    Prosthetic alignment, patient characteristics, and implant design are all factors in long-term survival of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet the level at which each of these factors contribute to implant loosening has not been fully described. Prior clinical and biomechanical studies have indicated tibial overload as a cause of early TKA revision. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between tibial component design and bone resection on tibial loading. Finite-element analysis (FEA) was performed after simulated implantation of metal backed (MB) and all-polyethylene (AP) TKA components in 5 and 15 mm of tibial resection into a validated intact tibia model. Proximal tibial strains significantly increased between 13% and 199% when implanted with AP components (p < 0.05). Strain significantly increased between 12% and 209% in the posterior tibial compartment with increased bone resection (p < 0.05). This study indicates elevated strains in AP implanted tibias across the entirety of the proximal tibial cortex, as well as a posterior shift in tibial loading in instances of increased resection depth. These results are consistent with trends observed in prior biomechanical studies and may associate the documented device history of tibial collapse in AP components with increased bone strain and overload beneath the prosthesis. PMID:26810930

  9. Is intramedullary nailing superior to plating in patients with extraarticular fracture of the distal tibia?

    PubMed

    Cabrolier, Jorge; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Distal tibial metaphyseal fractures are generally produced by high-energy trauma such as car accidents and can cause severe disability due to pain and deformity. In the management of these fractures, there are multiple surgical alternatives, but it is uncertain which the best option is. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including three randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether one surgical option is better than the other, because the certainty of the evidence is very low. Two ongoing randomized trials might help solving this uncertainty. PMID:26571329

  10. Is intramedullary nailing superior to plating in patients with extraarticular fracture of the distal tibia?

    PubMed

    Cabrolier, Jorge; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-11-06

    Distal tibial metaphyseal fractures are generally produced by high-energy trauma such as car accidents and can cause severe disability due to pain and deformity. In the management of these fractures, there are multiple surgical alternatives, but it is uncertain which the best option is. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including three randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether one surgical option is better than the other, because the certainty of the evidence is very low. Two ongoing randomized trials might help solving this uncertainty.

  11. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  12. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  13. Mid-femoral and mid-tibial muscle cross-sectional area as predictors of tibial bone strength in middle-aged and older men.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, T; Nikander, R; Kukuljan, S; Daly, R M

    2013-09-01

    While it is widely acknowledged that bones adapt to the site-specific prevalent loading environment, reasonable ways to estimate skeletal loads are not necessarily available. For long bone shafts, muscles acting to bend the bone may provide a more appropriate surrogate of the loading than muscles expected to cause compressive loads. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether mid-thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was a better predictor of tibial mid-shaft bone strength than mid-tibia muscle CSA in middle aged and older men. 181 Caucasian men aged 50-79 years (mean±SD; 61±7 years) participated in this study. Mid-femoral and mid-tibial bone traits cortical area, density weighted polar moment of area and muscle CSA [cm(2)] were assessed with computed tomography. Tibial bone traits were positively associated with both the mid-femur (r=0.44 to 0.46, P<0.001) and the mid-tibia muscle CSA (r=0.35 to 0.37, P<0.001). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for age, weight, physical activity and femoral length, indicated that mid-femur muscle CSA predicted tibial mid-shaft bone strength indices better than mid-tibia muscle CSA. In conclusion, the association between a given skeletal site and functionally adjacent muscles may provide a meaningful probe of the site-specific effect of loading on bone. PMID:23989248

  14. Genu Recurvatum Deformity in a Child due to Salter Harris Type V Fracture of the Proximal Tibial Physis Treated with High Tibial Dome Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Beslikas, Theodoros; Christodoulou, Andreas; Chytas, Anastasios; Gigis, Ioannis; Christoforidis, John

    2012-01-01

    Salter-Harris type V fracture is a very rare injury in the immature skeleton. In most cases, it remains undiagnosed and untreated. We report a case of genu recurvatum deformity in a 15-year-old boy caused by a Salter-Harris type V fracture of the proximal tibial physis. The initial X-ray did not reveal fracture. One year after injury, genu recurvatum deformity was detected associated with significant restriction of knee flexion and limp length discrepancy (2 cm) as well as medial and posterior instability of the joint. Further imaging studies revealed anterior bone bridge of the proximal tibial physis. The deformity was treated with a high tibial dome osteotomy combined with a tibial tubercle osteotomy stabilized with malleolar screws and a cast. Two years after surgery, the patient gained functional knee mobility without clinical instability. Firstly, this case highlights the importance of early identification of this rare lesion (Salter-Harris type V fracture) and, secondly, provides an alternative method of treatment for genu recurvatum deformity.

  15. Surgical Management of Tibial Plateau Fractures With 3.5 mm Simple Plates

    PubMed Central

    Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Jabalameli, Mahmoud; Hadi, Hosseinali; Rahbar, Mohammad; Minator Sajjadi, Mohammadreza; Jahansouz, Ali; Karimi Heris, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Tibial plateau fractures can be successfully fixed utilizing 3.5 mm locking plates. However, there are some disadvantages to using these plates. Objectives In the current prospective study, we investigated the outcome of treating different types of tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple plates which, to our knowledge, has not been evaluated in previous studies. Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 32 patients aged 40 ± 0.2 years underwent open reduction and internal fixation for tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple plates. The patients were followed for 16.14 ± 2.1 months. At each patient’s final visit, the articular surface depression, medial proximal tibial angle, and slope angle were measured and compared with measurements taken early after the operation. The functional outcomes were measured with the WOMAC and Lysholm knee scores. Results The mean union time was 13 ± 1.2 weeks. The mean knee range of motion was 116.8° ± 3.3°. The mean WOMAC and Lysholm scores were 83.5 ± 1.8 and 76.8 ± 1.6, respectively. On the early postoperative and final X-rays, 87.5% and 84% of patients, respectively, had acceptable reduction. Medial proximal tibial and slope angles did not change significantly by the last visit. No patient was found to have complications related to the type of plate. Conclusions In this case series study, the fixation of different types of tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple non-locking and non-precontoured plates was associated with acceptable clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes. Based on the advantages and costs of these plates, the authors recommend using 3.5 mm simple plates for different types of tibial plateau fractures. PMID:27626010

  16. Fact or fiction? Iatrogenic hallux abducto valgus secondary to tibial sesamoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Canales, Michael B; DeMore, Matthew; Bowen, Michael F; Ehredt, Duane J; Razzante, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    First ray function and hallux misalignment after isolated tibial sesamoidectomy have been topics of debate. Although sesamoidectomy has been proved to be effective in the relief of sesamoid pain, many foot and ankle surgeons remain hesitant to perform the procedure fearing a possible joint perturbation. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate both laboratory and clinical evidence of the association between isolated tibial sesamoidectomy and hallux abducto valgus deformity. The bench study consisted of 10 cadaveric limbs that were dissected and prepared for testing. Controlled valgus loads were applied before and after tibial sesamoidectomy. No significant difference was found in the joint position after sesamoidectomy in both the rectus (p = .36) and the dorsiflexed (p = .062) positions. The clinical evaluation consisted of a retrospective cohort of 5 females; all of whom underwent isolated tibial sesamoidectomy. The pre- and postoperative radiographs and self-reported pain scores (visual analog scale) were compared. None of the patients developed a postoperative hallux abducto valgus deformity. Neither the hallux abductus angle (p = .180) nor the intermetatarsal angle 1-2 (p = .180) changed significantly in the postoperative setting. The visual analog scale pain scores changed from a mean of 6.8 to 1, a significant difference (p = .042). Based on our observations and clinical experience, we believe that isolated tibial sesamoidectomy does not have a significant effect on the position of the first metatarsophalangeal joint when meticulous surgical technique is used to excise the sesamoid. Isolated tibial sesamoidectomy can provide substantial pain relief and appears to be a safe treatment for a variety of conditions affecting the tibial sesamoid.

  17. Thermal Analysis of the Tibial Cement Interface with Modern Cementing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vertullo, Christopher J.; Zbrojkiewicz, David; Vizesi, Frank; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The major cause of cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) failure is aseptic loosening of the tibial component necessitating revision surgery. Recently, multiple techniques have been described to maximize cement penetration depth and density in the proximal tibia during TKA to potentially avoid early loosening. While cement polymerisation is an exothermic reaction, minimal investigation into the proximal tibial thermal safety margin during cement polymerisation has been undertaken. In animal models osseous injury occurs at temperatures greater than 47 °C when applied for one minute. The aim of this study was to investigate the cement bone interface temperatures in TKA using modern tibial cementing techniques with a cadaveric tibial tray model. Methods: Eight adult cadavers were obtained with the proximal tibial surface prepared by a fellowship trained arthroplasty surgeon. Third generation cementation techniques were used and temperatures during cement polymerization on cadaveric knee arthroplasty models were recorded using thermocouples. Results: The results showed that no tibial cement temperature exceeded 44 °C for more than 1 minute. Two of the eight cadaveric tibias recorded maximum temperatures greater than 44 °C for 55 seconds and 33 seconds, just less than the 60 seconds reported to cause thermal injury. Average maximum polymerization temperatures did not correlate with deeper cement penetration or tray material. Maximum mantle temperatures were not statistically different between metal and all polyethylene tibial trays. Conclusion: Our investigation suggests that modern cementing techniques result in maximum mantle temperatures that are less than previously recorded temperatures required to cause thermal osseous injury, although this thermal injury safety margin is quite narrow at an average of 4.95 °C (95% confidence interval ± 4.31). PMID:27073585

  18. Evaluation of Tibial Condyle Fractures Treated with Ilizarov Fixation, A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy R, Sandeep; Shah, Harshad M; Golla, Dinesh Kumar; Ganesh D J, Niranthara; Kumar P, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tibial plateau fractures are associated with significant soft tissue injuries which increases the risks of complications and must be considered when managing tibial plateau fractures. Various modalities of treatment are available for treatment of these fractures but Ilizarov fixation has a special advantage over others. Review of literature shows many studies of Ilizarov fixation in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures with variable results. Aim of our study was to evaluate tibial condyle fractures treated by Ilizarov fixation. Materials and Methods: Study included 43 patients with Schatzker type II and above tibial plateau fractures treated by ilizarov fixation. Standard trauma evaluation, a meticulous musculoskeletal and neurologic examination was carried out. All patients underwent Ilizarov fixation by same team of surgeons. Clinicoradilogical assessment of the patients carried out at regular intervals. Results: Our study included 43 cases of tibial plateau of various types except type I. Mean time for radiological union was 24.51 wk (range 15 to 32 wk). Mean fixator period was 26.6 wk( 16-34 wk). The functional results were measured by Lyshom’s and Hohl and Luck score. The mean Lyshom’s score was at the end of one year was 82.16. At end of one year by Hohl and Luck grading 11 patients had fair, 23 had good and 9 had excellent results. Conclusion: High energy tibial plateau fractures can be definitively treated with Ilizarov external fixation. Treatment with this method gives good union rates and less risk of infection. Closed reduction, minimal soft tissue damage and early mobilization are the key to low complications. PMID:25584250

  19. Cementless fixation of the tibial component for the ICLH knee.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, M A; Bradley, G W; Blaha, J D; Insler, H P

    1982-01-01

    The use of polymethylmethacrylate bone cement in joint replacement surgery is not without drawbacks. Certain hazards have been appreciated and the bone cement interface may not be as stable in the long run as was once felt. This paper reports the results in 52 knees which were replaced using the uncemented ICLH (Imperial College/London Hospital) tibial component; the average follow up was two years (range six months to four years). The results were compiled with regard to pain as well as clinical examination and X-ray evaluation. The results were comparable to those achieved in knees replaced using bone cement. Roentgenographic evaluation revealed no evidence of loosening nor sinkage of any of these prostheses. Considerations in the development of a knee prosthesis to be utilized without bone cement and the operative technique employed to implant such a prosthesis are presented. The merits of such a system are discussed. Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C PMID:7086790

  20. Early migration of tibial components is associated with late revision

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We performed two parallel systematic reviews and meta-analyses to determine the association between early migration of tibial components and late aseptic revision. Methods One review comprised early migration data from radiostereometric analysis (RSA) studies, while the other focused on revision rates for aseptic loosening from long-term survival studies. Thresholds for acceptable and unacceptable migration were determined according to that of several national joint registries: < 5% revision at 10 years. Results Following an elaborate literature search, 50 studies (involving 847 total knee prostheses (TKPs)) were included in the RSA review and 56 studies (20,599 TKPs) were included in the survival review. The results showed that for every mm increase in migration there was an 8% increase in revision rate, which remained after correction for age, sex, diagnosis, hospital type, continent, and study quality. Consequently, migration up to 0.5 mm was considered acceptable during the first postoperative year, while migration of 1.6 mm or more was unacceptable. TKPs with migration of between 0.5 and 1.6 mm were considered to be at risk of having revision rates higher than 5% at 10 years. Interpretation There was a clinically relevant association between early migration of TKPs and late revision for loosening. The proposed migration thresholds can be implemented in a phased, evidence-based introduction of new types of knee prostheses, since they allow early detection of high-risk TKPs while exposing only a small number of patients. PMID:23140091

  1. [Treatment of defects of the long bones using distraction osteogenesis (Ilizarov) and intramedullary nailing. Theoretic principles, animal experiments, clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Brunner, U; Kessler, S; Cordey, J; Rahn, B; Schweiberer, L; Perren, S M

    1990-06-01

    For large shaft defects of tibia and femur, distraction-compression osteosynthesis (Ilizarov) provides an ideal autologous bone graft. Combination of this with an intramedullary interlocking nail instead of an external fixator could improve patient comfort, because transport with a small external device takes only one-third of the total fixation period. Using 21 adult female sheep we created standardized tibia shaft defects 20 mm (medium size) and 45 mm (large size) in length. The tibiae were stabilized with non-reamed intramedullary interlocking nails. Following corticotomy by chisel, segments were transported using subcutaneous traction wires with a screw as a fulcrum to maintain stationary skin exit points without soft tissue problems. The external traction devices were removed after 12 or 16 weeks. Animals were sacrificed after 12 or 24 weeks with medium-size defects, and after 16 or 32 weeks with large defects. We evaluated the results clinically, by standardized weekly X-rays and, after sacrifice, by quantitative computed tomography (QCT). No animals had to be excluded from the study. Despite primary destruction of the intramedullary circulation all distraction gaps were spanned with bone. X-Rays showed typical signs of good quality of distraction bone regeneration (narrow radiolucent zone in the middle of the regenerate, longitudinal structure), continuous calcification, and cortex formation. QCT cross sections showed completely circular bone regeneration with small and large defects. Bone regeneration was faster on the dorsal side, where more bone was formed than ventrally. Small defects can remain ventrally in the regenerate; these close secondarily.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Mechanical properties and in vivo performance of load-bearing fiber-reinforced composite intramedullary nails with improved torsional strength.

    PubMed

    Moritz, N; Strandberg, N; Zhao, D S; Mattila, R; Paracchini, L; Vallittu, P K; Aro, H T

    2014-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) could be feasible materials for fracture fixation devices if the mechanical properties of the composites are congruent with the local structural properties of bone. In a recently developed FRC implant, bisphenol A dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin was reinforced with unidirectional E-glass fibers. The addition of a braided glass fiber sleeving to the unidirectional fibers increased the torsional strength (99.5MPa) of the FRC implants at the expense of the flexural strength (602.0MPa). The flexural modulus was 15.3GPa. Two types of FRC intramedullary nails were prepared; first type was FRC as such, second type was FRC with a surface layer of bioactive glass (BG) granules. Experimental oblong subtrochanteric defect was created in 14 rabbits. The defect, which reduced the torsional strength of the bones by 66%, was fixed with an FRC intramedullary nail of either type. The contralateral intact femur served as the control. This model simulated surgical stabilization of bone metastasis. After 12 weeks of follow-up, the femurs were harvested and analyzed by torsional testing, micro-CT and hard tissue histology. Healed undisplaced peri-implant fractures were noticed in half of the animals irrespective of the type of FRC implant. Torsional testing showed no significant differences between the implantation groups. The torsional strength of the bones stabilized by either type of FRC implant was 83% of that of the contralateral femurs. In histological analysis, no implant debris and no adverse tissue reactions were observed. While the mechanical properties of the modified FRCs were suboptimal, the FRC intramedullary nails supported the femurs without structural failure, even in the cases of peri-implant fractures. PMID:25222871

  3. Effect of tibial tuberosity advancement on cranial tibial subluxation in the feline cranial cruciate deficient stifle joint: An ex vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Retournard, M; Bilmont, A; Asimus, E; Palierne, S; Autefage, A

    2016-08-01

    The effects of Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA) on Cranial Tibial Subluxation (CTS) and Tibial Rotation Angle (TRA) were evaluated in a model of feline Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifle joint. Ten hindlimbs of adult cats were used. Quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles were simulated using cables, turnbuckles and a spring. An axial load of 30% body weight was applied. The stifle and talocrural joint angles were adjusted to 120°. Patellar tendon angle (PTA), CTS and TRA were measured radiographically before and after CrCL section, after TTA and after additional advancement by 1 and 2mm. CrCL section resulted in a CTS of 8.1±1.5mm and a TRA of 18.4±5.7 °. After TTA, PTA was significantly decreased from 99.1±1.7° to 89.1±0.7°; CTS and TRA did not change significantly (7.8±1.0mm and 15.9±5.7° respectively). Additional advancement of the tibial tuberosity by 1mm did not significantly affect CTS and TRA. Additional advancement of the tibial tuberosity by 2mm significantly reduced the PTA to 82.9±0.9°. A significant decrease of CTS (6.9±1.3mm) and TRA (14.7±3.6°) was also observed. A lack of stabilization of the CrCL deficient stifle was observed after TTA in this model of the feline stifle. Even though the validity of the model can be questioned, simple transposition of the technique of TTA from the cat to the dog appeared hazardous. PMID:27474002

  4. [10-year follow-up of C3-C7 cervical laminectomy for intramedullary grade I astrocytoma].

    PubMed

    Staudte, H W; Busch, G

    In an eight years old boy we operated an intramedullary astrocytoma grade I and reimplanted the laminae C4-7 en bloc. A good stability was achieved. Ten years later only one segment remained intact, the others showing spontaneous fusion as a major draw back. This is possibly due to subperiostal dissection and bracing. No spinal stenosis occurred. An overuse of the remaining disc C4/5 might lead to a secondary degenerative stenosis. The operation is simple and might avoid swan neck deformity in children after large decompression of dorsal structures. PMID:8342307

  5. New Technique for Removal of the Ulnar Intramedullary Nail Failed to Remove: Broken Assembly Piece in the Nail

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jin Woong; Kim, Sang-Bum; Heo, Youn Moo; Kim, Tae Gyun; Kim, Doo Hyun; Jung, You Sun

    2016-01-01

    Methods about removal of intramedullary nail in complicated cases were reported in some literatures but there are no reports about nail removal in the ulna. The authors would like to report such a case and the technique. We removed bone of the inlet site and created another bony window using an osteotome to expose the interlocking screw holes. Only a bony window the size of 2 inter-interlocking holes at the most proximal part of the nail can be used to remove the nail with minimal damage of the triceps brachii tendon and soft tissue. PMID:27247748

  6. Novel intramedullary-fixation technique for long bone fragility fractures using bioresorbable materials.

    PubMed

    Nishizuka, Takanobu; Kurahashi, Toshikazu; Hara, Tatsuya; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Almost all of the currently available fracture fixation devices for metaphyseal fragility fractures are made of hard metals, which carry a high risk of implant-related complications such as implant cutout in severely osteoporotic patients. We developed a novel fracture fixation technique (intramedullary-fixation with biodegradable materials; IM-BM) for severely weakened long bones using three different non-metallic biomaterials, a poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) woven tube, a nonwoven polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) fiber mat, and an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of IM-BM with mechanical testing as well as with an animal experiment. To perform mechanical testing, we fixed two longitudinal acrylic pipes with four different methods, and used them for a three-point bending test (N = 5). The three-point bending test revealed that the average fracture energy for the IM-BM group (PLLA + CPC + PHA) was 3 times greater than that of PLLA + CPC group, and 60 to 200 times greater than that of CPC + PHA group and CPC group. Using an osteoporotic rabbit distal femur incomplete fracture model, sixteen rabbits were randomly allocated into four experimental groups (IM-BM group, PLLA + CPC group, CPC group, Kirschner wire (K-wire) group). No rabbit in the IM-BM group suffered fracture displacement even under full weight bearing. In contrast, two rabbits in the PLLA + CPC group, three rabbits in the CPC group, and three rabbits in the K-wire group suffered fracture displacement within the first postoperative week. The present work demonstrated that IM-BM was strong enough to reinforce and stabilize incomplete fractures with both mechanical testing and an animal experiment even in the distal thigh, where bone is exposed to the highest bending and torsional stresses in the body. IM-BM can be one treatment option for those with severe osteoporosis. PMID:25111138

  7. An Effective Approach for Optimization of a Composite Intramedullary Nail for Treating Femoral Shaft Fractures.

    PubMed

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-12-01

    The high stiffness of conventional intramedullary (IM) nails may result in stress shielding and subsequent bone loss following healing in long bone fractures. It can also delay union by reducing compressive loads at the fracture site, thereby inhibiting secondary bone healing. This paper introduces a new approach for the optimization of a fiber-reinforced composite nail made of carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy based on a combination of the classical laminate theory, beam theory, finite-element (FE) method, and bone remodeling model using irreversible thermodynamics. The optimization began by altering the composite stacking sequence and thickness to minimize axial stiffness, while maximizing torsional stiffness for a given range of bending stiffnesses. The selected candidates for the seven intervals of bending stiffness were then examined in an experimentally validated FE model to evaluate their mechanical performance in transverse and oblique femoral shaft fractures. It was found that the composite nail having an axial stiffness of 3.70 MN and bending and torsional stiffnesses of 70.3 and 70.9 N⋅m², respectively, showed an overall superiority compared to the other configurations. It increased compression at the fracture site by 344.9 N (31%) on average, while maintaining fracture stability through an average increase of only 0.6 mm (49%) in fracture shear movement in transverse and oblique fractures when compared to a conventional titanium-alloy nail. The long-term results obtained from the bone remodeling model suggest that the proposed composite IM nail reduces bone loss in the femoral shaft from 7.9% to 3.5% when compared to a conventional titanium-alloy nail. This study proposes a number of practical guidelines for the design of composite IM nails.

  8. An Effective Approach for Optimization of a Composite Intramedullary Nail for Treating Femoral Shaft Fractures.

    PubMed

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-12-01

    The high stiffness of conventional intramedullary (IM) nails may result in stress shielding and subsequent bone loss following healing in long bone fractures. It can also delay union by reducing compressive loads at the fracture site, thereby inhibiting secondary bone healing. This paper introduces a new approach for the optimization of a fiber-reinforced composite nail made of carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy based on a combination of the classical laminate theory, beam theory, finite-element (FE) method, and bone remodeling model using irreversible thermodynamics. The optimization began by altering the composite stacking sequence and thickness to minimize axial stiffness, while maximizing torsional stiffness for a given range of bending stiffnesses. The selected candidates for the seven intervals of bending stiffness were then examined in an experimentally validated FE model to evaluate their mechanical performance in transverse and oblique femoral shaft fractures. It was found that the composite nail having an axial stiffness of 3.70 MN and bending and torsional stiffnesses of 70.3 and 70.9 N⋅m², respectively, showed an overall superiority compared to the other configurations. It increased compression at the fracture site by 344.9 N (31%) on average, while maintaining fracture stability through an average increase of only 0.6 mm (49%) in fracture shear movement in transverse and oblique fractures when compared to a conventional titanium-alloy nail. The long-term results obtained from the bone remodeling model suggest that the proposed composite IM nail reduces bone loss in the femoral shaft from 7.9% to 3.5% when compared to a conventional titanium-alloy nail. This study proposes a number of practical guidelines for the design of composite IM nails. PMID:26458035

  9. Effect of Pentoxifylline Administration on an Experimental Rat Model of Femur Fracture Healing With Intramedullary Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Vashghani Farahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Mostafavinia, Ataroalsadat; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Pouriran, Ramin; Noruzian, Mohammad; Ghoreishi, Seyed Kamran; Aryan, Arefe; Bayat, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Globally, musculoskeletal injuries comprise a major public health problem that contributes to a large burden of disability and suffering. Pentoxifylline (PTX) has been originally used as a hemorheologic drug to treat intermittent claudication. Previous test tube and in vivo studies reported the beneficial effects of PTX on bony tissue. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different dosages of PTX on biomechanical properties that occur during the late phase of the fracture healing process following a complete femoral osteotomy in a rat model. We applied intramedullary pin fixation as the treatment of choice. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. We used the simple random technique to divide 35 female rats into five groups. Group 1 received intraperitoneal (i.p.) PTX (50 mg/kg, once daily) injections, starting 15 days before surgery, and group 2, group 3, and group 4 received 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg i.p. PTX injections, respectively, once daily after surgery. All animals across groups received treatment for six weeks (until sacrificed). Complete surgical transverse osteotomy was performed in the right femur of all rats. At six weeks after surgery, the femurs were subjected to a three-point bending test. Results: Daily administration of 50 mg/kg PTX (groups 1 and 2) decreased the high stress load in repairing osteotomized femurs when compared with the control group. The highest dose of PTX (200 mg/kg) significantly increased the high stress load when compared with the control group (P = 0.030), group 1 (P = 0.023), group 2 (P = 0.008), and group 3 (P = 0.010), per the LSD findings. Conclusions: Treatment with 200 mg/kg PTX accelerated fracture healing when compared with the control group. PMID:26756019

  10. Novel Intramedullary-Fixation Technique for Long Bone Fragility Fractures Using Bioresorbable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishizuka, Takanobu; Kurahashi, Toshikazu; Hara, Tatsuya; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Almost all of the currently available fracture fixation devices for metaphyseal fragility fractures are made of hard metals, which carry a high risk of implant-related complications such as implant cutout in severely osteoporotic patients. We developed a novel fracture fixation technique (intramedullary-fixation with biodegradable materials; IM-BM) for severely weakened long bones using three different non-metallic biomaterials, a poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) woven tube, a nonwoven polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) fiber mat, and an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of IM-BM with mechanical testing as well as with an animal experiment. To perform mechanical testing, we fixed two longitudinal acrylic pipes with four different methods, and used them for a three-point bending test (N = 5). The three-point bending test revealed that the average fracture energy for the IM-BM group (PLLA + CPC + PHA) was 3 times greater than that of PLLA + CPC group, and 60 to 200 times greater than that of CPC + PHA group and CPC group. Using an osteoporotic rabbit distal femur incomplete fracture model, sixteen rabbits were randomly allocated into four experimental groups (IM-BM group, PLLA + CPC group, CPC group, Kirschner wire (K-wire) group). No rabbit in the IM-BM group suffered fracture displacement even under full weight bearing. In contrast, two rabbits in the PLLA + CPC group, three rabbits in the CPC group, and three rabbits in the K-wire group suffered fracture displacement within the first postoperative week. The present work demonstrated that IM-BM was strong enough to reinforce and stabilize incomplete fractures with both mechanical testing and an animal experiment even in the distal thigh, where bone is exposed to the highest bending and torsional stresses in the body. IM-BM can be one treatment option for those with severe osteoporosis. PMID:25111138

  11. Locking plate versus retrograde intramedullary nail fixation for tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Shi, Zhongmin; Mei, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis (TTCA) surgery is indicated for the end-stage disease of the tibiotalar and subtalar joints. Although different fixation technique of TTCA has been proposed to achieve high fusion rate and low complication rate, there is still no consensus upon this point. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy of retrograde intramedullary nail fixation (RINF) and locking plate fixation (LPF) for TTCA. Materials and Methods: Fifty four patients who underwent TTCA through the lateral approach with lateral fibular osteotomy using RINF (32 patients, 18 male/14 female, mean age: 48) or LPF (22 patients, 12 male/10 female, mean age: 51) between January 2007 and January 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and clinical characteristics, surgery (operation time, blood loss) outcomes (postoperative fusion rates, visual analog scale and foot and ankle surgery score and complications) were compared. Results: The LPF group had a shorter operation time (72.3 ± 9.2 vs. 102.8 ± 11.1 min, P < 0.001), less blood loss (75.9 ± 20.2 vs. 140.0 ± 23.8 ml, P < 0.001) and less intraoperative fluoroscopy sessions (3.6 ± 0.9 vs. 8.4 ± 1.3, P < 0.001) than the RINF group. Patients were followed up for 12–24 months (mean of 16.2 months). Both groups had similar postoperative fusion rates (90.6% and 95.4%) and the LPF group showed a nonsignificant lower complication rate (18.2% vs. 28.1% respectively). Patients at higher risk on nonunion due to rheumatoid diseases may have a lower nonunion rate with LPF than RINF (one out of eight vs. three out of nine, P < 0.001). Conclusions: The LPF for TTCA was simpler to perform compared with RINF, but with similar postoperative outcomes and complication rates. PMID:26015614

  12. Effect of tibial tuberosity advancement on femorotibial contact mechanics and stifle kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stanley E; Pozzi, Antonio; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Lewis, Daniel D

    2009-01-01

    Objective- To evaluate the effects of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) on femorotibial contact mechanics and 3-dimensional kinematics in cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifles of dogs. Study Design- In vitro biomechanical study. Animals- Unpaired pelvic limbs from 8 dogs, weighing 28-35 kg. Methods- Digital pressure sensors placed subjacent to the menisci were used to measure femorotibial contact force, contact area, peak and mean contact pressure, and peak pressure location with the limb under an axial load of 30% body weight and a stifle angle of 135 degrees . Three-dimensional static poses of the stifle were obtained using a Microscribe digitizing arm. Each specimen was tested under normal, CrCL-deficient, and TTA-treated conditions. Repeated measures analysis of variance with a Tukey post hoc test (P<.05) was used for statistical comparison. Results- Significant disturbances to all measured contact mechanic parameters were evident after CrCL transection, which corresponded to marked cranial tibial subluxation and internal tibial rotation in the CrCL-deficient stifle. No significant differences in any contact mechanic and kinematic parameters were detected between normal and TTA-treated stifles. Conclusion- TTA eliminates craniocaudal stifle instability during simulated weight-bearing and concurrently restores femorotibial contact mechanics to normal. Clinical Relevance- TTA may mitigate the progression of stifle osteoarthritis in dogs afflicted with CrCL insufficiency by eliminating cranial tibial thrust while preserving the normal orientation of the proximal tibial articulating surface.

  13. Apophysitis of the Tibial Tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter Disease): A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Azizi, Ahmad Tariq; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) is a condition in which the patellar tendon insertion on the tibial tuberosity becomes inflamed. It is a well-known condition in late childhood characterized by pain and a bony prominence over the tibial tuberosity. The pain is usually exacerbated by physical activities like running, jumping, and climbing stairs. In the acute stage, the margins of the patellar tendon become blurred in radiographs due to the soft tissue swelling. After three to four months, bone fragmentation at the tibial tuberosity is viewed. In the sub-acute stage, soft tissue swelling resolves, but the bony ossicle remains. In the chronic stage, the bone fragment may fuse with the tibial tuberosity which can appear normal. The primary goal in the treatment of OSD is the reduction of pain and swelling over the tibial tuberosity. The patient should limit physical activities until the symptoms are resolved. In some cases, the patient should restrict physical activities for several months. The presence of pain with kneeling because of an ossicle that does not respond to conservative measures is the indication for surgery. In these cases, the removal of the ossicle, surrounding bursa, and the bony prominence is the treatment of choice. PMID:27752406

  14. Effects of physical exertion on trans-tibial prosthesis users' ability to accommodate alignment perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Goeran; Slavens, Brooke A; O'Connor, Kristian M; Smith, Roger O; Hafner, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Background It has long been reported that a range of prosthesis alignments is acceptable in trans-tibial prosthetics. This range was shown to be smaller when walking on uneven surfaces. It has also been argued that findings on gait with prostheses that were obtained under laboratory conditions are limited in their applicability to real-life environments. Objectives This study investigated the hypothesis that efforts to compensate for suboptimal alignments by active users of trans-tibial prostheses become less effective when levels of physical exertion increase. Study design A 2 × 2 repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to compare the effects of physical exertion and subtle alignment perturbations on gait with trans-tibial prostheses. Methods The gait of eight subjects with trans-tibial amputation was analyzed when walking with two different prosthesis alignments and two different physical exertion levels. The main and interaction effects were statistically evaluated. Results Bilateral step length symmetry and measures of step variability within the same leg were found to be affected by the intervention. There was no significant effect on index variables that combined kinematic or kinetic measures. Conclusion Findings showed that persons with trans-tibial prostheses responded heterogeneously to the interventions. For most variables, the research hypothesis could not be confirmed. PMID:25138114

  15. Sequential avulsions of the tibial tubercle in an adolescent basketball player.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying Chieh; Chao, Ying-Hao; Lien, Fang-Chieh

    2010-05-01

    Tibial tubercle avulsion is an uncommon fracture in physically active adolescents. Sequential avulsion of tibial tubercles is extremely rare. We reported a healthy, active 15-year-old boy who suffered from left tibial tubercle avulsion fracture during a basketball game. He received open reduction and internal fixation with two smooth Kirschner wires and a cannulated screw, with every effort to reduce the plate injury. Long-leg splint was used for protection followed by programmed rehabilitation. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. Another avulsion fracture happened at the right tibial tubercle 3.5 months later when he was playing the basketball. From the encouragement of previous successful treatment, we provided him open reduction and fixation with two small-caliber screws. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. No genu recurvatum or other deformity was happening in our case at the end of 2-year follow-up. No evidence of Osgood-Schlatter disease or osteogenesis imperfecta was found. Sequential avulsion fractures of tibial tubercles are rare. Good functional recovery can often be obtained like our case if we treat it well. To a physically active adolescent, we should never overstate the risk of sequential avulsion of the other leg to postpone the return to an active, functional life.

  16. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  17. Studying the Relation Between Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome and Anatomic and Anthropometric Characteristics of Military Male Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, Vahid; Shakibaee, Abolfazl; Khatibi Aghda, Amidoddin; Emami Meybodi, Mohammad Kazem; Delavari, Abbasali; Jahandideh, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (MTSS) is common among military recruits and to our knowledge; the factors that might put the military recruits at higher risk of incidence of MTSS are not well known. Objectives: This study was done to investigate the association between some anthropometric and anatomical factors and the prevalence of MTSS among military recruits. Patients and Methods: One hundred and eighty one randomly selected military recruits were included in this cross sectional study. Using history taking and physical examinations they were tested for MTSS. Accordingly the subjects were assigned to the case (those with MTSS) and control groups (normal healthy subjects). Using standard guidelines, the anthropometric and anatomical criteria of the subjects were measured. The correlation between the measurements and the prevalence of MTSS was tested using statistical analysis. Results: Data of all the 181 subjects with the mean age of 30.7 ± 4.68 years were Included in the final analysis. The prevalence of MTSS was found to be 16.6% (30 people). Internal and external rotation range of motion, iliospinale height, the score of navicular drop test, and the trochanteric tibial lateral length were significantly different between healthy subjects and patients with MTSS (P < 0.05). Discussion: The prevalence of MTSS was relatively lower in this study comparing to other studies on military personnel. It was not probably due to type of military shoes or exercise area surface (none of them were standardized); it could be due to low intensity trainings and the long intervals between training sessions. PMID:26448835

  18. [Split posterior tibial tendon transfer as a selected technique of treatment of spastic equino-varus deformity in children].

    PubMed

    Lipczyk, Zbigniew; Golański, Grzegorz; Flont, Paweł; Niedzielski, Kryspin Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Equinovarus deformity is one of the most common deformities seen in patients with cerebral palsy. During years between 1993 and 2004 in 36 patients with cerebral palsy 46 operative procedures of split posterior tibial tendon transfer to peroneus brevis muscle were performed to correct varus deformity of the foot. Additionally equinus was corrected by lengthening lengtheninglengthening of the calcaneal tendon in 42 cases and in 4 cases by gastrocnemius recession according to Baker modification of Vulpius procedure. Children's age at the time of operation was between 3.5 and 16 years of age (average 7.5). In our cohort of 36 patients there were 10 cases of quadriplegia (28%), 12 cases of hemiplegia (33%), 12 cases of paraparesis inferior (33%) and 2 cases of monoplegia (6%). 25 patients with 34 operated feet (73.9%) reported for final examination. Follow-up period was from 18 months to 11 years (average 5.5 years). At final examination we evaluated clinical effectiveness of gait, passive and active range of movement, plantograms, and subjective evaluation of patient and patients' parents. Wearing of orthoses and orthopaedic footwear was noted. The results were divided into groups according to Green's classification. There were 67.6% of very good results, 23.6% of good results and 8.8% of poor results. Basing on our experience in treatment of spastic equinovarus deformity of the foot in children with cerebral palsy we stand, that split posterior tibial tendon transfer can bring good results and is a valuable surgical technique in treatment of equinovarus deformity. PMID:20496775

  19. Temporary bridging external fixation in distal tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Lavini, F; Dall'Oca, C; Mezzari, S; Maluta, T; Luminari, E; Perusi, F; Vecchini, E; Magnan, B

    2014-12-01

    Fractures that involve the distal area of the tibia are associated with a high percentage of complications. Soft tissue oedema, swelling, blisters, skin abrasions and open wounds could compromise the outcome of these lesions. The waiting time before surgery with ORIF is mostly due to soft tissue conditions. Early application of a simple joint-spanning external fixator would achieve the initial goal of stability and the respect of soft tissue, thereby decreasing the time necessary for definitive treatment. A total of 40 consecutive patients (22 male and 18 female) with a mean age of 52 years (range 17-82 years) with distal tibial fracture treated between January 2010 and January 2013 were evaluated. Early temporary external fixation was the first treatment step. Twenty patients had pilon fractures, characterised by the intra-articular involvement of the distal tibia with metaphyseal extension, and 20 patients had malleolar fracture-dislocation. Patients were divided into two groups, A and B. Group A comprised 10 patients with ankle fracture-dislocation and bone fragmentation, who were treated with a temporary bridging external fixation that was maintained after ORIF to exploit ligamentotaxis during the first phases of bone healing. In Group B (30 patients), the external fixation was removed after ORIF. The results of the study are in line with the recent literature: temporary external fixation in high-energy trauma and fracture-dislocation of the ankle enables soft tissue to be restored, which facilitates postoperative assessment of bone fragments by CT scan. The complication rate in this study was 5% in patients with malleolar fractures and 20% in patients with pilon fractures. The maintenance of temporary external fixation after ORIF synthesis during the entire first stage of bone healing seems to be a good method of treatment that has a low rate of soft tissue complications.

  20. Student Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  1. Micromotion at the tibial plateau in primary and revision total knee arthroplasty: fixed versus rotating platform designs

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, R. D.; Malinzak, R. A.; Reyes, E. M.; Cook, P. L.; Farley, K. A.; Ritter, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Initial stability of tibial trays is crucial for long-term success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in both primary and revision settings. Rotating platform (RP) designs reduce torque transfer at the tibiofemoral interface. We asked if this reduced torque transfer in RP designs resulted in subsequently reduced micromotion at the cemented fixation interface between the prosthesis component and the adjacent bone. Methods Composite tibias were implanted with fixed and RP primary and revision tibial trays and biomechanically tested under up to 2.5 kN of axial compression and 10° of external femoral component rotation. Relative micromotion between the implanted tibial tray and the neighbouring bone was quantified using high-precision digital image correlation techniques. Results Rotational malalignment between femoral and tibial components generated 40% less overall tibial tray micromotion in RP designs than in standard fixed bearing tibial trays. RP trays reduced micromotion by up to 172 µm in axial compression and 84 µm in rotational malalignment models. Conclusions Reduced torque transfer at the tibiofemoral interface in RP tibial trays reduces relative component micromotion and may aid long-term stability in cases of revision TKA or poor bone quality. Cite this article: Mr S. R. Small. Micromotion at the tibial plateau in primary and revision total knee arthroplasty: fixed versus rotating platform designs. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:122–129. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000481. PMID:27095658

  2. The effect of tibial torsion on the dynamic function of the soleus during gait.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael; Lakin, Gaio

    2003-04-01

    An induced acceleration analysis (IAA) model was used to investigate the effect of tibial torsion on the ability of the soleus to support and propel the body during gait. The IAA approach is well suited for this study because it allows soleus action to be quantified in the presence of varying amounts of tibial torsion, while other factors such as body configuration and muscle activation are held constant. The results of the analysis showed that excess tibial torsion shifts the induced knee joint accelerations toward flexion, valgus and external rotation, and diminishes body center-of-mass support and propulsion. This analysis supports the concept that bony mal-alignment can lead to 'lever arm dysfunction'. The objective data correlate with previous clinical observations related to valgus stress, crouch and the role of the soleus in level walking. The IAA model provides a tool for examining various aspects of abnormal gait independently and quantitatively.

  3. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  4. Is There A Difference in Bone Ingrowth in Modular Versus Monoblock Porous Tantalum Tibial Trays?

    PubMed Central

    Hanzlik, Josa A.; Day, Judd S.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary total knee designs incorporating highly porous metallic surfaces have demonstrated promising clinical outcomes. However, stiffness differences between modular and monoblock porous tantalum tibial trays may affect bone ingrowth. This study investigated effect of implant design, spatial location and clinical factors on bone ingrowth in retrieved porous tantalum tibial trays. Three modular and twenty-one monoblock tibial trays were evaluated for bone ingrowth. Nonparametric statistical tests were used to investigate differences in bone ingrowth measurements by implant design, spatial location on the tray, substrate depth and clinical factors. Modular trays (5.3±3.2%) exhibited higher bone ingrowth than monoblock trays (1.6±1.9%, p=0.032). Bone ingrowth in both designs was highest in the initial 500 μm from the surface. Implantation time was positively correlated with bone ingrowth for monoblock trays. PMID:25743106

  5. Bilateral Medial Tibial Plateau Fracture after Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeon, Jong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are rare, and only isolated cases have been reported. The authors describe a case of bilateral medial tibial plateau fracture following a minor motorcycle accident in a patient who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in the past. Two years and four months before the accident, the patient underwent an arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using double-bundle technique on his left knee at a hospital. He had the same surgery using single-bundle technique on his right knee about eight months ago at another hospital. The fractures in his both involved knees occurred through the tibial tunnel and required open reduction with internal fixation. At three weeks after fixation, a second-look arthroscopy revealed intact ACLs in both knees. At five months follow-up, he was able to walk without instability on physical examination. Follow-up radiographs of the patient showed callus formations with healed fractures. PMID:26060613

  6. Arthroscopic 4-Point Suture Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial Avulsion Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Agathangelidis, Filon; Ditsios, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2014-01-01

    Tibial eminence avulsion fractures are rare injuries occurring mainly in adolescents and young adults. When necessary, regardless of patient age, anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are mandatory for fracture healing and accurate restoration of normal knee biomechanics. Various arthroscopically assisted fixation methods with sutures, anchors, wires, or screws have been described but can be technically demanding, thus elongating operative times. The purpose of this article is to present a technical variation of arthroscopic suture fixation of anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures. Using thoracic drain needles over 2.4-mm anterior cruciate ligament tibial guidewires, we recommend the safe and easy creation of four 2.9-mm tibial tunnels at different angles and at specific points. This technique uses thoracic drain needles as suture passage cannulas and offers 4-point fixation stability, avoiding potential complications of bony bridge fracture and tunnel connection. PMID:25685674

  7. A qualitative study of recovery from type III-B and III-C tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Shauver, Melissa S; Aravind, Maya S; Chung, Kevin C

    2011-01-01

    The literature has shown that long-term outcomes for both below-knee amputation and reconstruction after type III-B and III-C tibial fracture are poor. Yet, patients often report satisfaction with their treatment and outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between patient outcomes and satisfaction after open tibial fractures via qualitative methodology. Twenty patients who were treated for open tibial fractures at one institution were selected using purposeful sampling and interviewed in-person in a semi-structured manner. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Despite reporting marked physical and psychosocial deficits, participants relayed high satisfaction. We hypothesize that the use of adaptive coping techniques successfully reduces stress, which leads to an increase in coping self-efficacy that results in the further use of adaptive coping strategies, culminating in personal growth. This stress reduction and personal growth leads to satisfaction despite poor functional and emotional outcomes.

  8. All-poly tibial component better than metal-backed: a randomized RSA study.

    PubMed

    Norgren, B; Dalén, T; Nilsson, K G

    2004-06-01

    The quality of the fixation of the tibial component in 21 patients (23 knees) undergoing a cemented total-knee arthroplasty of the Profix design was investigated using radiostereometric analysis during 24 months. The patients were randomized to either an all-polyethylene (AP) or a metal-backed (MB) tibial component. The articulating geometry and the stem design of the implants were identical, as were the operative technique and the postoperative regimen. The results showed no negative consequences as regards fixation using AP tibial components. In all aspects, the AP components displayed magnitudes of migration on par with, or sometimes even lower than their MB counterparts. Five of 11 MB components displayed continuous migration between 1 and 2 years, compared to none of the AP implants, a finding known to be of positive prognostic significance when predicting future aseptic loosening. PMID:15194094

  9. Total knee arthroplasty using cementless keels and cemented tibial trays: 10-year results

    PubMed Central

    Kolisek, Frank R.; Mont, Michael A.; Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Jessup, Nenette M.; Siddiqui, Junaed A.; Monesmith, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The problem of early mechanical stability of cemented and cementless keels of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess clinical and radiographic outcomes of a cohort of 51 TKAs using a cemented platform with cementless keel fixation. At a mean follow-up of 10.4 years (range, 7 to 14 years), the mean Knee Society Score (KSS) was 93 points (range, 59 to 100 points), and the mean functional score was 73 points (range, 0 to 100 points). Only one patient demonstrated progressive tibial radiolucencies at 13.1 years follow-up, which resolved with a revision with an exchange of components. The results of this study suggest that a proximally cemented tibial tray with a press-fit keel TKA provides excellent mean 10-year outcomes. PMID:18185931

  10. Oxidation and other property changes of retrieved sequentially annealed UHMWPE acetabular and tibial bearings.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Steven D; Currier, Barbara H; Van Citters, Douglas W; Levine, Rayna A; Collier, John P

    2015-04-01

    This investigation analyzed retrieved sequentially crosslinked and annealed (SXL) ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings to determine whether the material is chemically stable in vivo. A series of retrieved tibial and acetabular components were analyzed for changes in ketone oxidation, crosslink density, and free radical concentration. Oxidation was observed to increase with in vivo duration, and the rate of oxidation in tibial inserts was significantly greater than in acetabular liners. SXL acetabular bearings oxidized at a rate comparable to gamma-sterilized liners, while SXL tibial inserts oxidized at a significantly faster rate than their gamma-sterilized counterparts. A significant decrease in crosslink density with increased mean ketone oxidation index was observed, suggesting that in vivo oxidation may be causing material degradation. Furthermore, a subsurface whitened damage region was also found in a subset of the bearings, indicating the possibility of a clinically relevant decrease in mechanical properties of these components.

  11. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of displaced tibial eminence fractures using a suture loop transporter.

    PubMed

    Yip, D K; Wong, J W; Chien, E P; Chan, C F

    2001-01-01

    Current arthroscopic suture fixation techniques of tibial eminence fractures are time consuming and the number of anchor sutures that can be placed is limited by the cumbersome and repetitive numerous needle threading steps. This occurs at 2 stages: first, when placing anchoring sutures through the avulsed anterior cruciate ligament stump with a suture punch, and second, when there is a need to traverse the tibial bone canal with the suture ends. We describe a modification that reduces the reliance on conventional rigid instruments and instead uses a loop transporter made from readily available suture material. The suture loop transporter being malleable reduces the necessary width of the tibial bone canal to be made and has a further advantage of minimizing the bone loss during the reaming of the bone tunnel. The subsequent potential for a stress fracture at these tunnel sites is also substantially reduced. Our technique is more user friendly, more accurate, and quicker to perform.

  12. A Nonenhancing World Health Organization Grade II Intramedullary Spinal Ependymoma in the Conus: Case Illustration and Review of Imaging Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; Jost, Gregory F; Schmidt, Meic H

    2012-03-01

    Spinal ependymomas comprise ~60% of all intramedullary tumors in adults. Ependymomas demonstrate distinct imaging features, such as central location within the spinal cord, symmetrical expansion, intra- and extratumoral cysts, hemosiderin caps, and strong enhancement on contrast-injected, T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In adults, most ependymomas are myxopapillary, and in children, most are nonmyxopapillary. In general, nonmyxopapillary or classic ependymomas are hyperintense on T2- and hypointense on T1-weighted MR imaging, but whereas the signal intensity on T1 and T2 is variable, homogeneous contrast enhancement is usually a characteristic finding. Here, the authors provide an overview on spinal ependymomas with an emphasis on imaging characteristics and morphological background and present the case of a World Health Organization grade II ependymoma in the conus that did not enhance. Interestingly, the tumor contained a large hemorrhagic cyst. Just as hemorrhagic metastatic tumors may not enhance, a hemorrhagic ependymoma may likewise not enhance after administration of contrast agent. Thus, the differential diagnosis of a nonenhancing intramedullary lesion in the conus should include ependymoma, particularly if there is concomitant hemorrhage.

  13. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System: a minimally invasive, percutaneous intramedullary polymeric osteosynthesis for simple and complex long bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    Vegt, Paul; Muir, Jeffrey M; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic long bone fractures is difficult due to diminished bone density and compromised biomechanical integrity. The majority of osteoporotic long bone fractures occur in the metaphyseal region, which poses additional problems for surgical repair due to increased intramedullary volume. Treatment with internal fixation using intramedullary nails or plating is associated with poor clinical outcomes in this patient population. Subsequent fractures and complications such as screw pull-out necessitate additional interventions, prolonging recovery and increasing health care costs. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System (PBSS) is a minimally invasive surgical technique that allows clinicians to repair bone fractures using a light-curable polymer contained within an inflatable balloon catheter, offering a new treatment option for osteoporotic long bone fractures. The unique polymer compound and catheter application provides a customizable solution for long bone fractures that produces internal stability while maintaining bone length, rotational alignment, and postsurgical mobility. The PBSS has been utilized in a case series of 41 fractures in 33 patients suffering osteoporotic long bone fractures. The initial results indicate that the use of the light-cured polymeric rod for this patient population provides excellent fixation and stability in compromised bone, with a superior complication profile. This paper describes the clinical uses, procedural details, indications for use, and the initial clinical findings of the PBSS. PMID:25540600

  14. The effect of intramedullary bone endoscopy on the endosteal blood supply in long bones. An experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Herget, Georg W; Haberstroh, Jörg; Südkamp, Norbert; Riede, Ursus; Oberst, Michael

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated whether the Intramedullary Bone Endoscopy (IBE) procedure within the cavity of an intact long bone will interfere with the local endosteal blood supply. In a sheep model, 10 animals underwent the IBE procedure with complete perioperative anaesthesiology monitoring. After the femora were harvested, histological analysis was performed to examine destruction of the endosteum and consecutive reduction in perfusion. Only one animal showed evidence of detachment of the endosteum with destruction of several microns of the endosteum, although this did not interfere with the cortical perfusion. None of the vessels were occluded by fat or other causes of occlusion, e.g. blood coagulation. Our findings indicate that with the IBE procedure under visual control there is a potential risk to damage the endosteum. However, the interference was limited to a small part of the endosteum and did not lead to a reduction in the cortical perfusion. Clinical use could be in localized intramedullary lesions such as osteomyelitis or benign bone tumours.

  15. The effect of leg muscle activation state and localized muscle fatigue on tibial response during impact.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Adriana M; Andrews, David M

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of voluntarily manipulating muscle activation and localized muscle fatigue on tibial response parameters, including peak tibial acceleration, time to peak tibial acceleration, and the acceleration slope, measured at the knee during unshod heel impacts. A human pendulum delivered consistent impacts to 15 female and 15 male subjects. The tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius were examined using electromyography, thus allowing voluntary contraction to various activation states (baseline, 15%, 30%, 45%, and 60% of the maximum activation state) and assessing localized muscle fatigue. A skin-mounted uniaxial accelerometer, preloaded medial to the tibial tuberosity, allowed tibial response parameter determination. There were significant decreases in peak acceleration during tibialis anterior fatigue, compared to baseline and all other activation states. In females, increased time to peak acceleration and decreased acceleration slope occurred during fatigue compared to 30% and 45%, and compared to 15% through 60% of the maximum activation state, respectively. Slight peak acceleration and acceleration slope increases, and decreased time to peak acceleration as activation state increased during tibialis anterior testing, were noted. When examining the lateral gastrocnemius, the time to peak acceleration was significantly higher across gender in the middle activation states than at the baseline and fatigue states. The acceleration slope decreased at all activation states above baseline in females, and decreased at 60% of the maximum activation state in males compared to the baseline and fatigue states. Findings agree with localized muscle fatigue literature, suggesting that with fatigue there is decreased impact transmission, which may protect the leg. The relative effects of leg stiffness and ankle angle on tibial response need to be verified.

  16. Mechanical Failure of Revision Knee Prosthesis at both Femoral and Tibial Modular Metaphyseal Stem Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Woodgate, Ian G; Rooney, John; Mulford, Johnathan S; Gillies, R Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This is a report of a mechanical failure of an S-ROM revision total knee prosthesis. The prosthesis was used as a revision implant following deep peri-prosthetic infection in a morbidly obese male. The prosthesis failed on both the femoral and tibial sides at the modular metaphyseal stem junctions and required a further revision using the same type of implant after infection was excluded. Case Presentation: A 57 year old male had previously undergone a left total knee arthroplasty in 1999 for osteoarthritis. He acquired a late deep peri-prosthetic infection with a multi-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The organism was sensitive to vancomycin and rifampicin. A two stage revision was undertaken after clinical signs of infection had resolved and blood parameters had normalized. Intra-operative gram stain was negative for micro-organisms and frozen section of deep tissue was less than five polymorphs per high power field. A cemented S-ROM prosthesis was implanted using a coronal tibial osteotomy and a lateral release for exposure. After three years of the second stage of revision, the patient again presented to the orthopaedic department after reportedly falling on a wet floor six weeks ago. Conclusion: Radiographically, there was a broken tibial wire, osteolysis and pedestal formation around both the femoral and distal tibial stem extensions. The prosthesis was bent at the proximal tibial sleeve and stem junction. The prosthesis was considered loose with mechanical failure. At implant removal, it was noted that the femoral and tibial components at the modular metaphyseal sleeve-stem junction were fractured. Surgeons should be cautious in the use of these implants in morbidly obese patients where the stresses generated maybe above the yield stress of the material and the frictional forces that may overcome the modular taper junction’s locking mechanism.

  17. Surgical management of combined intramedullary arteriovenous malformation and perimedullary arteriovenous fistula within the hybrid operating room after five years of performing focus fractionated radiotherapy: case report.

    PubMed

    Gekka, Masayuki; Seki, Toshitaka; Hida, Kazutoshi; Osanai, Toshiya; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) shunts occur on the spinal cord surface and can be treated surgically or by endovascular embolization. In contrast, the nidus of an intramedullary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is located in the spinal cord and is difficult to treat surgically or by endovascular techniques. The benefits of radiotherapy for treating intramedullary AVM have been published, but are anecdotal and consist largely of case reports. We present a case of combined cervical intramedullary AVM and perimedullary AVF which received surgical treatment within a hybrid operating room (OR) after 5 years of focus fractionated radiotherapy. A 37-year-old male presented with stepwise worsening myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging and spinal angiography revealed intramedullary AVM and perimedullary AVF at the C3 to C5 levels. In order to reduce nidus size and blood flow, we first performed focal fractionated radiotherapy. Five years later, the lesion volume was reduced. Following this, direct surgery was performed by an anterior approach using corpectomy in the hybrid OR. The spinal cord was monitored by motor-evoked potential throughout the surgery. Complete obliteration of the fistulous connection was confirmed by intraoperative indocyanine green video-angiography and intraoperative angiography, preserving the anterior spinal artery. We conclude that surgical treatment following focal fractionated radiotherapy may become one strategy for patients who are initially deemed ineligible for endovascular embolization and surgical treatment. Furthermore, the hybrid OR enables safe and precise treatment for spinal vascular disorders in the fields of endovascular treatment and neurosurgery.

  18. The treatment of medial tibial stress syndrome in athletes; a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The only three randomized trials on the treatment of MTSS were all performed in military populations. The treatment options investigated in this study were not previously examined in athletes. This study investigated if functional outcome of three common treatment options for medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) in athletes in a non-military setting was the same. Methods The study design was randomized and multi-centered. Physical therapists and sports physicians referred athletes with MTSS to the hospital for inclusion. 81 athletes were assessed for eligibility of which 74 athletes were included and randomized to three treatment groups. Group one performed a graded running program, group two performed a graded running program with additional stretching and strengthening exercises for the calves, while group three performed a graded running program with an additional sports compression stocking. The primary outcome measure was: time to complete a running program (able to run 18 minutes with high intensity) and secondary outcome was: general satisfaction with treatment. Results 74 Athletes were randomized and included of which 14 did not complete the study due a lack of progress (18.9%). The data was analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. Time to complete a running program and general satisfaction with the treatment were not significantly different between the three treatment groups. Conclusion This was the first randomized trial on the treatment of MTSS in athletes in a non-military setting. No differences were found between the groups for the time to complete a running program. Trial registration CCMO; NL23471.098.08 PMID:22464032

  19. Evaluation of tibial osteopathy occurrence in neurofibromatosis type 1 Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Morcaldi, Guido; Clementi, Maurizio; Lama, Giuliana; Gabrielli, Orazio; Vannelli, Silvia; Virdis, Raffaele; Vivarelli, Rossella; Boero, Silvio; Bonioli, Eugenio

    2013-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant disorder characterized by high penetrance, widely variable expressivity and occurrence of specific skeletal changes such as tibial osteopathy (TO). We collected data on patients referred to the Italian Neurofibromatosis Study Group in order to compare clinical features between 49 NF1 patients with TO, and 98 age-matched NF1 patients without TO, and to determine whether the presence of TO is associated with a different risk of developing the typical NF1 complications. We assessed both groups for: age at diagnosis of NF1, gender distribution, family history, gender inheritance, presence of scoliosis, sphenoid wing osteopathy, other skeletal abnormalities, macrocrania, hydrocephalus, plexiform neurofibromas, tumors, optic pathway gliomas, T2H (high-signal intensity areas on T2 weighted brain MRI), epilepsy, headache, mental retardation, cardiovascular malformations, and Noonan phenotype. Patients of both groups were subdivided by gender and re-evaluated for these items. Statistical comparison was carried out between the two groups of patients for each feature. We collected data on type of treatment and on the clinical conditions of NF1-TO patients after follow-up. Patient's age at NF1 diagnosis was significantly younger in NF1-TO subjects compared with NF1 subjects without TO, and the incidence of T2H was significantly reduced in NF1-TO males compared with NF1 males without TO. The presence of TO does not imply that there is an increased risk of developing typical complications of NF1 (e.g., optic pathway glioma, plexiform neurofibroma, etc.), however, it does allow us to make an earlier diagnosis of NF1.

  20. Suspensory Anterior Tibial Fixation in the Anatomic Transtibial Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2016-01-01

    The transtibial technique is the most relevant among many surgical techniques for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and many types of fixation devices are used for tibial fixation according to the technique and the length of the graft. However, bone density in the fixation areas should be taken into consideration when choosing the fixation device to achieve rigid and stable fixation. However, density is not a substantial issue for anteromedial cortical fixation using a cortical suspension device. We describe tibial fixation with a TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL), which is a cortical suspension device, in anatomic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27073781

  1. Tibial artery false aneurysm: uncommon result of blunt injury occurring during athletics.

    PubMed

    Skudder, P A; Gelfand, M L; Blumenberg, R M; Fulco, J

    1999-11-01

    Two young men presented with symptoms following lower extremity injuries sustained in the normal course of participation in sports. One played baseball while the other competed in Tae Kwon Do. One case presented with digital ischemia, the other developed a pulsating hematoma. Each came to angiography, and each proved to have a false aneurysm of a tibial artery. The tibial artery was ligated in each case, without further complications. The patient with digital ischemia was thought to have sustained microemboli, and also underwent lumbar sympathectomy.

  2. Rehabilitation of avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity following Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    PubMed

    Baltaci, G; Ozer, H; Tunay, V B

    2004-03-01

    A sixteen-year-old boy suffered from sharp pain in the knee during a jump while playing basketball. He had a positive history of Osgood Schlatter disease. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated an avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity Type III according to the classification of Watson-Jones. Rehabilitation after avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity is an important consideration for this relatively uncommon adolescent injury. In such avulsion fractures, landing on the ground with the knee fully extended after a jump is the most likely cause. This case report reviews the rehabilitation program, and selected functional outcome measures after rehabilitation are reported. The patient returned to sporting activity after 12 months.

  3. Non-union of a midshaft anterior tibial stress fracture: a frequent complication.

    PubMed

    Mabit, C; Pécout, C

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of non-union of a midshaft anterior cortex tibial stress fracture and review the literature concerning this pathological entity. This is a relatively rare clinical form of tibial stress fracture which often results in delayed union, non-union or complete fracture. Initial management is as for a conventional stress fracture, associated in some cases, according to certain authors, with pulsing electromagnetic field physiotherapy. If after 4-6 months no sign of union is present, surgical management is indicated, in the form of excision of the fracture site with or without bone graft.

  4. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... been tried for colds, such as vitamin C, zinc supplements, and echinacea. Talk to your health care ... nih.gov/pubmed/22962927 . Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database of Systematic ...

  5. Common Leg Injuries of Long-Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Robert A.; Plakke, Michael; Silvis, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    Context Long-distance running (greater than 3000 m) is often recommended to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Running injury rates increase significantly when weekly mileage extends beyond 40 miles cumulatively. With the development of running analysis and other diagnostic tests, injuries to the leg secondary to bone, musculotendinous, and vascular causes can be diagnosed and successfully managed. Evidence Acquisition Searches used the terms running, injuries, lower extremity, leg, medial tibial stress syndrome, compartment syndrome, stress fractures, popliteal artery entrapment, gastrocnemius soleus tears, and Achilles tendinopathy. Sources included Medline, Google Scholar, and Ovid from 1970 through January 2012. Results Tibial stress fractures and medial tibial stress syndrome can sometimes be prevented and/or treated by correcting biomechanical abnormalities. Exertional compartment syndrome and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are caused by anatomic abnormalities and are difficult to treat without surgical correction. Conclusion Leg pain due to bone, musculotendinous, and vascular causes is common among long-distance runners. Knowledge of the underlying biomechanical and/or anatomic abnormality is necessary to successfully treat these conditions. PMID:24179587

  6. Success of High Tibial Osteotomy in the United States Military

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Brian R.; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D.; Laughlin, Matthew D.; Burks, Robert; Pallis, Mark P.; Tokish, John M.; Belmont, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Historically, high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been performed to treat isolated medial gonarthrosis with varus deformity. Purpose: To evaluate the occupational outcomes of HTO in a high-demand military cohort. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of active duty service members undergoing HTO for coronal plane malalignment and/or intra-articular pathology was performed using the Military Health System between 2003 and 2011. Demographic parameters and surgical variables, including rates of perioperative complications, secondary surgery, activity limitations, and medical discharge, were extracted from electronic medical records. For the current study, cumulative failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty or postoperative medical discharge for persistent knee dysfunction. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify statistical associations with cumulative failure after HTO. Results: A total of 181 service members (202 HTOs) were identified at an average follow-up of 47.5 months (range, 24-96 months). Mean age was 35.7 years (range, 19-55 years), and the majority were men (93%) and of enlisted rank (78%). All index procedures utilized a valgus-producing, opening wedge technique. Concomitant or staged procedures were performed in 87 patients (48%), including 40 ligamentous, 48 meniscal, and 48 chondral procedures. Complications occurred in 19.3% of knees (n = 39), with unplanned reoperation in 26 knees (12.8%). Fifty-three patients (40.7%) had minor activity limitations during military duty postoperatively. Eleven knees (5.4%) underwent conversion to total knee arthroplasty. The cumulative failure rate was 28.2% (n = 51) at 2- to 8-year follow-up. Patient age younger than 30 years at the time of surgery was associated with an independently higher risk of failure, whereas sex, concomitant/staged procedures, and perioperative complications were not significantly associated with

  7. Skeletal Adaptation to Intramedullary Pressure-Induced Interstitial Fluid Flow Is Enhanced in Mice Subjected to Targeted Osteocyte Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Meays, Diana R.; Meilan, Alexander S.; Jones, Jeremiah; Miramontes, Rosa; Kardos, Natalie; Yeh, Jiunn-Chern; Frangos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow (IFF) is a potent regulatory signal in bone. During mechanical loading, IFF is generated through two distinct mechanisms that result in spatially distinct flow profiles: poroelastic interactions within the lacunar-canalicular system, and intramedullary pressurization. While the former generates IFF primarily within the lacunar-canalicular network, the latter generates significant flow at the endosteal surface as well as within the tissue. This gives rise to the intriguing possibility that loading-induced IFF may differentially activate osteocytes or surface-residing cells depending on the generating mechanism, and that sensation of IFF generated via intramedullary pressurization may be mediated by a non-osteocytic bone cell population. To begin to explore this possibility, we used the Dmp1-HBEGF inducible osteocyte ablation mouse model and a microfluidic system for modulating intramedullary pressure (ImP) to assess whether structural adaptation to ImP-driven IFF is altered by partial osteocyte depletion. Canalicular convective velocities during pressurization were estimated through the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and computational modeling. Following osteocyte ablation, transgenic mice exhibited severe losses in bone structure and altered responses to hindlimb suspension in a compartment-specific manner. In pressure-loaded limbs, transgenic mice displayed similar or significantly enhanced structural adaptation to Imp-driven IFF, particularly in the trabecular compartment, despite up to ∼50% of trabecular lacunae being uninhabited following ablation. Interestingly, regression analysis revealed relative gains in bone structure in pressure-loaded limbs were correlated with reductions in bone structure in unpressurized control limbs, suggesting that adaptation to ImP-driven IFF was potentiated by increases in osteoclastic activity and/or reductions in osteoblastic activity incurred independently of pressure loading

  8. Quantitative comparison of the microscopic anatomy of the human ACL femoral and tibial entheses.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Carey, Grace E; Schlecht, Stephen H; Wojtys, Edward M; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-12-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (p<0.001), a 43% greater calcified fibrocartilage tissue area (p<0.001), and a 226% greater uncalcified fibrocartilage depth (p<0.001), with the latter differences being particularly pronounced in the central region. We conclude that the ACL femoral enthesis has more fibrocartilage and a more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis, which provides insight into why it is more vulnerable to failure.

  9. Femoral interference screw placement through the tibial tunnel: a novel method without graft damage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2006-11-01

    A frequently encountered problem in endoscopic 1-incision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the difficulty involved in accurately inserting the femoral interference screw without significant and undesirable divergence between the screw and the graft when a femoral interference screw is fixed through the anteromedial portal. To minimize divergence, the authors demonstrated a modified, easy, and reproducible procedure that can be performed without causing graft injury or requiring special instrumentation. A ligament reconstruction route is created with the use of an ACL guide system. Lead graft sutures are pulled through the anteromedial portal by way of the femoral tunnel and out the anterolateral thigh first. The tendon graft is then inserted through the anteromedial portal and up into the femoral tunnel. A guidewire is introduced through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. An appropriately sized BioScrew (Linvatec, Largo, FL) is inserted, with the use of a guidewire inside the screw, through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. The graft is then retrieved through the anteromedial portal and is inserted through the tibial tunnel. Finally, the tendon graft in the tibial tunnel is similarly fixed with a BioScrew of the same size. Moreover, this novel approach is feasible for all tendon grafts (bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts, quadriceps tendon-patellar bone grafts, and hamstring tendon grafts). PMID:17084309

  10. TIBIAL PLATEAU PROXIMAL AND DISTAL BONE BEHAVE SIMILARLY: BOTH ARE ASSOCIATED WITH FEATURES OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a growing imperative to understand how changes in peri-articular bone relate to pathological progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Peri-articular bone density can be measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) is associated with MRI and...

  11. Baseline Vitamin D Status is Predictive of Longitudinal Change in Tibial BMD in Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With its lack of effective treatment and high prevalence, the public health impact of OA is substantial. Peri-articular bone in OA can be evaluated with the medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) obtained from dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Higher M:L BMD is associated with medial OA features...

  12. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  13. Thiram-Induced Changes in the Expression of Genes Relating to Vascularization and Tibial Dyschondroplasia.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD), a major metabolic cartilage disease in poultry, is characterized by the distension of proximal growth plates of tibia which fail to form bone, lack blood vessels, and contain nonviable cells. Thiram, a carbamate pesticide, when fed to young broiler chicks induces TD wi...

  14. Cost implications of the physiotherapy management of complex tibial fractures treated with circular frames.

    PubMed

    Barron, E; Rambani, R; Bailey, H; Sharma, H K

    2013-11-01

    Seventy-three consecutive patients with complex tibial fractures treated with an Ilizarov frame or Taylor Spatial Frame received physiotherapy between April 2008 and April 2010. Data were collected prospectively, and physiotherapy input was recorded (in minutes) for the patients identified. This included treatment received as an inpatient as well as an outpatient. The data were categorized for proximal, middle and distal third tibial fractures for analysis. The average cost of physiotherapy for an inpatient with an Ilizarov frame is £121.82 per case, whereas that for an outpatient receiving treatment for trauma was calculated as £404.60. The combined average cost of physiotherapy to support treatment of a complex tibial fracture with a fine wire fixator is £546.27. Treatment involving circular frames is complex and expensive, and the high physiotherapy cost is not reflected in Healthcare Resource Group codes. This cost calculation will help service units, and NHS Trusts develop realistic costing plans to support treatment. Cost implications of the physiotherapy management of complex tibial fractures using the Ilizarov technique. PMID:23943063

  15. Compression of the Popliteal Artery after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the Tibial Inlay Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung Suk; Kim, Do Hun; Park, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Popliteal artery compression rarely occurs after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the tibial inlay technique that allows for direct visualization of the surgical field. However, we experienced a popliteal artery compression after PCL reconstruction performed using the technique, which eventually required re-operation. Here, we report this rare case and discuss reasons of popliteal artery compression. PMID:26673356

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of tibial eminence fractures in adults.

    PubMed

    Monto, Raymond Rocco; Cameron-Donaldson, Michelle L; Close, Matthew A; Ho, Charles P; Hawkins, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    Proton density and T2-weighted sagittal, axial, coronal, and inversion recovery fat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were reviewed in 21 adults (10 men and 11 women) with 22 tibial eminence fractures. Average patient age was 43 years (range: 19-62 years). There were 3 type I, 3 type II, 12 type III, and 4 type IV fractures. The average fracture fragment size was 21 x 23 mm, and the average displacement was 5.5 mm (range: 0-12 mm). The MRI disclosed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertional avulsions in 20 (91%), distal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsions in 4 (18%), intrasubstance ACL damage in 9 (41%), intrasubstance PCL injury in 3 (14%), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears in 9 (41%) knees, retinacular injury in 8 (36%), posterolateral corner damage in 8 (36%), medial meniscal tears in 5 (23%), and 4 (18%) had lateral meniscal tears. Occult subchondral osseous injuries were seen in the posterolateral tibial plateau in 13 (59%) knees, anterolateral femoral condyle in 4 (18%), and posteromedial tibial plateau in 5 (23%) knees. Discrete osteochondral fractures were present in 7 (32%) knees. Significant osseous, cartilaginous, meniscal, and ligamentous damage was discovered in all patients. Based on these findings, we recommend MRI evaluation of all tibial eminence fractures to accurately detect all knee damage.

  17. The Changed Route of Anterior Tibial Artery due to Healed Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gökkuş, Kemal; Sagtas, Ergin; Comert, Nuri; Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Baloglu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    We would like to highlight unusual sequelae of healed distal third diaphyseal tibia fracture that was treated conservatively 36 years ago, in which we incidentally detected peripheral CT angiography. The anterior tibial artery was enveloped three-quarterly by the healing callus of the bone (distal tibia). PMID:27019760

  18. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  19. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for treatment of overactive bladder and urinary retention in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Zinkgraf, Kristine; Quinn, Annette O'Leary; Ketterhagen, Debra; Kreuziger, Betty; Stevenson, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is a treatment option for patients who present with urinary urgency, frequency, urge incontinence, or urinary retention. When behavior modification and/or pharmacotherapy did not adequately relieve symptoms, this treatment was found to decrease incidence of overactive bladder or retention symptoms in the authors' patient population.

  20. Combined Total Ankle Arthroplasty With Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer for End-Stage Cavovarus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, John M; Bowlby, Melinda A; Christensen, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon transfer has been described to reduce and balance the cavovarus deformity in those patients who receive a total ankle replacement for end-stage arthritis. In this article, we discuss the indications and provide a detailed description of the technique for this powerful procedure. Case examples that demonstrate the utility of the procedure are provided. PMID:27095088

  1. Neuroanatomy of the complex tibial organ of Stenopelmatus (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Stenopelmatidae).

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Stenopelmatidae (or "Jerusalem crickets") belong to the atympanate Ensifera, lacking hearing organs in the foreleg tibiae. Their phylogenetic position is controversial, either as a taxon in Tettigonioidea or within the clade of Gryllacridoidea. Similarly, the origin of tibial auditory systems in Ensifera is controversial. Therefore, we investigated the neuronal structures of the proximal tibiae of Stenopelmatus spec. with the hypothesis that internal sensory structures are similar to those in tympanate Ensifera. In Stenopelmatus the complex tibial organ consists of three neuronal parts: the subgenual organ, the intermediate organ, and a third part with linearly arranged neurons. This tripartite organization is also found in tympanate Ensifera, verifying our hypothesis. The third part of the sense organ found in Stenopelmatus can be regarded by the criterion of position as homologous to auditory receptors of hearing Tettigonioidea. This crista acustica homolog is found serially in all thoracic leg pairs and contains 20 +/- 2 chordotonal neurons in the foreleg. The tibial organ was shown to be responsive to vibration, with a broad threshold of about 0.06 ms(-2) in a frequency range from 100-600 Hz. The central projection of tibial sensory neurons terminates into two equally sized lobes in the primary sensory neuropil, the medial ventral association center. The data are discussed comparatively to those of other Ensifera and mapped phylogenetically onto recently proposed phylogenies for Ensifera. The crista acustica homolog could represent a neuronal rudiment of a secondarily reduced ear, but neuronal features are also consistent with an evolutionary preadaptation.

  2. Hexapod external fixator closed distraction in the management of stiff hypertrophic tibial nonunions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N; Marais, L C; Aldous, C

    2015-10-01

    Tibial nonunion represents a spectrum of conditions which are challenging to treat, and optimal management remains unclear despite its high rate of incidence. We present 44 consecutive patients with 46 stiff tibial nonunions, treated with hexapod external fixators and distraction to achieve union and gradual deformity correction. There were 31 men and 13 women with a mean age of 35 years (18 to 68) and a mean follow-up of 12 months (6 to 40). No tibial osteotomies or bone graft procedures were performed. Bony union was achieved after the initial surgery in 41 (89.1%) tibias. Four persistent nonunions united after repeat treatment with closed hexapod distraction, resulting in bony union in 45 (97.8%) patients. The mean time to union was 23 weeks (11 to 49). Leg-length was restored to within 1 cm of the contralateral side in all tibias. Mechanical alignment was restored to within 5° of normal in 42 (91.3%) tibias. Closed distraction of stiff tibial nonunions can predictably lead to union without further surgery or bone graft. In addition to generating the required distraction to achieve union, hexapod circular external fixators can accurately correct concurrent deformities and limb-length discrepancies. PMID:26430019

  3. Matched-pair analysis of all-polyethylene versus metal-backed tibial components.

    PubMed

    Udomkiat, P; Dorr, L D; Long, W

    2001-09-01

    Forty-eight matched pairs of osteoarthritic knees from patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty with a round-on-round, Apollo Knee System were studied to evaluate the outcome between all-polyethylene and metal-backed tibial components. Patients were matched for patient factors, preoperative deformities, cruciate salvage or sacrifice, and surgical technique. At the last follow-up (average, 38.4 months), there was no statistically significant difference in terms of knee scores, patient self-assessment, and radiographic outcomes. No component required revision, and no revisions were pending. Maintenance of these results over time would project into better long-term success for all-polyethylene tibial components because of the amount of wear and osteolysis with current modular metal-backed tibial components. We advocate the use of a more cost-effective all-polyethylene tibial component in elderly patients (>70 years old) who are not likely to need the versatility of exchange of a modular polyethylene insert because of wear. PMID:11547366

  4. Total Knee Arthroplasty Following High Tibial Osteotomy – a Radiological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    ORBAN, Horia; MARES, Emil; DRAGUSANU, Mihaela; STAN, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following a closed wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO). A total of 16 TKAs were performed in 16 pacients who had previously undergone a closed wedge (HTO) as a treatement for knee osteoarthritis. The radiographic results were evaluated with respect to the femurotibial angle (FTA), joint line height (JLH), tibial bone resection and Insall-Salvati ratio. The FTA improved in average, from 6.5 degree of varus preoperatively at 5.7 degree of valgus postoperatively. The JLH averaged 14.34 mm preop and 13.81 mm at the last follow-up. The amount of tibial bone resection averaged 5.98 mm, face to 7.5 mm for knees without HTO. The Insall-Salvati ratio was 1.127 preop and 1.172 postop. A meticulous surgical technique may lead to satisfactory results in TKA after HTO, considering the correction of the deformity, the re-estabilish of JLH and the amount of the tibial bone resection. PMID:21977186

  5. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaña Neto, Frederico Carlos; de Paula Canal, Marina; Alves, Bernardo Aurélio Fonseca; Ferreira, Pablício Martins; Ayres, Jefferson Castro; Alves, Robson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo–Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. Methods This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive); presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) index; mortality rate; and infection rate. Results 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%). Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75%) and IIIB (25%) predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. Conclusion The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions. PMID:27069881

  6. Serum chemistry and histopathology of broiler femoral head necrosis and tibial dyschondroplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) are two major leg problems in young meat type poultry which cause lameness, bone deformity and infections. Whereas FHN results from disarticulation of the femoral growth plate from the articular cartilage, TD lesions are characterized by i...

  7. Combined Total Ankle Arthroplasty With Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer for End-Stage Cavovarus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, John M; Bowlby, Melinda A; Christensen, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon transfer has been described to reduce and balance the cavovarus deformity in those patients who receive a total ankle replacement for end-stage arthritis. In this article, we discuss the indications and provide a detailed description of the technique for this powerful procedure. Case examples that demonstrate the utility of the procedure are provided.

  8. Posterior tibial tendon entrapment within an intact ankle mortise: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Allison M; Bowlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The present case report demonstrates a rare finding associated with irreducible ankle fracture dislocations. To our knowledge, posterior tibial tendon entrapment with an intact ankle mortise has not yet been documented in published studies. In the case of our patient, a high-energy, 12-ft fall resulted in a comminuted intra-articular fracture of the medial malleolus, confirmed by the initial radiographs. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed the Achilles tendon to be ruptured and the posterior tibial tendon to be both displaced and entrapped between the medial malleolar fracture fragments, preventing initial closed reduction. At operative repair for the ruptured Achilles tendon and the medial malleolus fracture, the posterior tibial tendon was removed from the fracture site and was found to be intact with no evidence of laceration or rupture. The tendon was returned back to its anatomic position, and the tendon sheath was reapproximated. Although uncommon, it is important that entrapment of the posterior tibial tendon be considered in cases of irreducible ankle fracture. This injury type can be addressed during open reduction internal fixation to achieve reduction. PMID:25441277

  9. How to overcome severed sutures of the tibial bone peg in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yip, Daniel K H; Wong, Jimmy W K; Chien, Eric P

    2002-03-01

    We report a case of severed sutures of the tibial bone peg during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The graft retracted proximally in the bone tunnel. We describe a simple and aesthetically acceptable method to salvage this rare complication by use of a small arthrotomy through the defect in the remaining patellar tendon.

  10. Inside-Out Antegrade Tibial Tunnel Drilling Through the Posterolateral Portal Using a Flexible Reamer in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Stuart, Joseph J.; Choi, J.H. James; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Taylor, Dean C.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the transtibial drilling or arthroscopic tibial-inlay technique has a risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle because a pin is drilled anterior to posterior. Intraoperative fluoroscopy is used to decrease the risk of neurovascular injury. In addition, graft passage in the transtibial technique may be problematic because of a sharp turn when placing the graft into the tibial tunnel, which may damage graft fibers. In the surgical technique described in this report, the posteromedial portal is used for visualization and the posterolateral portal is used for debridement of the PCL tibial footprint and the synovial fold closest to the PCL. A curved guide is placed from the posterolateral portal to the tibial footprint, and a flexible pin is drilled across the tibia. The tibial tunnel is then created using a flexible reamer under direct visualization up to the desired length, and a graft can be positioned in the tibial tunnel through the posterolateral portal. This technique has the potential advantages of decreasing the risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle (use of anteriorly directed, inside-out drilling), avoiding a sharp turn during graft passage, and allowing accurate and anatomic tibial tunnel placement without intraoperative fluoroscopy. PMID:26900551

  11. Neuroanatomy of the complex tibial organ in the splay-footed cricket Comicus calcaris Irish 1986 (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Schizodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2010-11-15

    The subgenual chordotonal organ complex in insects is modified in ensiferan taxa like Gryllidae and Tettigoniidae into hearing organs with specific sets of auditory receptors. Here, this sensory organ complex is documented in the nonhearing splay-footed cricket Comicus calcaris. The tibial chordotonal organ consists of three parts: the subgenual organ, the intermediate organ, and the crista acustica homolog. The latter is an array of linearly organized neurons homologous to auditory receptors in the tibial hearing organs of Tettigoniidae. The tibial organ is structurally similar in all three leg pairs, with similar neuron numbers in the fore- and midleg, but lower numbers in the hindleg. The foreleg crista acustica homolog consists of 34±4 neurons, the highest number in an atympanate Ensiferan. Additionally, an accessory chordotonal organ with 15±5 neurons innervated by nerve 5B1 is present in the foreleg. The central projection of the tibial organreveals ipsilateral sensory terminals in the primary sensory neuropil, the medial ventral association center with terminations close to the midline. As determined from extracellular recordings, the entire tibial organ is vibrosensitive. The organization of the tibial organ is compared to other ensiferan auditory and nonauditory tibial organs. Spatial orientation of neurons in the crista acustica homolog is not reminiscent of auditory structures, and the neuroanatomy is discussed with respect to stridulation behavior and the evolutionary origin of hearing in Ensifera.

  12. Tibialis anterior muscle fatigue leads to changes in tibial axial acceleration after impact when ankle dorsiflexion angles are visually controlled.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Adriana M; Andrews, David M

    2010-08-01

    Heel impact forces may lead to injury as they travel through the human musculoskeletal system. Previous work on the effect that localized muscle fatigue has on the tibial response (shank axial acceleration) to impact was limited because ankle angle was not controlled. The purpose of this study was to compare the tibial response when the tibialis anterior was fatigued and when not fatigued, while participants controlled dorsiflexion angles at impact using visual feedback. Twenty participants (10 male, 10 female; M+/-SD=21.8+/-2.9 years) were strapped supine to a human pendulum apparatus, and instrumented with a low mass accelerometer (affixed medial to the tibial tuberosity). Participant dorsiflexion angle range was recorded by an electro-goniometer, and divided into four angle ranges so tibial response variables (peak tibial acceleration, time to peak acceleration, acceleration slope) could be compared when fatigued and not fatigued. Peak tibial acceleration and acceleration slopes decreased, and time to peak acceleration increased following fatigue, when comparing values across the same dorsiflexion ranges. Dorsiflexion angle alone did not account for differences in tibial response during localized leg muscle fatigue; supporting prior work and suggesting that the muscle and ankle joint become less stiff when fatigued, thereby increasing the lower extremity attenuation capability to heel impacts.

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Mobile-bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: The Influence of Tibial Component Coronal Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-Duo; Guo, Wan-Shou; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controversies about the rational positioning of the tibial component in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) still exist. Previous finite element (FE) studies were rare, and the results varied. This FE study aimed to analyze the influence of the tibial component coronal alignment on knee biomechanics in mobile-bearing UKA and find a ration range of inclination angles. Methods: A three-dimensional FE model of the intact knee was constructed from image data of one normal subject. A 1000 N compressive load was applied to the intact knee model for validating. Then a set of eleven UKA FE models was developed with the coronal inclination angles of the tibial tray ranging from 10° valgus to 10° varus. Tibial bone stresses and strains, contact pressures and load distribution in all UKA models were calculated and analyzed under the unified loading and boundary conditions. Results: Load distribution, contact pressures, and contact areas in intact knee model were validated. In UKA models, von Mises stress and compressive strain at proximal medial cortical bone increased significantly as the tibial tray was in valgus inclination >4°, which may increase the risk of residual pain. Compressive strains at tibial keel slot were above the high threshold with varus inclination >4°, which may result in greater risk of component migration. Tibial bone resection corner acted as a strain-raiser regardless of the inclination angles. Compressive strains at the resected surface slightly changed with the varying inclinations and were not supposed to induce bone resorption and component loosening. Contact pressures and load percentage in lateral compartment increased with the more varus inclination, which may lead to osteoarthritis progression. Conclusions: Static knee biomechanics after UKA can be greatly affected by tibial component coronal alignment. A range from 4° valgus to 4° varus inclination of tibial component can be recommended in mobile-bearing UKA. PMID

  14. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  15. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area. PMID:27489768

  16. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  17. Associations of tibial lead levels with BsmI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor in former organolead manufacturing workers.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, B S; Stewart, W F; Kelsey, K T; Simon, D; Park, S; Links, J M; Todd, A C

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated associations of tibial lead levels with polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in 504 former organolead manufacturing workers with past exposure to lead. In this cross-sectional study, we measured tibial lead by (109)Cd K-shell X-ray fluorescence. Tibial lead was evaluated in subjects with different VDR genotypes defined using the BsmI restriction enzyme, adjusting for confounding variables. Study participants had a mean age +/- SD of 57.4 +/- 7.6 years. A total of 169 (33.5%) subjects were homozygous for the BsmI restriction site (designated bb), 251 (49.8%) were heterozygous (Bb), and 84 (16.7%) were homozygous for the absence of the restriction site (BB). Among all of the study subjects, tibial lead concentrations were low, with a mean +/- SD of 14.4 +/- 9.3 microg Pb/g bone mineral. There were only small differences in tibial lead concentrations by VDR genotype, with mean +/- SD tibial lead concentrations of 13.9 +/- 7.9, 14.3 +/- 9.5, and 15.5 +/- 11.1 in subjects with bb, Bb, and BB, respectively. In a multiple linear regression model of tibial lead concentrations, the VDR genotype modified the relation between age and tibial lead concentrations; subjects with the B allele had larger increases in tibial lead concentrations with increasing age (0.37, 0.48, and 0.67 microg/g per year of age in subjects with bb, Bb, and BB, respectively; the adjusted p-value for trend in slopes = 0.04). The VDR genotype also modified the relation between years since last exposure to lead and tibial lead concentrations. Subjects with bb evidenced an average decline in tibial lead concentrations of 0.10 microg/g per year since their last exposure to lead, whereas subjects with Bb and BB evidenced average increases of 0.03 and 0.11 microg/g per year, respectively (the adjusted p-value for trend in slopes = 0.01). Polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor modified the relations of age and years since the last exposure to lead with tibial lead concentrations

  18. Seropositive Neuromyelitis Optica imitating an Intramedullary Cervical Spinal Cord Tumor: Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peter Yat-Ming; Chiu, Jennifer Hiu-Fung; Leung, Kar-Ming; Chan, Kwong-Yau

    2014-10-01

    A 44-year-old woman with progressive cervical myelopathy and central cord syndrome was noted to have an extensive cervical intramedullary contrast-enhancing lesion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The lesion resembled a spinal astrocytoma or ependymoma that required surgical intervention. She was subsequently diagnosed to have neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a rare idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorder, when the clinical examination revealed left optic atrophy. This was confirmed by a test showing seropositivity for NMO-immunoglobulin (IgG). Disease control was achieved with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy. We report a rare case of a patient with NMO who had MRI features that could have easily led to the condition being misdiagnosed as a spinal cord tumor. The importance of careful history taking, awareness of typical radiological findings and the usefulness of serum NMO-IgG as a diagnostic tool are emphasized. PMID:25346824

  19. Making the Common Good Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  20. Risk factors associated with infection in tibial open fractures.

    PubMed

    Almeida Matos, Marcos; Castro-Filho, Romulo Neves; Pinto da Silva, Bruno Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: El objetivo del tratamiento de las fracturas abiertas es prevenir las infecciones, estabilizar el hueso e restaurar la función. En relación a los objetivos mencionados, la prevención de infecciones tiene mayor destaque y es el punto mas importante a ser alcanzado. Objetivo: El objetivo de este trabajo es identificar los factores de riesgo asociados con la infección en un grupo de pacientes con fracturas abierta de la tibia. Paciente y métodos. Fue realizado un análisis retrospectivo con pacientes que tuvieron fractura abierta tibial que estaban en tratamiento en el Hospital Roberto Santos-Geral-HGRS, Salvador, Bahía, Brasil, de marzo a octubre de 2009. Fueron excluidos de este estudio todos los niños menores de 8 años con fracturas múltiples o que tenían alguna enfermedad sistémica o en los huesos. De acuerdo con los datos clínicos y demográficos, los pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos: el grupo 1 estaba constituido por los que no tenían infección en las fracturas y el grupo 2 por los que tenían infección. En los dos grupos se investigo factores que podrían estar asociados a la infección. Resultados. De 50 pacientes estudiados la tasa de infección global fue de 14 (28%, IC95% = 15,5-40,5). El hecho de desenvolver infección fue asociado con el lugar del trauma (OR 3,78; IC 95% = 1,4-5,5, p = 0,02), y la demora en recibir tratamiento adecuado en tiempo superior a 24 horas (OR 3,4; IC95% 1.4-20.8 = p = 0,03). Las fracturas clasificadas como Gustilo I, II, IIIA tuvieron una menor chance de infección cuando comparadas como Gustilo IIIB y IIIC (OR 4.32; CI95%=1.3-19.1; p=0.01). Fracturas clasificadas como Tscherne III y IV tuvieron una mayor frecuencia de infección, lo que resulto ser el factor más importante e significativo (OR 8.07; CI95%=2.4-47.1; p p<0.00). Conclusión. En nuestros resultados observamos; una relación entre infección y la clasificación de Gustilo. También observamos asociación de infección cuando el