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Sample records for common tlr4 variants

  1. A toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) variant is associated with asthma severity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Qin-Fu; Zhao, Yu-Miao; Li, Dan-Dan; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Zhao, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a complex airways disease resulting from the input of both biological and environmental factors. Previous studies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which produces a protein involved in regulating T cell populations, have presented conflicting results regarding its role in asthma severity. In the current study, individuals with asthma were genotyped for variants of TLR4, and the genotypes were compared with asthma severity and T cell subpopulations. TLR4 rs11536879 (A>G) and rs1927907 (G>A) genotypes were determined in 350 asthma patients using TaqMan. Asthma severity was graded by clinical symptoms, and blood markers and lung function measures were also collected. T cell subpopulations were identified from peripheral blood by flow cytometry. No significant correlations were observed between genotypes at TLR4 rs11536879 or rs1927907 and eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, serum hypersensitive C-reactive protein, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), or FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) in asthma patients (P > 0.05). However, the GG genotype of rs1927907 was correlated with higher asthma severity (P < 0.05). No associations were detected between genotypes at rs11536879 or rs1927907 and CD4+CD25high regulatory T cell counts in peripheral blood from asthmatic patients (P > 0.05), but the rs1927907 genotype was associated with TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells (P < 0.05). Therefore, the TLR4 variant rs1927907 appears to be related to asthma severity and TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells, suggesting the potential influence of TLR4 on T cell population balances. PMID:26221339

  2. Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Pain Are Mediated by Common TLR4-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; White, Imogen A; Manavis, Jim; Hutchinson, Mark R; Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Logan, Richard M; Bowen, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    Strong epidemiological data indicate that chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain occur in parallel, indicating common underlying mechanisms. We have recently outlined evidence suggesting that TLR4 signaling may contribute to both side effects. We therefore aimed to determine if genetic deletion of TLR4 improves chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain. Forty-two female wild-type (WT) and 42 Tlr4 null (-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g (10-13 weeks) received a single 270 mg/kg (i.p.) dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. Bacterial sequencing was conducted on cecal samples of control animals to determine the gut microbiome profile. Gut toxicity was assessed using validated clinical and histopathologic markers, permeability assays, and inflammatory markers. Chemotherapy-induced pain was assessed using the validated rodent facial grimace criteria, as well as immunologic markers of glial activation in the lumbar spinal cord. TLR4 deletion attenuated irinotecan-induced gut toxicity, with improvements in weight loss (P = 0.0003) and diarrhea (P < 0.0001). Crypt apoptosis was significantly decreased in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P < 0.0001), correlating with lower mucosal injury scores (P < 0.005). Intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran (4 kDa) and LPS translocation was greater in WT mice than in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) (P = 0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively). GFAP staining in the lumbar spinal cord, indicative of astrocytic activation, was increased at 6 and 72 hours in WT mice compared with BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P = 0.008, P = 0.01). These data indicate that TLR4 is uniquely positioned to mediate irinotecan-induced gut toxicity and pain, highlighting the possibility of a targetable gut/CNS axis for improved toxicity outcomes. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1376-86. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Protective role for TLR4 signaling in atherosclerosis progression as revealed by infection with a common oral pathogen.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V; Weinberg, Ellen O; Barth, Kenneth R; Madrigal, Andrés G; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE(-/-)) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-)) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  4. Prothymosin-α Variants Elicit Anti-HIV-1 Response via TLR4 Dependent and Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, G. Luca; Teixeira, Avelino; Aberg, Judith; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Mosoian, Arevik

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothymosin α (ProTα) (isoform 2: iso2) is a widely distributed, small acidic protein with intracellular and extracellular-associated functions. Recently, we identified two new ProTα variants with potent anti-HIV activity from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene known as isoB and the second is the product of ProTα pseudogene 7 (p7). Similarly to iso2, the anti-HIV activity of both variants is mediated by type I IFN. Here we tested whether the immunomodulatory activity of isoB and p7 are also TLR4 dependent and determined their kinetic of release in response to HIV-1 infection. Methods Type I, type III, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA inducing activity was determined in macrophages from wild type and TLR4 knockout mice treated with recombinant ProTα variants. Supernatants from mock and HIV infected cells were analyzed by mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes for the presence of ProTα variants. In silico structural and functional analysis of ProTα variants were performed. Results We show that both isoB and p7 upregulate IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IL-6, TNF-α and RANTES mRNAs in primary human macrophages. The potent stimulation of IFN-β by the recombinant ProTα variants in human macrophages is dependent on the TLR4 pathway, whereas the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 may also occur independently of TLR4, suggesting the interaction of ProTα variants with other signaling molecules/receptors. In silico analyses confirmed that the novel isoB and p7 variants are intrinsically disordered proteins, which lack the NLS and mass spectrometry showed release of ProTα variants within minutes post HIV-1 infection. These features are consistent with the function of ProTα variants as damage associate molecular patterns (DAMPs). Conclusions Our findings indicate that ProTα variants strongly inhibit viral replication mainly, but not exclusively, through TLR4 signaling and that they are released within minutes of viral

  5. Genetic variants of TLR4 and TLR9 are risk factors for chronic Helicobacter pylori infection in South Indian Tamils.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rekha; Nazeer, Mehnaz; Goda, Vaishnavi; Devaraju, Panneer; Ali, Mohammed; Karunakaran, Premkumar; Jayaraman, Megala

    2017-02-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are a class of molecular pattern recognition receptors, elicits a strong inflammatory immune response against pathogens. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a gram negative flagellate colonizes the human stomach, is responsible for the development of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinoma. The higher incidence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer in South Indian Tamils demands a genetic study to unravel the influence of TLR4 and TLR9 polymorphisms associated with chronic H. pylori infection. In this study, 230 healthy individuals and 77 patients diagnosed with H. pylori infection were screened for TLR4 (rs1927914, rs4986790, rs4986791) and TLR9 (rs352140, rs34399053, rs150459369) polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP and ARMS-PCR. We observed that the individuals harboring heterozygous and homozygous polymorphic variants of TLR4 conferred a significant risk to develop chronic H. pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease [rs4986790 AG, p=0.001, OR-2.7, 95%CI: 1.5-5.03; GG, p=0.0006, OR-9.8, 95%CI: 2.4-39.4; rs4986791CT, p=0.0001, OR-7.2, 95%CI: 3.7-7.2; TT, p=0.0001, OR-7.9, 95%CI: 2.6-23.7]. Also, the heterozygous variant of TLR9 rs352140, favoured the persistence of the H. pylori infection [p=0.037, OR-1.87, 95%CI: 1.07-3.29]. Thus our findings suggest that TLR4 rs4986790, rs4986791 and TLR9 rs352140 polymorphisms are potential genetic risk factors influencing the disease susceptibility and clinical manifestation of chronic H. pylori infection in Indian Tamils.

  6. Genetic variants in TLR2 and TLR4 are associated with markers of monocyte activation: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jennifer L.; Pankow, James S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Matijevic-Aleksic, Nena; He, Max; Chambless, Lloyd; Folsom, Aaron R.

    2012-01-01

    Markers of monocyte activation play a critical role in atherosclerosis, but little is known about the genetic influences on cellular levels. Therefore, we investigated the influence of genetic variants in monocyte differentiation antigen (CD14), toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) on monocyte surface receptor levels. The study sample consisted of 1,817 members of a biracial cohort of adults from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Carotid MRI Study. Monocyte receptors were measured using flow cytometry on fasting whole blood samples. TLR2 rs1816702 genotype was significantly associated with CD14+/TLR2+ percent of positive cells (%) and median fluorescence intensity (MFI) in whites but not in blacks (p < 0.001). Specifically, the presence of the minor T-allele was associated with increased receptor levels. In blacks, TLR4 rs5030719 was significantly associated with CD14+/TLR4+ monocytes (MFI) with mean ± SE intensities of 16.7 ± 0.05 and 16.0 ± 0.14 for GG and GT/TT genotypes, respectively (p < 0.001). Variants in TLR2 and TLR4 were associated with monocyte receptor levels of TLR2 and TLR4, respectively, in a biracial cohort of adults. To our knowledge, this is the first study to look at associations between variants in the toll-like receptor family and toll-like receptor levels on monocytes. PMID:21298446

  7. Identification of a novel human MD-2 splice variant that negatively regulates Lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gray, Pearl; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Sirois, Cherilyn M; Lowe, Emily; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Chen, Shuang; Brikos, Constantinos; Bulut, Yonca; Latz, Eicke; Underhill, David; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-06-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) is a secreted gp that assembles with TLR4 to form a functional signaling receptor for bacterial LPS. In this study, we have identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human MD-2, termed MD-2 short (MD-2s), which lacks the region encoded by exon 2 of the MD-2 gene. Similar to MD-2, MD-2s is glycosylated and secreted. MD-2s also interacted with LPS and TLR4, but failed to mediate LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 production. We show that MD-2s is upregulated upon IFN-gamma, IL-6, and TLR4 stimulation and negatively regulates LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. Furthermore, MD-2s competitively inhibited binding of MD-2 to TLR4. Our study pinpoints a mechanism that may be used to regulate TLR4 activation at the onset of signaling and identifies MD-2s as a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases characterized by an overly exuberant or chronic immune response to LPS.

  8. TLR4/CD14 Variants-Related Serologic and Immunologic Dys-Regulations Predict Severe Sepsis in Febrile De-Compensated Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chih-Wei; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Huang, Chia-Chang; Li, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Yang, Ying-Ying; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants and dysfunctional monocyte had been reported to be associated with infection susceptibility in advanced cirrhotic patients. This study aims to explore genetic predictive markers and relevant immune dysfunction that contributed to severe sepsis in febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patents. Polymorphism analysis of candidate genes was undergone in 108 febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients and 121 healthy volunteers. Various plasma inflammatory/regulatory cytokines, proportion of classical (CD 16-, phagocytic) and non-classical (CD16+, inflammatory) monocytes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and intracellular/extracellular cytokines on cultured non-classical monocytes, mCD14/HLA-DR expression and phagocytosis of classical monocytes were measured. For TLR4+896A/G variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, high plasma endotoxin/IL-10 inhibits HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis were noted in their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset, enhanced LPS-stimulated TLR4 expression and TNFα/nitrite production, and systemic inflammation [high plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14) and total nitric oxide (NOx) levels] were noted. For CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, persist endotoxemia inhibited mCD14/HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis of their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset up-regulated TLR4-NFκB-iNOS and p38MAPK pathway, stimulated TNFα/nitrite production and elicited systemic inflammation. In febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients, TLR4+896A/G and CD14-159C/T polymorphisms-related non-classical and classical monocytes dysfunction resulted in increased severe sepsis risk. Malnutrition, high plasma endotoxin and sCD14 levels, single TLR4+896A/G or CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers and double variant allele carriers are significant predictive factors for the development of severe

  9. The Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Variant rs2149356 and Risk of Gout in European and Polynesian Sample Sets

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Humaira; McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K.; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K.; Day, Richard; Kannangara, Diluk; Williams, Kenneth; Smith, Malcolm; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Tim L.; Joosten, Leo A.; Radstake, Timothy R.; Riches, Philip L.; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; Lu, Leo; Stahl, Eli A.; Choi, Hyon K.; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R.

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of crystallized monosodium urate (MSU) in joints as a result of hyperuricemia is a central risk factor for gout. However other factors must exist that control the progression from hyperuricaemia to gout. A previous genetic association study has implicated the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway upon stimulation by MSU crystals. The T-allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2149356 in TLR4 is a risk factor associated with gout in a Chinese study. Our aim was to replicate this observation in participants of European and New Zealand Polynesian (Māori and Pacific) ancestry. A total of 2250 clinically-ascertained prevalent gout cases and 13925 controls were used. Non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cases and controls from the Health Professional Follow-up (HPFS) and Nurses Health Studies (NHS) were also used. Genotypes were derived from genome-wide genotype data or directly obtained using Taqman. Logistic regression analysis was done including age, sex, diuretic exposure and ancestry as covariates as appropriate. The T-allele increased the risk of gout in the clinically-ascertained European samples (OR = 1.12, P = 0.012) and decreased the risk of gout in Polynesians (OR = 0.80, P = 0.011). There was no evidence for association in the HPFS or NHS sample sets. In conclusion TLR4 SNP rs2143956 associates with gout risk in prevalent clinically-ascertained gout in Europeans, in a direction consistent with previously published results in Han Chinese. However, with an opposite direction of association in Polynesians and no evidence for association in a non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cohort this variant should be analysed in other international gout genetic data sets to determine if there is genuine evidence for association. PMID:26808548

  10. The Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Variant rs2149356 and Risk of Gout in European and Polynesian Sample Sets.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Humaira; McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K; Day, Richard; Kannangara, Diluk; Williams, Kenneth; Smith, Malcolm; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Tim L; Joosten, Leo A; Radstake, Timothy R; Riches, Philip L; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; Lu, Leo; Stahl, Eli A; Choi, Hyon K; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of crystallized monosodium urate (MSU) in joints as a result of hyperuricemia is a central risk factor for gout. However other factors must exist that control the progression from hyperuricaemia to gout. A previous genetic association study has implicated the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway upon stimulation by MSU crystals. The T-allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2149356 in TLR4 is a risk factor associated with gout in a Chinese study. Our aim was to replicate this observation in participants of European and New Zealand Polynesian (Māori and Pacific) ancestry. A total of 2250 clinically-ascertained prevalent gout cases and 13925 controls were used. Non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cases and controls from the Health Professional Follow-up (HPFS) and Nurses Health Studies (NHS) were also used. Genotypes were derived from genome-wide genotype data or directly obtained using Taqman. Logistic regression analysis was done including age, sex, diuretic exposure and ancestry as covariates as appropriate. The T-allele increased the risk of gout in the clinically-ascertained European samples (OR = 1.12, P = 0.012) and decreased the risk of gout in Polynesians (OR = 0.80, P = 0.011). There was no evidence for association in the HPFS or NHS sample sets. In conclusion TLR4 SNP rs2143956 associates with gout risk in prevalent clinically-ascertained gout in Europeans, in a direction consistent with previously published results in Han Chinese. However, with an opposite direction of association in Polynesians and no evidence for association in a non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cohort this variant should be analysed in other international gout genetic data sets to determine if there is genuine evidence for association.

  11. Variation in the TLR4 gene influences the risk of organ failure and shock post-trauma: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shalhub, Sherene; Junker, Christopher E.; Imahara, Scott D.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Dissanaike, Sharmila; O’Keefe, Grant E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic variation contributes to risk and outcomes of sepsis. We sought to determine if variation in inflammation related genes is associated with severity of sepsis in trauma patients. Methods A cohort of severely injured Caucasian patients was studied and genotyped for candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These were toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) A896G, tumor necrosis factor-α G-308A, interleukin-6 G-174C, interleukin-1β C-31T, and cluster of differentiation marker-14 C-159T. SNP genotypes among patients with sepsis and complicated sepsis were analyzed by chi-square and logistic regression. Six haplotype-tagging SNPs in the TLR4 gene were subsequently examined to determine their influence on TLR4 A896G SNP’s relationship to sepsis severity. Results We enrolled 598 patients. Complicated sepsis developed in 147 (25%). Adjusting for independent risk factors, carriage of the variant TLR4 896 G allele was associated with decreased risk of complicated sepsis (OR = 0.3, 95%CI = 0.1–0.7, p = 0.008). Furthermore, two haplotypes seemed to better characterize this risk than the variant TLR4 896 G allele. The variant TLR4 896G allele is linked to one common haplotype, which seems to confer a considerably reduced risk of complicated sepsis. (aOR = 0.2 95% CI = 0.05–0.7, p = 0.01) Conclusions Variation within TLR4 gene is associated with severity of post-traumatic sepsis. This risk may not be solely related to TLR4 A896G SNP. It is likely that other, uncharacterized variations in the TLR4 gene contribute to sepsis severity. A thorough evaluation of variability within the TLR4 gene is needed to characterize sepsis risk. PMID:19131814

  12. Allelic variation in TLR4 is linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Huihua; Zhao, Xingwang; Gou, Zhongyong; Liu, Ranran; Song, Yongmei; Li, Qinghe; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Everaert, Nadia; Zhao, Guiping; Wen, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a foodborne pathogen that negatively affects both animal and human health. Polymorphisms of the TLR4 gene may affect recognition by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to differences in host resistance to pathogenic infections. The present study has investigated polymorphic loci of chicken TLR4 (ChTLR4) in ten chicken breeds, electrostatic potentials of mutant structures of TLR4, and a linkage analysis between allelic variation and survival ratio to infection with SE in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) White Leghorns. A total of 19 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 10 were novel, were found in chicken breeds. Seven newly identified amino acid variants (C68G, G674A, G782A, A896T, T959G, T986A, and A1104C) and previously reported important mutations (G247A, G1028A, C1147T, and A1832G) were demonstrated in the extracellular domain of the ChTLR4 gene. Significant changes in surface electrostatic potential of the ectodomain of TLR4, built by homology modeling, were observed at the Glu83Lys (G247A), Arg298Ser (A896T), Ser368Arg (A1104C), and Gln611Arg (A1832G) substitutions. Linkage analysis showed that one polymorphic locus G247A of TLR4 gene, common in all breeds examined, was significantly associated with increased resistance to SE in SPF White Leghorns chicks (log-rank P-value = 0.04). The genotypes from A1832G SNPs did not show statistically significant survival differences. This study has provided the first direct evidence that G247A substitution in ChTLR4 is associated with increased resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis.

  13. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heeke, Darren S.; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K.; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Woo, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants. PMID:27736941

  14. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jason D; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E; Hajjar, Adeline M; Woo, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants.

  15. Epistatic interaction between TLR4 and NOD2 in patients with Crohn's Disease: relation with risk and phenotype in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Chamorro, Alba; Moreno, Antonia; Gómez-García, María; Cabello, María José; Martin, Javier; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel Ángel

    2016-09-01

    Crohn's Disease is one of the two major forms of the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and, although the etiology is not completely understood, the confluence of environmental and genetic factors has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TLR4 variants in a Spanish cohort of Crohn's Disease patients and their relation with phenotype and common NOD2 variants. A total of 371 Crohn's Disease (CD) patients and 636 healthy controls (HC) were included. Single Nucleotide Polimorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 (D299G and T399I) and NOD2 (R702W and G908R) detection was performed by a Taqman(®) Allelic Discrimination Assay. 1007insC NOD2 variant was analyzed using a PCR combined with fluorescent technology and the different alleles were determined depending on the PCR products size. D299G and T399I were related to CD only in patients carrying NOD2 variants (NOD2+/TLR4+ haplotype) (p=0.036; OR=1.924), increasing the risk to develop CD when 1007insC and TLR4 variants were both present (OR=4.886). We also described a strong association between mutant NOD2 and CD risk (p<0.001, OR=3.214). R702W, G908R and 1007insC were associated when they were considered separately (p<0.001; p=0.002; p<0.001, respectively). Moreover, the patients carrying any mutant D299G or T399I polymorphisms were predisposed to develop a stricturing disease (p=0.013; OR=2.391), especially in the presence of NOD2 mutation (p=0.002; OR=4.989). In this study, ileal disease was also associated with the presence of at least one NOD2 susceptibility allele (p=0.001; OR=3.838) and, the risk of ileal CD was increased if TLR4 variants were presents (p<0.050; OR=4.160). TLR4 variants were related to bowel perforation, independently of NOD2.

  16. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-08

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  17. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations. PMID:28272553

  18. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  19. TLR4 in Toxoplasmosis; friends or foe?

    PubMed

    Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Hakimi, Hamid; Abdollahi, Seyyed Hossein; Zainodini, Nahid; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Kennedy, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma species are obligate intracellular protozoan which are responsible for induction of several forms of Toxoplasmosis in humans. The mechanisms responsible for the progression of the prolonged forms of Toxoplasmosis and associated pathologies are yet to be identified. However, previous studies proposed that immunological and genetic parameters may play important roles in the etiology and complexity of Toxoplasmosis. Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize microbial antigens and induce immune responses against parasites, including toxoplasma species. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are PRRs which recognize toxoplasma as a pathogenic parasite and activate immune cells. It has been reported that the TLR4 is a critical innate immune cell receptor in toxoplasma detection and subsequently activates immune responses using either MYD88 or TRIF pathways. This review collates recent information regarding the role of TLR4 and its related signaling molecules with Toxoplasmosis.

  20. Ketamine effect on HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in rats with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ming-Zhe; Gu, Qiu-Han; Tao, Jun; Song, Xiao-Yang; Gan, Guo-Sheng; Luo, Zhong-Bin; Li, Bi-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common emergency and severe case in clinic. High mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) can be treated as a new anti-inflammatory treatment target. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important receptor of HMGB1. Ketamine is a widely used intravenous anesthetic with good anti-inflammatory and immune regulating function. Whether it can protect ALI through inhibiting HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in lung tissue still needs further investigation. Male SD rats were randomly divided into control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group and ketamine intervention group with 15 rats in each group. The rats were euthanatized at 24 h after modeling and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected for HMGB1 and TLR4 level detection. Western Blot was applied to analyze HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in the lung tissue. HMGB1 and TLR4 concentration in BALF were 5.369 ± 1.564 ng/ml and 43.980 ± 7.524 pg/ml in the control, respectively. They were 12.358 ± 4.681 ng/ml and 102.538 ± 8.412 pg/ml in LPS group, and 7.399 ± 2.346 ng/ml and 87.208 ± 7.558 pg/ml in ketamine intervention group, respectively. Their levels increased significantly in LPS group and down-regulated after ketamine intervention. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in lung tissue elevated obviously in LPS group, and decreased after ketamine treatment. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein level showed positive correlation in lung tissue (r = 0.921, P < 0.001). Ketamine can inhibit HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in ALI, and alleviate LPS induced rat lung injury.

  1. Galectin-3 induces ovarian cancer cell survival and chemoresistance via TLR4 signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guoqing; Ma, Xiangdong; Chen, Biliang; Huang, Yanhong; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Hong; Zou, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Paclitaxel resistance becomes common in patients with aggressive ovarian cancer and results in recurrence after conventional therapy. Galectin-3 is a multifunctional lectin associated with cell migration, cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cell-cell interaction in tumor cells. Whether circulating galectin-3 is involved in paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer remains unknown. The current study investigated the effect of galectin-3 on toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and thus paclitaxel resistance. With blood and cancer tissue samples obtained from 102 patients, we identified associations between serum galectin-3 level or TLR4 expression and paclitaxel resistance phenotype. In vitro, treatment with exogenous galectin-3 restored cell survival and migration of SKOV-3 and ES-2 cells was decreased by galectin-3 silencing and paclitaxel treatment. Furthermore, exogenous galectin-3 boosted expression of TLR4, MyD88, and p-p65, as well as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release induced by paclitaxel. Moreover, galectin-3 inhibited the interaction between TLR4 and caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in SKOV-3 and ES-2 cells. In addition, overexpression of Cav-1 dampened the expression of MyD88 and p-p65 stimulated by galectin-3 and enhanced apoptosis in SKOV-3 cells under paclitaxel exposure. In summary, our study elucidated that exogenous galectin-3 might induce paclitaxel resistance through TLR4 signaling activation by inhibiting TLR4-Cav-1 interaction, revealing a novel insight into paclitaxel resistance induction.

  2. Silencing cardiomyocyte TLR4 reduces injury following hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Avlas, Orna; Srara, Smadar; Shainberg, Asher; Aravot, Dan; Hochhauser, Edith

    2016-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of gram-negative pathogens expressed in the heart, is activated by several endogenous ligands associated with tissue injury in response to myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of TLR4 signaling in cardiomyocytes dysfunction following hypoxia (90min) using multiple methodologies such as knocking down TLR4 and small interfering RNA (siTLR4). Cardiomyocytes of C57Bl/6 mice (WT) subjected to hypoxic stress showed increased cardiac release of LDH, HMGB1, IκB, TNF-α and myocardial apoptotic and necrotic markers (BAX, PI) compared to TLR4 knock out mice (TLR4KO). Treating these cardiomyocytes with siRNA against TLR4 decreased the damage markers (LDH, IκB, TNF-α). TLR4 silencing during hypoxic stress resulted in the activation of the p-AKT and p-GSK3β (by ∼25%). The latter is an indicator that there is a reduction of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening following hypoxic myocardial induced injury leading to preserved mitochondrial membrane potential. Silencing TLR4 in cardiomyocytes improved cell survival following hypoxic injury through activation of the AKT/GSK3β pathway, reduced inflammatory and apoptotic signals. These findings suggest that TLR4 may serve as a potential target in the treatment of ischemic myocardial injury. Moreover, RNA interfering targeting TLR4 expression represents a therapeutic strategy.

  3. The gene history of zebrafish tlr4a and tlr4b is predictive of their divergent functions.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Con; Charette, Jeremy; Catchen, Julian; Lage, Christopher R; Giasson, Gregory; Postlethwait, John H; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2009-11-01

    Mammalian immune responses to LPS exposure are typified by the robust induction of NF-kappaB and IFN-beta responses largely mediated by TLR4 signal transduction pathways. In contrast to mammals, Tlr4 signal transduction pathways in nontetrapods are not well understood. Comprehensive syntenic and phylogenetic analyses support our hypothesis that zebrafish tlr4a and tlr4b genes are paralogous rather than orthologous to human TLR4. Furthermore, we provide evidence to support our assertion that the in vivo responsiveness of zebrafish to LPS exposure is not mediated by Tlr4a and Tlr4b paralogs because they fail to respond to LPS stimulation in vitro. Zebrafish Tlr4a and Tlr4b paralogs were also unresponsive to heat-killed Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila. Using chimeric molecules in which portions of the zebrafish Tlr4 proteins were fused to portions of the mouse TLR4 protein, we show that the lack of responsiveness to LPS was most likely due to the inability of the extracellular portions of zebrafish Tlr4a and Tlr4b to recognize the molecule, rather than to changes in their capacities to transduce signals through their Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains. Taken together, these findings strongly support the notion that zebrafish tlr4a and tlr4b paralogs have evolved to provide alternative ligand specificities to the Tlr immune defense system in this species. These data demonstrate that intensive examination of gene histories when describing the Tlr proteins of basally diverging vertebrates is required to obtain fuller appreciation of the evolution of their function. These studies provide the first evidence for the functional evolution of a novel Tlr.

  4. TLR4 and TNF-α polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk for severe sepsis following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Barber, R; Aragaki, C; Rivera-Chavez, F; Purdue, G; Hunt, J; Horton, J

    2004-01-01

    Context: Sepsis, organ failure, and shock remain common among patients with moderate to severe burn injuries. The inability of clinical factors to identify at-risk patients suggests that genetic variation may influence the risk for serious infection and the outcome from severe injury. Objective: Resolution of genetic variants associated with severe sepsis following burn injury. Patients: A total of 159 patients with burns ⩾20% of their total body surface area or any smoke inhalation injury without significant non-burn related trauma (injury severity score (ISS)⩾16), traumatic or anoxic brain injury, or spinal cord injury and who survived more than 48 h post-admission. Methods: Candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within bacterial recognition (TLR4 +896, CD14 –159) and inflammatory response (TNF-α –308, IL-1ß –31, IL-6 –174) loci were evaluated for association with increased risk for severe sepsis (sepsis plus organ dysfunction or septic shock) and mortality. Results: After adjustment for age, full-thickness burn size, ethnicity, and gender, carriage of the TLR4 +896 G-allele imparted at least a 1.8-fold increased risk of developing severe sepsis following a burn injury, relative to AA homozygotes (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8 to 23.2). Carriage of the TNF-α –308 A-allele imparted a similarly increased risk, relative to GG homozygotes (aOR = 4.5; 95% CI 1.7 to 12.0). None of the SNPs examined were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusions: The TLR4 +896 and TNF-α –308 polymorphisms were significantly associated with an increased risk for severe sepsis following burn trauma. PMID:15520404

  5. Coxiella burnetii lipopolysaccharide blocks p38α-MAPK activation through the disruption of TLR-2 and TLR-4 association

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Filippo; Boucherit, Nicolas; Baldassarre, Veronica; Trouplin, Virginie; Toman, Rudolf; Mottola, Giovanna; Mege, Jean-Louis; Ghigo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To survive in macrophages, Coxiella burnetii hijacks the activation pathway of macrophages. Recently, we have demonstrated that C. burnetii, via its lipopolysaccharide (LPS), avoids the activation of p38α-MAPK through an antagonistic engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. We investigated the fine-tuned mechanism leading to the absence of activation of the p38α-MAPK despite TLR-4 engagement. In macrophages challenged with LPS from the avirulent variants of C. burnetii, TLR-4 and TLR-2 co-immunoprecipitated. This association was absent in cells challenged by the LPS of pathogenic C. burnetii. The disruption makes TLRs unable to signal during the recognition of the LPS of pathogenic C. burnetii. The disruption of TLR-2 and TLR-4 was induced by the re-organization of the macrophage cytoskeleton by C. burnetii LPS. Interestingly, blocking the actin cytoskeleton re-organization relieved the disruption of the association TLR-2/TLR-4 by pathogenic C. burnetii and rescued the p38α-MAPK activation by C. burnetii. We elucidated an unexpected mechanism allowing pathogenic C. burnetii to avoid macrophage activation by the disruption of the TLR-2 and TLR-4 association. PMID:25610812

  6. Hantaan virus triggers TLR4-dependent innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Tao; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Ye; Nan, Xue-Ping; Li, Yu; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Yang, Dong-Qiang; Su, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Ping-Zhong; Bai, Xue-Fan

    2012-10-01

    The innate immune response induced by Hantavirus is responsible for endothelial cell dysfunction and viral pathogenicity. Recent studies demonstrate that TLR4 expression is upregulated and mediates the secretion of several cytokines in Hantaan virus (HTNV)-infected endothelial cells. To examine viral interactions with host endothelial cells and characterize the innate antiviral responses associated with Toll-like receptors, we selected TLR4 as the target molecule to investigate anti-hantavirus immunity. TLR4 mRNA-silenced EVC-304 (EVC-304 TLR4-) cells and EVC-304 cells were used to investigate signaling molecules downstream of TLR4. The expression of the adaptor protein TRIF was higher in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells than in EVC-304 TLR4- cells. However, there was no apparent difference in the expression of MyD88 in either cell line. The transcription factors for NF-κB and IRF-3 were translocated from the cytoplasm into the nucleus in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells, but not in HTNV-infected EVC-304 TLR4- cells. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 may play an important role in the antiviral immunity of the host against HTNV infection through an MyD88-independent signaling pathway.

  7. TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms influence mRNA and protein expression in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Marcela Alcântara; de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; Cadamuro, Aline Cristina Targa; Succi, Maysa; Netinho, João Gomes; Goloni-Bertolo, Eny Maria; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of promoter region polymorphisms of toll-like receptor (TLR)2-196 to -174del and TLR4-1607T/C (rs10759932) on mRNA and protein expression in tumor tissue and of TLR4+896A/G (rs4986790) on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. METHODS: The TLR2-196 to -174del polymorphism was investigated using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the TLR4-1607T/C and TLR4+896A/G by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We genotyped 434 DNA samples from 194 CRC patients and 240 healthy individuals. The mRNA relative quantification (RQ) was performed in 40 tumor tissue samples by quantitative PCR TaqMan assay, using specific probes for TLR2 and TLR4 genes, and ACTB and GAPDH reference genes were used as endogenous controls. Protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry with specific primary antibodies. RESULTS: No association was found for TLR4-1607T/C and TLR4+896A/G by three statistical models (log-additive, dominant and recessive). However, based on dominant and log-additive models, the polymorphic variant TLR2-196 to -174del was associated with increased CRC risk [dominant: odds ratio (OR) = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.03-2.89; P = 0.038 and log-additive: OR =1.59, 95%CI: 1.02-2.48; P = 0.039]. TLR2 mRNA expression was increased in tumor tissue (RQ = 2.36) when compared to adjacent normal tissue (RQ = 1; P < 0.0001), whereas the TLR4 mRNA showed a basal expression (RQ = 0.74 vs RQ = 1, P = 0.452). Immunohistochemistry analysis of TLR2 and TLR4 protein expression was concordant with the findings of mRNA expression. In addition, the TLR2-196 to -174del variant carriers showed mRNA relative expression 2.19 times higher than wild-genotype carriers. The TLR2 protein expression was also higher for the TLR2-196 to -174del variant carriers [117 ± 10 arbitrary unit (a.u.) vs 95 ± 4 a.u., P = 0.03]. However, for the TLR4 -1607T/C polymorphism no significant difference was found for both mRNA (P = 0.56) and protein expression (P = 0

  8. Lack of association between TLR4 rs4986790 polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-Bermúdez, Mercedes; López-Mejías, Raquel; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Castañeda, Santos; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Blanco, Ricardo; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Balsa, Alejandro; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Llorca, Javier; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2012-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) activates the innate immune response via NF-kB pathway and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, leading to expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The G allele of TLR4 rs4986790 (+896A>G, Asp299Gly) gene polymorphism has been implicated in reduction of risk of atherosclerosis. In this study, 1481 RA patients fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria were genotyped for the rs4986790 TLR4 variant to determine the influence of this variant in the risk of CV events in these patients. Also, HLA-DRB1 status was determined using molecular based methods. Moreover, potential influence of rs4986790 variant in the development of subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed in a subgroup of RA patients with no history of CV events by the measurement of surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. No statistically significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies for the rs4986790 variant between RA patients who experienced CV events or not were found. Likewise, no significant association between this gene variant and any of the surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis was found. In summary, results in our study do not support the hypothesis that the rs4986790 (+896A>G, Asp299Gly) TLR4 variant may influence predisposition for subclinical atherosclerosis and clinically evident CV disease in RA patients.

  9. TLR4 mediates LPS-induced VEGF expression in odontoblasts.

    PubMed

    Botero, Tatiana M; Shelburne, Charles E; Holland, G Rex; Hanks, Carl T; Nör, Jacques E

    2006-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria cell walls such as Prevotella intermedia and Escherichia coli induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in odontoblasts, but not in undifferentiated dental pulp cells. CD14 and TLR4 are responsible for LPS signaling in macrophages, but their expression levels and function in dental pulp cells are unknown. We showed here that murine odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) express CD14 and TLR4 by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. In contrast, undifferentiated dental pulp cells (OD-21) presented low or no expression of these two receptors. MDPC-23 cells showed CD14 and TLR4 up-regulation upon exposure to LPS, as determined by real time PCR. Dominant negative murine TLR4 (DN-mTLR4) transfected MDPC-23 cells did not show upregulated VEGF expression in response to LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that odontoblast-like cells express CD14 and TLR4, and that LPS-induced VEGF expression is mediated, at least in part, by TLR4 signaling.

  10. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases.

  11. Association of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) with chronic plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rh Ll; Hébert, H L; Massey, J; Bowes, J; Marzo-Ortega, H; Ho, P; McHugh, N J; Worthington, J; Barton, A; Griffiths, C E M; Warren, R B

    2016-04-01

    Family studies have provided overwhelming evidence for an underlying genetic component to psoriasis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key transmembrane proteins in both the innate and adaptive immune responses which are known to be integral processes in psoriasis. Recent functional studies support this notion having suggested a role for TLR4 in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Furthermore a missense polymorphism in the TLR4 gene has been associated with a number of autoimmune conditions, including Crohn diseases, making TLR4 a viable candidate gene for investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate polymorphisms across the TLR4 region with a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel in a large cohort of patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis. Twenty SNPs were successfully genotyped using Sequenom iPLEX Gold platform in 2826 UK chronic plaque type psoriasis patients including subgroup data on presence of confirmed psoriatic arthritis (n = 1839) and early-onset psoriasis (n = 1466) was available. Allele frequencies for psoriasis patients were compared against imputed Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium controls (n = 4861). Significant association was observed between a missense variant rs4986790 of TLR4 (Asp229Gly) and plaque type psoriasis (p = 2 × 10(-4)) which was also notable in those with psoriatic arthritis (p = 2 × 10(-4)) and early-onset psoriasis (p = 8 × 10(-4)). We present data suggestive of an association between a functional variant and an intronic variant of TLR4 and chronic plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, validation of this association in independent cohorts will be necessary.

  12. The TLR4 D299G and T399I SNPs are constitutively active to up-regulate expression of Trif-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Hold, Georgina L; Berry, Susan; Saunders, Karin A; Drew, Janice; Mayer, Claus; Brookes, Heather; Gay, Nick J; El-Omar, Emad M; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) signalling and genetic polymorphisms in these proteins are linked to many human diseases. We investigated TLR4 functional variants D299G and T399I to assess the impact on LPS-induced responsiveness in comparison to wild-type TLR4. The mechanism by which this occurs in unclear as these SNPs do not lie within the lipid A binding domain or dimerisation sites of the LPS-TLR4/MD2 receptor complexes. Transfection of TLR4D299G, TLR4T399I or TLR4D299G. T399I into HEK cells resulted in constitutive activation of an NF-κB reporter gene and a blunting of the LPS-induced reporter activation compared to WT-TLR4. Unstimulated human monocyte/macrophages, from patients with the D299G and T399I SNPs demonstrated a downregulation of many genes, particularly Tram/Trif signalling pathway constitutents compared to the TLR4 wild-type subjects supporting the concept of basal receptor activity. Monocyte/macrophages from carriers of the TLR4 D299G and T399I polymorphisms stimulated with LPS showed >6 fold lower levels of NF-κB and ∼12 fold higher IFN-β gene expression levels compared to wild-type subjects (P<0.05; MWU test) and dramatically altered resultant cytokine profiles. We conclude that these TLR4 SNPs affect constitutive receptor activity which impacts on the hosts ability to respond to LPS challenge leading to a dysregulated sub-optimal immune response to infection.

  13. Alcohol, TLR4-TGF-β Antagonism, and Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Mishra, Lopa; Machida, Keigo

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and obesity are two known risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that also synergistically promote HBV/HCV-related carcinogenesis. TLR4, the PAMP for endotoxin participates in inflammatory processes such as M1 activation of hepatic macrophages in alcoholic liver disease. However its role in liver carcinogenesis via ectopic expression and activation, has only recently been revealed in alcohol/HCV-associated HCC models. Alcohol feeding to mice expressing the HCV Ns5a in a hepatocyte specific manner, aggravates liver inflammation via activation of overexpressed TLR4 in the parenchymal cells. Long-term alcohol feeding produces liver tumors in these transgenic mice in a manner dependent on TLR4. From these mice, CD133+/CD49f+ tumor initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) have been isolated. These TICs exhibit self-renewal and tumorigenic activities driven by TLR4-dependent upregulation of the stem cell factor NANOG. Defective TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway is identified in the TICs and mediated by NANOG target genes Igf2bp3 and Yap1. This TGF-β pathway antagonism is responsible in part for TIC’s tumorigenic activity and chemoresistance. Conversely, mice with attenuated TGF-β pathway due to haploinsufficiency of β2-Spectrin, spontaneously develop liver tumors and alcohol-feeding increases tumor incidence in a TLR4 dependent manner. This reciprocal antagonism between TLR4 and TGF-β pathways may serve as a novel therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:26201318

  14. The Troll in Toll: Mal and Tram as bridges for TLR2 and TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, Frederick J; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2007-08-01

    Signaling by two of the most important bacteria-sensing TLRs, TLR2 and TLR4, involves two adaptor proteins, MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal) and Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-beta (Trif)-related adaptor molecule (TRAM). Recently, new insights into the functioning of these two adapters have emerged. Mal is required by both TLRs to act as a bridge to recruit the adaptor MyD88, leading ultimately to NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, TRAM acts as a bridge to recruit TRIF to the TLR4 complex, leading to activation of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3. Consistent with Mal and TRAM being key points of control, recent evidence suggests that they are subject to regulation by phosphorylation. Further, a variant in Mal in humans has been found to protect against multiple infectious diseases. Finally, another TIR domain-containing adaptor, sterile alpha and HEAT/armadillo motif protein (SARM), has been shown to act as an inhibitor of TRIF-dependent signaling. These recent discoveries add to the complexity of TLR signaling and highlight specific control mechanisms for TLR2 and TLR4 signaling.

  15. How important are rare variants in common disease?

    PubMed

    Saint Pierre, Aude; Génin, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have uncovered hundreds of common genetic variants involved in complex diseases. However, for most complex diseases, these common genetic variants only marginally contribute to disease susceptibility. It is now argued that rare variants located in different genes could in fact play a more important role in disease susceptibility than common variants. These rare genetic variants were not captured by genome-wide association studies using single nucleotide polymorphism-chips but with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, they have become detectable. It is now possible to study their contribution to common disease by resequencing samples of cases and controls or by using new genotyping exome arrays that cover rare alleles. In this review, we address the question of the contribution of rare variants in common disease by taking the examples of different diseases for which some resequencing studies have already been performed, and by summarizing the results of simulation studies conducted so far to investigate the genetic architecture of complex traits in human. So far, empirical data have not allowed the exclusion of many models except the most extreme ones involving only a small number of rare variants with large effects contributing to complex disease. To unravel the genetic architecture of complex disease, case-control data will not be sufficient, and alternative study designs need to be proposed together with methodological developments.

  16. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  17. Cytokine production in patients with cirrhosis and TLR4 polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Juan Camilo; Sánchez, Elisabet; Román, Eva; Vidal, Silvia; Oliva, Laia; Guarner-Argente, Carlos; Poca, Maria; Torras, Xavier; Juárez, Cándido; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, German

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the cytokine production by peripheral blood cells from cirrhotic patients with and without TLR4 D299G and/or T399I polymorphisms. METHODS: The study included nine patients with cirrhosis and TLR4 D299G and/or T399I polymorphisms, and 10 wild-type patients matched for age, sex and degree of liver failure. TLR4 polymorphisms were determined by sequence-based genotyping. Cytokine production by peripheral blood cells was assessed spontaneously and also after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) stimulation. RESULTS: Patients with TLR4 polymorphisms had a higher incidence of previous hepatic encephalopathy than wild-type patients (78% vs 20%, P = 0.02). Spontaneous production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 was lower in patients with TLR4 polymorphisms than in wild-type patients [IL-6: 888.7 (172.0-2119.3) pg/mL vs 5540.4 (1159.2-26053.9) pg/mL, P < 0.001; IL-10: 28.7 (6.5-177.1) pg/mL vs 117.8 (6.5-318.1) pg/mL, P = 0.02]. However, the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 and IL-10 after LPS and LTA stimulation was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: TLR4 polymorphisms were associated with a distinctive pattern of cytokine production in cirrhotic patients, suggesting that they play a role in the development of cirrhosis complications. PMID:25516666

  18. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of LrTLR4, analysis of its inductive expression and associated down-stream signaling molecules following lipopolysaccharide stimulation and Gram-negative bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Mrinal; Basu, Madhubanti; Swain, Banikalyan; Paichha, Mahismita; Lenka, Saswati S; Das, Surajit; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Maiti, Nikhil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in innate immunity from lower to higher vertebrates. Among various TLR types, TLR4 was reported to recognize LPS in higher vertebrates resulting in the activation of down-stream signaling pathway. Except in some teleosts, function of TLR4 in most fish species including rohu (Labeo rohita) a commercially important fish species in the South-East Asian countries remained unknown. To investigate it, full-length cDNA of Labeo rohita TLR4 (LrTLR4) was cloned, and it consisted of 2729 bp, with a single ORF of 2469 bp encoding a polypeptide of 822 aa with a predicted molecular mass of 94.753 kDa. Structurally, LrTLR4 consisted of 25 LRRs (leucine rich repeat regions), one TM (trans-membrane) domain and one TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor) domain, and was similar to higher vertebrate's TLR4. Phylogenetically, LrTLR4 exhibited highest (85%) identity with the common carp TLR4b amino acids sequence, and formed a separate subgroup in the phylogenetic tree. LrTLR4 was widely expressed in all tested organs/tissues, and amidst the tissues highest expression was detected in blood and the lowest in eye. In response to LPS-stimulation, LrTLR4 was induced with the activation of MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent signaling pathway resulting in pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 and 8) and type I IFN gene expression. Infection of rohu with a Gram-negative fish pathogen (Aeromonas hydrophila), also activated LrTLR4. Together, these findings suggest the important role of TLR4 in LPS sensing and augmentation of innate immunity against Gram-negative bacterial infection in fish.

  20. Association between variation in faecal egg count for a natural mixed field-challenge of nematode parasites and TLR4 variation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y-S; Zhou, H; Forrest, R H J; Frampton, C M; Burrows, L E R; Hickford, J G H

    2016-03-15

    Research has shown that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in immune responses to some helminth parasites. In sheep, variation in the PAMP region of TLR4 may result in structurally and thus functionally different TLR4 molecules, and this may consequently lead to variation in the TLR4 response to parasite infections. This study involved three separate, but related sheep breeds (Merino, Polwarth and Corriedale sheep) and a total of 885 lambs from five New Zealand farms that underwent a mixed field-challenge from gastro-intestinal parasites. Faecal samples were collected at approximately 4 and 9 months of age and faecal egg counts (FECs) for Nematodirus spp. and Strongyle species determined, along with the total number of eggs per gram (EPG). Analysis of the five farms collectively revealed an association (P=0.023) between the presence of TLR4 variant *02 (mean 24 EPG) and the absence of the variant (mean 32 EPG) at 9 months of age. Conversely the presence of *03 had a significantly (P=0.047) higher mean Nematodirus spp. FEC (mean 42 EPG) compared to the absence (mean 28 EPG) at 9 months of age. More associations were revealed when the data were split according to the dominant faecal parasite species. With a predominantly Trichostrongylus spp. FEC group of lambs at 9 months of age, the presence of TLR4 variant *02 was found to have significantly (P=0.003) lower Nematodirus spp. FEC (mean 4 EPG), and also significantly (P=0.033) lower total FEC (mean 312 EPG) when compared to sheep without the variant (mean 15 EPG and 449 EPG, respectively). The presence of TLR4 variant *03 and *04 were associated or tended to be associated (P=0.010 and P=0.088, respectively) with higher Nematodirus spp. FEC (mean 25 EPG and 22 EPG, respectively) when compared to lambs without the variant (mean 10 EPG and 11 EPG, respectively). These results suggest that TLR4 variation may be affecting the immune response to gastro-intestinal parasites in sheep, although principally to

  1. TLR4 deficiency promotes autophagy during cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    An, Chang Hyeok; Wang, Xiao Mei; Lam, Hilaire C; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Washko, George R; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2012-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) exert important nonimmune functions in lung homeostasis. TLR4 deficiency promotes pulmonary emphysema. We examined the role of TLR4 in regulating cigarette smoke (CS)-induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. Lung tissue was obtained from chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) patients. C3H/HeJ (Tlr4-mutated) mice and C57BL/10ScNJ (Tlr4-deficient) mice and their respective control strains were exposed to chronic CS or air. Human or mouse epithelial cells (wild-type, Tlr4-knockdown, and Tlr4-deficient) were exposed to CS-extract (CSE). Samples were analyzed for TLR4 expression, and for autophagic or apoptotic proteins by Western blot analysis or confocal imaging. Chronic obstructive lung disease lung tissues and human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to CSE displayed increased TLR4 expression, and increased autophagic [microtubule-associated protein-1 light-chain-3B (LC3B)] and apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3) markers. Beas-2B cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA displayed increased expression of LC3B relative to control cells, basally and after exposure to CSE. The basal and CSE-inducible expression of LC3B and cleaved caspase-3 were elevated in pulmonary alveolar type II cells from Tlr4-deficient mice. Wild-type mice subjected to chronic CS-exposure displayed airspace enlargement;, however, the Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice exhibited a marked increase in airspace relative to wild-type mice after CS-exposure. The Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice showed higher levels of LC3B under basal conditions and after CS exposure. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 was markedly increased in Tlr4-deficient mice exposed to CS. We describe a protective regulatory function of TLR4 against emphysematous changes of the lung in response to CS.

  2. Inhibition of TLR4 protects rat islets against lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ge, Qin Min; Bian, Fan; Dong, Yan; Huang, Chun Mei

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress leads to dysfunction in pancreatic cells, causing a reduction in insulin secretion following exposure to glucose. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may be activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stress. TLR4 may mediate the initiation of inflammatory and immune defense responses; however, the importance of the LPS/TLR4 interaction in apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in pancreatic β cells remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the importance of TLR4 during LPS‑induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and dysfunction of insulin secretion in isolated islets of rats. LPS‑induced stimulation of TLR4 increased the production of reactive oxygen species and promoted apoptosis by upregulating the expression levels of caspase‑3, poly ADP ribose polymerase and altering the expression ratio of B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2)/Bcl‑2 associated X protein. Additionally, the insulin secretion of islets cells was reduced. Anti‑TLR4 antibody and a knockdown of TLR4 by TLR4‑short hairpin RNA were used to inhibit TLR4 activity, which may reverse LPS‑induced events. The present study determined that in islets exposed to LPS oxidative stress, dysfunction may be partly mediated via the TLR4 pathway. Inhibition of TLR4 may prevent dysfunction of rat islets due to oxidative stress. The present study revealed that targeting the LPS/TLR4 signaling pathway and antioxidant therapy may be a novel treatment for the severely septic patients with hyperglycemia stress.

  3. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key factor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies from our group identified differences in the expression profile of TLR4 and genes affected by the TLR4 signaling pathway among pigs that shed varying...

  4. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  5. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  6. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  7. Effects of TLR4 gene silencing on the proliferation and apotosis of hepatocarcinoma HEPG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yating; Li, Tao; Xu, Yuanhong; Xu, Enjun; Zhou, Min; Wang, Baolong; Shen, Jilong

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key factors in the innate immune system and initiate an inflammatory response to foreign pathogens, such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. TLR4-mediated signaling has been implicated in tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis in numerous cancers. The present study aimed to investigate the biological effect of TLR4 on the proliferation and apoptosis of human liver cancer cells and the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cellular responses following TLR4 gene knockdown. Three TLR4 small interfering (si)RNA constructs, consisting of TLR4-siRNA-1, TLR4-siRNA-2 and TLR4-siRNA-3, were transiently transfected into HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. TLR4 knockdown was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The effect of the TLR4 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation was monitored by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and cell apoptosis was observed by flow cytometry. The expression of TLR4-associated proteins, consisting of myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), Toll-interleukin-1R-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, NF-κB inhibitor α (IκBα), phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), was detected by western blot analysis. TLR4-siRNA-1 had the strongest knockdown effect and inhibited TLR4 messenger RNA and protein expression. TLR4 knockdown with TLR4-siRNA-1 reduced cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. MyD88, TRIF, IRF3, IκBα, JNK and ERK were markedly suppressed in the cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA. However, nuclear expression of NF-κB and p-IκBα increased in HepG2 cells with TLR4 gene knockdown. The present study revealed that TLR4-mediated signaling plays a key role in the proliferation and apoptosis of cultured hepatocarcinoma cells. Therefore, RNA interference-directed targeting of TLR4 may raise

  8. Lipopolysaccharide promotes lipid accumulation in human adventitial fibroblasts via TLR4-NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic degenerative disease of the arteries and is thought to be one of the most common causes of death globally. In recent years, the functions of adventitial fibroblasts in the development of atherosclerosis and tissue repair have gained increased interests. LPS can increase the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis-associated cardiovascular disease. Although LPS increases neointimal via TLR4 activation has been reported, how LPS augments atherogenesis through acting on adventitial fibroblasts is still unknown. Here we explored lipid deposition within adventitial fibroblasts mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to imitate inflammatory conditions. Results In our study, LPS enhanced lipid deposition by the up-regulated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) as the silencing of ADRP abrogated lipid deposition in LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts. In addition, pre-treatment with anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antibody diminished the LPS-induced lipid deposition and ADRP expression. Moreover, LPS induced translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which could markedly up-regulate lipid deposition as pre-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly reduced lipid droplets. In addition, the lowering lipid accumulation was accompanied with the decreased ADRP expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced adventitial fibroblasts secreted more monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), compared with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that LPS promotes lipid accumulation via the up-regulation of ADRP expression through TLR4 activated downstream of NF-κB in adventitial fibroblasts. Increased levels of MCP-1 released from LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts and lipid accumulation may accelerate monocytes recruitment and lipid-laden macrophage foam cells formation. Here, our study provides a new explanation as to how bacterial infection contributes to

  9. Mechanisms of Toll-like Receptor 4 Endocytosis Reveal a Common Immune-Evasion Strategy Used by Pathogenic and Commensal Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yunhao; Zanoni, Ivan; Cullen, Thomas W; Goodman, Andrew L; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2015-11-17

    Microbe-induced receptor trafficking has emerged as an essential means to promote innate immune signal transduction. Upon detection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), CD14 induces an inflammatory endocytosis pathway that delivers Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to endosomes. Although several regulators of CD14-dependent TLR4 endocytosis have been identified, the cargo-selection mechanism during this process remains unknown. We reveal that, in contrast to classic cytosolic interactions that promoted the endocytosis of transmembrane receptors, TLR4 was selected as cargo for inflammatory endocytosis entirely through extracellular interactions. Mechanistically, the extracellular protein MD-2 bound to and dimerized TLR4 in order to promote this endocytic event. Our analysis of LPS variants from human pathogens and gut commensals revealed a common mechanism by which bacteria prevent inflammatory endocytosis. We suggest that evasion of CD14-dependent endocytosis is an attribute that transcends the concept of pathogenesis and might be a fundamental feature of bacteria that inhabit eukaryotic hosts.

  10. NOD2/CARD15, TLR4 and CD14 mutations in Scottish and Irish Crohn's disease patients: evidence for genetic heterogeneity within Europe?

    PubMed

    Arnott, I D R; Nimmo, E R; Drummond, H E; Fennell, J; Smith, B R K; MacKinlay, E; Morecroft, J; Anderson, N; Kelleher, D; O'Sullivan, M; McManus, R; Satsangi, J

    2004-08-01

    NOD2/caspase recruitment domain (CARD)15 variants are identified in up to 50% of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Functional variants of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and CD14 genes may also be relevant to disease pathophysiology. We aimed to assess the contribution of NOD2/CARD15, TLR4 and CD14 variants in Scottish and Irish CD patients. In all, 612 patients with well-characterised inflammatory bowel disease (252 Scottish CD, 247 Scottish UC, 113 Irish CD) and 304 controls were genotyped for variants of NOD2/CARD15 (1007fsinsC, G908R, R702W, P268S), TLR4 (A299G) and CD14 (T-159C). Genotype-phenotype analyses were performed. Variant 1007fsinsC (P=0.003) and G908R (P=0.008) but not R702W (P=0.269) alleles were more prevalent in Scottish CD (4.7, 1.8 and 7.1%, respectively) than Scottish control (2.3, 0.3 and 5.4%). CD allelic frequencies were lower than the series from Europe (P<0.00001) and North America (P<0.00001) but not Scandinavia (P<0.7). Associations were identified with age at diagnosis (P=0.002), ileal disease (P<0.02), penetrating disease (P=0.04) and inflammatory joint disease (P<0.02). TLR4 and CD14 variants did not differ between CD and controls. In conclusion, we present compelling evidence for genetic heterogeneity within Europe. These NOD2/CARD15 variants have a minor contribution in Scottish and Irish CD patients, consistent with an emerging pattern from Northern Europe.

  11. Distinct microenvironmental cues stimulate divergent TLR4-mediated signaling pathways in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini, Anna M.; Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Lim, Jenny M. P.; Midwood, Kim S.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit a phenotypic plasticity that enables them to orchestrate specific immune responses to distinct threats. The microbial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C are released during bacterial infection and tissue injury, respectively, and both activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We found that these two TLR4 ligands stimulated distinct signaling pathways in macrophages, resulting in cells with divergent phenotypes. Although macrophages activated by LPS or tenascin-C displayed some common features, including activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine synthesis, each ligand stimulated the production of different subsets of cytokines and generated different phosphoproteomic signatures. Moreover, tenascin-C promoted the generation of macrophages that exhibited increased synthesis and phosphorylation of extracellular matrix components, whereas LPS stimulated the production of macrophages that exhibited an enhanced capacity to degrade the matrix. These data reveal how the activation of one pattern recognition receptor by different microenvironmental cues generates macrophage with distinct phenotypes. PMID:27577261

  12. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma.

  13. Common variants at 30 loci contribute to polygenic dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Kathiresan, Sekar; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina; Demissie, Serkalem; Musunuru, Kiran; Schadt, Eric; Lee, Kaplan; Bennett, Derrick; Li, Yun; Tanaka, Toshiko; Voight, Benjamin F; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Crawford, Gabriel; Surti, Aarti; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Parish, Sarah; Clarke, Robert; Zelenika, Diana; Kubalanza, Kari A; Morken, Mario A; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Galan, Pilar; Swift, Amy J; Kuusisto, Johanna; Bergman, Richard N; Sundvall, Jouko; Laakso, Markku; Ferrucci, Luigi; Scheet, Paul; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Yang, Qiong; Lunetta, Kathryn; Dupuis, Josee; deBakker, Paul I; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Hercberg, Serge; Meneton, Pierre; Lakatta, Edward G; Scuteri, Angelo; Schlessinger, David; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; Altshuler, David; Collins, Rory; Lathrop, G Mark; Melander, Olle; Salomaa, Veikko; Peltonen, Leena; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ordovas, Jose M; Boehnke, Michael; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Mohlke, Karen L; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2009-01-01

    Blood low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. To dissect the polygenic basis of these traits, we conducted genome-wide association screens in 19,840 individuals and replication in up to 20,623 individuals. We identified 30 distinct loci associated with lipoprotein concentrations (each with P < 5 × 10-8), including 11 loci that reached genome-wide significance for the first time. The 11 newly defined loci include common variants associated with LDL cholesterol near ABCG8, MAFB, HNF1A and TIMD4; with HDL cholesterol near ANGPTL4, FADS1-FADS2-FADS3, HNF4A, LCAT, PLTP and TTC39B; and with triglycerides near AMAC1L2, FADS1-FADS2-FADS3 and PLTP. The proportion of individuals exceeding clinical cut points for high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides varied according to an allelic dosage score (P < 10-15 for each trend). These results suggest that the cumulative effect of multiple common variants contributes to polygenic dyslipidemia. PMID:19060906

  14. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Zhang, Yi; Haslip, Maria; Jin, Lei; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Xuchen; Lee, Patty J

    2016-03-01

    TLR4 deficiency causes hypersusceptibility to oxidant-induced injury. We investigated the role of TLR4 in lung protection, using used bone marrow chimeras; cell-specific transgenic modeling; and lentiviral delivery in vivo to knock down or express TLR4 in various lung compartments; and lung-specific VEGF transgenic mice to investigate the effect of TLR4 on VEGF-mediated protection. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in an enclosed chamber and assessed for survival and lung injury. Primary endothelial cells were stimulated with recombinant VEGF and exposed to hyperoxia or hydrogen peroxide. Endothelium-specific expression of human TLR4 (as opposed to its expression in epithelium or immune cells) increased the survival of TLR4-deficent mice in hyperoxia by 24 h and decreased LDH release and lung cell apoptosis after 72 h of exposure by 30%. TLR4 expression was necessary and sufficient for the protective effect of VEGF in the lungs and in primary endothelial cells in culture. TLR4 knockdown inhibited VEGF signaling through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), Akt, and ERK pathways in lungs and primary endothelial cells and decreased the availability of VEGFR2 at the cell surface. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which TLR4, an innate pattern receptor, interacts with an endothelial survival pathway.

  15. Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) modulation by synthetic and natural compounds: an update

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Francesco; Calabrese, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), together with MD-2, binds bacterial endotoxins (E) with high affinity, triggering formation of the activated homodimer (E-MD-2-TLR4)2. Activated TLR4 induces intracellular signaling leading to activation of transcription factors that result in cytokine and chemokine production and initiation of inflammatory and immune responses. TLR4 also responds to endogenous ligands called danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Increased sensitivity to infection and a variety of immune pathologies have been associated with either too little or too much TLR4 activation. We review here the molecular mechanisms of TLR4 activation (agonism) or inhibition (antagonism) by small organic molecules of both natural and synthetic origin. The role of co-receptors MD-2 and CD14 in the TLR4 modulation process is also discussed. Recent achievements in the field of chemical TLR4 modulation are reviewed, with special focus on non-classical TLR4 ligands with a chemical structure different from lipid A. PMID:24188011

  16. Apigenin protects blood-brain barrier and ameliorates early brain injury by inhibiting TLR4-mediated inflammatory pathway in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Su, Jingyuan; Guo, Bingyu; Wang, Kaiwen; Li, Xiaoming; Liang, Guobiao

    2015-09-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Inflammation has been considered as the major contributor to brain damage after SAH. SAH induces a systemic increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) facilitates the influx of inflammatory cells. It has been reported that the activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a vital role in the central nervous system diseases. Apigenin, a common plant flavonoid, possesses anti-inflammation effect. In this study, we focused on the effects of apigenin on EBI following SAH and its anti-inflammation mechanism. Our results showed that apigenin (20mg/kg) administration significantly attenuated EBI (including brain edema, BBB disruption, neurological deficient, severity of SAH, and cell apoptosis) after SAH in rats by suppressing the expression of TLR4, NF-κB and their downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cortex and by up-regulating the expression of tight junction proteins of BBB. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that TLR4 was activated following SAH in neurons, microglia cells, and endothelial cells but not in astrocytes. Apigenin could suppress the activation of TLR4 induced by SAH and inhibit apoptosis of cells in the cortex. These results suggested that apigenin could attenuate EBI after SAH in rats by suppressing TLR4-mediated inflammation and protecting against BBB disruption.

  17. TLR4 knockout attenuated high fat diet-induced cardiac dysfunction via NF-κB/JNK-dependent activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Zhang, Yingmei

    2017-01-17

    Obesity is commonly associated with a low grade systemic inflammation, which may contribute to the onset and development of myocardial remodeling and contractile dysfunction. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in innate immunity and inflammation although its role in high fat diet-induced obesity cardiac dysfunction remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the effect of TLR4 ablation on high fat diet intake-induced cardiac anomalies, if any, and underlying mechanism(s) involved. Wild-type (WT) and TLR4 knockout mice were fed normal or high fat (60% calorie from fat) diet for 12weeks prior to assessment of mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+) properties. The inflammatory signaling proteins (TLR4, NF-κB, and JNK) and autophagic markers (Atg5, Atg12, LC3B and p62) were evaluated. Our results revealed that high fat diet intake promoted obesity, marked decrease in fractional shortening, and cardiomyocyte contractile capacity with dampened intracellular Ca(2+) release and clearance, elevated ROS generation and oxidative stress as measured by aconitase activity, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by TLR4 knockout. In addition, high fat intake downregulated levels of Atg5, Atg12 and LC3B, while increasing p62 accumulation. TLR4 knockout itself did not affect Atg5, Atg12, LC3B and p62 levels while it reconciled high fat diet intake-induced changes in autophagy. In addition, TLR4 knockout alleviated high fat diet-induced phosphorylation of IKKβ, JNK and mTOR. In vitro study revealed that palmitic acid suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was inhibited the TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095, the JNK inhibitor AS601245 or the NF-κB inhibitor Celastrol. Taken together, these data showed that TLR4 knockout ameliorated high fat diet-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies through inhibition of inflammation and ROS, possibly through a NF-κB/JNK-dependent activation of autophagy. This article is

  18. Genetics of allergy and allergic sensitization: common variants, rare mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Sparks, Rachel; Waage, Johannes; Milner, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the specific genetic lesions in allergy has improved in recent years due to identification of common risk variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and studies of rare, monogenic diseases. Large-scale GWAS have identified novel susceptibility loci and provided information about shared genetics between allergy, related phenotypes and autoimmunity. Studies of monogenic diseases have elucidated critical cellular pathways and protein functions responsible for allergy. These complementary approaches imply genetic mechanisms involved in Th2 immunity, T-cell differentiation, TGFβ signaling, regulatory T-cell function and skin/mucosal function as well as yet unknown mechanisms associated with newly identified genes. Future studies, in combination with data on gene expression and epigenetics, are expected to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of allergy. PMID:26386198

  19. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W; Baker, Annette L; Shulman, Stanford T; Rowley, Anne H; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-07-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5' untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 x 10(-8) in the Japanese and P = 3.7 x 10(-3) in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD.

  20. Fusobacterium nucleatum induces fetal death in mice via stimulation of TLR4-mediated placental inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongqi; Redline, Raymond W; Han, Yiping W

    2007-08-15

    Intrauterine infection plays a pivotal role in preterm birth (PTB) and is characterized by inflammation. Currently, there is no effective therapy available to treat or prevent bacterial-induced PTB. Using Fusobacterium nucleatum, a Gram-negative anaerobe frequently associated with PTB, as a model organism, the mechanism of intrauterine infection was investigated. Previously, it was shown that F. nucleatum induced preterm and term stillbirth in mice. Fusobacterial-induced placental infection was characterized by localized bacterial colonization, inflammation, and necrosis. In this study, F. nucleatum was shown to activate both TLR2 and TLR4 in vitro. In vivo, the fetal death rate was significantly reduced in TLR4-deficient mice (C57BL/6 TLR4(-/-) and C3H/HeJ (TLR4(d/d))), but not in TLR2-deficient mice (C57BL/6 TLR2(-/-)), following F. nucleatum infection. The reduced fetal death in TLR4-deficient mice was accompanied by decreased placental necroinflammatory responses in both C57BL/6 TLR4(-/-) and C3H/HeJ. Decreased bacterial colonization in the placenta was observed in C3H/HeJ, but not in C57BL/6 TLR4(-/-). These results suggest that inflammation, rather than the bacteria per se, was the likely cause of fetal loss. TLR2 did not appear to be critically involved, as no difference in bacterial colonization, inflammation, or necrosis was observed between C57BL/6 and C57BL/6 TLR2(-/-) mice. A synthetic TLR4 antagonist, TLR4A, significantly reduced fusobacterial-induced fetal death and decidual necrosis without affecting the bacterial colonization in the placentas. TLR4A had no bactericidal activity nor did it affect the birth outcome in sham-infected mice. TLR4A could have promise as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment or prevention of bacterial-induced preterm birth.

  1. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  2. TPN-associated intestinal epithelial cell atrophy is modulated by TLR4/EGF signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer J.; Feng, Yongjia; Demehri, Farokh R.; Dempsey, Peter J.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a close interaction between epidermal growth factor (EGF) and TLR signaling in the modulation of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation; however, how these signaling pathways adjust IEC proliferation is poorly understood. We utilized a model of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), or enteral nutrient deprivation, to study this interaction as TPN results in mucosal atrophy due to decreased IEC proliferation and increased apoptosis. We identified the novel finding of decreased mucosal atrophy in TLR4 knockout (TLR4KO) mice receiving TPN. We hypothesized that EGF signaling is preserved in TLR4KO-TPN mice and prevents mucosal atrophy. C57Bl/6 and strain-matched TLR4KO mice were provided either enteral feeding or TPN. IEC proliferation and apoptosis were measured. Cytokine and growth factor abundances were detected in both groups. To examine interdependence of these pathways, ErbB1 pharmacologic blockade was used. The marked decline in IEC proliferation with TPN was nearly prevented in TLR4KO mice, and intestinal length was partially preserved. EGF was significantly increased, and TNF-α decreased in TLR4KO-TPN versus wild-type (WT)-TPN mice. Apoptotic positive crypt cells were 15-fold higher in WT-TPN versus TLR4KO-TPN mice. Bcl-2 was significantly increased in TLR4KO-TPN mice, while Bax decreased 10-fold. ErbB1 blockade prevented this otherwise protective effect in TLR4KO-sTPN mice. TLR4 blockade significantly prevented TPN-associated atrophy by preserving proliferation and preventing apoptosis. This is driven by a reduction in TNF-α abundance and increased EGF. Potential manipulation of this regulatory pathway may have significant clinical potential to prevent TPN-associated atrophy.—Freeman, J. J., Feng, Y., Demehri, F. R., Dempsey, P. J., Teitelbaum, D. H. TPN-associated intestinal epithelial cell atrophy is modulated by TLR4/EGF signaling pathways. PMID:25782989

  3. Role of the Toll Like receptor (TLR) radical cycle in chronic inflammation: possible treatments targeting the TLR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kurt; Maes, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) complex, a receptor of the innate immune system, may underpin the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including asthma, cardiovascular disorder, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, autoimmune disorders, neuroinflammatory disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, clinical depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, alcohol abuse, and toluene inhalation. TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that recognize damage-associated molecular patterns and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria. Here we focus on the environmental factors, which are known to trigger TLR4, e.g., ozone, atmosphere particulate matter, long-lived reactive oxygen intermediate, pentachlorophenol, ionizing radiation, and toluene. Activation of the TLR4 pathways may cause chronic inflammation and increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and oxidative and nitrosative stress and therefore TLR-related diseases. This implies that drugs or substances that modify these pathways may prevent or improve the abovementioned diseases. Here we review some of the most promising drugs and agents that have the potential to attenuate TLR-mediated inflammation, e.g., anti-LPS strategies that aim to neutralize LPS (synthetic anti-LPS peptides and recombinant factor C) and TLR4/MyD88 antagonists, including eritoran, CyP, EM-163, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, 6-shogaol, cinnamon extract, N-acetylcysteine, melatonin, and molecular hydrogen. The authors posit that activation of the TLR radical (ROS/RNS) cycle is a common pathway underpinning many "civilization" disorders and that targeting the TLR radical cycle may be an effective method to treat many inflammatory disorders.

  4. TLR-4 and VEGF Polymorphisms in Chronic Periaortitis

    PubMed Central

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Boiardi, Luigi; Vaglio, Augusto; Nicoli, Davide; Farnetti, Enrico; Palmisano, Alessandra; Pipitone, Nicolò; Martorana, Davide; Moroni, Gabriella; Longhi, Selena; Bonatti, Francesco; Buzio, Carlo; Salvarani, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic periaortitis (CP) is a rare disease that is characterised by fibro-inflammatory tissue surrounding the abdominal aorta and has both non-aneurysmal (idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis [IRF]) and aneurysmal forms (inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm [IAAA]). We investigated whether toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms were associated with susceptibility to, and the clinical features of CP. Methods One hundred and two CP patients and 200 healthy controls were molecularly genotyped for TLR-4 gene polymorphism (+896 A/G) (rs4986790), VEGF mutations +936 C/T (rs3025039) and −634 C/G (rs2010963), and an 18 base pair (bp) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism at −2549 of the VEGF promoter region. The patients were grouped on the basis of the type of CP (IRF or IAAA), and the presence or absence of established atherosclerotic disease (ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Results There were no significant differences in the distribution of the studied polymorphisms between the patients and controls. However, carriage of the +936 T allele was significantly more frequent in the patients with IRF than in those with IAAA (26.5% vs 5.3%; p = 0.046; OR 6.49 [95% CI 0.82–51.54]). There were significantly more carriers of the I allele among the patients with ureteral obstruction (83.8% vs 58.8%; p = 0.006; OR 3.63 [95% CI 1.42–9.28]) and those who received conservative treatment (48.5% vs 23.5%; p = 0.015; OR 3.06 [95% CI 1.22–7.721]) than among those without, and II homozygosity was significantly more frequent in the patients with deep vein thrombosis than in those without (30.4% vs 11.7%, p = 0.031; OR 3.31 [95% CI 1.07–10.21]). Conclusion The VEGF +936 C/T polymorphism may be associated with an increased risk of developing the non-aneurysmal IRF form of CP. Carriers of the I allele and II homozygosity are respectively at increased

  5. Siglec-E Negatively Regulates the Activation of TLR4 by Controlling Its Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yin; Ren, Dongren; Chen, Guo-Yun

    2016-10-15

    TLR4 signaling is critical for providing effective immune protection, but it must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation-induced pathology. Previously, we reported extensive and direct interactions between TLR and Siglec families of pattern recognition receptors. In this study, we examined the biological significance of this interaction during infection. We show that Siglec-E is required for Escherichia coli-induced endocytosis of TLR4. Siglec-E-deficient dendritic cells infected with E. coli fail to internalize TLR4. This leads to sustained TLR4 on the cell surface and activation of NF-κB and MAPK p38, resulting in high levels of TNF-α and IL-6 compared with wild-type dendritic cells. In contrast to the signaling events occurring at the plasma membrane, as a result of the inability to internalize TLR4, Siglec-E-deficient dendritic cells were also defective for TRIF-mediated IFN-β production in response to E. coli infection. Furthermore, we found that accumulation of ubiquitinated TLR4 and binding of E3 ubiquitin ligase Triad3A to TLR4 was increased significantly in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from wild-type mice, but not from Siglec-E-deficient mice, after E. coli infection. This represents a newly discovered mechanism that regulates the signaling of TLR4 during E. coli infection.

  6. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy.

  7. Combating Drug Abuse by Targeting Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    to preserve the desired effects of   3   opioids ( pain -relief) while diminishing unwanted effects (analgesic tolerance and reward...significant progress anticipated in the coming project period. 15. SUBJECT TERMS toll like receptor 4 (TLR4); TLR4 agonists non- opioid (+)-naloxone and...naltrexone; drug abuse; glial activation; therapeutic approach to treating drug abuse; opioids ; cocaine 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  8. Premetastatic milieu explained by TLR4 agonist-mediated homeostatic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maru, Yoshiro

    2010-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a sensor for danger signals, is expressed not only in immune cells, but also in resident epithelial cells, and appears to participate in tissue homeostasis. To explain the premetastatic microenvironment created by the newly discovered endogenous TLR4 ligands, I propose a hypothesis of homeostatic inflammation that includes the classical danger hypothesis.

  9. TLR4 regulates pulmonary vascular homeostasis and remodeling via redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Hui; Sun, Yong; Jhala, Nirag; Bradley, Wayne E.; Dell’Italia, Louis J.; Michalek, Sue; Wu, Hui; Steele, Chad; Benza, Raymond L; Chen, Yabing

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to morbidity and mortality of patients with lung and heart diseases. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced PAH and increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness in wild-type mice. Mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4−/−) spontaneously developed PAH, which was not further enhanced by hypoxia. Echocardiography determined right ventricular hypertrophy and decreased pulmonary arterial acceleration time were associated with the development of PAH in TLR4−/− mice. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), hypoxia decreased TLR4 expression and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox1/Nox4. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase decreased hypoxia-induced proliferation of wild-type PASMC. PASMC derived from TLR4−/− mice exhibited increased ROS and Nox4/Nox1 expression. Our studies demonstrate an important role of TLR4 in maintaining normal pulmonary vasculature and in hypoxia-induced PAH. Inhibition of TLR4, by genetic ablation or hypoxia, increases the expression of Nox1/Nox4 and induces PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. These results support a novel function of TLR4 in regulating the development of PAH and reveal a new regulatory axis contributing to TLR4 deficiency-induced vascular hypertrophy and remodeling. PMID:26709781

  10. TLR4 regulates pulmonary vascular homeostasis and remodeling via redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Hui; Sun, Yong; Jhala, Nirag; Bradley, Wayne E; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Michalek, Sue; Wu, Hui; Steele, Chad; Benza, Raymond L; Chen, Yabing

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to morbidity and mortality of patients with lung and heart diseases. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced PAH and increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness in wild-type mice. Mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-/-) spontaneously developed PAH, which was not further enhanced by hypoxia. Echocardiography determined right ventricular hypertrophy and decreased pulmonary arterial acceleration time were associated with the development of PAH in TLR4(-/-) mice. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), hypoxia decreased TLR4 expression and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox1/Nox4. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase decreased hypoxia-induced proliferation of wild-type PASMC. PASMC derived from TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited increased ROS and Nox4/Nox1 expression. Our studies demonstrate an important role of TLR4 in maintaining normal pulmonary vasculature and in hypoxia-induced PAH. Inhibition of TLR4, by genetic ablation or hypoxia, increases the expression of Nox1/Nox4 and induces PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. These results support a novel function of TLR4 in regulating the development of PAH and reveal a new regulatory axis contributing to TLR4 deficiency-induced vascular hypertrophy and remodeling.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of IL-17A, IL-17F, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Lü, Lingshuang; Xu, Kun; Chen, Yongzhong; Pan, Hongqiu; Burstrom, Bo; Burstrom, Kristina; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors affect host susceptibility to pathogens. In this population-based case control study, we explored the genetic polymorphisms of IL-17, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with pulmonary tuberculosis in a Chinese Han population. We recruited 1601 pulmonary tuberculosis patients matched with 1526 healthy controls and genotyped twelve functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After the correction for multiple comparisons, two SNPs (rs10759932 and rs2737190) in the TLR4 gene remained significant. Individuals carrying the rs2737190-AG genotype (vs. AA) had a significantly increased risk of either clinical tuberculosis (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11–1.53) or sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13–1.61). Stratification analysis revealed that the effects of genetic variations on tuberculosis were more evident among non-smokers. People with haplotype TLR4 rs10983755G–rs10759932C had a significantly increased risk of tuberculosis (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34–5.05). Moreover, we found that SNPs of rs3819024 in IL-17A and rs763780 in IL-17F were weakly related to a prognosis of tuberculosis. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of IL-17 and TLR4 may play a role in host susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population. More work is necessary to identify specific causative variants of tuberculosis underlying the observed associations. PMID:27339100

  12. Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in murine small intestine during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryo; Yajima, Takaji; Tsukahara, Takamitsu

    2017-02-01

    The important role played by the gut microbiota in host immunity is mediated, in part, through toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated the postnatal changes in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine and assessed how expression is influenced by gut microbiota. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine was highly dynamic during development. The changes were especially profound during the suckling period, with the maximal mRNA levels detected in the mid-suckling period. Immunohistochemical and flow-cytometric analyses indicated that the changes in TLR2 and TLR4 expression involve primarily epithelial cells. The germ-free mice showed minor changes in TLR2/TLR4 mRNA and TLR2 protein during the suckling period. This study demonstrated that the postnatal expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in small intestinal epithelial cells is dynamic and depends on the presence of commensal intestinal microbiota.

  13. Genetic and Pharmacologic Manipulation of TLR4 Has Minimal Impact on Ethanol Consumption in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Harris, R Adron; Bajo, Michal; Bell, Richard L; Blednov, Yuri A; Varodayan, Florence P; Truitt, Jay M; de Guglielmo, Giordano; Lasek, Amy W; Logrip, Marian L; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Roberts, Amanda J; Roberts, Edward; George, Olivier; Mayfield, Jody; Billiar, Timothy R; Hackam, David J; Mayfield, R Dayne; Koob, George F; Roberto, Marisa; Homanics, Gregg E

    2017-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a critical component of innate immune signaling and has been implicated in alcohol responses in preclinical and clinical models. Members of the Integrative Neuroscience Initiative on Alcoholism (INIA-Neuroimmune) consortium tested the hypothesis that TLR4 mediates excessive ethanol drinking using the following models: (1) Tlr4 knock-out (KO) rats, (2) selective knockdown of Tlr4 mRNA in mouse nucleus accumbens (NAc), and (3) injection of the TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone in mice. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreased food/water intake and body weight in ethanol-naive and ethanol-trained wild-type (WT), but not Tlr4 KO rats. There were no consistent genotypic differences in two-bottle choice chronic ethanol intake or operant self-administration in rats before or after dependence. In mice, (+)-naloxone did not decrease drinking-in-the-dark and only modestly inhibited dependence-driven consumption at the highest dose. Tlr4 knockdown in mouse NAc did not decrease drinking in the two-bottle choice continuous or intermittent access tests. However, the latency to ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex increased and the duration decreased in KO versus WT rats. In rat central amygdala neurons, deletion of Tlr4 altered GABAA receptor function, but not GABA release. Although there were no genotype differences in acute ethanol effects before or after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, genotype differences were observed after LPS exposure. Using different species and sexes, different methods to inhibit TLR4 signaling, and different ethanol consumption tests, our comprehensive studies indicate that TLR4 may play a role in ethanol-induced sedation and GABAA receptor function, but does not regulate excessive drinking directly and would not be an effective therapeutic target.

  14. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-06-23

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is important to understand pathways that drive the disease to devise effective therapeutic strategies. Our results show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) drives breast cancer cell growth differentially based on the presence of TP53, a tumor suppressor. TP53 is mutationally inactivated in most types of cancer and is mutated in 30-50% of diagnosed breast tumors. We demonstrate that TLR4 activation inhibits growth of TP53 wild-type cells, but promotes growth of TP53 mutant breast cancer cells by regulating proliferation. This differential effect is mediated by changes in tumor cell cytokine secretion. Whereas TLR4 activation in TP53 mutant breast cancer cells increases secretion of progrowth cytokines, TLR4 activation in TP53 wild-type breast cancer cells increases type I IFN (IFN-γ) secretion, which is both necessary and sufficient for mediating TLR4-induced growth inhibition. This study identifies a novel dichotomous role for TLR4 as a growth regulator and a modulator of tumor microenvironment in breast tumors. These results have translational relevance, demonstrating that TP53 mutant breast tumor growth can be suppressed by pharmacologic TLR4 inhibition, whereas TLR4 inhibitors may in fact promote growth of TP53 wild-type tumors. Furthermore, using data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the effect of TP53 mutational status on TLR4 activity may extend to ovarian, colon, and lung cancers, among others, suggesting that the viability of TLR4 as a therapeutic target depends on TP53 status in many different tumor types.

  15. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is important to understand pathways that drive the disease to devise effective therapeutic strategies. Our results show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) drives breast cancer cell growth differentially based on the presence of TP53, a tumor suppressor. TP53 is mutationally inactivated in most types of cancer and is mutated in 30–50% of diagnosed breast tumors. We demonstrate that TLR4 activation inhibits growth of TP53 wild-type cells, but promotes growth of TP53 mutant breast cancer cells by regulating proliferation. This differential effect is mediated by changes in tumor cell cytokine secretion. Whereas TLR4 activation in TP53 mutant breast cancer cells increases secretion of progrowth cytokines, TLR4 activation in TP53 wild-type breast cancer cells increases type I IFN (IFN-γ) secretion, which is both necessary and sufficient for mediating TLR4-induced growth inhibition. This study identifies a novel dichotomous role for TLR4 as a growth regulator and a modulator of tumor microenvironment in breast tumors. These results have translational relevance, demonstrating that TP53 mutant breast tumor growth can be suppressed by pharmacologic TLR4 inhibition, whereas TLR4 inhibitors may in fact promote growth of TP53 wild-type tumors. Furthermore, using data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the effect of TP53 mutational status on TLR4 activity may extend to ovarian, colon, and lung cancers, among others, suggesting that the viability of TLR4 as a therapeutic target depends on TP53 status in many different tumor types. PMID:26063617

  16. Evidence for a role of heat shock protein-90 (HSP90) in TLR4 mediated pain enhancement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Ramos, Khara M.; Loram, Lisa C.; Wieseler, Julie; Sholar, Paige W.; Kearney, Jeffrey J.; Lewis, Makenzie T.; Crysdale, Nicole Y.; Zhang, Yingning; Harrison, Jacqueline A.; Maier, Steven F.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord microglial toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) has been implicated in enhancing neuropathic pain and opposing morphine analgesia. The present study was initiated to explore TLR4-mediated pain modulation by intrathecal lipopolysaccharide, a classic TLR4 agonist. However, our initial study revealed that intrathecal lipopolysaccharide failed to induce low-threshold mechanical allodynia in naive rats, suggestive that TLR4 agonism may be insufficient to enhance pain. These studies explore the possibility that a second signal is required; namely, heat shock protein-90 (HSP90). This candidate was chosen for study given its known importance as a regulator of TLR4 signaling. A combination of in vitro TLR4 cell signaling and in vivo behavioral studies of pain modulation suggest that TLR4-enhancement of neuropathic pain and TLR4-suppression of morphine analgesia each likely require HSP90 as a cofactor for the effects observed. In vitro studies revealed that DMSO enhances HSP90 release, suggestive that this may be a means by which DMSO enhances TLR4 signaling. While 2 µg and 100 µg lipopolysaccharide intrathecally did not induce mechanical allodynia across the time course tested, co-administration of 1 µg lipopolysaccharide with a drug that enhances HSP90-mediated TLR4 signaling now induced robust allodynia. In support of this allodynia being mediated via a TLR4/HSP90 pathway, it was prevented or reversed by intrathecal co-administration of a HSP90 inhibitor, a TLR4 inhibitor, a microglia/monocyte activation inhibitor (as monocytes-derived cells are the predominant cell type expressing TLR4), and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (as this proinflammatory cytokine is a downstream consequence of TLR4 activation). Together, these results suggest for the first time that TLR4 activation is necessary but not sufficient to induce spinally mediated pain enhancement. Rather, the data suggest that TLR4-dependent pain phenomena may require contributions by multiple components of

  17. Hyperoxia-induced immature brain injury through the TLR4 signaling pathway in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Pu; Du, Min; Chen, Kun; Chen, Amber; Wang, Yang; Cao, Fei; Deng, Shixiong; Xu, Ying

    2015-06-12

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor, is known to initiate an inflammatory cascade in response to certain stimuli within the central nervous system (CNS). Although TLR4 activation is known to be a first-line response of the innate immune system, whether and how hyperoxia influences TLR4 signaling in an immature brain remains unclear. In this study, TLR4 wild-type (W) and TLR4 knock-out(M) mice were exposed to 100% oxygen (the WO2 and MO2 groups, respectively), and control groups were exposed to ambient air (the WA and MA groups, respectively) for 48 h after postnatal-day (PND) 3. Next, neuronal apoptosis was quantified, and Morris water maze assays were conducted. The WO2 mice showed increased TLR4 expression compared with the WA mice, additionally, the expression level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in the WO2 mice was significantly increased compared with the levels in the WA, MA and MO2 mice. Electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays showed a significant increase, compared to the WO2 mice, in neuronal apoptosis within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in the WO2 mice. In contrast, there were no obvious differences in neuronal apoptosis between the MO2 and MA groups. The results of the Morris water maze tests demonstrated marked deficits in learning and memory in the WO2 mice but much milder deficits in the MO2 mice compared to the WA and MA groups, respectively. Moreover, cultured N9 (TLR4 wild-type, derived from ICR/CD1 mice) microglia exposed to hyperoxia showed an immediate increase in the expression of TLR4 mRNA, followed by an increase in the expression of both TNF-α and reactive oxygen species (ROS), but this increase was abrogated by the loss of TLR4 signaling in TLR4-knockout microglia (primary cells from a C3H/HeJ strain defective in TLR4). Taken together, these data suggest that 1) TLR4 signaling is involved in

  18. Adaptive evolution and functional constraint at TLR4 during the secondary aquatic adaptation and diversification of cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) are a group of adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to full aquatic habitat and rapid radiation in waters around the world. Throughout this evolution, the pathogen stress-response proteins must have faced challenges from the dramatic change of environmental pathogens in the completely different ecological niches cetaceans occupied. For this reason, cetaceans could be one of the most ideal candidate taxa for studying evolutionary process and associated driving mechanism of vertebrate innate immune systems such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are located at the direct interface between the host and the microbial environment, act at the first line in recognizing specific conserved components of microorganisms, and translate them rapidly into a defense reaction. Results We used TLR4 as an example to test whether this traditionally regarded pattern recognition receptor molecule was driven by positive selection across cetacean evolutionary history. Overall, the lineage-specific selection test showed that the dN/dS (ω) values along most (30 out of 33) examined cetartiodactylan lineages were less than 1, suggesting a common effect of functional constraint. However, some specific codons made radical changes, fell adjacent to the residues interacting with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and showed parallel evolution between independent lineages, suggesting that TLR4 was under positive selection. Especially, strong signatures of adaptive evolution on TLR4 were identified in two periods, one corresponding to the early evolutionary transition of the terrestrial ancestors of cetaceans from land to semi-aquatic (represented by the branch leading to whale + hippo) and from semi-aquatic to full aquatic (represented by the ancestral branch leading to cetaceans) habitat, and the other to the rapid diversification and radiation of oceanic dolphins. Conclusions This is the first study thus

  19. Soluble CD83 Inhibits T Cell Activation by Binding to the TLR4/MD-2 Complex on CD14+ Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horvatinovich, Joe M.; Grogan, Elizabeth W.; Norris, Marcus; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Lemos, Henrique; Mellor, Andrew L.; Tcherepanova, Irina Y.; Nicolette, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane protein CD83, expressed on APCs, B cells, and T cells, can be expressed as a soluble form generated by alternative splice variants and/or by shedding. Soluble CD83 (sCD83) was shown to be involved in negatively regulating the immune response. sCD83 inhibits T cell proliferation in vitro, supports allograft survival in vivo, prevents corneal transplant rejection, and attenuates the progression and severity of autoimmune diseases and experimental colitis. Although sCD83 binds to human PBMCs, the specific molecules that bind sCD83 have not been identified. In this article, we identify myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD-2), the coreceptor within the TLR4/MD-2 receptor complex, as the high-affinity sCD83 binding partner. TLR4/MD-2 mediates proinflammatory signal delivery following recognition of bacterial LPSs. However, altering TLR4 signaling can attenuate the proinflammatory cascade, leading to LPS tolerance. Our data show that binding of sCD83 to MD-2 alters this signaling cascade by rapidly degrading IL-1R–associated kinase-1, leading to induction of the anti-inflammatory mediators IDO, IL-10, and PGE2 in a COX-2–dependent manner. sCD83 inhibited T cell proliferation, blocked IL-2 secretion, and rendered T cells unresponsive to further downstream differentiation signals mediated by IL-2. Therefore, we propose the tolerogenic mechanism of action of sCD83 to be dependent on initial interaction with APCs, altering early cytokine signal pathways and leading to T cell unresponsiveness. PMID:28193829

  20. NF-κB inhibition attenuates LPS-induced TLR4 activation in monocyte cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jian; Shan, Yi; Fan, Yibo; Fan, Conghui; Chen, Song; Sun, Jie; Zhu, Lili; Qin, Long; Yu, Mengjin; Lin, Zhaofen

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) family are receptors for extracellular or intracellular signaling, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. TLR induces the differentiation of human myeloid monocytic-leukemia cells (THP-1) to macrophages. However, the relationship between extracellular or intracellular signaling and the TLR protein level remain to be determined. Using RT-PCR and western blot analysis, the aim of the present study was to determine whether TLR4, a major TLR family member, could be moderately upregulated by high concentration of LPS and whether it promoted the maturation of THP1 cells. The results showed that, upregulated TLR4 at the protein level and mRNA level enriched the TLR4 modulation style. In addition, TLR4 expression was blocked by nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitor, and LPS stimulated NF-κB binding in the TLR4 gene promoter. Therefore, the increased expression of TLR4 in the responsiveness of LPS-treated THP1 cells occurred in response to the upregulation of their respective receptors, as well as a tight binding of NF-κB in the TLR4 gene promoter. PMID:27748869

  1. TLR4-mediated activation of mouse macrophages by Korean mistletoe lectin-C (KML-C).

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Hong, Ju-ho; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Jong-Bae; Song, Seong K

    2010-06-04

    Korean mistletoe lectin (KML-C) is an adjuvant that activates systemic and mucosal immune cells to release cytokines including TNF-alpha, which induces immunity against viruses and cancer cells. Although the immunomodulatory activity of KML-C has been well established, the underlying mechanism of action of KML-C has yet to be explored. When mouse peritoneal macrophages were treated with KML-C, both transcription and translation of TLR4 were upregulated. KML-C-induced TLR4 downstream events were similar to those activated by LPS: the upregulation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK1); resulting in macrophage activation and TNF-alpha production. When TLR4 was blocked using a TLR4-specific neutralizing antibody, TNF-alpha production from the macrophages was significantly inhibited. Moreover, TLR4-deficient mouse macrophages treated with KML-C also secreted greatly reduced level of TNF-alpha secretion. Finally, TLR4 molecules were co-precipitated with KML-C, to which agarose beads were conjugated, indicating that those molecules are associated. These data indicate that KML-C activates mouse macrophages to secrete TNF-alpha by interacting with the TLR4 molecule and activating its signaling pathways.

  2. Glycolipid-based TLR4 Modulators and Fluorescent Probes: Rational Design, Synthesis, and Biological Properties.

    PubMed

    Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Calabrese, Valentina; Sestito, Stefania E; Pérez-Regidor, Lucia; Klett, Javier; Oblak, Alja; Jerala, Roman; Piazza, Matteo; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Peri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The cationic glycolipid IAXO-102, a potent TLR4 antagonist targeting both MD-2 and CD14 co-receptors, has been used as scaffold to design new potential TLR4 modulators and fluorescent labels for the TLR4 receptor complex (membrane TLR4.MD-2 dimer and CD14). The primary amino group of IAXO-102, not involved in direct interaction with MD-2 and CD14 receptors, has been exploited to covalently attach a fluorescein (molecules 1 and 2) or to link two molecules of IAXO-102 through diamine and diammonium spacers, obtaining 'dimeric' molecules 3 and 4. The structure-based rational design of compounds 1-4 was guided by the optimization of MD-2 and CD14 binding. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited TLR4 activation, in a concentration-dependent manner, and signaling in HEK-Blue TLR4 cells. The fluorescent labeling of murine macrophages by molecule 1 was inhibited by LPS and was also abrogated when cell surface proteins were digested by trypsin, thus suggesting an interaction of fluorescent probe 1 with membrane proteins of the TLR4 receptor system.

  3. Crystal structure of the TLR4-MD-2 complex with bound endotoxin antagonist Eritoran.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Min; Park, Beom Seok; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Judong; Oh, Se Cheol; Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Matsushima, Norio; Lee, Hayyoung; Yoo, Ook Joon; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2007-09-07

    TLR4 and MD-2 form a heterodimer that recognizes LPS (lipopolysaccharide) from Gram-negative bacteria. Eritoran is an analog of LPS that antagonizes its activity by binding to the TLR4-MD-2 complex. We determined the structure of the full-length ectodomain of the mouse TLR4 and MD-2 complex. We also produced a series of hybrids of human TLR4 and hagfish VLR and determined their structures with and without bound MD-2 and Eritoran. TLR4 is an atypical member of the LRR family and is composed of N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains. The beta sheet of the central domain shows unusually small radii and large twist angles. MD-2 binds to the concave surface of the N-terminal and central domains. The interaction with Eritoran is mediated by a hydrophobic internal pocket in MD-2. Based on structural analysis and mutagenesis experiments on MD-2 and TLR4, we propose a model of TLR4-MD-2 dimerization induced by LPS.

  4. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D.; Jones, Brian T.; Whitby, Landon R.; Surakattula, Murali M. R. P.; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L.; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS. PMID:26831104

  5. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D; Jones, Brian T; Whitby, Landon R; Surakattula, Murali M R P; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-02-16

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS.

  6. Lipoprotein accumulation in macrophages via TLR4-dependent fluid phase uptake

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Harkewicz, Richard; Lee, Jee Hyun; Boullier, Agnès; Almazan, Felicidad; Li, Andrew C.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Bae, Yun Soo; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) recognizes microbial pathogens, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and mediates LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine secretion, as well as microbial uptake by macrophages. In addition to exogenous pathogens, TLR4 recognizes modified self, such as minimally oxidized low-density lipoprotein (mmLDL). Here we report that mmLDL and its active components, cholesteryl ester (CE) hydroperoxides, induce TLR4-dependent fluid phase uptake typical of macropinocytosis. We show that mmLDL induced recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to a TLR4 signaling complex, TLR4 phosphorylation, activation of a Vav1-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling cascade, phosphorylation of paxillin, and activation of Rac, Cdc42 and Rho. These mmLDL-induced and TLR4- and Syk-dependent signaling events and cytoskeletal rearrangements lead to enhanced uptake of small molecules, dextran and, most importantly, of both native and oxidized LDL, resulting in intracellular lipid accumulation. An intravenous injection of fluorescently labeled mmLDL in wild type mice resulted in its rapid accumulation in circulating monocytes, which was significantly attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. These data describe a novel mechanism leading to enhanced lipoprotein uptake in macrophages that would contribute to foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. These data also suggest that CE hydroperoxides are an endogenous ligand for TLR4. As TLR4 is highly expressed on the surface of circulating monocytes in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, and CE hydroperoxides are present in plasma, lipid uptake by monocytes in circulation may contribute to monocytes' pathological roles in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:19461045

  7. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-08-24

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration.

  8. Pulmonary Epithelial TLR4 Activation Leads to Lung Injury in Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongpeng; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Martin, Laura Y; Good, Misty; Zhou, Qinjie; Sung, Jungeun; Fulton, William B; Nino, Diego F; Prindle, Thomas; Ozolek, John A; Hackam, David J

    2016-08-01

    We seek to define the mechanisms leading to the development of lung disease in the setting of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a life-threatening gastrointestinal disease of premature infants characterized by the sudden onset of intestinal necrosis. NEC development in mice requires activation of the LPS receptor TLR4 on the intestinal epithelium, through its effects on modulating epithelial injury and repair. Although NEC-associated lung injury is more severe than the lung injury that occurs in premature infants without NEC, the mechanisms leading to its development remain unknown. In this study, we now show that TLR4 expression in the lung gradually increases during postnatal development, and that mice and humans with NEC-associated lung inflammation express higher levels of pulmonary TLR4 than do age-matched controls. NEC in wild-type newborn mice resulted in significant pulmonary injury that was prevented by deletion of TLR4 from the pulmonary epithelium, indicating a role for pulmonary TLR4 in lung injury development. Mechanistically, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation induced high-mobility group box 1 release from the intestine, which activated pulmonary epithelial TLR4, leading to the induction of the neutrophil recruiting CXCL5 and the influx of proinflammatory neutrophils to the lung. Strikingly, the aerosolized administration of a novel carbohydrate TLR4 inhibitor prevented CXCL5 upregulation and blocked NEC-induced lung injury in mice. These findings illustrate the critical role of pulmonary TLR4 in the development of NEC-associated lung injury, and they suggest that inhibition of this innate immune receptor in the neonatal lung may prevent this devastating complication of NEC.

  9. Pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba are recognized by TLR4 and initiated inflammatory responses in the cornea.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Hassan; Tripathi, Trivendra; Abdi, Mahshid; Smith, Ashley Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the Acanthamoeba species are the causative agent of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a sight-threatening corneal infection that causes severe pain and a characteristic ring-shaped corneal infiltrate. Innate immune responses play an important role in resistance against AK. The aim of this study is to determine if Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on corneal epithelial cells are activated by Acanthamoeba, leading to initiation of inflammatory responses in the cornea. Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells constitutively expressed TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9 mRNA, and A. castellanii upregulated TLR4 transcription. Expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR9 was unchanged when HCE cells were exposed to A. castellanii. IL-8 mRNA expression was upregulated in HCE cells exposed to A. castellanii. A. castellanii and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced significant IL-8 production by HCE cells as measured by ELISA. The percentage of total cells positive for TLR4 was higher in A. castellanii stimulated HCE cells compared to unstimulated HCE cells. A. castellanii induced upregulation of IL-8 in TLR4 expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, but not TLR3 expressing HEK-293 cells. TLR4 neutralizing antibody inhibited A. castellanii-induced IL-8 by HCE and HEK-293 cells. Clinical strains but not soil strains of Acanthamoeba activated TLR4 expression in Chinese hamster corneas in vivo and in vitro. Clinical isolates but not soil isolates of Acanthamoeba induced significant (P< 0.05) CXCL2 production in Chinese hamster corneas 3 and 7 days after infection, which coincided with increased inflammatory cells in the corneas. Results suggest that pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba activate TLR4 and induce production of CXCL2 in the Chinese hamster model of AK. TLR4 may be a potential target in the development of novel treatment strategies in Acanthamoeba and other microbial infections that activate TLR4 in corneal cells.

  10. TLR4 Deficiency Impairs Oligodendrocyte Formation in the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Church, Jamie S.; Kigerl, Kristina A.; Lerch, Jessica K.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute oligodendrocyte (OL) death after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is followed by robust neuron–glial antigen 2 (NG2)-positive OL progenitor proliferation and differentiation into new OLs. Inflammatory mediators are prevalent during both phases and can influence the fate of NG2 cells and OLs. Specifically, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling induces OL genesis in the naive spinal cord, and lack of TLR4 signaling impairs white matter sparing and functional recovery after SCI. Therefore, we hypothesized that TLR4 signaling may regulate oligodendrogenesis after SCI. C3H/HeJ (TLR4-deficient) and control (C3H/HeOuJ) mice received a moderate midthoracic spinal contusion. TLR4-deficient mice showed worse functional recovery and reduced OL numbers compared with controls at 24 h after injury through chronic time points. Acute OL loss was accompanied by reduced ferritin expression, which is regulated by TLR4 and needed for effective iron storage. TLR4-deficient injured spinal cords also displayed features consistent with reduced OL genesis, including reduced NG2 expression, fewer BrdU-positive OLs, altered BMP4 signaling and inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) expression, and delayed myelin phagocytosis. Expression of several factors, including IGF-1, FGF2, IL-1β, and PDGF-A, was altered in TLR4-deficient injured spinal cords compared with wild types. Together, these data show that TLR4 signaling after SCI is important for OL lineage cell sparing and replacement, as well as in regulating cytokine and growth factor expression. These results highlight new roles for TLR4 in endogenous SCI repair and emphasize that altering the function of a single immune-related receptor can dramatically change the reparative responses of multiple cellular constituents in the injured CNS milieu. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelinating cells of the CNS [oligodendrocytes (OLs)] are killed for several weeks after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), but they are replaced by resident

  11. Purified monomeric ligand.MD-2 complexes reveal molecular and structural requirements for activation and antagonism of TLR4 by Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gioannini, Theresa L; Teghanemt, Athmane; Zhang, DeSheng; Esparza, Gregory; Yu, Liping; Weiss, Jerrold

    2014-08-01

    A major focus of work in our laboratory concerns the molecular mechanisms and structural bases of Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin recognition by host (e.g., human) endotoxin-recognition proteins that mediate and/or regulate activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Here, we review studies of wild-type and variant monomeric endotoxin.MD-2 complexes first produced and characterized in our laboratories. These purified complexes have provided unique experimental reagents, revealing both quantitative and qualitative determinants of TLR4 activation and antagonism. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Theresa L. Gioannini (1949-2014) who played a central role in many of the studies and discoveries that are reviewed.

  12. Andrographolide inhibits melanoma tumor growth by inactivating the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Da-Lei; Ding, Yi; Liu, Hong-Ying; Lei, Yan; Fang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Qu-Liang; He, Xiao-Dong; Qi, Cui-Ling; Yang, Yi; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Xuesong; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-12-01

    The TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in tumor progression. Andrographolide (Andro) has been reported to have anticancer activity in multiple types of cancer. However, the pharmacological activities of Andro in melanoma are not completely understood. In this study, we defined the anticancer effects of Andro in melanoma and elucidated its potential mechanisms of action. Our experiments showed that Andro significantly inhibited melanoma tumor growth and metastasis by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, Andro significantly inhibited the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inactivation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 and Bcl-6, which are antitumor genes. This work provides evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target and may also be indispensable in the Andro-mediated anticancer effect in melanoma.

  13. Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) directly induces mouse Th1 activation through upregulating TLR2 and downregulating TLR4 expressions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Ni, Weihua; Liu, Guomu; Wang, Juan; Xie, Fei; Yuan, Hongyan; Guo, Yingying; Zhai, RuiPing; Chen, Tanxiu; Li, Qiongshu; Tai, Guixiang

    2015-06-01

    Maltose-binding protein (MBP), a component of the maltose transport system of Escherichia coli, has been commonly thought to have minimal bioactivity. Our previous studies demonstrated that MBP could significantly enhance Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced T helper 1 (Th1) cell activation in mice. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of MBP on mouse T cells and found that MBP promoted the proliferation and IFN-γ production of CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that MBP directly induces Th1 activation. To explore the mechanism of Th1 activation, the expression of Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) on purified mouse CD4(+) T cells was detected. The results showed that MBP up-regulated TLR2 while down-regulated TLR4 expression, accompanied by a clear increase in MyD88 expression and IκB phosphorylation. Notably, the addition of anti-TLR2 antibody abrogated the MBP-induced CD4(+) T cells proliferation, IFN-γ secretion and MyD88 expression, whereas the addition of anti-TLR4 antibody exhibited a contradictive effect. Besides, the block of either TLR2 or TLR4 both reduced IκB phosphorylation. These results above suggest that TLR2-mediated MyD88-dependent pathway contributes to MBP-induced Th1 activation, while TLR4 appears to counteract this effect via MyD88-independent pathway.

  14. Common variants in FOXP1 are associated with generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A.; Fain, Pamela R.; Mailloux, Christina M.; Riccardi, Sheri L.; Gowan, Katherine; Holland, Paulene J.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Wallace, Margaret R.; McCormack, Wayne T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Gawkrodger, David J.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; van Geel, Nanny; Lambert, Jo; Overbeck, Andreas; Spritz, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent genome-wide association study of generalized vitiligo (GV) we identified 10 confirmed susceptibility loci. By testing additional loci that showed suggestive association in the genome-wide study, using two replication cohorts of European descent, we observed replicated association of GV with variants at 3p13 encompassing FOXP1 (rs17008723, combined P = 1.04 × 10-8) and with variants at 6q27 encompassing CCR6 (rs6902119, combined P = 3.94 × 10-7). PMID:20526340

  15. TLR4 drives the pathogenesis of acquired cholesteatoma by promoting local inflammation and bone destruction

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yu; Chen, Yu Bin; Chen, Sui Jun; Zheng, Yi Qing; Liu, Xiang; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Huai Li; Xu, Guo; Li, Zhuo Hao; Huang, Qiu Hong; Xiong, Hao; Zhang, Zhi Gang

    2015-01-01

    Acquired cholesteatoma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by both hyperkeratinized squamous epithelial overgrowth and bone destruction. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation and subsequent inflammatory cytokine production are closely associated with inflammatory bone disease. However, the expression and function of TLRs in cholesteatoma remain unclear.We observed inflammatory cell infiltration of the matrix and prematrix of human acquired cholesteatoma, as well as dramatically increased expression of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. TLR2 exhibited an up-regulation that was not statistically significant. TLR4 expression in human acquired cholesteatoma correlated with disease severity; the number of TLR4-positive cells increased with an increased degree of cholesteatoma, invasion, bone destruction, and hearing loss. Moreover, TLR4 deficiency was protective against experimental acquired cholesteatoma-driven bone destruction and hearing loss, as it reduced local TNF-α and IL-1β expression and impaired osteoclast formation by decreasing expression of the osteoclast effectors receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). TLR2 deficiency did not relieve disease severity, inflammatory responses, or osteoclast formation. Moreover, neither TLR2 nor TLR4 deficiency had an effect on antimicrobial peptides, inducible iNOS,BD-2 expression or bacterial clearance. Therefore, TLR4 may promote cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction and deafness by enhancing inflammatory responses and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26639190

  16. CRF-Amplified Neuronal TLR4/MCP-1 Signaling Regulates Alcohol Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    June, Harry L; Liu, Juan; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Bell, Kimberly A; Balan, Irina; Bollino, Dominique; Puche, Adam; Aurelian, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a complex disorder that initiates with episodes of excessive alcohol drinking known as binge drinking. It has a 50–60% risk contribution from inherited susceptibility genes; however, their exact identity and function are still poorly understood. We report that alcohol-preferring P rats have innately elevated levels of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) that colocalize in neurons from the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). To examine the potential role of a TLR4/MCP-1 signal, we used Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) vectors (amplicons) that retain in vivo neurotropism. Infusion of amplicons for TLR4 or MCP-1 siRNA into the CeA or VTA from the P rats inhibited target gene expression and blunted binge drinking. A similarly delivered amplicon for scrambled siRNA did not inhibit TLR4 or MCP-1 expression nor reduce binge drinking, identifying a neuronal TLR4/MCP-1 signal that regulates the initiation of voluntary alcohol self-administration. The signal was sustained during alcohol drinking by increased expression of corticotropin-releasing factor and its feedback regulation of TLR4 expression, likely contributing to the transition to alcohol dependence. PMID:25567426

  17. Elevated muscle TLR4 expression and metabolic endotoxemia in human aging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sangeeta; Lertwattanarak, Raweewan; Garduño, Jose de Jesus; Galeana, Joaquin Joya; Li, Jinqi; Zamarripa, Frank; Lancaster, Jack L; Mohan, Sumathy; Hussey, Sophie; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in glucose metabolism and sarcopenia that jointly contribute to a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Because aging is considered as a state of low-grade inflammation, in this study we examined whether older, healthy (lean, community-dwelling) participants have altered signaling flux through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a key mediator of innate and adaptive immune responses. We also examined whether a 4-month aerobic exercise program would have an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing TLR4 expression and signaling. At baseline, muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB p50 and nuclear factor κB p65 protein content, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation were significantly elevated in older versus young participants. The plasma concentration of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide and its binding protein also were significantly elevated in older participants, indicative of metabolic endotoxemia, which is a recently described phenomenon of increased plasma endotoxin level in metabolic disease. These alterations in older participants were accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity, quadriceps muscle volume, and muscle strength. The exercise training program increased insulin sensitivity, without affecting quadriceps muscle volume or strength. Muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and plasma lipopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide binding protein were not changed by exercise. In conclusion, insulin resistance and sarcopenia of aging are associated with increased TLR4 expression/signaling, which may be secondary to metabolic endotoxemia.

  18. TLR4 Signaling Is Involved in Brain Vascular Toxicity of PCB153 Bound to Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Choi, Jeong June; Eum, Sung Yong; Daunert, Sylvia; Toborek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    PCBs bind to environmental particles; however, potential toxicity exhibited by such complexes is not well understood. The aim of the present study is to study the hypothesis that assembling onto nanoparticles can influence the PCB153-induced brain endothelial toxicity via interaction with the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To address this hypothesis, TLR4-deficient and wild type control mice (males, 10 week old) were exposed to PCB153 (5 ng/g body weight) bound to chemically inert silica nanoparticles (PCB153-NPs), PCB153 alone, silica nanoparticles (NPs; diameter, 20 nm), or vehicle. Selected animals were also subjected to 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. As compared to exposure to PCB153 alone, treatment with PCB153-NP potentiated the brain infarct volume in control mice. Importantly, this effect was attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. Similarly, PCB153-NP-induced proinflammatory responses and disruption of tight junction integrity were less pronounced in TLR4-deficient mice as compared to control animals. Additional in vitro experiments revealed that TLR4 mediates toxicity of PCB153-NP via recruitment of tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). The results of current study indicate that binding to seemingly inert nanoparticles increase cerebrovascular toxicity of PCBs and suggest that targeting the TLR4/TRAF6 signaling may protect against these effects. PMID:23690990

  19. Relationship between TLR4 and MCP2 expression levels and habitual abortion.

    PubMed

    Li, X P; Song, L N; Tian, L P; Zhang, Y S

    2016-04-25

    Habitual abortion is associated with the altered expression of multiple genes. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP2 or CCL8) and habitual abortion. This was done by detecting and comparing their relative expression in peripheral blood and placental villi of patients and healthy fertile women. Based on our previous research, 85 subjects with habitual abortion (study group) and 40 healthy fertile women (control group), who were admitted to our hospital between June 2013 and December 2014, were enrolled in this study. After these subjects signed written informed consent, peripheral blood samples and villous tissues were collected, from which the total RNA was extracted. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 was detected with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, using GAPDH as a reference control. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood and villous tissues of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the changes in expression levels of TLR4 and MCP2. In conclusion, TLR4 and MCP2 expression correlated with the occurrence of habitual abortion. Detecting expression changes in TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood is a feasible method for predicting the occurrence of abortion in women of child-bearing age.

  20. Auranofin, as an anti-rheumatic gold compound, suppresses LPS-induced homodimerization of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung S; Lee, Joo Y; Saitoh, Shin I; Miyake, Kensuke; Hwang, Daniel H

    2006-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are activated by invading microorganisms or endogenous molecules, evoke immune and inflammatory responses. TLR activation is closely linked to the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. Auranofin, an Au(I) compound, is a well-known and long-used anti-rheumatic drug. However, the mechanism as to how auranofin relieves the symptom of rheumatoid arthritis has not been fully clarified. Our results demonstrated that auranofin suppressed TLR4-mediated activation of transcription factors, NF-kappaB and IRF3, and expression of COX-2, a pro-inflammatory enzyme. This suppression was well correlated with the inhibitory effect of auranofin on the homodimerization of TLR4 induced by an agonist. Furthermore, auranofin inhibited NF-kappaB activation induced by MyD88-dependent downstream signaling components of TLR4, MyD88, IKKbeta, and p65. IRF3 activation induced by MyD88-independent signaling components, TRIF and TBK1, was also downregulated by auranofin. Our results first demonstrate that auranofin suppresses the multiple steps in TLR4 signaling, especially the homodimerization of TLR4. The results suggest that the suppression of TLR4 activity by auranofin may be the molecular mechanism through which auranofin exerts anti-rheumatic activity.

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms of TLR4 and MICA are Associated with Severity of Trachoma Disease in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Muneer; Berka, Noureddine; Khraiwesh, Mozna; Ramadan, Ali; Apprey, Victor; Furbert-Harris, Paulette; Quinn, Thomas; Brim, Hassan; Dunston, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of TLR4 Asp299Gly and MICA exon 5 microsatellites polymorphisms with severity of trachoma in a sub-Saharan East Africa population of Tanzanian villagers. Methods The samples were genotyped for MICA exon 5 microsatellites and the TLR4 299 A/G polymorphism by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), and GeneScan®, respectively. The association of TLR4 Asp299Gly and MICA exon 5 microsatellites with inflammatory trachoma (TI) and trichiasis (TI) were examined. Results The results showed an association between TLR4 and MICA polymorphisms and trachoma disease severity, as well as with protection. TLR4 an allele was significantly associated with inflammatory trachoma (p=0.0410), while the G allele (p=0.0410) was associated with protection. Conclusion TLR4 and MICA may modulate the risk of severity to trachoma disease by modulating the immune response to Ct. In addition; the increased frequency of MICA-A9 heterozygote in controls may suggest a positive selection of these alleles in adaptation to environments where Ct is endemic. PMID:27559544

  2. Cigarette smoke regulates the expression of TLR4 and IL-8 production by human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sarir, Hadi; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Karimi, Khalil; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Rahman, Irfan; Caldenhoven, Eric; Nijkamp, Frans P; Folkerts, Gert

    2009-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are present on monocytes and alveolar macrophages that form the first line of defense against inhaled particles. The importance of those cells in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has well been documented. Cigarette smoke contains high concentration of oxidants which can stimulate immune cells to produce reactive oxygen species, cytokines and chemokines. Methods In this study, we evaluated the effects of cigarette smoke medium (CSM) on TLR4 expression and interleukin (IL)-8 production by human macrophages investigating the involvement of ROS. Results and Discussion TLR4 surface expression was downregulated on short term exposure (1 h) of CSM. The downregulation could be explained by internalization of the TLR4 and the upregulation by an increase in TLR4 mRNA. IL-8 mRNA and protein were also increased by CSM. CSM stimulation increased intracellular ROS-production and decreased glutathione (GSH) levels. The modulation of TLR4 mRNA and surface receptors expression, IRAK activation, IκB-α degradation, IL-8 mRNA and protein, GSH depletion and ROS production were all prevented by antioxidants such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Conclusion TLR4 may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema and oxidative stress and seems to be a crucial contributor in lung inflammation. PMID:19409098

  3. TLR4 ligands lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid a differentially regulate effector and memory CD8+ T Cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiguo; Joshi, Nikhil S; Liu, Ying; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Kaech, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    Vaccines formulated with nonreplicating pathogens require adjuvants to help bolster immunogenicity. The role of adjuvants in Ab production has been well studied, but how they influence memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation remains poorly defined. In this study we implemented dendritic cell-mediated immunization to study the effects of commonly used adjuvants, TLR ligands, on effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation in mice. Intriguingly, we found that the TLR4 ligand LPS was far more superior to other TLR ligands in generating memory CD8(+) T cells upon immunization. LPS boosted clonal expansion similar to the other adjuvants, but fewer of the activated CD8(+) T cells died during contraction, generating a larger pool of memory cells. Surprisingly, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), another TLR4 ligand, enhanced clonal expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells, but it also promoted their terminal differentiation and contraction; thus, fewer memory CD8(+) T cells formed, and MPLA-primed animals were less protected against secondary infection compared with those primed with LPS. Furthermore, gene expression profiling revealed that LPS-primed effector cells displayed a stronger pro-memory gene expression signature, whereas the gene expression profile of MPLA-primed effector cells aligned closer with terminal effector CD8(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrated that the LPS-TLR4-derived "pro-memory" signals were MyD88, but not Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β, dependent. This study reveals the influential power of adjuvants on the quantity and quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, and that attention to adjuvant selection is crucial because boosting effector cell expansion may not always equate with more memory T cells or greater protection.

  4. CD40 Negatively Regulates ATP-TLR4-Activated Inflammasome in Microglia.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sagar; Patel, Divyesh; Agrawal-Rajput, Reena

    2017-03-01

    During acute brain injury and/or sterile inflammation, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activates pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Microglial toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 activated by DAMPs potentiates neuroinflammation through inflammasome-induced IL-1β and pathogenic Th17 polarization which critically influences brain injury. TLR4 activation accompanies increased CD40, a cognate costimulatory molecule, involved in microglia-mediated immune responses in the brain. During brain injury, excessive release of extracellular ATP (DAMPs) is involved in promoting the damage. However, the regulatory role of CD40 in microglia during ATP-TLR4-mediated inflammasome activation has never been explored. We report that CD40, in the absence of ATP, synergizes TLR4-induced proinflammatory cytokines but not IL-1β, suggesting that the response is independent of inflammasome. The presence of ATP during TLR4 activation leads to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and caspase-1-mediated IL-1β secretion which was inhibited during CD40 activation, accompanied with inhibition of ERK1/2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Experiments using selective inhibitors prove indispensability of ERK 1/2 and ROS for inflammasome activation. The ATP-TLR4-primed macrophages polarize the immune response toward pathogenic Th17 cells, whereas CD40 activation mediates Th1 response. Exogenous supplementation of IFN-γ (a Th1 cytokine and CD40 inducer) results in decreased IL-1β, suggesting possible feedback loop mechanism of inflammasome inhibition, whereby IFN-γ-mediated increase in CD40 expression and activation suppress neurotoxic inflammasome activation required for Th17 response. Collectively, the findings indicate that CD40 is a novel negative regulator of ATP-TLR4-mediated inflammasome activation in microglia, thus providing a checkpoint to regulate excessive inflammasome activation and Th17 response during DAMP-mediated brain injury.

  5. A TLR4-interacting SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Kosanke, Stanley; Awasthi, Shanjana

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between surfactant protein-A (SP-A) and TLR4 is important for host defense. We have recently identified an SPA4 peptide region from the interface of SP-A-TLR4 complex. Here, we studied the involvement of the SPA4 peptide region in SP-A-TLR4 interaction using a two-hybrid system, and biological effects of SPA4 peptide in cell systems and a mouse model. HEK293 cells were transfected with plasmid DNAs encoding SP-A or a SP-A-mutant lacking SPA4 peptide region and TLR4. Luciferase activity was measured as the end-point of SP-A-TLR4 interaction. NF-κB activity was also assessed simultaneously. Next, the dendritic cells or mice were challenged with Escherichia coli-derived LPS and treated with SPA4 peptide. Endotoxic shock-like symptoms and inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, NF-κB, leukocyte influx) were assessed. Our results reveal that the SPA4 peptide region contributes to the SP-A-TLR4 interaction and inhibits the LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α. We also observed that the SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced expression of TNF-α, nuclear localization of NF-κB-p65 and cell influx, and alleviates the endotoxic shock-like symptoms in a mouse model. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of the SPA4 peptide through its binding to TLR4 can be of therapeutic benefit.

  6. Increased TLR4 expression in murine placentas after oral infection with periodontal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Arce, R.M.; Barros, S.P.; Wacker, B.; Peters, B.; Moss, K.; Offenbacher, S.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal periodontitis has emerged as a putative risk factor for preterm births in humans. The periodontitis-associated dental biofilm is thought to serve as an important source of oral bacteria and related virulence factors that hematogenously disseminate and affect the fetoplacental unit; however the underlying biological mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated. This study hypothesized that an oral infection with the human periodontal pathogens Campylobacter rectus and Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to induce fetal growth restriction, placental inflammation and enhance Toll-like receptors type 4 (TLR4) expression in a murine pregnancy model. Female Balb/C mice (n=40) were orally infected with C. rectus and/or P. gingivalis over a 16-week period and mated once per week. Pregnant mice were sacrificed at embryonic day (E) 16.5 and placentas were collected and analyzed for TLR4 mRNA levels and qualitative protein expression by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. TLR4 mRNA expression was found to be increased in C. rectus-infected group (1.98±0.886 fold difference, P<0.01, ANOVA) compared to controls. Microscopic analysis of murine placentas showed enhanced immunofluorescence of TLR4 in trophoblasts, mainly in the placental labyrinth layer. Also, combined oral infection with C. rectus and P. gingivalis significantly reduced the overall fecundity compared to controls (16.7% vs. 75%, infected vs. non-infected mice respectively, P=0.03, Kaplan-Meier). The results supported an enhanced placental TLR4 expression after oral infection with periodontal pathogens. The TLR4 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of preterm births; therefore the abnormal regulation of placental TLR4 may give new insights into how maternal periodontitis and periodontal pathogens might be linked to placental inflammation and preterm birth pathogenesis. PMID:19101032

  7. Skeletal muscle TLR4 and TACE are associated with body fat percentage in older adults.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Kyle L; Connors, Ian D; Deal, Michael A; Mott, Rachael E

    2016-04-01

    Elevated skeletal muscle expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been linked to increased inflammation in clinical populations. TNFα converting enzyme (TACE), which cleaves membrane-bound TNFα (mTNFα) to its soluble (sTNFα) and more bioactive form, has been linked to chronic disease. In contrast, higher physical activity level is associated with decreased chronic disease risk and inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and skeletal muscle TLR4, TACE, and TNFα in older adults. In 26 older adults (age = 68 ± 4 years, body mass index = 26 ± 3 kg·m(-2)), self-reported physical activity (kcal·week(-1)), estimated maximal oxygen consumption, and body composition (air plethysmography) were measured. TLR4, TACE, mTNFα, and sTNFα were measured in skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) using western blot analyses. Pearson product-moment correlations were run between variables. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Skeletal muscle TACE was directly associated with sTNFα (r = 0.53, p < 0.01). Linear regression modeling showed that mTNFα and TACE expression were predictive of sTNFα expression. No correlations were observed between physical activity and TLR4, TACE, or sTNFα. Percent body fat was directly associated with skeletal muscle TLR4 (r = 0.52, p < 0.01) and TACE (r = 0.50, p < 0.01), whereas fasting blood glucose was directly associated with TACE and sTNFα. In conclusion, we found that percent body fat was directly associated with TLR4 and TACE expression in skeletal muscle of older adults. These findings suggest that elevated skeletal muscle expression of TLR4 and TACE may contribute to the augmented inflammation and chronic disease risk observed with increased adiposity.

  8. Targeting the TLR4 signaling pathway by polyphenols: A novel therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rahimifard, Mahban; Maqbool, Faheem; Moeini-Nodeh, Shermineh; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Braidy, Nady; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel

    2017-02-21

    A wide array of cell signaling mediators and their interactions play vital roles in neuroinflammation associated with ischemia, brain trauma, developmental disorders and age-related neurodegeneration. Along with neurons, microglia and astrocytes are also affected by the inflammatory cascade by releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen species. The release of pro-inflammatory mediators in response to neural dysfunction may be helpful, neutral or even deleterious to normal cellular survival. Moreover, the important role of NF-κB factors in the central nervous system (CNS) through toll-like receptor (TLR) activation has been well established. This review demonstrates recent findings regarding therapeutic aspects of polyphenolic compounds for the treatment of neuroinflammation, with the aim of regulating TLR4. Polyphenols including flavonoids, phenolic acids, phenolic alcohols, stilbenes and lignans, can target TLR4 signaling pathways in multiple ways. Toll interacting protein expression could be modulated by epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Resveratrol may also exert neuroprotective effects via the TLR4/NF-κB/STAT signaling cascade. Its role in activation of cascade via interfering with TLR4 oligomerization upon receptor stimulation has also been reported. Curcumin, another polyphenol, can suppress overexpression of inflammatory mediators via inhibiting the TLR4-MAPK/NF-κB pathway. It can also reduce neuronal apoptosis via a mechanism concerning the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia/macrophages. Despite a symphony of in vivo and in vitro studies, many molecular and pharmacological aspects of neuroinflammation remain unclear. It is proposed that natural compounds targeting TLR4 may serve as important pharmacophores for the development of potent drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  9. Glial TLR4 signaling does not contribute to opioid-induced depression of respiration

    PubMed Central

    Zwicker, Jennifer D.; Zhang, Yong; Ren, Jun; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.; Greer, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids activate glia in the central nervous system in part by activating the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2) complex. TLR4/MD2-mediated activation of glia by opioids compromises their analgesic actions. Glial activation is also hypothesized as pivotal in opioid-mediated reward and tolerance and as a contributor to opioid-mediated respiratory depression. We tested the contribution of TLR4 to opioid-induced respiratory depression using rhythmically active medullary slices that contain the pre-Bötzinger Complex (preBötC, an important site of respiratory rhythm generation) and adult rats in vivo. Injection with DAMGO (μ-opioid receptor agonist; 50 μM) or bath application of DAMGO (500 nM) or fentanyl (1 μM) slowed frequency recorded from XII nerves to 40%, 40%, or 50% of control, respectively. This DAMGO-mediated frequency inhibition was unaffected by preapplication of lipopolysaccharides from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (a TLR4 antagonist, 2,000 ng/ml) or (+)naloxone (1–10 μM, a TLR4-antagonist). Bath application of (−)naloxone (500 nM; a TLR4 and μ-opioid antagonist), however, rapidly reversed the opioid-mediated frequency decrease. We also compared the opioid-induced respiratory depression in slices in vitro in the absence and presence of bath-applied minocycline (an inhibitor of microglial activation) and in slices prepared from mice injected (ip) 18 h earlier with minocycline or saline. Minocycline had no effect on respiratory depression in vitro. Finally, the respiratory depression evoked in anesthetized rats by tail vein infusion of fentanyl was unaffected by subsequent injection of (+)naloxone, but completely reversed by (−)naloxone. These data indicate that neither activation of microglia in preBötC nor TLR4/MD2-activation contribute to opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:25103966

  10. Mice that exclusively express TLR4 on endothelial cells can efficiently clear a lethal systemic Gram-negative bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Andonegui, Graciela; Zhou, Hong; Bullard, Daniel; Kelly, Margaret M; Mullaly, Sarah C; McDonald, Braedon; Long, Elizabeth M; Robbins, Stephen M; Kubes, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Recognition of LPS by TLR4 on immune sentinel cells such as macrophages is thought to be key to the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection with Gram-negative bacteria. To explore whether endothelial TLR4 plays a role in this process, we engineered and imaged mice that expressed TLR4 exclusively on endothelium (known herein as EndotheliumTLR4 mice). Local administration of LPS into tissue induced comparable neutrophil recruitment in EndotheliumTLR4 and wild-type mice. Following systemic LPS or intraperitoneal E. coli administration, most neutrophils were sequestered in the lungs of wild-type mice and did not accumulate at primary sites of infection. In contrast, EndotheliumTLR4 mice showed reduced pulmonary capillary neutrophil sequestration over the first 24 hours; as a result, they mobilized neutrophils to primary sites of infection, cleared bacteria, and resisted a dose of E. coli that killed 50% of wild-type mice in the first 48 hours. In fact, the only defect we detected in EndotheliumTLR4 mice was a failure to accumulate neutrophils in the lungs following intratracheal administration of LPS; this response required TLR4 on bone marrow-derived immune cells. Therefore, endothelial TLR4 functions as the primary intravascular sentinel system for detection of bacteria, whereas bone marrow-derived immune cells are critical for pathogen detection at barrier sites. Nonendothelial TLR4 contributes to failure to accumulate neutrophils at primary infection sites in a disseminated systemic infection.

  11. TLR4-mediated inflammation is a key pathogenic event leading to kidney damage and fibrosis in cyclosporine nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    González-Guerrero, Cristian; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Guerri, Consuelo; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ramos, Adrián M

    2017-04-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) successfully prevents allograft rejection, but nephrotoxicity is still a dose-limiting adverse effect. TLR4 activation promotes kidney damage but whether this innate immunity receptor mediates CsA nephrotoxicity is unknown. The in vivo role of TLR4 during CsA nephrotoxicity was studied in mice co-treated with CsA and the TLR4 inhibitor TAK242 and also in TLR4(-/-) mice. CsA-induced renal TLR4 expression in wild-type mice. Pharmacological or genetic targeting of TLR4 reduced the activation of proinflammatory signaling, including JNK/c-jun, JAK2/STAT3, IRE1α and NF-κB and the expression of Fn14. Expression of proinflammatory factors and cytokines was also decreased, and kidney monocyte and lymphocyte influx was prevented. TLR4 inhibition also reduced tubular damage and drastically prevented the development of kidney fibrosis. In vivo and in vitro CsA promoted secretion of the TLR ligand HMGB1 by tubular cells upstream of TLR4 activation, and prevention of HMGB1 secretion significantly reduced CsA-induced synthesis of MCP-1, suggesting that HMGB1 may be one of the mediators of CsA-induced TLR4 activation. These results suggest that TLR4 is a potential pharmacological target in CsA nephrotoxicity.

  12. sTLR4/MD-2 complex inhibits colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo by targeting LPS

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jie; Wei, Liuhua; Wu, Chunlin; Zhang, Qiaoyun; Wei, Dong; Chen, Xiang; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiaoli; Dai, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is aggressive and associated with TLR4-MD-2 signaling. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) were highly expressed in human CRC. The soluble form of extracellular TLR4 domain (sTLR4) and MD-2 may have important roles in binding lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, sTLR4 and MD-2 protein and prepared sTLR4/MD-2 complex were synthesized successfully to restrain LPS-TLR4/MD-2 activation by competing with cellular membrane TLR4 for binding LPS. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex can significantly attenuate LPS induced pro-inflammatory and migration cytokine production in vitro and in vivo, and inhibit the effect of LPS on the cell cycle, migration and invasion of human CRC cells in vitro. Administration of sTLR4/MD-2 complex protected mice from tumor both in xenograft and implantation metastasis model. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex treated mice had smaller tumor, less body weight loss and lower expression of inflammatory cytokines. Here, the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium salt (AOM/DSS) murine model was used as an experimental platform to simulate the physiological and pathological processes of cancers associated with chronic intestinal inflammation. AOM/DSS-induced tumors were inhibited in mice treated by sTLR4/MD-2 complex. It is demonstrated in our study that sTLR4/MD-2 complex could inhibit CRC by competing with binding LPS, raising the complex's possibility of a new prevention agent against CRC. PMID:27409669

  13. Constitutive activation of epithelial TLR4 augments inflammatory responses to mucosal injury and drives colitis-associated tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fukata, Masayuki; Shang, Limin; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Sotolongo, John; Pastorini, Cristhine; España, Cecilia; Ungaro, Ryan; Harpaz, Noam; Cooper, Harry S.; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Zaias, Julia; Perez, Maria T.; Mayer, Lloyd; Vamadevan, Arunan S.; Lira, Sergio A.; Abreu, Maria T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation culminates in cancer and a link to TLR4 has been suggested by our observation that TLR4 deficiency prevents colitis-associated neoplasia. In the current study, we address the effect of the aberrant activation of epithelial TLR4 on induction of colitis and colitis-associated tumor development. We take a translational approach to address the consequences of increased TLR signaling in the intestinal mucosa. Mice transgenic for a constitutively-active TLR4 under the intestine-specific villin promoter (villin-TLR4 mice) were treated with DSS for acute colitis and azoxymethane-dextran sulfate sodium. TLR4 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in colonic tissue from patients with ulcerative colitis and ulcerative colitis associated cancer. The effect of an antagonist TLR4 Ab was tested in prevention of colitis-associated neoplasia in the AOM-DSS model. Villin-TLR4 mice were highly susceptible to both acute colitis and colitis-associated neoplasia. Villin-TLR4 mice had increased epithelial expression of COX-2 and mucosal PGE2 production at baseline. Increased severity of colitis in villin-TLR4 mice was characterized by enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators and increased neutrophilic infiltration. In human UC samples, TLR4 expression was upregulated in almost all CAC and progressively increases with grade of dysplasia. As a proof of principle, a TLR4/MD-2 antagonist antibody inhibited colitis-associated neoplasia in the mouse model. Our results show that regulation of TLR's can affect the outcome of both acute colitis and its consequences—cancer. Targeting TLR4 and other TLR's may ultimately play a role in prevention or treatment of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:21674704

  14. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T.-C.; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  15. Utilizing mutual information for detecting rare and common variants associated with a categorical trait.

    PubMed

    Sun, Leiming; Wang, Chan; Hu, Yue-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Genome-wide association studies have succeeded in detecting novel common variants which associate with complex diseases. As a result of the fast changes in next generation sequencing technology, a large number of sequencing data are generated, which offers great opportunities to identify rare variants that could explain a larger proportion of missing heritability. Many effective and powerful methods are proposed, although they are usually limited to continuous, dichotomous or ordinal traits. Notice that traits having nominal categorical features are commonly observed in complex diseases, especially in mental disorders, which motivates the incorporation of the characteristics of the categorical trait into association studies with rare and common variants. Methods. We construct two simple and intuitive nonparametric tests, MIT and aMIT, based on mutual information for detecting association between genetic variants in a gene or region and a categorical trait. MIT and aMIT can gauge the difference among the distributions of rare and common variants across a region given every categorical trait value. If there is little association between variants and a categorical trait, MIT or aMIT approximately equals zero. The larger the difference in distributions, the greater values MIT and aMIT have. Therefore, MIT and aMIT have the potential for detecting functional variants. Results.We checked the validity of proposed statistics and compared them to the existing ones through extensive simulation studies with varied combinations of the numbers of variants of rare causal, rare non-causal, common causal, and common non-causal, deleterious and protective, various minor allele frequencies and different levels of linkage disequilibrium. The results show our methods have higher statistical power than conventional ones, including the likelihood based score test, in most cases: (1) there are multiple genetic variants in a gene or region; (2) both protective and deleterious

  16. TLR4 signaling induces TLR3 up-regulation in alveolar macrophages during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Zhixia; Mei, Shuya; Zhang, Liming; Billiar, Timothy R.; Li, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. Toll-like receptors in alveolar macrophages (AMΦ) recognize the molecular constituents of pathogens and activate the host’s innate immune responses. Numerous studies have documented the importance of TLR-TLR cross talk, but few studies have specifically addressed the relationship between TLR4 and TLR3. We explored a novel mechanism of TLR3 up-regulation that is induced by LPS-TLR4 signaling in a dose- and time-dependent manner in AMΦ from C57BL/6 mice, while the LPS-induced TLR3 expression was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− and Myd88−/− mice and following pretreatment with a NF-κB inhibitor. The enhanced TLR3 up-regulation in AMΦ augmented the expression of cytokines and chemokines in response to sequential challenges with LPS and Poly I:C, a TLR3 ligand, which was physiologically associated with amplified AMΦ-induced PMN migration into lung alveoli. Our study demonstrates that the synergistic effect between TLR4 and TLR3 in macrophages is an important determinant in acute lung injury and, more importantly, that TLR3 up-regulation is dependent on TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB signaling. These results raise the possibility that bacterial infections can induce sensitivity to viral infections, which may have important implications for the therapeutic manipulation of the innate immune system. PMID:28198368

  17. [The role of TLR4 receptor in the stress response of lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Novoselova, E G; Khrenov, M O; Cherenkov, D A; Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, T V; Lunin, S M; Lysenko, E A; Fesenko, E E

    2008-01-01

    In vitro effects of low-level electromagnetic waves (8.18 GHz, frequency swings within 1 s, intensity 1 microW/cm, exposure for 1 h) and low-energy laser light (He-Ne laser with 632.8 nm, 0.2 mW/cm, dose 1.2 x 10(-2) J/cm2) on the expression of receptor protein TLR4, which is known as a part of the system for microbal toxin recognition, were studied in mouse lymphocytes. In addition, TLR4 expression was examined in situations when stress responses to low-level nonionizing radiation were modified by the antibiotic geldanamycin, which suppresses the activity of the heat shock protein Hsp90. It was found that low-level microwaves significantly raised the amount of TLR4; in contrast, laser light decreased the expression of the receptor in lymphocytes. In cells pretreated with geldanamycin, the TLR4 expression in irradiated cells was reduced to minimum levels, much lower than control values. The results showed that TLR4, which is involved in specific binding of toxin from gram-negative bacteria, can regulate cell responses to signals of other origin, in particular to nonionizig radiation, including low-level microwaves and laser light.

  18. TLR4-mediated blunting of inflammatory responses to eccentric exercise in young women.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; De Paz, José A; Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Cuevas, María J; González-Gallego, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the inflammatory response mediated by the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway after acute eccentric exercise before and after an eccentric training program in women. Twenty women performed two acute eccentric bouts using a squat machine over a ~9 week interval. The training group (TG) carried out an eccentric training program during 6 weeks, while the control group (CG) did not follow any training. Protein content of markers involved in the TLR4-mediated activation of several nuclear transcription factors, such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3), was analyzed. The inflammatory response after the first acute bout was similar between TG and CG, showing an upregulation of all the markers analyzed, with the exception of IRF3. After the second bout, the upregulation of TLR4 signaling pathway was blunted in TG, but not in CG, through both the myeloid differentiation factor 88- and toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain containing adapter inducing interferon-β-dependent pathways. These results highlight the role of the TLR4 in controlling the exercise-induced inflammatory response in young women. More importantly, these data suggest eccentric training may help to prevent TLR4 activation principally through NF-κB, and perhaps IRF3, downstream signaling in this population.

  19. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  20. Superoxide Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in a TLR-4 and NOX-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza Obaid; Miller, David; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the early innate immune response to perceived infectious and sterile threats. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a novel mechanism to counter pathogenic invasion and sequelae of ischemia, including cell death and oxidative stress. Superoxide is a radical intermediate of oxygen metabolism produced by parenchymal and nonparenchymal hepatic cells, and is a hallmark of oxidative stress after liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). While extracellular superoxide recruits neutrophils to the liver and initiates sterile inflammatory injury, it is unknown whether superoxide induces the formation of NETs. We hypothesize that superoxide induces NET formation through a signaling cascade involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and neutrophil NADPH oxidase (NOX). We treated neutrophils with extracellular superoxide and observed NET DNA release, histone H3 citrullination and increased levels of MPO-DNA complexes occurring in a TLR-4–dependent manner. Inhibition of superoxide generation by allopurinol and inhibition of NOX by diphenyleneiodonium prevented NET formation. When mice were subjected to warm liver I/R, we found significant NET formation associated with liver necrosis and increased serum ALT in TLR-4 WT but not TLR-4 KO mice. To reduce circulating superoxide, we pretreated mice undergoing I/R with allopurinol and N-acetylcysteine, which resulted in decreased NETs and ameliorated liver injury. Our study demonstrates a requirement for TLR-4 and NOX in superoxide-induced NETs, and suggests involvement of superoxide-induced NETs in pathophysiologic settings. PMID:27453505

  1. Modulation of CD14 and TLR4.MD-2 activities by a synthetic lipid A mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Cighetti, Roberto; Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Sestito, Stefania Enza; Zanoni, Ivan; Kubik, Łukasz; Ardá-Freire, Ana; Calabrese, Valentina; Granucci, Francesca; Jerala, Roman; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Monosaccharide lipid A mimetics composed by a glucosamine core linked to two fatty acid chains and bearing one or two phosphates have been synthesized. While compounds 1 and 2, with one phosphate group, were practically inactive in inhibiting LPS-induced TLR4 signaling and cytokine production in HEK-blue™ cells and murine macrophages, compound 3 with two phosphates was found to be active in efficiently inhibiting TLR4 signal in both cell types. The direct interaction of molecule 3 with MD-2 co-receptor has been investigated by means of NMR and molecular modeling/docking analysis. This compound also interacts directly with CD14 receptor, stimulating its internalization by endocytosis. Experiments on macrophages show that the effect on CD14 reinforces the activity on MD-2.TLR4, because compound 3 activity is higher when CD14 is important for TLR4 signaling i,e, at low LPS concentration. The dual MD-2 and CD14 targeting, accompanied by good solubility in water and lack of toxicity, suggests the use of monosaccharide 3 as a lead compound to develop drugs directed against TLR4-related syndromes. PMID:24339336

  2. TLR4 is a target of environmentally relevant concentration of lead.

    PubMed

    Luna, Ana L; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Martínez, Marcela; Torres-Avilés, Nallely; Gómez, Rocío; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S

    2012-11-15

    Lead (Pb) alters the susceptibility to different pathogens suggesting that macrophage-mediated defense mechanisms, through activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs), may be affected by Pb. The aim of this study was to test whether activation of TLR4 is a targeted molecule to the effect of environmentally relevant Pb concentrations (0.05, 0.5 and 5μg/dL). The function of macrophages activated through TLR4 was evaluated using as TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from two different pathogens: Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Pb induced proliferation, increased the NO(-) baseline, IL-1β and IL-6 secretion. Interestingly, Pb exposure induced differential effects on cells stimulated with the two LPS used: in macrophages stimulated with LPS from E. coli, Pb caused an early decrease in proliferation, increase NO(-) production, and decrease IL-6 and TNF-α secretion; in macrophages stimulated with LPS from S. typhimurium, Pb decreased proliferation after 36h, induced a biphasic effect on NO(-) production, and enhance the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Results suggest that TLR4 is a target for the Pb effect, which up to 5.0μg/dL affect immune competence against pathogens, dependent on the bacterial species. This effect may be attributable to structural differences that determine LPS affinity for TLR4.

  3. Role of TLR2- and TLR4-mediated signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage death.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Dulfary; Rojas, Mauricio; Hernández, Israel; Radzioch, Danuta; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Infection of macrophages with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. TLRs 2 and 4 recognition of mycobacterial ligands has been independently associated to apoptosis induction. To try to understand the particular contribution of these receptors to apoptotic or necrotic signaling upon infection with live Mtb H37Rv, we used macrophage lines derived from wild-type or TLR2-, TLR4-, and MyD88-deficient mouse strains. Mtb-infection triggered apoptosis depending on a TLR2/TLR4/MyD88/p38/ERK/PI-3K/NF-kB pathway; however, necrosis was favored in absence of TLR4 signaling independently of p38, ERK1/2, PI-3K or NF-kappaB activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that cooperation between TLR2- and TLR4-dependent mediated signals play a critical role in macrophage apoptosis induced by Mtb and the TLR4-mediated signaling has important role in the maintenance of the balance between apoptotic vs. necrotic cell death induced by macrophage infection with Mtb.

  4. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid affects PPARγ and TLR4 in Steatotic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Elias-Miro, M; Mendes-Braz, M; Lemoine, A; Rimola, A; Rodés, J; Casillas-Ramírez, A; Peralta, C

    2012-12-01

    Numerous steatotic livers are discarded for transplantation because of their poor tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). We examined whether tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a known inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, protects steatotic and nonsteatotic liver grafts preserved during 6 h in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and transplanted. The protective mechanisms of TUDCA were also examined. Neither unfolded protein response (UPR) induction nor ER stress was evidenced in steatotic and nonsteatotic liver grafts after 6 h in UW preservation solution. TUDCA only protected steatotic livers grafts and did so through a mechanism independent of ER stress. It reduced proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and damage. When PPARγ was activated, TUDCA did not reduce damage. TUDCA, which inhibited PPARγ, and the PPARγ antagonist treatment up-regulated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), specifically the TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFNβ (TRIF) pathway. TLR4 agonist treatment reduced damage in steatotic liver grafts. When TLR4 action was inhibited, PPARγ antagonists did not protect steatotic liver grafts. In conclusion, TUDCA reduced PPARγ and this in turn up-regulated the TLR4 pathway, thus protecting steatotic liver grafts. TLR4 activating-based strategies could reduce the inherent risk of steatotic liver failure after transplantation.

  5. A structure-function approach to optimizing TLR4 ligands for human vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Darrick; Fox, Christopher B; Day, Tracey A; Guderian, Jeffrey A; Liang, Hong; Rolf, Tom; Vergara, Julie; Sagawa, Zachary K; Ireton, Greg; Orr, Mark T; Desbien, Anthony; Duthie, Malcolm S; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are combined with vaccine antigens to enhance and modify immune responses, and have historically been primarily crude, undefined entities. Introducing toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands has led to a new generation of adjuvants, with TLR4 ligands being the most extensively used in human vaccines. The TLR4 crystal structures demonstrate extensive contact with their ligands and provide clues as to how they discriminate a broad array of molecules and activate or attenuate innate, as well as adaptive, responses resulting from these interactions. Leveraging this discerning ability, we made subtle chemical alterations to the structure of a synthetic monophosphoryl lipid-A molecule to produce SLA, a designer TLR4 ligand that had a number of desirable adjuvant effects. The SLA molecule stimulated human TLR4 and induced Th1 biasing cytokines and chemokines. On human cells, the activity of SLA plateaued at lower concentrations than the lipid A comparator, and induced cytokine profiles distinct from other known TLR4 agonists, indicating the potential for superior adjuvant performance. SLA was formulated in an oil-in-water emulsion, producing an adjuvant that elicited potent Th1-biased adaptive responses. This was verified using a recombinant Leishmania vaccine antigen, first in mice, then in a clinical study in which the antigen-specific Th1-biased responses observed in mice were recapitulated in humans. These results demonstrated that using structure-based approaches one can predictably design and produce modern adjuvant formulations for safe and effective human vaccines. PMID:27990284

  6. Fisetin Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via TLR4-Mediated NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Ze-yu; Sun, Bo; Fu, Jie; Li, Tian-zuo

    2016-02-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), a common component of systemic inflammatory disease, is a life-threatening condition without many effective treatments. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, was reported to have wide pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of fisetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury and investigate the potential mechanism. Fisetin was injected (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min before LPS administration (5 mg/kg, i.v.). Our results showed that fisetin effectively reduced the inflammatory cytokine release and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF), decreased the lung wet/dry ratios, and obviously improved the pulmonary histology in LPS-induced ALI. Furthermore, fisetin inhibited LPS-induced increases of neutrophils and macrophage infiltration and attenuated MPO activity in lung tissues. Additionally, fisetin could significantly inhibit the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and the activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Our data indicates that fisetin has a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI via suppression of TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways, and fisetin may be a promising candidate for LPS-induced ALI treatment.

  7. Soluble alpha-enolase activates monocytes by CD14-dependent TLR4 signalling pathway and exhibits a dual function

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Clément; Fréret, Manuel; Fondard, Emeline; Derambure, Céline; Avenel, Gilles; Golinski, Marie-Laure; Verdet, Mathieu; Boyer, Olivier; Caillot, Frédérique; Musette, Philippe; Lequerré, Thierry; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common form of chronic inflammatory rheumatism. Identifying auto-antigens targeted by RA auto-antibodies is of major interest. Alpha-enolase (ENO1) is considered to be a pivotal auto-antigen in early RA but its pathophysiologic role remains unknown. The main objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of soluble ENO1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and RA patients in order to determine the potential pathogenic role of ENO1. ELISA, transcriptomic analysis, experiments of receptor inhibition and flow cytometry analysis were performed to determine the effect, the target cell population and the receptor of ENO1. We showed that ENO1 has the ability to induce early production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines with delayed production of IL-10 and to activate the innate immune system. We demonstrated that ENO1 binds mainly to monocytes and activates the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway both in healthy subjects and in RA patients. Our results establish for the first time that ENO1 is able to activate in vitro the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway on monocytes involving a dual mechanism firstly pro-inflammatory and secondly anti-inflammatory. These results contribute to elucidating the role of this auto-antigen in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of RA. PMID:27025255

  8. Exome Array Analysis Identifies a Common Variant in IL27 Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Margaret M.; Chen, Han; Lao, Taotao; Hardin, Megan; Qiao, Dandi; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Castaldi, Peter J.; Hersh, Craig P.; Morrow, Jarrett; Celli, Bartolome R.; Pinto-Plata, Victor M.; Criner, Gerald J.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Bueno, Raphael; Agustí, Alvar; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.; Calverley, Peter M.; Donner, Claudio F.; Lomas, David A.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Vestbo, Jorgen; Paré, Peter D.; Levy, Robert D.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Laird, Nan M.; Lin, Xihong; Beaty, Terri H.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility is in part related to genetic variants. Most genetic studies have been focused on genome-wide common variants without a specific focus on coding variants, but common and rare coding variants may also affect COPD susceptibility. Objectives: To identify coding variants associated with COPD. Methods: We tested nonsynonymous, splice, and stop variants derived from the Illumina HumanExome array for association with COPD in five study populations enriched for COPD. We evaluated single variants with a minor allele frequency greater than 0.5% using logistic regression. Results were combined using a fixed effects meta-analysis. We replicated novel single-variant associations in three additional COPD cohorts. Measurements and Main Results: We included 6,004 control subjects and 6,161 COPD cases across five cohorts for analysis. Our top result was rs16969968 (P = 1.7 × 10−14) in CHRNA5, a locus previously associated with COPD susceptibility and nicotine dependence. Additional top results were found in AGER, MMP3, and SERPINA1. A nonsynonymous variant, rs181206, in IL27 (P = 4.7 × 10−6) was just below the level of exome-wide significance but attained exome-wide significance (P = 5.7 × 10−8) when combined with results from other cohorts. Gene expression datasets revealed an association of rs181206 and the surrounding locus with expression of multiple genes; several were differentially expressed in COPD lung tissue, including TUFM. Conclusions: In an exome array analysis of COPD, we identified nonsynonymous variants at previously described loci and a novel exome-wide significant variant in IL27. This variant is at a locus previously described in genome-wide associations with diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and obesity and appears to affect genes potentially related to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:26771213

  9. Sesamin Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibition of TLR4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Li; Yuan, Jiang; Shouyin, Jiang; Yulin, Li; Libing, Jiang; Jian-An, Wang

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies suggested that TLR4 signaling pathways played an important role in the development of LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Sesamin, a sesame lignan exacted from sesame seeds, has been shown to exhibit significant anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on LPS-induced ALI in mice. Mice ALI model was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS. Sesamin was given 1 h after LPS challenge. Our results showed that sesamin inhibited LPS-induced lung pathological change, edema, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Sesamin suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Furthermore, sesamin inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that sesamin protected against LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of TLR4 signaling pathways.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated signaling through TLR4 mediates persistent HIV infection of primary macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Agosto, Luis M.; Hirnet, Juliane B.; Michaels, Daniel H.; Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B.; Gibson, Frank C.; Viglianti, Gregory; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal infections contribute to HIV-associated co-morbidities in the oral cavity and provide a model to interrogate the dysregulation of macrophage function, inflammatory disease progression, and HIV replication during co-infections. We investigated the effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis on the establishment of HIV infection in monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV replication in macrophages was significantly repressed in the presence of P. gingivalis. This diminished viral replication was due partly to a decrease in the expression of integrated HIV provirus. HIV repression depended upon signaling through TLR4 as knock-down of TLR4 with siRNA rescued HIV expression. Importantly, HIV expression was reactivated upon removal of P. gingivalis. Our observations suggest that exposure of macrophages to Gram-negative bacteria influence the establishment and maintenance of HIV persistence in macrophages through a TLR4-dependent mechanism. PMID:27639573

  11. LPS-TLR4 Pathway Mediates Ductular Cell Expansion in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Odena, Gemma; Chen, Jiegen; Lozano, Juan Jose; Altamirano, Jose; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affo, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Matsushita, Hiroshi; Zou, Jian; Dumitru, Raluca; Caballeria, Juan; Gines, Pere; Arroyo, Vicente; You, Min; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique; Crews, Fulton; Seki, Ekihiro; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Bataller, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most severe form of alcoholic liver disease for which there are no effective therapies. Patients with AH show impaired hepatocyte proliferation, expansion of inefficient ductular cells and high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. It is unknown whether LPS mediates ductular cell expansion. We performed transcriptome studies and identified keratin 23 (KRT23) as a new ductular cell marker. KRT23 expression correlated with mortality and LPS serum levels. LPS-TLR4 pathway role in ductular cell expansion was assessed in human and mouse progenitor cells, liver slices and liver injured TLR4 KO mice. In AH patients, ductular cell expansion correlated with portal hypertension and collagen expression. Functional studies in ductular cells showed that KRT23 regulates collagen expression. These results support a role for LPS-TLR4 pathway in promoting ductular reaction in AH. Maneuvers aimed at decreasing LPS serum levels in AH patients could have beneficial effects by preventing ductular reaction development. PMID:27752144

  12. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  13. Studies of the TLR4-associated protein MD-2 using yeast-display and mutational analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mattis, Daiva M.; Chervin, Adam; Ranoa, Diana; Kelley, Stacy; Tapping, Richard; Kranz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the innate immune system by forming a complex with myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which is present on antigen presenting cells. MD-2 plays an essential role in this activation of the innate immune system as a member of the ternary complex, TLR4:MD-2:LPS. With the goal of further understanding the molecular details of the interaction of MD-2 with LPS and TLR4, and possibly toward engineering dominant negative regulators of the MD-2 protein, here we subjected MD-2 to a mutational analysis using yeast display. The approach included generation of site-directed alanine mutants, and ligand-driven selections of MD-2 mutant libraries. Our findings showed that: 1) proline mutations in the F119-K132 loop that binds LPS were strongly selected for enhanced yeast surface stability, 2) there was a preference for positive-charged side chains (R/K) at residue 120 for LPS binding, and negative-charged side chains (D/E) for TLR4 binding, 3) aromatic residues were strongly preferred at F119 and F121 for LPS binding, and 4) an MD-2 mutant (T84N/D101A/S118A/S120D/K122P) exhibited increased binding to TLR4 but decreased binding to LPS. These studies revealed the impact of specific residues and regions of MD-2 on the binding of LPS and TLR4, and they provide a framework for further directed evolution of the MD-2 protein. PMID:26320630

  14. Rare versus common variants in pharmacogenetics: SLCO1B1 variation and methotrexate disposition.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Bruun, Gitte H; Yang, Wenjian; Treviño, Lisa R; Vattathil, Selina; Scheet, Paul; Cheng, Cheng; Rosner, Gary L; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Fan, Yiping; Sparreboom, Alex; Mikkelsen, Torben S; Corydon, Thomas J; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2012-01-01

    Methotrexate is used to treat autoimmune diseases and malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Inter-individual variation in clearance of methotrexate results in heterogeneous systemic exposure, clinical efficacy, and toxicity. In a genome-wide association study of children with ALL, we identified SLCO1B1 as harboring multiple common polymorphisms associated with methotrexate clearance. The extent of influence of rare versus common variants on pharmacogenomic phenotypes remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that rare variants in SLCO1B1 could affect methotrexate clearance and compared the influence of common versus rare variants in addition to clinical covariates on clearance. From deep resequencing of SLCO1B1 exons in 699 children, we identified 93 SNPs, 15 of which were non-synonymous (NS). Three of these NS SNPs were common, with a minor allele frequency (MAF) >5%, one had low frequency (MAF 1%-5%), and 11 were rare (MAF <1%). NS SNPs (common or rare) predicted to be functionally damaging were more likely to be found among patients with the lowest methotrexate clearance than patients with high clearance. We verified lower function in vitro of four SLCO1B1 haplotypes that were associated with reduced methotrexate clearance. In a multivariate stepwise regression analysis adjusting for other genetic and non-genetic covariates, SLCO1B1 variants accounted for 10.7% of the population variability in clearance. Of that variability, common NS variants accounted for the majority, but rare damaging NS variants constituted 17.8% of SLCO1B1's effects (1.9% of total variation) and had larger effect sizes than common NS variants. Our results show that rare variants are likely to have an important effect on pharmacogenetic phenotypes.

  15. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning activates TLR4-TRIF signaling to induce protection of ischemic retina.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sebok Kumar; Matsunaga, Hayato; Ishii, Ken J; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Prothymosin-alpha protects the brain and retina from ischemic damage. Although prothymosin-alpha contributes to toll-like receptor (TLR4)-mediated immnunopotentiation against viral infection, the beneficial effects of prothymosin-alpha-TLR4 signaling in protecting against ischemia remain to be elucidated. In this study, intravitreal administration of prothymosin-alpha 48 h before induction of retinal ischemia prevented retinal cellular damage as evaluated by histology, and retinal functional deficits as evaluated by electroretinography. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning completely prevented the ischemia-induced loss of ganglion cells with partial survival of bipolar and photoreceptor cells, but not amacrine cells, in immunohistochemistry experiments. Prothymosin-alpha treatment in the absence of ischemia caused mild activation, proliferation, and migration of retinal microglia, whereas the ischemia-induced microglial activation was inhibited by prothymosin-alpha preconditioning. All these preventive effects of prothymosin-alpha preconditioning were abolished in TLR4 knock-out mice and by pre-treatments with anti-TLR4 antibodies or minocycline, a microglial inhibitor. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning inhibited the retinal ischemia-induced up-regulation of TLR4-related injury genes, and increased expression of TLR4-related protective genes. Furthermore, the prothymosin-alpha preconditioning-induced prevention of retinal ischemic damage was abolished in TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β knock-out mice, but not in myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 knock-out mice. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that prothymosin-alpha preconditioning selectively drives TLR4-TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β signaling and microglia in the prevention of retinal ischemic damage. We propose the following mechanism for prothymosin-alpha (ProTα) preconditioning-induced retinal prevention against ischemia: Pro

  16. Hypertensive rats are susceptible to TLR4-mediated signaling following exposure to combustion source particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Peter S; Schladweiler, Mette C; Richards, Judy H; Ledbetter, Allen D; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been shown to play a role in cell signaling that results in neutrophilic inflammation in response to lipopolysaccharide and respiratory syncytial virus infection. TLR4 also interacts with CD14, which upon complex formation triggers TLR4-associated signaling pathways to produce a proinflammatory response. This mechanism results in the activation of NF-kappa B and subsequent inflammatory gene induction. In order to determine the effect of combustion source particle matter (PM), rich in zinc and nickel but with negligible endotoxin, on a possible activation of TLR4-mediated cell signaling and inflammation, we intratracheally (IT) instilled 3.3 mg/kg of PM into 12-w-old healthy male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and susceptible spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. Inflammation, inflammatory-mediator gene expression, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein and LDH, TLR4 and CD14 protein, and NF-kappa B activation in the lung were determined after 24 h. Dose-response data (0.0, 0.83, 3.33, and 8.3 mg/kg PM) for BALF LDH were obtained as a marker of lung cell injury in SH rats. BALF neutrophils, but not macrophages, were significantly increased in the PM-exposed WKY and SH rats. SH rats showed a greater PMN increase than WKY rats. Similarly, BALF protein and LDH levels were also increased following PM exposure but to a significantly greater extent in SH rats. Plasma fibrinogen was increased only in SH rats exposed to PM. The increased inflammation seen in PM-exposed SH rats was accompanied by a significant increase in TLR4 protein in the lung tissue, which was primarily localized in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. CD14 was also increased by PM exposure in both SH and WKY rats but was significantly greater in the SH rats. These increases were associated with greater translocation of NF-kappa B in the lungs of SH rather than WKY rats. This was accompanied by increased macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-2 mRNA expression at 24 h of

  17. Unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans: Uncommon variant of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Kumar, Piyush; Gayen, Tirthankar; Roy, Kunal; Das, Nilay K.; Gharami, Ramesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a fairly common dermatosis characterized by hyperpigmented velvety plaques, having a predilection for the intertriginous areas. We herein present a case of unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans over the left lateral chest, in an adult male. The rarity of documentation of this entity in the world literature prompted us to report the case. PMID:25506563

  18. Inhibition of TLR4 Signalling-Induced Inflammation Attenuates Secondary Injury after Diffuse Axonal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonglin; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Junjie; Ma, Xudong; Huang, Tingqin; Pang, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that secondary injury after diffuse axonal injury (DAI) damages more axons than the initial insult, but the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are not fully understood. Recent studies show that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role in promoting adaptive immune responses and have been shown to be associated with brain damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the TLR4 signalling pathway in secondary axonal injury in the cortices of DAI rats. TLR4 was mainly localized in microglial cells and neurons, and the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules, including TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, toll/IR-1-(TIR-) domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-beta, interferon regulatory factor 3, interferon β, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65, and phospho-NF-κB p65, significantly increased and peaked at 1 d after DAI. Inhibition of TLR4 by TAK-242 attenuated apoptosis, neuronal and axonal injury, and glial responses. The neuroprotective effects of TLR4 inhibition were associated with decreases in the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules and inflammatory factors, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-α. These results suggest that the TLR4 signalling pathway plays an important role in secondary injury and may be an important therapeutic target following DAI. PMID:27478307

  19. Discovery and Validation of a New Class of Small Molecule Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Eyer, Benjamin; Good, Misty; Guerriero, Christopher J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Afrazi, Amin; Prindle, Thomas; Ma, Congrong; Branca, Maria; Ozolek, John; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Wipf, Peter; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases may be linked to pathologically elevated signaling via the receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). There has thus been great interest in the discovery of TLR4 inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Recently, the structure of TLR4 bound to the inhibitor E5564 was solved, raising the possibility that novel TLR4 inhibitors that target the E5564-binding domain could be designed. We utilized a similarity search algorithm in conjunction with a limited screening approach of small molecule libraries to identify compounds that bind to the E5564 site and inhibit TLR4. Our lead compound, C34, is a 2-acetamidopyranoside (MW 389) with the formula C17H27NO9, which inhibited TLR4 in enterocytes and macrophages in vitro, and reduced systemic inflammation in mouse models of endotoxemia and necrotizing enterocolitis. Molecular docking of C34 to the hydrophobic internal pocket of the TLR4 co-receptor MD-2 demonstrated a tight fit, embedding the pyran ring deep inside the pocket. Strikingly, C34 inhibited LPS signaling ex-vivo in human ileum that was resected from infants with necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings identify C34 and the β-anomeric cyclohexyl analog C35 as novel leads for small molecule TLR4 inhibitors that have potential therapeutic benefit for TLR4-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23776545

  20. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony R; Sweeten, Thayne L; Johnson, Randall C; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C; Davies, Christopher J; Thomas, Aaron J; Croen, Lisa A; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The "common variant-common disease" hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the "common variant-common disease" hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in autism over

  1. Thirty-five common variants for coronary artery disease: the fruits of much collaborative labour

    PubMed Central

    Peden, John F.; Farrall, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Affected individuals cluster in families in patterns that reflect the sharing of numerous susceptibility genes. Genome-wide and large-scale gene-centric genotyping studies that involve tens of thousands of cases and controls have now mapped common disease variants to 34 distinct loci. Some coronary disease common variants show allelic heterogeneity or copy number variation. Some of the loci include candidate genes that imply conventional or emerging risk factor-mediated mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Quantitative trait loci associations with risk factors have been informative in Mendelian randomization studies as well as fine-mapping of causative variants. But, for most loci, plausible mechanistic links are uncertain or obscure at present but provide potentially novel directions for research into this disease's pathogenesis. The common variants explain ∼4% of inter-individual variation in disease risk and no more than 13% of the total heritability of coronary disease. Although many CAD genes are presently undiscovered, it is likely that larger collaborative genome-wide association studies will map further common/low-penetrance variants and hoped that low-frequency or rare high-penetrance variants will also be identified in medical resequencing experiments. PMID:21875899

  2. TLR4 signaling promotes a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ang; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Huajun; Zhang, Yuyi; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can be expressed by tumor cells, and each TLR exhibits different biological functions. Evidences showed the activation of some certain TLRs could promote tumor progression. One of which TLR4 has been found to promote hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells proliferation, but the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we verified that TLR4 was functionally expressed on HCC cells, and TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could stimulate the proliferation and clone formation of HCC cells. Most importantly, we found a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop exists in HCC cells, which could be provoked by TLR4 activation. Consistently, the expression of TLR4, COX-2 and p-STAT3(Y705) was positively correlated with each other in liver tumor tissues from patients with primary HCC. Further investigation demonstrated this loop played a dominant role in TLR4-induced HCC cell proliferation and multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy. Inhibition of TLR4 or COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop would attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and proliferation of HCC cells, and enhance the sensitivity of HCC cells to chemotherapeutics in vitro. By using a primary HCC model, we observed COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop was significantly blocked in TLR4(-/-) mice compared to wild type mice, and there was no obvious tumorgenesis sign in TLR4(-/-) mice. Therefore, these findings provided the precise molecular mechanism of TLR4 signaling pathway involved in HCC progress, and suggested that TLR4 may be a promising target for HCC treatment.

  3. The Role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key players in the pathogenesis of inflammatory conditions including coronary arterial disease (CAD). They are expressed by a variety of immune cells where they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs recruit adaptor molecules, including myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MYD88) and TIRF-related adaptor protein (TRAM), to mediate activation of MAPKs and NF-kappa B pathways. They are associated with the development of CAD through various mechanisms. TLR4 is expressed in lipid-rich and atherosclerotic plaques. In TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice, atherosclerosis-associated inflammation was diminished. Moreover, TLR2 and TLR4 may induce expression of Wnt5a in advanced staged atheromatous plaque leading to activation of the inflammatory processes. TLR9 is activated by CpG motifs in nucleic acids and have been implicated in macrophage activation and the uptake of oxLDL from the circulation. Furthermore, TLR9 also stimulates interferon-α (INF-α) secretion and increases cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T-cells towards coronary artery tunica media smooth muscle cells. This review outlines the pathophysiological role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in atherosclerosis, focusing on evidence from animal models of the disease. PMID:27795867

  4. An unusual dimeric structure and assembly for TLR4 regulator RP105-MD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-16

    RP105-MD-1 modulates the TLR4-MD-2-mediated, innate immune response against bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The crystal structure of the bovine 1:1 RP105-MD-1 complex bound to a putative endogenous lipid at 2.9 Å resolution shares a similar overall architecture to its homolog TLR4-MD-2 but assembles into an unusual 2:2 homodimer that differs from any other known TLR-ligand assembly. The homodimer is assembled in a head-to-head orientation that juxtaposes the N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of the two RP105 chains, rather than the usual tail-to-tail configuration of C-terminal LRRs in ligand-activated TLR dimers, such as TLR1-TRL2, TLR2-TLR6, TLR3-TLR3 and TLR4-TLR4. Another unusual interaction is mediated by an RP105-specific asparagine-linked glycan, which wedges MD-1 into the co-receptor binding concavity on RP105. This unique mode of assembly represents a new paradigm for TLR complexes and suggests a molecular mechanism for regulating LPS responses.

  5. A role for intestinal TLR4-driven inflammatory response during activity-based anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Liliana; Achamrah, Najate; Nobis, Séverine; Guérin, Charlène; Riou, Gaëtan; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Boyer, Olivier; Richard, Vincent; Rego, Jean Claude Do; Déchelotte, Pierre; Goichon, Alexis; Coëffier, Moïse

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation and altered gut microbiota. However, the molecular origin of the inflammation remains unknown. Toll-like receptors are key regulators of innate immune response and their activation seems also to be involved in the control of food intake. We used activity-based anorexia (ABA) model to investigate the role of TLR4 and its contribution in anorexia-associated low-grade inflammation. Here, we found that ABA affected early the intestinal inflammatory status and the hypothalamic response. Indeed, TLR4 was upregulated both on colonic epithelial cells and intestinal macrophages, leading to elevated downstream mucosal cytokine production. These mucosal changes occurred earlier than hypothalamic changes driving to increased levels of IL-1β and IL-1R1 as well as increased levels of plasma corticosterone. Paradoxically, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited greater vulnerability to ABA with increased mortality rate, suggesting a major contribution of TLR4-mediated responses during ABA-induced weight loss. PMID:27779218

  6. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key receptor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria; genetic variation in this specific gene has been linked with the host’s response to bacterial infections and disease resistance. Since colonization and ...

  7. Euodenine A: a small-molecule agonist of human TLR4.

    PubMed

    Neve, Juliette E; Wijesekera, Hasanthi P; Duffy, Sandra; Jenkins, Ian D; Ripper, Justin A; Teague, Simon J; Campitelli, Marc; Garavelas, Agatha; Nikolakopoulos, George; Le, Phuc V; de A Leone, Priscila; Pham, Ngoc B; Shelton, Philip; Fraser, Neil; Carroll, Anthony R; Avery, Vicky M; McCrae, Christopher; Williams, Nicola; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-02-27

    A small-molecule natural product, euodenine A (1), was identified as an agonist of the human TLR4 receptor. Euodenine A was isolated from the leaves of Euodia asteridula (Rutaceae) found in Papua New Guinea and has an unusual U-shaped structure. It was synthesized along with a series of analogues that exhibit potent and selective agonism of the TLR4 receptor. SAR development around the cyclobutane ring resulted in a 10-fold increase in potency. The natural product demonstrated an extracellular site of action, which requires the extracellular domain of TLR4 to stimulate a NF-κB reporter response. 1 is a human-selective agonist that is CD14-independent, and it requires both TLR4 and MD-2 for full efficacy. Testing for immunomodulation in PBMC cells shows the induction of the cytokines IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p40 as well as suppression of IL-5 from activated PBMCs, indicating that compounds like 1 could modulate the Th2 immune response without causing lung damage.

  8. TLR4 genotype and environmental LPS mediate RSV bronchiolitis through Th2 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Mauricio T.; Serra, M. Elina; Acosta, Patricio L.; Marzec, Jacqui; Gibbons, Luz; Salim, Maximiliano; Rodriguez, Andrea; Reynaldi, Andrea; Garcia, Alejandro; Bado, Daniela; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Hijano, Diego R.; Coviello, Silvina; Newcomb, Dawn; Bellabarba, Miguel; Ferolla, Fausto M.; Libster, Romina; Berenstein, Ada; Siniawaski, Susana; Blumetti, Valeria; Echavarria, Marcela; Pinto, Leonardo; Lawrence, Andrea; Ossorio, M. Fabiana; Grosman, Arnoldo; Mateu, Cecilia G.; Bayle, Carola; Dericco, Alejandra; Pellegrini, Mariana; Igarza, Ignacio; Repetto, Horacio A.; Grimaldi, Luciano Alva; Gudapati, Prathyusha; Polack, Norberto R.; Althabe, Fernando; Shi, Min; Ferrero, Fernando; Bergel, Eduardo; Stein, Renato T.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Boothby, Mark; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Polack, Fernando P.

    2015-01-01

    While 30%–70% of RSV-infected infants develop bronchiolitis, 2% require hospitalization. It is not clear why disease severity differs among healthy, full-term infants; however, virus titers, inflammation, and Th2 bias are proposed explanations. While TLR4 is associated with these disease phenotypes, the role of this receptor in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pathogenesis is controversial. Here, we evaluated the interaction between TLR4 and environmental factors in RSV disease and defined the immune mediators associated with severe illness. Two independent populations of infants with RSV bronchiolitis revealed that the severity of RSV infection is determined by the TLR4 genotype of the individual and by environmental exposure to LPS. RSV-infected infants with severe disease exhibited a high GATA3/T-bet ratio, which manifested as a high IL-4/IFN-γ ratio in respiratory secretions. The IL-4/IFN-γ ratio present in infants with severe RSV is indicative of Th2 polarization. Murine models of RSV infection confirmed that LPS exposure, Tlr4 genotype, and Th2 polarization influence disease phenotypes. Together, the results of this study identify environmental and genetic factors that influence RSV pathogenesis and reveal that a high IL-4/IFN-γ ratio is associated with severe disease. Moreover, these molecules should be explored as potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25555213

  9. Rare and low-frequency variants in human common diseases and other complex traits.

    PubMed

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    In humans, most of the genetic variation is rare and often population-specific. Whereas the role of rare genetic variants in familial monogenic diseases is firmly established, we are only now starting to explore the contribution of this class of genetic variation to human common diseases and other complex traits. Such large-scale experiments are possible due to the development of next-generation DNA sequencing. Early findings suggested that rare and low-frequency coding variation might have a large effect on human phenotypes (eg, PCSK9 missense variants on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and coronary heart diseases). This observation sparked excitement in prognostic and diagnostic medicine, as well as in genetics-driven strategies to develop new drugs. In this review, I describe results and present initial conclusions regarding some of the recent rare and low-frequency variant discoveries. We can already assume that most phenotype-associated rare and low-frequency variants have modest-to-weak phenotypical effect. Thus, we will need large cohorts to identify them, as for common variants in genome-wide association studies. As we expand the list of associated rare and low-frequency variants, we can also better recognise the current limitations: we need to develop better statistical methods to optimally test association with rare variants, including non-coding variation, and to account for potential confounders such as population stratification.

  10. Suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory response by macrophage class A scavenger receptor (CD204)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takemura, Kenichi; Lei, XiaoFeng; Nakagawa, Takenobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} We focused on the interaction between SR-A and TLR4 signaling in this study. {yields} SR-A deletion promoted NF{kappa}B activation in macrophages in septic model mouse. {yields} SR-A suppresses both MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR4 signaling in vitro. {yields} SR-A clears LPS binding to TLR4 which resulting in the suppression of TLR4 signals. -- Abstract: The class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, CD204), one of the principal receptors expressed on macrophages, has been found to regulate inflammatory response and attenuate septic endotoxemia. However, the detailed mechanism of this process has not yet been well characterized. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation by SR-A, we evaluated the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling molecules in SR-A-deficient (SR-A{sup -/-}) macrophages. In a septic shock model, the blood levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-{beta} were significantly increased in SR-A{sup -/-} mice compared to wild-type mice, and elevated nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation was detected in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. SR-A deletion increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF{kappa}B in vitro. SR-A deletion also promoted the nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B and IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-3. In addition, a competitive binding assay with acetylated low-density lipoprotein, an SR-A-specific ligand, and anti-SR-A antibody induced significant activation of TLR4-mediated signaling molecules in wild-type macrophages but not in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. These results suggest that SR-A suppresses the macrophage activation by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 in a competitive manner and it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  11. TLR4 activates NF-{kappa}B in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Dori C.; Johnson, A.L.

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} TLR4 is expressed in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} Acting through TLR4, LPS and HSP60 induce a NF{kappa}B signaling cascade in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation or inhibition did not alter chemosensitivity to TRAIL or cisplatin. -- Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the surface epithelium of normal ovaries (OSE) and in epithelial ovarian tumors. Most notably, OSE-derived cancers express TLR4, which activates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling cascade as a mediator of inflammatory response. Currently, there is considerable interest in elucidating the role of TLR-mediated signaling in cancers. Nevertheless, the expression of TLRs in granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary, and the extent to which GCT expression of TLRs may influence cell-signaling pathways and/or modulate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, has yet to be determined. In the present study, human GCT lines (COV434 and KGN) were utilized to evaluate expression of functional TLR4. TLR4 is expressed in GCT cell lines and ligation of TLR4 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to I{kappa}B degradation and activation of NF-{kappa}B. NF-{kappa}B activation was confirmed by nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65 following treatment with LPS and the naturally occurring ligand, HSP60. Notably, immunoneutralization of TLR4 blocked nuclear localization, and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling attenuated LPS-induced TNF{alpha} plus increased doubling time in both cell lines. Contradictory to reports using human OSE cell lines, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling failed to sensitize GCT lines to TRAIL or cisplatin. In summary, findings herein are the first to demonstrate a functional TLR-signaling pathway specifically in GCTs, and indicate that in contrast to OSE-derived cancers, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B does not sensitize GCTs to TRAIL or cisplatin.

  12. Epigenetic modification of TLR4 promotes activation of NF-κB by regulating methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 and Sp1 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Moo; Lee, Heesoo; Uhm, Tae Gi; Min, Jeong-Ki; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Jong Wan; Choe, Yong-Kyung; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in promoting the immune response in various cancers. Recently, TLR4 is highly expressed in a stage-dependent manner in gastric cancer, but the regulatory mechanism of TLR4 expression has been not elucidated it. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying regulation of TLR4 expression through promoter methylation and histone modification between transcriptional regulation and silencing of the TLR4 gene in gastric cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was carried out to screen for factors related to TLR4 methylation such as MeCP2, HDAC1, and Sp1 on the TLR4 promoter. Moreover, DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induced demethylation of the TLR4 promoter and increased H3K4 trimethylation and Sp1 binding to reactivate silenced TLR4. In contrast, although the silence of TLR4 activated H3K9 trimethylation and MeCP2 complex, combined treatment with TLR4 agonist and 5-aza-dC upregulated H3K4 trimethylation and activated with transcription factors as Sp1 and NF-κB. This study demonstrates that recruitment of the MeCP2/HDAC1 repressor complex increases the low levels of TLR4 expression through epigenetic modification of DNA and histones on the TLR4 promoter, but Sp1 activates TLR4 high expression by hypomethylation and NF-κB signaling in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26675260

  13. HBD-3 regulation of the immune response and the LPS/TLR4-mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Bao, Ni-Rong; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the mechanisms of human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3) regulation of the immune response and the lipopolysaccharide/Toll-like receptor-4 (LPS/TLR4)-mediated signaling pathway. A TLR4 extracellular gene fragment was cloned into the pET32a plasmid to determine its expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and purification. A dialysis labeling method was used to stain HBD-3 with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). FITC-HBD-3 was used to induce the differentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) into immature dendritic cells (imDC) in vitro. Binding reactions were established using FITC-HBD-3 and sTLR4 into cell suspensions. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to analyze the results. Western blot analysis confirmed the identity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and was used to quantify its nuclear translocation. The results showed that, HBD-3 bound to imDC in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and sTLR4 and LPS competitively inhibited the binding. HBD-3 competitively blocked the binding of LPS and imDC by binding to imDC. HBD-3 significantly decreased the translocation of LPS-induced NF-κB into the nucleus. In conclusion, HBD-3 can competitively inhibit the binding of LPS and imDC through its binding to TLR4 molecules, which are expressed in imDC, thereby preventing LPS from inducing the maturity of the imDCs. PMID:27703496

  14. Activation of Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Attenuates Adaptive Thermogenesis via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Okla, Meshail; Wang, Wei; Kang, Inhae; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carr, Timothy; Chung, Soonkyu

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive thermogenesis is the cellular process transforming chemical energy into heat in response to cold. A decrease in adaptive thermogenesis is a contributing factor to obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the compromised adaptive thermogenesis in obese subjects have not yet been elucidated. In this study we hypothesized that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation and subsequent inflammatory responses are key regulators to suppress adaptive thermogenesis. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were either fed a palmitate-enriched high fat diet or administered with chronic low-dose LPS before cold acclimation. TLR4 stimulation by a high fat diet or LPS were both associated with reduced core body temperature and heat release. Impairment of thermogenic activation was correlated with diminished expression of brown-specific markers and mitochondrial dysfunction in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). Defective sWAT browning was concomitant with elevated levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. Consistently, TLR4 activation by LPS abolished cAMP-induced up-regulation of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in primary human adipocytes, which was reversed by silencing of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Moreover, the inactivation of ER stress by genetic deletion of CHOP or chemical chaperone conferred a resistance to the LPS-induced suppression of adaptive thermogenesis. Collectively, our data indicate the existence of a novel signaling network that links TLR4 activation, ER stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby antagonizing thermogenic activation of sWAT. Our results also suggest that TLR4/ER stress axis activation may be a responsible mechanism for obesity-mediated defective brown adipose tissue activation. PMID:26370079

  15. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  16. Contribution of TLR4 and MyD88 for adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) activity in a DNA prime-protein boost HIV-1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Kimberly; Buglione-Corbett, Rachel; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Montminy-Paquette, Sara; West, Kim; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Lien, Egil

    2014-09-03

    Recombinant protein vaccines are commonly formulated with an immune-stimulatory compound, or adjuvant, to boost immune responses to a particular antigen. Recent studies have shown that, through recognition of molecular motifs, receptors of the innate immune system are involved in the functions of adjuvants to generate and direct adaptive immune responses. However, it is not clear to which degree those receptors are also important when the adjuvant is used as part of a novel heterologous prime-boost immunization process in which the priming and boosting components are not the same type of vaccines. In the current study, we compared the immune responses elicited by a pentavalent HIV-1 DNA prime-protein boost vaccine in mice deficient in either Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) to wildtype mice. HIV gp120 protein administered in the boost phase was formulated with either monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), QS-21, or Al(OH)3. Endpoint antibody titer, serum cytokine response and T-cell memory response were assessed. Neither TLR4 nor MyD88 deficiency had a significant effect on the immune response of mice given vaccine formulated with QS-21 or Al(OH)3. However, TLR4- and MyD88-deficiency decreased both the antibody and T-cell responses in mice administered HIV gp120 formulated with MPLA. These results further our understanding of the activation of TLR4 and MyD88 by MPLA in the context of a DNA prime/protein boost immunization strategy.

  17. Spatiotemporal expression of endogenous TLR4 ligands leads to inflammation and bone erosion in mouse collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kiyeko, Gaëlle Wambiekele; Hatterer, Eric; Herren, Suzanne; Di Ceglie, Irene; van Lent, Peter L; Reith, Walter; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Ferlin, Walter; Shang, Limin

    2016-11-01

    Increased expression of endogenous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands (e.g., Tenascin-C, S100A8/A9, citrullinated fibrinogen (cFb) immune complexes) has been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their roles in RA pathogenesis are not well understood. Here, we investigated the expression kinetics and role of endogenous TLR4 ligands in the murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Tenascin-C was upregulated in blood early in CIA, and correlated positively with the clinical score at day 56. Levels of S100A8/A9 increased starting from day 28, peaking at day 42, and correlated positively with joint inflammation. Levels of anti-cFb antibodies increased during the late phase of CIA and correlated positively with both joint inflammation and cartilage damage. Blockade of TLR4 activation at the time of the first TLR4 ligand upregulation prevented clinical and histological signs of arthritis. A TLR4-dependent role was also observed for Tenascin-C and cFb immune complexes in osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Taken together, our data suggests that the pathogenic contribution of TLR4 in promoting joint inflammation and bone erosion during CIA occurs via various TLR4 ligands arising at different stages of disease. The data also suggests that Blockade of TLR4 with monoclonal antibodies is a promising strategy in RA treatment.

  18. Isoflurane preconditioning provides neuroprotection against stroke by regulating the expression of the TLR4 signalling pathway to alleviate microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Gao, Changjun; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Daihua; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Lixian; Chen, Lei; Sun, Xude

    2015-01-01

    Excessive microglial activation often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity in the ischemic penumbra during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation via the NF-κB pathway. Isoflurane preconditioning (IP) can provide neuroprotection and inhibit microglial activation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the TLR4 signalling pathway in IP to exert neuroprotection following ischemic stroke in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that 2% IP alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, attenuated apoptosis and weakened microglial activation in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, IP down-regulated the expression of HSP 60, TLR4 and MyD88 and up-regulated inhibitor of IκB-α expression compared with I/R group in vivo. In vitro, 2% IP and a specific inhibitor of TLR4, CLI-095, down-regulated the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, and up-regulated IκB-α and Bcl-2 expression compared with OGD group. Moreover, IP and CLI-095 attenuated microglial activation-induced neuronal apoptosis, and overexpression of the TLR4 gene reversed the neuroprotective effects of IP. In conclusion, IP provided neuroprotection by regulating TLR4 expression directly, alleviating microglial activation and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the activation of microglial activation via TLR4 may be a new avenue for stroke treatment. PMID:26086415

  19. Inducible Lentivirus-Mediated siRNA against TLR4 Reduces Nociception in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ruirui; Di, Huiting; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Zhangxiang; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Weifeng; Wu, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Although bone cancer pain is still not fully understood by scientists and clinicians alike, studies suggest that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in the initiation and/or maintenance of pathological pain state in bone cancer pain. A promising treatment for bone cancer pain is the downregulation of TLR4 by RNA interference; however, naked siRNA (small interference RNA) is not effective in long-term treatments. In order to concoct a viable prolonged treatment for bone cancer pain, an inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 (tetracycline inducible lentivirus carrying siRNA targeting TLR4) was prepared and the antinociception effects were observed in bone cancer pain rats induced by Walker 256 cells injection in left leg. Results showed that LvOn-siTLR4 intrathecal injection with doxycycline (Dox) oral administration effectively reduced the nociception induced by Walker 256 cells while inhibiting the mRNA and protein expression of TLR4. Proinflammatory cytokines as TNF-α and IL-1β in spinal cord were also decreased. These findings suggest that TLR4 could be a target for bone cancer pain treatment and tetracycline inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 represents a new potential option for long-term treatment of bone cancer pain.

  20. Stimulation of TLR4 by LMW-HA induces metastasis in human papillary thyroid carcinoma through CXCR7.

    PubMed

    Dang, Shipeng; Peng, Yongde; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yanan; Qian, Zhongqing; Chen, Yuqing; Wang, Xiaojing; Lin, Yunzhi; Zhang, Xiaomei; Sun, Xiyan; Wu, Qiong; Cheng, Yiji; Nie, Hong; Jin, Min; Xu, Huanbai

    2013-01-01

    In inflammatory sites, high molecular weight hyaluronan fragments are degraded into lower molecular weight hyaluronan fragments (LMW-HA) to regulate immune responses. However, the function of LMW-HA in PTC progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that receptor of LMW-HA, TLR4, was aberrantly overexpressed in PTC tissues and cell line W3. Exposure of W3 cells to LMW-HA promoted cell proliferation and migration via TLR4. Knockdown of TLR4 has provided evidence that TLR4 is essential for LMW-HA-induced CXCR7 expression, which is responsible for LMW-HA-induced proliferation and migration of W3 cells. In tumor-bearing adult nude mice, stimulation of LMW-HA on W3 cells promotes CXCR7 expression in tumor masses (P = 0.002) and tumor growth (P < 0.001). To further confirm our findings, we investigated the clinicopathologic significance of TLR4 and CXCR7 expression using immumohistochemistry in 135 human PTC tissues and 56 normal thyroid tissue samples. Higher rates of TLR4 (53%) and CXCR7 (24%) expression were found in PTC tissues than in normal tissues. Expression of TLR4 or CXCR7 is associated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis. Therefore, LMW-HA may contribute to the development of PTC via TLR4/CXCR7 pathway, which may be a novel target for PTC immunomodulatory therapy.

  1. Radioiodination of an endotoxin·MD-2 complex generates a novel sensitive, high affinity ligand for TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Teghanemt, Athmane; Weiss, Jerrold P.; Gioannini, Theresa L.

    2013-01-01

    A purified complex of metabolically labeled endotoxin ([3H] lipooligosaccharide, LOS) and insect-cell derived recombinant human myeloid differentiation factor 2, (MD-2), [3H] LOS·MD-2, has been used to demonstrate pM affinity binding interactions with soluble Toll-like receptor 4 ectodomain (TLR4ecd). Measurement of the binding parameters of membrane-bound TLR4 has been hampered by the paucity of TLR4 on cell surfaces and inadequate sensitivity of available reagents. We took advantage of the stability of endotoxin·MD-2 and tyrosine(s) present on the surface of MD-2 to radioiodinate LOS·MD-2. Radioiodinated LOS·MD-2 generated a reagent with an estimated 1:1 molar ratio of [125I] to sMD-2 with 20-fold higher specific radioactivity and TLR4-activating properties comparable to metabolically labeled LOS·MD-2. LOS·MD-2[125I] and [3H]LOS·MD-2 have similar affinities for soluble FLAGTLR4ecd and for membrane-bound TLR4 in transiently transfected HEK293T/TLR4 cells. In a similar dose-dependent manner, sMD-2 and LOS·MD-2 inhibit LOS·MD-2[125I] binding to TLR4 indicating the pM affinity binding of LOS·MD-2[125I] is agonist-independent. LOS·MD-2[125I] allowed measurement of low levels of cell-surface human or murine TLR4 expressed by stable cell lines (2,000–3,000 sites/cell) and quantitatively measures low levels of “MD-2-free” TLR4 (est. 250 molecules/cell) in cells co-expressing TLR4 and MD-2. Occupation of 50–100 TLR4/cell by LOS·MD-2 is sufficient to trigger measurable TLR4-dependent cell activation. LOS·MD-2[125I] provides a powerful reagent to measure quantitatively functional cell-surface TLR4 in human and murine cells, including cells where surface TLR4 are potentially functionally significant but too low to detect by other methods. PMID:23439691

  2. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Johnson, Randall C.; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C.; Davies, Christopher J.; Thomas, Aaron J.; Croen, Lisa A.; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The “common variant—common disease” hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the “common variant—common disease” hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in

  3. Optimum designs for next-generation sequencing to discover rare variants for common complex disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gang; Rao, D C

    2011-09-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies make it affordable to search for rare and functional variants for common complex diseases systematically. We investigated strategies for enriching rare variants in the samples selected for sequencing so as to optimize the power for their discovery. In particular, we investigated the roles of alternative sources of enrichment in families through computer simulations. We showed that linkage information, extreme phenotype, and nonrandom ascertainment, such as multiply affected families, constitute different sources for enriching rare and functional variants in a sequencing study design. Linkage is well known to have limited power for detecting small genetic effects, and hence not considered to be a powerful tool for discovering variants for common complex diseases. However, those families with some degree of family-specific linkage evidence provide an effective sampling strategy to sub-select the most linkage-informative families for sequencing. Compared with selecting subjects with extreme phenotypes, linkage evidence performs better with larger families, while extreme-phenotype method is more efficient with smaller families. Families with multiple affected siblings were found to provide the largest enrichment of rare variants. Finally, we showed that combined strategies, such as selecting linkage-informative families from multiply affected families, provide much higher enrichment of rare functional variants than either strategy alone.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide induces proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro via TLR4 activation.

    PubMed

    Herzmann, Nicole; Salamon, Achim; Fiedler, Tomas; Peters, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are capable of multi-lineage differentiation and support regenerative processes. In bacterial infections, resident MSC can come intocontact with and need to react to bacterial components. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a typical structure of Gram-negative bacteria, increases the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSC. LPS is usually recognized by the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and induces pro-inflammatory reactions in numerous cell types. In this study, we quantified the protein expression of TLR4 and CD14 on adipose-derived MSC (adMSC) in osteogenic differentiation and investigated the effect of TLR4 activation by LPS on NF-κB activation, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. We found that TLR4 is expressed on adMSC whereas CD14 is not, and that osteogenic differentiation induced an increase of the amount of TLR4 protein whereas LPS stimulation did not. Moreover, we could show that NF-κB activation via TLR4 occurs upon LPS treatment. Furthermore, we were able to show that competitive inhibition of TLR4 completely abolished the stimulatory effect of LPS on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. In addition, the inhibition of TLR4 leads to the complete absence of osteogenic differentiation of adMSC, even when osteogenically stimulated. Thus, we conclude that LPS induces proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC in vitro through the activation of TLR4 and that the TLR4 receptor seems to play a role during osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  5. Resveratrol enhances cell-mediated immune response to DMBA through TLR4 and prevents DMBA induced cutaneous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Nasti, Tahseen H; Meleth, Sreelatha; Elmets, Craig A

    2009-01-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) activate signals that are critically involved in innate immune responses and that contribute to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Resveratrol (trans-3, 5,4-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenol found in red grapes and in several other plant sources, is an effective chemopreventive agent in cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether TLR4 was required for the chemopreventive action of resveratrol in DMBA skin carcinogenesis. For this purpose, mice with normal and deficient TLR4 function were compared when pretreated with resveratrol and then subjected to a DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis protocol. There were fewer tumors/group (p<0.001) in resveratrol treated TLR4 competent C3H/HeN mice than in TLR4 deficient C3H/HeJ mice. In addition, the size of tumors in C3H/HeN mice was reduced in vivo and their survival in vitro was inhibited by resveratrol to a significantly greater extent than in C3H/HeJ mice. Resveratrol inhibited angiogenesis to a much greater extent in the TLR4 competent mice than in TLR4 deficient mice. IFN-γ and IL-12 levels were also increased in TLR4 competent mice compared to TLR4 deficient mice, and TLR4 competent C3H/HeN mice exhibited a greater increase in the cell-mediated immune response to DMBA. The results of this study indicate that TLR4 is an important mediator of resveratrol chemoprevention in DMBA skin tumorigenesis. PMID:19142898

  6. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

  7. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  8. TLR4 is involved in the pathogenic effects observed in a murine model of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongxiang; Kong, Xiangmin; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Yachao; Sheng, Liangju; Wang, Ting; Xia, Longfei; Yan, Jinchuan

    2015-10-01

    Antiphospholipid (aPL)/anti-β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) antibodies are considered to play a pivotal pathogenic role in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) by inducing an intracellular signaling and procoagulant/proinflammatory phenotype that leads to thrombosis. There is increasing evidence that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) could serve as an important molecule for anti-β2GPI recognition on target cells. However, few studies have focused on the effects of TLR4 in in vivo models. Here, we investigated the role of TLR4 in the pathogenic effects of aPL/anti-β2GPI more precisely using TLR4-intact (C3H/HeN) and TLR4-defective (C3H/HeJ) mice. C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice were injected with either IgG isolated from patient with APS (IgG-APS) or epitope-specific anti-β2GPI purified from β2GPI peptide-immunized rabbits. We found that, following anti-β2GPI injections and vascular injury, thrombus formation in both the carotid artery and femoral vein was markedly reduced in C3H/HeJ mice when compared with C3H/HeN mice. IgG-APS or anti-β2GPI-induced carotid artery and peritoneal macrophage tissue factor activity/expression was significantly lesser in C3H/HeJ than in C3H/HeN mice. Furthermore, the IgG-APS or anti-β2GPI induced expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin in the aorta and of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in peritoneal macrophages of C3H/HeJ mice was also significantly reduced compared to C3H/HeN mice. Together, these data suggest that TLR4 is involved in the pathogenic effects of aPL/anti-β2GPI antibodies in vivo.

  9. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Nieuwenhuysen, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10–7). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r 2 with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11–1.24, P = 1.1×10−7). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10−8). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r 2 = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10-8). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  10. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein Promotes TLR-4–Dependent Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Funchal, Giselle A.; Jaeger, Natália; Czepielewski, Rafael S.; Machado, Mileni S.; Muraro, Stéfanie P.; Stein, Renato T.; Bonorino, Cristina B. C.; Porto, Bárbara N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis. PMID:25856628

  12. Correlation of TLR4 and KLF7 in Inflammation Induced by Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuizhe; Ha, Xiaodan; Li, Wei; Xu, Peng; Gu, Yajuan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Yan; Xie, Jianxin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Objective Recent studies have revealed a link between toll-like receptors (TLRs), Kruppel-like factors (KLFs), and the adipose tissue inflammation associated with obesity. TLR4 is associated with chronic inflammation in obesity. KLF7 is known to play an important role in the differentiation of adipocytes, but its role in visceral adipose tissue inflammation has not yet been investigated. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the correlation of TLR4 and KLF7 in inflammation induced by obesity. Methods A total of 32 Wistar male rat subjects were fed in the center for experimental animals of Shihezi University. The rats were divided into normal control (NC) and high-fat diet (HFD) group. Surgical instruments were used to collect rats' visceral adipose tissue samples in the 10th week after HFD feeding. Ninety-five Uygur subjects between 20 and 90 years old were enrolled in the present study. The subjects were divided into two groups: the normal control group (NC, 18.0 kg/m(2) ≤ BMI ≤ 23.9 kg/m(2), n = 50) and the obesity group (OB, BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2), n = 45), and visceral adipose tissue was collected from the subjects. Anthropometric and clinical parameters were measured using standard procedures; biochemical indices were detected using the glucose oxidase-peroxidase method and a standardized automatic biochemistry analyzer; the plasma levels of inflammatory factors and adipocytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); the mRNA and protein expression levels of key genes involved in the inflammatory signaling pathway were measured by real-time PCR and Western blot. Results In rats, compared with the NC group, the weight, Lee's index, waist circumference, visceral fat mass, and the plasma level of Glu, TG, FFA, and TNF-α were higher in the HFD group, while the plasma levels of LPT and APN were significantly lower in the HFD group in the 10th week. Furthermore, compared with the NC group, visceral adipose

  13. A TLR4/MD2 fusion protein inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling in hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schnabl, Bernd Brandl, Katharina; Fink, Marina; Gross, Philipp; Taura, Kojiro; Gaebele, Erwin; Hellerbrand, Claus; Falk, Werner

    2008-10-17

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in hepatic fibrogenesis. In injured liver they are the main extracellular matrix protein producing cell type and further perpetuate hepatic injury by secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators. Since LPS-mediated signaling through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been identified as key fibrogenic signal in HSCs we aimed to test TLR4 as potential target of therapy via ligand-binding soluble receptors. Incubation of human HSCs with a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of TLR4 and MD2 which binds LPS inhibited LPS-induced NF{kappa}B and JNK activation. TLR4/MD2 abolished LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8, MCP1, and RANTES in HSCs. In addition, TLR4/MD2 fused to human IgG-Fc neutralized LPS activity. Since TLR4 mutant mice are resistant to liver fibrosis, the TLR4/MD2 soluble receptor might represent a new therapeutic molecule for liver fibrogenesis in vivo.

  14. Sequencing of SCN5A identifies rare and common variants associated with cardiac conduction

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Prins, Bram P.; Arking, Dan E.; Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Morrison, Alanna C.; Zhang, Feng; Spector, Tim D.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Lubitz, Steven A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Pulit, Sara L.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Santibanez, Jireh; Taylor, Herman A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Lange, Leslie A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca; Rich, Stephen S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Jamshidi, Yalda; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Background The cardiac sodium channel SCN5A regulates atrioventricular and ventricular conduction. Genetic variants in this gene are associated with PR and QRS intervals. We sought to further characterize the contribution of rare and common coding variation in SCN5A to cardiac conduction. Methods and Results In the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Targeted Sequencing Study (CHARGE), we performed targeted exonic sequencing of SCN5A (n=3699, European-ancestry individuals) and identified 4 common (minor allele frequency >1%) and 157 rare variants. Common and rare SCN5A coding variants were examined for association with PR and QRS intervals through meta-analysis of European ancestry participants from CHARGE, NHLBI’s Exome Sequencing Project (ESP, n=607) and the UK10K (n=1275) and by examining ESP African-ancestry participants (N=972). Rare coding SCN5A variants in aggregate were associated with PR interval in European and African-ancestry participants (P=1.3×10−3). Three common variants were associated with PR and/or QRS interval duration among European-ancestry participants and one among African-ancestry participants. These included two well-known missense variants; rs1805124 (H558R) was associated with PR and QRS shortening in European-ancestry participants (P=6.25×10−4 and P=5.2×10−3 respectively) and rs7626962 (S1102Y) was associated with PR shortening in those of African ancestry (P=2.82×10−3). Among European-ancestry participants, two novel synonymous variants, rs1805126 and rs6599230, were associated with cardiac conduction. Our top signal, rs1805126 was associated with PR and QRS lengthening (P=3.35×10−7 and P=2.69×10−4 respectively), and rs6599230 was associated with PR shortening (P=2.67×10−5). Conclusions By sequencing SCN5A, we identified novel common and rare coding variants associated with cardiac conduction. PMID:24951663

  15. Common and Rare Variant Association Study for Plasma Lipids and Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Konno, Tetsuo; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Blood lipid levels are highly heritable and modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), and are the leading cause of death worldwide. These facts have motivated human genetic association studies that have the substantial potential to define the risk factors that are causal and to identify pathways and therapeutic targets for lipids and CAD.The success of the HapMap project that provided an extensive catalog of human genetic variations and the development of microarray based genotyping chips (typically containing variations with allele frequencies > 5%) facilitated common variant association study (CVAS; formerly termed genome-wide association study, GWAS) identifying disease-associated variants in a genome-wide manner. To date, 157 loci associated with blood lipids and 46 loci with CAD have been successfully identified, accounting for approximately 12%-14% of heritability for lipids and 10% of heritability for CAD. However, there is yet a major challenge termed "missing heritability problem," namely the observation that loci detected by CVAS explain only a small fraction of the inferred genetic variations. To explain such missing portions, focuses in genetic association studies have shifted from common to rare variants. However, it is challenging to apply rare variant association study (RVAS) in an unbiased manner because such variants typically lack the sufficient number to be identified statistically.In this review, we provide a current understanding of the genetic architecture mostly derived from CVAS, and several updates on the progress and limitations of RVAS for lipids and CAD.

  16. Combined Tlr2 and Tlr4 Deficiency Increases Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paun, Alexandra; Fox, Jessica; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Qureshi, Salman T.; Haston, Christina K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether Toll-like receptor 2 or 4 genotype alters the lung response to irradiation in C57BL/6 mice using a model developing a phenotype that resembles radiotherapy-induced fibrosis in both histological characteristics and onset post-treatment. Methods and Materials: The pulmonary phenotype of C57BL/6 mice deficient in each or both of these genes was assessed after an 18-Gy single dose to the thoracic cavity by survival time postirradiation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential, histological evidence of alveolitis and fibrosis, and gene expression levels, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Results: The lung phenotype of Tlr4-deficient and Tlr2-deficient mice did not differ from that of wild-type mice in terms of survival time postirradiation, or by histological evidence of alveolitis or fibrosis. In contrast, mice deficient in both receptors developed respiratory distress at an earlier time than did wild-type mice and presented an enhanced fibrotic response (13.5% vs. 5.8% of the lung by image analysis of histological sections, p < 0.001). No differences in bronchoalveolar cell differential counts, nor in numbers of apoptotic cells in the lung as detected through active caspase-3 staining, were evident among the irradiated mice grouped by Tlr genotype. Gene expression analysis of lung tissue revealed that Tlr2,4-deficient mice have increased levels of hyaluronidase 2 compared with both wild-type mice and mice lacking either Tlr2 or Tlr4. Conclusion: We conclude that a combined deficiency in both Tlr2 and Tlr4, but not Tlr2 or Tlr4 alone, leads to enhanced radiation-induced fibrosis in the C57BL/6 mouse model.

  17. Cereblon negatively regulates TLR4 signaling through the attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6.

    PubMed

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae Mi; Kang, Jung-Ah; Yang, Taewoo; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Chung, Sungkwon; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-07-28

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor protein for the CRL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. In this study, we report on a new regulatory role of CRBN in TLR4 signaling. CRBN overexpression leads to suppression of NF-κB activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and IL-1β in response to TLR4 stimulation. Biochemical studies revealed interactions between CRBN and TAK1, and TRAF6 proteins. The interaction between CRBN and TAK1 did not affect the association of the TAB1 and TAB2 proteins, which have pivotal roles in the activation of TAK1, whereas the CRBN-TRAF6 interaction critically affected ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Binding mapping results revealed that CRBN interacts with the Zinc finger domain of TRAF6, which contains the ubiquitination site of TRAF6, leading to attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Functional studies revealed that CRBN-knockdown THP-1 cells show enhanced NF-κB activation and p65- or p50-DNA binding activities, leading to up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in response to TLR4 stimulation. Furthermore, Crbn(-/-) mice exhibit decreased survival in response to LPS challenge, accompanied with marked enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CRBN negatively regulates TLR4 signaling via attenuation of TRAF6 and TAB2 ubiquitination.

  18. Cereblon negatively regulates TLR4 signaling through the attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae Mi; Kang, Jung-Ah; Yang, Taewoo; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Chung, Sungkwon; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor protein for the CRL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. In this study, we report on a new regulatory role of CRBN in TLR4 signaling. CRBN overexpression leads to suppression of NF-κB activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and IL-1β in response to TLR4 stimulation. Biochemical studies revealed interactions between CRBN and TAK1, and TRAF6 proteins. The interaction between CRBN and TAK1 did not affect the association of the TAB1 and TAB2 proteins, which have pivotal roles in the activation of TAK1, whereas the CRBN-TRAF6 interaction critically affected ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Binding mapping results revealed that CRBN interacts with the Zinc finger domain of TRAF6, which contains the ubiquitination site of TRAF6, leading to attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Functional studies revealed that CRBN-knockdown THP-1 cells show enhanced NF-κB activation and p65- or p50-DNA binding activities, leading to up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in response to TLR4 stimulation. Furthermore, Crbn−/− mice exhibit decreased survival in response to LPS challenge, accompanied with marked enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CRBN negatively regulates TLR4 signaling via attenuation of TRAF6 and TAB2 ubiquitination. PMID:27468689

  19. Stimulation through CD40 and TLR-4 Is an Effective Host Directed Therapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Pahari, Susanta; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Aqdas, Mohammad; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among all infectious diseases. Failure of Bacillus Calmette Guerin as a vaccine and serious side-effects and toxicity due to long-term TB drug regime are the major hurdles associated with TB control. The problem is further compounded by the emergence of drug-resistance strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Consequently, it demands a serious attempt to explore safer and superior treatment approaches. Recently, an improved understanding of host–pathogen interaction has opened up new avenues for immunotherapy for treating TB. Although, dendritic cells (DCs) show a profound role in generating immunity against Mtb, their immunotherapeutic potential needs to be precisely investigated in controlling TB. Here, we have devised an approach of bolstering DCs efficacy against Mtb by delivering signals through CD40 and TLR-4 molecules. We found that DCs triggered through CD40 and TLR-4 showed increased secretion of IL-12, IL-6, and TNF-α. It also augmented autophagy. Interestingly, CD40 and TLR-4 stimulation along with the suboptimal dose of anti-TB drugs significantly fortified their efficacy to kill Mtb. Importantly, animals treated with the agonists of CD40 and TLR-4 boosted Th1 and Th17 immunity. Furthermore, it amplified the pool of memory CD4 T cells as well as CD8 T cells. Furthermore, substantial reduction in the bacterial burden in the lungs was observed. Notably, this adjunct therapy employing immunomodulators and chemotherapy can reinvigorate host immunity suppressed due to drugs and Mtb. Moreover, it would strengthen the potency of drugs in curing TB. PMID:27729911

  20. Differential outcome of TRIF-mediated signaling in TLR4 and TLR3 induced DC maturation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Jain, Aakanksha; Gao, Yajing; Dozmorov, Igor M; Mandraju, Rajakumar; Wakeland, Edward K; Pasare, Chandrashekhar

    2015-11-10

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on dendritic cells (DCs) leads to DC maturation, a process involving up-regulation of MHC and costimulatory molecules and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. All TLRs except TLR3 achieve these outcomes by using the signaling adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88. TLR4 and TLR3 can both use the Toll-IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF)-dependent signaling pathway leading to IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and induction of IFN-β and -α4. The TRIF signaling pathway, downstream of both of these TLRs, also leads to DC maturation, and it has been proposed that the type I IFNs act in cis to induce DC maturation and subsequent effects on adaptive immunity. The present study was designed to understand the molecular mechanisms of TRIF-mediated DC maturation. We have discovered that TLR4-TRIF-induced DC maturation was independent of both IRF3 and type I IFNs. In contrast, TLR3-mediated DC maturation was completely dependent on type I IFN feedback. We found that differential activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by the TLR4- and TLR3-TRIF axes determined the type I IFN dependency for DC maturation. In addition, we found that the adjuvanticity of LPS to induce T-cell activation is completely independent of type I IFNs. The important distinction between the TRIF-mediated signaling pathways of TLR4 and TLR3 discovered here could have a major impact in the design of future adjuvants that target this pathway.

  1. MicroRNA-181b negatively regulates the proliferation of human epidermal keratinocytes in psoriasis through targeting TLR4.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng; Bai, Ming; Yu, Nan-Ze; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Zeng

    2017-02-01

    Our study aims to explore the role of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) and TLR in the regulation of cell proliferation of human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) in psoriasis. Twenty-eight patients diagnosed with psoriasis vulgaris were selected as a case group with their lesional and non-lesional skin tissues collected. A control group consisted of 20 patients who underwent plastic surgery with their healthy skin tissues collected. Real-time quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expressions of miR-181b and TLR4 in HEKs of healthy skin, psoriatic lesional skin and non-lesional skin respectively. The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TLR4 combined with miR-181b was verified by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. Western blotting and bromodeoxyuridine were applied for corresponding detection of TLR4 expression and cell mitosis. The expression of miR-181b in HEKs of psoriatic lesional skin was less than healthy skin and psoriatic non-lesional skin. In psoriatic lesional and non-lesional skin, TLR4-positive cell rates and the number of positive cells per square millimetre were higher than healthy skin. The dual-luciferase reporter assay verified that miR-181b targets TLR4. HEKs transfected with miR-181b mimics had decreased expression of TLR4, along with the decrease of mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. However, HEKs transfected with miR-181b inhibitors showed increased TLR4 expression, mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. HEKs transfected with both miR-181b inhibitors and siTLR4 had decreased mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. These results indicate that miR-181b can negatively regulate the proliferation of HEKs in psoriasis by targeting TLR4.

  2. TLR4-dependant pro-inflammatory effects of HMGB1 on human adipocyte.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Manoj Kumar; Virama-Latchoumy, Anne-Laurence; Girard, Anne-Claire; Planesse, Cynthia; Guérin-Dubourg, Alexis; Ottosson, Lars; Andersson, Ulf; Césari, Maya; Roche, Régis; Hoareau, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is one of the major metabolic disorders in case of obesity and associated pathologies. By its important secretion function, the role of adipose tissue in this metabolic low grade inflammation is well known. Recently, it was demonstrated that the alarmin high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is involved in obesity-related pathologies by its increased serum levels in obese compared to normal weight individuals, and by its pro-inflammatory effects. However, the role of HMGB1 on adipocytes inflammation is poorly documented and we propose to investigate this point. Primary culture of human subcutaneous adipocytes were performed from human adipose tissue samples. Cells were treated with recombinant HMGB1 with/without anti-TLR4 antibody and inhibitors of NF-κB and P38 MAPK. Supernatants were collected for IL-6 and MCP-1 ELISA. HMGB1 initiates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent activation of inflammation through the downstream NF-κB and P38 MAPK signaling pathway to upregulate the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. HMGB1 has pro-inflammatory effects on adipocytes. This reinforces the role of TLR4 in adipose tissue inflammation and antagonizing the HMGB1 inflammatory pathway could bring on new therapeutic targets to counteract obesity-associated pathologies.

  3. A Light-Controlled TLR4 Agonist and Selectable Activation of Cell Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Stutts, Lalisa

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and temporal aspects of immune cell signalling are key parameters in defining the magnitude of an immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on innate immune cells are important in early detection of pathogens and initiation of an immune response. Controlling the spatial and temporal signalling of TLRs would enable further study of immune synergies and assist in the development of new vaccines. Here, we show a light-based method for spatial control of TLR4 signalling. A TLR4 agonist, pyrimido[5,4-b]indole, was protected with a cage at a position critical for receptor binding. This afforded a photo-controllable agonist that was inactive while caged, yet effected NF-κB activity in cells following UV photo-controlled deprotection. We demonstrated spatial control of NF-κB activation within a population of cells by treating all cells with the caged TLR4 agonist and constraining light exposure, thereby activation, to a region of interest. PMID:26097006

  4. TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host immune responses in major infectious diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Suprabhat; Karmakar, Subhajit; Babu, Santi Prasad Sinha

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, multicellular organisms have been orchestrated with an efficient and versatile immune system to counteract diverse group of pathogenic organisms. Pathogen recognition is considered as the most critical step behind eliciting adequate immune response during an infection. Hitherto Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially the surface ones viz. TLR2 and TLR4 have gained immense importance due to their extreme ability of identifying distinct molecular patterns from invading pathogens. These pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) not only act as innate sensor but also shape and bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, they also play a pivotal role in regulating the balance between Th1 and Th2 type of response essential for the survivability of the host. In this work, major achievements rather findings made on the typical signalling and immunopathological attributes of TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host response against the major infectious diseases have been reviewed. Infectious diseases like tuberculosis, trypanosomiasis, malaria, and filariasis are still posing myriad threat to mankind. Furthermore, increasing resistance of the causative organisms against available therapeutics is also an emerging problem. Thus, stimulation of host immune response with TLR2 and TLR4 agonist can be the option of choice to treat such diseases in future.

  5. Effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} inhibitor, on TLR-4-dependent activation of murine microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Min-Woo; Baek, Nam-in; Kim, Kyong-Tai . E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr

    2005-11-11

    In microglia, Toll-like receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiate innate immune responses upon interaction with infectious agents. The effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} specific inhibitor, on TLR-4-mediated signaling was investigated in murine microglia stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and taxol. Pretreatment of microglia cells with rottlerin decreased LPS- and taxol-induced nitric oxide production in a concentration-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 99.1 {+-} 1.5 nM). Through MTT and FACS analysis, we found that the inhibition effect of rottlerin was not due to microglial cell death. Rottlerin pretreatment also attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and expression of type II nitric oxide synthase. In addition, microglial phagocytosis in response to TLR-4 activation was diminished in which rottlerin was pretreated. Together, these data raise the possibility that certain PKC-{delta} specific inhibitors can modulate TLR-4-derived signaling and inflammatory target gene expression, and can alter susceptibility to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases in central nervous system.

  6. Dectin-1 Regulates Hepatic Fibrosis and Hepatocarcinogenesis by Suppressing TLR4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Deutsch, Michael; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Werba, Gregor; Pansari, Mridul; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Levie, Elliot; Tippens, Daniel; Greco, Stephanie H; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Eisenthal, Andrew; van Heerden, Eliza; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Rendon, Mauricio; Daley, Donnele; Pachter, H Leon; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2015-12-01

    Dectin-1 is a C-type lectin receptor critical in anti-fungal immunity, but Dectin-1 has not been linked to regulation of sterile inflammation or oncogenesis. We found that Dectin-1 expression is upregulated in hepatic fibrosis and liver cancer. However, Dectin-1 deletion exacerbates liver fibro-inflammatory disease and accelerates hepatocarcinogenesis. Mechanistically, we found that Dectin-1 protects against chronic liver disease by suppressing TLR4 signaling in hepatic inflammatory and stellate cells. Accordingly, Dectin-1(-/-) mice exhibited augmented cytokine production and reduced survival in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated sepsis, whereas Dectin-1 activation was protective. We showed that Dectin-1 inhibits TLR4 signaling by mitigating TLR4 and CD14 expression, which are regulated by Dectin-1-dependent macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) expression. Our study suggests that Dectin-1 is an attractive target for experimental therapeutics in hepatic fibrosis and neoplastic transformation. More broadly, our work deciphers critical cross-talk between pattern recognition receptors and implicates a role for Dectin-1 in suppression of sterile inflammation, inflammation-induced oncogenesis, and LPS-mediated sepsis.

  7. The interaction between HMGB1 and TLR4 dictates the outcome of anticancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Tesniere, Antoine; Criollo, Alfredo; Ortiz, Carla; Lidereau, Rosette; Mariette, Christophe; Chaput, Nathalie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Delaloge, Suzette; André, Fabrice; Tursz, Thomas; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2007-12-01

    For the last four decades, the treatment of cancer has relied on four treatment modalities, namely surgery, radiotherapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and hormonotherapy. Most of these therapies are believed to directly attack and eradicate tumor cells. The emerging concept that cancer is not just a disease of a tissue or an organ but also a host disease relies on evidence of tumor-induced immunosuppression and polymorphisms in genes involved in host protection against tumors. This theory is now gaining new impetus, based on our recent data showing that optimal therapeutic effects require the immunoadjuvant effect of tumor cell death induced by cytotoxic anticancer agents. Here, we show that the release of the high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) by dying tumor cells is mandatory to license host dendritic cells (DCs) to process and present tumor antigens. HMGB1 interacts with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on DCs, which are selectively involved in the cross-priming of anti-tumor T lymphocytes in vivo. A TLR4 polymorphism that affects the binding of HMGB1 to TLR4 predicts early relapse after anthracycline-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. This knowledge may be clinically exploited to predict the immunogenicity and hence the efficacy of chemotherapeutic regimens.

  8. Kukoamine B promotes TLR4-independent lipopolysaccharide uptake in murine hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Zheng, Xinchuan; Wang, Ning; Fan, Shijun; Yang, Yongjun; Lu, Yongling; Chen, Qian; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Free bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is generally removed from the bloodstream through hepatic uptake via TLR4, the LPS pattern recognition receptor, but mechanisms for internalization and clearance of conjugated LPS are less clear. Kukoamine B (KB) is a novel cationic alkaloid that interferes with LPS binding to TLR4. In this study, KB accelerated blood clearance of LPS. KB also enhanced LPS distribution in the hepatic tissues of C57 BL/6 mice, along with LPS uptake in primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. By contrast, KB inhibited LPS internalization in Kupffer and RAW 264.7 cells. Loss of TLR4 did not affect LPS uptake into KB-treated hepatocytes. We also detected selective upregulation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) upon KB treatment, and ASGPR colocalized with KB in cultured hepatocytes. Molecular docking showed that KB bound to ASGPR in a manner similar to GalNAc, a known ASGPR agonist. GalNAc dose-dependently reduced KB internalization, suggesting it competes with KB for ASGPR binding, and ASGPR knockdown also impaired LPS uptake into hepatocytes. Finally, while KB enhanced LPS uptake, it was protective against LPS-induced inflammation and hepatocyte injury. Our study provides a new mechanism for conjugated LPS hepatic uptake induced by the LPS neutralizer KB and mediated by membrane ASGPR binding. PMID:27542278

  9. Histones from dying renal cells aggravate kidney injury via TLR2 and TLR4.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-08-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI.

  10. Common variants in Mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Siscovick, David S; Fox, Caroline S; Kao, W Linda; Böger, Carsten A

    2013-12-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.

  11. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  12. Common variants of the vitamin D binding protein gene and adverse health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suneil; Fu, Lei; Juras, David James; Karmali, Mohamed; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Gozdzik, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is the major plasma carrier for vitamin D and its metabolites, but it is also an actin scavenger, and is the precursor to the immunomodulatory protein, Gc-MAF. Two missense variants of the DBP gene – rs7041 encoding Asp432Glu and rs4588 encoding Thr436Lys – change the amino acid sequence and alter the protein function. They are common enough to generate population-wide constitutive differences in vitamin D status, based on assay of the serum metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD). Whether these variants also influence the role of vitamin D in an immunologic milieu is not known. However, the issue is relevant, given the immunomodulatory effects of DBP and the role of protracted innate immune-related inflammation in response to tissue injury or repeated infection. Indeed, DBP and vitamin D may jointly or independently contribute to a variety of adverse health outcomes unrelated to classical notions of their function in bone and mineral metabolism. This review summarizes the reports to date of associations between DBP variants, and various chronic and infectious diseases. The available information leads us to conclude that DBP variants are a significant and common genetic factor in some common disorders, and therefore, are worthy of closer attention. In view of the heightened interest in vitamin D as a public health target, well-designed studies that look simultaneously at vitamin D and its carrier in relation to genotypes and adverse health outcome should be encouraged. PMID:23427793

  13. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kathryn L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Jacob J; Christiansen, Morten H; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population.

  14. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population. PMID:27064276

  15. TLR4 Asp299Gly (rs4986790) polymorphism and coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Gao, Ying; Cen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have shown conflicting results on the association between toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) Asp299Gly (rs4986790) polymorphism and coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism on CAD risk, CRP level and the number of stenotic coronary arteries, as well as to investigate whether G allele carriers would benefit more from statin treatment. Methods. PubMed, EMBASE, and CNKI databases were searched until May 2015. All the statistical tests were performed using R version 3.1.2. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association between TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism and CAD risk, the number of stenotic vessels, and the incidence of cardiovascular events according to statin-treated patients. Weighted mean difference (WMD) was calculated for the association between Asp299Gly and CRP level. Results. Overall, 12 case-control studies with 10,258 cases and 5,891 controls were included, and no association of TLR4Asp299Gly polymorphism with CAD was found (G allele vs. A allele: OR = 0.97, 95% CI [0.81–1.17], P = 0.75; AA vs. GG + AG: OR = 0.97, 95% CI [0.80–1.18], P = 0.76; GG vs. AG + AA: OR = 1.08, 95% CI [0.57–2.02], P = 0.82; AG vs. AA + GG: OR = 1.03, 95% CI [0.85–1.25], P = 0.74). Also, no association was noted between Asp299Gly and CRP level (WMD = −0.10, 95% CI [−0.62, 0.41], P = 0.69). Furthermore, no synergistic effect of statin and 299Gly was reported (Statin_AA vs. Statin_AG/GG: OR = 1.12, 95% CI [0.41–3.09], P = 0.82). Discussion. This meta-analysis suggests no association of TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism with CAD and CRP level. It is further indicated that the G allele carriers may not benefit more from statin treatment. Further studies should include large sample size and high-quality literature to understand this issue in depth. PMID:26644971

  16. Statistical Colocalization of Genetic Risk Variants for Related Autoimmune Diseases in the Context of Common Controls

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Mary D.; Guo, Hui; Burren, Oliver; Schofield, Ellen; Walker, Neil M.; Ban, Maria; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Ann; Eyre, Steve; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying whether potential causal variants for related diseases are shared can identify overlapping etiologies of multifactorial disorders. Colocalization methods disentangle shared and distinct causal variants. However, existing approaches require independent datasets. Here we extend two colocalization methods to allow for the shared control design commonly used in comparison of genome-wide association study results across diseases. Our analysis of four autoimmune diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis, revealed 90 regions that were associated with at least one disease, 33 (37%) of which with two or more disorders. Nevertheless, for 14 of these 33 shared regions there was evidence that causal variants differed. We identified novel disease associations in 11 regions previously associated with one or more of the other three disorders. Four of eight T1D-specific regions contained known type 2 diabetes candidate genes: COBL, GLIS3, RNLS and BCAR1, suggesting a shared cellular etiology. PMID:26053495

  17. Novel Associations between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants and Risk-Predicting Mammographic Density Measures.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jennifer; Thompson, Deborah J; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Scott, Christopher; Tamimi, Rulla M; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hazra, Aditi; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Jensen, Matt; Cunningham, Julie; Olson, Janet E; Purrington, Kristen; Couch, Fergus J; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M L; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith, Paula; Wareham, Nicholas J; Jud, Sebastian M; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Douglas, Julie A; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Ursin, Giske; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela N; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gram, Inger Torhild; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Fasching, Peter A; Pankratz, V Shane; Hopper, John L; Vachon, Celine M

    2015-06-15

    Mammographic density measures adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) are heritable predictors of breast cancer risk, but few mammographic density-associated genetic variants have been identified. Using data for 10,727 women from two international consortia, we estimated associations between 77 common breast cancer susceptibility variants and absolute dense area, percent dense area and absolute nondense area adjusted for study, age, and BMI using mixed linear modeling. We found strong support for established associations between rs10995190 (in the region of ZNF365), rs2046210 (ESR1), and rs3817198 (LSP1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas (all P < 10(-5)). Of 41 recently discovered breast cancer susceptibility variants, associations were found between rs1432679 (EBF1), rs17817449 (MIR1972-2: FTO), rs12710696 (2p24.1), and rs3757318 (ESR1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas, respectively. There were associations between rs6001930 (MKL1) and both adjusted absolute dense and nondense areas, and between rs17356907 (NTN4) and adjusted absolute nondense area. Trends in all but two associations were consistent with those for breast cancer risk. Results suggested that 18% of breast cancer susceptibility variants were associated with at least one mammographic density measure. Genetic variants at multiple loci were associated with both breast cancer risk and the mammographic density measures. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms at these loci could help identify etiologic pathways implicated in how mammographic density predicts breast cancer risk.

  18. Prevalence of common hemoglobin variants in an afro-descendent Ecuadorian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemoglobinopathies are among the most studied and frequent pathologies. These genetic disorders are considered a very important health care threat in many tropical countries. Ecuador is a tropical Latin-American country with an important presence of afro-descendants (7.2%). Afro-descendants are among the ethnic groups with higher frequency of hemoglobinopathies reported. Ambuqui is a region within the Imbabura province with an important presence of afro-descendants (>50%). The present study analyzed the frequency of the most common hemoglobin variants in an asymptomatic afro-descendent population using capillary electrophoresis. Findings From 114 individuals, 25 (22%) reported a hemoglobin variant. All individuals that presented hemoglobin variants were heterozygotes (asymptomatic). Hemoglobin S (sickle cell trait) was the most frequent variant found (14%), followed by hemoglobin E (4.4%), Fetal (2.6%) and C (1%). Conclusion Prevalence of hemoglobin S was consistent with populations from other countries, but it was lower than other Ecuadorian afro-descendent populations. Frequency of hemoglobin C was lower than other afro-descendent populations. This data suggests the possibility of gene flow from Native American individuals to the Ambuqui population there by lowering the frequency of their hemoglobin variants compared with other afro-descendant populations. Evaluating the frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Ecuadorian populations is essential. Despite the high frequency of these disorders, very few health care facilities implement hemoglobinopathies tests as a routine practice. PMID:23557107

  19. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine. PMID:27279675

  20. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  1. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    DOE PAGES

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; ...

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with itsmore » neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.« less

  2. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; Jeanbart, Laura; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with its neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.

  3. TLR4-dependent immune response promotes radiation-induced liver disease by changing the liver tissue interstitial microenvironment during liver cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhi-Feng, Wu; Le-Yuan, Zhou; Xiao-Hui, Zhou; Ya-Bo, Gao; Jian-Ying, Zhang; Yong, Hu; Zhao-Chong, Zeng

    2014-12-01

    Liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) a special microenvironment around liver cells, which may play a vital role in cell communication during liver injury. Moreover, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important trigger of the immune response that may also play a role in liver injuries, including radiation-induced liver disease (RILD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the roles of the TLR4-dependent immune response and TIFs in RILD after radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancer. This study consisted of two phases, and in the primary phase, the livers of TLR4 mutant (TLR4(-)) and normal (TLR4(+)) mice were irradiated with 30 Gy. TIF was then obtained from mouse livers and assessed by cytokine array analysis 20 days after irradiation, and cytokines in the TIFs, TLR4 and RILD were analyzed. In the second or validation phase, hepatocytes were isolated from TLR4(+) or TLR4(-) mice irradiated with 8 Gy and were co-cultured with TIFs from mouse livers, apoptosis of the hepatocytes was then measured using flow cytometry. We found that severe RILD was accompanied by higher expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2(VEGFR-2) in liver TIFs, from in TLR4(+) mice compared with TLR4(-) mice (P < 0.05). In both TLR4(+) and TLR4(-) hepatocytes, apoptosis after irradiaton was increased significantly after co-culture in TIFs from TLR4(+) mice that had their livers irradiated, compared with TIFs from TLR4(-) mice that had their livers irradiated or TIFs from unirradiated mice (P < 0.05). In summary, these findings indicate that the TLR4-dependent immune response may promote RILD by enhancing the expression of GM-CSF, VEGFR-2 and TRAIL in liver TIFs.

  4. Common variants near MC4R are associated with fat mass, weight and risk of obesity.

    PubMed

    Loos, Ruth J F; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Li, Shengxu; Wheeler, Eleanor; Zhao, Jing Hua; Prokopenko, Inga; Inouye, Michael; Freathy, Rachel M; Attwood, Antony P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Bergmann, Sven; Bennett, Amanda J; Bingham, Sheila A; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris; Cauchi, Stéphane; Connell, John M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian; Dina, Christian; De, Subhajyoti; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M; Sadaf Farooqi, I; Froguel, Philippe; Ghori, Jilur; Groves, Christopher J; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hadley, David; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hebebrand, Johannes; Heid, Iris M; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Herrera, Blanca; Hinney, Anke; Hunt, Sarah E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D M; Karpe, Fredrik; Keniry, Andrew; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert N; Mangino, Massimo; Marchini, Jonathan; McArdle, Wendy L; McGinnis, Ralph; Meyre, David; Munroe, Patricia B; Morris, Andrew D; Ness, Andrew R; Neville, Matthew J; Nica, Alexandra C; Ong, Ken K; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Potter, Simon; Pouta, Anneli; Qi, Lu; Randall, Joshua C; Rayner, Nigel W; Ring, Susan M; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Scherag, André; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Soranzo, Nicole; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Syddall, Holly E; Teichmann, Sarah A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tobias, Jonathan H; Uda, Manuela; Vogel, Carla I Ganz; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Wraight; Yuan, Xin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Strachan, David P; Ouwehand, Willem H; Caulfield, Mark J; Samani, Nilesh J; Frayling, Timothy M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Mooser, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hunter, David J; Hu, Frank B; Lyon, Helen N; Voight, Benjamin F; Ridderstrale, Martin; Groop, Leif; Scheet, Paul; Sanna, Serena; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Albai, Giuseppe; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Schlessinger, David; Jackson, Anne U; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2008-06-01

    To identify common variants influencing body mass index (BMI), we analyzed genome-wide association data from 16,876 individuals of European descent. After previously reported variants in FTO, the strongest association signal (rs17782313, P = 2.9 x 10(-6)) mapped 188 kb downstream of MC4R (melanocortin-4 receptor), mutations of which are the leading cause of monogenic severe childhood-onset obesity. We confirmed the BMI association in 60,352 adults (per-allele effect = 0.05 Z-score units; P = 2.8 x 10(-15)) and 5,988 children aged 7-11 (0.13 Z-score units; P = 1.5 x 10(-8)). In case-control analyses (n = 10,583), the odds for severe childhood obesity reached 1.30 (P = 8.0 x 10(-11)). Furthermore, we observed overtransmission of the risk allele to obese offspring in 660 families (P (pedigree disequilibrium test average; PDT-avg) = 2.4 x 10(-4)). The SNP location and patterns of phenotypic associations are consistent with effects mediated through altered MC4R function. Our findings establish that common variants near MC4R influence fat mass, weight and obesity risk at the population level and reinforce the need for large-scale data integration to identify variants influencing continuous biomedical traits.

  5. Glioblastoma Cancer Stem Cells Evade Innate Immune Suppression of Self-Renewal through Reduced TLR4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alvaro G; Thiagarajan, Praveena S; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Silver, Daniel J; Hale, James S; Alban, Tyler J; Turaga, Soumya M; Jarrar, Awad; Reizes, Ofer; Longworth, Michelle S; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-12-27

    Tumors contain hostile inflammatory signals generated by aberrant proliferation, necrosis, and hypoxia. These signals are sensed and acted upon acutely by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to halt proliferation and activate an immune response. Despite the presence of TLR ligands within the microenvironment, tumors progress, and the mechanisms that permit this growth remain largely unknown. We report that self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs) in glioblastoma have low TLR4 expression that allows them to survive by disregarding inflammatory signals. Non-CSCs express high levels of TLR4 and respond to ligands. TLR4 signaling suppresses CSC properties by reducing retinoblastoma binding protein 5 (RBBP5), which is elevated in CSCs. RBBP5 activates core stem cell transcription factors, is necessary and sufficient for self-renewal, and is suppressed by TLR4 overexpression in CSCs. Our findings provide a mechanism through which CSCs persist in hostile environments because of an inability to respond to inflammatory signals.

  6. The Cancer Chemotherapeutic Paclitaxel Increases Human and Rodent Sensory Neuron Responses to TRPV1 by Activation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Adamek, Pavel; Zhang, Haijun; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D.; Mrozkova, Petra; Li, Qin; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Cata, Juan P.; Sapire, Kenneth; Zhang, Hongmei; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Ghetti, Andre; Yan, Jiusheng; Palecek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting in paclitaxel cancer chemotherapy and can result in both acute pain during treatment and chronic persistent pain in cancer survivors. The hypothesis tested was that paclitaxel produces these adverse effects at least in part by sensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. The data show that paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity is prevented and reversed by spinal administration of a TRPV1 antagonist. The number of TRPV1+ neurons is increased in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in paclitaxel-treated rats and is colocalized with TLR4 in rat and human DRG neurons. Cotreatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS), a TLR4 inhibitor, prevents the increase in numbers of TRPV1+ neurons by paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of paclitaxel or the archetypal TLR4 agonist LPS activated both rat DRG and spinal neurons directly and produced acute sensitization of TRPV1 in both groups of cells via a TLR4-mediated mechanism. Paclitaxel and LPS sensitize TRPV1 in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TLR4 and transiently expressing human TRPV1. These physiological effects also are prevented by LPS-RS. Finally, paclitaxel activates and sensitizes TRPV1 responses directly in dissociated human DRG neurons. In summary, TLR4 was activated by paclitaxel and led to sensitization of TRPV1. This mechanism could contribute to paclitaxel-induced acute pain and chronic painful neuropathy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this original work, it is shown for the first time that paclitaxel activates peripheral sensory and spinal neurons directly and sensitizes these cells to transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-mediated capsaicin responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in multiple species. A direct functional interaction between TLR4 and TRPV1 is shown in rat and human dorsal root ganglion neurons, TLR4/TRPV1

  7. The TLR4-Active Morphine Metabolite Morphine-3-Glucuronide Does Not Elicit Macrophage Classical Activation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khabbazi, Samira; Xie, Nan; Pu, Wenjun; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are abundant in the tumor microenvironment where they adopt a pro-tumor phenotype following alternative polarization induced by paracrine factors from cancer and stromal cells. In contrast, classically activated macrophages have tumoricidal activities, such that the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages has become a novel therapeutic target. Toll-like receptor 4 engagement promotes classical activation of macrophages, and recent literature suggests TLR4 agonism to prevent metastasis and promote survival in experimental metastasis models. A growing number of studies indicate that TLR4 can respond to opioids, including the opioid receptor-inactive morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). We measured the activation of TLR4 in a reporter cell line exogenously expressing TLR4 and TLR4 co-receptors, and confirmed that M3G weakly but significantly activates TLR4. We hypothesized that M3G would promote the expression of classical activation signature genes in macrophages in vitro. We exposed mouse and human macrophage cell lines to M3G or the TLR4 activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone or in combination with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The classical macrophage activation markers tested were iNOS, CD86, IL-6, or TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells and IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, CXCL10, and CXCL11 in THP1 cells. Our results show that despite exhibiting TLR4-activation ability, M3G does not elicit the expression of classical activation markers in LPS-responsive macrophages. PMID:27909407

  8. The TLR4-Active Morphine Metabolite Morphine-3-Glucuronide Does Not Elicit Macrophage Classical Activation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Xie, Nan; Pu, Wenjun; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are abundant in the tumor microenvironment where they adopt a pro-tumor phenotype following alternative polarization induced by paracrine factors from cancer and stromal cells. In contrast, classically activated macrophages have tumoricidal activities, such that the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages has become a novel therapeutic target. Toll-like receptor 4 engagement promotes classical activation of macrophages, and recent literature suggests TLR4 agonism to prevent metastasis and promote survival in experimental metastasis models. A growing number of studies indicate that TLR4 can respond to opioids, including the opioid receptor-inactive morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). We measured the activation of TLR4 in a reporter cell line exogenously expressing TLR4 and TLR4 co-receptors, and confirmed that M3G weakly but significantly activates TLR4. We hypothesized that M3G would promote the expression of classical activation signature genes in macrophages in vitro. We exposed mouse and human macrophage cell lines to M3G or the TLR4 activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone or in combination with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The classical macrophage activation markers tested were iNOS, CD86, IL-6, or TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells and IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, CXCL10, and CXCL11 in THP1 cells. Our results show that despite exhibiting TLR4-activation ability, M3G does not elicit the expression of classical activation markers in LPS-responsive macrophages.

  9. CD14 dependence of TLR4 endocytosis and TRIF signaling displays ligand specificity and is dissociable in endotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rajaiah, Rajesh; Perkins, Darren J; Ireland, Derek D C; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2015-07-07

    Dimerization of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2) heterodimers is critical for both MyD88- and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β (TRIF)-mediated signaling pathways. Recently, Zanoni et al. [(2011) Cell 147(4):868-880] reported that cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) is required for LPS-/Escherichia coli- induced TLR4 internalization into endosomes and activation of TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophages. We confirmed their findings with LPS but report here that CD14 is not required for receptor endocytosis and downstream signaling mediated by TLR4/MD2 agonistic antibody (UT12) and synthetic small-molecule TLR4 ligands (1Z105) in murine macrophages. CD14 deficiency completely ablated the LPS-induced TBK1/IRF3 signaling axis that mediates production of IFN-β in murine macrophages without affecting MyD88-mediated signaling, including NF-κB, MAPK activation, and TNF-α and IL-6 production. However, neither the MyD88- nor TRIF-signaling pathways and their associated cytokine profiles were altered in the absence of CD14 in UT12- or 1Z105-treated murine macrophages. Eritoran (E5564), a lipid A antagonist that binds the MD2 "pocket," completely blocked LPS- and 1Z105-driven, but not UT12-induced, TLR4 dimerization and endocytosis. Furthermore, TLR4 endocytosis is induced in macrophages tolerized by exposure to either LPS or UT12 and is independent of CD14. These data indicate that TLR4 receptor endocytosis and the TRIF-signaling pathway are dissociable and that TLR4 internalization in macrophages can be induced by UT12, 1Z105, and during endotoxin tolerance in the absence of CD14.

  10. Toll like receptor (TLR)-4 as a regulator of peripheral endogenous opioid-mediated analgesia in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leukocytes containing opioid peptides locally control inflammatory pain. In the early phase of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced hind paw inflammation, formyl peptides (derived e.g. from Mycobacterium butyricum) trigger the release of opioid peptides from neutrophils contributing to tonic basal antinociception. In the later phase we hypothesized that toll-like-receptor-(TLR)-4 activation of monocytes/macrophages triggers opioid peptide release and thereby stimulates peripheral opioid-dependent antinociception. Results In Wistar rats with CFA hind paw inflammation in the later inflammatory phase (48–96 h) systemic leukocyte depletion by cyclophosphamide (CTX) or locally injected naloxone (NLX) further decreased mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. In vitro β-endorphin (β-END) content increased during human monocyte differentiation as well as in anti-inflammatory CD14+CD16- or non-classical M2 macrophages. Monocytes expressing TLR4 dose-dependently released β-END after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dependent on intracellular calcium. Despite TLR4 expression proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages only secreted opioid peptides in response to ionomycin, a calcium ionophore. Intraplantar injection of LPS as a TLR4 agonist into the inflamed paw elicited an immediate opioid- and dose-dependent antinociception, which was blocked by TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of TLR4, or by peripheral applied NLX. In the later phase LPS lowered mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Furthermore, local peripheral TLR4 blockade worsened thermal and mechanical nociceptive pain thresholds in CFA inflammation. Conclusion Endogenous opioids from monocytes/macrophages mediate endogenous antinociception in the late phase of inflammation. Peripheral TLR4 stimulation acts as a transient counter-regulatory mechanism for inflammatory pain in vivo, and increases the release of opioid peptides from monocytes in vitro. TLR4

  11. Activation of PPARγ suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of esophageal cancer cells by inhibiting TLR4-dependent MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Donglei; Qi, Yu; Zhang, Chunyang; Zhao, Jia; Zhao, Song

    2016-07-12

    Although substantial studies on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g (PPARg) have focused on the mechanisms by which PPARg regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, recent reports have suggested that PPARg shows tumorigenic or antitumorigenic effects. The roles and mechanisms of PPARg activation in esophageal cancer remain unclarified. EC109 and TE10 esophageal cancer cells were treated with 0, 10, 20 and 40 mM of PPARg agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ) for 24, 48, and 72 h, and the cell viability and apoptosis were detected using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and Flow cytometric (FCM) analysis, respectively. Moreover, the effects of inhibition of PPARg by antagonist or specific RNA interference on cell viability, apoptosis, the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were evaluated. Additionally, the effect of TLR4 signaling on the MAPK pathway, cell viability and apoptosis was assessed. The results showed that RGZ suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis of esophageal cancer cells, which could be partly restored by inactivation of PPARg. RGZ suppressed the MAPK and TLR4 pathways, and the inhibitory effect could be counteracted by PPARg antagonist or specific RNA interference. We also suggested that MAPK activation was regulated by the TLR4 pathway and that blocking the TLR4 and MAPK pathways significantly suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis of esophageal cancer cells. In conclusion, our data suggested that activation of PPARg suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis of esophageal cancer cells by inhibiting TLR4-dependent MAPK pathway.

  12. The role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in cardiac ischaemic-reperfusion injury, cardioprotection and preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sam Man; Hutchinson, Mark; Saint, David A

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac ischaemic-reperfusion injury (IRI) remains the primary cause of mortality throughout the developed world. Molecular mechanisms underlying IRI are complex and are often interlinked with each other driving a synergistic response. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an immunosurveillance receptor, is known to enhance tissue injury during IRI by enhancing the inflammatory response. The release of endogenous components during IRI bind onto TLR4 leading to the activation of multiple signalling kinases. Once this event occurs these proteins are defined as danger associated molecular patterns molecules (DAMPs) or alarmins. Examples include heat shock proteins, high mobility group box one (HMGB1) and extracellular matrix proteins, all of which are involved in IRI. However, literature in the last two decades suggests that transient stimulation of TLR4 may suppress IRI and thus improve cardiac recovery. Furthermore, it remains to be seen what role TLR4 plays during ischaemic-preconditioning where acute bouts of ischaemia, preceding a harmful bout of ischaemic-reperfusion, is cardioprotective. The other question which also needs to be considered is that if transient TLR4 signalling drives a preconditioning response then what are the ligands which drive this? Hence the second part of this review explores the possible TLR4 ligands which may promote cardioprotection against IRI.

  13. Sequence Based Structural Characterization and Genetic Diversity Analysis of Full Length TLR4 CDS in Crossbred and Indigenous Cattle.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Chinmoy; Kumar, Subodh; Sonwane, Arvind Asaram; Yathish, H M; Chaudhary, Rajni

    2017-01-02

    The exploration of candidate genes for immune response in cattle may be vital for improving our understanding regarding the species specific response to pathogens. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is mostly involved in protection against the deleterious effects of Gram negative pathogens. Approximately 2.6 kb long cDNA sequence of TLR4 gene covering the entire coding region was characterized in two Indian milk cattle (Vrindavani and Tharparkar). The phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the bovine TLR4 was apparently evolved from an ancestral form that predated the appearance of vertebrates, and it is grouped with buffalo, yak, and mithun TLR4s. Sequence analysis revealed a 2526-nucleotide long open reading frame (ORF) encoding 841 amino acids, similar to other cattle breeds. The calculated molecular weight of the translated ORF was 96144 and 96040.9 Da; the isoelectric point was 6.35 and 6.42 in Vrindavani and Tharparkar cattle, respectively. The Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool (SMART) analysis identified 14 leucine rich repeats (LRR) motifs in bovine TLR4 protein. The deduced TLR4 amino acid sequence of Tharparkar had 4 different substitutions as compared to Bos taurus, Sahiwal, and Vrindavani. The signal peptide cleavage site predicted to lie between 16th and 17th amino acid of mature peptide. The transmebrane helix was identified between 635-657 amino acids in the mature peptide.

  14. Saturated and unsaturated fat induce hepatic insulin resistance independently of TLR-4 signaling and ceramide synthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Jurczak, Michael J; Camporez, João-Paulo G; Alves, Tiago C; Kahn, Mario; Guigni, Blas A; Serr, Julie; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-07-30

    Hepatic insulin resistance is a principal component of type 2 diabetes, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for its pathogenesis remain unknown. Recent studies have suggested that saturated fatty acids induce hepatic insulin resistance through activation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) receptor in the liver, which in turn transcriptionally activates hepatic ceramide synthesis leading to inhibition of insulin signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that TLR-4 receptor signaling is not directly required for saturated or unsaturated fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance in both TLR-4 antisense oligonucleotide treated and TLR-4 knockout mice, and that ceramide accumulation is not dependent on TLR-4 signaling or a primary event in hepatic steatosis and impairment of insulin signaling. Further, we show that both saturated and unsaturated fats lead to hepatic accumulation of diacylglycerols, activation of PKCε, and impairment of insulin-stimulated IRS-2 signaling. These data demonstrate that saturated fat-induced insulin resistance is independent of TLR-4 activation and ceramides.

  15. Hydroxysafflor yellow A alleviates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in hyperlipidemic animals through the suppression of TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dan; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Wenhuan; Shen, Chen; Feng, Yidong; Xia, Nian; Xu, Dan; Cai, Dongcheng; Li, Yunman; Fang, Weirong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia aggravates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury through stimulating excessive inflammatory response. Therefore, blockade of inflammatory signal is a potential therapeutic management for MI/R complicated with hyperlipidemia. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA, a monomer extracted from Carthamus tinctorius L.), was studied in this article to address that the regulation of inflammatory signal would alleviate MI/R combined with hyperlipidemia injury. High-fat diet induced hyperlipidemia worsened MI/R mediated heart injury (elevation of infarct size, CK-MB and LDH activity), activated TLR4 over-expression in hearts, released inflammatory cytokines (LPS, TNF-α and IL-1β) excessively. HSYA administration suppressed the over-expression of TLR4 and alleviated heart damage caused by MI/R complicated with hyperlipidemia. Furthermore, HSYA had little influence on MI/R injury in TLR4-knockout mice, which indicated that HSYA protected MI/R through TLR4 inhibition. In vitro, hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) coexisting with LPS model in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) induced serious damage compared with H/R injury to NRVMs. HSYA decreased excessive secretion of inflammatory cytokines, down-regulated over-expression of TLR4 and NF-κB in H/R + LPS injured NRVMs. In conclusion, HSYA alleviated myocardial inflammatory injury through suppressing TLR4, offering an alternative medication for MI/R associated with hyperlipidemia. PMID:27731393

  16. Study of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR9 in breast carcinomas and their association with metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have garnered an extraordinary amount of interest in cancer research due to their role in tumor progression. By activating the production of several biological factors, TLRs induce type I interferons and other cytokines, which drive an inflammatory response and activate the adaptive immune system. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and clinical relevance of TLR3, 4 and 9 in breast cancer. Methods The expression levels of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR9 were analyzed on tumors from 74 patients with breast cancer. The analysis was performed by immunohistochemistry. Results Samples of carcinomas with recurrence exhibited a significant increase in the mRNA levels of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR9. Tumors showed high expression of TLRs expression levels by cancer cells, especially TLR4 and 9. Nevertheless, a significant percentage of tumors also showed TLR4 expression by mononuclear inflammatory cells (21.6%) and TLR9 expression by fibroblast-like cells (57.5%). Tumors with high TLR3 expression by tumor cell or with high TLR4 expression by mononuclear inflammatory cells were significantly associated with higher probability of metastasis. However, tumours with high TLR9 expression by fibroblast-like cells were associated with low probability of metastasis. Conclusions The expression levels of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR9 have clinical interest as indicators of tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer. TLRs may represent therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:21129170

  17. Reversal of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes With an Agonistic TLR4/MD-2 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Kyle J; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Kachapati, Kritika; Ohta, Shoichiro; Wu, Yuehong; Katz, Jonathan D; Ascherman, Dana P; Ridgway, William M

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is currently an incurable disease, characterized by a silent prodromal phase followed by an acute clinical phase, reflecting progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Autoreactive T cells play a major role in β-cell destruction, but innate immune cell cytokines and costimulatory molecules critically affect T-cell functional status. We show that an agonistic monoclonal antibody to TLR4/MD-2 (TLR4-Ab) reverses new-onset diabetes in a high percentage of NOD mice. TLR4-Ab induces antigen-presenting cell (APC) tolerance in vitro and in vivo, resulting in an altered cytokine profile, decreased costimulatory molecule expression, and decreased T-cell proliferation in APC:T-cell assays. TLR4-Ab treatment increases T-regulatory cell (Treg) numbers in both the periphery and the pancreatic islet, predominantly expanding the Helios(+)Nrp-1(+)Foxp3(+) Treg subset. TLR4-Ab treatment in the absence of B cells in NOD.scid mice prevents subsequent T cell-mediated disease, further suggesting a major role for APC tolerization in disease protection. Specific stimulation of the innate immune system through TLR4/MD-2, therefore, can restore tolerance in the aberrant adaptive immune system and reverse new-onset T1D, suggesting a novel immunological approach to treatment of T1D in humans.

  18. Constitutive TLR4 signalling in intestinal epithelium reduces tumor load by increasing apoptosis in APC(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Teo, W L; Low, M J; Meijer, L; Sanderson, I; Pettersson, S; Greicius, G

    2014-01-16

    The microbial pattern-recognizing Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are major signal transducers known to shape and influence the postnatal maturation of host intestinal epithelium. Perturbations in this intricate host-microbe cross-talk have been reported to be associated with uncontrolled epithelial cell growth and thus potential cancer development by mechanisms which are largely unknown. We therefore generated transgenic mice carrying a constitutively active TLR4 (CD4-TLR4) linked to an intestinal epithelial cell-specific promoter. Ex vivo analysis of transgenic crypt-villus organoid cultures revealed an increased proliferative capacity and a lowered cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) expression in these organoids compared with wild-type control cultures. Introducing the CD4-TLR4 transgene into APC(Min/+) mice (CD4-TLR4-APC(Min/+)), a model of colorectal carcinoma, resulted in a dramatic drop in tumor load as compared with control APC(Min/+) mice. Intestinal tumors from CD4-TLR4-APC(Min/+) mice displayed reduced Cox-2 protein, elevated interferon β expression and increased caspase-3 activity, which correlated with increased apoptosis in vivo. Thus, our data reveal that host microbiota-mediated signal transduction via TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells is far more complex than what is previously reported.

  19. A common variant near BDNF is associated with dietary calcium intake in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dušátková, Lenka; Zamrazilová, Hana; Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Sedláčková, Barbora; Včelák, Josef; Hlavatý, Petr; Bendlová, Běla; Kunešová, Marie; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2015-09-01

    Specific targets for most obesity candidate genes discovered by genomewide association studies remain unknown. Such genes are often highly expressed in the hypothalamus, indicating their role in energy homeostasis. We aimed to evaluate the associations of selected gene variants with adiposity and dietary traits. Anthropometric parameters, fat mass, dietary intake (total energy, fat, protein, carbohydrate, fiber, and calcium) and 10 gene variants (in/near TMEM18, SH2B1, KCTD15, PCSK1, BDNF, SEC16B, MC4R and FTO) were analyzed in 1953 Czech individuals aged 10.0 to 18.0 years (1035 nonoverweight and 918 overweight: body mass index [BMI] ≥90th percentile). Obesity risk alleles of TMEM18 rs7561317, SEC16B rs10913469, and FTO rs9939609 were related to increased body weight and BMI (P < .005). The FTO variant also showed a significant positive association with waist circumference and fat mass (P < .001). Overweight adolescents had a lower total energy intake (P < .001) but a higher percentage of fat (P = .009) and protein intake (P < .001) than the nonoverweight subjects. There was also a lower calcium intake in the overweight group (P < .001). An association with at least one component of dietary intake was found in 3 of 10 studied gene variants. The MC4R rs17782313 was associated negatively with protein (P = .012) and positively associated with fiber (P = .032) intakes. The obesity risk alleles of BDNF rs925946 and FTO rs9939609 were related to a lower calcium intake (P = .001 and .037). The effects of FTO and MC4R variants, however, disappeared after corrections for multiple testing. Our results suggest that the common BDNF variant may influence dietary calcium intake independent of BMI.

  20. Multiple linear combination (MLC) regression tests for common variants adapted to linkage disequilibrium structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yun Joo; Sun, Lei; Poirier, Julia G.; Paterson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By jointly analyzing multiple variants within a gene, instead of one at a time, gene‐based multiple regression can improve power, robustness, and interpretation in genetic association analysis. We investigate multiple linear combination (MLC) test statistics for analysis of common variants under realistic trait models with linkage disequilibrium (LD) based on HapMap Asian haplotypes. MLC is a directional test that exploits LD structure in a gene to construct clusters of closely correlated variants recoded such that the majority of pairwise correlations are positive. It combines variant effects within the same cluster linearly, and aggregates cluster‐specific effects in a quadratic sum of squares and cross‐products, producing a test statistic with reduced degrees of freedom (df) equal to the number of clusters. By simulation studies of 1000 genes from across the genome, we demonstrate that MLC is a well‐powered and robust choice among existing methods across a broad range of gene structures. Compared to minimum P‐value, variance‐component, and principal‐component methods, the mean power of MLC is never much lower than that of other methods, and can be higher, particularly with multiple causal variants. Moreover, the variation in gene‐specific MLC test size and power across 1000 genes is less than that of other methods, suggesting it is a complementary approach for discovery in genome‐wide analysis. The cluster construction of the MLC test statistics helps reveal within‐gene LD structure, allowing interpretation of clustered variants as haplotypic effects, while multiple regression helps to distinguish direct and indirect associations. PMID:27885705

  1. Common and rare exonic MUC5B variants associated with type 2 diabetes in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenjian; Adebamowo, Sally N.; Liu, Guozheng; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Zhou, Yanxun; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Wang, Chuntao; Zhou, Jie; Yan, Wenqiang; Shriner, Daniel; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Bentley, Amy R.; Jiang, Congqing; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified over one hundred common genetic risk variants associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, most of the heritability of T2D has not been accounted for. In this study, we investigated the contribution of rare and common variants to T2D susceptibility by analyzing exome array data in 1,908 Han Chinese genotyped with Affymetrix Axiom® Exome Genotyping Arrays. Based on the joint common and rare variants analysis of 57,704 autosomal SNPs within 12,244 genes using Sequence Kernel Association Tests (SKAT), we identified significant associations between T2D and 25 variants (9 rare and 16 common) in MUC5B, p-value 1.01×10−14. This finding was replicated (p = 0.0463) in an independent sample that included 10,401 unrelated individuals. Sixty-six of 1,553 possible haplotypes based on 25 SNPs within MUC5B showed significant association with T2D (Bonferroni corrected p values < 3.2×10−5). The expression level of MUC5B is significantly higher in pancreatic tissues of persons with T2D compared to those without T2D (p-value = 5×10−5). Our findings suggest that dysregulated MUC5B expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of T2D. As a strong candidate gene for T2D, MUC5B may play an important role in the mechanisms underlying T2D etiology and its complications. PMID:28346466

  2. Common variants in ZNF365 are associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Vachon, Celine M; Li, Jingmei; Varghese, Jajini; Thompson, Deborah; Warren, Ruth; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Audley, Tina; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Paterson, Andrew D; Rommens, Johanna; Waggott, Darryl; Martin, Lisa J; Scott, Christopher G; Pankratz, V Shane; Hankinson, Susan E; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Chanock, Stephen J; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Liu, JianJun; Eriksson, Louise; Couch, Fergus J; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Czene, Kamila; Kraft, Peter; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Boyd, Norman F; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2011-03-01

    High-percent mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. We conducted a meta analysis of five genome-wide association studies of percent mammographic density and report an association with rs10995190 in ZNF365 (combined P = 9.6 × 10(-10)). Common variants in ZNF365 have also recently been associated with susceptibility to breast cancer.

  3. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis amastigotes induces the expression of TNFα and IL-10 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro in a TLR4-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Galdino, Hélio; Saar Gomes, Rodrigo; Dos Santos, Jessica Cristina; Pessoni, Lívia Lara; Maldaner, Anetícia Eduarda; Marques, Stéfanne Madalena; Gomes, Clayson Moura; Dorta, Miriam Leandro; de Oliveira, Milton Adriano Pelli; Joosten, Leo A B; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima

    2016-12-01

    While the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been investigated in murine models of tegumentary leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the interaction between TLRs and Leishmania sp. has not been investigated in human cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the involvement of TLR4 in cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) induced by L. braziliensis, and whether the parasite alters the expression of TLR4 on monocytes/macrophages. Amastigote forms were obtained from mice lesions and PBMCs were isolated from healthy donors. PBMCs were cultured in absence or presence of IFNγ, TLR4 neutralizing antibodies, natural antagonist of TLR4 (Bartonella LPS), TLR4 agonist (E. coli LPS), and amastigote forms. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) were assayed by ELISA and TLR4 expression by flow cytometry. Amastigotes forms of L. braziliensis induced TNFα and IL-10 production only in IFNγ-primed PBMCs. The TNFα and IL-10 production was inhibited by TLR4 neutralization, both with anti-TLR4 antibodies and Bartonella LPS. Interestingly, addition of E. coli LPS further increased TNFα but not IL-10 production induced by L. braziliensis amastigotes. Amastigotes of L. braziliensis strongly reduced membrane TLR4 expression on monocytes/macrophages, apparently by internalization after the infection. The present study reveals that TLR4 drives the production of TNFα and IL-10 induced by L. braziliensis amastigotes and that the parasites decrease TLR4 expression on monocyte surface.

  4. MAPK signaling downstream to TLR4 contributes to paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Hongmei; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Zhang, Haijun; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Colomand, Cecilia M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated as a locus for initiation of paclitaxel related chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). This project explores the involvement of the immediate down-stream signal molecules in inducing paclitaxel CIPN. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) were measured in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal cord over time using Western blot and immunohistochemistry in a rat model of paclitaxel CIPN. The effects of MAPK inhibitors in preventing and reversing behavioral signs of CIPN were also measured (group sizes 4–9). Extracellular signal related kinase (ERK1/2) and p38 but not c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) or PI3K-Akt signaling expression was increased in DRG. Phospho-ERK1/2 staining was co-localized to small CGRP-positive DRG neurons in cell profiles surrounding large DRG neurons consistent with satellite glial cells. The expression of phospho-P38 was co-localized to small IB4-positive and CGRP-positive DRG neurons. The TLR4 antagonist LPS derived from R. sphaeroides (LPS-RS) inhibited paclitaxel-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38. The MAPK inhibitors PD98059 (MEK1/2), U0126 (MEK1/2) and SB203580 (P38) prevented but did not reverse paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Paclitaxel treatment resulted in phosphorylation of Inhibitor α of NFκB (IκBα) in DRG resulting in an apparent release of NFκB from the IκBα-NFκB complex as increased expression of nuclear NFκB was also observed. LPS-RS inhibited paclitaxel-induced translocation of NFκB in DRG. No change was observed in spinal NFκB. These results implicate TLR4 signaling via MAP kinases and NFκB in the induction and maintenance of paclitaxel-related CIPN. PMID:26065826

  5. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-02-15

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. In this study, we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intratracheally an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Compared to adenovirus serotype 5 containing an empty vector lacking a transgene control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant, and MIP-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before intratracheal LPS challenge diminished proinflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and HDM-triggered allergic lung inflammation.

  6. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) protein inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D.; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. Here we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intracheally (i.t.) an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Compared to Ad-EV control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, KC, and MIP-2. BALF from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before i.t. LPS challenge diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and house dust mite-triggered allergic lung inflammation. PMID:25576596

  7. Initiation of the TLR4 signal transduction network : deeper understanding for better therapeutics.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael Y.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Sale, Kenneth L.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2010-09-01

    The innate immune system represents our first line of defense against microbial pathogens, and in many cases is activated by recognition of pathogen cellular components (dsRNA, flagella, LPS, etc.) by cell surface membrane proteins known as toll-like receptors (TLRs). As the initial trigger for innate immune response activation, TLRs also represent a means by which we can effectively control or modulate inflammatory responses. This proposal focused on TLR4, which is the cell-surface receptor primarily responsible for initiating the innate immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of the outer membrane envelope of gram-negative bacteria. The goal was to better understand TLR4 activation and associated membrane proximal events, in order to enhance the design of small molecule therapeutics to modulate immune activation. Our approach was to reconstitute the receptor in biomimetic systems in-vitro to allow study of the structure and dynamics with biophysical methods. Structural studies were initiated in the first year but were halted after the crystal structure of the dimerized receptor was published early in the second year of the program. Methods were developed to determine the association constant for oligomerization of the soluble receptor. LPS-induced oligomerization was observed to be a strong function of buffer conditions. In 20 mM Tris pH 8.0 with 200 mM NaCl, the onset of receptor oligomerization occurred at 0.2 uM TLR4/MD2 with E coli LPS Ra mutant in excess. However, in the presence of 0.5 uM CD14 and 0.5 uM LBP, the onset of receptor oligomerization was observed to be less than 10 nM TLR4/MD2. Several methods were pursued to study LPS-induced oligomerization of the membrane-bound receptor, including CryoEM, FRET, colocalization and codiffusion followed by TIRF, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. However, there approaches met with only limited success.

  8. KALRN Rare and Common Variants and Susceptibility to Ischemic Stroke in Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Dang, Meizheng; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Ruyou; Li, Xiaoying; Peng, Yanqing; Han, Xuesong; Sun, Litao; Tian, Jiawei

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of mortality worldwide, and it is a major cause of physical disability. Several genome-wide association studies have yielded numerous common variants which increase the risk of ischemic stroke, including the Kalirin-coding gene, KALRN. KALRN strongly associates with early-onset coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis and plays an important role in stroke in the European population. In this study, we analyzed four KALRN gene SNPs in 503 ischemic stroke patients and 493 control subjects, separating the patients into separate research groups based on comorbidity with hypertension or diabetes and stroke type (atherosis or lacunar and combination type). We found a rare variant of KALRN, rs11712619, that associated with lacunar stroke in the northern Chinese Han population with an average-risk allele frequency 0.009 (OR 2.95, 95 % CI 1.08-8.01, p = 0.028). However, after adjusting for relevant factors, including sex, age, body mass index, dyslipidemia, alcohol consumption, and smoking, this association was not evident. Additionally, the KALRN variant rs6438833 was associated with ischemic stroke, ischemic stroke comorbid with diabetes, and lacunar stroke after adjusting for the relevant factors (p = 0.046, p = 0.019 and p = 0.046, respectively), which remained significant after 10,000 permutation procedure test (p' = 0.047, p' = 0.018 and p' = 0.048, respectively). The association of these rare and common variants of KALRN with ischemic stroke in northern Chinese Han population offers insight for potential therapeutic research.

  9. Role of common and rare APP DNA sequence variants in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooli, B.V.; Mohapatra, G.; Mattheisen, M.; Parrado, A.R.; Roehr, J.T.; Shen, Y.; Gusella, J.F.; Moir, R.; Saunders, A.J.; Lange, C.; Tanzi, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: More than 30 different rare mutations, including copy number variants (CNVs), in the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) cause early-onset familial Alzheimer disease (EOFAD), whereas the contribution of common APP variants to disease risk remains controversial. In this study we systematically assessed the role of both rare and common APP DNA variants in Alzheimer disease (AD) families. Methods: Families with EOFAD genetically linked to the APP region were screened for missense mutations and locus duplications of APP. Further, using genome-wide DNA microarray data, we examined the APP locus for CNVs in a total of 797 additional early- and late-onset AD pedigrees. Finally, 423 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the APP locus, including 2 promoter polymorphisms previously associated with AD risk, were tested in up to 4,200 individuals from multiplex AD families. Results: Analyses of 8 21q21-linked families revealed one family carrying a nonsynonymous mutation in exon 17 (Val717Leu) and another family with a partially penetrant 3.5-Mb locus duplication encompassing APP. CNV analysis in the APP locus revealed an additional family carrying a fully penetrant 380-kb duplication, merely spanning APP. Last, contrary to previous reports, association analyses of more than 400 different SNPs in or near APP failed to show significant effects on AD risk. Conclusion: Our study shows that APP mutations and locus duplications are a very rare cause of EOFAD and that the contribution of common APP variants to AD susceptibility is insignificant. Furthermore, duplications of APP may not be fully penetrant, possibly indicating the existence of hitherto unknown protective genetic factors. PMID:22491860

  10. TLR4-Dependent Claudin-1 Internalization and Secretagogue-Mediated Chloride Secretion Regulate Irinotecan-Induced Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; Ball, Imogen A; Logan, Richard M; Gibson, Rachel J

    2016-11-01

    We have previously shown increased intestinal permeability, to 4-kDa FITC-dextran, in BALB/c mice treated with irinotecan. Importantly, genetic deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4; Tlr4(-/-)) protected against loss of barrier function, indicating that TLR4 is critical in tight junction regulation. The current study aimed (i) to determine the molecular characteristics of intestinal tight junctions in wild-type and Tlr4(-/-) BALB/c mice and (ii) to characterize the secretory profile of the distal colon. Forty-two female wild-type and 42 Tlr4(-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g received a single 270 mg/kg [intraperitoneal (i.p.)] dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. The secretory profile of the distal colon, following carbachol and forksolin, was assessed using Ussing chambers at all time points. Tight junction integrity was assessed at 24 hours, when peak intestinal permeability and diarrhea were reported, using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and RT-PCR. Irinotecan caused internalization of claudin-1 with focal lesions of ZO-1 and occludin proteolysis in the ileum and colon of wild-type mice. Tlr4(-/-) mice maintained phenotypically normal tight junctions. Baseline conductance, a measure of paracellular permeability, was increased in irinotecan-treated wild-type mice at 24 hours (53.19 ± 6.46 S/cm(2); P = 0.0008). No change was seen in Tlr4(-/-) mice. Increased carbachol-induced chloride secretion was seen in irinotecan-treated wild-type and Tlr4(-/-) mice at 24 hours (wild-type: 100.35 ± 18.37 μA/cm(2); P = 0.022; Tlr4(-/-): 102.72 ± 18.80 μA/cm(2); P = 0.023). Results suggest that TLR4-dependent claudin-1 internalization and secondary anion secretion contribute to irinotecan-induced diarrhea. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2767-79. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Effect of A-769662, a direct AMPK activator, on Tlr-4 expression and activity in mice heart tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rameshrad, Maryam; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Soraya, Hamid; Toutounchi, Negisa Seyed; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Garjani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s):: TLR-4 activates a number of inflammatory signaling pathways. Also, AMPK could be involved in anti-inflammatory signaling. The aim of this study was to identify whether stimulation of AMPK could inhibit LPS-induced Tlr-4 gene expression in mice hearts. Materials and methods: Heart AMPK activity and/or Tlr-4 expression was stimulated in different mice groups, using respectively IP injection of A-769662 (10 mg/kg) and LPS (2 mg/kg) or a combination of both agents. Moreover, compound-C (20 mg/kg), as an AMPK antagonist, was intraperitoneally co-administrated with both A-769662 and LPS in another group to investigate the role of AMPK activity on Tlr-4 regulation. After 8 hr, in addition to peripheral neutrophil cell count, myocardial p-AMPK, p-ACC as well as MyD88 protein contents and Tlr-4 expression was assessed by Western blotting and real-time qRT-PCR, respectively. TNF-α and IL-6 expression levels were also determined by ELISA. Results: LPS induced heart Tlr-4 expression (P<0.001) associating with an increase in the myocardial MyD88 protein content (P<0.001), elevation of heart TNF-α (P<0.01) and IL-6 (P<0.05) concentrations, and rise in the peripheral neutrophil cell count (P<0.001). Administration of A-769662 decreased LPS-induced Tlr-4 expression (P<0.01) and alleviated peripheral neutrophil cell count (P<0.01). The inhibitory effect of A-769662 on LPS-induced Tlr-4 expression was reversed by antagonizing AMPK with compound-C (P<0.001) which reduced p-AMPK (P<0.05) and p-ACC (P<0.01) myocardial protein contents in the LPS+A-769662 group. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that activation of AMPK, by A-769662 agent, could inhibit Tlr-4 expression and activity, suggesting a link between AMPK and Tlr-4 in heart tissue. PMID:28096963

  12. Genome-wide meta-analysis of common variant differences between men and women

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Jerončić, Ana; Colonna, Vincenza; Southam, Lorraine; Nyholt, Dale R.; William Rayner, Nigel; Perry, John R.B.; Toniolo, Daniela; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Barroso, Inês; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Biffar, Reiner; Boomsma, Dorret; Campbell, Harry; Corre, Tanguy; Erdmann, Jeanette; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Franceschini, Nora; Frayling, Timothy M.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heid, Iris M.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hua Zhao, Jing; Jackson, Anne U.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Klopp, Norman; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lagou, Vasiliki; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lemire, Mathieu; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Loley, Christina; Luan, Jian'an; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Navis, Gerjan; Newnham, John; Nieminen, Markku S.; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Peters, Annette; Pirastu, Nicola; Polašek, Ozren; Rehnström, Karola; Ripatti, Samuli; Ritchie, Graham R.S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Samani, Nilesh J.; Shin, So-Youn; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Johannes H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Stolk, Lisette; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Tönjes, Anke; Traglia, Michela; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valsesia, Armand; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Viikari, Jorma; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Waeber, Gerard; Warrington, Nicole M.; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wright, Alan F.; Zanke, Brent W.; Zgaga, Lina; Boehnke, Michael; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; de Geus, Eco; Demerath, Ellen W.; den Heijer, Martin; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hayward, Caroline; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hudson, Thomas J.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kogevinas, Manolis; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Spector, Tim D.; Stumvoll, Michael; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulivi, Sheila; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Xue, Yali; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2012-01-01

    The male-to-female sex ratio at birth is constant across world populations with an average of 1.06 (106 male to 100 female live births) for populations of European descent. The sex ratio is considered to be affected by numerous biological and environmental factors and to have a heritable component. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of common allele modest effects at autosomal and chromosome X variants that could explain the observed sex ratio at birth. We conducted a large-scale genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis across 51 studies, comprising overall 114 863 individuals (61 094 women and 53 769 men) of European ancestry and 2 623 828 common (minor allele frequency >0.05) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Allele frequencies were compared between men and women for directly-typed and imputed variants within each study. Forward-time simulations for unlinked, neutral, autosomal, common loci were performed under the demographic model for European populations with a fixed sex ratio and a random mating scheme to assess the probability of detecting significant allele frequency differences. We do not detect any genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10−8) common SNP differences between men and women in this well-powered meta-analysis. The simulated data provided results entirely consistent with these findings. This large-scale investigation across ∼115 000 individuals shows no detectable contribution from common genetic variants to the observed skew in the sex ratio. The absence of sex-specific differences is useful in guiding genetic association study design, for example when using mixed controls for sex-biased traits. PMID:22843499

  13. Partitioning heritability of regulatory and cell-type-specific variants across 11 common diseases.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Kähler, Anna K; Hultman, Christina M; Purcell, Shaun M; McCarroll, Steven A; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F; Neale, Benjamin M; Wray, Naomi R; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L

    2014-11-06

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg(2)) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg(2) from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10(-17)) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg(2) from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10(-4)). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg(2) despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease.

  14. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S. Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H.M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Brglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St. Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Ripke, Stephan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L.; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kähler, Anna K.; Hultman, Christina M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg2 from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10−17) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg2 from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10−4). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg2 despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  15. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    May, Patrick; Thiele, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Schwarz, Günter; Riesch, Erik; Ikram, M. Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Steinböck, Hannelore; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Neophytou, Birgit; Zara, Federico; Hahn, Andreas; Gormley, Padhraig; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne G.; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Krause, Roland; Zimprich, Fritz; Lemke, Johannes R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Lerche, Holger; Neubauer, Bernd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. Methods We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. Results and Interpretation We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10−4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions. PMID:26990884

  16. TLR4 Promotes Breast Cancer Metastasis via Akt/GSK3β/β-Catenin Pathway upon LPS Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Yin, Jing; Shen, Wenzhi; Gao, Ruifang; Liu, Yanhua; Chen, Yanan; Li, Xiru; Liu, Chenghu; Xiang, Rong; Luo, Na

    2017-03-14

    Bacteria/virus-induced chronic inflammation is involved in both tumor initiation and tumor progression. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated in the development of several types of cancer. In this study, we explored the impact of TLR4 activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on breast cancer metastasis and associated signaling molecules. We first examined TLR4 expression levels in breast tissue using a human breast tissue microarray and breast cell lines. We then studied the role of TLR4 activation by LPS stimulation in breast cancer metastasis using both in vitro and in vivo models. Finally, we investigated signaling molecules involved in the process using Western blotting and fluorescent immunohistochemistry staining. The results showed that TLR4 expression levels increased in breast cancer tissue compared to normal breast tissue. In addition, our results also showed that TLR4 pathway activation by LPS stimulation in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells caused the following actions: (1) promotes migration of breast cancer cells, (2) triggers the β-catenin signaling pathway via PI3K/Akt/GSK3β, and (3) promotes transcription of downstream β-catenin target genes leading to breast cancer metastasis. This study substantiates and further extends the relationship between TLR4 activation by LPS and breast cancer using both in vitro and in vivo models. The results suggest that the Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin signal transduction pathway may serve as a viable clinical treatment target in breast cancer. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Resatorvid Against Traumatic Brain Injury in Rat: Involvement of Neuronal Autophagy and TLR4 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Gao, Junling; Cui, Ying; Li, Minghang; Li, Ran; Cui, Changmeng; Cui, Jianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy and inflammatory responses contributes to secondary brain injury after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is considered to involvement of this cascade and plays an important role. The present study was designed to determine the hypothesis that administration of resatorvid (TAK-242), a TLR4 antagonist, might provide a neuroprotective effect by inhibit TLR4-mediated pathway in a TBI rat model. Rat subjected to controlled cortical impact injury were injected with TAK-242 (0.5 mg/kg, i.v. injected) 10 min prior to injury. The results demonstrated that TAK-242 treatment significantly attenuated TBI-induced neurons loss, brain edema, and neurobehavioral impairment in rats. Immunoblotting analysis showed that TAK-242 treatment reduced TBI-induced TLR4, Beclin 1, and LC3-II levels, and maintained p62 levels at 24 h. Double immunolabeling demonstrated that LC3 dots co-localized with the hippocampus pyramidal neurons, and TLR4 was localized with the hippocampus neurons and astrocytes. In addition, the expression of TLR4 downstream signaling molecules, including MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α, and IL-1β, was significantly downregulated in hippocampus tissue by Western blot analysis. In conclusion, our findings indicate that pre-injury treatment with TAK-242 could inhibit neuronal autophagy and neuroinflammation responses in the hippocampus in a rat model of TBI. The neuroprotective effects of TAK-242 may be related to modulation of the TLR4-MyD88/TRIF-NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the study also suggests that TAK-242, an attractive potential drug, may be a promising drug candidate for TBI.

  18. Heritability estimates of the Big Five personality traits based on common genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Power, R A; Pluess, M

    2015-07-14

    According to twin studies, the Big Five personality traits have substantial heritable components explaining 40-60% of the variance, but identification of associated genetic variants has remained elusive. Consequently, knowledge regarding the molecular genetic architecture of personality and to what extent it is shared across the different personality traits is limited. Using genomic-relatedness-matrix residual maximum likelihood analysis (GREML), we here estimated the heritability of the Big Five personality factors (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness for experience) in a sample of 5011 European adults from 527,469 single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. We tested for the heritability of each personality trait, as well as for the genetic overlap between the personality factors. We found significant and substantial heritability estimates for neuroticism (15%, s.e. = 0.08, P = 0.04) and openness (21%, s.e. = 0.08, P < 0.01), but not for extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness. The bivariate analyses showed that the variance explained by common variants entirely overlapped between neuroticism and openness (rG = 1.00, P < 0.001), despite low phenotypic correlation (r = - 0.09, P < 0.001), suggesting that the remaining unique heritability may be determined by rare or structural variants. As far as we are aware of, this is the first study estimating the shared and unique heritability of all Big Five personality traits using the GREML approach. Findings should be considered exploratory and suggest that detectable heritability estimates based on common variants is shared between neuroticism and openness to experiences.

  19. Sex-dependent association of common variants of microcephaly genes with brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rimol, Lars M; Agartz, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Brown, Andrew A; Roddey, J Cooper; Kähler, Anna K; Mattingsdal, Morten; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Joyner, Alexander H; Schork, Nicholas J; Halgren, Eric; Sundet, Kjetil; Melle, Ingrid; Dale, Anders M; Andreassen, Ole A

    2010-01-05

    Loss-of-function mutations in the genes associated with primary microcephaly (MCPH) reduce human brain size by about two-thirds, without producing gross abnormalities in brain organization or physiology and leaving other organs largely unaffected [Woods CG, et al. (2005) Am J Hum Genet 76:717-728]. There is also evidence suggesting that MCPH genes have evolved rapidly in primates and humans and have been subjected to selection in recent human evolution [Vallender EJ, et al. (2008) Trends Neurosci 31:637-644]. Here, we show that common variants of MCPH genes account for some of the common variation in brain structure in humans, independently of disease status. We investigated the correlations of SNPs from four MCPH genes with brain morphometry phenotypes obtained with MRI. We found significant, sex-specific associations between common, nonexonic, SNPs of the genes CDK5RAP2, MCPH1, and ASPM, with brain volume or cortical surface area in an ethnically homogenous Norwegian discovery sample (n = 287), including patients with mental illness. The most strongly associated SNP findings were replicated in an independent North American sample (n = 656), which included patients with dementia. These results are consistent with the view that common variation in brain structure is associated with genetic variants located in nonexonic, presumably regulatory, regions.

  20. Upregulation of TLR2 and TLR4 in the human adrenocortical cells differentially modulates adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Tymoszuk, Piotr; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Janitzky, Volker; Weirich, Torsten; Zacharowski, Kai; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2011-04-10

    Rapid activation of adrenal steroid release plays a pivotal role in an organism's first line of defense during sepsis. Adrenal gland function is often suppressed in critically ill patients and negatively impacts the overall survival rate. Increasingly, experimental and clinical evidence suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs), components of the innate immune system, play a key role in the mediation of systemic responses to invading pathogens during sepsis. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the effect of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 upregulation on adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis. We found that TLR4 and CD14 but not TLR2 overexpression in NCI-H295R cells inhibited basal and acute cortisol and aldosterone production. This effect could be partially explained by reduced expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis of latter steroids--CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. Together, these data suggest that TLR upregulation in the steroid producing cells may be involved in the adrenal gland dysfunction during sepsis.

  1. Schisandra polysaccharide evokes immunomodulatory activity through TLR 4-mediated activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Li, Jing; Mao, Riwen; Zou, Ye; Feng, Weiwei; Zheng, Daheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yao; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2014-04-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Previous studies have shown that Schisandra polysaccharide (SCPP11) has robust antitumor activity in vivo. In this study, the immunomodulatory activity and mechanisms of action of SCPP11 were investigated further to reveal its mechanism of action against tumors. Results showed that SCPP11 increased the thymus and spleen indices, pinocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, and hemolysin formation in CTX-induced immunosuppressed mice. Moreover, SCPP11 significantly increased immunoglobulin levels, cytokines levels in vivo and induced RAW264.7 cells to secrete cytokines in vitro. RAW264.7 cells pretreated with SCPP11 significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG-2 cells. In addition, SCPP11 promoted both the expression of iNOS protein and of iNOS and TNF-α mRNA. TLR-4 is a possible receptor for SCPP11-mediated macrophage activation. Therefore, the data suggest that SCPP11 exerted its antitumor activity by improving immune system functions through TLR-4-mediated up-regulation of NO and TNF-α.

  2. Effect of pioglitazone on neuropathic pain and spinal expression of TLR-4 and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongbin; Xu, Shuangshuang; Liu, Qingzhen; Liu, Jian; Xu, Jianguo; Li, Weiyan; Jin, Yi; Ji, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain have yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to examine the modulation of neuroimmune activation in the spinal cord by the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, pioglitazone (Pio), in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Rats were randomly assigned into four groups: Sham surgery with vehicle, chronic constriction injury with vehicle or Pio (10 mg/kg), and chronic constriction injury with Pio and a PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (2 mg/kg). Pio or vehicle was administered 1 h prior to the surgery and continued daily until day 7 post-surgery. Paw pressure threshold was measured prior to surgery and on days 0, 1, 3 and 7 post-surgery. Microglia activation markers macrophage antigen complex-1, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β, and the mRNA expression levels of toll like receptor (TLR-4) in the lumbar spinal cord were determined. Administration of Pio resulted in the prominent attenuation of mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, Pio was able to significantly inhibit neuroimmune activation characterized by glial activation, the production of cytokines and expression levels of TLR-4. Concurrent administration of a PPAR-γ antagonist, GW9662, reversed the effects of Pio. The antihyperalgesic effect of administration of Pio in rats receiving CCI may, in part, be attributed to the inhibition of neuroimmune activation associated with the sustaining of neuropathic pain. PMID:27698768

  3. Association of TLR4 polymorphisms with subclinical mastitis in Brazilian holsteins

    PubMed Central

    de Mesquita, Adriano Queiroz; e Rezende, Cintia Silva Minafra; de Mesquita, Albenones José; Jardim, Eurione Antonio Garcia da Veiga; Kipnis, Ana Paula Junqueira

    2012-01-01

    The identification of dairy cows with greater or lower potential to develop mastits has been pursued for many years among different segments of the milk industry, including governmental organizations. Genomic studies have suggested that Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) within the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) could lead to different responses to pathogens, and consequently result in mastitis resistance or susceptibility. To investigate whether toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene is associated with subclinical mastitis in Holstein cows from a property in the state of Goiás, Brazil, TaqMan allelic discrimination and somatic cell count were performed. One hundred and fifty milk samples were analyzed for SCC and centesimal composition. Twenty percent of those samples with SCC above 200,000 (n=13) were screened for real-time PCR identification of microorganisms and blood samples were genotyped for TLR4 SNPs. There was a higher prevalence of Gram-positive bacteria in the analyzed samples (88.9%) and animals that had the combined genotypes AACCCC, GGTCGG and GACCGC presented the lowest somatic cell scores, and consequently those genotypes have the potential to be applied as molecular markers for assisted animal selection to improve milk quality. PMID:24031881

  4. Association of TLR4 polymorphisms with subclinical mastitis in Brazilian holsteins.

    PubMed

    de Mesquita, Adriano Queiroz; E Rezende, Cintia Silva Minafra; de Mesquita, Albenones José; Jardim, Eurione Antonio Garcia da Veiga; Kipnis, Ana Paula Junqueira

    2012-04-01

    The identification of dairy cows with greater or lower potential to develop mastits has been pursued for many years among different segments of the milk industry, including governmental organizations. Genomic studies have suggested that Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) within the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) could lead to different responses to pathogens, and consequently result in mastitis resistance or susceptibility. To investigate whether toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene is associated with subclinical mastitis in Holstein cows from a property in the state of Goiás, Brazil, TaqMan allelic discrimination and somatic cell count were performed. One hundred and fifty milk samples were analyzed for SCC and centesimal composition. Twenty percent of those samples with SCC above 200,000 (n=13) were screened for real-time PCR identification of microorganisms and blood samples were genotyped for TLR4 SNPs. There was a higher prevalence of Gram-positive bacteria in the analyzed samples (88.9%) and animals that had the combined genotypes AACCCC, GGTCGG and GACCGC presented the lowest somatic cell scores, and consequently those genotypes have the potential to be applied as molecular markers for assisted animal selection to improve milk quality.

  5. Transcriptome sequencing wide functional analysis of human mesenchymal stem cells in response to TLR4 ligand

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Das, Amitabh; Chai, Jin Choul; Binas, Bert; Choi, Mi Ran; Park, Kyoung Sun; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Due to their multipotentiality and immunomodulation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are widely studied for the treatment of degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Transplantation of hMSCs to damaged tissue is a promising approach for tissue regeneration. However, the physiological mechanisms and regulatory processes of MSC trafficking to injured tissue are largely unexplored. Here, we evaluated the gene expression profile and migratory potential of hMSCs upon stimulation with the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using RNA sequencing, we identified unique induction patterns of interferon stimulated genes, cytokines and chemokines involved in chemotaxis and homing. The −950 to +50 bp regions of many of these LPS-responsive genes were enriched with putative binding motifs for the transcription factors (TFs) interferon regulatory factor (IRF1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB1, REL), which were also induced by LPS along with other TFs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that IRF1 bound within their target genes promoter region. In addition, IRF1 attenuation significantly down-regulated interferon stimulated genes as well as key cytokines. Furthermore, using pharmacological inhibitors, we showed that the NF-κB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways regulate the migratory and cytokines/chemokines response to LPS. These unprecedented data suggest that IRF1 and NF-κB orchestrate the TLR4-primed immunomodulatory response of hMSCs and that this response also involves the PI3K pathway. PMID:27444640

  6. The role of TLR4 in pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome-associated thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongxiang; Sheng, Liangju; Zhou, Hong; Yan, Jinchuan

    2014-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the clinical features of recurrent thrombosis in the venous or arterial circulation and fetal losses. Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), particularly against the phospholipid binding protein beta-2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), play an important role in APS pathological mechanisms. aPL can activate intracellular signal transduction in a β2GPI-dependent manner to induce inflammatory responses, and promote hypercoagulable state and recurrent spontaneous abortion when β2GPI is associated with the cell surface receptor. In vivo and in vitro studies show that Annexin A2 (ANXA2) is the high affinity receptor that connects β2GPI to the target cells. However, ANXA2 is not a transmembrane protein and lacks an intracellular signal transduction pathway. Growing evidences suggest that the transmembrane protein toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) might act as an 'adaptor' for intracellular signal transduction. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 and its signalling pathway in APS pathological mechanisms which will help us better understand the pathological processes of this syndrome.

  7. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  8. Pycnogenol attenuates atherosclerosis by regulating lipid metabolism through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Wang, Jing; Qiao, Chenhui; Ma, Ning; Liu, Donghai; Zhang, Weihua

    2015-10-23

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and is characterized by lipid-laden foam cell formation. Recently, pycnogenol (PYC) has drawn much attention because of its prominent effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, its protective effect against atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Here PYC treatment reduced areas of plaque and lipid deposition in atherosclerotic mice, concomitant with decreases in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels and increases in HDL cholesterol levels, indicating a potential antiatherosclerotic effect of PYC through the regulation of lipid levels. Additionally, PYC preconditioning markedly decreased foam cell formation and lipid accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 monocytes. A mechanistic analysis indicated that PYC decreased the lipid-related protein expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP/aP2) in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis confirmed that PYC attenuated LPS-induced lipid droplet formation via ADRP and ALBP expression through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, because pretreatment with anti-TLR4 antibody or a specific inhibitor of NF-κB (PDTC) strikingly mitigated the LPS-induced increase in ADRP and ALBP. Together, our results provide insight into the ability of PYC to attenuate bacterial infection-triggered pathological processes associated with atherosclerosis. Thus PYC may be a potential lead compound for the future development of antiatherosclerotic CVD therapy.

  9. Imidacloprid induced histomorphological changes and expression of TLR-4 and TNFα in lung.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Arif Ahmad; Choudhary, Shanti; Ramneek; Singh, Baljit; Sethi, R S

    2016-07-01

    The imidacloprid is used worldwide as a pesticide and has been linked with endocrine disturbances and reduced pulmonary function. However, effects of imidacloprid alone or in combination with microbial molecules on lungs are not fully understood. Because the pulmonary effects of interactions of endotoxins with imidacloprid are unknown, we designed a study to investigate that in a mouse model. Mice (N=14) were given imidacloprid orally @ 1/20(th) of LD50 dissolved in corn oil for 30days. After the treatments, six animals from each group were challenged with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) @ 80μg/animal via intranasal route and remaining animals were challenged with normal saline solution @ 80μl/animal via same route. Imidacloprid in combination with LPS led to significant increase in total cell and neutrophil counts in BAL and peripheral blood. Semi-quantitative histopathology revealed lung injury in imidacloprid treatment group and injury was more marked in animal receiving both imidacloprid and LPS. There was no change (p<0.05) in the expression of TLR-4 and TNF-α both at mRNA and protein levels following exposure to imidacloprid alone or in combination with LPS. The data show that imidacloprid alone or in combination with LPS resulted changes in lung morphology without altering the expression of TLR-4 and TNF-α. Furthermore, pre-treatment with imidacloprid didn't affect response to LPS.

  10. Modelling and simulation of the TLR4 pathway with coloured petri nets.

    PubMed

    Täubner, C; Mathiak, B; Kupfer, A; Fleischer, N; Eckstein, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the first steps of an automation process to develop models of signal transduction pathways using discrete modelling languages. The whole approach consists of modelling, validation, animation, linking databases to simulation tools and also the qualitative analysis of the data. In this paper, we detail the modelling and simulation of the TLR4 pathway with a coloured petri net simulation tool and the validation of this model against the semantic and mechanistic map from a biological database. These graphical maps contain all necessary reactions as a figure. We start with an UML class diagram to understand the static structure of molecules involved in the TLR4 pathway. Afterwards we model and simulate each "pathway step reaction" - one after another - to get the behaviour of the final system. The result is a model of the pathway which can be used in simulations, derived solely from basic chemical reactions in the database. Also, it is a lesson on critical points where human decision-making is needed, because not all the required information is stored directly in the database.

  11. Lipopolysaccharides with acylation defects potentiate TLR4 signaling and shape T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Ohne, Yoichiro; Degos, Clara; Gorvel, Laurent; Moriyón, Ignacio; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defects were capable of triggering a strong and early TLR4-dependent DC activation, which in turn led to the activation of the proteasome machinery dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Upon activation with tetra-acyl LPS both mouse and human dendritic cells triggered CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses and, importantly, human myeloid dendritic cells favored the induction of regulatory T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that LPS acylation controlled by pathogenic bacteria might be an important strategy to subvert adaptive immunity.

  12. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS): structure and characteristics of a potent TLR4 antagonist for in-vitro and in-vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Malgorzata-Miller, Gosia; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-09-27

    The pattern recognition receptor TLR4 is well known as a crucial receptor during infection and inflammation. Several TLR4 antagonists have been reported to inhibit the function of TLR4. Both natural occurring antagonists, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria as well as synthetic compounds based on the lipid A structure of LPS have been described as potent inhibitors of TLR4. Here, we have examined the characteristics of a natural TLR4 antagonist, isolated from Bartonella quintana bacterium by elucidating its chemical primary structure. We have found that this TLR4 antagonist is actually a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) instead of a LPS, and that it acts very effective, with a high inhibitory activity against triggering by the LPS-TLR4 system in the presence of a potent TLR4 agonist (E. coli LPS). Furthermore, we demonstrate that B. quintana LPS is not inactivated by polymyxin B, a classical cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic that bind the lipid A part of LPS, such as E. coli LPS. Using a murine LPS/D-galactosamine endotoxaemia model we showed that treatment with B. quintana LPS could improve the survival rate significantly. Since endogenous TLR4 ligands have been associated with several inflammatory- and immune-diseases, B. quintana LPS might be a novel therapeutic strategy for TLR4-driven pathologies.

  13. The critical role of ABCG1 and PPARγ/LXRα signaling in TLR4 mediates inflammatory responses and lipid accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaojie; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Chunhai; Wang, Qingsong; Guo, Lu; Ma, Qinlong; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Gang; Li, Binghu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chunyan; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Li, Jingcheng

    2017-04-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays critical roles in vascular inflammation, lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis development. However, the mechanisms underlying these processes are still not well established, especially in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) is one of the key genes mediating inflammation and cellular lipid accumulation. The function of TLR4 in regulating the expression of ABCG1 and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this study, we cultured VSMCs from the thoracic aortas of mice and treated the cells with 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) to activate TLR4 signaling. We observed that activating TLR4 with oxLDL induced inflammatory responses and lipid accumulation in VSMCs. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) and ABCG1 was inhibited by TLR4 activation. However, these effects could be reversed by knocking out TLR4. PPARγ activation by rosiglitazone rescued LXRα and ABCG1 expression and reduced TLR4-induced inflammation and lipid accumulation. Silencing PPARγ expression with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited LXRα and ABCG1 expression and, importantly, enhanced TLR4-induced inflammation and lipid accumulation. In conclusion, ABCG1 expression was down-regulated by TLR4, which induces inflammation and lipid accumulation in VSMCs via PPARγ/LXRα signaling. These findings indicate a novel molecular mechanism underlying TLR4-induced inflammation and lipid accumulation.

  14. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS): structure and characteristics of a potent TLR4 antagonist for in-vitro and in-vivo applications

    PubMed Central

    Malgorzata-Miller, Gosia; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern recognition receptor TLR4 is well known as a crucial receptor during infection and inflammation. Several TLR4 antagonists have been reported to inhibit the function of TLR4. Both natural occurring antagonists, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria as well as synthetic compounds based on the lipid A structure of LPS have been described as potent inhibitors of TLR4. Here, we have examined the characteristics of a natural TLR4 antagonist, isolated from Bartonella quintana bacterium by elucidating its chemical primary structure. We have found that this TLR4 antagonist is actually a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) instead of a LPS, and that it acts very effective, with a high inhibitory activity against triggering by the LPS-TLR4 system in the presence of a potent TLR4 agonist (E. coli LPS). Furthermore, we demonstrate that B. quintana LPS is not inactivated by polymyxin B, a classical cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic that bind the lipid A part of LPS, such as E. coli LPS. Using a murine LPS/D-galactosamine endotoxaemia model we showed that treatment with B. quintana LPS could improve the survival rate significantly. Since endogenous TLR4 ligands have been associated with several inflammatory- and immune-diseases, B. quintana LPS might be a novel therapeutic strategy for TLR4-driven pathologies. PMID:27670746

  15. Cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways in the arachidonic acid-induced inflammatory response in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Mateu, A; Ramudo, L; Manso, M A; De Dios, I

    2015-12-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is generally associated with inflammation in different settings. We assess the molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response exerted by AA on pancreatic acini as an approach to acute pancreatitis (AP). Celecoxib (COX-2 inhibitor), TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor) and 15d-PGJ2 (PPARγ agonist) were used to ascertain the signaling pathways. In addition, we examine the effects of TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 on AP induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO). To carry out in vitro studies, acini were isolated from pancreas of control rats. Generation of PGE2 and TXB2, activation of pro-inflammatory pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, and JAK/STAT3) and overexpression of CCL2 and P-selectin was found in AA-treated acini. In addition, AA up-regulated TLR4 and down-regulated PPARγ expression. Celecoxib prevented the up-regulation of CCL2 and P-selectin but did not show any effect on the AA-mediated changes in TLR4 and PPARγ expression. TAK-242, reduced the generation of AA metabolites and repressed both the cascade of pro-inflammatory events which led to CCL2 and P-selectin overexpression as well as the AA-induced PPARγ down-regulation. Thus, TLR4 acts as upstream activating pro-inflammatory and inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways. 15d-PGJ2 down-regulated TLR4 expression and hence prevented the synthesis of AA metabolites and the inflammatory response mediated by them. Reciprocal negative cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways is evidenced. In vivo experiments showed that TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 treatments reduced the inflammatory response in BPDO-induced AP. We conclude that through TLR4-dependent mechanisms, AA up-regulated CCL2 and P-selectin in pancreatic acini, partly mediated by the generation of PGE2 and TXB2, which activated pro-inflammatory pathways, but also directly by down-regulating PPARγ expression with anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro and in vivo studies support the role of TLR4 in AP and the use of TLR4 inhibitors and

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of NRG1 Common and Rare Variants in Hirschsprung Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Torroglosa, Ana; Núñez-Torres, Rocío; Enguix-Riego, María Valle; Fernández, Raquel María; de Agustín, Juan Carlos; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud

    2012-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by the absence of ganglion cells along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in tonic contraction of the aganglionic gut segment and functional intestinal obstruction. The RET proto-oncogene is the major gene for HSCR with differential contributions of its rare and common, coding and noncoding mutations to the multifactorial nature of this pathology. Many other genes have been described to be associated with the pathology, as NRG1 gene (8p12), encoding neuregulin 1, which is implicated in the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS), and seems to contribute by both common and rare variants. Here we present the results of a comprehensive analysis of the NRG1 gene in the context of the disease in a series of 207 Spanish HSCR patients, by both mutational screening of its coding sequence and evaluation of 3 common tag SNPs as low penetrance susceptibility factors, finding some potentially damaging variants which we have functionally characterized. All of them were found to be associated with a significant reduction of the normal NRG1 protein levels. The fact that those mutations analyzed alter NRG1 protein would suggest that they would be related with HSCR disease not only in Chinese but also in a Caucasian population, which reinforces the implication of NRG1 gene in this pathology. PMID:22574178

  17. Contribution of rare and common variants determine complex diseases-Hirschsprung disease as a model.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maria M; Sribudiani, Yunia; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Amiel, Jeanne; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud; Ceccherini, Isabella; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Fernández, Raquel M; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercè; Griseri, Paola; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Tam, Paul K; van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; Eggen, Bart J L; te Meerman, Gerard J; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2013-10-01

    Finding genes for complex diseases has been the goal of many genetic studies. Most of these studies have been successful by searching for genes and mutations in rare familial cases, by screening candidate genes and by performing genome wide association studies. However, only a small fraction of the total genetic risk for these complex genetic diseases can be explained by the identified mutations and associated genetic loci. In this review we focus on Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) as an example of a complex genetic disorder. We describe the genes identified in this congenital malformation and postulate that both common 'low penetrant' variants in combination with rare or private 'high penetrant' variants determine the risk on HSCR, and likely, on other complex diseases. We also discuss how new technological advances can be used to gain further insights in the genetic background of complex diseases. Finally, we outline a few steps to develop functional assays in order to determine the involvement of these variants in disease development.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide promotes adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Kwon, Seong-Min; Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2011-02-01

    Odontoblasts and/or dental pulp cells are responsible for tooth repair and dentin formation. Furthermore, adhesion and migration are critical processes for tissue regeneration. This study was performed to clarify whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modulates adhesion and migration of the murine odontoblast-like cell line MDPC-23, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is engaged in this process. TLR4 expression in MDPC-23 cells was examined by RT-PCR. Adhesion assay was performed using type I collagen-coated plates. Migration ability was determined by a commercial assay kit. Phosphorylation of IκB-α, FAK, AKT, and ERK was examined by Western blot analysis. TLR4 was functionally expressed in MDPC-23 cells. LPS treatment enhanced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Blockade of TLR4 using its antibody restored LPS-induced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells. These findings indicate that LPS, an immune activator from Gram-negative bacteria, can promote the adhesion and migration ability of MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

  19. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J.; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R.; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin αM (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS.

  20. Insights into the species-specific TLR4 signaling mechanism in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 in complex with MD2 senses the presence of lipid A (LA) and initiates a signaling cascade that curb the infection. This complex is evolutionarily conserved and can initiate the immune system in response to a variety of LAs. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation (25 ns) was performed to elucidate the differential behavior of TLR4/MD2 complex in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RsLA). Penta-acyl chain-containing RsLA is at the verge of agonist (6 acyl-chains) and antagonist (4 acyl-chains) structure, and activates the TLR4 pathway in horses and hamsters, while inhibiting in humans and murine. In the time-evolved coordinates, the promising factors that dictated the differential response included the local and global mobility pattern of complexes, solvent-accessible surface area of ligand, and surface charge distributions of TLR4 and MD2. We showed that the GlcN1-GlcN2 backbone acquires agonist (3FXI)-like configurations in horses and hamsters, while acquiring antagonist (2E59)-like configurations in humans and murine systems. Moreover, analysis of F126 behavior in the MD2 F126 loop (amino acids 123-129) and loop EF (81-89) suggested that certain sequence variations also contribute to species-specific response. This study underlines the TLR4 signaling mechanism and provides new therapeutic opportunities.

  1. TLR3 or TLR4 Activation Enhances Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Mediated Treg Induction via Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Rashedi, Iran; Gómez-Aristizábal, Alejandro; Wang, Xing-Hua; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Keating, Armand

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the subject of numerous clinical trials, largely due to their immunomodulatory and tissue regenerative properties. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLR3 and TLR4, are highly expressed on MSCs and their activation can significantly modulate the immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory functions of MSCs. While MSCs can recruit and promote the generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs), the effect of TLR activation on MSC-mediated Treg induction is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of ligand-mediated activation of TLR3 and TLR4 on Treg induction by human MSCs. We found that generation of Tregs in human CD4(+) lymphocyte and MSC cocultures was enhanced by either TLR3 or TLR4 activation of MSCs and that the increase was abolished by TLR3 and TLR4 gene-silencing. Augmented Treg induction by TLR-activated MSCs was cell contact-dependent and associated with increased gene expression of the Notch ligand, Delta-like 1. Moreover, inhibition of Notch signaling abrogated the augmented Treg levels in the MSC cocultures. Our data show that TLR3 or TLR4 activation of MSCs increases Treg induction via the Notch pathway and suggest new means to enhance the potency of MSCs for treating disorders with an underlying immune dysfunction, including steroid resistant acute graft-versus-host disease. Stem Cells 2017;35:265-275.

  2. Osmotin attenuates LPS-induced neuroinflammation and memory impairments via the TLR4/NFκB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Badshah, Haroon; Ali, Tahir; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in the brain mediates autoimmune responses and induces neuroinflammation that results in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The plant hormone osmotin inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TLR4 downstream signaling, including activation of TLR4, CD14, IKKα/β, and NFκB, and the release of inflammatory mediators, such as COX-2, TNF-α, iNOS, and IL-1β. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated colocalization of TLR4 and AdipoR1 receptors in BV2 microglial cells, which suggests that osmotin binds to AdipoR1 and inhibits downstream TLR4 signaling. Furthermore, osmotin treatment reversed LPS-induced behavioral and memory disturbances and attenuated LPS-induced increases in the expression of AD markers, such as Aβ, APP, BACE-1, and p-Tau. Osmotin improved synaptic functionality via enhancing the activity of pre- and post-synaptic markers, like PSD-95, SNAP-25, and syntaxin-1. Osmotin also prevented LPS-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration via inhibition of PARP-1 and caspase-3. Overall, our studies demonstrated that osmotin prevented neuroinflammation-associated memory impairment and neurodegeneration and suggest AdipoR1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurological disorders, such as AD. PMID:27093924

  3. The molecular mechanism of species-specific recognition of lipopolysaccharides by the MD-2/TLR4 receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Oblak, Alja; Jerala, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Lipid A, a component of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, is a conserved microbe-associated molecular pattern that activates the MD-2/TLR4 receptor complex. Nevertheless, bacteria produce lipid A molecules of considerable structural diversity. The human MD-2/TLR4 receptor most efficiently recognizes hexaacylated bisphosphorylated lipid A produced by enterobacteria, but in some animal species the immune response can be elicited also by alternative lipid A varieties, such as tetraacylated lipid IVa or pentaacylated lipid A of Rhodobacter spheroides. Several crystal structures revealed that hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated lipid IVa activate the murine MD-2/TLR4 in a similar manner, but failed to explain the antagonistic vs. agonistic activity of lipid IVa in the human vs. equine receptor, respectively. Targeted mutagenesis studies of the receptor complex revealed intricate combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions primarily within the MD-2 co-receptor, but with a contribution of TLR4 as well, that contribute to species-specific recognition of lipid A. We will review current knowledge regarding lipid A diversity and species-specific activation of the MD-2/TLR4 receptor complex in different species (e.g. human, mouse or equine) by lipid A varieties.

  4. Effect of herbal melanin on IL-8: a possible role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4).

    PubMed

    El-Obeid, Adila; Hassib, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Westermark, Bengt

    2006-06-16

    The production of IL-8 can be induced by LPS via TLR4 signaling pathway. In this study, we tested the effect of a herbal melanin (HM) extract, from black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.), on IL-8 production. We used HM and LPS in parallel to induce IL-8 production by THP-I, PBMCs, and TLR4-transfected HEK293 cells. Both HM and LPS induced IL-8 mRNA expression and protein production in THP-1 and PBMCs. On applying similar treatment to HEK293 cells that express TLR4, MD2, and CD14, both HM and LPS significantly induced IL-8 protein production. We have also demonstrated that HM and LPS had identical effects in terms of IL-8 stimulation by HEK293 transfected with either TLR4 or MD2-CD14. Melanin extracted from N. sativa L. mimics the action of LPS in the induction of IL-8 by PBMC and the other used cell lines. Our results suggest that HM may share a signaling pathway with LPS that involves TLR4.

  5. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M; Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collée, J Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I; Neuhausen, Susan L; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V; Nielsen, Finn C; Greene, Mark H; Greene, Mark I; Mai, Phuong L; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Daly, Mark J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Altshuler, David M; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-10-28

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5) and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4). These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  6. Common susceptibility variants are shared between schizophrenia and psoriasis in the Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xianyong; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Wang, Kai; Yue, Weihua; Norgren, Nina; Wang, Ling; Yao, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Wu, Bo; Cui, Yong; Shen, Changbing; Cheng, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Zheng, Xiaodong; Fan, Xing; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Lifang; Lee, Jimmy; Lam, Max; Tai, E. Shyong; Zhang, Zheng; Huang, Qiong; Sun, Liangdan; Xu, Jinhua; Yang, Sen; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Liu, Jianjun; Schork, Nicholas J.; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that individuals with schizophrenia have a greater risk for psoriasis than a typical person. This suggests that there might be a shared genetic etiology between the 2 conditions. We aimed to characterize the potential shared genetic susceptibility between schizophrenia and psoriasis using genome-wide marker genotype data. Methods We obtained genetic data on individuals with psoriasis, schizophrenia and control individuals. We applied a marker-based coheritability estimation procedure, polygenic score analysis, a gene set enrichment test and a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression model to estimate the potential shared genetic etiology between the 2 diseases. We validated the results in independent schizophrenia and psoriasis cohorts from Singapore. Results We included 1139 individuals with psoriasis, 744 with schizophrenia and 1678 controls in our analysis, and we validated the results in independent cohorts, including 441 individuals with psoriasis (and 2420 controls) and 1630 with schizophrenia (and 1860 controls). We estimated that a large fraction of schizophrenia and psoriasis risk could be attributed to common variants (h2SNP = 29% ± 5.0%, p = 2.00 × 10−8), with a coheritability estimate between the traits of 21%. We identified 5 variants within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene region, which were most likely to be associated with both diseases and collectively conferred a significant risk effect (odds ratio of highest risk quartile = 6.03, p < 2.00 × 10−16). We discovered that variants contributing most to the shared heritable component between psoriasis and schizophrenia were enriched in antigen processing and cell endoplasmic reticulum. Limitations Our sample size was relatively small. The findings of 5 HLA gene variants were complicated by the complex structure in the HLA region. Conclusion We found evidence for a shared genetic etiology between schizophrenia and psoriasis. The

  7. Association of primary open-angle glaucoma with mitochondrial variants and haplogroups common in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gudiseva, Harini V.; Trachtman, Benjamin; Bowman, Anita S.; Sagaser, Anna; Sankar, Prithvi; Miller-Ellis, Eydie; Lehman, Amanda; Addis, Victoria; O'Brien, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the population frequencies of all common mitochondrial variants and ancestral haplogroups among 1,999 subjects recruited for the Primary Open-Angle African American Glaucoma Genetics (POAAGG) Study, including 1,217 primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) cases and 782 controls, and to identify ancestral subpopulations and mitochondrial mutations as potential risk factors for POAG susceptibility. Methods Subject classification by characteristic glaucomatous optic nerve findings and corresponding visual field defects, as defined by enrolling glaucoma specialists, stereo disc photography, phlebotomy, extraction of total DNA from peripheral blood or saliva, DNA quantification and normalization, PCR amplification of whole mitochondrial genomes, Ion Torrent deep semiconductor DNA sequencing on DNA pools (“Pool-seq”), Sanger sequencing of 3,479 individual mitochondrial DNAs, and bioinformatic analysis. Results The distribution of common African haplogroups within the POAAGG study population was broadly similar to prior surveys of African Americans. However, the POAG case population was found to be enriched in L1c2 haplogroups, which are defined in part by missense mutations m.6150G>A (Val83Ile, odds ratio [OR] 1.8, p=0.01), m.6253C>T (Met117Thr, rs200165736, OR 1.6, p=0.04), and m.6480G>A (Val193Ile, rs199476128, OR 4.6, p=0.04) in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (MT-CO1) gene and by a variant, m.2220A>G (OR 2.0, p=0.01), in MT-RNR2, which encodes the mitochondrial ribosomal 16s RNA gene. L2 haplogroups were predicted to be overrepresented in the POAG case population by Pool-seq, and the difference was confirmed to be significant with Sanger sequencing, that targeted the L2-associated variants m.2416T>C (rs28358580, OR 1.2, p=0.02) and m.2332C>T (OR 1.2, p=.02) in MT-RNR2. Another variant within MT-RNR2, m.3010G>A (rs3928306), previously implicated in sensitivity to the optic neuropathy-associated antibiotic linezolid, and arising on D4 and J1

  8. Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-stimulated mesencephalic astrocytes by interference with TLR4 and downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Song; Wang, Xu; He, Xingliang; Wang, Yue; Gao, Sujie; Ren, Lu; Shi, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Neuroinflammation is closely associated with the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidence indicates that astrocytes also play pro-inflammatory roles in the central nervous system (CNS) by activation with toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Therefore, targeting anti-inflammation may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for PD. Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound isolated from Curcuma longa root, has been commonly used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the details of how curcumin exerts neuroprotection remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the protective effect of curcumin on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-(MPP(+)-) stimulated primary astrocytes. Our results showed that MPP(+) stimulation resulted in significant production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL-6), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in primary mesencephalic astrocytes. Curcumin pretreatment decreased the levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines while increased IL-10 expression in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. In addition, curcumin increased the levels of antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and reduced ROS production. Our results further showed that curcumin decreased the levels of TLR4 and its downstream effectors including NF-κB, IRF3, MyD88, and TIRF that are induced by MPP(+) as well as inhibited the immunoreactivity of TLR4 and morphological activation in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. Together, data suggest that curcumin might exert a beneficial effect on neuroinflammation in the pathophysiology of PD.

  9. Distinct Roles for Dectin-1 and TLR4 in the Pathogenesis of Aspergillus fumigatus Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Sixto M.; Cowden, Susan; Hsia, Yen-Cheng; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Momany, Michelle; Pearlman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus species are a major worldwide cause of corneal ulcers, resulting in visual impairment and blindness in immunocompetent individuals. To enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of Aspergillus keratitis, we developed a murine model in which red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing A. fumigatus (Af293.1RFP) conidia are injected into the corneal stroma, and disease progression and fungal survival are tracked over time. Using Mafia mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, we demonstrated that the presence of resident corneal macrophages is essential for production of IL-1β and CXCL1/KC, and for recruitment of neutrophils and mononuclear cells into the corneal stroma. We found that β-glucan was highly expressed on germinating conidia and hyphae in the cornea stroma, and that both Dectin-1 and phospho-Syk were up-regulated in infected corneas. Additionally, we show that infected Dectin-1−/− corneas have impaired IL-1β and CXCL1/KC production, resulting in diminished cellular infiltration and fungal clearance compared with control mice, especially during infection with clinical isolates expressing high β-glucan. In contrast to Dectin 1−/− mice, cellular infiltration into infected TLR2−/−, TLR4−/−, and MD-2−/− mice corneas was unimpaired, indicating no role for these receptors in cell recruitment; however, fungal killing was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− mice, but not TLR2−/− or MD-2−/− mice. We also found that TRIF−/− and TIRAP−/− mice exhibited no fungal-killing defects, but that MyD88−/− and IL-1R1−/− mice were unable to regulate fungal growth. In conclusion, these data are consistent with a model in which β-glucan on A.fumigatus germinating conidia activates Dectin-1 on corneal macrophages to produce IL-1β, and CXCL1, which together with IL-1R1/MyD88-dependent activation, results in recruitment of neutrophils to the corneal stroma and TLR4

  10. Genetic Association Analysis of Common Variants in FOXO3 Related to Longevity in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongjing; Liao, Xiaoping; Wang, Xianshou; Fu, Yunxin; Cai, Wangwei

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that forkhead box class O3 (FOXO3) functions as a key regulator for the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1signaling pathway that influence aging and longevity. This study aimed to comprehensively elucidate the association of common genetic variants in FOXO3 with human longevity in a Chinese population. Eighteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FOXO3 were successfully genotyped in 616 unrelated long-lived individuals and 846 younger controls. No nominally significant effects were found. However, when stratifying by gender, four SNPs (rs10499051, rs7762395, rs4946933 and rs3800230) previously reported to be associated with longevity and one novel SNP (rs4945815) showed significant association with male longevity (P-values: 0.007–0.032), but all SNPs were not associated with female longevity. Correspondingly, males carrying the G-G-T-G haplotype of rs10499051, rs7762395, rs4945815 and rs3800230 tended to have longer lifespan than those carrying the most common haplotype A-G-C-T (odds ratio = 2.36, 95% confidence interval = 1.20–4.63, P = 0.013). However, none of the associated SNPs and haplotype remained significant after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the FOXO3 variants we tested in our population of Chinese men and women were associated with longevity in men only. None of these associations passed Bonferroni correction. Bonferroni correction is very stringent for association studies. We therefore believe the effects of these nominally significant variants on human longevity will be confirmed by future studies. PMID:27936216

  11. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Daniel R; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Fallgaard Nielsen, Sune; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Stančáková, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A; Groves, Christopher J; Rayner, N William; Neville, Matt J; Robertson, Neil R; Yiorkas, Andrianos M; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton JM; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian’an; Scott, Robert A; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David CM; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Felix, Janine F; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstig, Anders; Reily, Dermot F; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh F; Highland, Heather M; Justice, Anne E; Marouli, Eirini; Lindström, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D; Jousilahti, Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J; Brown, Morris J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Connell, John M; Jukema, J Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul IW; Numans, Mattijs E; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva RB; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Blakemore, Alexandra IF; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex SF; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin NA; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Käräjämäki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S; Shafi Majumder, Abdulla al; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrières, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Caulfield, Mark J; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up to ~192,000 individuals, and used ~155,063 samples for independent replication. We identified 31 novel blood pressure or hypertension associated genetic regions in the general population, including three rare missense variants in RBM47, COL21A1 and RRAS with larger effects (>1.5mmHg/allele) than common variants. Multiple rare, nonsense and missense variant associations were found in A2ML1 and a low-frequency nonsense variant in ENPEP was identified. Our data extend the spectrum of allelic variation underlying blood pressure traits and hypertension, provide new insights into the pathophysiology of hypertension and indicate new targets for clinical intervention. PMID:27618447

  12. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Young, Robin; Warren, Helen; Cook, James P; Manning, Alisa K; Grarup, Niels; Sim, Xueling; Barnes, Daniel R; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Stančáková, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A; Groves, Christopher J; Rayner, N William; Neville, Matt J; Robertson, Neil R; Yiorkas, Andrianos M; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton J M; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian'an; Scott, Robert A; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C M; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Felix, Janine F; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstig, Anders; Reilly, Dermot F; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas F; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh S; Highland, Heather M; Justice, Anne E; Marouli, Eirini; Lindström, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D; Jousilahti, Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J; Brown, Morris J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Connell, John M; Jukema, J Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I W; Numans, Mattijs E; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva R B; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex S F; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Käräjämäki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrières, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David J; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Caulfield, Mark J; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J; Saleheen, Danish; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Danesh, John; Wain, Louise V; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Munroe, Patricia B

    2016-10-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up to 192,763 individuals and used ∼155,063 samples for independent replication. We identified 30 new blood pressure- or hypertension-associated genetic regions in the general population, including 3 rare missense variants in RBM47, COL21A1 and RRAS with larger effects (>1.5 mm Hg/allele) than common variants. Multiple rare nonsense and missense variant associations were found in A2ML1, and a low-frequency nonsense variant in ENPEP was identified. Our data extend the spectrum of allelic variation underlying blood pressure traits and hypertension, provide new insights into the pathophysiology of hypertension and indicate new targets for clinical intervention.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is correlated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor prognosis in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunxiao; Zhou, Wei; Yan, Zhaoyue; Qu, Mingqi; Bu, Xingyao

    2015-12-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of key players in regulation of inflammation. Animal experiments have suggested an important role of TLR4 in the pathophysiology of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In present study, TLR4 is investigated in clinical SAH patients to explore its clinical significance. 30 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and 20 healthy control patients (HC) were enrolled in this prospective study. Blood samples were collected on days 1, 3 and 7 after admission. TLR4 expression level on cell surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was determined by flow cytometry and presented as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Patients were clinically assessed every day after admission to monitor the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Participants were followed up until completion of 3 months after SAH. Functional outcome was defined by modified Rankin score (mRs). Results show that SAH patients presented a significantly higher TLR4 levels on days 1 and 3 post SAH compared to HC; TLR4 levels in SAH patients on day 1 was highest compared with that on days 3 and 7 and in HC. TLR4 of SAH patients on day 7 declined to the level showing no significant difference with that of HC. In patients with Hunt-Hess grades I-III lower TLR4 levels were observed. Patients with DCI showed significantly higher TLR4 levels than those without DCI. High TLR4 levels were statistically significantly associated with poor functional outcome after 3 months. Logistic regression analysis showed that TLR4 level on day 1 was independent predictor for DCI and 3-month poor neurological outcome of aneurysmal SAH patients. In summary, admission TLR4 level on PBMCs (day 1) is an independent risk factor to predict the occurrence of DCI and 3-month poor neurological outcome in aneurysmal SAH patients.

  14. Peroxiredoxin 1-mediated activation of TLR4/NF-κB pathway contributes to neuroinflammatory injury in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Ling; Zhao, Li-Xue; Zhang, Shuang; Du, Jun-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The proinflammatory properties of extracellular peroxiredoxins (Prxs) via induction of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation have been gradually revealed under diverse stress conditions, including cerebral ischemia but not hemorrhage. Prx1 is proposed to be a major hemorrhagic stress-inducible isoform of Prxs during acute and subacute phases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the potential of Prx1 in the neuroinflammatory injury after ICH remains unclear. This study investigated the proinflammatory effect and underlying mechanism of extracellular Prx1 in cultured murine macrophages and a collagenase-induced mouse ICH model. The current results show that incubation of exogenous Prx1 (0-50nM) with murine RAW264.7 macrophages resulted in increased expression of TLR4, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 and production of proinflammatory mediators (NO, TNF-a and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, ICH induced murine neurological deficits, cerebral edema and neuropathological alterations, such as neuron injury, astrocyte and microglia/macrophage activation, and neutrophil and T lymphocyte invasion up to 72h after ICH. Moreover, ICH stimulated Prx1 expression and extracellular release, TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation, reflected by increases in TLR4 expression, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and NF-κB activation, and production of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17). Taken together, these findings suggest that extracellular Prx1-mediated TLR4/NF-κB pathway activation probably contributes to neuroinflammatory injury after ICH, and thus blocking Prx1-TLR4 signaling might provide a novel anti-neuroinflammatory strategy with extended therapeutic window for hemorrhagic stroke.

  15. IinQ attenuates systemic inflammatory responses via selectively impairing the Myddosome complex formation upon TLR4 ligation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kidong; Won, Minho; Yuk, Jae-Min; Park, Chan-Yong; Byun, Hee Sun; Park, Kyeong Ah; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Young-Goo; Shen, Han-Ming; Lee, Ill Young; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-12-01

    A specific small-molecule inhibitor of the TLR4 signaling complex upstream of the IKK would likely provide therapeutic benefit for NF-κB-mediated inflammatory disease. We previously identified brazilin as a selective upstream IKK inhibitor targeting the Myddosome complex. In this study, using a cell-based ubiquitination assay for IRAK1 and a chemical library comprising a series of structural analogues of brazilin, a novel small molecule, 2-hydroxy-5,6-dihydroisoindolo[1,2-a]isoquinoline-3,8-dione (IinQ), was identified as a selective and potent inhibitor of IRAK1-dependent NF-κB activation upon TLR4 ligation. In RAW264.7 macrophages, IinQ drastically suppressed activation of upstream IKK signaling events including membrane-bound IRAK1 ubiquitination and IKK phosphorylation by the TLR4 ligand, resulting in reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators including IL-6, TNF-α, and nitric oxide. Interestingly, IinQ did not suppress NF-κB activation via the TLR3 ligand, DNA damaging agents, or a protein kinase C activator, indicating IinQ is specific for TLR4 signaling. Analysis of upstream signaling events further confirmed that IinQ disrupts the MyD88-IRAK1-TRAF6 complex formation induced by LPS treatment, without affecting TLR4 oligomerization. Moreover, intravenous administration of IinQ significantly reduced lethality and attenuated systemic inflammatory responses in an in vivo mouse model of endotoxin shock following LPS challenge. Thus, IinQ represents a novel class of brazilin analogues with improved potency and specificity toward disruption of Myddosome complex formation in TLR4 signaling, indicating that IinQ may be a promising therapeutic candidate for the treatment of systemic inflammatory diseases.

  16. Maximizing the potency of an anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibody by exploiting proximity to Fcγ receptors

    PubMed Central

    Loyau, Jérémy; Malinge, Pauline; Daubeuf, Bruno; Shang, Limin; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas; Rousseau, François

    2014-01-01

    In order to treat Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated diseases, we generated a potent antagonistic antibody directed against human TLR4, Hu 15C1. This antibody's potency can be modulated by engaging not only TLR4 but also Fcγ receptors (FcγR), a mechanism that is driven by avidity and not cell signaling. Here, using various formats of the antibody, we further dissect the relative contributions of the Fv and Fc portions of Hu 15C1, discovering that the relationship to potency of the different antibody arms is not linear. First, as could be anticipated, we observed that Hu 15C1 co-engages up to 3 receptors on the same plasma membrane, i.e., 2 TLR4 molecules (via its variable regions) and either FcγRI or FcγRIIA (via the Fc). The Kd of these interactions are in the nM range (3 nM of the Fv for TLR4 and 47 nM of the Fc for FcγRI). However, unexpectedly, neutralization experiments revealed that, due to the low level of cell surface TLR4 expression, the avidity afforded by engagement through 2 Fv arms was significantly limited. In contrast, the antibody's neutralization capacity increases by 3 logs when able to exploit Fc-FcγR interactions. Taken together, these results demonstrate an unforeseen level of contribution by FcγRs to an antibody's effectiveness when targeting a cell surface protein of relatively low abundance. These findings highlight an exploitable mechanism by which FcγR-bearing cells may be more powerfully targeted, envisioned to be broadly applicable to other reagents aimed at neutralizing cell surface targets on cells co-expressing FcγRs. PMID:25484053

  17. Involvement of TLR2 and TLR4 in inflammatory immune responses induced by fine and coarse ambient air particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfelt, Joanna; Mitkus, Robert J.; Zeisler, Rolf; Spatz, Rabia O.; Powell, Jan; Fenton, Matthew J.; Squibb, Katherine A.; Medvedev, Andrei E.

    2009-01-01

    Induction of proinflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient air particulate matter has been suggested to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and allergic diseases in the lungs. However, receptors and mechanisms underlying these responses have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether TLR2, TLR4, and the key adaptor protein, MyD88, mediate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to fine and coarse PM. TLR2 deficiency blunted macrophage TNF-α and IL-6 expression in response to fine (PM2.5), while not affecting cytokine-inducing ability of coarse NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1648) particles. In contrast, TLR4−/− macrophages showed inhibited cytokine expression upon stimulation with NIST SRM 1648 but exhibited normal responses to PM2.5. Preincubation with polymyxin B markedly suppressed the capacity of NIST SRM 1648 to elicit TNF-α and IL-6, indicating endotoxin as a principal inducer of cytokine responses. Overexpression of TLR2 in TLR2/4-deficient human embryonic kidney 293 cells imparted PM2.5 sensitivity, as judged by IL-8 gene expression, whereas NIST SRM 1648, but not PM2.5 elicited IL-8 expression in 293/TLR4/MD-2 transfectants. Engagement of TLR4 by NIST SRM 1648 induced MyD88-independent expression of the chemokine RANTES, while TLR2-reactive NIST IRM PM2.5 failed to up-regulate this response. Consistent with the shared use of MyD88 by TLR2 and TLR4, cytokine responses of MyD88−/− macrophages to both types of air PM were significantly reduced. These data indicate differential utilization of TLR2 and TLR4 but shared use of MyD88 by fine and coarse air pollution particles. PMID:19406832

  18. Microglial activation by Citrobacter koseri is mediated by TLR4- and MyD88-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuliang; Kielian, Tammy

    2009-11-01

    Citrobacter koseri is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause a highly aggressive form of neonatal meningitis, which often progresses to establish multifocal brain abscesses. Despite its tropism for the brain parenchyma, microglial responses to C. koseri have not yet been examined. Microglia use TLRs to recognize invading pathogens and elicit proinflammatory mediator expression important for infection containment. In this study, we investigated the importance of the LPS receptor TLR4 and MyD88, an adaptor molecule involved in the activation of the majority of TLRs in addition to the IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, for their roles in regulating microglial activation in response to C. koseri. Proinflammatory mediator release was significantly reduced in TLR4 mutant and MyD88 knockout microglia compared with wild-type cells following exposure to either live or heat-killed C. koseri, indicating a critical role for both TLR4- and MyD88-dependent pathways in microglial responses to this pathogen. However, residual proinflammatory mediator expression was still observed in TLR4 mutant and MyD88 KO microglia following C. koseri exposure, indicating a contribution of TLR4- and MyD88-independent pathway(s) for maximal pathogen recognition. Interestingly, C. koseri was capable of surviving intracellularly in both primary microglia and macrophages, suggesting that these cells may serve as a reservoir for the pathogen during CNS infections. These results demonstrate that microglia respond to C. koseri with the robust expression of proinflammatory molecules, which is dictated, in part, by TLR4- and MyD88-dependent signals.

  19. Species-specific activation of TLR4 by hypoacylated endotoxins governed by residues 82 and 122 of MD-2.

    PubMed

    Oblak, Alja; Jerala, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 receptor complex recognizes endotoxin, a Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope component. Recognition of the most potent hexaacylated form of endotoxin is mediated by the sixth acyl chain that protrudes from the MD-2 hydrophobic pocket and bridges TLR4/MD-2 to the neighboring TLR4 ectodomain, driving receptor dimerization via hydrophobic interactions. In hypoacylated endotoxins all acyl chains could be accommodated within the binding pocket of the human hMD-2. Nevertheless, tetra- and pentaacylated endotoxins activate the TLR4/MD-2 receptor of several species. We observed that amino acid residues 82 and 122, located at the entrance to the endotoxin binding site of MD-2, have major influence on the species-specific endotoxin recognition. We show that substitution of hMD-2 residue V82 with an amino acid residue with a bulkier hydrophobic side chain enables activation of TLR4/MD-2 by pentaacylated and tetraacylated endotoxins. Interaction of the lipid A phosphate group with the amino acid residue 122 of MD-2 facilitates the appropriate positioning of the hypoacylated endotoxin. Moreover, mouse TLR4 contributes to the agonistic effect of pentaacylated msbB endotoxin. We propose a molecular model that explains how the molecular differences between the murine or equine MD-2, which both have sufficiently large hydrophobic pockets to accommodate all five or four acyl chains, influence the positioning of endotoxin so that one of the acyl chains remains outside the pocket and enables hydrophobic interactions with TLR4, leading to receptor activation.

  20. Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Baird, Gillian; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Casey, Jillian; Conroy, Judith; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Jacob, Suma; Kenny, Graham P.; Kim, Cecilia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Law-Smith, Miriam; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lombard, Frances; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Mantoulan, Carine; McDougle, Christopher J.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Noakes, Carolyn; Nygren, Gudrun; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Posey, David J.; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Regan, Regina; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Schlitt, Sabine; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Sykes, Nuala; Tancredi, Raffaella; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, JAS; Wallace, Simon; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bailey, Anthony J.; Battaglia, Agatino; Cantor, Rita M.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Dawson, Geraldine; Ennis, Sean; Freitag, Christine M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Klauck, Sabine M.; McMahon, William M.; Maestrini, Elena; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar; Parr, Jeremy R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Piven, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vicente, Astrid M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; Hallmayer, Joachim; Paterson, Andrew D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm< 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest. PMID:22843504

  1. Extract of Reishi polysaccharides induces cytokine expression via TLR4-modulated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Lin, Chun-Hung; Hsu, Jason; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2004-11-15

    We have demonstrated that an extract of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi or Ling-Zhi) polysaccharides (EORP) exerts immunomodulating activities by stimulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines from mouse spleen cells. Interestingly, via responding to LPS in genetic variation of murine macrophage HeNC2 and GG2EE cell lines, and using TLR4 Ab blockage in human blood-derived monocytic macrophages, we have found that the TLR4, but not complement receptor type 3, is a putative receptor of EORP, mediating the consequent immunomodulating events associated with IL-1 gene expression. Based on our studies of reactive oxygen species production, polymyxin B inhibition, and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, we ruled out the possibility of LPS contamination in EORP. We have found that EORP differentially modulates the protein kinase (PK)-mediated signal transduction pathways associated with inflammatory cytokine IL-1. In human macrophages and murine macrophage J774A.1 cells, EORP was found to up-regulate IL-1 secretion and pro-IL-1 (precursor of IL-1) as well as IL-1-converting enzyme expression. Specifically, EORP rapidly stimulates PTK-mediated phosphorylation, followed by induction of PKs and activation of MAPKs: ERK, JNK, and p38. Using PK inhibitors in the kinase activity assays, Western blot analyses and IL-1 ELISA, we have extensively examined and dissected the role of individual PK in the regulation of pro-IL-1/IL-1. Our findings establish that EORP-mediated signaling pathways are involved in the pro-IL-1/IL-1 regulation: PTK/protein kinase C/MEK1/ERK and PTK/Rac1/p21-activated kinase/p38.

  2. TLR4-dependent internalization of CX3CR1 aggravates sepsis-induced immunoparalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xin-Yu; Fang, Shang-Ping; Zhou, Miao; Luo, Jing; Wei, Juan; Wen, Xue-Ping; Yan, Xiao-Di; Zou, Zui

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, the most severe manifestation of infection, poses a major challenge to health-care systems around the world. Limited ability to clean and remove the pathogen renders difficulty in septic patients to recover from the phase of immunoparalysis. The present study found the vital role of CX3CR1 internalization on sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. A mouse model with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and cell model with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were employed to explore the relationship between CX3CR1 internalization and septic immunoparalysis. Immunoparalysis model in mice was established 4 days after CLP with significantly decreased proinflammatory cytokines. Flow cytometry analysis found a decreased surface expression of CX3CR1 during immunoparalysis, which was associated with reduced mRNA level and increased internalization of CX3CR1. G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and β-arrestin2 were significantly increased during septic immunoparalysis and involved in the internalization of CX3CR1. TLR4-/- or TLR4 inhibitor-treated macrophages exhibited an inhibited expression of GRK2 and β-arrestin2, along with reduced internalization of CX3CR1. Moreover, the knockdown of GRK2 and β-arrestin2 inhibited the internalization of CX3CR1 and led to a higher response on the second hit, which was associated with an increased activation of NF-κB. The critical association between internalization of CX3CR1 and immunosuppression in sepsis may provide a novel reference for clinical therapeutics. PMID:28078040

  3. TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2 mediate immune recognition of putative newly identified periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, J; Jiao, Y Z; Schaff, R A; Hao, J; Morelli, T; Kinney, J S; Gerow, E; Sheridan, R; Rodrigues, V; Paster, B J; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that results from the interaction between the oral microbiota and the host immunity. Although the innate immune response is important for disease initiation and progression, the innate immune receptors that recognize both classical and putative periodontal pathogens that elicit an immune response have not been elucidated. By using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM), we identified multiple predominant oral bacterial species in human plaque biofilm that strongly associate with severe periodontitis. Ten of the identified species were evaluated in greater depth, six being classical pathogens and four putative novel pathogens. Using human peripheral blood monocytes (HPBM) and murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type (WT) and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific and MyD88 knockouts (KOs), we demonstrated that heat-killed Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, Selenomonas infelix, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia mediate high immunostimulatory activity. Campylobacter concisus, C. rectus, and S. infelix exhibited robust TLR4 stimulatory activity. Studies using mesothelial cells from WT and NOD1-specific KOs and NOD2-expressing human embryonic kidney cells demonstrated that Eubacterium saphenum, Eubacterium nodatum and Filifactor alocis exhibit robust NOD1 stimulatory activity, and that Porphyromonas endodontalis and Parvimonas micra have the highest NOD2 stimulatory activity. These studies allowed us to provide important evidence on newly identified putative pathogens in periodontal disease pathogenesis showing that these bacteria exhibit different immunostimulatory activity via TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01154855).

  4. TLR4-dependent internalization of CX3CR1 aggravates sepsis-induced immunoparalysis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin-Yu; Fang, Shang-Ping; Zhou, Miao; Luo, Jing; Wei, Juan; Wen, Xue-Ping; Yan, Xiao-Di; Zou, Zui

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, the most severe manifestation of infection, poses a major challenge to health-care systems around the world. Limited ability to clean and remove the pathogen renders difficulty in septic patients to recover from the phase of immunoparalysis. The present study found the vital role of CX3CR1 internalization on sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. A mouse model with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and cell model with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were employed to explore the relationship between CX3CR1 internalization and septic immunoparalysis. Immunoparalysis model in mice was established 4 days after CLP with significantly decreased proinflammatory cytokines. Flow cytometry analysis found a decreased surface expression of CX3CR1 during immunoparalysis, which was associated with reduced mRNA level and increased internalization of CX3CR1. G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and β-arrestin2 were significantly increased during septic immunoparalysis and involved in the internalization of CX3CR1. TLR4(-/-) or TLR4 inhibitor-treated macrophages exhibited an inhibited expression of GRK2 and β-arrestin2, along with reduced internalization of CX3CR1. Moreover, the knockdown of GRK2 and β-arrestin2 inhibited the internalization of CX3CR1 and led to a higher response on the second hit, which was associated with an increased activation of NF-κB. The critical association between internalization of CX3CR1 and immunosuppression in sepsis may provide a novel reference for clinical therapeutics.

  5. Association of TLR4 and Treg in Helicobacter pylori Colonization and Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lei; Liu, Dongsheng; Hu, Sijun; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Nanjin; Xie, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The host immune response plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to clarify the immune pathogenic mechanism of Helicobacter pylori infection via TLR signaling and gastric mucosal Treg cells in mice. To discover the underlying mechanism, we selectively blocked the TLR signaling pathway and subpopulations of regulatory T cells in the gastric mucosa of mice, and examined the consequences on H. pylori infection and inflammatory response as measured by MyD88, NF-κB p65, and Foxp3 protein expression levels and the levels of Th1, Th17 and Th2 cytokines in the gastric mucosa. We determined that blocking TLR4 signaling in H. pylori infected mice decreased the numbers of Th1 and Th17 Treg cells compared to controls (P < 0.001–0.05), depressed the immune response as measured by inflammatory grade (P < 0.05), and enhanced H. pylori colonization (P < 0.05). In contrast, blocking CD25 had the opposite effects, wherein the Th1 and Th17 cell numbers were increased (P < 0.001–0.05), immune response was enhanced (P < 0.05), and H. pylori colonization was inhibited (P < 0.05) compared to the non-blocked group. In both blocked groups, the Th2 cytokine IL-4 remained unchanged, although IL-10 in the CD25 blocked group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MyD88, NF-κB p65, and Foxp3 in the non-blocked group were significantly lower than those in the TLR4 blocked group (P < 0.05), but significantly higher than those of the CD25 blocked group (P < 0.05). Together, these results suggest that there might be an interaction between TLR signaling and Treg cells that is important for limiting H. pylori colonization and suppressing the inflammatory response of infected mice. PMID:26901645

  6. Brucella spp. Lumazine Synthase Induces a TLR4-Mediated Protective Response against B16 Melanoma in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrés H; Farias, Ana; Fernández, Javier E; Bonomi, Hernán R; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Berguer, Paula M

    2015-01-01

    Brucella Lumazine Synthase (BLS) is a highly immunogenic decameric protein which can accept the fusion of foreign proteins at its ten N-termini. These chimeras are very efficient to elicit systemic and oral immunity without adjuvants. BLS signaling via Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) regulates innate and adaptive immune responses, inducing dendritic cell maturation and CD8(+) T-cell cytotoxicity. In this work we study the effect induced by BLS in TLR4-expressing B16 melanoma. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of BLS as a preventive vaccine, C57BL/6J mice were immunized with BLS or BLS-OVA, and 35 days later were subcutaneously inoculated with B16-OVA melanoma. BLS or BLS-OVA induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, and 50% of mice immunized with the highest dose of BLS did not develop visible tumors. This effect was not observed in TLR4-deficient mice. For treatment experiments, mice were injected with BLS or BLS-OVA 2 days after the inoculation of B16 cells. Both treatments induced significant and equal tumor growth delay and increased survival. Moreover, BLS and BLS-OVA stimulation were also effective in TLR4-deficient mice. In order to study whether BLS has a direct effect on tumor cells, B16 cells were preincubated with BLS, and after 48h, cells were inoculated. Tumors induced by BLS-stimulated cells had inhibited growth and survival was increased. In the BLS group, 40% of mice did not develop tumors. This effect was abolished by the addition of TLR4/MD2 blocking antibody to cells before BLS stimulation. Our work demonstrates that BLS immunization induces a preventive antitumor response that depends on mice TLR4. We also show that BLS generates a therapeutic effect in mice inoculated with B16 cells. Our results show that BLS acts directly in cultured tumor cells via TLR4, highly suggesting that BLS elicits its therapeutic effects acting on the TLR4 from B16 melanoma cells.

  7. Brucella spp. Lumazine Synthase Induces a TLR4-Mediated Protective Response against B16 Melanoma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Andrés H.; Farias, Ana; Fernández, Javier E.; Bonomi, Hernán R.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Berguer, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella Lumazine Synthase (BLS) is a highly immunogenic decameric protein which can accept the fusion of foreign proteins at its ten N-termini. These chimeras are very efficient to elicit systemic and oral immunity without adjuvants. BLS signaling via Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) regulates innate and adaptive immune responses, inducing dendritic cell maturation and CD8+ T-cell cytotoxicity. In this work we study the effect induced by BLS in TLR4-expressing B16 melanoma. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of BLS as a preventive vaccine, C57BL/6J mice were immunized with BLS or BLS-OVA, and 35 days later were subcutaneously inoculated with B16-OVA melanoma. BLS or BLS-OVA induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, and 50% of mice immunized with the highest dose of BLS did not develop visible tumors. This effect was not observed in TLR4-deficient mice. For treatment experiments, mice were injected with BLS or BLS-OVA 2 days after the inoculation of B16 cells. Both treatments induced significant and equal tumor growth delay and increased survival. Moreover, BLS and BLS-OVA stimulation were also effective in TLR4-deficient mice. In order to study whether BLS has a direct effect on tumor cells, B16 cells were preincubated with BLS, and after 48h, cells were inoculated. Tumors induced by BLS-stimulated cells had inhibited growth and survival was increased. In the BLS group, 40% of mice did not develop tumors. This effect was abolished by the addition of TLR4/MD2 blocking antibody to cells before BLS stimulation. Our work demonstrates that BLS immunization induces a preventive antitumor response that depends on mice TLR4. We also show that BLS generates a therapeutic effect in mice inoculated with B16 cells. Our results show that BLS acts directly in cultured tumor cells via TLR4, highly suggesting that BLS elicits its therapeutic effects acting on the TLR4 from B16 melanoma cells. PMID:25973756

  8. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in IL8 and TLR4 Genes as Candidates for Digital Dermatitis Resistance/Susceptibility in Holstein Cattle.

    PubMed

    El-Shafaey, El-Sayed; Ateya, Ahmed; Ramadan, Hazem; Saleh, Rasha; Elseady, Yousef; Abo El Fadl, Eman; El-Khodery, Sabry

    2017-04-03

    Relatedness between single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL8 and TLR4 genes and digital dermatitis resistance/susceptibility was investigated in seventy Holstein dairy cows. Animals were assigned into two groups, affected group (n = 35) and resistant group (n = 35) based on clinical signs and previous history of farm clinical records. Blood samples were collected for DNA extraction to ampliy fragments of 267-bp and 382-bp for IL8 and TLR4 genes, respectively. PCR-DNA sequencing revealed three SNPs in each of IL8 and TLR4 genes. The identified SNPs associated with digital dermatitis resistance were C94T, A220G, and T262A for IL8 and C118T for TLR4. However, the G349C and C355A SNPs in TLR4 gene were associated with digital dermatitis susceptibility. Chi-square analysis for comparison the distribution of all identified SNPs in both IL8 and TLR4 genes between resistant and affected animals showed no significant variation among the identified SNPs in IL8 gene. Meanwhile, there was a significant variation in case of TLR4 gene. As a pilot study, the present results revealed that identified SNPs in IL8 and TLR4 genes can be used as a genetic marker and predisposing factor for resistance/susceptibility to digital dermatitis in dairy cows. However, TLR4 gene may be a potential candidate for such disease.

  10. N-Butylphthalide (NBP) ameliorated cerebral ischemia reperfusion-induced brain injury via HGF-regulated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Guo, Zhen-Fang; Xu, Yu-Ming; Li, Yu-Sheng; Song, Jing-Gui

    2016-10-01

    N-Butylphthalide (NBP) has been known to have potential neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer's disease and stroke animal models. Hepatocyte-growth factor (HGF), with strong angiogenic properties, exerted protective role in brain injury. The present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory effects of NBP on the brain injury of rats with cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) and astrocytes activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Our results showed that cerebral IR induced brain damage with down-regulation of HGF and astrocytes activation. NBP treatment significantly increased HGF expression and activated cMet/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, stimulating mTOR activity and suppressing apoptosis in brain tissues. Also NBP inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokines expression, including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα, via TLR4/NF-κB suppression. Anti-HGF treatment enhanced TLR4 expression while HGF could suppress TLR4 activation and its down-streaming signals, attenuating inflammation finally. Notably, NBP up-regulated HGF and down-regulated TLR4 expression significantly in the astrocytes combined with the treatment of TLR4 inhibitor than the cells only treated with TLR4 inhibitor, suggesting that NBP could further suppress TLR4 activation, suggesting that NBP might impede TLR4 through up-regulating HGF expression. These results suggested that NBP treatment significantly ameliorated cerebral IR-induced brain injury by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB-associated inflammation regulated by HGF.

  11. Common variants at 12q15 and 12q24 are associated with infant head circumference

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Nicole M; Kaakinen, Marika; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Freathy, Rachel M; Geller, Frank; Guxens, Mònica; Cousminer, Diana L; Kerkhof, Marjan; Timpson, Nicholas J; Ikram, M Arfan; Beilin, Lawrence J; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Buxton, Jessica L; Charoen, Pimphen; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Eriksson, Johan; Evans, David M; Hofman, Albert; Kemp, John P; Kim, Cecilia E; Klopp, Norman; Lahti, Jari; Lye, Stephen J; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D; Müller, Martina; O’Reilly, Paul F; Prokopenko, Inga; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Steegers, Eric A P; Sunyer, Jordi; Tiesler, Carla; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Breteler, Monique M B; Debette, Stephanie; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J; van der Lugt, Aad; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Smith, Albert V; Vernooij, Meike W; Blakemore, Alexandra IF; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fernandez-Benet, Julio; Grant, Struan F A; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; van der Heijden, Albert J; Iñiguez, Carmen; Lathrop, Mark; McArdle, Wendy L; Mølgaard, Anne; Newnham, John P; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Pouta, Annneli; Ring, Susan M; Sovio, Ulla; Standl, Marie; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wichmann, H-Erich; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; DeCarli, Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia M; McCarthy, Mark I; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Estivill, Xavier; Hattersley, Andrew T; Melbye, Mads; Bisgaard, Hans; Pennell, Craig E; Widen, Elisabeth; Hakonarson, Hakon; Smith, George Davey; Heinrich, Joachim; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2013-01-01

    To identify genetic variants associated with head circumference in infancy, we performed a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association (GWA) studies (N=10,768 from European ancestry enrolled in pregnancy/birth cohorts) and followed up three lead signals in six replication studies (combined N=19,089). Rs7980687 on chromosome 12q24 (P=8.1×10−9), and rs1042725 on chromosome 12q15 (P=2.8×10−10) were robustly associated with head circumference in infancy. Although these loci have previously been associated with adult height1, their effects on infant head circumference were largely independent of height (P=3.8×10−7 for rs7980687, P=1.3×10−7 for rs1042725 after adjustment for infant height). A third signal, rs11655470 on chromosome 17q21, showed suggestive evidence of association with head circumference (P=3.9×10−6). SNPs correlated to the 17q21 signal show genome-wide association with adult intra cranial volume2, Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases3-5, indicating that a common genetic variant in this region might link early brain growth with neurological disease in later life. PMID:22504419

  12. Growth of nutritionally variant streptococci on common laboratory and 10 commercial blood culture media.

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, L G; Reller, L B

    1981-01-01

    Nutritionally variant streptococci fail to grow on routine sheep blood agar plates. Moreover, these strains are a recognized cause of culture-negative endocarditis. We tested the ability of chocolate and brucella blood agars, sheep blood agar with a staphylococcal streak, sheep blood agar with 0.001% pyridoxal, and 10 commercial blood culture media from two manufactures to grow these bacteria. Of the original 25 strains tested, 16 were recovered on chocolate agar, 21 were recovered on brucella blood agar and 21 were recovered on sheep blood agar with a staphylococcal streak. Sheep blood agar with pyridoxal grew all 22 strains tested. Supplemented peptone, thioglycolate, and thiol broths grew all strains, but brain heart infusion and three tryptic soy broths supported five or fewer strains. The addition of 5 ml of human blood improved recovery to 100% in all media except tryptic soy broths. Unless supplemented wih pyridoxal, common laboratory agars were inadequate for recovering all strains of variant streptococci upon subculture of blood culture bottles. As used clinically, the blood culture media that we studied other than tryptic soy broths should reliably grow these bacteria. PMID:7287889

  13. Impaired Innate Immunity in Tlr4−/− Mice but Preserved CD8+ T Cell Responses against Trypanosoma cruzi in Tlr4-, Tlr2-, Tlr9- or Myd88-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Klezewsky, Weberton; da Silva, Raquel N.; Neves, Fabieni S.; Cavalcanti, Gisele S.; Boscardin, Silvia; Nunes, Marise P.; Santiago, Marcelo F.; Nóbrega, Alberto; Rodrigues, Maurício M.; Bellio, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The murine model of T. cruzi infection has provided compelling evidence that development of host resistance against intracellular protozoans critically depends on the activation of members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family via the MyD88 adaptor molecule. However, the possibility that TLR/MyD88 signaling pathways also control the induction of immunoprotective CD8+ T cell-mediated effector functions has not been investigated to date. We addressed this question by measuring the frequencies of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells specific for H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant peptides as well as the in vivo Ag-specific cytotoxic response in infected animals that are deficient either in TLR2, TLR4, TLR9 or MyD88 signaling pathways. Strikingly, we found that T. cruzi-infected Tlr2−/−, Tlr4−/−, Tlr9−/− or Myd88−/− mice generated both specific cytotoxic responses and IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells at levels comparable to WT mice, although the frequency of IFN-γ+CD4+ cells was diminished in infected Myd88−/− mice. We also analyzed the efficiency of TLR4-driven immune responses against T. cruzi using TLR4-deficient mice on the C57BL genetic background (B6 and B10). Our studies demonstrated that TLR4 signaling is required for optimal production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) in the spleen of infected animals and, as a consequence, Tlr4−/− mice display higher parasitemia levels. Collectively, our results indicate that TLR4, as well as previously shown for TLR2, TLR9 and MyD88, contributes to the innate immune response and, consequently, resistance in the acute phase of infection, although each of these pathways is not individually essential for the generation of class I-restricted responses against T. cruzi. PMID:20442858

  14. Genetic association of TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile, and CD14 C-159T polymorphisms with the risk of severe RSV infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiahui; Zhang, Xiangning; Liu, Shuming; Wang, Ziyou; Chen, Qicong; Wu, Yongfu; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Zunnan

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in infants worldwide. It is recognized by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR 4) and cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) in the innate immune response. Previous case-control studies reported the influence of TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile, and CD14 C-159T polymorphisms on the risk of severe RSV infection. However, a decisive conclusion has not been achieved. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to examine the association between these three polymorphisms and the development of RSV bronchiolitis. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMbase, Google Scholar Search, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biological Medicine, and Wanfang Databases. The data were extracted and pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated under six genetic models. A total of six studies with 1009 cases and 1348 controls, three studies with 473 cases and 481 controls, or four studies with 325 cases and 650 controls relating to each of the three polymorphisms were included in this meta-analysis. The analyzed data indicated that all of these polymorphisms were not associated with the risk of severe RSV infection. This is the first meta-analysis to investigate the relationship of TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile, and CD14 C-159T polymorphisms with the risk of severe RSV infection. Although the results of this retrospective analysis indicated a lack of the association, more extensive multicentric studies with large sample sizes are necessary to provide a more reliable estimation of the association between these three polymorphisms and RSV bronchiolitis susceptibility.

  15. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  16. Acanthamoeba infection in lungs of mice expressed by toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4).

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Hadaś, Edward; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the innate immune responses to a variety of pathogens including parasites. TLRs are among the most highly conserved in the evolution of the receptor family, localized mainly on cells of the immune system and on other cells such as lung cells. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the lung of Acanthamoeba spp. infected mice using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The Acanthamoeba spp. were isolated from a patient with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) (strain Ac 55) and from environmental samples of water from Malta Lake (Poznań, Poland - strain Ac 43). We observed a significantly increased level of expression of TLR2 as well as TLR4 mRNA from 2 to 30 days post Acanthamoeba infection (dpi) in the lungs of mice infected with Ac55 (KP120880) and Ac43 (KP120879) strains. According to our observations, increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the pneumocytes, interstitial cells and epithelial cells of the bronchial tree may suggest an important role of these receptors in protective immunity against Acanthamoeba infection in the lung. Moreover, increased levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in infected Acanthamoeba mice may suggest the involvement of these TLRs in the recognition of this amoeba pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP).

  17. Mesenteric artery responsiveness to acetylcholine and phenylephrine in cirrhotic rats challenged with endotoxin: the role of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Tavangar, Seyed-Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Eftekhari, Golnar; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2015-06-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with vascular dysfunction and endotoxemia. These experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the administration of a low-dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) worsens vascular dysfunction in rats subjected to bile-duct ligation (BDL), and to determine whether LPS initiates changes in vascular Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression. Four weeks after BDL, the animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or LPS (1.0 mg/kg body mass). Three hours later, the superior mesenteric artery was isolated, perfused, and then subjected to the vasoconstriction and vasodilatation effects of phenylephrine and acetylcholine, respectively. Our results show that phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction decreased in the cirrhotic vascular bed (BDL rats) compared with the vascular bed of the sham-operated animals, and that the LPS injections in the cirrhotic (BDL) rats worsened this response. LPS injection administered to the sham-operated animals had no such effect. On the other hand, both the BDL procedure and the LPS injection increased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, but LPS administration to the BDL rats had no effect on this response. The mRNA levels of TLR4 did not change, but immunohistochemical studies showed that TLR4 localization switched from the endothelium to vascular smooth muscle cells following chronic BDL. In conclusion, acute endotoxemia in cirrhotic rats is associated with hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine and tolerance to the effects of acetylcholine. Altered localization of TLR4 may be responsible for these effects.

  18. Up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 in high mobility group Box1-stimulated macrophages in pulpitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Javad; Sabermarouf, Babak; Baradaran, Behzad; Sadat-Hatamnezhad, Leila; Shotorbani, Siamak Sandoghchian

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): High Mobility Group Box1 (HMGB1) is a nonhistone, DNA-binding protein that serves a crucial role in regulating gene transcription and is involved in a variety of proinflammatory, extracellular activities. The aim of this study was to explore whether HMGB1 stimulation can up-regulate the expression of Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) and Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) on macrophages from pulpitis and to clarify the subsequent events involving Th17 cells and Th17 cell-associated cytokine changes. Materials and Methods: Having prepared dental pulp tissues of pulpitis and healthy controls, macrophage were isolated and cultured. Macrophages were thereafter stimulated by HMGB1 time course. RT-QPCR, flowcytometer, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and ELISA techniques were used in the present research. Results: Our results showed that the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages stimulated with HMGB1 increased in pulpitis compared with controls (macrophages without HMGB1 stimulation) with a statistical significance (P<0.001). In addition, the levels of IL-17, IL-23, and IL-6 in supernatants from cultured macrophages stimulated with HMGB1 from pulpitis increased, and NF-kB, the downstream target of TLR2 and TLR4, also showed a marked elevation after macrophages’ stimulation by HMGB1. Conclusion: The evidence from the present study suggests that the enhanced TLR2 and TLR4 pathways and Th17 cell polarization may be due to HMGB1 stimulation in pulpitis. PMID:28293399

  19. Annexin A2 binds to endosomes and negatively regulates TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses via the TRAM-TRIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Min; Guo, Qiang; Li, Rongpeng; Li, Guobo; Tan, Shirui; Li, Xuefeng; Wei, Yuquan; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Gram-negative bacteria activates plasma membrane signaling via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on host cells and triggers innate inflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here we reveal a role for annexin A2 (AnxA2) in host defense against infection as anxa2−/− mice were highly susceptible to Gram-negative bacteria-induced sepsis with enhanced inflammatory responses. Computing analysis and biochemical experiments identified that constitutive AnxA2 expression facilitated TLR4 internalization and its subsequent translocation into early endosomal membranes. It activated the TRAM-dependent endosomal signaling, leading to the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, AnxA2 deficiency prolonged TLR4-mediated signaling from the plasma membrane, which was attributable to pro-inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, TNFα and IL-1β). Thus, AnxA2 directly exerted negative regulation of inflammatory responses through TLR4-initiated TRAM-TRIF pathway occurring on endosomes. This study reveals AnxA2 as a critical regulator in infection-initiated inflammation, which protects the host from excessive inflammatory damage. PMID:26527544

  20. The Small GTPase Arf6 Is Essential for the Tram/Trif Pathway in TLR4 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Tim; Eyckerman, Sven; Vande Walle, Lieselotte; Gerlo, Sarah; Goethals, Marc; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Bovijn, Celia; Tavernier, Jan; Peelman, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) at the plasma membrane triggers NF-κB activation through recruitment of the adaptor proteins Mal and MyD88. Endocytosis of the activated TLR4 allows recruitment of the adaptors Tram and Trif, leading to activation of the transcription factor IRF3 and interferon production. The small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) was shown to regulate the plasma membrane association of Mal. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of Arf6 also markedly reduced LPS-induced cytokine production in Mal−/− mouse macrophages. In this article, we focus on a novel role for Arf6 in the MyD88-independent TLR4 pathway. MyD88-independent IRF3 activation and IRF3-dependent gene transcription were strictly dependent on Arf6. Arf6 was involved in transport of Tram to the endocytic recycling compartment and internalization of LPS, possibly explaining its requirement for LPS-induced IRF3 activation. Together, these results show a critical role for Arf6 in regulating Tram/Trif-dependent TLR4 signaling. PMID:24297182

  1. mRNA TLR2 AND TLR4 EXPRESSION IN THE ENDOMETRIUM TISSUE IN WOMEN WITH ENDOMETRIOSIS ASSOSIATED WITH INFERTILITY.

    PubMed

    Koval, H; Chopiak, V; Kamyshnyi, А

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an important medical and social problem as it causes stable pelvic pains, afflicts women of the reproductive age, provokes infertility characterized by poor outcome of treatment. In recent times much attention is paid to the mechanisms of congenital immunity as possible mediators of the development of endometriosis and targets of therapy. The work deals with the investigation of the levels of mRNA TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the tissue of eutopic endometrium in women with endometriosis and infertility in comparison with women afflicted with infertility of a tubular character with the aim to define the role of TLR2 and TLR4 in the development of infertility in case of endometriosis. The study was conducted by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) real-time method. The results of the study are indicative of an increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression (especially TLR2) in the endometrium in women with endometriosis. The results obtained may be indicative of an important role of TLR2 and TLR4 in the development of endometrioid ectopia and should be considered while treating infertility in women with endometriosis.

  2. CD19, a response regulator of B lymphocytes, regulates wound healing through hyaluronan-induced TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yohei; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Komura, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Fumihide; Hara, Toshihide; Muroi, Eiji; Bae, Sangjae; Takenaka, Motoi; Yukami, Toru; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tomita, Yasushi; Tedder, Thomas F; Sato, Shinichi

    2009-08-01

    Immune cells are critical to the wound-healing process, through both cytokine and growth factor secretion. Although previous studies have revealed that B cells are present within wound tissue, little is known about the role of B cells in wound healing. To clarify this, we investigated cutaneous wound healing in mice either lacking or overexpressing CD19, a critical positive-response regulator of B cells. CD19 deficiency inhibited wound healing, infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages, and cytokine expression, including basic and acidic fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-6, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta. By contrast, CD19 overexpression enhanced wound healing and cytokine expression. Hyaluronan (HA), an endogenous ligand for toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, stimulated B cells, which infiltrates into wounds to produce interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-beta through TLR4 in a CD19-dependent manner. CD19 expression regulated TLR4 signaling through p38 activation. HA accumulation was increased in injured skin tissue relative to normal skin, and exogenous application of HA promoted wound repair in wild-type but not CD19-deficient mice, suggesting that the beneficial effects of HA to the wound-healing process are CD19-dependent. Collectively, these results suggest that increased HA accumulation in injured skin induces cytokine production by stimulating B cells through TLR4 in a CD19-dependent manner. Thus, this study is the first to reveal a critical role of B cells and novel mechanisms in wound healing.

  3. Common Functional Genetic Variants in Catecholamine Storage Vesicle Protein Promoter Motifs Interact to Trigger Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Wang, Lei; Rana, Brinda K.; Ghosh, Sajalendu; Mahata, Manjula; Salem, Rany M.; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Fung, Maple M.; Waalen, Jill; Tayo, Bamidele; Taupenot, Laurent; Mahata, Sushil K.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore transcriptional mechanisms whereby genetic variation in the CHGB promoter influence BP and hypertension. Background Hypertension is a complex trait in which deranged autonomic control of the circulation may be an etiological culprit. Chromogranin B (CHGB) is a major soluble protein in the core of catecholamine storage vesicles, playing a necessary (catalytic) role in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles. Previously we found that genetic variation at CHGB influenced plasma CHGB expression as well as autonomic function, and that BP association was maximal towards the 5′ end of the gene. Methods After polymorphism discovery, we functionally characterized the 2 common variants in the proximal CHGB promoter, A-296C and A-261T, which lay within the same haplotype block in black and white populations. CHGB promoter activity was studied by haplotype/luciferase reporter transfection. Transcriptional mechanisms were probed by EMSA and ChIP. Results The A-296C variant disrupted a c-FOS motif, and exhibited differential mobility shifting to chromaffin cell nuclear proteins during EMSA, differential binding of endogenous c-FOS on ChIP, and differential transcriptional response to exogenous c-FOS. A-261T disrupted motifs for SRY and YY1, with similar consequences for gel mobility during EMSA, endogenous factor binding during ChIP, and transcriptional responses to the exogenous factors. 2-SNP haplotype analyses demonstrated a profound (p∼3×10-20) effect of CHGB promoter variation on BP in the European ancestry population, with a rank order of CT

  4. Association of common variants in the Joubert syndrome gene (AHI1) with autism

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Retuerto, Ana I.; Cantor, Rita M.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Schackwitz, Wendy S.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that autism, like other complex genetic disorders, may benefit from the study of rare or Mendelian variants associated with syndromic or non-syndromic forms of the disease. However, there are few examples in which common variation in genes causing a Mendelian neuropsychiatric disorder has been shown to contribute to disease susceptibility in an allied common condition. Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare recessively inherited disorder, with mutations reported at several loci including the gene Abelson’s Helper Integration 1 (AHI1). A significant proportion of patients with JS, in some studies up to 40%, have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and several linkage studies in ASD have nominally implicated the region on 6q where AHI1 resides. To evaluate AHI1 in ASD, we performed a three-stage analysis of AHI1 as an a priori candidate gene for autism. Re-sequencing was first used to screen AHI1, followed by two subsequent association studies, one limited and one covering the gene more completely, in Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) families. In stage 3, we found evidence of an associated haplotype in AHI1 with ASD after correction for multiple comparisons, in a region of the gene that had been previously associated with schizophrenia. These data suggest a role for AHI1 in common disorders affecting human cognition and behavior. PMID:18782849

  5. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    -wide association studies, demonstrate that a myriad of common variants of very small effect impacts ASD liability. PMID:23067556

  6. Soyasaponin Ab ameliorates colitis by inhibiting the binding of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Ah; Park, Young-Jun; Joh, Eun-Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2011-12-28

    Many clinical studies have shown that daily intake of soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr., Fabacease] or its foods may reduce the risk of osteoporosis, heart attack, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, cardiovascular and chronic renal diseases, and cancers, including prostate, colon, and breast cancers. Of the soy constituents, soyasaponins exhibit anti-aging, antioxidant, apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of soyasaponin Ab has not been thoroughly studied. Therefore, we investigated its anti-inflammatory effects in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitic mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. Soyasaponin Ab inhibited colon shortening, myeloperoxidase activity, the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Soyasaponin Ab (1, 2, 5, and 10 μM) inhibited the production of NO (IC(50) = 1.6 ± 0.1 μM) and prostaglandin E(2) (IC(50) = 2.0 ± 0.1 ng/mL), the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (IC(50) = 1.3 ± 0.1 ng/mL), interleukin (IL)-1β (IC(50) = 1.5 ± 0.1 pg/mL), and toll-like receptor (TLR)4, and the phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-1 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. Soyasaponin Ab weakly inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38. Soyasaponin Ab significantly reduced the binding of Alexa-Fluor-594-conjugated LPS to peritoneal macrophages. Soyasaponin Ab did not affect TLR4 expression or LPS-induced NF-κB activation in TLR4 siRNA-treated peritoneal macrophages (knockdown efficiency of TLR4 > 94%). On the basis of these findings, soyasaponin Ab may ameliorate colitis by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 on macrophages.

  7. TLR4 Antagonist Attenuates Atherogenesis in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice with Diet-Induced Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongyang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Yanchun; Lopes-Virella, Maria F.; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Although a large number of studies have well documented a key role of toll-like receptor (TLR)4 in atherosclerosis, it remains undetermined if TLR4 antagonist attenuates atherogenesis in mouse model for type 2 diabetes. In this study, we induced type 2 diabetes in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR−/−) mice by high-fat diet (HFD). At 8 weeks old, 20 mice were fed HFD and 20 mice fed regular chow (RC) for 24 weeks. In the last 10 weeks, half HFD-fed mice and half RC-fed mice were treated with Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipopolysaccharide (Rs-LPS), an established TLR4 antagonist. After the treatment, atherosclerotic lesions in aortas were analyzed. Results showed that the HFD significantly increased bodyweight, glucose, lipids including total cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids, and insulin resistance, indicating that the HFD induced type 2 diabetes in LDLR−/− mice. Results also showed that Rs-LPS had no effect on HFD-increased metabolic parameters in both nondiabetic and diabetic mice. Lipid staining of aortas and histological analysis of cross-sections of aortic roots showed that diabetes increased atherosclerotic lesions, but Rs-LPS attenuated atherogenesis in diabetic mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies showed that Rs-LPS reduced infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in atherosclerotic lesions of diabetic mice. Finally, the antagonistic effect of Rs-LPS on TLR4 was demonstrated by our in vitro studies showing that Rs-LPS inhibited IL-6 secretion from macrophages and endothelial cells stimulated by LPS or LPS plus saturated fatty acid palmitate. Taken together, our study demonstrated that TLR4 antagonist was capable of attenuating vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in mice with HFD-induced type 2 diabetes. PMID:26162692

  8. Therapeutic implication of 'Iturin A' for targeting MD-2/TLR4 complex to overcome angiogenesis and invasion.

    PubMed

    Dey, Goutam; Bharti, Rashmi; Ojha, Probir Kumar; Pal, Ipsita; Rajesh, Y; Banerjee, Indranil; Banik, Payel; Parida, Sheetal; Parekh, Aditya; Sen, Ramkrishna; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2017-03-24

    Tumor angiogenesis and invasion are deregulated biological processes that drive multistage transformation of tumors from a benign to a life-threatening malignant state activating multiple signaling pathways including MD-2/TLR4/NF-κB. Development of potential inhibitors of this signaling is emerging area for discovery of novel cancer therapeutics. In the current investigation, we identified Iturin A (A lipopeptide molecule from Bacillus megaterium) as a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and cancer invasion by various in vitro and in vivo methods. Iturin A was found to suppress VEGF, a powerful inducer of angiogenesis and key player in tumor invasion, as confirmed by ELISA, western blot and real time PCR. Iturin A inhibited endothelial tube arrangement, blood capillary formation, endothelial sprouting and vascular growth inside the matrigel. In addition, Iturin A inhibited MMP-2/9 expression in MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells. Cancer invasion, migration and colony forming ability were significantly hampered by Iturin A. Expressions of MD-2/TLR4 and its downstream MyD88, IKK-α and NF-κB were also reduced in treated MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells. Western blot and immunofluorescence study showed that nuclear accumulation of NF-κB was hampered by Iturin A. MD-2 siRNA or plasmid further confirmed the efficacy of Iturin A by suppressing MD-2/TLR4 signaling pathway. The in silico docking study showed that the Iturin A interacted well with the MD-2 in MD-2/TLR4 receptor complex. Conclusively, inhibition of MD-2/TLR4 complex with Iturin A offered strategic advancement in cancer therapy.

  9. Short-term bed rest increases TLR4 and IL-6 expression in skeletal muscle of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Kyle L.; Markofski, Melissa M.; Walker, Dillon K.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Volpi, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Bed rest induces significant loss of leg lean mass in older adults. Systemic and tissue inflammation also accelerates skeletal muscle loss, but it is unknown whether inflammation is associated to inactivity-induced muscle atrophy in healthy older adults. We determined if short-term bed rest increases toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and pro-inflammatory markers in older adult skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Six healthy, older adults underwent seven consecutive days of bed rest. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken after an overnight fast before and at the end of bed rest. Serum cytokine expression was measured before and during bed rest. TLR4 signaling and cytokine mRNAs associated with pro- and anti-inflammation and anabolism were measured in muscle biopsy samples using Western blot analysis and qPCR. Participants lost ∼4% leg lean mass with bed rest. We found that after bed rest, muscle levels of TLR4 protein expression and interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-κB1, interleukin-10, and 15 mRNA expression were increased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Additionally, the cytokines interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, were elevated in serum samples following bed rest (P < 0.05). We conclude that short-term bed rest in older adults modestly increased some pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in muscle samples while systemic changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines were mostly absent. Upregulation of TLR4 protein content suggests that bed rest in older adults increases the capacity to mount an exaggerated, and perhaps unnecessary, inflammatory response in the presence of specific TLR4 ligands, e.g., during acute illness. PMID:23761639

  10. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  11. Requirement of TLR4 signaling for the induction of a Th1 immune response elicited by oligomannose-coated liposomes.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yuko; Takagi, Hideaki; Yamatani, Minami; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Sato, Katsuaki; Kojima, Naoya

    2016-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that administration of oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs), in which an antigen is encased, induce antigen-specific Th1 immune responses and CTLs. In the present study, we showed that TLR4 signaling is required for the induction of specific immune responses following OML administration. In C3H/HeJ mice, which express a dysfunctional TLR4, the antigen-specific Th1 immune response could not be elicited following intraperitoneal administration of OVA-encased OMLs (OML/OVA). However, OML uptake by peritoneal cells, the subsequent production of IL-12 and the upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and MHC class II on the cells in response to OML uptake occurred in C3H/HeJ mice to the same extent as in wild type C3H/HeN mice. In addition, peritoneal phagocytic cells from TLR4(-/-) mice that ingest OML/OVA can activate CD4(+) T cells from OT-II mice. On the other hand, the number of OML-ingesting peritoneal cells that migrated into mesenteric lymph nodes in C3H/HeJ mice was significantly less than that in C3H/HeN mice. Therefore, the chemotactic capability of OML-ingesting peritoneal phagocytes to the draining lymph nodes rather than the activation and maturation of the cells in response to OML uptake is impaired by lack of TLR4 signaling, and disorder of the Th1 immune response elicited by OMLs in mice, which lack TLR4 signaling, is due to the impairment of cell migration following OML uptake.

  12. TLR4 Accessory Molecule RP105 (CD180) Regulates Monocyte-Driven Arteriogenesis in a Murine Hind Limb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaansen, Antonius J. N. M.; Karper, Jacco C.; Wezel, Anouk; de Boer, Hetty C.; Welten, Sabine M. J.; de Jong, Rob C. M.; Peters, Erna A. B.; de Vries, Margreet R.; van Oeveren-Rietdijk, Annemarie M.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated the role of the TLR4-accessory molecule RP105 (CD180) in post-ischemic neovascularization, i.e. arteriogenesis and angiogenesis. TLR4-mediated activation of pro-inflammatory Ly6Chi monocytes is crucial for effective neovascularization. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that RP105+ monocytes are present in the perivascular space of remodeling collateral arterioles. As RP105 inhibits TLR4 signaling, we hypothesized that RP105 deficiency would lead to an unrestrained TLR4-mediated inflammatory response and hence to enhanced blood flow recovery after ischemia. Methods and Results RP105−/− and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to hind limb ischemia and blood flow recovery was followed by Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging. Surprisingly, we found that blood flow recovery was severely impaired in RP105−/− mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that arteriogenesis was reduced in these mice compared to the WT. However, both in vivo and ex vivo analyses showed that circulatory pro-arteriogenic Ly6Chi monocytes were more readily activated in RP105−/− mice. FACS analyses showed that Ly6Chi monocytes became activated and migrated to the affected muscle tissues in WT mice following induction of hind limb ischemia. Although Ly6Chi monocytes were readily activated in RP105−/− mice, migration into the ischemic tissues was hampered and instead, Ly6Chi monocytes accumulated in their storage compartments, bone marrow and spleen, in RP105−/− mice. Conclusions RP105 deficiency results in an unrestrained inflammatory response and monocyte over-activation, most likely due to the lack of TLR4 regulation. Inappropriate, premature systemic activation of pro-inflammatory Ly6Chi monocytes results in reduced infiltration of Ly6Chi monocytes in ischemic tissues and in impaired blood flow recovery. PMID:24945347

  13. Procyanidin dimer B2-mediated IRAK-M induction negatively regulates TLR4 signaling in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sub; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Byun, Eui-Hong

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Pro B2 elevated the expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. •LPS-induced expression of cell surface molecules was inhibited by Pro B2. •LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was inhibited by Pro B2. •Pro B2 inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB through IRAK-M. •Pro B2 inactivated naïve T cells by inhibiting LPS-induced cytokines via IRAK-M. -- Abstract: Polyphenolic compounds have been found to possess a wide range of physiological activities that may contribute to their beneficial effects against inflammation-related diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory activity are not completely characterized, and many features remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for the down-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction by procyanidin dimer B2 (Pro B2) in macrophages. Pro B2 markedly elevated the expression of the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-M protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II) and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70) were inhibited by Pro B2, and this action was prevented by IRAK-M silencing. In addition, Pro B2-treated macrophages inhibited LPS-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the translocation of nuclear factor κB and p65 through IRAK-M. We also found that Pro B2-treated macrophages inactivated naïve T cells by inhibiting LPS-induced interferon-γ and IL-2 secretion through IRAK-M. These novel findings provide new insights into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and the immune-pharmacological role of Pro B2 in the immune response against the development

  14. TLR4 antagonist FP7 inhibits LPS-induced cytokine production and glycolytic reprogramming in dendritic cells, and protects mice from lethal influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure; Aublin-Gex, Anne; Sestito, Stefania E.; Shirey, Kari Ann; Patel, Mira C.; André, Patrice; Blanco, Jorge C.; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Peri, Francesco; Lotteau, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulated Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 activation is involved in acute systemic sepsis, chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and in viral infections, such as influenza infection. Thus, therapeutic control of the TLR4 signalling pathway is of major interest. Here we tested the activity of the small-molecule synthetic TLR4 antagonist, FP7, in vitro on human monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and in vivo during influenza virus infection of mice. Our results indicate that FP7 antagonized the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and MIP-1β) by monocytes and DCs (IC50 < 1 μM) and prevented DC maturation upon TLR4 activation by ultrapure lipopolysaccharide (LPS). FP7 selectively blocked TLR4 stimulation, but not TLR1/2, TLR2/6, or TLR3 activation. TLR4 stimulation of human DCs resulted in increased glycolytic activity that was also antagonized by FP7. FP7 protected mice from influenza virus-induced lethality and reduced both proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in the lungs and acute lung injury (ALI). Therefore, FP7 can antagonize TLR4 activation in vitro and protect mice from severe influenza infection, most likely by reducing TLR4-dependent cytokine storm mediated by damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) like HMGB1. PMID:28106157

  15. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect.

    PubMed

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-04-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1-EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects.

  16. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-01-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1–EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects. PMID:25026904

  17. Impact of Common Diabetes Risk Variant in MTNR1B on Sleep, Circadian, and Melatonin Physiology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jacqueline M; Chang, Anne-Marie; Bjonnes, Andrew C; Aeschbach, Daniel; Anderson, Clare; Cade, Brian E; Cain, Sean W; Czeisler, Charles A; Gharib, Sina A; Gooley, Joshua J; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Grant, Struan F A; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Lauderdale, Diane S; Lockley, Steven W; Munch, Miriam; Patel, Sanjay; Punjabi, Naresh M; Rajaratnam, Shanthakumar M W; Rueger, Melanie; St Hilaire, Melissa A; Santhi, Nayantara; Scheuermaier, Karin; Van Reen, Eliza; Zee, Phyllis C; Shea, Steven A; Duffy, Jeanne F; Buxton, Orfeu M; Redline, Susan; Scheer, Frank A J L; Saxena, Richa

    2016-06-01

    The risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increased by abnormalities in sleep quantity and quality, circadian alignment, and melatonin regulation. A common genetic variant in a receptor for the circadian-regulated hormone melatonin (MTNR1B) is associated with increased fasting blood glucose and risk of T2D, but whether sleep or circadian disruption mediates this risk is unknown. We aimed to test if MTNR1B diabetes risk variant rs10830963 associates with measures of sleep or circadian physiology in intensive in-laboratory protocols (n = 58-96) or cross-sectional studies with sleep quantity and quality and timing measures from self-report (n = 4,307-10,332), actigraphy (n = 1,513), or polysomnography (n = 3,021). In the in-laboratory studies, we found a significant association with a substantially longer duration of elevated melatonin levels (41 min) and delayed circadian phase of dim-light melatonin offset (1.37 h), partially mediated through delayed offset of melatonin synthesis. Furthermore, increased T2D risk in MTNR1B risk allele carriers was more pronounced in early risers versus late risers as determined by 7 days of actigraphy. Our results provide the surprising insight that the MTNR1B risk allele influences dynamics of melatonin secretion, generating a novel hypothesis that the MTNR1B risk allele may extend the duration of endogenous melatonin production later into the morning and that early waking may magnify the diabetes risk conferred by the risk allele.

  18. Common risk variants for colorectal cancer: an evaluation of associations with age at cancer onset

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nan; Shin, Aesun; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Jeongseon; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Common genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer (CRC) have been identified at approximately 40 loci by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We investigated the association of these risk variants by age at onset of CRC using case-only and case-control analysis. A total of 1,962 CRC cases and 2,668 controls from two independent case-control studies conducted by Korea’s National Cancer Center were included in this study. We genotyped 33 GWAS-identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRC risk. The risk allele in SNP rs704017, located at 10q22.3 in the ZMIZ1-AS1 gene, was consistently less frequent among CRC patients aged <50 years than among CRC patients aged ≥50 years in the case-only analysis (odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.66–0.92, P = 2.7 × 10−3, in an additive model), although this did not surpass the threshold for multiple testing. The direction of associations between rs704017 and CRC risk differed by age group in the combined case-control analysis (<50 years: OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60–0.98, P = 0.03 and ≥50 years: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.98–1.29, P = 0.09, in a dominant model); the p-values for heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 7.5 × 10−3) and for interaction were statistically significant (Pinteraction = 7.8 × 10−3, in the dominant model). Our results suggest that the CRC susceptibility SNP rs704017 has a hereditary effect on onset age of CRC. PMID:28084440

  19. Toll-like receptor 4 variant D299G is associated with susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zareparsi, Sepideh; Buraczynska, Monika; Branham, Kari E H; Shah, Sapna; Eng, Donna; Li, Mingyao; Pawar, Hemant; Yashar, Beverly M; Moroi, Sayoko E; Lichter, Paul R; Petty, Howard R; Richards, Julia E; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elner, Victor M; Swaroop, Anand

    2005-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease that leads to progressive and irreversible vision loss among the elderly. Inflammation, oxidative damage, cholesterol metabolism and/or impaired function of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. We examined toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) as a candidate gene for AMD susceptibility because: (i) the TLR4 gene is located on chromosome 9q32-33, a region exhibiting evidence of linkage to AMD in three independent reports; (ii) the TLR4-D299G variant is associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease with subendothelial accumulation; (iii) the TLR4 is not only a key mediator of proinflammatory signaling pathways but also linked to regulation of cholesterol efflux and (iv) the TLR4 participates in phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments by the RPE. We examined D299G and T399I variants of TLR4 in a sample of 667 unrelated AMD patients and 439 unrelated controls, all of Caucasian ancestry. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated an increased risk of AMD in carriers of the G allele at TLR4 residue 299 (odds ratio=2.65, P=0.025), but lack of an independent effect by T399I variant. TLR4-D299G showed an additive effect on AMD risk (odds ratio=4.13, P=0.002) with allelic variants of apolipoprotein E (APOE) and ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1), two genes involved in cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, the effect of TLR4, APOE and ABCA1 variants on AMD susceptibility was opposite to that of association with atherosclerosis risk. Our data provide evidence of a link between multiple diverse mechanisms underlying AMD pathogenesis.

  20. Common genetic variants on 5p14.1 associate with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Ma, Deqiong; Bucan, Maja; Glessner, Joseph T.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Salyakina, Daria; Imielinski, Marcin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi; Rappaport, Eric; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette; Korvatska, Olena; Piven, Joseph; Sonnenblick, Lisa I.; Retuerto, Ana I. Alvarez; Herman, Edward I.; Dong, Hongmei; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian; Ozonoff, Sally; Klin, Ami; Owley, Thomas; Sweeney, John A.; Brune, Camille W.; Cantor, Rita M.; Bernier, Raphael; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; McMahon, William M.; Miller, Judith; State, Matthew W.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Coon, Hilary; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Nurnberger, John I.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Cook, Edwin H.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Dawson, Geraldine; Grant, Struan F. A.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)—two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules—revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 × 10−8, odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 × 10−8 to 2.1 × 10−10. Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs. PMID:19404256

  1. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Günter U.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Wang, Li-San; Klei, Lambertus; Rademakers, Rosa; de Silva, Rohan; Litvan, Irene; Riley, David E.; van Swieten, John C.; Heutink, Peter; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Maetzler, Walter; Goldwurm, Stefano; Tolosa, Eduardo; Borroni, Barbara; Pastor, Pau; Cantwell, Laura B.; Han, Mi Ryung; Dillman, Allissa; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Yu, Chang-En; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Revesz, Tamas; Hardy, John; Lees, Andrew J.; Devlin, Bernie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Müller, Ulrich; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2011-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common being Alzheimer’s disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated with some sports. To identify common genetic variation contributing to risk for tauopathies, we carried out a genome-wide association study of 1,114 PSP cases and 3,247 controls (Stage 1) followed up by a second stage where 1,051 cases and 3,560 controls were genotyped for Stage 1 SNPs that yielded P ≤ 10−3. We found significant novel signals (P < 5 × 10−8) associated with PSP risk at STX6, EIF2AK3, and MOBP. We confirmed two independent variants in MAPT affecting risk for PSP, one of which influences MAPT brain expression. The genes implicated encode proteins for vesicle-membrane fusion at the Golgi-endosomal interface, for the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, and for a myelin structural component. PMID:21685912

  2. Association between Common Genetic Variants and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Risk in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Yuan, Yi; Yang, Hua; Li, Jingjie; Feng, Tian; Ouyang, Yongri; Jin, Tianbo; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinopathies affecting 5-7% of reproductive age women worldwide. The aim of our study was to explore the PCOS-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations between common genetic variants and PCOS risk in a Han Chinese women population. Methods: In this case-control study, 285 Chinese Han women aged 28.50±6.858 years with PCOS and 299 controls of a mean age of 32.66±7.018 years were compared. We selected recently published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) which identified several genetic loci in PCOS. All the SNPs were genotyped by Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. Associations between the gene and the risk of PCOS were tested using various genetic models by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and Plink. Results: We found that rs705702 in the RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS (odds ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.87, p=0.011) and increased the PCOS risk. The genotypic model analysis also showed that rs705702 was associated with PCOS risk. Conclusion: Our results suggest that SNPs rs705702 in gene RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS in Han Chinese women. PMID:27217259

  3. TLR4 and CD14 receptors expressed in rat pineal gland trigger NFKB pathway.

    PubMed

    da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia Emanuele; Tamura, Eduardo Koji; Pinato, Luciana; Cecon, Erika; Fernandes, Pedro Augusto Carlos Magno; de Avellar, Maria Christina Werneck; Ferreira, Zulma Silva; Markus, Regina Pekelmann

    2010-09-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFKB), a pivotal player in inflammatory responses, is constitutively expressed in the pineal gland. Corticosterone inhibits pineal NFKB leading to an enhancement of melatonin production, while tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leads to inhibition of Aa-nat transcription and the production of N-acetylserotonin in cultured glands. The reduction in nocturnal melatonin surge favors the mounting of the inflammatory response. Despite these data, there is no clear evidence of the ability of the pineal gland to recognize molecules that signal infection. This study investigated whether the rat pineal gland expresses receptors for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the endotoxin from the membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, and to establish the mechanism of action of LPS. Here, we show that pineal glands possess both CD14 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), membrane proteins that bind LPS and trigger the NFKB pathway. LPS induced the nuclear translocation of p50/p50 and p50/RELA dimers and the synthesis of TNF. The maximal expression of TNF in cultured glands coincides with an increase in the expression of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) in isolated pinealocytes. In addition, LPS inhibited the synthesis of N-acetylserotonin and melatonin. Therefore, the pineal gland transduces Gram-negative endotoxin stimulation by producing TNF and inhibiting melatonin synthesis. Here, we provide evidence to reinforce the idea of an immune-pineal axis, showing that the pineal gland is a constitutive player in the innate immune response.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bonin, Camila P.; Baccarin, Raquel Y.A.; Nostell, Katarina; Nahum, Laila A.; Fossum, Caroline; Camargo, Maristela M. de

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Chimpanzees, horses and humans have regions of similarity on TLR4 and MD2 promoters. ► Rodents have few regions of similarity on TLR4 promoter when compared to primates. ► Conserved NFkB binding sites were found in the promoters of TLR4 and MD2. ► LPS-induced inhibition of TLR4 transcription is reversed by dexamethasone. ► LPS-induced transcription of MD2 is inhibited by dexamethasone. -- Abstract: Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explaining these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2.

  5. Gene and Network Analysis of Common Variants Reveals Novel Associations in Multiple Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakka, Priyanka; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically lack power to detect genotypes significantly associated with complex diseases, where different causal mutations of small effect may be present across cases. A common, tractable approach for identifying genomic elements associated with complex traits is to evaluate combinations of variants in known pathways or gene sets with shared biological function. Such gene-set analyses require the computation of gene-level P-values or gene scores; these gene scores are also useful when generating hypotheses for experimental validation. However, commonly used methods for generating GWA gene scores are computationally inefficient, biased by gene length, imprecise, or have low true positive rate (TPR) at low false positive rates (FPR), leading to erroneous hypotheses for functional validation. Here we introduce a new method, PEGASUS, for analytically calculating gene scores. PEGASUS produces gene scores with as much as 10 orders of magnitude higher numerical precision than competing methods. In simulation, PEGASUS outperforms existing methods, achieving up to 30% higher TPR when the FPR is fixed at 1%. We use gene scores from PEGASUS as input to HotNet2 to identify networks of interacting genes associated with multiple complex diseases and traits; this is the first application of HotNet2 to common variation. In ulcerative colitis and waist–hip ratio, we discover networks that include genes previously associated with these phenotypes, as well as novel candidate genes. In contrast, existing methods fail to identify these networks. We also identify networks for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which GWA studies have yet to identify any significant SNPs. PMID:27489002

  6. Gene and Network Analysis of Common Variants Reveals Novel Associations in Multiple Complex Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nakka, Priyanka; Raphael, Benjamin J; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2016-10-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically lack power to detect genotypes significantly associated with complex diseases, where different causal mutations of small effect may be present across cases. A common, tractable approach for identifying genomic elements associated with complex traits is to evaluate combinations of variants in known pathways or gene sets with shared biological function. Such gene-set analyses require the computation of gene-level P-values or gene scores; these gene scores are also useful when generating hypotheses for experimental validation. However, commonly used methods for generating GWA gene scores are computationally inefficient, biased by gene length, imprecise, or have low true positive rate (TPR) at low false positive rates (FPR), leading to erroneous hypotheses for functional validation. Here we introduce a new method, PEGASUS, for analytically calculating gene scores. PEGASUS produces gene scores with as much as 10 orders of magnitude higher numerical precision than competing methods. In simulation, PEGASUS outperforms existing methods, achieving up to 30% higher TPR when the FPR is fixed at 1%. We use gene scores from PEGASUS as input to HotNet2 to identify networks of interacting genes associated with multiple complex diseases and traits; this is the first application of HotNet2 to common variation. In ulcerative colitis and waist-hip ratio, we discover networks that include genes previously associated with these phenotypes, as well as novel candidate genes. In contrast, existing methods fail to identify these networks. We also identify networks for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which GWA studies have yet to identify any significant SNPs.

  7. TLR4 Expression by Liver Resident Cells Mediates the Development of Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance in Experimental Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Ilievski, Vladimir; Cho, Yale; Katwala, Priya; Rodriguez, Heriberto; Tulowiecka, Margaret; Kurian, David; Leoni, Lara; Christman, John W.; Unterman, Terry G.; Watanabe, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Results from epidemiological studies indicate a close association between periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the mechanism linking periodontitis to glucose intolerance (GI) and insulin resistance (IR) is unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that periodontitis induces the development of GI/IR through a liver Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. Methods TLR4 chimeric mice were developed by bone marrow transplantation using green fluorescent protein expressing TLR4WT mouse (GFPWT) as donor and TLR4 WT or TLR4-/- as recipient mice (GFPWT:WT and GFPWT:KO chimeras respectively). These chimeras were subjected to experimental chronic periodontitis induced by repeated applications of LPS to the gingival sulci for 18 weeks. The levels of GI/IR were monitored and plasma cytokines and LPS were determined at 18 weeks when differences in glucose tolerance were most apparent. Cytokine gene expression was measured in liver tissue by qPCR. Results Alveolar bone loss was significantly greater in GFPWT:WT chimeras treated with LPS compared with chimeras treated with PBS or GFPWT:KO chimeras. However, the degree of gingival inflammation was similar between GFPWT:WT and GFPWT:KO mice with LPS application. Severe GI/IR occurred in GFPWT:WT chimeras but not in the GFPWT:KO chimeras that were subjected to 18 weeks of LPS. Serum LPS was detected only in animals to which LPS was applied and the level was similar in GFPWT:WT and GFPWT:KO mice at the 18 week time point. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference in the plasma levels of IL1β, IL6 and TNFα at 18 weeks in spite of the severe GI/IR in the GFPWT:WT chimeras with LPS application. Also, no difference in the expression of TNFα or IL6 mRNA was detected in the liver of GFPWT:WT vs GFPWT:KO mice. In contrast, liver IL1β expression was significantly greater in GFPWT:WT chimeras compared to GFPWT:KO chimeras treated with LPS. Conclusion We observed that GFPWT:WT, but not GFPWT

  8. Combining family- and population-based imputation data for association analysis of rare and common variants in large pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mohamad; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-11-01

    In the last two decades, complex traits have become the main focus of genetic studies. The hypothesis that both rare and common variants are associated with complex traits is increasingly being discussed. Family-based association studies using relatively large pedigrees are suitable for both rare and common variant identification. Because of the high cost of sequencing technologies, imputation methods are important for increasing the amount of information at low cost. A recent family-based imputation method, Genotype Imputation Given Inheritance (GIGI), is able to handle large pedigrees and accurately impute rare variants, but does less well for common variants where population-based methods perform better. Here, we propose a flexible approach to combine imputation data from both family- and population-based methods. We also extend the Sequence Kernel Association Test for Rare and Common variants (SKAT-RC), originally proposed for data from unrelated subjects, to family data in order to make use of such imputed data. We call this extension "famSKAT-RC." We compare the performance of famSKAT-RC and several other existing burden and kernel association tests. In simulated pedigree sequence data, our results show an increase of imputation accuracy from use of our combining approach. Also, they show an increase of power of the association tests with this approach over the use of either family- or population-based imputation methods alone, in the context of rare and common variants. Moreover, our results show better performance of famSKAT-RC compared to the other considered tests, in most scenarios investigated here.

  9. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiologic studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P<5×10−8 for each) to examine the role of triglycerides on risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides, and show that the direction and magnitude of both are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong magnitude of association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, a polymorphism's strength of effect on triglycerides is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD. PMID:24097064

  10. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H.; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F.; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lee, James J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Medland, Sarah E.; Miller, Michael B.; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J.; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G.; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H.; Starr, John M.; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ward, Mary E.; Wright, Margaret J.; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Koellinger, Philipp D.

    2014-01-01

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated SNPs. Second, using independent samples (n = 24,189), we measure the association of these education-associated SNPs with cognitive performance. Three SNPs (rs1487441, rs7923609, and rs2721173) are significantly associated with cognitive performance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In an independent sample of older Americans (n = 8,652), we also show that a polygenic score derived from the education-associated SNPs is associated with memory and absence of dementia. Convergent evidence from a set of bioinformatics analyses implicates four specific genes (KNCMA1, NRXN1, POU2F3, and SCRT). All of these genes are associated with a particular neurotransmitter pathway involved in synaptic plasticity, the main cellular mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:25201988

  11. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-11-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P < 5 × 10(-8) for each) to examine the role of triglycerides in risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels, and we show that the direction and magnitude of the associations with both traits are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, the strength of a polymorphism's effect on triglyceride levels is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD.

  12. Pancreas divisum: a common developmental variant that deserves attention in preclinical medical education.

    PubMed

    White, Jessica J; Roberts, Zoey N; Gest, Thomas R; Beale, Elmus G

    2014-10-01

    Clinical literature indicates that pancreas divisum (PD) is present in 3-22% of the population and may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis. PD is a developmental variant wherein the duct systems derived from the dorsal and ventral pancreatic buds are not fused. Hence secretions from the head, neck, body, and tail, which develop from the dorsal bud, must pass through the minor duodenal papilla. The smaller uncinate process, derived from the ventral bud, drains through the major duodenal papilla. The purpose of this study was: (1) to do a cadaveric dissection to confirm whether PD is common in donors who had not been selected because they had pancreatitis and (2) to determine the frequency of PD descriptions in anatomy, embryology, pathology, and surgery books in our libraries. For our anatomical study, pancreata of eight human donors were dissected. Dye was injected into the ducts so that any communications between main and accessory ducts could be easily located. For our literature review, 22 anatomy, 14 embryology, 11 pathology, and 26 surgery books were examined for mention of PD. PD was unambiguously identified in two donor cadavers. However, only 14% of the anatomy plus embryology books compared to 70% of the surgery plus pathology books describe PD. Cadaveric dissection confirms that PD is indeed prevalent. The prevalence of PD with its increased risk of pancreatitis merits inclusion of this topic in textbooks of anatomy and embryology.

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies common variants associated with pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Athanasiu, Lavinia; Smorr, Lisa-Lena H; Tesli, Martin; Røssberg, Jan I; Sønderby, Ida E; Spigset, Olav; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2015-08-01

    Individual variation in pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs, particularly metabolism, is an important factor to consider in pharmacological treatment in psychiatry. A large proportion of this variance is still not accounted for, but evidence so far suggests the involvement of genetic factors. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with concentration dose ratio (CDR) as sub-phenotype to assess metabolism rate of psychotropic drugs in a homogenous Norwegian sample of 1334 individuals diagnosed with a severe mental disorder. The GWAS revealed one genome-wide significant marker (rs16935279, p-value=3.95×10(-10), pperm=7.5×10(-4)) located in an intronic region of the lncRNA LOC100505718. Carriers of the minor allele have a lower metabolism rate of antiepileptic drugs compared to major allele carriers. In addition, several nominally significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CDR for antipsychotic, antidepressant and antiepileptic drugs were disclosed. We consider standardised CDR to be a useful measure of the metabolism rate of a drug. The present findings indicate that common gene variants could affect the metabolism of psychotropic drugs. This warrants further investigations into the functional mechanisms involved as it may lead to identification of predictive markers as well as novel drug targets.

  14. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Lars G.; Igl, Wilmar; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Grassmann, Felix; Sengupta, Sebanti; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Wen, Cindy; Gorski, Mathias; Kim, Ivana K.; Cho, David; Zack, Donald; Souied, Eric; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Bala, Elisa; Lee, Kristine E.; Hunter, David J.; Sardell, Rebecca J.; Mitchell, Paul; Merriam, Joanna E.; Cipriani, Valentina; Hoffman, Joshua D.; Schick, Tina; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Jiang, Yingda; Stanton, Chloe M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Zhan, Xiaowei; Kwong, Alan M.; Boleda, Alexis; Brooks, Matthew; Gieser, Linn; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Branham, Kari E.; Foerster, Johanna R.; Heckenlively, John R.; Othman, Mohammad I.; Vote, Brendan J.; Liang, Helena Hai; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L.; Isaacs, Timothy; Hall, Janette; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A.; Constable, Ian J.; Craig, Jamie E.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Yang, Zhenglin; Su, Zhiguang; Luo, Hongrong; Chen, Daniel; Ouyang, Hong; Flagg, Ken; Lin, Danni; Mao, Guanping; Ferreyra, Henry; Stark, Klaus; von Strachwitz, Claudia N.; Wolf, Armin; Brandl, Caroline; Rudolph, Guenther; Olden, Matthias; Morrison, Margaux A.; Morgan, Denise J.; Schu, Matthew; Ahn, Jeeyun; Silvestri, Giuliana; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Park, Kyu Hyung; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Orlin, Anton; Brucker, Alexander; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Cree, Angela J.; Rennie, Christina A.; Goverdhan, Srinivas V.; Grunin, Michelle; Hagbi-Levi, Shira; Campochiaro, Peter; Katsanis, Nicholas; Holz, Frank G.; Blond, Frédéric; Blanché, Hélène; Deleuze, Jean-François; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Peachey, Neal S.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Myers, Chelsea E.; Moore, Emily L.; Klein, Ronald; Hauser, Michael A.; Postel, Eric A.; Courtenay, Monique D.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Kovach, Jaclyn L.; Scott, William K.; Liew, Gerald; Tƒan, Ava G.; Gopinath, Bamini; Merriam, John C.; Smith, R. Theodore; Khan, Jane C.; Shahid, Humma; Moore, Anthony T.; McGrath, J. Allie; Laux, Reneé; Brantley, Milam A.; Agarwal, Anita; Ersoy, Lebriz; Caramoy, Albert; Langmann, Thomas; Saksens, Nicole T. M.; de Jong, Eiko K.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cain, Melinda S.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Martin, Tammy M.; Blangero, John; Weeks, Daniel E.; Dhillon, Bal; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Romm, Jane; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Hayward, Caroline; Gorin, Michael B.; Klein, Michael L.; Baird, Paul N.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Fauser, Sascha; Yates, John R. W.; Allikmets, Rando; Wang, Jie Jin; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Chowers, Itay; Lotery, Andrew J.; Léveillard, Thierry; Zhang, Kang; Brilliant, Murray H.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; DeAngelis, Margaret; Stambolian, Dwight; Haines, Jonathan L.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Heid, Iris M.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly with limited therapeutic options. Here, we report on a study of >12 million variants including 163,714 directly genotyped, most rare, protein-altering variant. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832 controls, we identify 52 independently associated common and rare variants (P < 5×10–8) distributed across 34 loci. While wet and dry AMD subtypes exhibit predominantly shared genetics, we identify the first signal specific to wet AMD, near MMP9 (difference-P = 4.1×10–10). Very rare coding variants (frequency < 0.1%) in CFH, CFI, and TIMP3 suggest causal roles for these genes, as does a splice variant in SLC16A8. Our results support the hypothesis that rare coding variants can pinpoint causal genes within known genetic loci and illustrate that applying the approach systematically to detect new loci requires extremely large sample sizes. PMID:26691988

  15. Activation of Human Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)·Myeloid Differentiation Factor 2 (MD-2) by Hypoacylated Lipopolysaccharide from a Clinical Isolate of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Kubik, Łukasz; Oblak, Alja; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Hamad, Mohamad A; De Soyza, Anthony; Silipo, Alba; Jerala, Roman; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Valvano, Miguel A; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-08-28

    Lung infection by Burkholderia species, in particular Burkholderia cenocepacia, accelerates tissue damage and increases post-lung transplant mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. Host-microbe interplay largely depends on interactions between pathogen-specific molecules and innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which recognizes the lipid A moiety of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The human TLR4·myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) LPS receptor complex is strongly activated by hexa-acylated lipid A and poorly activated by underacylated lipid A. Here, we report that B. cenocepacia LPS strongly activates human TLR4·MD-2 despite its lipid A having only five acyl chains. Furthermore, we show that aminoarabinose residues in lipid A contribute to TLR4-lipid A interactions, and experiments in a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxic shock confirmed the proinflammatory potential of B. cenocepacia penta-acylated lipid A. Molecular modeling combined with mutagenesis of TLR4-MD-2 interactive surfaces suggests that longer acyl chains and the aminoarabinose residues in the B. cenocepacia lipid A allow exposure of the fifth acyl chain on the surface of MD-2 enabling interactions with TLR4 and its dimerization. Our results provide a molecular model for activation of the human TLR4·MD-2 complex by penta-acylated lipid A explaining the ability of hypoacylated B. cenocepacia LPS to promote proinflammatory responses associated with the severe pathogenicity of this opportunistic bacterium.

  16. Reconstruction of LPS Transfer Cascade Reveals Structural Determinants within LBP, CD14, and TLR4-MD2 for Efficient LPS Recognition and Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Je-Kyung; Kim, Soo Jin; Rah, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Ji In; Jung, Hi Eun; Lee, Dongsun; Lee, Heung Kyu; Lee, Jie-Oh; Park, Beom Seok; Yoon, Tae-Young; Kim, Ho Min

    2017-01-17

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, binds Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-MD2 complex and activates innate immune responses. LPS transfer to TLR4-MD2 is catalyzed by both LPS binding protein (LBP) and CD14. To define the sequential molecular interactions underlying this transfer, we reconstituted in vitro the entire LPS transfer process from LPS micelles to TLR4-MD2. Using electron microscopy and single-molecule approaches, we characterized the dynamic intermediate complexes for LPS transfer: LBP-LPS micelles, CD14-LBP-LPS micelle, and CD14-LPS-TLR4-MD2 complex. A single LBP molecule bound longitudinally to LPS micelles catalyzed multi-rounds of LPS transfer to CD14s that rapidly dissociated from LPB-LPS complex upon LPS transfer via electrostatic interactions. Subsequently, the single LPS molecule bound to CD14 was transferred to TLR4-MD2 in a TLR4-dependent manner. The definition of the structural determinants of the LPS transfer cascade to TLR4 may enable the development of targeted therapeutics for intervention in LPS-induced sepsis.

  17. TLR4-mediated galectin-1 production triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells through ADAM10- and ADAM17-associated lactate production.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation is a key contributor to the carcinogenesis of colon cancer. Overexpression of galectin-1 (Gal-1) also correlates with increased invasive activity of colorectal cancer. Lactate production is a critical predictive factor of risk of metastasis, but the functional relationship between intracellular lactate and Gal-1 expression in TLR4-activated colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and role of Gal-1 in metastasis and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells after TLR4 stimulation. Exposure to the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased expression of Gal-1, induced EMT-related cytokines, triggered the activation of glycolysis-related enzymes, and promoted lactate production. Gene silencing of TLR4 and Gal-1 in CRC cells inhibited lactate-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) after TLR4 stimulation. Gal-1-mediated activation of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM 17 increased the invasion activity and expression of mesenchymal characteristics in LPS-activated CRC cells. Conversely, inhibition of ADAM10 or ADAM17 effectively blocked the generation of lactate and the migration capacity of LPS-treated CRC cells. Thus, the TLR4/Gal-1 signaling pathway regulates lactate-mediated EMT processes through the activation of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in CRC cells.

  18. A structural insight into the negative effects of opioids in analgesia by modulating the TLR4 signaling: An in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Masaud; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are considered the gold standard therapy for pain. However, TLR-dependent negative effects in analgesia have highlighted the complexities in the pharmacodynamics of opioids. While successive studies have reported that morphine and Morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) activate the TLR4 pathway, the structural details of this mechanism are lacking. Here, we have utilized various computational tools to reveal the structural dynamics of the opioid-bound TLR4/MD2 complex, and have proposed a potential TLR4 activation mechanism. Our results support previous findings, and include the novel insight that the stable binding of morphine and naloxone, but not M3G, in the MD2 cavity, is TLR4 dependent. Morphine interacts with MD2 near its Phe126 loop to induce the active conformation (MD2C); however, this binding is likely reversible, and the complex gains stability upon interaction with TLR4. M3G also induces the MD2C state, with both the Phe126 loop and the H1 loop being involved in MD2-M3G complex stability. Remarkably, naloxone, which requires TLR4 interaction for complex stability, switches the conformation of the gating loop to the inactive state (MD2°). Cumulatively, our findings suggest that ligand binding and receptor clustering occur successively in opioid-induced TLR4 signaling, and that MD2 plasticity and pocket hydrophobicity are crucial for the recognition and accommodation of ligands. PMID:27982096

  19. TLR4 elimination prevents synaptic and myelin alterations and long-term cognitive dysfunctions in adolescent mice with intermittent ethanol treatment.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, Jorge; Pascual, María; Pla, Antoni; Maldonado, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Guerri, Consuelo

    2015-03-01

    The adolescent brain undergoes important dynamic and plastic cell changes, including overproduction of axons and synapses, followed by rapid pruning along with ongoing axon myelination. These developmental changes make the adolescent brain particularly vulnerable to neurotoxic and behavioral effects of alcohol. Although the mechanisms of these effects are largely unknown, we demonstrated that ethanol by activating innate immune receptors toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), induces neuroinflammation and brain damage in adult mice. The present study aims to evaluate whether intermittent ethanol treatment in adolescence promotes TLR4-dependent pro-inflammatory processes, leading to myelin and synaptic dysfunctions, and long-term cognitive impairments. Using wild-type (WT) and TLR4-deficient (TLR4-KO) adolescent mice treated intermittently with ethanol (3.0g/kg) for 2weeks, we show that binge-like ethanol treatment activates TLR4 signaling pathways (MAPK, NFκB) leading to the up-regulation of cytokines and pro-inflammatory mediators (COX-2, iNOS, HMGB1), impairing synaptic and myelin protein levels and causing ultrastructural alterations. These changes were associated with long-lasting cognitive dysfunctions in young adult mice, as demonstrated with the object recognition, passive avoidance and olfactory behavior tests. Notably, elimination of TLR4 receptors prevented neuroinflammation along with synaptic and myelin derangements, as well as long-term cognitive alterations. These results support the role of the neuroimmune response and TLR4 signaling in the neurotoxic and behavioral effects of ethanol in adolescence.

  20. Blockade of Toll-Like Receptors (TLR2, TLR4) Attenuates Pain and Potentiates Buprenorphine Analgesia in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Pilat, Dominika; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that microglial TLR2 and TLR4 play a significant role in nociception. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the contribution of TLR2 and TLR4 and their adaptor molecules to neuropathy and their ability to amplify opioid effectiveness. Behavioral tests (von Frey's and cold plate) and biochemical (Western blot and qRT-PCR) analysis of spinal cord and DRG tissue were conducted after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Repeated intrathecal administration of LPS-RS (TLR2 and TLR4 antagonist) and LPS-RS Ultrapure (TLR4 antagonist) attenuated allodynia and hyperalgesia. Biochemical analysis revealed time-dependent upregulation of mRNA and/or protein levels of TLR2 and TLR4 and MyD88 and TRIF adaptor molecules, which was paralleled by an increase in IBA-1/CD40-positive cells under neuropathy. LPS-RS and LPS-RS Ultrapure similarly influenced opioid analgesia by enhancing the effectiveness of buprenorphine but not morphine. Summing up, in light of their upregulation over the course of pain, both TLR2 and TLR4 may indeed play a significant role in neuropathy, which could be linked to the observed activation of IBA-1/CD40-positive cells. Blockade of TLR2 and TLR4 produced analgesia and enhanced buprenorphine's effectiveness, which suggests that they may be a putative target for future pharmacological pain relief tools, especially for opioid rotation, when the effect of morphine is tolerated. PMID:26962463

  1. Blockade of Toll-Like Receptors (TLR2, TLR4) Attenuates Pain and Potentiates Buprenorphine Analgesia in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Agnieszka M; Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Pilat, Dominika; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that microglial TLR2 and TLR4 play a significant role in nociception. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the contribution of TLR2 and TLR4 and their adaptor molecules to neuropathy and their ability to amplify opioid effectiveness. Behavioral tests (von Frey's and cold plate) and biochemical (Western blot and qRT-PCR) analysis of spinal cord and DRG tissue were conducted after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Repeated intrathecal administration of LPS-RS (TLR2 and TLR4 antagonist) and LPS-RS Ultrapure (TLR4 antagonist) attenuated allodynia and hyperalgesia. Biochemical analysis revealed time-dependent upregulation of mRNA and/or protein levels of TLR2 and TLR4 and MyD88 and TRIF adaptor molecules, which was paralleled by an increase in IBA-1/CD40-positive cells under neuropathy. LPS-RS and LPS-RS Ultrapure similarly influenced opioid analgesia by enhancing the effectiveness of buprenorphine but not morphine. Summing up, in light of their upregulation over the course of pain, both TLR2 and TLR4 may indeed play a significant role in neuropathy, which could be linked to the observed activation of IBA-1/CD40-positive cells. Blockade of TLR2 and TLR4 produced analgesia and enhanced buprenorphine's effectiveness, which suggests that they may be a putative target for future pharmacological pain relief tools, especially for opioid rotation, when the effect of morphine is tolerated.

  2. Paracoccin Induces M1 Polarization of Macrophages via Interaction with TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mateus S.; Oliveira, Aline F.; da Silva, Thiago A.; Fernandes, Fabrício F.; Gonçales, Relber A.; Almeida, Fausto; Roque-Barreira, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal human pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis contains paracoccin (PCN), a multi-domain protein that has lectin and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities, which account for its effects on the growth and morphogenesis of the fungus and on the activation of host macrophages through its interaction with TLR N-glycans. With the purpose of detailing the knowledge on the effects of PCN on macrophages, we used recombinant PCN expressed in Pichia pastoris (p-rPCN) to stimulate isolated murine peritoneal macrophages. The activation of these cells manifested through the release of high levels of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-12p40, and IL-6. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages stimulated with p-rPCN increased the relative expression of STAT1, SOCS3, and iNOS2 mRNA (M1 polarization markers). However, the expression of Arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ1 (M2 polarization markers) remained at basal levels. Interestingly, the observed M1 macrophages’ polarization triggered by p-rPCN was abolished in cells obtained from knockout Toll-like receptor-4 mice. In this case, the p-rPCN-induced production of pro-inflammatory mediators was blocked too. These results demonstrate that the classical activation of macrophages induced by paracoccin depends on TLR4. Taken together, the results of our study indicate that paracoccin acts as a TLR agonist able to modulate immunity and exerts biological activities that favor its applicability as an immunotherapeutic agent to combat systemic fungal infections. PMID:27458431

  3. TLR2 and TLR4 in autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yin, Heng; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune diseases are immune disorders characterized by T cell hyperactivity and B cell overstimulation leading to overproduction of autoantibodies. Although the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases remains to be elucidated, environmental factors have been thought to contribute to the initiation and maintenance of auto-respond inflammation. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors belonging to innate immunity that recognize and defend invading microorganisms. Besides these exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns, TLRs can also bind with damage-associated molecular patterns produced under strike or by tissue damage or cells apoptosis. It is believed that TLRs build a bridge between innate immunity and autoimmunity. There are five adaptors to TLRs including MyD88, TRIF, TIRAP/MAL, TRAM, and SARM. Upon activation, TLRs recruit specific adaptors to initiate the downstream signaling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Under certain circumstances, ligation of TLRs drives to aberrant activation and unrestricted inflammatory responses, thereby contributing to the perpetuation of inflammation in autoimmune diseases. In the past, most studies focused on the intracellular TLRs, such as TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9, but recent studies reveal that cell surface TLRs, especially TLR2 and TLR4, also play an essential role in the development of autoimmune diseases and afford multiple therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarized the biological characteristics, signaling mechanisms of TLR2/4, the negative regulators of TLR2/4 pathway, and the pivotal function of TLR2/4 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes.

  4. Evolution of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition and signaling: fish TLR4 does not recognize LPS and negatively regulates NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Sepulcre, María P; Alcaraz-Pérez, Francisca; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Roca, Francisco J; Meseguer, José; Cayuela, María L; Mulero, Victoriano

    2009-02-15

    It has long been established that lower vertebrates, most notably fish and amphibians, are resistant to the toxic effect of LPS. Furthermore, the lack of a TLR4 ortholog in some fish species and the lack of the essential costimulatory molecules for LPS activation via TLR4 (i.e., myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) and CD14) in all the fish genomes and expressed sequence tag databases available led us to hypothesize that the mechanism of LPS recognition in fish may be different from that of mammals. To shed light on the role of fish TLRs in LPS recognition, a dual-luciferase reporter assay to study NF-kappaB activation in whole zebrafish embryos was developed and three different bony fish models were studied: 1) the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata, Perciformes), an immunological-tractable teleost model in which the presence of a TLR4 ortholog is unknown; 2) the spotted green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis, Tetraodontiformes), which lacks a TLR4 ortholog; and 3) the zebrafish (Danio rerio, Cypriniformes), which possesses two TLR4 orthologs. Our results show that LPS signaled via a TLR4- and MyD88-independent manner in fish, and, surprisingly, that the zebrafish TLR4 orthologs negatively regulated the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. We think that the identification of TLR4 as a negative regulator of TLR signaling in the zebrafish, together with the absence of this receptor in most fish species, explains the resistance of fish to endotoxic shock and supports the idea that the TLR4 receptor complex for LPS recognition arose after the divergence of fish and tetrapods.

  5. Linoleic acid and stearic acid elicit opposite effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in immortalized hypothalamic N38 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Xiang, Nana; Yang, Liusong; Zhu, Canjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of food intake is a promising way to combat obesity. It has been implicated that various fatty acids exert different effects on food intake and body weight. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) on agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression and secretion in immortalized mouse hypothalamic N38 cells and to explore the likely underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that LA inhibited, while SA stimulated AgRP expression and secretion of N38 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LA suppressed the protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylation levels of JNK and IKKα/β, suggesting the inhibition of TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway. However, the above mentioned inhibitory effects of LA were eliminated by TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, SA promoted TLR4 protein expression and activated TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway, with elevated ratio of p-JNK/JNK. While TLR4 siRNA reversed the stimulatory effects of SA on AgRP expression and TLR4-dependent inflammation. Moreover, we found that TLR4 was also involved in LA-enhanced and SA-impaired leptin/insulin signal pathways in N38 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicated that LA elicited inhibitory while SA exerted stimulatory effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent inflammation and leptin/insulin pathways in N38 cells. These data provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying fatty acids-regulated food intake and suggested the potential role of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids such as LA in reducing food intake and treating obesity.

  6. TLR4/NF-κB/Ceramide signaling contributes to Ox-LDL-induced calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Hou, Menglin; Li, Zhenlin; Luo, Chufan; Ou, Jing-Song; Yu, Huimin; Yan, Jianyun; Lu, Lihe

    2017-01-05

    Vascular calcification is a major feature of advanced atherosclerosis and highly associated with cardiovascular diseases. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) has been recognized as a critical risk factor for atherosclerosis and osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Previous studies have demonstrated that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) is highly expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and participates in the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the role of TLR4 in vascular calcification remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether TLR4 modulates vascular calcification induced by Ox-LDL. TLR4 expression was up-regulated in cultured human VSMCs treated with Ox-LDL. Knockdown of TLR4 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly reduced Ox-LDL-induced calcification, detected by alizarin red staining and calcium content assay. TLR4 siRNA also decreased the mRNA expression of bone-related proteins including Msx2, osterix, BMP2 and KLF4, but increased the expression of VSMC contractile proteins including SMA and SM22α in VSMCs. In addition, Ox-LDL stimulated nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NK-κB) p65. These effects of Ox-LDL on VSMCs were reversed by TLR4 siRNA. Furthermore, NK-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), attenuated Ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification, which was rescued by C2-ceramide treatment. In conclusion, these findings suggest that TLR4 regulates VSMC calcification induced by Ox-LDL through activation of NK-κB, highlighting the critical role of TLR4/NK-κB signaling in vascular calcification.

  7. An Optimal Weighted Aggregated Association Test for Identification of Rare Variants Involved in Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Jae Hoon; Han, Buhm; He, Dan; Eskin, Eleazar

    2011-01-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing technologies allows one to discover nearly all rare variants in a genomic region of interest. This technological development increases the need for an effective statistical method for testing the aggregated effect of rare variants in a gene on disease susceptibility. The idea behind this approach is that if a certain gene is involved in a disease, many rare variants within the gene will disrupt the function of the gene and are associated with the disease. In this article, we present the rare variant weighted aggregate statistic (RWAS), a method that groups rare variants and computes a weighted sum of differences between case and control mutation counts. We show that our method outperforms the groupwise association test of Madsen and Browning in the disease-risk model that assumes that each variant makes an equally small contribution to disease risk. In addition, we can incorporate prior information into our method of which variants are likely causal. By using simulated data and real mutation screening data of the susceptibility gene for ataxia telangiectasia, we demonstrate that prior information has a substantial influence on the statistical power of association studies. Our method is publicly available at http://genetics.cs.ucla.edu/rarevariants. PMID:21368279

  8. CHK1 and RAD51 activation after DNA damage is regulated via urokinase receptor/TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B; Tkachuk, Sergey; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of DNA damage and repair signaling are not completely understood that hinder the efficiency of cancer therapy. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (PLAUR) is highly expressed in most solid cancers and serves as a marker of poor prognosis. We show that PLAUR actively promotes DNA repair in cancer cells. On the contrary, downregulation of PLAUR expression results in delayed DNA repair. We found PLAUR to be essential for activation of Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1); maintenance of cell cycle arrest after DNA damage in a TP53-dependent manner; expression, nuclear import and recruitment to DNA-damage foci of RAD51 recombinase, the principal protein involved in the homologous recombination repair pathway. Underlying mechanism implies auto-/paracrine signaling of PLAUR/TLR4 receptor complex leading to activation of CHK1 and DNA repair. The signaling is induced by a danger molecule released by DNA-damaged cells and mediates, at least partially, activation of DNA-damage response. This study describes a new mechanism of DNA repair activation initiated by auto-/paracrine signaling of membrane receptors PLAUR/TLR4. It adds to the understanding of role of PLAUR in cancer and provides a rationale for therapeutic targeting of PLAUR/TLR4 interaction in TP53-positive cancers. PMID:27685627

  9. Tlr4 upregulation in the brain accompanies depression- and anxiety-like behaviors induced by a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Strekalova, Tatyana; Evans, Matthew; Costa-Nunes, Joao; Bachurin, Sergey; Yeritsyan, Naira; Couch, Yvonne; Steinbusch, Harry M W; Eleonore Köhler, S; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Anthony, Daniel C

    2015-08-01

    An association between metabolic abnormalities, hypercholesterolemia and affective disorders is now well recognized. Less well understood are the molecular mechanisms, both in brain and in the periphery, that underpin this phenomenon. In addition to hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammation, C57BL/6J mice fed a high-cholesterol diet (0.2%) to induce non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), exhibited behavioral despair, anxiogenic changes, and hyperlocomotion under bright light. These abnormalities were accompanied by increased expression of transcript and protein for Toll-like receptor 4, a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) receptor, in the prefrontal cortex and the liver. The behavioral changes and Tlr4 expression were reversed ten days after discontinuation of the high-cholesterol diet. Remarkably, the dietary fat content and body mass of experimental mice were unchanged, suggesting a specific role for cholesterol in the molecular and behavioral changes. Expression of Sert and Cox1 were unaltered. Together, our study has demonstrated for the first time that high consumption of cholesterol results in depression- and anxiety-like changes in C57BL/6J mice and that these changes are unexpectedly associated with the increased expression of TLR4, which suggests that TLR4 may have a distinct role in the CNS unrelated to pathogen recognition.

  10. Viperin inhibits rabies virus replication via reduced cholesterol and sphingomyelin and is regulated upstream by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hai-Bo; Lu, Zhuan-Ling; Wei, Xian-Kai; Zhong, Tao-Zhen; Zhong, Yi-Zhi; Ouyang, Ling-Xuan; Luo, Yang; Xing, Xing-Wei; Liao, Fang; Peng, Ke-Ke; Deng, Chao-Qian; Minamoto, Nobuyuki; Luo, Ting Rong

    2016-01-01

    Viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum-associated, IFN-inducible) is an interferon-inducible protein that mediates antiviral activity. Generally, rabies virus (RABV) multiplies extremely well in susceptible cells, leading to high virus titres. In this study, we found that viperin was significantly up-regulated in macrophage RAW264.7 cells but not in NA, BHK-21 or BSR cells. Transient viperin overexpression in BSR cells and stable expression in BHK-21 cells could inhibit RABV replication, including both attenuated and street RABV. Furthermore, the inhibitory function of viperin was related to reduce cholesterol/sphingomyelin on the membranes of RAW264.7 cells. We explored the up-stream regulation pathway of viperin in macrophage RAW264.7 cells in the context of RABV infection. An experiment confirmed that a specific Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor, TAK-242, could inhibit viperin expression in RABV-infected RAW264.7 cells. These results support a regulatory role for TLR4. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) (by inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) of the IRF3 phosphorylation chaperone), significantly delayed and reduced viperin expression, indicating that IRF3 is involved in viperin induction in RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, our data support the therapeutic potential for viperin to inhibit RABV replication, which appears to involve upstream regulation by TLR4. PMID:27456665

  11. Signaling through NOD-2 and TLR-4 Bolsters the T cell Priming Capability of Dendritic cells by Inducing Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Pahari, Susanta; Negi, Shikha; Aqdas, Mohammad; Nadeem, Sajid; Agnihotri, Tapan; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    T cells play a cardinal role in mediating protection against intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). It is important to understand the factors that govern the T cell response; thereby can modulate its activity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the major player in initiation and augmentation of T cell response. Targeting DCs to induce their optimum maturation and activation can lead to a better T cell response. Interestingly, we observed that combinatorial signaling of DCs through NOD-2 and TLR-4 fortified better yield of IL-12p40/70, IL-6 and IFN-γ and upregulated the expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules. Further, we noticed improved phagocytic capabilities of DCs. Furthermore, NOD-2 and TLR-4 induced autophagy in DCs, which enhanced the activation of T cells. This study signifies that NOD-2 and TLR-4 exhibit synergism in invigorating the activity of DCs. Consequently, this strategy may have significant immunotherapeutic potential in bolstering the function of DCs and thus improving the immunity against pathogens. PMID:26754352

  12. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Through Inhibiting TLR4/MyD88 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Chen, Guang; Yu, Xiangdong; Li, Yunchao; Zhang, Li; He, Zongze; Zhang, Nannan; Yang, Xiuping; Zhao, Yansheng; Li, Na; Qiu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic stroke can activate multiple transcription factors and cause inflammatory reactions, which involve pattern recognition receptors with immunostimulatory effects. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the receptors related to innate immunity and several inflammatory reactions. The promising anti- inflammatory activity of salvianolic acid B (SAB) had been previously reported, but its effect on ischemic stroke remains unknown. An oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in vitro and a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in vivo were used in this paper, and the results showned that SAB remarkably increased the viabilities of PC12 cells and primary cortical neurons after OGD/R injury and notably prevented cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. SAB also significantly ameliorated NeuN release from primary cortical neurons. Further research indicated that the neuroprotection of SAB was completed through inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6 signaling pathway. The blocking of TLR4 by SAB also restrained NF-kB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These findings supply a new insight that will aid in clarifying the effect of SAB against cerebral I/R injury and provide the development of SAB as a potential candidate for treating ischemic stroke.

  13. Atorvastatin protected from paraquat-induced cytotoxicity in alveolar macrophages via down-regulation of TLR-4.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh-Tabrizi, Nazli; Malekinejad, Hassan; Varasteh, Soheil; Cheraghi, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The current study designed to clarify the mechanism of paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and protective effects of Atorvastatin on freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AMs). AMs were collected via bronchoalveolar lavage and exposed to various concentrations of paraquat in the presence and absence of atorvastatin for 24h. Cell viability, myeloperoxidase activity; nitric oxide generation and total antioxidant capacity were assessed. Expression of TLR-4 at mRNA and protein levels were studied by using PCR and western blot methods Atorvastatin enhanced the paraquat-reduced cell viability and reduced the paraquat-induced myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide production. Moreover, atorvastatin down-regulated by 60% the paraquat up-regulated expression of TLR-4 at protein and mRNA level. Our results suggest that, AMs in vitro model could be a novel cytological tool for studies on paraquat poisoning and therapy regimens. Additionally, atorvastatin cytoprotective effects on paraquat-induced cytotoxicity partly attribute to its anti-myeloperoxidase, antioxidant properties, which might be regulated via TLR-4 expression.

  14. Can the TLR-4-Mediated Signaling Pathway Be “A Key Inflammatory Promoter for Sporadic TAA”?

    PubMed Central

    Ruvolo, Giovanni; Pisano, Calogera; Candore, Giuseppina; Lio, Domenico; Palmeri, Cesira; Maresi, Emiliano; Balistreri, Carmela R.

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic aorta shows with advancing age various changes and a progressive deterioration in structure and function. As a result, vascular remodeling (VR) and medial degeneration (MD) occur as pathological entities responsible principally for the sporadic TAA onset. Little is known about their genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms. Recent evidence is proposing the strong role of a chronic immune/inflammatory process in their evocation and progression. Thus, we evaluated the potential role of Toll like receptor- (TLR-) 4-mediated signaling pathway and its polymorphisms in sporadic TAA. Genetic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical analyses were assessed. Interestingly, the rs4986790 TLR4 polymorphism confers a higher susceptibility for sporadic TAA (OR = 14.4, P = 0.0008) and it represents, together with rs1799752 ACE, rs3918242 MMP-9, and rs2285053 MMP-2 SNPs, an independent sporadic TAA risk factor. In consistency with these data, a significant association was observed between their combined risk genotype and sporadic TAA. Cases bearing this risk genotype showed higher systemic inflammatory mediator levels, significant inflammatory/immune infiltrate, a typical MD phenotype, lower telomere length, and positive correlations with histopatological abnormalities, hypertension, smoking, and ageing. Thus, TLR4 pathway should seem to have a key role in sporadic TAA. It might represent a potential useful tool for preventing and monitoring sporadic TAA and developing personalized treatments. PMID:25120286

  15. The HIV Protease Inhibitor Saquinavir Inhibits HMGB1-Driven Inflammation by Targeting the Interaction of Cathepsin V with TLR4/MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Pribis, John P; Al-Abed, Yousef; Yang, Huan; Gero, Domokos; Xu, Hongbo; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Bauer, Eileen M; Kim, Sodam; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Cai, Changchun; Li, Tunliang; Szoleczky, Petra; Szabo, Csaba; Tracey, Kevin J; Billiar, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) (disulfide form), via activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signaling, is a strong driver of pathologic inflammation in both acute and chronic conditions. Identification of selective inhibitors of HMGB1-TLR4 signaling could offer novel therapies that selectively target proximal endogenous activators of inflammation. A cell-based screening strategy led us to identify first generation HIV-protease inhibitors (PI) as potential inhibitors of HMGB1-TLR4 driven cytokine production. Here we report that the first-generation HIV-PI saquinavir (SQV), as well as a newly identified mammalian protease inhibitor STO33438 (334), potently block disulfide HMGB1-induced TLR4 activation, as assayed by the production of TNF-α by human monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1). We further report on the identification of mammalian cathepsin V, a protease, as a novel target of these inhibitors. Cellular as well as recombinant protein studies show that the mechanism of action involves a direct interaction between cathepsin V with TLR4 and its adaptor protein MyD88. Treatment with SQV, 334 or the known cathepsin inhibitor SID26681509 (SID) significantly improved survival in murine models of sepsis and reduced liver damage following warm liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models, both characterized by strong HMGB1-TLR4 driven pathology. The current study demonstrates a novel role for cathepsin V in TLR4 signaling and implicates cathepsin V as a novel target for first-generation HIV-PI compounds. The identification of cathepsin V as a target to block HMGB1-TLR4-driven inflammation could allow for a rapid transition of the discovery from the bench to the bedside. Disulfide HMGB1 drives pathologic inflammation in many models by activating signaling through TLR4. Cell-based screening identified the mammalian protease cathepsin V as a novel therapeutic target to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation induced by extracellular HMGB1 (disulfide

  16. No Evidence of a Common DNA Variant Profile Specific to World Class Endurance Athletes.

    PubMed

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Fuku, Noriyuki; Wolfarth, Bernd; Wang, Guan; Sarzynski, Mark A; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Ahmetov, Ildus I; Boulay, Marcel R; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Eynon, Nir; Filipenko, Maxim L; Garton, Fleur C; Generozov, Edward V; Govorun, Vadim M; Houweling, Peter J; Kawahara, Takashi; Kostryukova, Elena S; Kulemin, Nickolay A; Larin, Andrey K; Maciejewska-Karłowska, Agnieszka; Miyachi, Motohiko; Muniesa, Carlos A; Murakami, Haruka; Ospanova, Elena A; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Pyankova, Olga N; Santiago, Catalina; Sawczuk, Marek; Scott, Robert A; Uyba, Vladimir V; Yvert, Thomas; Perusse, Louis; Ghosh, Sujoy; Rauramaa, Rainer; North, Kathryn N; Lucia, Alejandro; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Bouchard, Claude

    2016-01-01

    There are strong genetic components to cardiorespiratory fitness and its response to exercise training. It would be useful to understand the differences in the genomic profile of highly trained endurance athletes of world class caliber and sedentary controls. An international consortium (GAMES) was established in order to compare elite endurance athletes and ethnicity-matched controls in a case-control study design. Genome-wide association studies were undertaken on two cohorts of elite endurance athletes and controls (GENATHLETE and Japanese endurance runners), from which a panel of 45 promising markers was identified. These markers were tested for replication in seven additional cohorts of endurance athletes and controls: from Australia, Ethiopia, Japan, Kenya, Poland, Russia and Spain. The study is based on a total of 1520 endurance athletes (835 who took part in endurance events in World Championships and/or Olympic Games) and 2760 controls. We hypothesized that world-class athletes are likely to be characterized by an even higher concentration of endurance performance alleles and we performed separate analyses on this subsample. The meta-analysis of all available studies revealed one statistically significant marker (rs558129 at GALNTL6 locus, p = 0.0002), even after correcting for multiple testing. As shown by the low heterogeneity index (I2 = 0), all eight cohorts showed the same direction of association with rs558129, even though p-values varied across the individual studies. In summary, this study did not identify a panel of genomic variants common to these elite endurance athlete groups. Since GAMES was underpowered to identify alleles with small effect sizes, some of the suggestive leads identified should be explored in expanded comparisons of world-class endurance athletes and sedentary controls and in tightly controlled exercise training studies. Such studies have the potential to illuminate the biology not only of world class endurance performance but

  17. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the CASC15, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1, and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated eight additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNPs at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2,101 cases and 4,202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing, and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNPs associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014: Pcombined = 0.0050; OR, 0.88; rs2979704: Pcombined = 0.0072; OR, 0.87; rs1059111: Pcombined = 0.0049; OR, 0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biologic investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens were associated with better overall survival (P = 0.03; HR, 0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and

  18. No Evidence of a Common DNA Variant Profile Specific to World Class Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfarth, Bernd; Wang, Guan; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Ahmetov, Ildus I.; Boulay, Marcel R.; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Eynon, Nir; Filipenko, Maxim L.; Garton, Fleur C.; Generozov, Edward V.; Govorun, Vadim M.; Houweling, Peter J.; Kawahara, Takashi; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Kulemin, Nickolay A.; Larin, Andrey K.; Maciejewska-Karłowska, Agnieszka; Miyachi, Motohiko; Muniesa, Carlos A.; Murakami, Haruka; Ospanova, Elena A.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pavlenko, Alexander V.; Pyankova, Olga N.; Santiago, Catalina; Sawczuk, Marek; Scott, Robert A.; Uyba, Vladimir V.; Yvert, Thomas; Perusse, Louis; Ghosh, Sujoy; Rauramaa, Rainer; North, Kathryn N.; Lucia, Alejandro; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Bouchard, Claude

    2016-01-01

    There are strong genetic components to cardiorespiratory fitness and its response to exercise training. It would be useful to understand the differences in the genomic profile of highly trained endurance athletes of world class caliber and sedentary controls. An international consortium (GAMES) was established in order to compare elite endurance athletes and ethnicity-matched controls in a case-control study design. Genome-wide association studies were undertaken on two cohorts of elite endurance athletes and controls (GENATHLETE and Japanese endurance runners), from which a panel of 45 promising markers was identified. These markers were tested for replication in seven additional cohorts of endurance athletes and controls: from Australia, Ethiopia, Japan, Kenya, Poland, Russia and Spain. The study is based on a total of 1520 endurance athletes (835 who took part in endurance events in World Championships and/or Olympic Games) and 2760 controls. We hypothesized that world-class athletes are likely to be characterized by an even higher concentration of endurance performance alleles and we performed separate analyses on this subsample. The meta-analysis of all available studies revealed one statistically significant marker (rs558129 at GALNTL6 locus, p = 0.0002), even after correcting for multiple testing. As shown by the low heterogeneity index (I2 = 0), all eight cohorts showed the same direction of association with rs558129, even though p-values varied across the individual studies. In summary, this study did not identify a panel of genomic variants common to these elite endurance athlete groups. Since GAMES was underpowered to identify alleles with small effect sizes, some of the suggestive leads identified should be explored in expanded comparisons of world-class endurance athletes and sedentary controls and in tightly controlled exercise training studies. Such studies have the potential to illuminate the biology not only of world class endurance performance but

  19. Common single nucleotide variants underlying drug addiction: more than a decade of research.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Kora-Mareen; Giné, Elena; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Calleja-Conde, Javier; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Drug-related phenotypes are common complex and highly heritable traits. In the last few years, candidate gene (CGAS) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a huge number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with drug use, abuse or dependence, mainly related to alcohol or nicotine. Nevertheless, few of these associations have been replicated in independent studies. The aim of this study was to provide a review of the SNPs that have been most significantly associated with alcohol-, nicotine-, cannabis- and cocaine-related phenotypes in humans between the years of 2000 and 2012. To this end, we selected CGAS, GWAS, family-based association and case-only studies published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals (using the PubMed/MEDLINE and Addiction GWAS Resource databases) in which a significant association was reported. A total of 371 studies fit the search criteria. We then filtered SNPs with at least one replication study and performed meta-analysis of the significance of the associations. SNPs in the alcohol metabolizing genes, in the cholinergic gene cluster CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4, and in the DRD2 and ANNK1 genes, are, to date, the most replicated and significant gene variants associated with alcohol- and nicotine-related phenotypes. In the case of cannabis and cocaine, a far fewer number of studies and replications have been reported, indicating either a need for further investigation or that the genetics of cannabis/cocaine addiction are more elusive. This review brings a global state-of-the-art vision of the behavioral genetics of addiction and collaborates on formulation of new hypothesis to guide future work.

  20. Copy number variants are a common cause of non-syndromic hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Copy number variants (CNVs) are a well-recognized cause of genetic disease; however, methods for their identification are often gene-specific, excluded as ‘routine’ in screens of genetically heterogeneous disorders, and not implemented in most next-generation sequencing pipelines. For this reason, the contribution of CNVs to non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) is most likely under-recognized. We aimed to incorporate a method for CNV identification as part of our standard analysis pipeline and to determine the contribution of CNVs to genetic hearing loss. Methods We used targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing to isolate and sequence all exons of all genes known to cause NSHL. We completed testing on 686 patients with hearing loss with no exclusions based on type of hearing loss or any other clinical features. For analysis we used an integrated method for detection of single nucleotide changes, indels and CNVs. CNVs were identified using a previously published method that utilizes median read-depth ratios and a sliding-window approach. Results Of 686 patients tested, 15.2% (104) carried at least one CNV within a known deafness gene. Of the 38.9% (267) of individuals for whom we were able to determine a genetic cause of hearing loss, a CNV was implicated in 18.7% (50). We identified CNVs in 16 different genes including 7 genes for which no CNVs have been previously reported. CNVs of STRC were most common (73% of CNVs identified) followed by CNVs of OTOA (13% of CNVs identified). Conclusion CNVs are an important cause of NSHL and their detection must be included in comprehensive genetic testing for hearing loss. PMID:24963352

  1. Association of a common genetic variant in prostate stem cell antigen with cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Zhang, Li Feng; Wu, Xiao Peng; Zhou, Zhong Xing; Zou, Jian Gang; He, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphisms in the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene have been hypothesized to increase the genetic susceptibility to cancers. The common sequence variation in PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) has been implicated in cancer risk. However, results of the relevant published studies were somewhat underpowered and controversial in general. Material and methods To evaluate the role of PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) genotype in global cancer, we performed a pooled analysis of all the available published studies involving 22,817 cancer patients and 27,753 control subjects. Results The results showed evidence that PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) was associated with increased total cancer risk in the overall comparisons. Stratified analysis by cancer type indicated that PSCA rs2294008 T is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.09–1.42, pheterogeneity < 0.001, I2 = 88.0%) and bladder cancer (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.04–1.11, pheterogeneity = 0.108, I2 = 55.0%) by allelic contrast. Furthermore, in stratified analysis by histological types of gastric cancer, this PSCA variant showed significant associations with diffuse type (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.16–2.81, pheterogeneity < 0.001, I2 = 88.9%) but not intestinal type (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 0.95–1.74, pheterogeneity < 0.001, I2 = 85.2%) in a dominant genetic model. Similar results were found in Asian and European descendents and population-based studies. Conclusions In all, our meta-analysis suggests that PSCA rs2294008 (C>T) may play allele-specific roles in cancer development. Further prospective studies with larger numbers of participants worldwide should be performed in different kinds of cancer and other descendents in more detail. PMID:25097570

  2. Common genetic variants in pituitary-thyroid axis genes and the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Susana; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; González, Eddy R; Castell, Juan; Biarnés, Josefina; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors, THRA and THRB, together with the TSH receptor, TSHR, are key regulators of thyroid function. Alterations in the genes of these receptors (THRA, THRB and TSHR) have been related to thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that predisposition to differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is related to common genetic variants with low penetrance that interact with each other and with environmental factors. In this study, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the THRA (one SNP), THRB (three SNPs) and TSHR (two SNPs) genes with DTC risk. A case-control association study was conducted with 398 patients with sporadic DTC and 479 healthy controls from a Spanish population. Among the polymorphisms studied, only THRA-rs939348 was found to be associated with an increased risk of DTC (recessive model, odds ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval=1.03-3.14, P=0.037). Gene-gene interaction analysis using the genotype data of this study together with our previous genotype data on TG and TRHR indicated a combined effect of the pairwises: THRB-TG (P interaction=0.014, THRB-rs3752874 with TG-rs2076740; P interaction=0.099, THRB-rs844107 with TG-rs2076740) and THRB-TRHR (P interaction=0.0024, THRB-rs3752874 with TRHR-rs4129682) for DTC risk in a Spanish population. Our results confirm that THRA is a risk factor for DTC, and we show for the first time the combined effect of THRB and TG or TRHR on DTC susceptibility, supporting the importance of gene-gene interaction in thyroid cancer risk.

  3. β2-glycoprotein I, lipopolysaccharide and endothelial TLR4: three players in the two hit theory for anti-phospholipid-mediated thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Raschi, Elena; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Grossi, Claudia; Ronda, Nicoletta; Gatti, Rita; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Borghi, M Orietta

    2014-12-01

    The thrombogenic effect of β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI)-dependent anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) in animal models was found to be LPS dependent. Since β2GPI behaves as LPS scavenger, LPS/β2GPI complex was suggested to account for in vitro cell activation through LPS/TLR4 involvement being LPS the actual bridge ligand between β2GPI and TLR4 at least in monocytes/macrophages. However, no definite information is available on the interaction among β2GPI, LPS and endothelial TLR4 in spite of the main role of endothelial cells (EC) in clotting. To analyse at the endothelial level the need of LPS, we investigated the in vitro interaction of β2GPI with endothelial TLR4 and we assessed the role of LPS in such an interaction. To do this, we evaluated the direct binding and internalization of β2GPI by confocal microscopy in living TLR4-MD2 transfected CHO cells (CHO/TLR4-MD2) and β2GPI binding to CHO/TLR4-MD2 cells and human umbilical cord vein EC (HUVEC) by flow cytometry and cell-ELISA using anti-β2GPI monoclonal antibodies in the absence or presence of various concentrations of exogenous LPS. To further investigate the role of TLR4, we performed anti-β2GPI antibody binding and adhesion molecule up-regulation in TLR4-silenced HUVEC. Confocal microscopy studies show that β2GPI does interact with TLR4 at the cell membrane and is internalized in cytoplasmic granules in CHO/TLR4-MD2 cells. β2GPI binding to CHO/TLR4-MD2 cells and HUVEC is also confirmed by flow cytometry and cell-ELISA, respectively. The interaction between β2GPI and TLR4 is confirmed by the reduction of anti-β2GPI antibody binding and by the up-regulation of E-selectin or ICAM-1 by TLR4 silencing in HUVEC. β2GPI binding is not affected by LPS at concentrations comparable to those found in both β2GPI and antibody preparations. Only higher amount of LPS that can activate EC and up-regulate TLR4 expression are found to increase the binding. Our findings demonstrate that β2GPI interacts

  4. Prx1 promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells in a TLR4-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhicheng; Zheng, Xiaomei; Li, Dan; Wang, Tiance; Xu, Rihao; Piao, Hulin; Liu, Kexiang

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effect of peroxiredocin 1 (Prx1) on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, invasion and migration abilities, and to examine the effect of Toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene silencing on VSMC proliferation, invasion and migration induced by the overexpression of Prx1. The expression of Prx1 in rats with vein graft intimal hyperplasia (IH) was detected using western blot analysis. In addition, VSMCs were retrovirally transfected to establish stable cell lines overexpressing Prx1. An MTT assay was used to determine the effect of the overexpression of Prx1 on VSMC proliferation. A Transwell assay was used to detect the effect of the overexpression of Prx1 on the invasion of VSMCs and a wound‑healing assay was used to determine the effect of the overexpression of Prx1 on the migration of VSMCs. The Prx1‑overexpressed cells were then transfected with interference plasmids of TLR4, to detect the effect of silencing the TLR4 gene on the proliferation and migration of VSMCs using MTT and wound‑healing assays. The results showed that the expression of Prx1 (1.067±0.03) in the IH group was significantly higher, compared with that in the control (0.677±0.05). The number of VSMCs able penetrated the membrane in Prx1-overexpressed group (150±17/visual field) was significantly higher, compared with that in the control (40±5/visual field). The VSMCs in the Prx1‑overexpressed group possessed significantly higher migration ability, compared with those in the control group. The numbers of viable cells in the Prx1‑overexpression groups were 5.625±0.1x105, 8.9±0.737x105 and 10.635±0.065x105, respectively, on days 1, 2 and 3 post‑transfetion, which were significantly higher, compared with those in the control group (3.0±0.025x105, 4.1±0.035x105 and 5.06±0.023x105. The overexpression of Prx1 promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration abilities of the VSMCs. Silencing of the TLR4 gene attenuated the Prx1

  5. Rare and common variants in CARD14, encoding an epidermal regulator of NF-kappaB, in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Catherine T; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D O; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A; Nair, Rajan P; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Stuart, Philip E; Goldgar, David; Hayashi, Genki; Olfson, Emily H; Feng, Bing-Jian; Pullinger, Clive R; Kane, John P; Wise, Carol A; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A; Peddle, Lynette; Chandran, Vinod; Liao, Wilson; Rahman, Proton; Krueger, Gerald G; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T; Menter, Alan; Bowcock, Anne M

    2012-05-04

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disorder of the skin and other organs. We have determined that mutations in CARD14, encoding a nuclear factor of kappa light chain enhancer in B cells (NF-kB) activator within skin epidermis, account for PSORS2. Here, we describe fifteen additional rare missense variants in CARD14, their distribution in seven psoriasis cohorts (>6,000 cases and >4,000 controls), and their effects on NF-kB activation and the transcriptome of keratinocytes. There were more CARD14 rare variants in cases than in controls (burden test p value = 0.0015). Some variants were only seen in a single case, and these included putative pathogenic mutations (c.424G>A [p.Glu142Lys] and c.425A>G [p.Glu142Gly]) and the generalized-pustular-psoriasis mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala); these three mutations lie within the coiled-coil domain of CARD14. The c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) familial-psoriasis mutation was present at a frequency of 0.0005 in cases of European ancestry. CARD14 variants led to a range of NF-kB activities; in particular, putative pathogenic variants led to levels >2.5× higher than did wild-type CARD14. Two variants (c.511C>A [p.His171Asn] and c.536G>A [p.Arg179His]) required stimulation with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) to achieve significant increases in NF-kB levels. Transcriptome profiling of wild-type and variant CARD14 transfectants in keratinocytes differentiated probably pathogenic mutations from neutral variants such as polymorphisms. Over 20 CARD14 polymorphisms were also genotyped, and meta-analysis revealed an association between psoriasis and rs11652075 (c.2458C>T [p.Arg820Trp]; p value = 2.1 × 10(-6)). In the two largest psoriasis cohorts, evidence for association increased when rs11652075 was conditioned on HLA-Cw*0602 (PSORS1). These studies contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of psoriasis and illustrate the challenges faced in identifying pathogenic variants in common disease.

  6. Rare and Common Variants in CARD14, Encoding an Epidermal Regulator of NF-kappaB, in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Catherine T.; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D.O.; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A.; Nair, Rajan P.; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Stuart, Philip E.; Goldgar, David; Hayashi, Genki; Olfson, Emily H.; Feng, Bing-Jian; Pullinger, Clive R.; Kane, John P.; Wise, Carol A.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A.; Peddle, Lynette; Chandran, Vinod; Liao, Wilson; Rahman, Proton; Krueger, Gerald G.; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T.; Menter, Alan; Bowcock,