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Sample records for common tlr4 variants

  1. Influence of common variants of TLR4 and TLR9 on clinical outcomes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Kar, Avishek; Panigrahi, Subhendu; Tripathy, Sagnika; Mohapatra, Manoj K; Tayung, Kumananda; Dhangadamajhi, Gunanidhi

    2015-12-01

    In malaria, the toll-like receptors (TLRs) have recently emerged as major player of innate immunity. However, implication of TLR variants on clinical manifestations of malaria is conflicting. The present study aims to provide relevant information of growing interest in understanding the role of TLR4D299G, TLR9T-1237C and TLR9T-1486C polymorphisms on clinical outcomes of malaria. We genotyped TLR4D299G, TLR9T-1237C and TLR9T-1486C polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP methods and subsequently analyzed in 200 uncomplicated patients and 200 severe patients. Further, the severe malaria categorized into sub-clinical groups such as cerebral malaria (CM), non-cerebral severe malaria (NCSM), single organ dysfunction (SOD) and multi-organ dysfunctions (MODS) are analyzed. The TLR9-1237CC genotype was observed at significantly low frequency in MODS (p=0.0008), while in heterozygous state (TC) it was proportionately more frequent in SOD (p=0.087) as compared to mild malaria. The TLR9T-1486C heterozygote was more common in all categories of severe malaria. However, pair wise LD analysis revealed significant linkage between T-1237C and T-1486C, whereas haplotype analysis showed significantly low frequency of C-T haplotype in CM (p=0.005, pc=0.02) and high frequency of T-C haplotype in NCSM as compared to mild malaria. Although TLR9-1237C could be a risk factor for severe malaria in heterozygous state, negative association of CC genotype with MODS warrants caution of segregating severe malaria into its sub-clinical groups while interpreting data. Further, clinical outcome in malaria was observed to be apparently modulated by LD between TLR9 promoter variants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) variant is associated with asthma severity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Qin-Fu; Zhao, Yu-Miao; Li, Dan-Dan; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Zhao, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a complex airways disease resulting from the input of both biological and environmental factors. Previous studies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which produces a protein involved in regulating T cell populations, have presented conflicting results regarding its role in asthma severity. In the current study, individuals with asthma were genotyped for variants of TLR4, and the genotypes were compared with asthma severity and T cell subpopulations. TLR4 rs11536879 (A>G) and rs1927907 (G>A) genotypes were determined in 350 asthma patients using TaqMan. Asthma severity was graded by clinical symptoms, and blood markers and lung function measures were also collected. T cell subpopulations were identified from peripheral blood by flow cytometry. No significant correlations were observed between genotypes at TLR4 rs11536879 or rs1927907 and eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, serum hypersensitive C-reactive protein, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), or FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) in asthma patients (P > 0.05). However, the GG genotype of rs1927907 was correlated with higher asthma severity (P < 0.05). No associations were detected between genotypes at rs11536879 or rs1927907 and CD4+CD25high regulatory T cell counts in peripheral blood from asthmatic patients (P > 0.05), but the rs1927907 genotype was associated with TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells (P < 0.05). Therefore, the TLR4 variant rs1927907 appears to be related to asthma severity and TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells, suggesting the potential influence of TLR4 on T cell population balances. PMID:26221339

  3. Recognition of lipid A variants by the TLR4-MD-2 receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Maeshima, Nina; Fernandez, Rachel C.

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and consists of lipid A, core sugars, and O-antigen. LPS is recognized by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 on host innate immune cells and can signal to activate the transcription factor NFκB, leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. Most of what is known about how LPS is recognized by the TLR4-MD-2 receptor complex on animal cells has been studied using Escherichia coli lipid A, which is a strong agonist of TLR4 signaling. Recent work from several groups, including our own, has shown that several important pathogenic bacteria can modify their LPS or lipid A molecules in ways that significantly alter TLR4 signaling to NFκB. Thus, it has been hypothesized that expression of lipid A variants is one mechanism by which pathogens modulate or evade the host immune response. Additionally, several key differences in the amino acid sequences of human and mouse TLR4-MD-2 receptors have been shown to alter the ability to recognize these variations in lipid A, suggesting a host-specific effect on the immune response to these pathogens. In this review, we provide an overview of lipid A variants from several human pathogens, how the basic structure of lipid A is recognized by mouse and human TLR4-MD-2 receptor complexes, as well as how alteration of this pattern affects its recognition by TLR4 and impacts the downstream immune response. PMID:23408095

  4. Differential host response to LPS variants in amniochorion and the TLR4/MD-2 system in Macaca nemestrina.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Jain, S; Carl, D J; Paolella, L; Darveau, R P; Gravett, M G; Adams Waldorf, K M

    2010-09-01

    Microbial-specific factors are likely critical in determining whether bacteria trigger preterm labor. Structural variations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacteria, can determine whether LPS has an inflammatory (agonist) or anti-inflammatory (antagonist) effect through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our objective was to determine whether amniochorion could discriminate between LPS variants in a nonhuman primate model. We also cloned Macaca nemestrina TLR4 and MD-2 and compared this complex functionally to the human homologue to establish whether nonhuman primates could be used to study TLR4 signaling in preterm birth. Amniochorion explants from M. nemestrina were stimulated with a panel of LPS variants for 24 h. Supernatants were analyzed for IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8 and prostaglandins E2 and F2alpha. Tissue expression of TLR1, 2, 4, 6, MyD88 and NF-kappaB was studied by RT-PCR. M. nemestrina TLR4 and MD-2 genes were cloned and compared with their human counterparts in a recombinant TLR4 signaling system to determine LPS sensitivity. LPS variants differentially stimulated cytokines and prostaglandins, which was not related to transcriptional changes of TLR4 or other TLRs. Nearly all elements of LPS binding and TLR4 leucine-rich repeats were conserved between humans and M. nemestrina. TLR4/MD-2 signaling complexes from both species were equally sensitive to LPS variants. LPS variants elicit a hierarchical inflammatory response within amniochorion that may contribute to preterm birth. LPS sensitivity is similar between M. nemestrina and humans, validating M. nemestrina as an appropriate model to study TLR4 signaling in preterm birth. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Pain Are Mediated by Common TLR4-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; White, Imogen A; Manavis, Jim; Hutchinson, Mark R; Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Logan, Richard M; Bowen, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    Strong epidemiological data indicate that chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain occur in parallel, indicating common underlying mechanisms. We have recently outlined evidence suggesting that TLR4 signaling may contribute to both side effects. We therefore aimed to determine if genetic deletion of TLR4 improves chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain. Forty-two female wild-type (WT) and 42 Tlr4 null (-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g (10-13 weeks) received a single 270 mg/kg (i.p.) dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. Bacterial sequencing was conducted on cecal samples of control animals to determine the gut microbiome profile. Gut toxicity was assessed using validated clinical and histopathologic markers, permeability assays, and inflammatory markers. Chemotherapy-induced pain was assessed using the validated rodent facial grimace criteria, as well as immunologic markers of glial activation in the lumbar spinal cord. TLR4 deletion attenuated irinotecan-induced gut toxicity, with improvements in weight loss (P = 0.0003) and diarrhea (P < 0.0001). Crypt apoptosis was significantly decreased in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P < 0.0001), correlating with lower mucosal injury scores (P < 0.005). Intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran (4 kDa) and LPS translocation was greater in WT mice than in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) (P = 0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively). GFAP staining in the lumbar spinal cord, indicative of astrocytic activation, was increased at 6 and 72 hours in WT mice compared with BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P = 0.008, P = 0.01). These data indicate that TLR4 is uniquely positioned to mediate irinotecan-induced gut toxicity and pain, highlighting the possibility of a targetable gut/CNS axis for improved toxicity outcomes. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1376-86. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Should a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) agonist or antagonist be designed to treat cancer? TLR-4: its expression and effects in the ten most common cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Chun Wai; Kang, Yew Beng; Pichika, Mallikarjuna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) is well known for its host innate immunity. Despite the fact that TLR-4 activation confers antitumor responses; emerging evidence suggests that TLR-4 is associated with tumor development and progression. It is now clear that overactivation of TLR-4, through various immune mediators, may cause immune response dysfunction, resulting in tumorigenesis. Different cancers could have different extents of TLR-4 involvement during tumorigenesis or tumor progression. In this review, we focus on infection- and inflammation-related TLR-4 activation in noncancer and cancer cells, as well as on the current evidence about the role of TLR-4 in ten of the most common cancers, viz, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, skin cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, and prostate cancer. PMID:24235843

  7. Protective role for TLR4 signaling in atherosclerosis progression as revealed by infection with a common oral pathogen.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V; Weinberg, Ellen O; Barth, Kenneth R; Madrigal, Andrés G; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE(-/-)) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-)) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  8. Prothymosin-α Variants Elicit Anti-HIV-1 Response via TLR4 Dependent and Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, G. Luca; Teixeira, Avelino; Aberg, Judith; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Mosoian, Arevik

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothymosin α (ProTα) (isoform 2: iso2) is a widely distributed, small acidic protein with intracellular and extracellular-associated functions. Recently, we identified two new ProTα variants with potent anti-HIV activity from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene known as isoB and the second is the product of ProTα pseudogene 7 (p7). Similarly to iso2, the anti-HIV activity of both variants is mediated by type I IFN. Here we tested whether the immunomodulatory activity of isoB and p7 are also TLR4 dependent and determined their kinetic of release in response to HIV-1 infection. Methods Type I, type III, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA inducing activity was determined in macrophages from wild type and TLR4 knockout mice treated with recombinant ProTα variants. Supernatants from mock and HIV infected cells were analyzed by mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes for the presence of ProTα variants. In silico structural and functional analysis of ProTα variants were performed. Results We show that both isoB and p7 upregulate IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IL-6, TNF-α and RANTES mRNAs in primary human macrophages. The potent stimulation of IFN-β by the recombinant ProTα variants in human macrophages is dependent on the TLR4 pathway, whereas the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 may also occur independently of TLR4, suggesting the interaction of ProTα variants with other signaling molecules/receptors. In silico analyses confirmed that the novel isoB and p7 variants are intrinsically disordered proteins, which lack the NLS and mass spectrometry showed release of ProTα variants within minutes post HIV-1 infection. These features are consistent with the function of ProTα variants as damage associate molecular patterns (DAMPs). Conclusions Our findings indicate that ProTα variants strongly inhibit viral replication mainly, but not exclusively, through TLR4 signaling and that they are released within minutes of viral

  9. Protective Role for TLR4 Signaling in Atherosclerosis Progression as Revealed by Infection with a Common Oral Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V.; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Barth, Kenneth R.; Madrigal, Andrés G.; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C.; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE−/−) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE−/−TLR4−/−) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE−/−TLR4−/− mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE−/−TLR4−/− mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis. PMID:22956579

  10. Genetic variants of TLR4 and TLR9 are risk factors for chronic Helicobacter pylori infection in South Indian Tamils.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rekha; Nazeer, Mehnaz; Goda, Vaishnavi; Devaraju, Panneer; Ali, Mohammed; Karunakaran, Premkumar; Jayaraman, Megala

    2017-02-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are a class of molecular pattern recognition receptors, elicits a strong inflammatory immune response against pathogens. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a gram negative flagellate colonizes the human stomach, is responsible for the development of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinoma. The higher incidence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer in South Indian Tamils demands a genetic study to unravel the influence of TLR4 and TLR9 polymorphisms associated with chronic H. pylori infection. In this study, 230 healthy individuals and 77 patients diagnosed with H. pylori infection were screened for TLR4 (rs1927914, rs4986790, rs4986791) and TLR9 (rs352140, rs34399053, rs150459369) polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP and ARMS-PCR. We observed that the individuals harboring heterozygous and homozygous polymorphic variants of TLR4 conferred a significant risk to develop chronic H. pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease [rs4986790 AG, p=0.001, OR-2.7, 95%CI: 1.5-5.03; GG, p=0.0006, OR-9.8, 95%CI: 2.4-39.4; rs4986791CT, p=0.0001, OR-7.2, 95%CI: 3.7-7.2; TT, p=0.0001, OR-7.9, 95%CI: 2.6-23.7]. Also, the heterozygous variant of TLR9 rs352140, favoured the persistence of the H. pylori infection [p=0.037, OR-1.87, 95%CI: 1.07-3.29]. Thus our findings suggest that TLR4 rs4986790, rs4986791 and TLR9 rs352140 polymorphisms are potential genetic risk factors influencing the disease susceptibility and clinical manifestation of chronic H. pylori infection in Indian Tamils.

  11. Common NOD2/CARD15 and TLR4 Polymorphisms Are Associated with Crohn's Disease Phenotypes in Southeastern Brazilians.

    PubMed

    Tolentino, Yolanda F M; Elia, Paula Peruzzi; Fogaça, Homero Soares; Carneiro, Antonio José V; Zaltman, Cyrla; Moura-Neto, Rodrigo; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria C; de Souza, Heitor S

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether variants in NOD2/CARD15 and TLR4 are associated with CD and ulcerative colitis (UC) in a genetically admixed population of Rio de Janeiro, where IBD has continued to rise. We recruited 67 consecutive patients with CD, 61 patients with UC, and 86 healthy and ethnically matched individuals as controls. DNA was extracted from buccal brush samples and genotyped by PCR with restriction enzymes for G908R and L1007finsC NOD2/CARD15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and for T399I and D299G TLR4 SNPs. Clinical data were registered for subsequent analysis with multivariate models. NOD2/CARD15 G908R and L1007finsC SNPs were found in one and three patients, respectively, with CD. NOD2/CARD15 G908R and L1007finsC SNPs were not found in any patients with UC, but were found in three and three controls, respectively. With regard to the TLR4 gene, no significant difference was detected among the groups. Overall, none of the SNPs investigated determined a differential risk for a specific diagnosis. Genotype-phenotype associations were found in only CD, where L1007finsC was associated with colonic localization; however, TLR4 T399I SNP was associated with male gender, and D299G SNP was associated with colonic involvement, chronic corticosteroid use, and the need for anti-TNF-alpha therapy. Variants of NOD2/CARD15 and TLR4 do not confer susceptibility to IBD, but appear to determine CD phenotypes in this southeastern Brazilian population.

  12. The common food additive carrageenan is not a ligand for Toll-Like- Receptor 4 (TLR4) in an HEK293-TLR4 reporter cell-line model.

    PubMed

    McKim, James M; Wilga, Paul C; Pregenzer, Jeffrey F; Blakemore, William R

    2015-04-01

    Carrageenan (CGN) is widely used in the food manufacturing industry as an additive that stabilizes and thickens food products. Standard animal safety studies in which CGN was administered in diet showed no adverse effects. However, several in vitro studies have reported that intestinal inflammation is caused by CGN and that this effect is mediated through Toll-Like-Receptor 4 (TLR4). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of different types of CGN to bind and activate TLR4 signaling. To accomplish this a TLR4/MD-2/CD14/NFκB/SEAP reporter construct in a HEK293 cell line was used. The reporter molecule, secretable alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), was measured as an indicator of TLR4 activation. The test compounds were exposed to this system at concentrations of 0.1, 1, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 ng/mL for 24 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated following the 24 h exposure period by LDH leakage and ATP. CGN binding to serum proteins was characterized by Toluidine Blue. The results show that CGN does not bind to TLR4 and is not cytotoxic to the HEK293 cells at the concentrations and experimental conditions tested and that CGN binds tightly to serum proteins. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic variants in TLR2 and TLR4 are associated with markers of monocyte activation: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jennifer L.; Pankow, James S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Matijevic-Aleksic, Nena; He, Max; Chambless, Lloyd; Folsom, Aaron R.

    2012-01-01

    Markers of monocyte activation play a critical role in atherosclerosis, but little is known about the genetic influences on cellular levels. Therefore, we investigated the influence of genetic variants in monocyte differentiation antigen (CD14), toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) on monocyte surface receptor levels. The study sample consisted of 1,817 members of a biracial cohort of adults from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Carotid MRI Study. Monocyte receptors were measured using flow cytometry on fasting whole blood samples. TLR2 rs1816702 genotype was significantly associated with CD14+/TLR2+ percent of positive cells (%) and median fluorescence intensity (MFI) in whites but not in blacks (p < 0.001). Specifically, the presence of the minor T-allele was associated with increased receptor levels. In blacks, TLR4 rs5030719 was significantly associated with CD14+/TLR4+ monocytes (MFI) with mean ± SE intensities of 16.7 ± 0.05 and 16.0 ± 0.14 for GG and GT/TT genotypes, respectively (p < 0.001). Variants in TLR2 and TLR4 were associated with monocyte receptor levels of TLR2 and TLR4, respectively, in a biracial cohort of adults. To our knowledge, this is the first study to look at associations between variants in the toll-like receptor family and toll-like receptor levels on monocytes. PMID:21298446

  14. Identification of a novel human MD-2 splice variant that negatively regulates Lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gray, Pearl; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Sirois, Cherilyn M; Lowe, Emily; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Chen, Shuang; Brikos, Constantinos; Bulut, Yonca; Latz, Eicke; Underhill, David; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-06-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) is a secreted gp that assembles with TLR4 to form a functional signaling receptor for bacterial LPS. In this study, we have identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human MD-2, termed MD-2 short (MD-2s), which lacks the region encoded by exon 2 of the MD-2 gene. Similar to MD-2, MD-2s is glycosylated and secreted. MD-2s also interacted with LPS and TLR4, but failed to mediate LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 production. We show that MD-2s is upregulated upon IFN-gamma, IL-6, and TLR4 stimulation and negatively regulates LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. Furthermore, MD-2s competitively inhibited binding of MD-2 to TLR4. Our study pinpoints a mechanism that may be used to regulate TLR4 activation at the onset of signaling and identifies MD-2s as a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases characterized by an overly exuberant or chronic immune response to LPS.

  15. TLR4/CD14 Variants-Related Serologic and Immunologic Dys-Regulations Predict Severe Sepsis in Febrile De-Compensated Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chih-Wei; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Huang, Chia-Chang; Li, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Yang, Ying-Ying; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants and dysfunctional monocyte had been reported to be associated with infection susceptibility in advanced cirrhotic patients. This study aims to explore genetic predictive markers and relevant immune dysfunction that contributed to severe sepsis in febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patents. Polymorphism analysis of candidate genes was undergone in 108 febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients and 121 healthy volunteers. Various plasma inflammatory/regulatory cytokines, proportion of classical (CD 16-, phagocytic) and non-classical (CD16+, inflammatory) monocytes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and intracellular/extracellular cytokines on cultured non-classical monocytes, mCD14/HLA-DR expression and phagocytosis of classical monocytes were measured. For TLR4+896A/G variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, high plasma endotoxin/IL-10 inhibits HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis were noted in their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset, enhanced LPS-stimulated TLR4 expression and TNFα/nitrite production, and systemic inflammation [high plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14) and total nitric oxide (NOx) levels] were noted. For CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, persist endotoxemia inhibited mCD14/HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis of their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset up-regulated TLR4-NFκB-iNOS and p38MAPK pathway, stimulated TNFα/nitrite production and elicited systemic inflammation. In febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients, TLR4+896A/G and CD14-159C/T polymorphisms-related non-classical and classical monocytes dysfunction resulted in increased severe sepsis risk. Malnutrition, high plasma endotoxin and sCD14 levels, single TLR4+896A/G or CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers and double variant allele carriers are significant predictive factors for the development of severe

  16. The Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Variant rs2149356 and Risk of Gout in European and Polynesian Sample Sets

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Humaira; McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K.; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K.; Day, Richard; Kannangara, Diluk; Williams, Kenneth; Smith, Malcolm; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Tim L.; Joosten, Leo A.; Radstake, Timothy R.; Riches, Philip L.; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; Lu, Leo; Stahl, Eli A.; Choi, Hyon K.; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R.

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of crystallized monosodium urate (MSU) in joints as a result of hyperuricemia is a central risk factor for gout. However other factors must exist that control the progression from hyperuricaemia to gout. A previous genetic association study has implicated the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway upon stimulation by MSU crystals. The T-allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2149356 in TLR4 is a risk factor associated with gout in a Chinese study. Our aim was to replicate this observation in participants of European and New Zealand Polynesian (Māori and Pacific) ancestry. A total of 2250 clinically-ascertained prevalent gout cases and 13925 controls were used. Non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cases and controls from the Health Professional Follow-up (HPFS) and Nurses Health Studies (NHS) were also used. Genotypes were derived from genome-wide genotype data or directly obtained using Taqman. Logistic regression analysis was done including age, sex, diuretic exposure and ancestry as covariates as appropriate. The T-allele increased the risk of gout in the clinically-ascertained European samples (OR = 1.12, P = 0.012) and decreased the risk of gout in Polynesians (OR = 0.80, P = 0.011). There was no evidence for association in the HPFS or NHS sample sets. In conclusion TLR4 SNP rs2143956 associates with gout risk in prevalent clinically-ascertained gout in Europeans, in a direction consistent with previously published results in Han Chinese. However, with an opposite direction of association in Polynesians and no evidence for association in a non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cohort this variant should be analysed in other international gout genetic data sets to determine if there is genuine evidence for association. PMID:26808548

  17. The Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Variant rs2149356 and Risk of Gout in European and Polynesian Sample Sets.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Humaira; McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K; Day, Richard; Kannangara, Diluk; Williams, Kenneth; Smith, Malcolm; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Tim L; Joosten, Leo A; Radstake, Timothy R; Riches, Philip L; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; Lu, Leo; Stahl, Eli A; Choi, Hyon K; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of crystallized monosodium urate (MSU) in joints as a result of hyperuricemia is a central risk factor for gout. However other factors must exist that control the progression from hyperuricaemia to gout. A previous genetic association study has implicated the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway upon stimulation by MSU crystals. The T-allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2149356 in TLR4 is a risk factor associated with gout in a Chinese study. Our aim was to replicate this observation in participants of European and New Zealand Polynesian (Māori and Pacific) ancestry. A total of 2250 clinically-ascertained prevalent gout cases and 13925 controls were used. Non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cases and controls from the Health Professional Follow-up (HPFS) and Nurses Health Studies (NHS) were also used. Genotypes were derived from genome-wide genotype data or directly obtained using Taqman. Logistic regression analysis was done including age, sex, diuretic exposure and ancestry as covariates as appropriate. The T-allele increased the risk of gout in the clinically-ascertained European samples (OR = 1.12, P = 0.012) and decreased the risk of gout in Polynesians (OR = 0.80, P = 0.011). There was no evidence for association in the HPFS or NHS sample sets. In conclusion TLR4 SNP rs2143956 associates with gout risk in prevalent clinically-ascertained gout in Europeans, in a direction consistent with previously published results in Han Chinese. However, with an opposite direction of association in Polynesians and no evidence for association in a non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cohort this variant should be analysed in other international gout genetic data sets to determine if there is genuine evidence for association.

  18. Variation in the TLR4 gene influences the risk of organ failure and shock post-trauma: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shalhub, Sherene; Junker, Christopher E.; Imahara, Scott D.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Dissanaike, Sharmila; O’Keefe, Grant E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic variation contributes to risk and outcomes of sepsis. We sought to determine if variation in inflammation related genes is associated with severity of sepsis in trauma patients. Methods A cohort of severely injured Caucasian patients was studied and genotyped for candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These were toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) A896G, tumor necrosis factor-α G-308A, interleukin-6 G-174C, interleukin-1β C-31T, and cluster of differentiation marker-14 C-159T. SNP genotypes among patients with sepsis and complicated sepsis were analyzed by chi-square and logistic regression. Six haplotype-tagging SNPs in the TLR4 gene were subsequently examined to determine their influence on TLR4 A896G SNP’s relationship to sepsis severity. Results We enrolled 598 patients. Complicated sepsis developed in 147 (25%). Adjusting for independent risk factors, carriage of the variant TLR4 896 G allele was associated with decreased risk of complicated sepsis (OR = 0.3, 95%CI = 0.1–0.7, p = 0.008). Furthermore, two haplotypes seemed to better characterize this risk than the variant TLR4 896 G allele. The variant TLR4 896G allele is linked to one common haplotype, which seems to confer a considerably reduced risk of complicated sepsis. (aOR = 0.2 95% CI = 0.05–0.7, p = 0.01) Conclusions Variation within TLR4 gene is associated with severity of post-traumatic sepsis. This risk may not be solely related to TLR4 A896G SNP. It is likely that other, uncharacterized variations in the TLR4 gene contribute to sepsis severity. A thorough evaluation of variability within the TLR4 gene is needed to characterize sepsis risk. PMID:19131814

  19. Allelic variation in TLR4 is linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Huihua; Zhao, Xingwang; Gou, Zhongyong; Liu, Ranran; Song, Yongmei; Li, Qinghe; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Everaert, Nadia; Zhao, Guiping; Wen, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a foodborne pathogen that negatively affects both animal and human health. Polymorphisms of the TLR4 gene may affect recognition by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to differences in host resistance to pathogenic infections. The present study has investigated polymorphic loci of chicken TLR4 (ChTLR4) in ten chicken breeds, electrostatic potentials of mutant structures of TLR4, and a linkage analysis between allelic variation and survival ratio to infection with SE in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) White Leghorns. A total of 19 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 10 were novel, were found in chicken breeds. Seven newly identified amino acid variants (C68G, G674A, G782A, A896T, T959G, T986A, and A1104C) and previously reported important mutations (G247A, G1028A, C1147T, and A1832G) were demonstrated in the extracellular domain of the ChTLR4 gene. Significant changes in surface electrostatic potential of the ectodomain of TLR4, built by homology modeling, were observed at the Glu83Lys (G247A), Arg298Ser (A896T), Ser368Arg (A1104C), and Gln611Arg (A1832G) substitutions. Linkage analysis showed that one polymorphic locus G247A of TLR4 gene, common in all breeds examined, was significantly associated with increased resistance to SE in SPF White Leghorns chicks (log-rank P-value = 0.04). The genotypes from A1832G SNPs did not show statistically significant survival differences. This study has provided the first direct evidence that G247A substitution in ChTLR4 is associated with increased resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis.

  20. TLR4 genetic variation is associated with inflammatory responses in Gram-positive sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, N; Tandhavanant, S; Seal, S; Wikraiphat, C; Wongsuvan, G; Ariyaprasert, P; Suntornsut, P; Teerawattanasook, N; Jutrakul, Y; Srisurat, N; Chaimanee, P; Mahavanakul, W; Srisamang, P; Phiphitaporn, S; Mokchai, M; Anukunananchai, J; Wongratanacheewin, S; Chetchotisakd, P; Emond, M J; Peacock, S J; West, T E

    2017-01-01

    To identify important pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) pathways regulating innate immune responses and outcome in Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. We analysed whether candidate PRR pathway genetic variants were associated with killed S. aureus-induced cytokine responses ex vivo and performed follow-up in vitro studies. We tested the association of our top-ranked variant with cytokine responses and clinical outcomes in a prospective multicentre cohort of patients with staphylococcal sepsis. An intronic TLR4 polymorphism and expression quantitative trait locus, rs1927907, was highly associated with cytokine release induced by stimulation of blood from healthy Thai subjects with S. aureus ex vivo. S. aureus did not induce TLR4-dependent NF-κB activation in transfected HEK293 cells. In monocytes, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release induced by S. aureus was not blunted by a TLR4/MD-2 neutralizing antibody, but in a monocyte cell line, TNF-α was reduced by knockdown of TLR4. In Thai patients with staphylococcal sepsis, rs1927907 was associated with higher interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels as well as with respiratory failure. S. aureus-induced responses in blood were most highly correlated with responses to Gram-negative stimulants whole blood. A genetic variant in TLR4 is associated with cytokine responses to S. aureus ex vivo and plasma cytokine levels and respiratory failure in staphylococcal sepsis. While S. aureus does not express lipopolysaccharide or activate TLR4 directly, the innate immune response to S. aureus does appear to be modulated by TLR4 and shares significant commonality with that induced by Gram-negative pathogens and lipopolysaccharide. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The Toll-Like Receptor 4 Polymorphism Asp299Gly but Not Thr399Ile Influences TLR4 Signaling and Function

    PubMed Central

    Long, Huaicong; O'Connor, Brian P.; Zemans, Rachel L.; Zhou, Xiaofang; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The common, co-segregating Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile, are associated with hyporesponsiveness to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and increased susceptibility to Gram negative pathogens in humans. The purpose of this study was to identify the relative contributions of the Asp299Gly and the Thr399Ile variants in inhibiting the function of TLR4. 293/hMD2-CD14 cell line was transfected with lentiviral constructs containing human wild type (WT) TLR4-EGFP or TLR4-EGFP with Asp299Gly, Thr399Ile or Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile complementary DNA (cDNA). Multiple stable cell lines were established for each construct: three for WT TLR4, Asp299Gly, and Thr399Ile, and only two for Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile mutants and EGFP control. We did not observe a significant effect of polymorphisms on cell surface and intracellular TLR4 expression nor were there any significant differences in TLR4 and EGFP protein levels assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy among the multiple cell lines of each of the constructs. All cell lines had a dose-dependent responsiveness to LPS stimulation. However, compared to the WT TLR4, cells expressing TLR4 with Asp299Gly but not Thr399Ile polymorphism produced significantly less (P<0.05) IL-8 following LPS stimulation. Similarly, cells expressing TLR4 Asp299Gly but not Thr399Ile allele had significantly lower percentage of phosphorylated and total NF-κB P65 following LPS stimulation. While we could not do statistics on the Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile group, we observed a reduced responsiveness to LPS compared to WT TLR4. Taken together, we observed that the TLR4 Asp299Gly variant, but not the Thr399Ile variant, is responsible for impaired responsiveness of TLR4 to LPS and corresponding activation of NF-κB. PMID:24695807

  2. Genetic Variants in Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, TLR9, and FCγ Receptor II Are Associated with Antibody Response to Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine in HIV-Infected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Min; Lujan-Zilbermann, Jorge; Singh, Kumud K.; Warshaw, Meredith G.; Williams, Paige L.; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Fenton, Terence; Siberry, George K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the association of host genetic variants with the antibody response to the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) in HIV-infected youth. Genetic variants associated with severity of meningococcal disease, including the IgG Fc receptor (FCγRII)-A484T, interleukin-10 (IL-10)-A1082G, -C819T, and -C627A, IL-4-C589T, mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL2)-A/O, -H/L, -P/Q, and -X/Y, toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-G2408A, TLR4-A12874G and -C13174T, and TLR9-T1237C and -T1486C were determined by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) for 271 HIV-infected subjects (median, 17 years). Response was defined as a ≥4-fold increase from entry in bactericidal antibody titers to each serogroup. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to evaluate the association of allelic variants with the immunologic response to all serogroups within each subject with and without adjusting for CD4 percentage and HIV viral load. At week 4, but not after, subjects with TLR2-2408-G/A versus -G/G genotypes and the TLR4-12874-A/A genotype were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase overall in the four serogroups (unadjusted P of 0.006 and adjusted P of 0.008 and unadjusted P of 0.008 and adjusted P of 0.019, respectively). At week 28, the TLR9-1237 T allele was associated with enhanced antibody response (T allele versus C/C, unadjusted P of 0.014 and adjusted P of 0.009), which was maintained at week 72 (unadjusted and adjusted P of 0.008). At week 72, the FcγRII-131Arg allotype was associated with a ≥4-fold increase in antibody titer versus those with His/His (unadjusted P of 0.009; adjusted P of <0.001). These findings suggest that for HIV-infected youth, the initial antibody response to MCV4 is associated with variants in TLR2 and TLR4 while the long-term response is associated with genetic polymorphisms in TLR9 and FcγRIIa. PMID:23595505

  3. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heeke, Darren S.; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K.; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Woo, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants. PMID:27736941

  4. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jason D; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E; Hajjar, Adeline M; Woo, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants.

  5. TLR4 inactivation protects from graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Liu, Qiuyan; Yang, Li; He, Donghua; Wang, Lijuan; Tian, Jun; Li, Yi; Zi, Fuming; Bao, Hanying; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jimin; Xue, Xingkui; Cai, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is the most common complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To clarify the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which is a major receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), in the development of acute GVHD, we used a TLR4-knockout (TLR4−/−) mouse GVHD model and analyzed the underlying immunological mechanisms. When TLR4−/− mice were used as bone marrow and splenocyte cell graft donors or recipients, GVHD symptom occurrence and mortality were delayed compared to wild-type (TLR4+/+) mice. In addition, histopathological analyses revealed that in TLR4−/−→BALB/c chimeras, liver and small intestine tissue damage was reduced with minimal lymphocytic infiltration. In contrast to TLR4+/+, TLR4−/− mice dendritic cells did not express CD80, CD86, CD40, MHC-II or IL-12 during LPS induction and remained in an immature state. Furthermore, the ability of TLR4−/− mice spleen dendritic cells to promote allogeneic T-cell proliferation and, in particular, T-helper cell 1 (Th1) development was obviously attenuated compared with TLR4+/+ mice dendritic cells, and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-10, Th2-cell specific cytokines, were significantly higher in the serum of TLR4−/−→BALB/c than in TLR4+/+→BALB/c chimeric mice. Overall, our data revealed that TLR4 may play a role in the pathogenesis of GVHD and that targeted TLR4 gene therapy might provide a new treatment approach to reduce the risk of GVHD. PMID:23262974

  6. Particulate β-glucans synergistically activate TLR4 and Dectin-1 in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, Neha M; Dokter-Fokkens, Jelleke; de Vos, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The major receptor for β(1-3)-glucans on immune cells is considered to be Dectin-1 receptor. Particulate β-glucans induce stronger immune responses than soluble β-glucans by clustering of Dectin-1 receptors. Here, it was hypothesized that activation of other pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) can also contribute to enhanced activity of immune cells after exposure to particulate β-glucans. To test this hypothesis, reporter cell lines were designed expressing TLR4 with either Dectin-1A or Dectin-1B, that is, one of the two transcript variants of human Dectin-1 receptors. Enhanced NF-κB activation was observed after stimulation with particulate β-glucans in both Dectin-1A-TLR4 and the Dectin-1B-TLR4 cell lines. This was different with soluble β-glucans, which enhanced activation in Dectin-1A-TLR4 cell lines but not in Dectin-1B-TLR4 cells. The synergistic activation of TLR4 and Dectin-1 by particulate β-glucans was confirmed in human dendritic cells. The effects of particulate β-glucan induced TLR4 binding were regulatory as blocking TLR4 enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-23, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-α production. These results suggest that TLR4 and Dectin-1 are synergistically activated by particulate β-glucans, wherein TLR4 activates an immune regulatory pathway in human dendritic cells. Our data suggest that β-glucan is an immune regulatory ligand for TLR4. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Targeting TLR4 Signaling by TLR4 TIR-derived Decoy Peptides: Identification of the TLR4 TIR Dimerization Interface

    PubMed Central

    Toshchakov, Vladimir Y.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Couture, Leah A.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2011-01-01

    Agonist-induced dimerization of TLR4 TIR domains initiates intracellular signaling. Therefore, identification of the TLR4 TIR dimerization interface is one key to the rational design of therapeutics that block TLR4 signaling. A library of cell-permeating “decoy peptides,” each of which represents a non-fragmented patch of the TLR4 TIR surface, was designed such that the peptides entirely encompass the TLR4 TIR surface. Each peptide was synthesized in tandem with a cell-permeating Antennapedia homeodomain sequence and tested for the ability to inhibit early cytokine mRNA expression and MAPK activation in LPS-stimulated primary murine macrophages. Five peptides, 4R1, 4R3, 4BB, 4R9, and 4αE, potently inhibited all manifestations of TLR4, but not TLR2 signaling. When tested for their ability to bind directly to TLR4 TIR by FRET using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, Bodipy-TMR-X (BTX)-labeled 4R1, 4BB, and 4αE quenched fluorescence of TLR4-Cerulean (Cer) expressed in HeLa or HEK293T cells, while 4R3 was partially active and 4R9 was least active. These findings suggest that the area between BB loop of TLR4 and its fifth helical region mediates TLR4 TIR dimerization. Moreover, our data provide direct evidence for the utility of the “decoy peptide approach,” in which peptides representing various surface-exposed segments of a protein are initially probed for the ability to inhibit protein function and then their specific targets are identified by FRET, to define recognition sites in signaling proteins that may be targeted therapeutically to disrupt functional transient protein interactions. PMID:21402890

  8. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of the Duck TLR4 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenming; Huang, Zhengyang; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Yang; Rong, Guanghui; Mu, Chunyu; Xu, Qi; Chen, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns in some animals and has been shown to be closely associated with several diseases such as tumors, atherosclerosis, and asthma. However, its function in ducks is not clear. Alternative splicing of the TLR4 gene has been identified in pigs, sheep, mice, and other species, but has not yet been reported in the duck. In this study, alternative splicing of the duck TLR4 gene was investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Duck TLR4 gene (duTLR4, accession number: KF278109) was found to consist of 3367 nucleotides of coding sequence. An alternative splice form, TLR4-b, was identified and shown by alignment to retain the intron between exons 1 and 2. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses suggested that duTLR4-a (wild-type) mRNA is widely expressed in various healthy tissues, whereas TLR4-b is expressed at only low levels. Following stimulation of normal duck embryo fibroblasts with lipopolysaccharide, the expression of both isoforms initially increased and then decreased. Expression of the wild-type isoform subsequently increased again, while that of the variant remained low. The expression levels of wild-type TLR4 were further analyzed by transient transfection of a pcDNA3.1(+)-TLR4-a overexpression vector into duck embryo fibroblasts. qRT-PCR analyses showed that after stimulation with LPS and poly(I:C) the expression levels of IL-1β, IL6, and MHC II increased with a response-efficacy relationship. Our experimental results indicate that TLR4 plays an important role in resistance to both bacterial and viral infections in the duck. PMID:24025421

  9. TLR4 as a risk factor for periodontal disease: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ayla; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2009-04-01

    To determine whether genetic variants of the TLR4 gene are associated with either chronic or aggressive periodontitis. A systematic electronic search of literature was conducted to identify all published studies without any language restriction on the association between TLR4 and periodontal diseases, including chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis. All case-control studies evaluating the TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms in chronic or aggressive periodontitis were identified. A meta-analysis of the studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria was performed. Seven studies comprising 744 chronic periodontitis cases and 855 controls and four studies consisting of a total of 295 aggressive periodontitis cases and 456 controls were included in the meta-analysis. In the pooled analysis, the TLR4 299Gly allele (TLR4+896 A>G) appeared to be a genetic risk factor for susceptibility to chronic periodontitis with a random effects and fixed effects odds ratio (OR) of 1.43 [95% confidence interval (CI):1.04-1.97; p=0.03]. On the other hand, the TLR4 399Ile polymorphism (TLR4+1196 C>T) showed a protective effect against aggressive periodontitis with a random effects OR of 0.29 (95% CI: 0.13-0.61; p=0.001). Our results suggest that the alleles 299Gly and 399Ile in TLR4 can be a potential genetic marker for periodontal disease.

  10. Structural basis of species-specific endotoxin sensing by innate immune receptor TLR4/MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Ohto, Umeharu; Fukase, Koichi; Miyake, Kensuke; Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin, activates the innate immune response through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its coreceptor, MD-2. MD-2 has a unique hydrophobic cavity that directly binds to lipid A, the active center of LPS. Tetraacylated lipid IVa, a synthetic lipid A precursor, acts as a weak agonist to mouse TLR4/MD-2, but as an antagonist to human TLR4/MD-2. However, it remains unclear as to how LPS and lipid IVa show agonistic or antagonistic activities in a species-specific manner. The present study reports the crystal structures of mouse TLR4/MD-2/LPS and TLR4/MD-2/lipid IVa complexes at 2.5 and 2.7 Å resolutions, respectively. Mouse TLR4/MD-2/LPS exhibited an agonistic “m”-shaped 2:2:2 complex similar to the human TLR4/MD-2/LPS complex. Mouse TLR4/MD-2/lipid IVa complex also showed an agonistic structural feature, exhibiting architecture similar to the 2:2:2 complex. Remarkably, lipid IVa in the mouse TLR4/MD-2 complex occupied nearly the same space as LPS, although lipid IVa lacked the two acyl chains. Human MD-2 binds lipid IVa in an antagonistic manner completely differently from the way mouse MD-2 does. Together, the results provide structural evidence of the agonistic property of lipid IVa on mouse TLR4/MD-2 and deepen understanding of the ligand binding and dimerization mechanism by the structurally diverse LPS variants. PMID:22532668

  11. Structural basis of species-specific endotoxin sensing by innate immune receptor TLR4/MD-2.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Umeharu; Fukase, Koichi; Miyake, Kensuke; Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2012-05-08

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin, activates the innate immune response through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its coreceptor, MD-2. MD-2 has a unique hydrophobic cavity that directly binds to lipid A, the active center of LPS. Tetraacylated lipid IVa, a synthetic lipid A precursor, acts as a weak agonist to mouse TLR4/MD-2, but as an antagonist to human TLR4/MD-2. However, it remains unclear as to how LPS and lipid IVa show agonistic or antagonistic activities in a species-specific manner. The present study reports the crystal structures of mouse TLR4/MD-2/LPS and TLR4/MD-2/lipid IVa complexes at 2.5 and 2.7 Å resolutions, respectively. Mouse TLR4/MD-2/LPS exhibited an agonistic "m"-shaped 2:2:2 complex similar to the human TLR4/MD-2/LPS complex. Mouse TLR4/MD-2/lipid IVa complex also showed an agonistic structural feature, exhibiting architecture similar to the 2:2:2 complex. Remarkably, lipid IVa in the mouse TLR4/MD-2 complex occupied nearly the same space as LPS, although lipid IVa lacked the two acyl chains. Human MD-2 binds lipid IVa in an antagonistic manner completely differently from the way mouse MD-2 does. Together, the results provide structural evidence of the agonistic property of lipid IVa on mouse TLR4/MD-2 and deepen understanding of the ligand binding and dimerization mechanism by the structurally diverse LPS variants.

  12. Epistatic interaction between TLR4 and NOD2 in patients with Crohn's Disease: relation with risk and phenotype in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Chamorro, Alba; Moreno, Antonia; Gómez-García, María; Cabello, María José; Martin, Javier; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel Ángel

    2016-09-01

    Crohn's Disease is one of the two major forms of the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and, although the etiology is not completely understood, the confluence of environmental and genetic factors has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TLR4 variants in a Spanish cohort of Crohn's Disease patients and their relation with phenotype and common NOD2 variants. A total of 371 Crohn's Disease (CD) patients and 636 healthy controls (HC) were included. Single Nucleotide Polimorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 (D299G and T399I) and NOD2 (R702W and G908R) detection was performed by a Taqman(®) Allelic Discrimination Assay. 1007insC NOD2 variant was analyzed using a PCR combined with fluorescent technology and the different alleles were determined depending on the PCR products size. D299G and T399I were related to CD only in patients carrying NOD2 variants (NOD2+/TLR4+ haplotype) (p=0.036; OR=1.924), increasing the risk to develop CD when 1007insC and TLR4 variants were both present (OR=4.886). We also described a strong association between mutant NOD2 and CD risk (p<0.001, OR=3.214). R702W, G908R and 1007insC were associated when they were considered separately (p<0.001; p=0.002; p<0.001, respectively). Moreover, the patients carrying any mutant D299G or T399I polymorphisms were predisposed to develop a stricturing disease (p=0.013; OR=2.391), especially in the presence of NOD2 mutation (p=0.002; OR=4.989). In this study, ileal disease was also associated with the presence of at least one NOD2 susceptibility allele (p=0.001; OR=3.838) and, the risk of ileal CD was increased if TLR4 variants were presents (p<0.050; OR=4.160). TLR4 variants were related to bowel perforation, independently of NOD2.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and typhoid fever in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Hue; Mai, Ngoc Lanh; Le, Thi Phuong; Ha, Vinh; Nguyen, Tran Chinh; Tran, Tinh Hien; Nguyen, T Hieu; Farrar, Jeremy J; Dunstan, Sarah J

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the host genetic susceptibility to typhoid fever may provide a better understanding of pathogenesis and help in the development of new therapeutics and vaccines. Here we determine the genetic variation within the human TLR4 gene encoding the principal receptor for bacterial endotoxin recognition in typhoid fever patients. It is possible that genetic variants of TLR4 could detrimentally affect the innate immune response against S. typhi infection. Mutation detection and genotyping of TLR4 was performed on DNA from 414 Vietnamese typhoid fever patients and 372 population controls. dHPLC detected a total of 10 polymorphisms within the upstream and exonic regions of TLR4, of which 7 are novel. Two SNPs, T4025A and C4215G, were more frequent in typhoid cases than in controls however due to their low allele frequencies they showed borderline significance (T4025A: OR 1.9, 95%CI 0.9-4.3, P 0.07 and C4215G: OR 6.7, 95%CI 0.8-307, P 0.04). Six missense mutations were identified, with 5/6 positioned in the ectoplasmic domain. Four missense mutations and one promoter SNP (A-271G) were only present in typhoid cases, albeit at low allele frequencies. Here we determined the extent of genetic variation within TLR4 in a Vietnamese population and suggest that TLR4 may be involved in defense against typhoid fever in this population.

  14. TLR4 in Toxoplasmosis; friends or foe?

    PubMed

    Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Hakimi, Hamid; Abdollahi, Seyyed Hossein; Zainodini, Nahid; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Kennedy, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma species are obligate intracellular protozoan which are responsible for induction of several forms of Toxoplasmosis in humans. The mechanisms responsible for the progression of the prolonged forms of Toxoplasmosis and associated pathologies are yet to be identified. However, previous studies proposed that immunological and genetic parameters may play important roles in the etiology and complexity of Toxoplasmosis. Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize microbial antigens and induce immune responses against parasites, including toxoplasma species. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are PRRs which recognize toxoplasma as a pathogenic parasite and activate immune cells. It has been reported that the TLR4 is a critical innate immune cell receptor in toxoplasma detection and subsequently activates immune responses using either MYD88 or TRIF pathways. This review collates recent information regarding the role of TLR4 and its related signaling molecules with Toxoplasmosis.

  15. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  16. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-08

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  17. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations. PMID:28272553

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA attenuates post-seizure hippocampal microglia TLR4/MYD88 signaling and inhibits TLR4 gene expression via histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Peng; Mao, Ding-An

    2016-05-18

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Seizure-induced TLR4/MYD88 signaling plays a critical role in activating microglia and triggering neuron apoptosis. SAHA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that regulates gene expression by increasing chromatin histone acetylation. In this study, we investigated the role of SAHA in TLR4/MYD88 signaling in a rat seizure model. Sprague-Dawley rats with kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures were treated with SAHA. The expression of TLR4, MYD88, NF-κB P65 and IL-1β in hippocampus was detected at hour 2 and 6 and day 1, 2, and 3 post seizure. SAHA pretreatment increased seizure latency and decreased seizure scores. The expression levels of TLR4, MYD88, NF-κB and IL-1β increased significantly in both activated microglia and apoptotic neurons after KA treatment. The effects were attenuated by SAHA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that the H3 histone acetylation levels significantly decreased while H3K9 levels significantly increased in the KA treatment group. The H3 and H3K9 acetylation levels returned to control levels after SAHA (50 mg/kg) pretreatment. There was a positive correlation between the expression of TLR4 and the acetylation levels of H3K9. Histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA can suppress seizure-induced TLR4/MYD88 signaling and inhibit TLR4 gene expression through histone acetylation regulation. This suggests that SAHA may protect against seizure-induced brain damage.

  19. Rare and Common Variants: Twenty arguments

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have greatly improved our understanding of the genetic basis of disease risk. The fact that they tend not to identify more than a fraction of the specific causal loci has led to divergence of opinion over whether most of the variance is hidden as numerous rare variants of large effect, or common variants of very small effect. Here I review 20 arguments for and against each of these models of the genetic basis of complex traits, and conclude that both classes of effect can be reconciled readily. PMID:22251874

  20. Ketamine effect on HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in rats with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ming-Zhe; Gu, Qiu-Han; Tao, Jun; Song, Xiao-Yang; Gan, Guo-Sheng; Luo, Zhong-Bin; Li, Bi-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common emergency and severe case in clinic. High mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) can be treated as a new anti-inflammatory treatment target. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important receptor of HMGB1. Ketamine is a widely used intravenous anesthetic with good anti-inflammatory and immune regulating function. Whether it can protect ALI through inhibiting HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in lung tissue still needs further investigation. Male SD rats were randomly divided into control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group and ketamine intervention group with 15 rats in each group. The rats were euthanatized at 24 h after modeling and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected for HMGB1 and TLR4 level detection. Western Blot was applied to analyze HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in the lung tissue. HMGB1 and TLR4 concentration in BALF were 5.369 ± 1.564 ng/ml and 43.980 ± 7.524 pg/ml in the control, respectively. They were 12.358 ± 4.681 ng/ml and 102.538 ± 8.412 pg/ml in LPS group, and 7.399 ± 2.346 ng/ml and 87.208 ± 7.558 pg/ml in ketamine intervention group, respectively. Their levels increased significantly in LPS group and down-regulated after ketamine intervention. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in lung tissue elevated obviously in LPS group, and decreased after ketamine treatment. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein level showed positive correlation in lung tissue (r = 0.921, P < 0.001). Ketamine can inhibit HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in ALI, and alleviate LPS induced rat lung injury.

  1. Galectin-3 induces ovarian cancer cell survival and chemoresistance via TLR4 signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guoqing; Ma, Xiangdong; Chen, Biliang; Huang, Yanhong; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Hong; Zou, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Paclitaxel resistance becomes common in patients with aggressive ovarian cancer and results in recurrence after conventional therapy. Galectin-3 is a multifunctional lectin associated with cell migration, cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cell-cell interaction in tumor cells. Whether circulating galectin-3 is involved in paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer remains unknown. The current study investigated the effect of galectin-3 on toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and thus paclitaxel resistance. With blood and cancer tissue samples obtained from 102 patients, we identified associations between serum galectin-3 level or TLR4 expression and paclitaxel resistance phenotype. In vitro, treatment with exogenous galectin-3 restored cell survival and migration of SKOV-3 and ES-2 cells was decreased by galectin-3 silencing and paclitaxel treatment. Furthermore, exogenous galectin-3 boosted expression of TLR4, MyD88, and p-p65, as well as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release induced by paclitaxel. Moreover, galectin-3 inhibited the interaction between TLR4 and caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in SKOV-3 and ES-2 cells. In addition, overexpression of Cav-1 dampened the expression of MyD88 and p-p65 stimulated by galectin-3 and enhanced apoptosis in SKOV-3 cells under paclitaxel exposure. In summary, our study elucidated that exogenous galectin-3 might induce paclitaxel resistance through TLR4 signaling activation by inhibiting TLR4-Cav-1 interaction, revealing a novel insight into paclitaxel resistance induction.

  2. Silencing cardiomyocyte TLR4 reduces injury following hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Avlas, Orna; Srara, Smadar; Shainberg, Asher; Aravot, Dan; Hochhauser, Edith

    2016-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of gram-negative pathogens expressed in the heart, is activated by several endogenous ligands associated with tissue injury in response to myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of TLR4 signaling in cardiomyocytes dysfunction following hypoxia (90min) using multiple methodologies such as knocking down TLR4 and small interfering RNA (siTLR4). Cardiomyocytes of C57Bl/6 mice (WT) subjected to hypoxic stress showed increased cardiac release of LDH, HMGB1, IκB, TNF-α and myocardial apoptotic and necrotic markers (BAX, PI) compared to TLR4 knock out mice (TLR4KO). Treating these cardiomyocytes with siRNA against TLR4 decreased the damage markers (LDH, IκB, TNF-α). TLR4 silencing during hypoxic stress resulted in the activation of the p-AKT and p-GSK3β (by ∼25%). The latter is an indicator that there is a reduction of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening following hypoxic myocardial induced injury leading to preserved mitochondrial membrane potential. Silencing TLR4 in cardiomyocytes improved cell survival following hypoxic injury through activation of the AKT/GSK3β pathway, reduced inflammatory and apoptotic signals. These findings suggest that TLR4 may serve as a potential target in the treatment of ischemic myocardial injury. Moreover, RNA interfering targeting TLR4 expression represents a therapeutic strategy.

  3. The gene history of zebrafish tlr4a and tlr4b is predictive of their divergent functions.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Con; Charette, Jeremy; Catchen, Julian; Lage, Christopher R; Giasson, Gregory; Postlethwait, John H; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2009-11-01

    Mammalian immune responses to LPS exposure are typified by the robust induction of NF-kappaB and IFN-beta responses largely mediated by TLR4 signal transduction pathways. In contrast to mammals, Tlr4 signal transduction pathways in nontetrapods are not well understood. Comprehensive syntenic and phylogenetic analyses support our hypothesis that zebrafish tlr4a and tlr4b genes are paralogous rather than orthologous to human TLR4. Furthermore, we provide evidence to support our assertion that the in vivo responsiveness of zebrafish to LPS exposure is not mediated by Tlr4a and Tlr4b paralogs because they fail to respond to LPS stimulation in vitro. Zebrafish Tlr4a and Tlr4b paralogs were also unresponsive to heat-killed Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila. Using chimeric molecules in which portions of the zebrafish Tlr4 proteins were fused to portions of the mouse TLR4 protein, we show that the lack of responsiveness to LPS was most likely due to the inability of the extracellular portions of zebrafish Tlr4a and Tlr4b to recognize the molecule, rather than to changes in their capacities to transduce signals through their Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains. Taken together, these findings strongly support the notion that zebrafish tlr4a and tlr4b paralogs have evolved to provide alternative ligand specificities to the Tlr immune defense system in this species. These data demonstrate that intensive examination of gene histories when describing the Tlr proteins of basally diverging vertebrates is required to obtain fuller appreciation of the evolution of their function. These studies provide the first evidence for the functional evolution of a novel Tlr.

  4. Expression of TLR-4 and -2 in peripheral mononuclear cells in renal transplant patients with TLR-4 gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eliana; Salomao, Reinaldo; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colló; Ozaki, Kikumi S; Marques, Geórgia D M; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2010-12-01

    TLR-4 has also been identified as a receptor for endogenous alarmins, which are increased post transplantation. TLR-4 has also been associated with a polymorphism that could impact graft outcome. To assess the expression of TLR-4 in kidney transplant patients carrying or not a polymorphism. TLR-4 polymorphism (A299G/T399I) was studied in 200 renal transplant patients. Healthy volunteers were also enrolled as control group. The polymorphism analysis was performed using restriction enzymes technique (RFLP). Functionality of TLR-4 polymorphism was assessed in samples from controls by quantification of TNF-α after LPS stimulus. TLR-4 and -2 expressions were also analyzed by flow cytometry. TLR-4 polymorphism was present in 8.5% of renal transplant patients. This polymorphism was associated with impairment in TNF-α secretion. In general, in renal transplant patients, TLR-4 expression in monocytes and in neutrophils was lower than in health volunteers. TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions in healthy volunteers with A299G/T399I TLR-4 polymorphism was higher than in wild-type genotype healthy volunteers (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively), and also higher than A299G/T399I TLR-4 polymorphism renal transplant patients (p<0.05). TLR-2 expression on neutrophils in wild-type genotype renal transplant patients was higher compared to wild-type genotype healthy volunteers, and was also higher in relation to A299G/T399I kidney transplanted patients (p<0.01). Stable renal transplant patients with TLR-4 polymorphism have a lower expression of TLR-4 and TLR-2 receptors in peripheral mononuclear cells, which ultimately indicate a less responsiveness for alarmins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. TLR4 and TNF-α polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk for severe sepsis following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Barber, R; Aragaki, C; Rivera-Chavez, F; Purdue, G; Hunt, J; Horton, J

    2004-01-01

    Context: Sepsis, organ failure, and shock remain common among patients with moderate to severe burn injuries. The inability of clinical factors to identify at-risk patients suggests that genetic variation may influence the risk for serious infection and the outcome from severe injury. Objective: Resolution of genetic variants associated with severe sepsis following burn injury. Patients: A total of 159 patients with burns ⩾20% of their total body surface area or any smoke inhalation injury without significant non-burn related trauma (injury severity score (ISS)⩾16), traumatic or anoxic brain injury, or spinal cord injury and who survived more than 48 h post-admission. Methods: Candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within bacterial recognition (TLR4 +896, CD14 –159) and inflammatory response (TNF-α –308, IL-1ß –31, IL-6 –174) loci were evaluated for association with increased risk for severe sepsis (sepsis plus organ dysfunction or septic shock) and mortality. Results: After adjustment for age, full-thickness burn size, ethnicity, and gender, carriage of the TLR4 +896 G-allele imparted at least a 1.8-fold increased risk of developing severe sepsis following a burn injury, relative to AA homozygotes (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8 to 23.2). Carriage of the TNF-α –308 A-allele imparted a similarly increased risk, relative to GG homozygotes (aOR = 4.5; 95% CI 1.7 to 12.0). None of the SNPs examined were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusions: The TLR4 +896 and TNF-α –308 polymorphisms were significantly associated with an increased risk for severe sepsis following burn trauma. PMID:15520404

  6. Targeted resequencing implicates the familial Mediterranean fever gene MEFV and the toll-like receptor 4 gene TLR4 in Behçet disease

    PubMed Central

    Kirino, Yohei; Zhou, Qing; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Seyahi, Emire; Özyazgan, Yilmaz; Ugurlu, Serdal; Erer, Burak; Abaci, Neslihan; Ustek, Duran; Meguro, Akira; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Ombrello, Michael J.; Satorius, Colleen L.; Maskeri, Baishali; Mullikin, James C.; Sun, Hong-Wei; Gutierrez-Cruz, Gustavo; Kim, Yoonhee; Wilson, Alexander F.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Gül, Ahmet; Remmers, Elaine F.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful means of identifying genes with disease-associated common variants, but they are not well-suited to detecting genes with disease-associated rare and low-frequency variants. In the current study of Behçet disease (BD), nonsynonymous variants (NSVs) identified by deep exonic resequencing of 10 genes found by GWAS (IL10, IL23R, CCR1, STAT4, KLRK1, KLRC1, KLRC2, KLRC3, KLRC4, and ERAP1) and 11 genes selected for their role in innate immunity (IL1B, IL1R1, IL1RN, NLRP3, MEFV, TNFRSF1A, PSTPIP1, CASP1, PYCARD, NOD2, and TLR4) were evaluated for BD association. A differential distribution of the rare and low-frequency NSVs of a gene in 2,461 BD cases compared with 2,458 controls indicated their collective association with disease. By stringent criteria requiring at least a single burden test with study-wide significance and a corroborating test with at least nominal significance, rare and low-frequency NSVs in one GWAS-identified gene, IL23R (P = 6.9 × 10−5), and one gene involved in innate immunity, TLR4 (P = 8.0 × 10−4), were associated with BD. In addition, damaging or rare damaging NOD2 variants were nominally significant across all three burden tests applied (P = 0.0063–0.045). Furthermore, carriage of the familial Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) mutation Met694Val, which is known to cause recessively inherited familial Mediterranean fever, conferred BD risk in the Turkish population (OR, 2.65; P = 1.8 × 10−12). The disease-associated NSVs in MEFV and TLR4 implicate innate immune and bacterial sensing mechanisms in BD pathogenesis. PMID:23633568

  7. Hantaan virus triggers TLR4-dependent innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Tao; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Ye; Nan, Xue-Ping; Li, Yu; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Yang, Dong-Qiang; Su, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Ping-Zhong; Bai, Xue-Fan

    2012-10-01

    The innate immune response induced by Hantavirus is responsible for endothelial cell dysfunction and viral pathogenicity. Recent studies demonstrate that TLR4 expression is upregulated and mediates the secretion of several cytokines in Hantaan virus (HTNV)-infected endothelial cells. To examine viral interactions with host endothelial cells and characterize the innate antiviral responses associated with Toll-like receptors, we selected TLR4 as the target molecule to investigate anti-hantavirus immunity. TLR4 mRNA-silenced EVC-304 (EVC-304 TLR4-) cells and EVC-304 cells were used to investigate signaling molecules downstream of TLR4. The expression of the adaptor protein TRIF was higher in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells than in EVC-304 TLR4- cells. However, there was no apparent difference in the expression of MyD88 in either cell line. The transcription factors for NF-κB and IRF-3 were translocated from the cytoplasm into the nucleus in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells, but not in HTNV-infected EVC-304 TLR4- cells. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 may play an important role in the antiviral immunity of the host against HTNV infection through an MyD88-independent signaling pathway.

  8. Recognition of lipopolysaccharide pattern by TLR4 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Beom Seok; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Minute amounts of LPS released from infecting pathogens can initiate potent innate immune responses that prime the immune system against further infection. However, when the LPS response is not properly controlled it can lead to fatal septic shock syndrome. The common structural pattern of LPS in diverse bacterial species is recognized by a cascade of LPS receptors and accessory proteins, LPS binding protein (LBP), CD14 and the Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4)–MD-2 complex. The structures of these proteins account for how our immune system differentiates LPS molecules from structurally similar host molecules. They also provide insights useful for discovery of anti-sepsis drugs. In this review, we summarize these structures and describe the structural basis of LPS recognition by LPS receptors and accessory proteins. PMID:24310172

  9. TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms influence mRNA and protein expression in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Marcela Alcântara; de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; Cadamuro, Aline Cristina Targa; Succi, Maysa; Netinho, João Gomes; Goloni-Bertolo, Eny Maria; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of promoter region polymorphisms of toll-like receptor (TLR)2-196 to -174del and TLR4-1607T/C (rs10759932) on mRNA and protein expression in tumor tissue and of TLR4+896A/G (rs4986790) on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. METHODS: The TLR2-196 to -174del polymorphism was investigated using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the TLR4-1607T/C and TLR4+896A/G by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We genotyped 434 DNA samples from 194 CRC patients and 240 healthy individuals. The mRNA relative quantification (RQ) was performed in 40 tumor tissue samples by quantitative PCR TaqMan assay, using specific probes for TLR2 and TLR4 genes, and ACTB and GAPDH reference genes were used as endogenous controls. Protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry with specific primary antibodies. RESULTS: No association was found for TLR4-1607T/C and TLR4+896A/G by three statistical models (log-additive, dominant and recessive). However, based on dominant and log-additive models, the polymorphic variant TLR2-196 to -174del was associated with increased CRC risk [dominant: odds ratio (OR) = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.03-2.89; P = 0.038 and log-additive: OR =1.59, 95%CI: 1.02-2.48; P = 0.039]. TLR2 mRNA expression was increased in tumor tissue (RQ = 2.36) when compared to adjacent normal tissue (RQ = 1; P < 0.0001), whereas the TLR4 mRNA showed a basal expression (RQ = 0.74 vs RQ = 1, P = 0.452). Immunohistochemistry analysis of TLR2 and TLR4 protein expression was concordant with the findings of mRNA expression. In addition, the TLR2-196 to -174del variant carriers showed mRNA relative expression 2.19 times higher than wild-genotype carriers. The TLR2 protein expression was also higher for the TLR2-196 to -174del variant carriers [117 ± 10 arbitrary unit (a.u.) vs 95 ± 4 a.u., P = 0.03]. However, for the TLR4 -1607T/C polymorphism no significant difference was found for both mRNA (P = 0.56) and protein expression (P = 0

  10. Molecular characterization and expression profile of partial TLR4 gene in association to mastitis in crossbred cattle.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Manjit; Sharma, Arjava; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Crossbred cattle are more prone to mastitis in comparison to indigenous cattle. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes pathogen ligands, for example, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin from Escherichia coli and mediates signaling to initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. Mutations in TLR4 can compromise the host immune response to certain pathogens, so it may be a potential candidate for marker assisted selection to enhance mastitis resistance in dairy cattle. Hence, in this study role of bovine TLR4 gene in mastitis resistance was investigated by association as well as expression profiling analysis in crossbred cattle. The animals were divided into mastitis affected and unaffected groups on the basis of history of animals and California Mastitis Test (CMT). PCR-SSCP and Sequence analysis revealed three genotypes of coreceptor binding region 1 (CRBR1) fragment of TLR4 gene namely AA, AB, and BB in both groups of cattle. The logistic regression model did not show any significant effect of these genotypes on the occurrence of clinical mastitis. Moreover, in vitro challenge of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with LPS failed to show any association of the genotypes with TLR4 gene expression. In a nutshell, in the present study enough evidence was not found for association of the SNP variants of CRBR1 fragment of TLR4 gene with mastitis susceptibility in crossbred cattle.

  11. Coxiella burnetii lipopolysaccharide blocks p38α-MAPK activation through the disruption of TLR-2 and TLR-4 association

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Filippo; Boucherit, Nicolas; Baldassarre, Veronica; Trouplin, Virginie; Toman, Rudolf; Mottola, Giovanna; Mege, Jean-Louis; Ghigo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To survive in macrophages, Coxiella burnetii hijacks the activation pathway of macrophages. Recently, we have demonstrated that C. burnetii, via its lipopolysaccharide (LPS), avoids the activation of p38α-MAPK through an antagonistic engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. We investigated the fine-tuned mechanism leading to the absence of activation of the p38α-MAPK despite TLR-4 engagement. In macrophages challenged with LPS from the avirulent variants of C. burnetii, TLR-4 and TLR-2 co-immunoprecipitated. This association was absent in cells challenged by the LPS of pathogenic C. burnetii. The disruption makes TLRs unable to signal during the recognition of the LPS of pathogenic C. burnetii. The disruption of TLR-2 and TLR-4 was induced by the re-organization of the macrophage cytoskeleton by C. burnetii LPS. Interestingly, blocking the actin cytoskeleton re-organization relieved the disruption of the association TLR-2/TLR-4 by pathogenic C. burnetii and rescued the p38α-MAPK activation by C. burnetii. We elucidated an unexpected mechanism allowing pathogenic C. burnetii to avoid macrophage activation by the disruption of the TLR-2 and TLR-4 association. PMID:25610812

  12. Negative Regulation of TLR4 Signaling by RP105

    PubMed Central

    Divanovic, Senad; Trompette, Aurelien; Atabani, Sowsan F.; Madan, Rajat; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Visintin, Alberto; Finberg, Robert W.; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Karp, Christopher L.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling by microbial signatures is critical to the induction of immune responses. Such responses demand tight regulation. RP105 is a TLR homolog, thought to be largely B cell-specific, which lacks a signaling domain. We report that RP105 expression is wide, directly mirroring that of TLR4 on antigen presenting cells. We further show that RP105 is a specific inhibitor of TLR4 signaling in HEK293 cells, a function conferred by its extracellular domain. Notably, RP105 and its helper molecule, MD-1, interacted directly with the TLR4 signaling complex, inhibiting its ability to bind microbial ligand. Finally, we demonstrate that RP105 regulates TLR4 signaling in dendritic cells, as well as endotoxin responses in vivo. Thus, these results identify RP105 as a physiological negative regulator of TLR4 responses. PMID:15852007

  13. Lack of association between TLR4 rs4986790 polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-Bermúdez, Mercedes; López-Mejías, Raquel; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Castañeda, Santos; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Blanco, Ricardo; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Balsa, Alejandro; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Llorca, Javier; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2012-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) activates the innate immune response via NF-kB pathway and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, leading to expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The G allele of TLR4 rs4986790 (+896A>G, Asp299Gly) gene polymorphism has been implicated in reduction of risk of atherosclerosis. In this study, 1481 RA patients fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria were genotyped for the rs4986790 TLR4 variant to determine the influence of this variant in the risk of CV events in these patients. Also, HLA-DRB1 status was determined using molecular based methods. Moreover, potential influence of rs4986790 variant in the development of subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed in a subgroup of RA patients with no history of CV events by the measurement of surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. No statistically significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies for the rs4986790 variant between RA patients who experienced CV events or not were found. Likewise, no significant association between this gene variant and any of the surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis was found. In summary, results in our study do not support the hypothesis that the rs4986790 (+896A>G, Asp299Gly) TLR4 variant may influence predisposition for subclinical atherosclerosis and clinically evident CV disease in RA patients.

  14. TLR4 mediates LPS-induced VEGF expression in odontoblasts.

    PubMed

    Botero, Tatiana M; Shelburne, Charles E; Holland, G Rex; Hanks, Carl T; Nör, Jacques E

    2006-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria cell walls such as Prevotella intermedia and Escherichia coli induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in odontoblasts, but not in undifferentiated dental pulp cells. CD14 and TLR4 are responsible for LPS signaling in macrophages, but their expression levels and function in dental pulp cells are unknown. We showed here that murine odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) express CD14 and TLR4 by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. In contrast, undifferentiated dental pulp cells (OD-21) presented low or no expression of these two receptors. MDPC-23 cells showed CD14 and TLR4 up-regulation upon exposure to LPS, as determined by real time PCR. Dominant negative murine TLR4 (DN-mTLR4) transfected MDPC-23 cells did not show upregulated VEGF expression in response to LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that odontoblast-like cells express CD14 and TLR4, and that LPS-induced VEGF expression is mediated, at least in part, by TLR4 signaling.

  15. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases.

  16. Polymorphisms of the TLR2 and TLR4 genes are associated with risk of gastric cancer in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) -196 to -174 del, and TLR4 (+896A/G rs4986790 and +1196C/T rs4986791) polymorphisms at risk of chronic gastritis and gastric cancer in a Brazilian population and association of gastric lesions with risk factors such as smoking, alcohol intake and Helicobacter pylori infection. METHODS: In this case-control study, polymorphism at TLR2 -196 to -174 del was investigated by using the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, while the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was carried out to identify the TLR4 (rs4986790 and rs4986791) genotypes in 607 Brazilian individuals (208 with chronic gastritis-CG, 174 with gastric cancer-GC and 225 controls -C). RESULTS: The single nucleotide polymorphisms TLR4+1196C/T was not associated with risk of chronic gastritis or gastric cancer and the homozygous genotypes TLR4+896GG and TLR4+1196TT were absent in the studied population. However, the frequency of TLR2 -196 to -174 ins/del + del/del and TLR4+896AG genotypes was significantly higher (P < 0.01 and P = 0.01, respectively) in the cancer group (33.4% and 11.5%, respectively) than in the control group (16.9% and 4.5%, respectively). It was also observed that the G-C haplotype of the TLR4+896A/G+1196C/T (P = 0.02) and the combination of variant alleles of the TLR2/TLR4+896G (P = 0.02) are associated with susceptibility to gastric cancer. In addition, the multiple logistic regression showed that male gender [odds ratio (OR) = 2.70; 95% CI: 1.66-4.41; P < 0.01], alcohol intake (OR = 2.93; 95% CI: 1.76-4.87; P < 0.01), TLR2 -196 to -174 del (OR = 2.64; 95% CI: 1.56-4.44; P < 0.01) and TLR4+896G (OR = 3.19; 95% CI: 1.34- 7.61; P < 0.01) polymorphisms were associated with a higher susceptibility to developing this neoplasm. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that TLR2 -196 to -174 del and TLR4+896G may increase the risk of gastric cancer in a Brazilian population. PMID:22468087

  17. Association of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) with chronic plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rh Ll; Hébert, H L; Massey, J; Bowes, J; Marzo-Ortega, H; Ho, P; McHugh, N J; Worthington, J; Barton, A; Griffiths, C E M; Warren, R B

    2016-04-01

    Family studies have provided overwhelming evidence for an underlying genetic component to psoriasis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key transmembrane proteins in both the innate and adaptive immune responses which are known to be integral processes in psoriasis. Recent functional studies support this notion having suggested a role for TLR4 in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Furthermore a missense polymorphism in the TLR4 gene has been associated with a number of autoimmune conditions, including Crohn diseases, making TLR4 a viable candidate gene for investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate polymorphisms across the TLR4 region with a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel in a large cohort of patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis. Twenty SNPs were successfully genotyped using Sequenom iPLEX Gold platform in 2826 UK chronic plaque type psoriasis patients including subgroup data on presence of confirmed psoriatic arthritis (n = 1839) and early-onset psoriasis (n = 1466) was available. Allele frequencies for psoriasis patients were compared against imputed Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium controls (n = 4861). Significant association was observed between a missense variant rs4986790 of TLR4 (Asp229Gly) and plaque type psoriasis (p = 2 × 10(-4)) which was also notable in those with psoriatic arthritis (p = 2 × 10(-4)) and early-onset psoriasis (p = 8 × 10(-4)). We present data suggestive of an association between a functional variant and an intronic variant of TLR4 and chronic plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, validation of this association in independent cohorts will be necessary.

  18. The TLR4 D299G and T399I SNPs are constitutively active to up-regulate expression of Trif-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Hold, Georgina L; Berry, Susan; Saunders, Karin A; Drew, Janice; Mayer, Claus; Brookes, Heather; Gay, Nick J; El-Omar, Emad M; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) signalling and genetic polymorphisms in these proteins are linked to many human diseases. We investigated TLR4 functional variants D299G and T399I to assess the impact on LPS-induced responsiveness in comparison to wild-type TLR4. The mechanism by which this occurs in unclear as these SNPs do not lie within the lipid A binding domain or dimerisation sites of the LPS-TLR4/MD2 receptor complexes. Transfection of TLR4D299G, TLR4T399I or TLR4D299G. T399I into HEK cells resulted in constitutive activation of an NF-κB reporter gene and a blunting of the LPS-induced reporter activation compared to WT-TLR4. Unstimulated human monocyte/macrophages, from patients with the D299G and T399I SNPs demonstrated a downregulation of many genes, particularly Tram/Trif signalling pathway constitutents compared to the TLR4 wild-type subjects supporting the concept of basal receptor activity. Monocyte/macrophages from carriers of the TLR4 D299G and T399I polymorphisms stimulated with LPS showed >6 fold lower levels of NF-κB and ∼12 fold higher IFN-β gene expression levels compared to wild-type subjects (P<0.05; MWU test) and dramatically altered resultant cytokine profiles. We conclude that these TLR4 SNPs affect constitutive receptor activity which impacts on the hosts ability to respond to LPS challenge leading to a dysregulated sub-optimal immune response to infection.

  19. The TLR4 D299G and T399I SNPs Are Constitutively Active to Up-Regulate Expression of Trif-Dependent Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hold, Georgina L.; Berry, Susan; Saunders, Karin A.; Drew, Janice; Mayer, Claus; Brookes, Heather; Gay, Nick J.; El-Omar, Emad M.; Bryant, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) signalling and genetic polymorphisms in these proteins are linked to many human diseases. We investigated TLR4 functional variants D299G and T399I to assess the impact on LPS-induced responsiveness in comparison to wild-type TLR4. The mechanism by which this occurs in unclear as these SNPs do not lie within the lipid A binding domain or dimerisation sites of the LPS-TLR4/MD2 receptor complexes. Transfection of TLR4D299G, TLR4T399I or TLR4D299G. T399I into HEK cells resulted in constitutive activation of an NF-κB reporter gene and a blunting of the LPS-induced reporter activation compared to WT-TLR4. Unstimulated human monocyte/macrophages, from patients with the D299G and T399I SNPs demonstrated a downregulation of many genes, particularly Tram/Trif signalling pathway constitutents compared to the TLR4 wild-type subjects supporting the concept of basal receptor activity. Monocyte/macrophages from carriers of the TLR4 D299G and T399I polymorphisms stimulated with LPS showed >6 fold lower levels of NF-κB and ∼12 fold higher IFN-β gene expression levels compared to wild-type subjects (P<0.05; MWU test) and dramatically altered resultant cytokine profiles. We conclude that these TLR4 SNPs affect constitutive receptor activity which impacts on the hosts ability to respond to LPS challenge leading to a dysregulated sub-optimal immune response to infection. PMID:25365308

  20. Alcohol, TLR4-TGF-β Antagonism, and Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Mishra, Lopa; Machida, Keigo

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and obesity are two known risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that also synergistically promote HBV/HCV-related carcinogenesis. TLR4, the PAMP for endotoxin participates in inflammatory processes such as M1 activation of hepatic macrophages in alcoholic liver disease. However its role in liver carcinogenesis via ectopic expression and activation, has only recently been revealed in alcohol/HCV-associated HCC models. Alcohol feeding to mice expressing the HCV Ns5a in a hepatocyte specific manner, aggravates liver inflammation via activation of overexpressed TLR4 in the parenchymal cells. Long-term alcohol feeding produces liver tumors in these transgenic mice in a manner dependent on TLR4. From these mice, CD133+/CD49f+ tumor initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) have been isolated. These TICs exhibit self-renewal and tumorigenic activities driven by TLR4-dependent upregulation of the stem cell factor NANOG. Defective TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway is identified in the TICs and mediated by NANOG target genes Igf2bp3 and Yap1. This TGF-β pathway antagonism is responsible in part for TIC’s tumorigenic activity and chemoresistance. Conversely, mice with attenuated TGF-β pathway due to haploinsufficiency of β2-Spectrin, spontaneously develop liver tumors and alcohol-feeding increases tumor incidence in a TLR4 dependent manner. This reciprocal antagonism between TLR4 and TGF-β pathways may serve as a novel therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:26201318

  1. Shock-induced neutrophil mediated priming for acute lung injury in mice: divergent effects of TLR-4 and TLR-4/FasL deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Alfred; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas, Joanne L; Song, Grace Y; Doughty, Lesley A; Gregory, Stephen H; Cioffi, William G; LeBlanc, Brian W; Reichner, Jonathan; Simms, H Hank; Grutkoski, Patricia S

    2002-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) leading to respiratory distress is a common sequela of shock/trauma, however, modeling this process in mice with a single shock or septic event is inconsistent. One explanation is that hemorrhage is often just a "priming insult," thus, secondary stimuli may be required to "trigger" ALI. To test this we carried out studies in which we assessed the capacity of hemorrhage alone or hemorrhage followed by septic challenge (CLP) to induce ALI. Lung edema, bronchoalveolar lavage interleukin (IL)-6, alveolar congestion, as well as lung IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were all increased in mice subjected to CLP at 24 but not 72 hours following hemorrhage. This was associated with a marked increase in the susceptibility of these mice to septic mortality. Peripheral blood neutrophils derived from 24 hours post-hemorrhage, but not Sham animals, exhibited an ex vivo decrease in apoptotic frequency and an increase in respiratory burst capacity, consistent with in vivo "priming." Subsequently, we observed that adoptive transfer of neutrophils from hemorrhaged but not sham-hemorrhage animals to neutropenic recipients reproduce ALI when subsequently septically challenged, implying that this priming was mediated by neutrophils. We also found marked general increases in lung IL-6, MIP-2, and MPO in mice deficient for toll-like receptor (TLR-4) or the combined lack of TLR-4/FasL. However, the TLR-4 defect markedly attenuated neutrophil influx into the lung while not altering the change in local cytokine/chemokine expression. Alternatively, the combined loss of FasL and TLR-4 did not inhibit the increase in MPO and exacerbated lung IL-6/MIP-2 levels even further.

  2. The Asp299Gly Polymorphism Alters TLR4 Signaling by Interfering with Recruitment of MyD88 and TIR domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β1

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Leandra; Xiong, Yanbao; Song, Chang; Piao, Wenji; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Medvedev, Andrei E.

    2012-01-01

    Asp299Gly (D299G) and, to a lesser extent, Thr399Ile (T399I) TLR4 polymorphisms have been associated with Gram negative sepsis and other infectious diseases, but the mechanisms by which they affect TLR4 signaling are unclear. In this study, we determined the impact of the D299G and T399I polymorphisms on TLR4 expression, interactions with myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2), LPS binding, and LPS-mediated activation of the MyD88- and TIR domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β (TRIF) signaling pathways. Complementation of human embryonic kidney 293/CD14/MD2 transfectants with wild-type (WT) or mutant yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged TLR4 variants revealed comparable total TLR4 expression, TLR4-MD-2 interactions, and LPS binding. FACS analyses with anti-TLR4 Ab showed only minimal changes in the cell surface levels of the D299G TLR4. Cells transfected with D299G TLR4 exhibited impaired LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 and TANK binding kinase-1, activation of NF-κB and IFN regulatory factor 3, and induction of IL-8 and IFN-β mRNA, while T399I TLR4 did not cause statistically significant inhibition. In contrast to WT TLR4, expression of the D299G mutants in TLR4−/− mouse macrophages failed to elicit LPS-mediated induction of TNF-α and IFN-β mRNA. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed diminished LPS-driven interaction of MyD88 and TRIF with the D299G TLR4 species, in contrast to robust adapter recruitment exhibited by WT TLR4. Thus, the D299G polymorphism compromises recruitment of MyD88 and TRIF to TLR4 without affecting TLR4 expression, TLR4-MD-2 interaction, or LPS binding, suggesting that it interferes with TLR4 dimerization and assembly of intracellular docking platforms for adapter recruitment. PMID:22474023

  3. The Troll in Toll: Mal and Tram as bridges for TLR2 and TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, Frederick J; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2007-08-01

    Signaling by two of the most important bacteria-sensing TLRs, TLR2 and TLR4, involves two adaptor proteins, MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal) and Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-beta (Trif)-related adaptor molecule (TRAM). Recently, new insights into the functioning of these two adapters have emerged. Mal is required by both TLRs to act as a bridge to recruit the adaptor MyD88, leading ultimately to NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, TRAM acts as a bridge to recruit TRIF to the TLR4 complex, leading to activation of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3. Consistent with Mal and TRAM being key points of control, recent evidence suggests that they are subject to regulation by phosphorylation. Further, a variant in Mal in humans has been found to protect against multiple infectious diseases. Finally, another TIR domain-containing adaptor, sterile alpha and HEAT/armadillo motif protein (SARM), has been shown to act as an inhibitor of TRIF-dependent signaling. These recent discoveries add to the complexity of TLR signaling and highlight specific control mechanisms for TLR2 and TLR4 signaling.

  4. TLR4 Deficiency Protects against Hepatic Fibrosis and Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Pre-Carcinogenic Liver Injury in Fibrotic Liver

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Susanne Nicole; Bohner, Annika; Dapito, Dianne H.; Schwabe, Robert F.; Lammert, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common consequence of advanced liver fibrosis but the interactions between fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis are still poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that HCC promotion depends on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Pre-cancerogenous events can be modelled in mice by the administration of a single dose of diethylnitrosamine (DEN), with HCC formation depending amongst others on interleukin (IL) 6 production. Mice lacking the hepatocanalicular phosphatidylcholine transporter ABCB4 develop liver fibrosis spontaneously, resemble patients with sclerosing cholangitis due to mutations of the orthologous human gene, and represent a valid model to study tumour formation in pre-injured cholestatic liver. The aim of this study was to investigate DEN-induced liver injury in TLR4-deficient mice with biliary fibrosis. Methods ABCB4-deficient mice on the FVB/NJ genetic background were crossed to two distinct genetic backgrounds (TLR4-sufficient C3H/HeN and TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ) for more than 10 generations. The two congenic knockout and the two corresponding wild-type mouse lines were treated with a single dose of DEN for 48 hours. Phenotypic differences were assessed by measuring hepatic collagen contents, inflammatory markers (ALT, CRP, IL6) as well as hepatic apoptosis (TUNEL) and proliferation (Ki67) rates. Results Hepatic collagen accumulation is significantly reduced in ABCB4-/-:TLR4-/-double-deficient mice. After DEN challenge, apoptosis, proliferation and inflammatory markers are decreased in TLR4-deficient in comparison to TLR4-sufficient mice. When combining ABCB4 and TLR4 deficiency with DEN treatment, hepatic IL6 expression and proliferation rates are lowest in fibrotic livers from the double-deficient line. Consistent with these effects, selective digestive tract decontamination in ABCB4-/- mice also led to reduced tumor size and number after DEN. Conclusion This study demonstrates that liver

  5. A designed TLR4/MD-2 complex to capture LPS.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Katharina; Glück, Thomas; Hartmann, Pia; Salzberger, Bernd; Falk, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is involved in the defense of an organism to microbial attack. TLR4-induced signaling is involved in infectious diseases, chronic inflammatory diseases and sepsis; therefore, we aimed at modulating TLR4-signaling via ligand-binding soluble receptors. Because recognition of microbial structures shows some species-specific traits, we specifically selected the mouse model for later in vivo studies. We first prepared the N-terminally Flag-tagged mouse (m) recombinant (r) soluble (s) fusion proteins mrsTLR4-IgGFc (T4Fc) and mrsMD-2 in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells. The function of these molecules was tested by inhibition of synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines after stimulation of mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells with purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS). T4Fc alone had no inhibitory activity; however, a T4Fc/MD-2 complex blocked LPS activity. By analogy with 'cytokine traps', we then prepared a designer molecule (LPS-Trap) by fusing MD-2 to the C-terminus of soluble TLR4 via a flexible linker. LPS-Trap significantly inhibited TNF production by LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, the T4Fc/MD-2 complex as well as the LPS-Trap blocked LPS activity in vitro and might thus represent a new therapeutic option in sepsis by neutralization of TLR4-activating ligands.

  6. TLR4-directed Molecular Strategies Targeting Skin Photodamage and Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Sally E; Wondrak, Georg T

    2017-08-28

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a causative factor in skin photodamage and carcinogenesis, and inflammatory dysregulation is a key mechanism underlying detrimental effects of acute and chronic UV exposure. The health and economic burden of skin cancer treatment is substantial, creating an increasingly urgent need for the development of improved molecular strategies for photoprotection and photochemoprevention. The role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) as a key regulator of skin anti-microbial defense, wound healing, and cutaneous tumorigenic inflammation has now been recognized, and recently published evidence suggests that TLR4 represents a novel molecular target for skin photoprotection and cancer photochemoprevention. Specifically, it has been shown that pharmacological and genetic antagonism of TLR4 suppresses UV-induced inflammatory signaling involving the attenuation of cutaneous NF-κB and AP-1 stress signaling observable in vitro and in vivo. A number of TLR4-directed small molecule pharmacological antagonists [including eritoran, (+)-naloxone, ST2825, and resatorvid] have now been identified and are at various stages of preclinical and clinical development for the modulation of dysregulated TLR4-dependent inflammatory signaling. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Cytokine production in patients with cirrhosis and TLR4 polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Juan Camilo; Sánchez, Elisabet; Román, Eva; Vidal, Silvia; Oliva, Laia; Guarner-Argente, Carlos; Poca, Maria; Torras, Xavier; Juárez, Cándido; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, German

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the cytokine production by peripheral blood cells from cirrhotic patients with and without TLR4 D299G and/or T399I polymorphisms. METHODS: The study included nine patients with cirrhosis and TLR4 D299G and/or T399I polymorphisms, and 10 wild-type patients matched for age, sex and degree of liver failure. TLR4 polymorphisms were determined by sequence-based genotyping. Cytokine production by peripheral blood cells was assessed spontaneously and also after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) stimulation. RESULTS: Patients with TLR4 polymorphisms had a higher incidence of previous hepatic encephalopathy than wild-type patients (78% vs 20%, P = 0.02). Spontaneous production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 was lower in patients with TLR4 polymorphisms than in wild-type patients [IL-6: 888.7 (172.0-2119.3) pg/mL vs 5540.4 (1159.2-26053.9) pg/mL, P < 0.001; IL-10: 28.7 (6.5-177.1) pg/mL vs 117.8 (6.5-318.1) pg/mL, P = 0.02]. However, the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 and IL-10 after LPS and LTA stimulation was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: TLR4 polymorphisms were associated with a distinctive pattern of cytokine production in cirrhotic patients, suggesting that they play a role in the development of cirrhosis complications. PMID:25516666

  8. How important are rare variants in common disease?

    PubMed

    Saint Pierre, Aude; Génin, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have uncovered hundreds of common genetic variants involved in complex diseases. However, for most complex diseases, these common genetic variants only marginally contribute to disease susceptibility. It is now argued that rare variants located in different genes could in fact play a more important role in disease susceptibility than common variants. These rare genetic variants were not captured by genome-wide association studies using single nucleotide polymorphism-chips but with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, they have become detectable. It is now possible to study their contribution to common disease by resequencing samples of cases and controls or by using new genotyping exome arrays that cover rare alleles. In this review, we address the question of the contribution of rare variants in common disease by taking the examples of different diseases for which some resequencing studies have already been performed, and by summarizing the results of simulation studies conducted so far to investigate the genetic architecture of complex traits in human. So far, empirical data have not allowed the exclusion of many models except the most extreme ones involving only a small number of rare variants with large effects contributing to complex disease. To unravel the genetic architecture of complex disease, case-control data will not be sufficient, and alternative study designs need to be proposed together with methodological developments.

  9. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  10. In situ TLR2 and TLR4 expression in a murine model of mycetoma caused by Nocardia brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Millán-Chiu, Blanca Edith; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Méndez-Tovar, Luis Javier; López-Martínez, Rubén

    2011-04-01

    Actinomycetoma caused by Nocardia brasiliensis is a common disease in tropical regions. This ailment is characterized by a localized chronic inflammation that mainly affects the lower limbs. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, inducing the production of proinflammatory mediators. The role of TLRs in the immune response against N. brasiliensis is unknown. The aim of this work was to locate and quantify in a murine model the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the infection site using reverse transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that TLR2 expression increased in the infected tissue, whereas TLR4 expression decreased. The presence of TLR2 and TLR4 was demonstrated in different cell populations throughout the chronic infectious process. In the early stages of this process, TLR2 was expressed in neutrophils and macrophages in direct contact with the inoculum, whereas TLR4 was observed in mast cells. In the advanced stages of the infection, TLR2 was expressed in foam cells and fibroblasts and was likely associated with bacterial containment, while TLR4 was downregulated, probably resulting in an imbalance between the host immune response and the bacterial load that favoured chronic disease. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The evolutionary history of TLR4 polymorphisms in Europe.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Theo S; Ioana, Mihai; Alonso, Santos; Izagirre, Neskuts; Hervella, Montserrat; Joosten, Leo A B; van der Meer, Jos W M; de la Rúa, Concepcion; Netea, Mihai G

    2012-01-01

    Infections exert important evolutionary pressures shaping the human genome, especially on genes involved in host defense. A crucial step for host defense is recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors on innate immune cells, among which Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the best known. Genetic variation in TLR4 (Asp299Gly, Thr399Ile) has been recently described. Haplotype frequencies of these polymorphisms differ among African, Asian and European populations, suggesting evolutionary pressures exerted by local infections. The TLR4 299Gly/399Ile haplotype, characteristic mainly of European populations, has relatively high frequency in the Iberian peninsula. This region is also described as refuge area during the last glacial maximum 20,000 years ago, from which repopulation of Europe took place. We speculate that a genetic bottleneck in the Iberian peninsula could have promoted the increased frequency of this haplotype by genetic drift. This hypothesis is supported by three arguments: (1) the West-East gradient of prevalence in the haplotype among European populations; (2) ancient DNA from Neolithic burials in the Iberian peninsula, dated 6,600-4,500 years before present, confirmed the relatively high frequency of this haplotype in the region, and (3) no functional differences between this haplotype and wild-type TLR4 have been found. In contrast, the disappearance of the 299Gly/399Thr haplotype in Europe is most likely due to negative selection due to sepsis. In conclusion, differences in distribution of TLR4 polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile in European populations are most likely due to a combination of population migration events combined with selection due to sepsis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. CCR2 dependent neutrophil activation and mobilization rely on TLR4-p38 axis during liver ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Zhang, Junbin; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Cong-Yi; Zhang, Jinxiang

    2017-01-01

    Liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common clinical problem in which neutrophil recruitment is an essential event. Our previous study revealed the important role of C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) in neutrophils during liver IRI. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the underlying mechanisms mediating the changes in CCR2 expression in neutrophils during this pathophysiological process. Herein, we found that TLR4 ablation reduced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow and the subsequent infiltration into the liver during liver IRI; neutrophil-derived CCR2 expression was also repressed. In addition, neutrophil mobilization was dependent on CCR2 expression in neutrophils, which in turn relied on activation of the TLR4-p38 axis during liver IRI. In conclusion, neutrophil-derived CCR2 expression regulates neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow and infiltration into the liver, which requires activation of the TLR4-p38 axis during liver IRI. PMID:28670376

  13. TLR-4-dependent and -independent mechanisms of fetal brain injury in the setting of preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kelsey; Brown, Amy; Burd, Irina; Chai, Jinghua; Friedman, Alexander; Elovitz, Michal A

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we sought to assess how essential activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) is to fetal brain injury from intrauterine inflammation. Both wild-type and TLR-4 mutant fetal central nervous system cells were exposed to inflammation using lipopolysaccharide in vivo or in vitro. Inflammation could not induce neuronal injury in the absence of glial cells, in either wild-type or TLR-4 mutant neurons. However, injured neurons could induce injury in other neurons regardless of TLR-4 competency. Our results indicate that initiation of neuronal injury is a TLR-4-dependent event, while propagation is a TLR-4-independent event.

  14. MD-2 Determinants of Nickel and Cobalt-Mediated Activation of Human TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Oblak, Alja; Pohar, Jelka; Jerala, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings unexpectedly revealed that human TLR4 can be directly activated by nickel ions. This activation is due to the coordination of nickel by a cluster of histidine residues on the ectodomain of human TLR4, which is absent in most other species. We aimed to elucidate the role of MD-2 in the molecular mechanism of TLR4/MD-2 activation by nickel, as nickel binding site on TLR4 is remote from MD-2, which directly binds the endotoxin as the main pathological activator of TLR4. We identified MD-2 and TLR4 mutants which abolished TLR4/MD-2 receptor activation by endotoxin but could nevertheless be significantly activated by nickel, which acts in synergy with LPS. Human TLR4/MD-2 was also activated by cobalt ions, while copper and cadmium were toxic in the tested concentration range. Activation of TLR4 by cobalt required MD-2 and was abolished by human TLR4 mutations of histidine residues at positions 456 and 458. We demonstrated that activation of TLR4 by nickel and cobalt ions can trigger both the MyD88-dependent and the –independent pathway. Based on our results we propose that predominantly hydrophobic interactions between MD-2 and TLR4 contribute to the stabilization of the TLR4/MD-2/metal ion complex in a conformation that enables activation. PMID:25803856

  15. MD-2 determinants of nickel and cobalt-mediated activation of human TLR4.

    PubMed

    Oblak, Alja; Pohar, Jelka; Jerala, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings unexpectedly revealed that human TLR4 can be directly activated by nickel ions. This activation is due to the coordination of nickel by a cluster of histidine residues on the ectodomain of human TLR4, which is absent in most other species. We aimed to elucidate the role of MD-2 in the molecular mechanism of TLR4/MD-2 activation by nickel, as nickel binding site on TLR4 is remote from MD-2, which directly binds the endotoxin as the main pathological activator of TLR4. We identified MD-2 and TLR4 mutants which abolished TLR4/MD-2 receptor activation by endotoxin but could nevertheless be significantly activated by nickel, which acts in synergy with LPS. Human TLR4/MD-2 was also activated by cobalt ions, while copper and cadmium were toxic in the tested concentration range. Activation of TLR4 by cobalt required MD-2 and was abolished by human TLR4 mutations of histidine residues at positions 456 and 458. We demonstrated that activation of TLR4 by nickel and cobalt ions can trigger both the MyD88-dependent and the -independent pathway. Based on our results we propose that predominantly hydrophobic interactions between MD-2 and TLR4 contribute to the stabilization of the TLR4/MD-2/metal ion complex in a conformation that enables activation.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of LrTLR4, analysis of its inductive expression and associated down-stream signaling molecules following lipopolysaccharide stimulation and Gram-negative bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Mrinal; Basu, Madhubanti; Swain, Banikalyan; Paichha, Mahismita; Lenka, Saswati S; Das, Surajit; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Maiti, Nikhil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in innate immunity from lower to higher vertebrates. Among various TLR types, TLR4 was reported to recognize LPS in higher vertebrates resulting in the activation of down-stream signaling pathway. Except in some teleosts, function of TLR4 in most fish species including rohu (Labeo rohita) a commercially important fish species in the South-East Asian countries remained unknown. To investigate it, full-length cDNA of Labeo rohita TLR4 (LrTLR4) was cloned, and it consisted of 2729 bp, with a single ORF of 2469 bp encoding a polypeptide of 822 aa with a predicted molecular mass of 94.753 kDa. Structurally, LrTLR4 consisted of 25 LRRs (leucine rich repeat regions), one TM (trans-membrane) domain and one TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor) domain, and was similar to higher vertebrate's TLR4. Phylogenetically, LrTLR4 exhibited highest (85%) identity with the common carp TLR4b amino acids sequence, and formed a separate subgroup in the phylogenetic tree. LrTLR4 was widely expressed in all tested organs/tissues, and amidst the tissues highest expression was detected in blood and the lowest in eye. In response to LPS-stimulation, LrTLR4 was induced with the activation of MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent signaling pathway resulting in pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 and 8) and type I IFN gene expression. Infection of rohu with a Gram-negative fish pathogen (Aeromonas hydrophila), also activated LrTLR4. Together, these findings suggest the important role of TLR4 in LPS sensing and augmentation of innate immunity against Gram-negative bacterial infection in fish.

  17. Association between variation in faecal egg count for a natural mixed field-challenge of nematode parasites and TLR4 variation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y-S; Zhou, H; Forrest, R H J; Frampton, C M; Burrows, L E R; Hickford, J G H

    2016-03-15

    Research has shown that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in immune responses to some helminth parasites. In sheep, variation in the PAMP region of TLR4 may result in structurally and thus functionally different TLR4 molecules, and this may consequently lead to variation in the TLR4 response to parasite infections. This study involved three separate, but related sheep breeds (Merino, Polwarth and Corriedale sheep) and a total of 885 lambs from five New Zealand farms that underwent a mixed field-challenge from gastro-intestinal parasites. Faecal samples were collected at approximately 4 and 9 months of age and faecal egg counts (FECs) for Nematodirus spp. and Strongyle species determined, along with the total number of eggs per gram (EPG). Analysis of the five farms collectively revealed an association (P=0.023) between the presence of TLR4 variant *02 (mean 24 EPG) and the absence of the variant (mean 32 EPG) at 9 months of age. Conversely the presence of *03 had a significantly (P=0.047) higher mean Nematodirus spp. FEC (mean 42 EPG) compared to the absence (mean 28 EPG) at 9 months of age. More associations were revealed when the data were split according to the dominant faecal parasite species. With a predominantly Trichostrongylus spp. FEC group of lambs at 9 months of age, the presence of TLR4 variant *02 was found to have significantly (P=0.003) lower Nematodirus spp. FEC (mean 4 EPG), and also significantly (P=0.033) lower total FEC (mean 312 EPG) when compared to sheep without the variant (mean 15 EPG and 449 EPG, respectively). The presence of TLR4 variant *03 and *04 were associated or tended to be associated (P=0.010 and P=0.088, respectively) with higher Nematodirus spp. FEC (mean 25 EPG and 22 EPG, respectively) when compared to lambs without the variant (mean 10 EPG and 11 EPG, respectively). These results suggest that TLR4 variation may be affecting the immune response to gastro-intestinal parasites in sheep, although principally to

  18. Oxymatrine inhibits microglia activation via HSP60-TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Feijia; Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Shuting; Wang, Yin

    2016-11-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens, which has broad anti-inflammatory, antitumor and immunosuppressant actions. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has recently been shown to have an important role in autoimmune reactions. The present study aimed to investigate whether OMT exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting microglial activation and examined the role of HSP60 in this process. Western blot analysis and ELISA showed that OMT decreased the expression and release of HSP60 by LPS-activated BV2 cells. The expression of heat shock factor 1, the transcription factor of HSP60, was also suppressed by OMT. Extracellular HSP60 has been previously indicated to induce microglial apoptosis through the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 pathway. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that LPS treatment induced apoptosis of BV2 cells, which was inhibited by OMT in parallel with inhibition of LPS-induced expression of TLR-4. Furthermore, OMT was shown to suppress the levels of myeloid differentiation factor (MYD)88, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. In light of these results, it was concluded that OMT may exert its neuroprotective effects via HSP60/TLR-4/MYD88/NF-κB signaling pathways to inhibit microglial activation. OMT may therefore offer substantial therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglial activation.

  19. Oxymatrine inhibits microglia activation via HSP60-TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feijia; Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Shuting; Wang, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens, which has broad anti-inflammatory, antitumor and immunosuppressant actions. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has recently been shown to have an important role in autoimmune reactions. The present study aimed to investigate whether OMT exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting microglial activation and examined the role of HSP60 in this process. Western blot analysis and ELISA showed that OMT decreased the expression and release of HSP60 by LPS-activated BV2 cells. The expression of heat shock factor 1, the transcription factor of HSP60, was also suppressed by OMT. Extracellular HSP60 has been previously indicated to induce microglial apoptosis through the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 pathway. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that LPS treatment induced apoptosis of BV2 cells, which was inhibited by OMT in parallel with inhibition of LPS-induced expression of TLR-4. Furthermore, OMT was shown to suppress the levels of myeloid differentiation factor (MYD)88, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. In light of these results, it was concluded that OMT may exert its neuroprotective effects via HSP60/TLR-4/MYD88/NF-κB signaling pathways to inhibit microglial activation. OMT may therefore offer substantial therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglial activation. PMID:27882228

  20. TLR4 deficiency promotes autophagy during cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    An, Chang Hyeok; Wang, Xiao Mei; Lam, Hilaire C; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Washko, George R; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2012-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) exert important nonimmune functions in lung homeostasis. TLR4 deficiency promotes pulmonary emphysema. We examined the role of TLR4 in regulating cigarette smoke (CS)-induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. Lung tissue was obtained from chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) patients. C3H/HeJ (Tlr4-mutated) mice and C57BL/10ScNJ (Tlr4-deficient) mice and their respective control strains were exposed to chronic CS or air. Human or mouse epithelial cells (wild-type, Tlr4-knockdown, and Tlr4-deficient) were exposed to CS-extract (CSE). Samples were analyzed for TLR4 expression, and for autophagic or apoptotic proteins by Western blot analysis or confocal imaging. Chronic obstructive lung disease lung tissues and human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to CSE displayed increased TLR4 expression, and increased autophagic [microtubule-associated protein-1 light-chain-3B (LC3B)] and apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3) markers. Beas-2B cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA displayed increased expression of LC3B relative to control cells, basally and after exposure to CSE. The basal and CSE-inducible expression of LC3B and cleaved caspase-3 were elevated in pulmonary alveolar type II cells from Tlr4-deficient mice. Wild-type mice subjected to chronic CS-exposure displayed airspace enlargement;, however, the Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice exhibited a marked increase in airspace relative to wild-type mice after CS-exposure. The Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice showed higher levels of LC3B under basal conditions and after CS exposure. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 was markedly increased in Tlr4-deficient mice exposed to CS. We describe a protective regulatory function of TLR4 against emphysematous changes of the lung in response to CS.

  1. TLR4 deficiency promotes autophagy during cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema

    PubMed Central

    An, Chang Hyeok; Wang, Xiao Mei; Lam, Hilaire C.; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Washko, George R.; Ryter, Stefan W.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) exert important nonimmune functions in lung homeostasis. TLR4 deficiency promotes pulmonary emphysema. We examined the role of TLR4 in regulating cigarette smoke (CS)-induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. Lung tissue was obtained from chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) patients. C3H/HeJ (Tlr4-mutated) mice and C57BL/10ScNJ (Tlr4-deficient) mice and their respective control strains were exposed to chronic CS or air. Human or mouse epithelial cells (wild-type, Tlr4-knockdown, and Tlr4-deficient) were exposed to CS-extract (CSE). Samples were analyzed for TLR4 expression, and for autophagic or apoptotic proteins by Western blot analysis or confocal imaging. Chronic obstructive lung disease lung tissues and human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to CSE displayed increased TLR4 expression, and increased autophagic [microtubule-associated protein-1 light-chain-3B (LC3B)] and apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3) markers. Beas-2B cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA displayed increased expression of LC3B relative to control cells, basally and after exposure to CSE. The basal and CSE-inducible expression of LC3B and cleaved caspase-3 were elevated in pulmonary alveolar type II cells from Tlr4-deficient mice. Wild-type mice subjected to chronic CS-exposure displayed airspace enlargement;, however, the Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice exhibited a marked increase in airspace relative to wild-type mice after CS-exposure. The Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice showed higher levels of LC3B under basal conditions and after CS exposure. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 was markedly increased in Tlr4-deficient mice exposed to CS. We describe a protective regulatory function of TLR4 against emphysematous changes of the lung in response to CS. PMID:22983353

  2. Inhibition of TLR4 protects rat islets against lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ge, Qin Min; Bian, Fan; Dong, Yan; Huang, Chun Mei

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress leads to dysfunction in pancreatic cells, causing a reduction in insulin secretion following exposure to glucose. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may be activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stress. TLR4 may mediate the initiation of inflammatory and immune defense responses; however, the importance of the LPS/TLR4 interaction in apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in pancreatic β cells remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the importance of TLR4 during LPS‑induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and dysfunction of insulin secretion in isolated islets of rats. LPS‑induced stimulation of TLR4 increased the production of reactive oxygen species and promoted apoptosis by upregulating the expression levels of caspase‑3, poly ADP ribose polymerase and altering the expression ratio of B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2)/Bcl‑2 associated X protein. Additionally, the insulin secretion of islets cells was reduced. Anti‑TLR4 antibody and a knockdown of TLR4 by TLR4‑short hairpin RNA were used to inhibit TLR4 activity, which may reverse LPS‑induced events. The present study determined that in islets exposed to LPS oxidative stress, dysfunction may be partly mediated via the TLR4 pathway. Inhibition of TLR4 may prevent dysfunction of rat islets due to oxidative stress. The present study revealed that targeting the LPS/TLR4 signaling pathway and antioxidant therapy may be a novel treatment for the severely septic patients with hyperglycemia stress.

  3. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key factor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies from our group identified differences in the expression profile of TLR4 and genes affected by the TLR4 signaling pathway among pigs that shed varying...

  4. Involvement of S100A8/A9-TLR4-NLRP3 Inflammasome Pathway in Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xuexian; Zheng, Xiaohe; Huang, Zena; Lin, Jiaqiong; Xie, Chuli; Lin, Yan

    2017-08-30

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) is a common cause of hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI). S100A8/A9-TLR4-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway triggers inflammation, apoptosis and tissue injury in several AKI models. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism of S100A8/A9-TLR4-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in CIKAI is not clear. We aimed to investigate the possible role of S100A8/A9-TLR4-NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathophysiology of CIAKI. We treated male rats and NRK-52E cells by iopromide to establish in vivo and in vitro models of CIAKI. We collected serum and urine samples to detect renal function. We obtained kidney tissue for histological analysis and detection of protein concentration. We used inhibitor of TLR4 and NLRP3-siRNA to further testify their role in CIAKI in NRK-52E cells. Iopromide caused elevation of SCr, BUN and NGAL level, decrease of endogenous creatinine clearance, morphological injury and tubular apoptosis, enhanced IL-1β and IL-18 expression, and increased expression of S100A8/A9, TLR4 and NLRP3 inflammsome. In NRK-52E cells, iopromide caused enhanced apoptotic rates and ROS generation, which could be ameliorated by inhibitor of TLR4 and NLRP3-siRNA. Moreover, inhibition of TLR4 dampened NLRP3 expression. S100A8/A9-TLR4-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway represented a key mechanism of CI-AKI, which provided a potential therapeutic target. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. A Common Property of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Kathleen S.; Karabacak, N. Murat; Johnson, Joshua L.; Wang, Qi; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Coales, Stephen J.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Agar, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    At least 119 mutations in the gene encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by an unidentified toxic gain of function. We compared the dynamic properties of 13 as-isolated, partially metallated, SOD1 variant enzymes using hydrogen-deuterium exchange. We identified a shared property of these familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-related SOD1 variants, namely structural and dynamic change affecting the electrostatic loop (loop VII) of SOD1. Furthermore, SOD1 variants that have severely compromised metal binding affinities demonstrated additional structural and dynamic changes to the zinc-binding loop (loop IV) of SOD1. Although the biological consequences of increased loop VII mobility are not fully understood, this common property is consistent with the hypotheses that SOD1 mutations exert toxicity via aggregation or aberrant association with other cellular constituents. PMID:19635794

  6. Functional Characterization of TLR4 +3725 G/C Polymorphism and Association with Protection against Overweight

    PubMed Central

    Penas-Steinhardt, Alberto; Barcos, Lucía Soledad; Belforte, Fiorella Sabrina; de Sereday, Martha; Vilariño, Jorge; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Tellechea, Mariana Lorena; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Poskus, Edgardo; Frechtel, Gustavo Daniel; Leskow, Federico Coluccio

    2012-01-01

    Subclinical low-grade systemic inflammation has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome (MS). Recent studies have highlighted the role of gut microbiota in these disorders. The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a key role in the innate immune response activation. We studied two polymorphisms (+3725G/C and 11350G/C) in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the TLR4 gene that may alter its expression and their association with metabolic disorders related to systemic inflammation. We cloned the 3′UTR into a luciferase reporter system and compared wild-type 3′UTR (WT) and +3725C variant (MUT) constructs luciferase activities. MUT construct reduced the reporter gene activity by 30% compared to WT (P = 0.0001). To evaluate the association between these polymorphisms with biochemical and clinical overweight related variables, we conducted a population cross-sectional study in 966 men of Argentine general population. Considering smoking as a confounding variable that causes systemic inflammation, we studied these possible effects in both, smokers and nonsmokers. The 11350G/C polymorphism was not detected in our sample whereas the CC genotype of +3725 polymorphism was associated with lean subjects (p = 0.011) and higher Adiponectin levels (p = 0.021). Subjects without any NCEP/ATP III MS component were associated with this genotype as well (p = 0.001). These results were strengthened in nonsmokers, in which CC genotype was associated with lean subjects (p = 0.003) and compared with G carriers showed significantly lower BMI (25.53 vs. 28.60 kg/m2; p = 0.023) and waist circumference (89.27 vs. 97.51 cm; p = 0.025). None of these associations were found in smokers. These results showed that +3725C variant has a functional effect down-regulating gene expression and it could be considered as a predictive factor against overweight, particularly in nonsmokers. Considering the role of TLR4 in inflammation, these

  7. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  8. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  9. Early interleukin 6 production by leukocytes during ischemic acute kidney injury is regulated by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianlin; Hartono, John R.; John, Reji; Bennett, Michael; Zhou, Xin Jin; Wang, Yanxia; Wu, Qingqing; Winterberg, Pamela D.; Nagami, Glenn T.; Lu, Christopher Y.

    2012-01-01

    Although leukocytes infiltrate the kidney during ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) and release interleukin 6 (IL6), their mechanism of activation is unknown. Here, we tested whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on leukocytes mediated this activation by interacting with high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) released by renal cells as a consequence of ischemic kidney injury. We constructed radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras using C3H/HeJ and C57BL/10ScNJ strains of TLR4 (−/−) mice and their respective TLR4 (+/+) wild-type counterparts and studied them at 4 h after an ischemic insult. Leukocytes adopted from TLR4 (+/+) mice infiltrated the kidneys of TLR4 (−/−) mice, and TLR4 (−/−) leukocytes infiltrated the kidneys of TLR4 (+/+) mice but caused little functional renal impairment in each case. Maximal ischemic AKI required both radiosensitive leukocytes and radioresistant renal parenchymal and endothelial cells from TLR4 (+/+) mice. Only TLR4 (−/−) leukocytes produced IL6 in vivo and in response to HMGB1 in vitro. Thus, following infiltration of the injured kidney, leukocytes produce IL6 when their TLR4 receptors interact with HMGB1 released by injured renal cells. This underscores the importance of TLR4 in the pathogenesis of ischemic AKI. PMID:21633411

  10. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  11. Effects of TLR4 gene silencing on the proliferation and apotosis of hepatocarcinoma HEPG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yating; Li, Tao; Xu, Yuanhong; Xu, Enjun; Zhou, Min; Wang, Baolong; Shen, Jilong

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key factors in the innate immune system and initiate an inflammatory response to foreign pathogens, such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. TLR4-mediated signaling has been implicated in tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis in numerous cancers. The present study aimed to investigate the biological effect of TLR4 on the proliferation and apoptosis of human liver cancer cells and the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cellular responses following TLR4 gene knockdown. Three TLR4 small interfering (si)RNA constructs, consisting of TLR4-siRNA-1, TLR4-siRNA-2 and TLR4-siRNA-3, were transiently transfected into HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. TLR4 knockdown was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The effect of the TLR4 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation was monitored by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and cell apoptosis was observed by flow cytometry. The expression of TLR4-associated proteins, consisting of myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), Toll-interleukin-1R-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, NF-κB inhibitor α (IκBα), phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), was detected by western blot analysis. TLR4-siRNA-1 had the strongest knockdown effect and inhibited TLR4 messenger RNA and protein expression. TLR4 knockdown with TLR4-siRNA-1 reduced cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. MyD88, TRIF, IRF3, IκBα, JNK and ERK were markedly suppressed in the cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA. However, nuclear expression of NF-κB and p-IκBα increased in HepG2 cells with TLR4 gene knockdown. The present study revealed that TLR4-mediated signaling plays a key role in the proliferation and apoptosis of cultured hepatocarcinoma cells. Therefore, RNA interference-directed targeting of TLR4 may raise

  12. Polymorphisms in the Tlr4 and Tlr5 Gene Are Significantly Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in German Shepherd Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kathrani, Aarti; House, Arthur; Catchpole, Brian; Murphy, Angela; German, Alex; Werling, Dirk; Allenspach, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to be the most common cause of vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs, and the German shepherd dog (GSD) is particularly susceptible. The exact aetiology of IBD is unknown, however associations have been identified between specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and human IBD. However, to date, no genetic studies have been undertaken in canine IBD. The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in canine TLR 2, 4 and 5 genes are associated with IBD in GSDs. Mutational analysis of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5 was performed in 10 unrelated GSDs with IBD. Four non-synonymous SNPs (T23C, G1039A, A1571T and G1807A) were identified in the TLR4 gene, and three non-synonymous SNPs (G22A, C100T and T1844C) were identified in the TLR5 gene. The non-synonymous SNPs identified in TLR4 and TLR5 were evaluated further in a case-control study using a SNaPSHOT multiplex reaction. Sequencing information from 55 unrelated GSDs with IBD were compared to a control group consisting of 61 unrelated GSDs. The G22A SNP in TLR5 was significantly associated with IBD in GSDs, whereas the remaining two SNPs were found to be significantly protective for IBD. Furthermore, the two SNPs in TLR4 (A1571T and G1807A) were in complete linkage disequilibrium, and were also significantly associated with IBD. The TLR5 risk haplotype (ACC) without the two associated TLR4 SNP alleles was significantly associated with IBD, however the presence of the two TLR4 SNP risk alleles without the TLR5 risk haplotype was not statistically associated with IBD. Our study suggests that the three TLR5 SNPs and two TLR4 SNPs; A1571T and G1807A could play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD in GSDs. Further studies are required to confirm the functional importance of these polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:21203467

  13. Robust TLR4-induced gene expression patterns are not an accurate indicator of human immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is widely accepted as an essential event for defence against infection. Many TLRs utilize a common signalling pathway that relies on activation of the kinase IRAK4 and the transcription factor NFκB for the rapid expression of immunity genes. Methods 21 K DNA microarray technology was used to evaluate LPS-induced (TLR4) gene responses in blood monocytes from a child with an IRAK4-deficiency. In vitro responsiveness to LPS was confirmed by real-time PCR and ELISA and compared to the clinical predisposition of the child and IRAK4-deficient mice to Gram negative infection. Results We demonstrated that the vast majority of LPS-responsive genes in IRAK4-deficient monocytes were greatly suppressed, an observation that is consistent with the described role for IRAK4 as an essential component of TLR4 signalling. The severely impaired response to LPS, however, is inconsistent with a remarkably low incidence of Gram negative infections observed in this child and other children with IRAK4-deficiency. This unpredicted clinical phenotype was validated by demonstrating that IRAK4-deficient mice had a similar resistance to infection with Gram negative S. typhimurium as wildtype mice. A number of immunity genes, such as chemokines, were expressed at normal levels in human IRAK4-deficient monocytes, indicating that particular IRAK4-independent elements within the repertoire of TLR4-induced responses are expressed. Conclusions Sufficient defence to Gram negative immunity does not require IRAK4 or a robust, 'classic' inflammatory and immune response. PMID:20105294

  14. Lipopolysaccharide promotes lipid accumulation in human adventitial fibroblasts via TLR4-NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic degenerative disease of the arteries and is thought to be one of the most common causes of death globally. In recent years, the functions of adventitial fibroblasts in the development of atherosclerosis and tissue repair have gained increased interests. LPS can increase the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis-associated cardiovascular disease. Although LPS increases neointimal via TLR4 activation has been reported, how LPS augments atherogenesis through acting on adventitial fibroblasts is still unknown. Here we explored lipid deposition within adventitial fibroblasts mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to imitate inflammatory conditions. Results In our study, LPS enhanced lipid deposition by the up-regulated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) as the silencing of ADRP abrogated lipid deposition in LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts. In addition, pre-treatment with anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antibody diminished the LPS-induced lipid deposition and ADRP expression. Moreover, LPS induced translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which could markedly up-regulate lipid deposition as pre-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly reduced lipid droplets. In addition, the lowering lipid accumulation was accompanied with the decreased ADRP expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced adventitial fibroblasts secreted more monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), compared with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that LPS promotes lipid accumulation via the up-regulation of ADRP expression through TLR4 activated downstream of NF-κB in adventitial fibroblasts. Increased levels of MCP-1 released from LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts and lipid accumulation may accelerate monocytes recruitment and lipid-laden macrophage foam cells formation. Here, our study provides a new explanation as to how bacterial infection contributes to

  15. Paneth-cell-disruption-induced necrotizing enterocolitis in mice requires live bacteria and occurs independently of TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    White, Jessica R.; Gong, Huiyu; Pope, Brock

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Both human surgical specimens and animal models suggest a potential involvement of Paneth cells in NEC pathogenesis. Paneth cells play critical roles in epithelial homeostasis, innate immunity and host-microbial interactions. Yet, the complex interplay between Paneth cell disruption, epithelial barrier dysfunction and microbial-driven inflammation remains unclear in the immature intestine. In this study, mucosal intestinal injury consistent with human NEC was induced in postnatal day 14-16 (P14-P16) mice by disrupting Paneth cells, followed by gavage with Klebsiella pneumonia. Mucosal injury was determined by histology, serum cytokine levels and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation was examined using protein expression, gene expression, and TLR4−/− mice. Finally, the role of bacteria was evaluated using heat-killed bacteria, conditioned media, Bacillus cereus and cecal slurries. We found that live bacteria were required to induce injury; however, TLR4 activation was not required. NEC induced by Paneth cell disruption results in altered localization of tight junction proteins and subsequent loss of barrier function. Prior research has shown a requirement for TLR4 activation to induce NEC-like damage. However, many infants develop NEC in the absence of Gram-negative rod bacteremia, raising the possibility that alternative pathways to intestinal injury exist. In this study, we show a previously unknown mechanism for the development of intestinal injury equivalent to that seen in human NEC and that is not dependent on TLR4 pathways. These data are congruent with the new hypothesis that NEC may be the consequence of several disease processes ending in a final common inflammatory pathway. PMID:28450472

  16. Inhibition of TLR4 attenuates vascular dysfunction and oxidative stress in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Sepulveda, Maria Alicia; Spitler, Kathryn; Pandey, Deepesh; Berkowitz, Dan E; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production plays a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a key component of innate immunity, is known to be activated during diabetes. Therefore, we hypothesize that hyperglycemia activates TLR4 signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) that triggers ROS production and causes vascular dysfunction. Rat mesenteric VSMCs exposed to high glucose (25 mmol/l) increased TLR4 expression and activated TLR4 signaling via upregulation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095 significantly attenuated elevated levels of ROS and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity in VSMCs exposed to high glucose. Mesenteric arteries from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with CLI-095 (2 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally for 2 weeks exhibited reduced ROS generation and attenuated noradrenaline-induced contraction. These results suggest that hyperglycemia-induced ROS generation and NF-κB activation in VSMCs are at least, in part, mediated by TLR4 signaling. Therefore, strategies to block TLR4 signaling pathways pose a promising avenue to alleviate diabetic-induced vascular complications. High glucose-induced TLR4 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. Inhibition of TLR4 attenuated high glucose-induced ROS production and NF-κB activity in VSMC. Suppression of TLR4 signaling attenuated mesenteric contraction in diabetic rat.

  17. TLR4 regulates insulin-resistant proteins to increase apoptosis in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Jiang, Youde; Curtiss, Elizabeth; Fukuchi, Ken-Ichiro; Steinle, Jena J

    2017-07-05

    Work in multiple organs has suggested that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may play a role in insulin resistance. Additional studies have shown a negative role for TLR4 on retinal health. We have previously reported that β-adrenergic receptors can regulate both TLR4 signal transduction, as well as insulin signaling in the retina and in retinal endothelial cells. Thus, we hypothesized that TLR4 would regulate retinal insulin signaling. We used endothelial cell-specific TLR4 knockout mice, as well as TLR4-overexpressing mice for these studies. Western blotting and ELISA analyses were done for investigations of insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) serine 307, and Akt phosphorylation, as well as cleaved caspase 3 levels in the mouse retina. We found that loss of TLR4 led to increased insulin receptor and Akt phosphorylation, as well as decreased IRS-1(Ser307) levels. In support of these results, TLR4 overexpression decreased insulin signaling and the cleavage of caspase 3. Therefore, these results suggest that TLR4 plays a key role in insulin signaling in the retina. Reduction of TLR4 levels may be protective to the retina.

  18. TLR4 promotes fibrosis but attenuates tubular damage in progressive renal injury.

    PubMed

    Pulskens, Wilco P; Rampanelli, Elena; Teske, Gwendoline J; Butter, Loes M; Claessen, Nike; Luirink, Ilse K; van der Poll, Tom; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2010-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can orchestrate an inflammatory response upon activation by pathogen-associated motifs and release of endogenous stress ligands during tissue injury. The kidney constitutively expresses most TLRs, including TLR4. The function of TLR4 during the inflammation, tubular atrophy, and fibrosis that accompany progressive renal injury is unknown. Here, we subjected wild-type (WT) and TLR4-deficient mice to unilateral ureteral obstruction and observed elevated levels of TLR4 mRNA in the kidney after obstruction. One day after unilateral ureteral obstruction, TLR4-deficient mice had fewer proliferating tubular epithelial cells and more tubular damage than WT mice; however, TLR4-deficient mice developed considerably less renal fibrosis despite decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity and without significant differences in myofibroblast accumulation. In vitro, TLR4-deficient primary tubular epithelial cells and myofibroblasts produced significantly less type I collagen mRNA after TGF-beta stimulation than WT cells. The reduced fibrosis in TLR4-deficient mice associated with an upregulation of Bambi, a negative regulator of TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, TLR4 attenuates tubular damage but promotes renal fibrosis by modulating the susceptibility of renal cells to TGF-beta. These data suggest that TLR4 signaling may be a therapeutic target for the prevention of renal fibrosis.

  19. Mechanisms of Toll-like Receptor 4 Endocytosis Reveal a Common Immune-Evasion Strategy Used by Pathogenic and Commensal Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yunhao; Zanoni, Ivan; Cullen, Thomas W; Goodman, Andrew L; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2015-11-17

    Microbe-induced receptor trafficking has emerged as an essential means to promote innate immune signal transduction. Upon detection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), CD14 induces an inflammatory endocytosis pathway that delivers Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to endosomes. Although several regulators of CD14-dependent TLR4 endocytosis have been identified, the cargo-selection mechanism during this process remains unknown. We reveal that, in contrast to classic cytosolic interactions that promoted the endocytosis of transmembrane receptors, TLR4 was selected as cargo for inflammatory endocytosis entirely through extracellular interactions. Mechanistically, the extracellular protein MD-2 bound to and dimerized TLR4 in order to promote this endocytic event. Our analysis of LPS variants from human pathogens and gut commensals revealed a common mechanism by which bacteria prevent inflammatory endocytosis. We suggest that evasion of CD14-dependent endocytosis is an attribute that transcends the concept of pathogenesis and might be a fundamental feature of bacteria that inhabit eukaryotic hosts.

  20. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma.

  1. Distinct microenvironmental cues stimulate divergent TLR4-mediated signaling pathways in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini, Anna M.; Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Lim, Jenny M. P.; Midwood, Kim S.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit a phenotypic plasticity that enables them to orchestrate specific immune responses to distinct threats. The microbial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C are released during bacterial infection and tissue injury, respectively, and both activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We found that these two TLR4 ligands stimulated distinct signaling pathways in macrophages, resulting in cells with divergent phenotypes. Although macrophages activated by LPS or tenascin-C displayed some common features, including activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine synthesis, each ligand stimulated the production of different subsets of cytokines and generated different phosphoproteomic signatures. Moreover, tenascin-C promoted the generation of macrophages that exhibited increased synthesis and phosphorylation of extracellular matrix components, whereas LPS stimulated the production of macrophages that exhibited an enhanced capacity to degrade the matrix. These data reveal how the activation of one pattern recognition receptor by different microenvironmental cues generates macrophage with distinct phenotypes. PMID:27577261

  2. NOD2/CARD15, TLR4 and CD14 mutations in Scottish and Irish Crohn's disease patients: evidence for genetic heterogeneity within Europe?

    PubMed

    Arnott, I D R; Nimmo, E R; Drummond, H E; Fennell, J; Smith, B R K; MacKinlay, E; Morecroft, J; Anderson, N; Kelleher, D; O'Sullivan, M; McManus, R; Satsangi, J

    2004-08-01

    NOD2/caspase recruitment domain (CARD)15 variants are identified in up to 50% of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Functional variants of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and CD14 genes may also be relevant to disease pathophysiology. We aimed to assess the contribution of NOD2/CARD15, TLR4 and CD14 variants in Scottish and Irish CD patients. In all, 612 patients with well-characterised inflammatory bowel disease (252 Scottish CD, 247 Scottish UC, 113 Irish CD) and 304 controls were genotyped for variants of NOD2/CARD15 (1007fsinsC, G908R, R702W, P268S), TLR4 (A299G) and CD14 (T-159C). Genotype-phenotype analyses were performed. Variant 1007fsinsC (P=0.003) and G908R (P=0.008) but not R702W (P=0.269) alleles were more prevalent in Scottish CD (4.7, 1.8 and 7.1%, respectively) than Scottish control (2.3, 0.3 and 5.4%). CD allelic frequencies were lower than the series from Europe (P<0.00001) and North America (P<0.00001) but not Scandinavia (P<0.7). Associations were identified with age at diagnosis (P=0.002), ileal disease (P<0.02), penetrating disease (P=0.04) and inflammatory joint disease (P<0.02). TLR4 and CD14 variants did not differ between CD and controls. In conclusion, we present compelling evidence for genetic heterogeneity within Europe. These NOD2/CARD15 variants have a minor contribution in Scottish and Irish CD patients, consistent with an emerging pattern from Northern Europe.

  3. TLR4 Inactivation in Myeloid Cells Accelerates Bone Healing of a Calvarial Defect Model in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gilbert, James R; Taylor, Gwen M; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Hackam, David J; Losee, Joseph E; Billiar, Timothy R; Cooper, Gregory M

    2017-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated in inflammation-induced bone destruction in various chronic bone diseases; however, its direct influence on bone healing is not well understood. The authors' previous study showed accelerated bone healing with higher osteoclastogenesis gene expression in toll-like receptor 4 knockout mice (TLR4). This study aimed to further elucidate the underlying cellular mechanisms during fracture healing by generating a myeloid cell-specific toll-like receptor 4 knockout model (Lyz-TLR4 mice). Calvarial defects, 1.8 mm in diameter, were created in wild-type, TLR4, and Lyz-TLR4 mice. Bone healing was investigated using micro-computed tomography and histologic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Primary bone marrow-derived cells were also isolated from wild-type, TLR4, and Lyz-TLR4 mice to measure their osteoclast differentiation and resorption properties. A similar faster bone healing response, with active intramembranous bone formation, intense osteopontin staining, and more osteoblast infiltration, was observed in TLR4 and Lyz-TLR4 mice. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining showed more osteoclast infiltration in Lyz-TLR4 mice than in wild-type mice at day 7. Primary bone marrow-derived cells isolated from TLR4 and Lyz-TLR4 mice presented enhanced osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity compared with those from wild-type mice. Comparable M0, M1, and M2 macrophage infiltration was found among all groups at days 1, 4, and 7. This study revealed that inactivation of toll-like receptor 4 in myeloid cells enhanced osteoclastogenesis and accelerated healing response during skull repair. Together with the role of toll-like receptor 4 in inflammation-mediated bone destruction, it suggests that toll-like receptor 4 might regulate inflammation-induced osteoclastogenesis under different clinical settings.

  4. TLR4 and NFκB signaling is critical for taxol resistance in ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nian-Kang; Huang, Shang-Lang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2017-08-03

    We report here that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and ABCB1 are upregulated in SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells that acquired resistance to the anticancer drug taxol. Silencing of TLR4 using short-hairpin RNA sensitized taxol-resistant SKOV3 cells to taxol (4.6 fold), whereas ectopic expression of TLR4 in parental, taxol-sensitive SKOV3 cells or TLR4-null HEK293 cells induced taxol resistance (∼2 fold). A sub-lethal dose of taxol induced ABCB1 protein expression in taxol-resistant SKOV3 cells. Inactivation of TLR4 using chemical inhibitors (CLI-095 and AO-I) downregulated ABCB1 protein expression and enhanced the cytotoxic activity of taxol in taxol-resistant SKOV3 cells. While the sensitization effect of TLR4 inactivation was also detected in TOV21G ovarian cancer cells, which express moderate level of TLR4, ectopic expression of ABCB1 prevented the sensitization effect in these cells. Notably, the NFκB pathway was significantly activated by taxol, and inhibition of this pathway suppressed TLR4-regulated ABCB1 expression. Furthermore, taxol-induced NFκB signaling was reduced following TLR4 silencing in taxol-resistant SKOV3 cells. Consistent with these results, ectopic expression of TLR4 in taxol-sensitive SKOV3 cells enhanced ABCB1 expression and conferred resistance to taxol. The protective effect of exogenous TLR4 expression against taxol was reduced by treatment with NFκB inhibitor in these cells. These results demonstrate that taxol activates the TLR4-NFκB pathway which in turn induces ABCB1 gene expression. This cellular pathway thus represents a novel target to limit resistance to taxol in ovarian cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. TLR4 Inactivation in Myeloid Cells Accelerates Bone Healing of a Calvarial Defect Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gilbert, James R.; Taylor, Gwen M.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Hackam, David J.; Losee, Joseph E.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated in inflammation-induced bone destruction in various chronic bone diseases; however, its direct influence on bone healing is not well understood. The authors’ previous study showed accelerated bone healing with higher osteoclastogenesis gene expression in toll-like receptor 4 knockout mice (TLR4-/-). This study aimed to further elucidate the underlying cellular mechanisms during fracture healing by generating a myeloid cell-specific toll-like receptor 4 knockout model (Lyz-TLR4-/- mice). Methods: Calvarial defects, 1.8 mm in diameter, were created in wild-type, TLR4-/-, and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice. Bone healing was investigated using micro–computed tomography and histologic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Primary bone marrow–derived cells were also isolated from wild-type, TLR4-/-, and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice to measure their osteoclast differentiation and resorption properties. Results: A similar faster bone healing response, with active intramembranous bone formation, intense osteopontin staining, and more osteoblast infiltration, was observed in TLR4-/- and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining showed more osteoclast infiltration in Lyz-TLR4-/- mice than in wild-type mice at day 7. Primary bone marrow–derived cells isolated from TLR4-/- and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice presented enhanced osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity compared with those from wild-type mice. Comparable M0, M1, and M2 macrophage infiltration was found among all groups at days 1, 4, and 7. Conclusions: This study revealed that inactivation of toll-like receptor 4 in myeloid cells enhanced osteoclastogenesis and accelerated healing response during skull repair. Together with the role of toll-like receptor 4 in inflammation-mediated bone destruction, it suggests that toll-like receptor 4 might regulate inflammation-induced osteoclastogenesis under different clinical settings. PMID:28746278

  6. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Zhang, Yi; Haslip, Maria; Jin, Lei; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Xuchen; Lee, Patty J

    2016-03-01

    TLR4 deficiency causes hypersusceptibility to oxidant-induced injury. We investigated the role of TLR4 in lung protection, using used bone marrow chimeras; cell-specific transgenic modeling; and lentiviral delivery in vivo to knock down or express TLR4 in various lung compartments; and lung-specific VEGF transgenic mice to investigate the effect of TLR4 on VEGF-mediated protection. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in an enclosed chamber and assessed for survival and lung injury. Primary endothelial cells were stimulated with recombinant VEGF and exposed to hyperoxia or hydrogen peroxide. Endothelium-specific expression of human TLR4 (as opposed to its expression in epithelium or immune cells) increased the survival of TLR4-deficent mice in hyperoxia by 24 h and decreased LDH release and lung cell apoptosis after 72 h of exposure by 30%. TLR4 expression was necessary and sufficient for the protective effect of VEGF in the lungs and in primary endothelial cells in culture. TLR4 knockdown inhibited VEGF signaling through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), Akt, and ERK pathways in lungs and primary endothelial cells and decreased the availability of VEGFR2 at the cell surface. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which TLR4, an innate pattern receptor, interacts with an endothelial survival pathway.

  7. Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) modulation by synthetic and natural compounds: an update

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Francesco; Calabrese, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), together with MD-2, binds bacterial endotoxins (E) with high affinity, triggering formation of the activated homodimer (E-MD-2-TLR4)2. Activated TLR4 induces intracellular signaling leading to activation of transcription factors that result in cytokine and chemokine production and initiation of inflammatory and immune responses. TLR4 also responds to endogenous ligands called danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Increased sensitivity to infection and a variety of immune pathologies have been associated with either too little or too much TLR4 activation. We review here the molecular mechanisms of TLR4 activation (agonism) or inhibition (antagonism) by small organic molecules of both natural and synthetic origin. The role of co-receptors MD-2 and CD14 in the TLR4 modulation process is also discussed. Recent achievements in the field of chemical TLR4 modulation are reviewed, with special focus on non-classical TLR4 ligands with a chemical structure different from lipid A. PMID:24188011

  8. TLR4 mutant mice are protected from renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana C P; Tsuji, Takayuki; Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Hu, Xuzhen; Eggerman, Thomas; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with persistent low-grade inflammation and immunosuppression. In this study we tested the role of Toll-like receptor 4, the main receptor for endotoxin (LPS), in a mouse model of renal fibrosis and in a model of progressive CKD that better resembles the human disease. C3HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice have a missense point mutation in the TLR4 gene, rendering the receptor nonfunctional. In a model of renal fibrosis after folic acid injection, TLR4 mutant mice developed less interstititial fibrosis in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy with continuous low-dose angiotensin II infusion, C3HeOuJ (TLR4 WT) mice developed progressive CKD with albuminuria, increased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis, whereas TLR4 mutant mice were significantly protected from CKD progression. TLR4 WT mice also developed low-grade systemic inflammation, splenocyte apoptosis and increased expression of the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 in the spleen, which were not observed in TLR4 mutant mice. In vitro, endotoxin (LPS) directly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome expression in renal epithelial cells via TLR4. In summary, TLR4 contributes to renal fibrosis and CKD progression, at least in part, via inflammasome activation in renal epithelial cells, and may also participate in the dysregulated immune response that is associated with CKD. PMID:26416975

  9. Common variants at 30 loci contribute to polygenic dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Kathiresan, Sekar; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina; Demissie, Serkalem; Musunuru, Kiran; Schadt, Eric; Lee, Kaplan; Bennett, Derrick; Li, Yun; Tanaka, Toshiko; Voight, Benjamin F; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Crawford, Gabriel; Surti, Aarti; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Parish, Sarah; Clarke, Robert; Zelenika, Diana; Kubalanza, Kari A; Morken, Mario A; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Galan, Pilar; Swift, Amy J; Kuusisto, Johanna; Bergman, Richard N; Sundvall, Jouko; Laakso, Markku; Ferrucci, Luigi; Scheet, Paul; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Yang, Qiong; Lunetta, Kathryn; Dupuis, Josee; deBakker, Paul I; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Hercberg, Serge; Meneton, Pierre; Lakatta, Edward G; Scuteri, Angelo; Schlessinger, David; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; Altshuler, David; Collins, Rory; Lathrop, G Mark; Melander, Olle; Salomaa, Veikko; Peltonen, Leena; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ordovas, Jose M; Boehnke, Michael; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Mohlke, Karen L; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2009-01-01

    Blood low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. To dissect the polygenic basis of these traits, we conducted genome-wide association screens in 19,840 individuals and replication in up to 20,623 individuals. We identified 30 distinct loci associated with lipoprotein concentrations (each with P < 5 × 10-8), including 11 loci that reached genome-wide significance for the first time. The 11 newly defined loci include common variants associated with LDL cholesterol near ABCG8, MAFB, HNF1A and TIMD4; with HDL cholesterol near ANGPTL4, FADS1-FADS2-FADS3, HNF4A, LCAT, PLTP and TTC39B; and with triglycerides near AMAC1L2, FADS1-FADS2-FADS3 and PLTP. The proportion of individuals exceeding clinical cut points for high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides varied according to an allelic dosage score (P < 10-15 for each trend). These results suggest that the cumulative effect of multiple common variants contributes to polygenic dyslipidemia. PMID:19060906

  10. Apigenin protects blood-brain barrier and ameliorates early brain injury by inhibiting TLR4-mediated inflammatory pathway in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Su, Jingyuan; Guo, Bingyu; Wang, Kaiwen; Li, Xiaoming; Liang, Guobiao

    2015-09-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Inflammation has been considered as the major contributor to brain damage after SAH. SAH induces a systemic increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) facilitates the influx of inflammatory cells. It has been reported that the activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a vital role in the central nervous system diseases. Apigenin, a common plant flavonoid, possesses anti-inflammation effect. In this study, we focused on the effects of apigenin on EBI following SAH and its anti-inflammation mechanism. Our results showed that apigenin (20mg/kg) administration significantly attenuated EBI (including brain edema, BBB disruption, neurological deficient, severity of SAH, and cell apoptosis) after SAH in rats by suppressing the expression of TLR4, NF-κB and their downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cortex and by up-regulating the expression of tight junction proteins of BBB. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that TLR4 was activated following SAH in neurons, microglia cells, and endothelial cells but not in astrocytes. Apigenin could suppress the activation of TLR4 induced by SAH and inhibit apoptosis of cells in the cortex. These results suggested that apigenin could attenuate EBI after SAH in rats by suppressing TLR4-mediated inflammation and protecting against BBB disruption.

  11. Fusobacterium nucleatum induces fetal death in mice via stimulation of TLR4-mediated placental inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongqi; Redline, Raymond W; Han, Yiping W

    2007-08-15

    Intrauterine infection plays a pivotal role in preterm birth (PTB) and is characterized by inflammation. Currently, there is no effective therapy available to treat or prevent bacterial-induced PTB. Using Fusobacterium nucleatum, a Gram-negative anaerobe frequently associated with PTB, as a model organism, the mechanism of intrauterine infection was investigated. Previously, it was shown that F. nucleatum induced preterm and term stillbirth in mice. Fusobacterial-induced placental infection was characterized by localized bacterial colonization, inflammation, and necrosis. In this study, F. nucleatum was shown to activate both TLR2 and TLR4 in vitro. In vivo, the fetal death rate was significantly reduced in TLR4-deficient mice (C57BL/6 TLR4(-/-) and C3H/HeJ (TLR4(d/d))), but not in TLR2-deficient mice (C57BL/6 TLR2(-/-)), following F. nucleatum infection. The reduced fetal death in TLR4-deficient mice was accompanied by decreased placental necroinflammatory responses in both C57BL/6 TLR4(-/-) and C3H/HeJ. Decreased bacterial colonization in the placenta was observed in C3H/HeJ, but not in C57BL/6 TLR4(-/-). These results suggest that inflammation, rather than the bacteria per se, was the likely cause of fetal loss. TLR2 did not appear to be critically involved, as no difference in bacterial colonization, inflammation, or necrosis was observed between C57BL/6 and C57BL/6 TLR2(-/-) mice. A synthetic TLR4 antagonist, TLR4A, significantly reduced fusobacterial-induced fetal death and decidual necrosis without affecting the bacterial colonization in the placentas. TLR4A had no bactericidal activity nor did it affect the birth outcome in sham-infected mice. TLR4A could have promise as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment or prevention of bacterial-induced preterm birth.

  12. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  13. TLR4 Activates the β-catenin Pathway to Cause Intestinal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Santaolalla, Rebeca; Sussman, Daniel A.; Ruiz, Jose R.; Davies, Julie M.; Pastorini, Cristhine; España, Cecilia L.; Sotolongo, John; Burlingame, Oname; Bejarano, Pablo A.; Philip, Sakhi; Ahmed, Mansoor M.; Ko, Jeffrey; Dirisina, Ramanarao; Barrett, Terrence A.; Shang, Limin; Lira, Sergio A.; Fukata, Masayuki; Abreu, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    Colonic bacteria have been implicated in the development of colon cancer. We have previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is over-expressed in humans with colitis-associated cancer. Genetic epidemiologic data support a role for TLR4 in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) as well, with over-expression favoring more aggressive disease. The goal of our study was to determine whether TLR4 played a role as a tumor promoter in sporadic colon cancer. Using immunofluorescence directed to TLR4, we found that a third of sporadic human colorectal cancers over-express this marker. To mechanistically investigate this observation, we used a mouse model that over-expresses TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium (villin-TLR4 mice). We found that these transgenic mice had increased epithelial proliferation as measured by BrdU labeling, longer colonic crypts and an expansion of Lgr5+ crypt cells at baseline. In addition, villin-TLR4 mice developed spontaneous duodenal dysplasia with age, a feature that is not seen in any wild-type (WT) mice. To model human sporadic CRC, we administered the genotoxic agent azoxymethane (AOM) to villin-TLR4 and WT mice. We found that villin-TLR4 mice showed an increased number of colonic tumors compared to WT mice as well as increased β-catenin activation in non-dysplastic areas. Biochemical studies in colonic epithelial cell lines revealed that TLR4 activates β-catenin in a PI3K-dependent manner, increasing phosphorylation of β-cateninSer552, a phenomenon associated with activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. Our results suggest that TLR4 can trigger a neoplastic program through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Our studies highlight a previously unexplored link between innate immune signaling and activation of oncogenic pathways, which may be targeted to prevent or treat CRC. PMID:23691015

  14. TPN-associated intestinal epithelial cell atrophy is modulated by TLR4/EGF signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer J.; Feng, Yongjia; Demehri, Farokh R.; Dempsey, Peter J.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a close interaction between epidermal growth factor (EGF) and TLR signaling in the modulation of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation; however, how these signaling pathways adjust IEC proliferation is poorly understood. We utilized a model of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), or enteral nutrient deprivation, to study this interaction as TPN results in mucosal atrophy due to decreased IEC proliferation and increased apoptosis. We identified the novel finding of decreased mucosal atrophy in TLR4 knockout (TLR4KO) mice receiving TPN. We hypothesized that EGF signaling is preserved in TLR4KO-TPN mice and prevents mucosal atrophy. C57Bl/6 and strain-matched TLR4KO mice were provided either enteral feeding or TPN. IEC proliferation and apoptosis were measured. Cytokine and growth factor abundances were detected in both groups. To examine interdependence of these pathways, ErbB1 pharmacologic blockade was used. The marked decline in IEC proliferation with TPN was nearly prevented in TLR4KO mice, and intestinal length was partially preserved. EGF was significantly increased, and TNF-α decreased in TLR4KO-TPN versus wild-type (WT)-TPN mice. Apoptotic positive crypt cells were 15-fold higher in WT-TPN versus TLR4KO-TPN mice. Bcl-2 was significantly increased in TLR4KO-TPN mice, while Bax decreased 10-fold. ErbB1 blockade prevented this otherwise protective effect in TLR4KO-sTPN mice. TLR4 blockade significantly prevented TPN-associated atrophy by preserving proliferation and preventing apoptosis. This is driven by a reduction in TNF-α abundance and increased EGF. Potential manipulation of this regulatory pathway may have significant clinical potential to prevent TPN-associated atrophy.—Freeman, J. J., Feng, Y., Demehri, F. R., Dempsey, P. J., Teitelbaum, D. H. TPN-associated intestinal epithelial cell atrophy is modulated by TLR4/EGF signaling pathways. PMID:25782989

  15. TLR4 knockout attenuated high fat diet-induced cardiac dysfunction via NF-κB/JNK-dependent activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Zhang, Yingmei

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is commonly associated with a low grade systemic inflammation, which may contribute to the onset and development of myocardial remodeling and contractile dysfunction. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in innate immunity and inflammation although its role in high fat diet-induced obesity cardiac dysfunction remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the effect of TLR4 ablation on high fat diet intake-induced cardiac anomalies, if any, and underlying mechanism(s) involved. Wild-type (WT) and TLR4 knockout mice were fed normal or high fat (60% calorie from fat) diet for 12weeks prior to assessment of mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+) properties. The inflammatory signaling proteins (TLR4, NF-κB, and JNK) and autophagic markers (Atg5, Atg12, LC3B and p62) were evaluated. Our results revealed that high fat diet intake promoted obesity, marked decrease in fractional shortening, and cardiomyocyte contractile capacity with dampened intracellular Ca(2+) release and clearance, elevated ROS generation and oxidative stress as measured by aconitase activity, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by TLR4 knockout. In addition, high fat intake downregulated levels of Atg5, Atg12 and LC3B, while increasing p62 accumulation. TLR4 knockout itself did not affect Atg5, Atg12, LC3B and p62 levels while it reconciled high fat diet intake-induced changes in autophagy. In addition, TLR4 knockout alleviated high fat diet-induced phosphorylation of IKKβ, JNK and mTOR. In vitro study revealed that palmitic acid suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was inhibited the TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095, the JNK inhibitor AS601245 or the NF-κB inhibitor Celastrol. Taken together, these data showed that TLR4 knockout ameliorated high fat diet-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies through inhibition of inflammation and ROS, possibly through a NF-κB/JNK-dependent activation of autophagy. This article is

  16. Common DNA variants predict tall stature in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Hendriks, A Emile J; Ralf, Arwin; Boot, Annemieke M; Benyi, Emelie; Sävendahl, Lars; Oostra, Ben A; van Duijn, Cornelia; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Drop, Stenvert L S; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Genomic prediction of the extreme forms of adult body height or stature is of practical relevance in several areas such as pediatric endocrinology and forensic investigations. Here, we examine 770 extremely tall cases and 9,591 normal height controls in a population-based Dutch European sample to evaluate the capability of known height-associated DNA variants in predicting tall stature. Among the 180 normal height-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported by the Genetic Investigation of ANthropocentric Traits (GIANT) genome-wide association study on normal stature, in our data 166 (92.2 %) showed directionally consistent effects and 75 (41.7 %) showed nominally significant association with tall stature, indicating that the 180 GIANT SNPs are informative for tall stature in our Dutch sample. A prediction analysis based on the weighted allele sums method demonstrated a substantially improved potential for predicting tall stature (AUC = 0.75; 95 % CI 0.72-0.79) compared to a previous attempt using 54 height-associated SNPs (AUC = 0.65). The achieved accuracy is approaching practical relevance such as in pediatrics and forensics. Furthermore, a reanalysis of all SNPs at the 180 GIANT loci in our data identified novel secondary association signals for extreme tall stature at TGFB2 (P = 1.8 × 10(-13)) and PCSK5 (P = 7.8 × 10(-11)) suggesting the existence of allelic heterogeneity and underlining the importance of fine analysis of already discovered loci. Extrapolating from our results suggests that the genomic prediction of at least the extreme forms of common complex traits in humans including common diseases are likely to be informative if large numbers of trait-associated common DNA variants are available.

  17. TLR-4 and VEGF Polymorphisms in Chronic Periaortitis

    PubMed Central

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Boiardi, Luigi; Vaglio, Augusto; Nicoli, Davide; Farnetti, Enrico; Palmisano, Alessandra; Pipitone, Nicolò; Martorana, Davide; Moroni, Gabriella; Longhi, Selena; Bonatti, Francesco; Buzio, Carlo; Salvarani, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic periaortitis (CP) is a rare disease that is characterised by fibro-inflammatory tissue surrounding the abdominal aorta and has both non-aneurysmal (idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis [IRF]) and aneurysmal forms (inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm [IAAA]). We investigated whether toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms were associated with susceptibility to, and the clinical features of CP. Methods One hundred and two CP patients and 200 healthy controls were molecularly genotyped for TLR-4 gene polymorphism (+896 A/G) (rs4986790), VEGF mutations +936 C/T (rs3025039) and −634 C/G (rs2010963), and an 18 base pair (bp) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism at −2549 of the VEGF promoter region. The patients were grouped on the basis of the type of CP (IRF or IAAA), and the presence or absence of established atherosclerotic disease (ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Results There were no significant differences in the distribution of the studied polymorphisms between the patients and controls. However, carriage of the +936 T allele was significantly more frequent in the patients with IRF than in those with IAAA (26.5% vs 5.3%; p = 0.046; OR 6.49 [95% CI 0.82–51.54]). There were significantly more carriers of the I allele among the patients with ureteral obstruction (83.8% vs 58.8%; p = 0.006; OR 3.63 [95% CI 1.42–9.28]) and those who received conservative treatment (48.5% vs 23.5%; p = 0.015; OR 3.06 [95% CI 1.22–7.721]) than among those without, and II homozygosity was significantly more frequent in the patients with deep vein thrombosis than in those without (30.4% vs 11.7%, p = 0.031; OR 3.31 [95% CI 1.07–10.21]). Conclusion The VEGF +936 C/T polymorphism may be associated with an increased risk of developing the non-aneurysmal IRF form of CP. Carriers of the I allele and II homozygosity are respectively at increased

  18. Genetics of allergy and allergic sensitization: common variants, rare mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Sparks, Rachel; Waage, Johannes; Milner, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the specific genetic lesions in allergy has improved in recent years due to identification of common risk variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and studies of rare, monogenic diseases. Large-scale GWAS have identified novel susceptibility loci and provided information about shared genetics between allergy, related phenotypes and autoimmunity. Studies of monogenic diseases have elucidated critical cellular pathways and protein functions responsible for allergy. These complementary approaches imply genetic mechanisms involved in Th2 immunity, T-cell differentiation, TGFβ signaling, regulatory T-cell function and skin/mucosal function as well as yet unknown mechanisms associated with newly identified genes. Future studies, in combination with data on gene expression and epigenetics, are expected to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of allergy. PMID:26386198

  19. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W; Baker, Annette L; Shulman, Stanford T; Rowley, Anne H; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-07-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5' untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 x 10(-8) in the Japanese and P = 3.7 x 10(-3) in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD.

  20. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C.; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette L.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Rowley, Anne H.; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5′ untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 × 10−8 in the Japanese and P = 3.7 × 10−3 in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD. PMID:20423928

  1. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Premetastatic milieu explained by TLR4 agonist-mediated homeostatic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maru, Yoshiro

    2010-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a sensor for danger signals, is expressed not only in immune cells, but also in resident epithelial cells, and appears to participate in tissue homeostasis. To explain the premetastatic microenvironment created by the newly discovered endogenous TLR4 ligands, I propose a hypothesis of homeostatic inflammation that includes the classical danger hypothesis.

  3. Evidence for ProTα-TLR4/MD-2 binding: molecular dynamics and gravimetric assay studies.

    PubMed

    Omotuyi, Olaposi; Matsunaga, Hayato; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    During preconditioning, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) selectively activates TLR4/MD-2/Toll/IL-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF) pathway instead of pro-inflammatory myeloid differentiation protein-88 (MyD88)/MyD88-adaptor-like protein (MAL) pathway. Extracellular prothymosin alpha (ProTα) is also known to selectively activate the TLR4/MD2/TRIF-IRF3 pathway in certain diseased conditions. In the current study, biophysical evidence for ProTα/TLR4/MD-2 complex formation and its interaction dynamics have been studied. Gravimetric assay was used to investigate ProTα/TLR4/MD-2 complex formation while molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study its interaction dynamics. Through electrostatic interaction, full-length ProTα (F-ProTα) C-terminal peptide (aa 91 - 111) superficially interacts with similar TLR4/MD-2 (KD = 273.36 nm vs 16.07 μg/ml [LPS]) conformation with LPS at an overlapping three-dimensional space while F-ProTα is hinged to the TLR4 scaffold by one-amino acid shift-Mosoian domain (aa-51 - 90). Comparatively, F-ProTα better stabilizes MD-2 metastable states transition and mediates higher TLR4/MD-2 interaction than LPS. ProTα via its C-terminal peptide (aa 91 - 111) exhibits in vitro biophysical contact with TLR4/MD-2 complex conformation recognized by LPS at overlapping LPS-binding positions.

  4. TLR4 regulates pulmonary vascular homeostasis and remodeling via redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Hui; Sun, Yong; Jhala, Nirag; Bradley, Wayne E.; Dell’Italia, Louis J.; Michalek, Sue; Wu, Hui; Steele, Chad; Benza, Raymond L; Chen, Yabing

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to morbidity and mortality of patients with lung and heart diseases. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced PAH and increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness in wild-type mice. Mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4−/−) spontaneously developed PAH, which was not further enhanced by hypoxia. Echocardiography determined right ventricular hypertrophy and decreased pulmonary arterial acceleration time were associated with the development of PAH in TLR4−/− mice. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), hypoxia decreased TLR4 expression and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox1/Nox4. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase decreased hypoxia-induced proliferation of wild-type PASMC. PASMC derived from TLR4−/− mice exhibited increased ROS and Nox4/Nox1 expression. Our studies demonstrate an important role of TLR4 in maintaining normal pulmonary vasculature and in hypoxia-induced PAH. Inhibition of TLR4, by genetic ablation or hypoxia, increases the expression of Nox1/Nox4 and induces PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. These results support a novel function of TLR4 in regulating the development of PAH and reveal a new regulatory axis contributing to TLR4 deficiency-induced vascular hypertrophy and remodeling. PMID:26709781

  5. TLR4 regulates pulmonary vascular homeostasis and remodeling via redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Hui; Sun, Yong; Jhala, Nirag; Bradley, Wayne E; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Michalek, Sue; Wu, Hui; Steele, Chad; Benza, Raymond L; Chen, Yabing

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to morbidity and mortality of patients with lung and heart diseases. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced PAH and increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness in wild-type mice. Mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-/-) spontaneously developed PAH, which was not further enhanced by hypoxia. Echocardiography determined right ventricular hypertrophy and decreased pulmonary arterial acceleration time were associated with the development of PAH in TLR4(-/-) mice. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), hypoxia decreased TLR4 expression and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox1/Nox4. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase decreased hypoxia-induced proliferation of wild-type PASMC. PASMC derived from TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited increased ROS and Nox4/Nox1 expression. Our studies demonstrate an important role of TLR4 in maintaining normal pulmonary vasculature and in hypoxia-induced PAH. Inhibition of TLR4, by genetic ablation or hypoxia, increases the expression of Nox1/Nox4 and induces PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. These results support a novel function of TLR4 in regulating the development of PAH and reveal a new regulatory axis contributing to TLR4 deficiency-induced vascular hypertrophy and remodeling.

  6. Siglec-E Negatively Regulates the Activation of TLR4 by Controlling Its Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yin; Ren, Dongren; Chen, Guo-Yun

    2016-10-15

    TLR4 signaling is critical for providing effective immune protection, but it must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation-induced pathology. Previously, we reported extensive and direct interactions between TLR and Siglec families of pattern recognition receptors. In this study, we examined the biological significance of this interaction during infection. We show that Siglec-E is required for Escherichia coli-induced endocytosis of TLR4. Siglec-E-deficient dendritic cells infected with E. coli fail to internalize TLR4. This leads to sustained TLR4 on the cell surface and activation of NF-κB and MAPK p38, resulting in high levels of TNF-α and IL-6 compared with wild-type dendritic cells. In contrast to the signaling events occurring at the plasma membrane, as a result of the inability to internalize TLR4, Siglec-E-deficient dendritic cells were also defective for TRIF-mediated IFN-β production in response to E. coli infection. Furthermore, we found that accumulation of ubiquitinated TLR4 and binding of E3 ubiquitin ligase Triad3A to TLR4 was increased significantly in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from wild-type mice, but not from Siglec-E-deficient mice, after E. coli infection. This represents a newly discovered mechanism that regulates the signaling of TLR4 during E. coli infection.

  7. Differential role for p120-catenin in regulation of TLR4 signaling in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Sun, Dong; Yan, Zhibo; Reynolds, Albert B.; Christman, John W.; Minshall, Richard D.; Malik, Asrar B.; Zhang, Yang; Hu, Guochang

    2014-01-01

    Activation of TLR signaling through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns is essential for the innate immune response against bacterial and viral infections. We have shown that p120-catenin suppresses TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling in LPS-challenged endothelial cells. Here we report that p120-catenin differentially regulates LPS/TLR4 signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. We observed that p120-catenin inhibited MyD88-dependent NF-κB activation and release of TNF-α and IL-6, but enhanced TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dependent IRF3 activation and release of IFN-β upon LPS exposure. p120-catenin silencing diminished LPS-induced TLR4 internalization, whereas genetic and pharmacological inhibition of RhoA GTPase rescued the decrease in endocytosis of TLR4 and TLR4-MyD88 signaling and reversed the increase in TLR4-TRIF signaling induced by p120-catenin depletion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that altered p120-catenin expression in macrophages regulates the inflammatory phenotype of LPS-induced acute lung injury. These results indicate that p120-catenin functions as a differential regulator of TLR4 signaling pathways by facilitating TLR4 endocytic trafficking in macrophages and support a novel role for p120-catenin in influencing the macrophages in the lung inflammatory response to endotoxin. PMID:25015829

  8. Inhibitory Effect of TLR4 Gene Silencing on Intimal Hyperplasia of Vein Grafting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhicheng; Xu, Rihao; Zheng, Xiaomei; Wang, Tiance; Li, Dan; Wang, Yong; Liu, Kexiang

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to explore the regulating effect of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on intimal hyperplasia in rat vein grafts. Rat models of external jugular vein carotid artery bypass grafting were established. Afterward, TLR4 small interfering RNA (siRNA) recombinant plasmids were constructed, which were transfected into rat vein graft bypass to study the effect of TLR4 silencing on intimal hyperplasia and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were used to detect the expression levels of TLR4 and inflammatory factors in TLR4 siRNA-transfected vein graft bypass. The intimal thickness was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Compared with the scramble siRNA group, the intimal thickness of vein grafting was decreased significantly, while the inflammatory factors including interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α in grafted vein were dramatically downregulated in the TLR4 siRNA group. These results showed that local silencing of TLR4 in the vein grafts could inhibit intimal hyperplasia by downregulating the expression of inflammatory factors in the vein grafts, suggesting that TLR4 can be used as a new target for therapy of vascular intimal hyperplasia. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Evidence for a Developmental Role for TLR4 in Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Eitan; Barak, Boaz; Saada-Madar, Ravit; Rothman, Sarah M.; Griffioen, Kathleen J.; Roberts, Nicholas; Castro, Kamilah; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Pita, Mario A.; Stranahan, Alexis M.; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play essential roles in innate immunity and increasing evidence indicates that these receptors are expressed in neurons, astrocytes and microglia in the brain where they mediate responses to infection, stress and injury. Very little is known about the roles of TLRs in cognition. To test the hypothesis that TLR4 has a role in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory, we used mice deficient for TLR4 and mice receiving chronic TLR4 antagonist infusion to the lateral ventricles in the brain. We found that developmental TLR4 deficiency enhances spatial reference memory acquisition and memory retention, impairs contextual fear-learning and enhances motor functions, traits that were correlated with CREB up-regulation in the hippocampus. TLR4 antagonist infusion into the cerebral ventricles of adult mice did not affect cognitive behavior, but instead affected anxiety responses. Our findings indicate a developmental role for TLR4 in shaping spatial reference memory, and fear learning and memory. Moreover, we show that central TLR4 inhibition using a TLR4 antagonist has no discernible physiological role in regulating spatial and contextual hippocampus-dependent cognitive behavior. PMID:23071817

  10. TLR4 Activation Promotes Podocyte Injury and Interstitial Fibrosis in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jin; Chadban, Steven J.; Zhao, Cathy Y.; Chen, Xiaochen; Kwan, Tony; Panchapakesan, Usha; Pollock, Carol A.; Wu, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    Toll like receptor (TLR) 4 has been reported to promote inflammation in diabetic nephropathy. However the role of TLR4 in the complicated pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy is not understood. In this study, we report elevated expression of TLR4, its endogenous ligands and downstream cytokines, chemokines and fibrogenic genes in diabetic nephropathy in WT mice with streptozotocin (STZ) diabetes. Subsequently, we demonstrated that TLR4−/− mice were protected against the development of diabetic nephropathy, exhibiting less albuminuria, inflammation, glomerular hypertrophy and hypercellularity, podocyte and tubular injury as compared to diabetic wild-type controls. Marked reductions in interstitial collagen deposition, myofibroblast activation (α-SMA) and expression of fibrogenic genes (TGF-β and fibronectin) were also evident in TLR4 deficient mice. Consistent with our in vivo results, high glucose directly promoted TLR4 activation in podocytes and tubular epithelial cells in vitro, resulting in NF-κB activation and consequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses. Our data indicate that TLR4 activation may promote inflammation, podocyte and tubular epithelial cell injury and interstitial fibrosis, suggesting TLR4 is a potential therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24842252

  11. TLR-4 may mediate signaling pathways of Astragalus polysaccharide RAP induced cytokine expression of RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Bao, Wan-Rong; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Han, Xiao-Qiang; Ko, Chun-Hay; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Han, Quan-Bin

    2016-02-17

    Polysaccharides of Radix Astragali (Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch) Bge.; Huangqi) are able to induce cytokine production of macrophages and are considered the main active ingredient for the immune-enhancing effect of this commonly used medicinal herb. To investigate the molecular mechanism of immunomodulating activities of a reported Astragalus polysaccharide, RAP, which is a hyperbranched heteroglycan with average molecular weight of 1334kDa. The cytokine production of RAW264.7 cells were analyzed by using ELISA assays while cell viability was assessed by MTT method. Western blot analysis was used for determining protein contents of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In addition, the level of IL-6, iNOS, and TNF-α mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. It has been found that RAP itself did not have any cytotoxic effect on mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells, but it significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of the supernatant of RAW264.7cells on 4T1 cells. Furthermore, RAP enhanced the production of NO and cytokines in RAW264.7 cells, and significantly up-regulated gene expressions of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS. All these bioactivities were blocked by the inhibitor of TLR4 (Toll-like receptor 4), suggesting that TLR4 is a receptor of RAP and mediates its immunomodulating activity. Further analyses demonstrated that RAP rapidly activated TLR4-related MAPKs, including phosphorylated ERK, phosphorylated JNK, and phosphorylated p38, and induced translocation of NF-κB as well as degradation of IκB-α. These results are helpful to better understand the immunomodulating effects of Radix Astragali. RAP may induce cytokine production of RAW264.7 cells through TLR4-mediated activation of MAPKs and NF-κB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of the Toll Like receptor (TLR) radical cycle in chronic inflammation: possible treatments targeting the TLR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kurt; Maes, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) complex, a receptor of the innate immune system, may underpin the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including asthma, cardiovascular disorder, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, autoimmune disorders, neuroinflammatory disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, clinical depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, alcohol abuse, and toluene inhalation. TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that recognize damage-associated molecular patterns and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria. Here we focus on the environmental factors, which are known to trigger TLR4, e.g., ozone, atmosphere particulate matter, long-lived reactive oxygen intermediate, pentachlorophenol, ionizing radiation, and toluene. Activation of the TLR4 pathways may cause chronic inflammation and increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and oxidative and nitrosative stress and therefore TLR-related diseases. This implies that drugs or substances that modify these pathways may prevent or improve the abovementioned diseases. Here we review some of the most promising drugs and agents that have the potential to attenuate TLR-mediated inflammation, e.g., anti-LPS strategies that aim to neutralize LPS (synthetic anti-LPS peptides and recombinant factor C) and TLR4/MyD88 antagonists, including eritoran, CyP, EM-163, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, 6-shogaol, cinnamon extract, N-acetylcysteine, melatonin, and molecular hydrogen. The authors posit that activation of the TLR radical (ROS/RNS) cycle is a common pathway underpinning many "civilization" disorders and that targeting the TLR radical cycle may be an effective method to treat many inflammatory disorders.

  13. PFKFB3 potentially contributes to paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer cells through TLR4 activation by stimulating lactate production.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Cao, Z; Gu, Y; Wang, F; Li, J; Han, M; Xia, W; Yu, Z; Lyu, P

    2016-05-30

    Paclitaxel is a commonly used agent for breast cancer therapy, which comes across the obstacle "drug resistance", resulting in shortened overall survival of patients. Warburg effect has become one character of cancer cell and was reported to induce paclitaxel resistance, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. In this study, we sought to examine the role of 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFKFB3), a critical regulator of glycolysis, in paclitaxel resistance development. Two clones of paclitaxel resistant breast cancer cells, MCF-7RA and MCF-7RB, were established by a long term exposure of MCF-7 cells to paclitaxel. Consequently, PFKFB3 expression was found to be increased in MCF-7RA and MCF-7RB cells compared with MCF-7 cells. Silencing PFKFB3 expression markedly reduced the IC50 concentrations of MCF-7RA and MCF-7RB cells. Moreover, PFKFB3 modulated toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MyD88 expression as well as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 release from breast cancer cells in response to paclitaxel exposure. In addition, PFKFB3 overexpression boosted up fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) and lactate production. The enhanced lactate contributed to TLR4 signaling activation, IL-6 and IL-8 generation, and cell viability promotion in MCF-7 cells. In all, we characterized the novel role of PFKFB3 in induction of paclitaxel resistance by raising lactate production and activating TLR4 signaling.

  14. Inhibition of Toll-like receptors TLR4 and 7 signaling pathways by SIGIRR: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Wei, Tiandi; Stark, Robert W; Jamitzky, Ferdinand; Heckl, Wolfgang M; Anders, Hans J; Lech, Maciej; Rössle, Shaila C

    2010-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the Toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 receptor (TLR/IL-1R) superfamily which is defined by a common cytoplasmic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. TLRs recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiate an intracellular kinase cascade to trigger an immediate defensive response. SIGIRR (single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related molecule), another member of the TLR/IL-1R superfamily, acts as a negative regulator of MyD88-dependent TLR signaling. It attenuates the recruitment of MyD88 adaptors to the receptors with its intracellular TIR domain. Thus, SIGIRR is a highly important molecule for the therapy of autoimmune diseases caused by TLRs. So far, the structural mechanism of interactions between SIGIRR, TLRs and adaptor molecules is unclear. To develop a working hypothesis for this interaction, we constructed three-dimensional models for the TIR domains of TLR4, TLR7, MyD88 and SIGIRR based on computational modeling. Through protein-protein docking analysis, we developed models of essential complexes involved in the TLR4 and 7 signaling and the SIGIRR inhibiting processes. We suggest that SIGIRR may exert its inhibitory effect through blocking the molecular interface of TLR4, TLR7 and the MyD88 adaptor mainly via its BB-loop region. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A polymeric bacterial protein activates dendritic cells via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Berguer, Paula M; Mundiñano, Juliana; Piazzon, Isabel; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2006-02-15

    The enzyme lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) is a highly immunogenic protein that folds as a stable dimer of pentamers. It is possible to insert foreign peptides and proteins at the 10 N terminus of BLS without disrupting its general folding, and these chimeras are very efficient to elicit systemic and oral immunity without adjuvants. In this study, we show that BLS stimulates bone marrow dendritic cells from mice in vitro to up-regulate the levels of costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and major histocompatibility class II Ag. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of several chemokines are increased, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion is induced upon exposure to BLS. In vivo, BLS increases the number of dendritic cells and their expression of CD62L in the draining lymph node. All of the observed effects are dependent on TLR4, and clearly independent of LPS contamination. The described characteristics of BLS make this protein an excellent candidate for vaccine development.

  16. Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in murine small intestine during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryo; Yajima, Takaji; Tsukahara, Takamitsu

    2017-02-01

    The important role played by the gut microbiota in host immunity is mediated, in part, through toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated the postnatal changes in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine and assessed how expression is influenced by gut microbiota. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine was highly dynamic during development. The changes were especially profound during the suckling period, with the maximal mRNA levels detected in the mid-suckling period. Immunohistochemical and flow-cytometric analyses indicated that the changes in TLR2 and TLR4 expression involve primarily epithelial cells. The germ-free mice showed minor changes in TLR2/TLR4 mRNA and TLR2 protein during the suckling period. This study demonstrated that the postnatal expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in small intestinal epithelial cells is dynamic and depends on the presence of commensal intestinal microbiota.

  17. Lung cell-specific modulation of LPS-induced TLR4 receptor and adaptor localization

    PubMed Central

    Sender, Vicky; Stamme, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    Lung infection by Gram-negative bacteria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), located in the outer membrane of the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall, is a highly potent stimulus of immune and structural cells via the TLR4/MD2 complex whose function is sequentially regulated by defined subsets of adaptor proteins. Regulatory mechanisms of lung-specific defense pathways point at the crucial role of resident alveolar macrophages, alveolar epithelial cells, the TLR4 receptor pathway, and lung surfactant in shaping the innate immune response to Gram-negative bacteria and LPS. During the past decade intracellular spatiotemporal localization of TLR4 emerged as a key feature of TLR4 function. Here, we briefly review lung cell type- and compartment-specific mechanisms of LPS-induced TLR4 regulation with a focus on primary resident hematopoietic and structural cells as well as modifying microenvironmental factors involved. PMID:25136402

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of IL-17A, IL-17F, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Lü, Lingshuang; Xu, Kun; Chen, Yongzhong; Pan, Hongqiu; Burstrom, Bo; Burstrom, Kristina; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors affect host susceptibility to pathogens. In this population-based case control study, we explored the genetic polymorphisms of IL-17, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with pulmonary tuberculosis in a Chinese Han population. We recruited 1601 pulmonary tuberculosis patients matched with 1526 healthy controls and genotyped twelve functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After the correction for multiple comparisons, two SNPs (rs10759932 and rs2737190) in the TLR4 gene remained significant. Individuals carrying the rs2737190-AG genotype (vs. AA) had a significantly increased risk of either clinical tuberculosis (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11–1.53) or sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13–1.61). Stratification analysis revealed that the effects of genetic variations on tuberculosis were more evident among non-smokers. People with haplotype TLR4 rs10983755G–rs10759932C had a significantly increased risk of tuberculosis (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34–5.05). Moreover, we found that SNPs of rs3819024 in IL-17A and rs763780 in IL-17F were weakly related to a prognosis of tuberculosis. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of IL-17 and TLR4 may play a role in host susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population. More work is necessary to identify specific causative variants of tuberculosis underlying the observed associations. PMID:27339100

  19. Genetic and Pharmacologic Manipulation of TLR4 Has Minimal Impact on Ethanol Consumption in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Harris, R Adron; Bajo, Michal; Bell, Richard L; Blednov, Yuri A; Varodayan, Florence P; Truitt, Jay M; de Guglielmo, Giordano; Lasek, Amy W; Logrip, Marian L; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Roberts, Amanda J; Roberts, Edward; George, Olivier; Mayfield, Jody; Billiar, Timothy R; Hackam, David J; Mayfield, R Dayne; Koob, George F; Roberto, Marisa; Homanics, Gregg E

    2017-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a critical component of innate immune signaling and has been implicated in alcohol responses in preclinical and clinical models. Members of the Integrative Neuroscience Initiative on Alcoholism (INIA-Neuroimmune) consortium tested the hypothesis that TLR4 mediates excessive ethanol drinking using the following models: (1) Tlr4 knock-out (KO) rats, (2) selective knockdown of Tlr4 mRNA in mouse nucleus accumbens (NAc), and (3) injection of the TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone in mice. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreased food/water intake and body weight in ethanol-naive and ethanol-trained wild-type (WT), but not Tlr4 KO rats. There were no consistent genotypic differences in two-bottle choice chronic ethanol intake or operant self-administration in rats before or after dependence. In mice, (+)-naloxone did not decrease drinking-in-the-dark and only modestly inhibited dependence-driven consumption at the highest dose. Tlr4 knockdown in mouse NAc did not decrease drinking in the two-bottle choice continuous or intermittent access tests. However, the latency to ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex increased and the duration decreased in KO versus WT rats. In rat central amygdala neurons, deletion of Tlr4 altered GABAA receptor function, but not GABA release. Although there were no genotype differences in acute ethanol effects before or after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, genotype differences were observed after LPS exposure. Using different species and sexes, different methods to inhibit TLR4 signaling, and different ethanol consumption tests, our comprehensive studies indicate that TLR4 may play a role in ethanol-induced sedation and GABAA receptor function, but does not regulate excessive drinking directly and would not be an effective therapeutic target.

  20. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-06-23

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is important to understand pathways that drive the disease to devise effective therapeutic strategies. Our results show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) drives breast cancer cell growth differentially based on the presence of TP53, a tumor suppressor. TP53 is mutationally inactivated in most types of cancer and is mutated in 30-50% of diagnosed breast tumors. We demonstrate that TLR4 activation inhibits growth of TP53 wild-type cells, but promotes growth of TP53 mutant breast cancer cells by regulating proliferation. This differential effect is mediated by changes in tumor cell cytokine secretion. Whereas TLR4 activation in TP53 mutant breast cancer cells increases secretion of progrowth cytokines, TLR4 activation in TP53 wild-type breast cancer cells increases type I IFN (IFN-γ) secretion, which is both necessary and sufficient for mediating TLR4-induced growth inhibition. This study identifies a novel dichotomous role for TLR4 as a growth regulator and a modulator of tumor microenvironment in breast tumors. These results have translational relevance, demonstrating that TP53 mutant breast tumor growth can be suppressed by pharmacologic TLR4 inhibition, whereas TLR4 inhibitors may in fact promote growth of TP53 wild-type tumors. Furthermore, using data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the effect of TP53 mutational status on TLR4 activity may extend to ovarian, colon, and lung cancers, among others, suggesting that the viability of TLR4 as a therapeutic target depends on TP53 status in many different tumor types.

  1. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Zhang, Yi; Haslip, Maria; Jin, Lei; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Xuchen; Lee, Patty J.

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 deficiency causes hypersusceptibility to oxidant-induced injury. We investigated the role of TLR4 in lung protection, using used bone marrow chimeras; cell-specific transgenic modeling; and lentiviral delivery in vivo to knock down or express TLR4 in various lung compartments; and lung-specific VEGF transgenic mice to investigate the effect of TLR4 on VEGF-mediated protection. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in an enclosed chamber and assessed for survival and lung injury. Primary endothelial cells were stimulated with recombinant VEGF and exposed to hyperoxia or hydrogen peroxide. Endothelium-specific expression of human TLR4 (as opposed to its expression in epithelium or immune cells) increased the survival of TLR4-deficent mice in hyperoxia by 24 h and decreased LDH release and lung cell apoptosis after 72 h of exposure by 30%. TLR4 expression was necessary and sufficient for the protective effect of VEGF in the lungs and in primary endothelial cells in culture. TLR4 knockdown inhibited VEGF signaling through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), Akt, and ERK pathways in lungs and primary endothelial cells and decreased the availability of VEGFR2 at the cell surface. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which TLR4, an innate pattern receptor, interacts with an endothelial survival pathway.—Takyar, S., Zhang, Y., Haslip, M., Jin L., Shan P., Zhang, X., Lee, P. J. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury. PMID:26655705

  2. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is important to understand pathways that drive the disease to devise effective therapeutic strategies. Our results show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) drives breast cancer cell growth differentially based on the presence of TP53, a tumor suppressor. TP53 is mutationally inactivated in most types of cancer and is mutated in 30–50% of diagnosed breast tumors. We demonstrate that TLR4 activation inhibits growth of TP53 wild-type cells, but promotes growth of TP53 mutant breast cancer cells by regulating proliferation. This differential effect is mediated by changes in tumor cell cytokine secretion. Whereas TLR4 activation in TP53 mutant breast cancer cells increases secretion of progrowth cytokines, TLR4 activation in TP53 wild-type breast cancer cells increases type I IFN (IFN-γ) secretion, which is both necessary and sufficient for mediating TLR4-induced growth inhibition. This study identifies a novel dichotomous role for TLR4 as a growth regulator and a modulator of tumor microenvironment in breast tumors. These results have translational relevance, demonstrating that TP53 mutant breast tumor growth can be suppressed by pharmacologic TLR4 inhibition, whereas TLR4 inhibitors may in fact promote growth of TP53 wild-type tumors. Furthermore, using data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the effect of TP53 mutational status on TLR4 activity may extend to ovarian, colon, and lung cancers, among others, suggesting that the viability of TLR4 as a therapeutic target depends on TP53 status in many different tumor types. PMID:26063617

  3. Association of Common Variants in MMPs with Periodontitis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyang; Zhu, Ying; Singh, Pradeep; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered to play an important role during tissue remodeling and extracellular matrix degradation. And functional polymorphisms in MMPs genes have been reported to be associated with the increased risk of periodontitis. Recently, many studies have investigated the association between MMPs polymorphisms and periodontitis risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to quantify the influence of MMPs polymorphisms on the susceptibility to periodontitis, we performed a meta-analysis and systematic review. Results. Overall, this comprehensive meta-analysis included a total of 17 related studies, including 2399 cases and 2002 healthy control subjects. Our results revealed that although studies of the association between MMP-8 −799 C/T variant and the susceptibility to periodontitis have not yielded consistent results, MMP-1 (−1607 1G/2G, −519 A/G, and −422 A/T), MMP-2 (−1575 G/A, −1306 C/T, −790 T/G, and −735 C/T), MMP-3 (−1171 5A/6A), MMP-8 (−381 A/G and +17 C/G), MMP-9 (−1562 C/T and +279 R/Q), and MMP-12 (−357 Asn/Ser), as well as MMP-13 (−77 A/G, 11A/12A) SNPs are not related to periodontitis risk. Conclusions. No association of these common MMPs variants with the susceptibility to periodontitis was found; however, further larger-scale and multiethnic genetic studies on this topic are expected to be conducted to validate our results. PMID:27194818

  4. Evidence for a role of heat shock protein-90 (HSP90) in TLR4 mediated pain enhancement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Ramos, Khara M.; Loram, Lisa C.; Wieseler, Julie; Sholar, Paige W.; Kearney, Jeffrey J.; Lewis, Makenzie T.; Crysdale, Nicole Y.; Zhang, Yingning; Harrison, Jacqueline A.; Maier, Steven F.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord microglial toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) has been implicated in enhancing neuropathic pain and opposing morphine analgesia. The present study was initiated to explore TLR4-mediated pain modulation by intrathecal lipopolysaccharide, a classic TLR4 agonist. However, our initial study revealed that intrathecal lipopolysaccharide failed to induce low-threshold mechanical allodynia in naive rats, suggestive that TLR4 agonism may be insufficient to enhance pain. These studies explore the possibility that a second signal is required; namely, heat shock protein-90 (HSP90). This candidate was chosen for study given its known importance as a regulator of TLR4 signaling. A combination of in vitro TLR4 cell signaling and in vivo behavioral studies of pain modulation suggest that TLR4-enhancement of neuropathic pain and TLR4-suppression of morphine analgesia each likely require HSP90 as a cofactor for the effects observed. In vitro studies revealed that DMSO enhances HSP90 release, suggestive that this may be a means by which DMSO enhances TLR4 signaling. While 2 µg and 100 µg lipopolysaccharide intrathecally did not induce mechanical allodynia across the time course tested, co-administration of 1 µg lipopolysaccharide with a drug that enhances HSP90-mediated TLR4 signaling now induced robust allodynia. In support of this allodynia being mediated via a TLR4/HSP90 pathway, it was prevented or reversed by intrathecal co-administration of a HSP90 inhibitor, a TLR4 inhibitor, a microglia/monocyte activation inhibitor (as monocytes-derived cells are the predominant cell type expressing TLR4), and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (as this proinflammatory cytokine is a downstream consequence of TLR4 activation). Together, these results suggest for the first time that TLR4 activation is necessary but not sufficient to induce spinally mediated pain enhancement. Rather, the data suggest that TLR4-dependent pain phenomena may require contributions by multiple components of

  5. Hyperoxia-induced immature brain injury through the TLR4 signaling pathway in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Pu; Du, Min; Chen, Kun; Chen, Amber; Wang, Yang; Cao, Fei; Deng, Shixiong; Xu, Ying

    2015-06-12

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor, is known to initiate an inflammatory cascade in response to certain stimuli within the central nervous system (CNS). Although TLR4 activation is known to be a first-line response of the innate immune system, whether and how hyperoxia influences TLR4 signaling in an immature brain remains unclear. In this study, TLR4 wild-type (W) and TLR4 knock-out(M) mice were exposed to 100% oxygen (the WO2 and MO2 groups, respectively), and control groups were exposed to ambient air (the WA and MA groups, respectively) for 48 h after postnatal-day (PND) 3. Next, neuronal apoptosis was quantified, and Morris water maze assays were conducted. The WO2 mice showed increased TLR4 expression compared with the WA mice, additionally, the expression level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in the WO2 mice was significantly increased compared with the levels in the WA, MA and MO2 mice. Electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays showed a significant increase, compared to the WO2 mice, in neuronal apoptosis within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in the WO2 mice. In contrast, there were no obvious differences in neuronal apoptosis between the MO2 and MA groups. The results of the Morris water maze tests demonstrated marked deficits in learning and memory in the WO2 mice but much milder deficits in the MO2 mice compared to the WA and MA groups, respectively. Moreover, cultured N9 (TLR4 wild-type, derived from ICR/CD1 mice) microglia exposed to hyperoxia showed an immediate increase in the expression of TLR4 mRNA, followed by an increase in the expression of both TNF-α and reactive oxygen species (ROS), but this increase was abrogated by the loss of TLR4 signaling in TLR4-knockout microglia (primary cells from a C3H/HeJ strain defective in TLR4). Taken together, these data suggest that 1) TLR4 signaling is involved in

  6. Genetic and Pharmacologic Manipulation of TLR4 Has Minimal Impact on Ethanol Consumption in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Yuri A.; Varodayan, Florence P.; Truitt, Jay M.; Lasek, Amy W.; Logrip, Marian L.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Roberts, Edward; Mayfield, Jody; Billiar, Timothy R.; Hackam, David J.; Koob, George F.; Roberto, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a critical component of innate immune signaling and has been implicated in alcohol responses in preclinical and clinical models. Members of the Integrative Neuroscience Initiative on Alcoholism (INIA-Neuroimmune) consortium tested the hypothesis that TLR4 mediates excessive ethanol drinking using the following models: (1) Tlr4 knock-out (KO) rats, (2) selective knockdown of Tlr4 mRNA in mouse nucleus accumbens (NAc), and (3) injection of the TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone in mice. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreased food/water intake and body weight in ethanol-naive and ethanol-trained wild-type (WT), but not Tlr4 KO rats. There were no consistent genotypic differences in two-bottle choice chronic ethanol intake or operant self-administration in rats before or after dependence. In mice, (+)-naloxone did not decrease drinking-in-the-dark and only modestly inhibited dependence-driven consumption at the highest dose. Tlr4 knockdown in mouse NAc did not decrease drinking in the two-bottle choice continuous or intermittent access tests. However, the latency to ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex increased and the duration decreased in KO versus WT rats. In rat central amygdala neurons, deletion of Tlr4 altered GABAA receptor function, but not GABA release. Although there were no genotype differences in acute ethanol effects before or after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, genotype differences were observed after LPS exposure. Using different species and sexes, different methods to inhibit TLR4 signaling, and different ethanol consumption tests, our comprehensive studies indicate that TLR4 may play a role in ethanol-induced sedation and GABAA receptor function, but does not regulate excessive drinking directly and would not be an effective therapeutic target. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key mediator of innate immune signaling and has been implicated in alcohol responses in animal models and human

  7. Soluble CD83 Inhibits T Cell Activation by Binding to the TLR4/MD-2 Complex on CD14+ Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horvatinovich, Joe M.; Grogan, Elizabeth W.; Norris, Marcus; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Lemos, Henrique; Mellor, Andrew L.; Tcherepanova, Irina Y.; Nicolette, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane protein CD83, expressed on APCs, B cells, and T cells, can be expressed as a soluble form generated by alternative splice variants and/or by shedding. Soluble CD83 (sCD83) was shown to be involved in negatively regulating the immune response. sCD83 inhibits T cell proliferation in vitro, supports allograft survival in vivo, prevents corneal transplant rejection, and attenuates the progression and severity of autoimmune diseases and experimental colitis. Although sCD83 binds to human PBMCs, the specific molecules that bind sCD83 have not been identified. In this article, we identify myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD-2), the coreceptor within the TLR4/MD-2 receptor complex, as the high-affinity sCD83 binding partner. TLR4/MD-2 mediates proinflammatory signal delivery following recognition of bacterial LPSs. However, altering TLR4 signaling can attenuate the proinflammatory cascade, leading to LPS tolerance. Our data show that binding of sCD83 to MD-2 alters this signaling cascade by rapidly degrading IL-1R–associated kinase-1, leading to induction of the anti-inflammatory mediators IDO, IL-10, and PGE2 in a COX-2–dependent manner. sCD83 inhibited T cell proliferation, blocked IL-2 secretion, and rendered T cells unresponsive to further downstream differentiation signals mediated by IL-2. Therefore, we propose the tolerogenic mechanism of action of sCD83 to be dependent on initial interaction with APCs, altering early cytokine signal pathways and leading to T cell unresponsiveness. PMID:28193829

  8. Adaptive evolution and functional constraint at TLR4 during the secondary aquatic adaptation and diversification of cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) are a group of adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to full aquatic habitat and rapid radiation in waters around the world. Throughout this evolution, the pathogen stress-response proteins must have faced challenges from the dramatic change of environmental pathogens in the completely different ecological niches cetaceans occupied. For this reason, cetaceans could be one of the most ideal candidate taxa for studying evolutionary process and associated driving mechanism of vertebrate innate immune systems such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are located at the direct interface between the host and the microbial environment, act at the first line in recognizing specific conserved components of microorganisms, and translate them rapidly into a defense reaction. Results We used TLR4 as an example to test whether this traditionally regarded pattern recognition receptor molecule was driven by positive selection across cetacean evolutionary history. Overall, the lineage-specific selection test showed that the dN/dS (ω) values along most (30 out of 33) examined cetartiodactylan lineages were less than 1, suggesting a common effect of functional constraint. However, some specific codons made radical changes, fell adjacent to the residues interacting with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and showed parallel evolution between independent lineages, suggesting that TLR4 was under positive selection. Especially, strong signatures of adaptive evolution on TLR4 were identified in two periods, one corresponding to the early evolutionary transition of the terrestrial ancestors of cetaceans from land to semi-aquatic (represented by the branch leading to whale + hippo) and from semi-aquatic to full aquatic (represented by the ancestral branch leading to cetaceans) habitat, and the other to the rapid diversification and radiation of oceanic dolphins. Conclusions This is the first study thus

  9. Crystal structure of the TLR4-MD-2 complex with bound endotoxin antagonist Eritoran.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Min; Park, Beom Seok; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Judong; Oh, Se Cheol; Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Matsushima, Norio; Lee, Hayyoung; Yoo, Ook Joon; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2007-09-07

    TLR4 and MD-2 form a heterodimer that recognizes LPS (lipopolysaccharide) from Gram-negative bacteria. Eritoran is an analog of LPS that antagonizes its activity by binding to the TLR4-MD-2 complex. We determined the structure of the full-length ectodomain of the mouse TLR4 and MD-2 complex. We also produced a series of hybrids of human TLR4 and hagfish VLR and determined their structures with and without bound MD-2 and Eritoran. TLR4 is an atypical member of the LRR family and is composed of N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains. The beta sheet of the central domain shows unusually small radii and large twist angles. MD-2 binds to the concave surface of the N-terminal and central domains. The interaction with Eritoran is mediated by a hydrophobic internal pocket in MD-2. Based on structural analysis and mutagenesis experiments on MD-2 and TLR4, we propose a model of TLR4-MD-2 dimerization induced by LPS.

  10. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D.; Jones, Brian T.; Whitby, Landon R.; Surakattula, Murali M. R. P.; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L.; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS. PMID:26831104

  11. Glycolipid-based TLR4 Modulators and Fluorescent Probes: Rational Design, Synthesis, and Biological Properties.

    PubMed

    Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Calabrese, Valentina; Sestito, Stefania E; Pérez-Regidor, Lucia; Klett, Javier; Oblak, Alja; Jerala, Roman; Piazza, Matteo; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Peri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The cationic glycolipid IAXO-102, a potent TLR4 antagonist targeting both MD-2 and CD14 co-receptors, has been used as scaffold to design new potential TLR4 modulators and fluorescent labels for the TLR4 receptor complex (membrane TLR4.MD-2 dimer and CD14). The primary amino group of IAXO-102, not involved in direct interaction with MD-2 and CD14 receptors, has been exploited to covalently attach a fluorescein (molecules 1 and 2) or to link two molecules of IAXO-102 through diamine and diammonium spacers, obtaining 'dimeric' molecules 3 and 4. The structure-based rational design of compounds 1-4 was guided by the optimization of MD-2 and CD14 binding. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited TLR4 activation, in a concentration-dependent manner, and signaling in HEK-Blue TLR4 cells. The fluorescent labeling of murine macrophages by molecule 1 was inhibited by LPS and was also abrogated when cell surface proteins were digested by trypsin, thus suggesting an interaction of fluorescent probe 1 with membrane proteins of the TLR4 receptor system.

  12. TLR4-mediated activation of mouse macrophages by Korean mistletoe lectin-C (KML-C).

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Hong, Ju-ho; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Jong-Bae; Song, Seong K

    2010-06-04

    Korean mistletoe lectin (KML-C) is an adjuvant that activates systemic and mucosal immune cells to release cytokines including TNF-alpha, which induces immunity against viruses and cancer cells. Although the immunomodulatory activity of KML-C has been well established, the underlying mechanism of action of KML-C has yet to be explored. When mouse peritoneal macrophages were treated with KML-C, both transcription and translation of TLR4 were upregulated. KML-C-induced TLR4 downstream events were similar to those activated by LPS: the upregulation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK1); resulting in macrophage activation and TNF-alpha production. When TLR4 was blocked using a TLR4-specific neutralizing antibody, TNF-alpha production from the macrophages was significantly inhibited. Moreover, TLR4-deficient mouse macrophages treated with KML-C also secreted greatly reduced level of TNF-alpha secretion. Finally, TLR4 molecules were co-precipitated with KML-C, to which agarose beads were conjugated, indicating that those molecules are associated. These data indicate that KML-C activates mouse macrophages to secrete TNF-alpha by interacting with the TLR4 molecule and activating its signaling pathways.

  13. Significance of TLR4/MyD88 expression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangjin; Zhao, Feng; Zhang, Huihao; Zhu, Youzhi; Wu, Kunlin; Tan, Guozheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of TLR4/MyD88 in breast cancer, and explore the relationship between their expression and breast cancer tumor growth and invasion. Methods: We examined the protein expression of TLR4 and MyD88 in 60 cases of histologically confirmed breast cancer. The relationship of their protein expressions with clinical features including age at diagnosis, tumor size and stage, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were analyzed. Results: The IHC results showed that TLR4 and MyD88 were expressed in 63.3% (38/60) and 58.3% (35/60) of malignant breast tumors respectively. TLR4 expression in breast cancer were significantly higher than in fibroadenoma (n = 4, 20.0%) and adjacent normal tissues (n = 2, 10.0%) (P < 0.001). MyD88 expression in breast cancer were also significantly higher than in fibroadenoma (n = 4, 20.0%) and adjacent normal tissue (n = 3, 15.0%) (P < 0.001). The gene expressions of TLR4 and MyD88 were significantly higher in breast cancer than in fibroadenoma and adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.05). The protein expressions of TLR4 and MyD88 were also significantly associated with poor clinical features (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TLR4 and MyD88 expression might be associated with breast cancer growth and regional and distant metastases. PMID:26261595

  14. Significance of TLR4/MyD88 expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangjin; Zhao, Feng; Zhang, Huihao; Zhu, Youzhi; Wu, Kunlin; Tan, Guozheng

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression of TLR4/MyD88 in breast cancer, and explore the relationship between their expression and breast cancer tumor growth and invasion. We examined the protein expression of TLR4 and MyD88 in 60 cases of histologically confirmed breast cancer. The relationship of their protein expressions with clinical features including age at diagnosis, tumor size and stage, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were analyzed. The IHC results showed that TLR4 and MyD88 were expressed in 63.3% (38/60) and 58.3% (35/60) of malignant breast tumors respectively. TLR4 expression in breast cancer were significantly higher than in fibroadenoma (n = 4, 20.0%) and adjacent normal tissues (n = 2, 10.0%) (P < 0.001). MyD88 expression in breast cancer were also significantly higher than in fibroadenoma (n = 4, 20.0%) and adjacent normal tissue (n = 3, 15.0%) (P < 0.001). The gene expressions of TLR4 and MyD88 were significantly higher in breast cancer than in fibroadenoma and adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.05). The protein expressions of TLR4 and MyD88 were also significantly associated with poor clinical features (P < 0.05). TLR4 and MyD88 expression might be associated with breast cancer growth and regional and distant metastases.

  15. Elucidation of the MD-2/TLR4 interface required for signaling by lipid IVa.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine; Gangloff, Monique; Monie, Tom; Smyth, Tomoko; Wei, Bin; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Maskell, Duncan; Gay, Nicholas; Bryant, Clare

    2008-07-15

    LPS signals through a membrane bound-complex of the lipid binding protein MD-2 and the receptor TLR4. In this study we identify discrete regions in both MD-2 and TLR4 that are required for signaling by lipid IVa, an LPS derivative that is an agonist in horse but an antagonist in humans. We show that changes in the electrostatic surface potential of both MD-2 and TLR4 are required in order that lipid IVa can induce signaling. In MD-2, replacing horse residues 57-66 and 82-89 with the equivalent human residues confers a level of constitutive activity on horse MD-2, suggesting that conformational switching in this protein is likely to be important in ligand-induced activation of MD-2/TLR4. We identify leucine-rich repeat 14 in the C terminus of TLR4 as essential for lipid IVa activation of MD-2/TLR4. Remarkably, we identify a single residue in the glycan-free flank of the horse TLR4 solenoid that confers the ability to signal in response to lipid IVa. These results suggest a mechanism of signaling that involves crosslinking mediated by both MD-2-receptor and receptor-receptor contacts in a model that shows striking similarities to the recently published structure (Cell 130: 1071-1082) of the ligand-bound TLR1/2 ectodomain heterodimer.

  16. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D; Jones, Brian T; Whitby, Landon R; Surakattula, Murali M R P; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-02-16

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS.

  17. Pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba are recognized by TLR4 and initiated inflammatory responses in the cornea.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Hassan; Tripathi, Trivendra; Abdi, Mahshid; Smith, Ashley Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the Acanthamoeba species are the causative agent of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a sight-threatening corneal infection that causes severe pain and a characteristic ring-shaped corneal infiltrate. Innate immune responses play an important role in resistance against AK. The aim of this study is to determine if Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on corneal epithelial cells are activated by Acanthamoeba, leading to initiation of inflammatory responses in the cornea. Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells constitutively expressed TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9 mRNA, and A. castellanii upregulated TLR4 transcription. Expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR9 was unchanged when HCE cells were exposed to A. castellanii. IL-8 mRNA expression was upregulated in HCE cells exposed to A. castellanii. A. castellanii and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced significant IL-8 production by HCE cells as measured by ELISA. The percentage of total cells positive for TLR4 was higher in A. castellanii stimulated HCE cells compared to unstimulated HCE cells. A. castellanii induced upregulation of IL-8 in TLR4 expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, but not TLR3 expressing HEK-293 cells. TLR4 neutralizing antibody inhibited A. castellanii-induced IL-8 by HCE and HEK-293 cells. Clinical strains but not soil strains of Acanthamoeba activated TLR4 expression in Chinese hamster corneas in vivo and in vitro. Clinical isolates but not soil isolates of Acanthamoeba induced significant (P< 0.05) CXCL2 production in Chinese hamster corneas 3 and 7 days after infection, which coincided with increased inflammatory cells in the corneas. Results suggest that pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba activate TLR4 and induce production of CXCL2 in the Chinese hamster model of AK. TLR4 may be a potential target in the development of novel treatment strategies in Acanthamoeba and other microbial infections that activate TLR4 in corneal cells.

  18. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-08-24

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration.

  19. Pulmonary Epithelial TLR4 Activation Leads to Lung Injury in Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongpeng; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Martin, Laura Y; Good, Misty; Zhou, Qinjie; Sung, Jungeun; Fulton, William B; Nino, Diego F; Prindle, Thomas; Ozolek, John A; Hackam, David J

    2016-08-01

    We seek to define the mechanisms leading to the development of lung disease in the setting of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a life-threatening gastrointestinal disease of premature infants characterized by the sudden onset of intestinal necrosis. NEC development in mice requires activation of the LPS receptor TLR4 on the intestinal epithelium, through its effects on modulating epithelial injury and repair. Although NEC-associated lung injury is more severe than the lung injury that occurs in premature infants without NEC, the mechanisms leading to its development remain unknown. In this study, we now show that TLR4 expression in the lung gradually increases during postnatal development, and that mice and humans with NEC-associated lung inflammation express higher levels of pulmonary TLR4 than do age-matched controls. NEC in wild-type newborn mice resulted in significant pulmonary injury that was prevented by deletion of TLR4 from the pulmonary epithelium, indicating a role for pulmonary TLR4 in lung injury development. Mechanistically, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation induced high-mobility group box 1 release from the intestine, which activated pulmonary epithelial TLR4, leading to the induction of the neutrophil recruiting CXCL5 and the influx of proinflammatory neutrophils to the lung. Strikingly, the aerosolized administration of a novel carbohydrate TLR4 inhibitor prevented CXCL5 upregulation and blocked NEC-induced lung injury in mice. These findings illustrate the critical role of pulmonary TLR4 in the development of NEC-associated lung injury, and they suggest that inhibition of this innate immune receptor in the neonatal lung may prevent this devastating complication of NEC.

  20. TLR4 Methylation Moderates the Relationship Between Alcohol Use Severity and Gray Matter Loss.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Hollis C; Thayer, Rachel E; Hagerty, Sarah L; Hutchison, Kent E

    2017-09-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are associated with decreased gray matter, and neuroinflammation is one mechanism through which alcohol may confer such damage, given that heavy alcohol use may promote neural damage via activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated inflammatory signaling cascades. We previously demonstrated that TLR4 is differentially methylated in AUD compared with control subjects, and the present study aims to extend this work by examining whether TLR4 methylation moderates the relationship between alcohol use and gray matter. We examined TLR4 methylation and gray matter thickness in a large sample (N = 707; 441 males) of adults (ages 18-56) reporting a range of AUD severity (mean Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score = 13.18; SD = 8.02). We used a series of ordinary least squares multiple regression equations to regress gray matter in four bilateral brain regions (precuneus, lateral orbitofrontal, inferior parietal, and superior temporal) on alcohol use, TLR4 methylation, and their interaction, controlling for demographic, psychological, and other substance use variables. After we corrected for multiple tests, a significant Alcohol × TLR4 Methylation interaction emerged in the equations modeling left precuneus and right inferior parietal gray matter. Follow-up analyses examining the nature of these interactions demonstrated a significant negative association between alcohol and precuneus and inferior parietal gray matter in individuals with low TLR4 methylation, but no relationship between alcohol and gray matter in the high methylation group. These findings suggest that TLR4 methylation may be protective against the damage conferred by alcohol on precuneus and inferior parietal gray matter, thereby implicating TLR4 for further investigation as a possible AUD treatment target.

  1. Lipoprotein accumulation in macrophages via TLR4-dependent fluid phase uptake

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Harkewicz, Richard; Lee, Jee Hyun; Boullier, Agnès; Almazan, Felicidad; Li, Andrew C.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Bae, Yun Soo; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) recognizes microbial pathogens, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and mediates LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine secretion, as well as microbial uptake by macrophages. In addition to exogenous pathogens, TLR4 recognizes modified self, such as minimally oxidized low-density lipoprotein (mmLDL). Here we report that mmLDL and its active components, cholesteryl ester (CE) hydroperoxides, induce TLR4-dependent fluid phase uptake typical of macropinocytosis. We show that mmLDL induced recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to a TLR4 signaling complex, TLR4 phosphorylation, activation of a Vav1-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling cascade, phosphorylation of paxillin, and activation of Rac, Cdc42 and Rho. These mmLDL-induced and TLR4- and Syk-dependent signaling events and cytoskeletal rearrangements lead to enhanced uptake of small molecules, dextran and, most importantly, of both native and oxidized LDL, resulting in intracellular lipid accumulation. An intravenous injection of fluorescently labeled mmLDL in wild type mice resulted in its rapid accumulation in circulating monocytes, which was significantly attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. These data describe a novel mechanism leading to enhanced lipoprotein uptake in macrophages that would contribute to foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. These data also suggest that CE hydroperoxides are an endogenous ligand for TLR4. As TLR4 is highly expressed on the surface of circulating monocytes in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, and CE hydroperoxides are present in plasma, lipid uptake by monocytes in circulation may contribute to monocytes' pathological roles in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:19461045

  2. Cotransfection of DC with TLR4 and MART-1 RNA induces MART-1-specific responses.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Zeinab; Cisco, Robin; Dannull, Jens; Ueno, Tomio; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Kalady, Matthew F; Onaitis, Mark W; Tyler, Douglas S; Pruitt, Scott K

    2005-04-01

    Cotransfection of dendritic cells (DC) with MART-1 and constitutively active TLR4 (caTLR4) RNA enhances the maturation of DC. Immature DC were cotransfected with RNA constructs encoding MART-1 and caTLR4, and CTL responses were analyzed. Cotransfection of DC with MART-1 + caTLR4 enhanced the expression of CD80 and CD83 surface markers and increased the secretion of cytokines IL-6, IL-12, and TNFalpha. Neither the native nor the A27L-modified MART-1 RNA could induce significant DC maturation or cytokine secretion. More importantly, DC cotransfected with caTLR4 + MART-1 RNA induced MART-1-specific CTL responses of a higher magnitude than DC transfected with either the native or A27L MART-1 RNA. When the MART-1 RNA-transfected DC were treated with DC-maturing cytokines, the induced CTL were less frequent and less lytic than those induced with MART-1 + caTLR4. A 2- to 100-fold increase in MART-1 tetramer+ cells and 2- to 10-fold increases in IFNgamma secretion and cytotoxicity were seen in CTL induced with MART-1 + caTLR4 compared to CTL induced with either MART-1 or A27L RNA. CTL induced with the mixed RNA displayed high percentages of CD8+ cells coexpressing CD45RA, CD56, and 2B4 antigens. Transfection with caTLR4 alone induced DC maturation, but did not induce lytic CTL, suggesting that CTL responses were induced solely by MART-1 epitopes. caTLR4 increases the CTL-inducing capacity of DC generating a lytic response specific for the accompanying antigen. These results demonstrate the possibility of enhancing the immunogenicity of the native MART-1 and other RNA derived from weakly immunogenic tumors in DC-based immunotherapy.

  3. Mechanisms underlying the hyperalgesic responses triggered by joint activation of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Ana T G; Pinto, Larissa G; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Verri, Waldiceu A; Cunha, Thiago M

    2016-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) including TLR4 and their signal pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of arthritis. Herein, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying the hyperalgesic response caused by TLR4 activation in the tibio-tarsal joint in mice. Joint inflammatory hyperalgesia was induced by intra-articular (ia) injection of LPS (lipopolysaccharide- TLR4 agonist) in C57BL/6, TLR4, TLR2, MyD88, TRIF, TNFR1/2 and IL-1R1 knockout ((-/-)) mice. Joint hyperalgesia was evaluated using an electronic von Frey. Neutrophil recruitment was assessed by MPO activity. Joint levels of cytokines were measured by ELISA. Firstly, it was shown that LPS injected into the joints causes a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the mechanical nociceptive threshold. The TLR4 activation in the joint triggers mechanical hyperalgesia and neutrophil migration, which was abolished in TLR4 (-/-) and MyD88(-/-), but not in TLR2(-/-) and TRIF(-/-) mice. Besides, joint administration of LPS increased the release of TNF-α, IL-1β, and KC/CXCL1, which were reduced in TLR4(-/-) and MyD88(-/-), but not in TRIF(-/-) mice. In agreement, the LPS-induced joint nociceptive effect was decreased in TNFR1/2(-/-) and IL-1R1(-/-) mice or in mice pre-treated with a CXCR1/2 selective antagonist (DF2156A). These results suggest that TLR4 activation in the joint produces articular hyperalgesia via MyD88 signaling pathway. Moreover, this pathway is involved in the cascade of events of articular hyperalgesia through mechanisms dependent on cytokines and chemokines production. Thus, TLR4/MyD88 signaling pathway inhibitors might be useful for the treatment of inflammatory joint pain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  4. Relationship of TLR2, TLR4 and tissue remodeling in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Chunyuan; Ji, Wenjun; Xu, Yuan; Guo, Huamin

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore the role of innate immunity in the remodeling of CRS (chronic rhinosinusitis), we investigated the correlation between TLR2, TLR4 and remodeling involved cytokines and histopathological features. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to detect the expression of TLR2, TLR4 and TGF-β1. Masson staining was used for observing the collagen deposition. The other histopathologic features of remodeling were observed by hemotoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Nasal epithelial cell culture was used to elucidate the effect of TLR2, TLR4 agonists and inhibitors on the expression of TGF-β1 and MMP-9. The association study showed that the significantly higher expression of TLR2, TLR4, TGF-β1 and collagen appeared in CRSsNP (chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps) patients compared with CRSwNP (chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps) patients. In CRSsNP, patients with a severe epithelial damage (score 3) had a significantly higher expression of TLR2 than patients with mild epithelial damage (score ≤ 2) (P < 0.05). Moreover the expression of TLR2 correlated negatively with squamous hyperplasia in CRSsNP, and positively with gland hyperplasia in CRSwNP. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was closely related to neutrophil infiltration in CRSsNP (P < 0.01). TGF-β1 was downregulated by TLR2 agonist in CRSwNP and upregulated by TLR4 agonist in CRSsNP (P < 0.05). MMP-9 was upregulated by TLR4 agonist in CRSwNP (P < 0.05). TLR2 and TLR4 had close relationship with TGF-β1 and the histologic features of remodeling, especially collagen deposition and neutrophil infiltration in CRSsNP. The innate immunity could influence the histologic characteristics and involved cytokines through TLR2 and TLR4 in the remodeling of CRS. PMID:25973005

  5. TLR4 Deficiency Impairs Oligodendrocyte Formation in the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Church, Jamie S.; Kigerl, Kristina A.; Lerch, Jessica K.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute oligodendrocyte (OL) death after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is followed by robust neuron–glial antigen 2 (NG2)-positive OL progenitor proliferation and differentiation into new OLs. Inflammatory mediators are prevalent during both phases and can influence the fate of NG2 cells and OLs. Specifically, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling induces OL genesis in the naive spinal cord, and lack of TLR4 signaling impairs white matter sparing and functional recovery after SCI. Therefore, we hypothesized that TLR4 signaling may regulate oligodendrogenesis after SCI. C3H/HeJ (TLR4-deficient) and control (C3H/HeOuJ) mice received a moderate midthoracic spinal contusion. TLR4-deficient mice showed worse functional recovery and reduced OL numbers compared with controls at 24 h after injury through chronic time points. Acute OL loss was accompanied by reduced ferritin expression, which is regulated by TLR4 and needed for effective iron storage. TLR4-deficient injured spinal cords also displayed features consistent with reduced OL genesis, including reduced NG2 expression, fewer BrdU-positive OLs, altered BMP4 signaling and inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) expression, and delayed myelin phagocytosis. Expression of several factors, including IGF-1, FGF2, IL-1β, and PDGF-A, was altered in TLR4-deficient injured spinal cords compared with wild types. Together, these data show that TLR4 signaling after SCI is important for OL lineage cell sparing and replacement, as well as in regulating cytokine and growth factor expression. These results highlight new roles for TLR4 in endogenous SCI repair and emphasize that altering the function of a single immune-related receptor can dramatically change the reparative responses of multiple cellular constituents in the injured CNS milieu. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelinating cells of the CNS [oligodendrocytes (OLs)] are killed for several weeks after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), but they are replaced by resident

  6. Identification of key residues that confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS activity at horse TLR4/MD-2.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katherine L; Gangloff, Monique; Walsh, Catherine M; Spring, David R; Gay, Nicholas J; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  7. Identification of Key Residues That Confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS Activity at Horse TLR4/MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Catherine M.; Spring, David R.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Bryant, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  8. Common Genetic Variants Associate with Serum Phosphorus Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Nicole L.; Köttgen, Anna; Felix, Janine F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Hausman, Dorothy B.; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Gieger, Christian; Ried, Janina S.; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Wichmann, H. Erich; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; de Boer, Ian H.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Li, Man; Arking, Dan E.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Yang, Qiong; Levy, Daniel; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Dehghan, Abbas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential mineral that maintains cellular energy and mineralizes the skeleton. Because complex actions of ion transporters and regulatory hormones regulate serum phosphorus concentrations, genetic variation may determine interindividual variation in phosphorus metabolism. Here, we report a comprehensive genome-wide association study of serum phosphorus concentration. We evaluated 16,264 participants of European ancestry from the Cardiovascular Heath Study, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, Framingham Offspring Study, and the Rotterdam Study. We excluded participants with an estimated GFR <45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 to focus on phosphorus metabolism under normal conditions. We imputed genotypes to approximately 2.5 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the HapMap and combined study-specific findings using meta-analysis. We tested top polymorphisms from discovery cohorts in a 5444-person replication sample. Polymorphisms in seven loci with minor allele frequencies 0.08 to 0.49 associate with serum phosphorus concentration (P = 3.5 × 10−16 to 3.6 × 10−7). Three loci were near genes encoding the kidney-specific type IIa sodium phosphate co-transporter (SLC34A1), the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), proteins that contribute to phosphorus metabolism. We also identified genes encoding phosphatases, kinases, and phosphodiesterases that have yet-undetermined roles in phosphorus homeostasis. In the replication sample, five of seven top polymorphisms associate with serum phosphorous concentrations (P < 0.05 for each). In conclusion, common genetic variants associate with serum phosphorus in the general population. Further study of the loci identified in this study may help elucidate mechanisms of phosphorus regulation. PMID:20558539

  9. Andrographolide inhibits melanoma tumor growth by inactivating the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Da-Lei; Ding, Yi; Liu, Hong-Ying; Lei, Yan; Fang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Qu-Liang; He, Xiao-Dong; Qi, Cui-Ling; Yang, Yi; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Xuesong; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-12-01

    The TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in tumor progression. Andrographolide (Andro) has been reported to have anticancer activity in multiple types of cancer. However, the pharmacological activities of Andro in melanoma are not completely understood. In this study, we defined the anticancer effects of Andro in melanoma and elucidated its potential mechanisms of action. Our experiments showed that Andro significantly inhibited melanoma tumor growth and metastasis by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, Andro significantly inhibited the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inactivation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 and Bcl-6, which are antitumor genes. This work provides evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target and may also be indispensable in the Andro-mediated anticancer effect in melanoma.

  10. TLR4 siRNA inhibits proliferation and invasion in colorectal cancer cells by downregulating ACAT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kai; Wu, Yiyang; Sun, Yafeng; Lin, Jian'an; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is involved in tumor development. Numerous studies have confirmed that TLR4 mediates processes in tumorigenesis, for example, inflammation, proliferation and invasion. However, the effects of TLR4 on colorectal cancer development have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects and mechanisms of TLR4 on colorectal cancer development. The expression of TLR4 and Acyl coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) in colorectal cancer tissues and cell lines was detected using RT-PCR and Western blot. The nude mouse xenograft model was established by subcutaneous injection of SW480 cells transfected with TLR4 scramble or TLR4 siRNA. CCK8 and transwell assays were used to evaluate the effects of TLR4 silencing on cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HT29 and SW480. RT-PCR and Western blot was used to determine the regulation between TLR4 and ACAT1. Both TLR4 and ACAT1 were highly expressed in colorectal cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of TLR4 reduced tumor growth, suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HT29 and SW480. TLR4 siRNA decreased ACAT1 expression in HT29, and that overexpression of ACAT1 by pLV-Neo-ACAT1 abolished the effects of TLR4 on colorectal cancer cell lines. TLR4 siRNA inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion by suppressing ACAT1 expression, suggesting that TLR4 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Does pathway analysis make it easier for common variants to tag rare ones?

    PubMed

    Uh, Hae-Won; Tsonaka, Roula; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J

    2011-11-29

    Analyzing sequencing data is difficult because of the low frequency of rare variants, which may result in low power to detect associations. We consider pathway analysis to detect multiple common and rare variants jointly and to investigate whether analysis at the pathway level provides an alternative strategy for identifying susceptibility genes. Available pathway analysis methods for data from genome-wide association studies might not be efficient because these methods are designed to detect common variants. Here, we investigate the performance of several existing pathway analysis methods for sequencing data. In particular, we consider the global test, which does not consider linkage disequilibrium between the variants in a gene. We improve the performance of the global test by assigning larger weights to rare variants, as proposed in the weighted-sum approach. Our conclusion is that straightforward application of pathway analysis is not satisfactory; hence, when common and rare variants are jointly analyzed, larger weights should be assigned to rare variants.

  12. Purified monomeric ligand.MD-2 complexes reveal molecular and structural requirements for activation and antagonism of TLR4 by Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gioannini, Theresa L; Teghanemt, Athmane; Zhang, DeSheng; Esparza, Gregory; Yu, Liping; Weiss, Jerrold

    2014-08-01

    A major focus of work in our laboratory concerns the molecular mechanisms and structural bases of Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin recognition by host (e.g., human) endotoxin-recognition proteins that mediate and/or regulate activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Here, we review studies of wild-type and variant monomeric endotoxin.MD-2 complexes first produced and characterized in our laboratories. These purified complexes have provided unique experimental reagents, revealing both quantitative and qualitative determinants of TLR4 activation and antagonism. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Theresa L. Gioannini (1949-2014) who played a central role in many of the studies and discoveries that are reviewed.

  13. Haematopoietic TLR4 deletion attenuates perivascular brown adipose tissue inflammation in atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Penghao; Huang, Gaojian; Cao, Zhiyong; Xie, Qihai; Wei, Tong; Huang, Chenglin; Li, Qun; Sun, Mengwei; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2017-09-01

    To investigate whether haematopoietic TLR4 deletion attenuates perivascular brown adipose tissue inflammation in atherosclerotic mice. Experiments were performed using irradiated LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice with marrow from either TLR4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) or age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. After 12 weeks of being fed a high-cholesterol diet, TLR4(-/-)→LDLR(-/-) mice developed fewer atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta compared to WT→LDLR(-/-) mice. This effect was associated with an increase in multilocular lipid droplets and mitochondria in perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that there was an increase in capillary density and M2 macrophage infiltration, accompanied by a decrease in tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in the localized PVAT of TLR4(-/-)→LDLR(-/-) mice. In vitro studies indicated that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from WT mice demonstrated an M1-like phenotype and expression of inflammatory cytokines induced by palmitate. These effects were attenuated in BMDMs isolated from TLR4(-/-) mice. Furthermore, brown adipocytes incubated with conditioned medium (CM) derived from palmitate-treated BMDMs, exhibited larger and more unilocular lipid droplets, and reduced expression of brown adipocyte-specific markers and perilipin-1 compared to those observed in brown adipocytes exposed to CM from palmitate-treated BMDMs of TLR4(-/-) mice. This decreased potency was primarily due to TNF-α, as demonstrated by the capacity of the TNF-α neutralizing antibody to reverse these effects. These results suggest that haematopoietic-specific deletion of TLR4 promotes PVAT homeostasis, which is involved in reducing macrophage-induced TNF-α secretion and increasing mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipocytes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Inhibition of TLR4 alleviates the inflammation and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in high glucose.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lili; Yang, Hongxia; Ai, Ming; Jiang, Shuanghong

    2017-08-14

    To investigate the expression profiles of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the effect of TLR4 on inflammation, and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) cultured in high glucose and the underlying mechanism. A high-glucose model was established in RGCs isolated from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (2-3 days old) and identified with Brn3a. Primary cultured RGCs were divided into control (0 mM), HG1 (10 mM glucose), HG2 (20 mM glucose), HG3 (30 mM glucose), HG (20 mM glucose) + TAK-242 (1.0 μM), and HG (20 mM glucose) + vehicle (1% DMSO) groups. The expression levels of TLR4, its downstream signalling molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured by real-time PCR, Western blot or ELISA at 24 h and 48 h. The apoptosis rate of RGCs was measured by flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR4 were increased in high-glucose groups (10 mM, 20 mM, 30 mM). Consistent with these findings, four TLR4 downstream signalling molecules (MyD88, NF-κB, TRAF6, NLRP3) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-18) were upregulated in the three high-glucose groups. Apoptosis of RGCs was clearly increased in the high-glucose group. The administration of TAK-242, an antagonist of TLR4, inhibited inflammation and apoptosis of RGCs in the high-glucose group. Our results demonstrated that TLR4 plays a critical role in the inflammation and apoptosis of RGCs induced by high glucose. TLR4 might become a novel potential pharmacological target for preventing the progression of DR.

  15. MD-2-mediated ionic interactions between lipid A and TLR4 are essential for receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianmin; Lien, Egil; Golenbock, Douglas T

    2010-03-19

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates innate immune responses through TLR4.MD-2. LPS binds to the MD-2 hydrophobic pocket and bridges the dimerization of two TLR4.MD-2 complexes to activate intracellular signaling. However, exactly how lipid A, the endotoxic moiety of LPS, activates myeloid lineage cells remains unknown. Lipid IV(A), a tetra-acylated lipid A precursor, has been used widely as a model for lipid A activation. For unknown reasons, lipid IV(A) activates proinflammatory responses in rodent cells but inhibits the activity of LPS in human cells. Using stable TLR4-expressing cell lines and purified monomeric MD-2, as well as MD-2-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages, we found that both mouse TLR4 and mouse MD-2 are required for lipid IV(A) activation. Computational studies suggested that unique ionic interactions exist between lipid IV(A) and TLR4 at the dimerization interface in the mouse complex only. The negatively charged 4'-phosphate on lipid IV(A) interacts with two positively charged residues on the opposing mouse, but not human, TLR4 (Lys(367) and Arg(434)) at the dimerization interface. When replaced with their negatively charged human counterparts Glu(369) and Gln(436), mouse TLR4 was no longer responsive to lipid IV(A). In contrast, human TLR4 gained lipid IV(A) responsiveness when ionic interactions were enabled by charge reversal at the dimerization interface, defining the basis of lipid IV(A) species specificity. Thus, using lipid IV(A) as a selective lipid A agonist, we successfully decoupled and coupled two sequential events required for intracellular signaling: receptor engagement and dimerization, underscoring the functional role of ionic interactions in receptor activation.

  16. mRNA levels of TLR4 and TLR5 are independent of H pylori

    PubMed Central

    Garza-González, Elvira; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco Javier; Flores-Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Moreno, Francisco; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine if the presence H pylori or its virulence affect toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR5 mRNA expression levels. METHODS: For the in vivo assays, gastric biopsies were obtained from 40 patients and H pylori status was determined. For the in vitro assays, human gastric adenocarcinoma mucosal cells (AGS) were cultured in the presence or absence of twelve selected H pylori strains. H pylori strains isolated from culture-positive patients and selected strains were genotyped for cagA and vacA. The cDNA was obtained from mRNA extracted from biopsies and from infected AGS cells. TLR4 and TLR5 mRNA levels were examined by real-time PCR. RESULTS: The presence of H pylori did not affect the mRNA levels of TLR4 or TLR5 in gastric biopsies. The mRNA levels of both receptors were not influenced by the vacA status (P > 0.05 for both receptors) and there were no differences in TLR4 or TLR5 mRNA levels among the different clinical presentations/histological findings (P > 0.05). In the in vitro assay, the mRNA levels of TLR4 or TLR5 in AGS cells were not influenced by the vacAs1 status or the clinical condition associated with the strains (P > 0.05 for both TLR4 and TLR5). CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that the mRNA levels of TLR4 and TLR5 in gastric cells, both in vivo and in vitro, are independent of H pylori colonization and suggest that vacA may not be a significant player in the first step of innate immune recognition mediated by TLR4 or TLR5. PMID:18785283

  17. Activation of TLR4/STAT3 signaling in VTA contributes to the acquisition and maintenance of morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Xin; Huang, Kang-Mei; Liu, Meng; Jiang, Jin-Xiang; Liu, Jian-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Chen; Xin, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Qin

    2017-09-29

    Morphine, commonly used to relieve the acute or chronic pain, has a high potential for addiction and exerts rewarding effects via a critical role for mesolimbic dopamine system. Studies suggest that addiction-related behavior is highly associated with inflammatory immune response, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study showed that intra-VTA microinjection of TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS prevented the acquisition and maintenance, but not the expression, of morphine-induced CPP in rats. In addition, chronic morphine treatment significantly activated STAT3 on day 6 and 11 in VTA, and bilateral microinjection of STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201 into the VTA suppressed the acquisition and maintenance of morphine-induced CPP in rats. Furthermore, local knockout of STAT3 by injection of the AAV-Cre-GFP into the VTA area of STAT3(flox/flox) mice also significantly impaired the acquisition of morphine CPP. Importantly, the TLR4 expression is colocalized with p-STAT3-positive cell in VTA, and repeated injection of LPS-RS significantly attenuated the STAT3 activation in VTA induced by chronic morphine treatment. Collectively, these data suggest that TLR4/STAT3 signaling pathway in VTA might play a critical role in the acquisition and maintenance of morphine CPP, and provides new evidence that TLR4/STAT3 signaling pathway might be a potential target for treatment of morphine addiction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) directly induces mouse Th1 activation through upregulating TLR2 and downregulating TLR4 expressions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Ni, Weihua; Liu, Guomu; Wang, Juan; Xie, Fei; Yuan, Hongyan; Guo, Yingying; Zhai, RuiPing; Chen, Tanxiu; Li, Qiongshu; Tai, Guixiang

    2015-06-01

    Maltose-binding protein (MBP), a component of the maltose transport system of Escherichia coli, has been commonly thought to have minimal bioactivity. Our previous studies demonstrated that MBP could significantly enhance Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced T helper 1 (Th1) cell activation in mice. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of MBP on mouse T cells and found that MBP promoted the proliferation and IFN-γ production of CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that MBP directly induces Th1 activation. To explore the mechanism of Th1 activation, the expression of Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) on purified mouse CD4(+) T cells was detected. The results showed that MBP up-regulated TLR2 while down-regulated TLR4 expression, accompanied by a clear increase in MyD88 expression and IκB phosphorylation. Notably, the addition of anti-TLR2 antibody abrogated the MBP-induced CD4(+) T cells proliferation, IFN-γ secretion and MyD88 expression, whereas the addition of anti-TLR4 antibody exhibited a contradictive effect. Besides, the block of either TLR2 or TLR4 both reduced IκB phosphorylation. These results above suggest that TLR2-mediated MyD88-dependent pathway contributes to MBP-induced Th1 activation, while TLR4 appears to counteract this effect via MyD88-independent pathway.

  19. Auranofin, as an anti-rheumatic gold compound, suppresses LPS-induced homodimerization of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung S; Lee, Joo Y; Saitoh, Shin I; Miyake, Kensuke; Hwang, Daniel H

    2006-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are activated by invading microorganisms or endogenous molecules, evoke immune and inflammatory responses. TLR activation is closely linked to the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. Auranofin, an Au(I) compound, is a well-known and long-used anti-rheumatic drug. However, the mechanism as to how auranofin relieves the symptom of rheumatoid arthritis has not been fully clarified. Our results demonstrated that auranofin suppressed TLR4-mediated activation of transcription factors, NF-kappaB and IRF3, and expression of COX-2, a pro-inflammatory enzyme. This suppression was well correlated with the inhibitory effect of auranofin on the homodimerization of TLR4 induced by an agonist. Furthermore, auranofin inhibited NF-kappaB activation induced by MyD88-dependent downstream signaling components of TLR4, MyD88, IKKbeta, and p65. IRF3 activation induced by MyD88-independent signaling components, TRIF and TBK1, was also downregulated by auranofin. Our results first demonstrate that auranofin suppresses the multiple steps in TLR4 signaling, especially the homodimerization of TLR4. The results suggest that the suppression of TLR4 activity by auranofin may be the molecular mechanism through which auranofin exerts anti-rheumatic activity.

  20. CRF-Amplified Neuronal TLR4/MCP-1 Signaling Regulates Alcohol Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    June, Harry L; Liu, Juan; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Bell, Kimberly A; Balan, Irina; Bollino, Dominique; Puche, Adam; Aurelian, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a complex disorder that initiates with episodes of excessive alcohol drinking known as binge drinking. It has a 50–60% risk contribution from inherited susceptibility genes; however, their exact identity and function are still poorly understood. We report that alcohol-preferring P rats have innately elevated levels of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) that colocalize in neurons from the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). To examine the potential role of a TLR4/MCP-1 signal, we used Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) vectors (amplicons) that retain in vivo neurotropism. Infusion of amplicons for TLR4 or MCP-1 siRNA into the CeA or VTA from the P rats inhibited target gene expression and blunted binge drinking. A similarly delivered amplicon for scrambled siRNA did not inhibit TLR4 or MCP-1 expression nor reduce binge drinking, identifying a neuronal TLR4/MCP-1 signal that regulates the initiation of voluntary alcohol self-administration. The signal was sustained during alcohol drinking by increased expression of corticotropin-releasing factor and its feedback regulation of TLR4 expression, likely contributing to the transition to alcohol dependence. PMID:25567426

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms of TLR4 and MICA are Associated with Severity of Trachoma Disease in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Muneer; Berka, Noureddine; Khraiwesh, Mozna; Ramadan, Ali; Apprey, Victor; Furbert-Harris, Paulette; Quinn, Thomas; Brim, Hassan; Dunston, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of TLR4 Asp299Gly and MICA exon 5 microsatellites polymorphisms with severity of trachoma in a sub-Saharan East Africa population of Tanzanian villagers. Methods The samples were genotyped for MICA exon 5 microsatellites and the TLR4 299 A/G polymorphism by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), and GeneScan®, respectively. The association of TLR4 Asp299Gly and MICA exon 5 microsatellites with inflammatory trachoma (TI) and trichiasis (TI) were examined. Results The results showed an association between TLR4 and MICA polymorphisms and trachoma disease severity, as well as with protection. TLR4 an allele was significantly associated with inflammatory trachoma (p=0.0410), while the G allele (p=0.0410) was associated with protection. Conclusion TLR4 and MICA may modulate the risk of severity to trachoma disease by modulating the immune response to Ct. In addition; the increased frequency of MICA-A9 heterozygote in controls may suggest a positive selection of these alleles in adaptation to environments where Ct is endemic. PMID:27559544

  2. Sex Differences in monocytes and TLR4 associated immune responses; implications for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Gilkeson, Gary

    2014-03-07

    It has been shown that TLR7 and TLR9 signaling play a role in SLE pathogenesis. Our recent study revealed that estrogen receptor α knockout mice have impaired inflammatory responses to TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation in DCs, B cells and whole spleen cells. These findings indicate that estrogen receptor mediated signaling may impact universal TLR responsiveness. Whether estrogen has a direct or indirect effect on TLR responsiveness by immune cells is not clear. There is evidence of a role of TLR4 in SLE disease pathogenesis, such as the kidney damage, the induction of CD40 and autoantibodies, the suppression of regulatory T cells, and the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α) in SLE pathogenesis that can be induced by TLR4-mediated monocyte activation, suggesting that TLR4 and TLR4 responsiveness are also important for SLE disease. This review will focus on TLR4 responses and monocytes, which are understudied in systemic autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  3. TLR4 Signaling Is Involved in Brain Vascular Toxicity of PCB153 Bound to Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Choi, Jeong June; Eum, Sung Yong; Daunert, Sylvia; Toborek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    PCBs bind to environmental particles; however, potential toxicity exhibited by such complexes is not well understood. The aim of the present study is to study the hypothesis that assembling onto nanoparticles can influence the PCB153-induced brain endothelial toxicity via interaction with the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To address this hypothesis, TLR4-deficient and wild type control mice (males, 10 week old) were exposed to PCB153 (5 ng/g body weight) bound to chemically inert silica nanoparticles (PCB153-NPs), PCB153 alone, silica nanoparticles (NPs; diameter, 20 nm), or vehicle. Selected animals were also subjected to 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. As compared to exposure to PCB153 alone, treatment with PCB153-NP potentiated the brain infarct volume in control mice. Importantly, this effect was attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. Similarly, PCB153-NP-induced proinflammatory responses and disruption of tight junction integrity were less pronounced in TLR4-deficient mice as compared to control animals. Additional in vitro experiments revealed that TLR4 mediates toxicity of PCB153-NP via recruitment of tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). The results of current study indicate that binding to seemingly inert nanoparticles increase cerebrovascular toxicity of PCBs and suggest that targeting the TLR4/TRAF6 signaling may protect against these effects. PMID:23690990

  4. FoxO1 regulates Tlr4 inflammatory pathway signalling in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fan, WuQiang; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Kim, Jane J; Bae, Eunju; Spann, Nathanael J; Heinz, Sven; Glass, Christopher K; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2010-01-01

    The macrophage-mediated inflammatory response is a key etiologic component of obesity-related tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. The transcriptional factor FoxO1 is a key regulator of cell metabolism, cell cycle and cell death. Its activity is tightly regulated by the phosphoinositide-3-kinase-AKT (PI3K-Akt) pathway, which leads to phosphorylation, cytoplasmic retention and inactivation of FoxO1. Here, we show that FoxO1 promotes inflammation by enhancing Tlr4-mediated signalling in mature macrophages. By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq), we show that FoxO1 binds to multiple enhancer-like elements within the Tlr4 gene itself, as well as to sites in a number of Tlr4 signalling pathway genes. While FoxO1 potentiates Tlr4 signalling, activation of the latter induces AKT and subsequently inactivates FoxO1, establishing a self-limiting mechanism of inflammation. Given the central role of macrophage Tlr4 in transducing extrinsic proinflammatory signals, the novel functions for FoxO1 in macrophages as a transcriptional regulator of the Tlr4 gene and its inflammatory pathway, highlights FoxO1 as a key molecular adaptor integrating inflammatory responses in the context of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:21045807

  5. TLR4 drives the pathogenesis of acquired cholesteatoma by promoting local inflammation and bone destruction

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yu; Chen, Yu Bin; Chen, Sui Jun; Zheng, Yi Qing; Liu, Xiang; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Huai Li; Xu, Guo; Li, Zhuo Hao; Huang, Qiu Hong; Xiong, Hao; Zhang, Zhi Gang

    2015-01-01

    Acquired cholesteatoma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by both hyperkeratinized squamous epithelial overgrowth and bone destruction. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation and subsequent inflammatory cytokine production are closely associated with inflammatory bone disease. However, the expression and function of TLRs in cholesteatoma remain unclear.We observed inflammatory cell infiltration of the matrix and prematrix of human acquired cholesteatoma, as well as dramatically increased expression of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. TLR2 exhibited an up-regulation that was not statistically significant. TLR4 expression in human acquired cholesteatoma correlated with disease severity; the number of TLR4-positive cells increased with an increased degree of cholesteatoma, invasion, bone destruction, and hearing loss. Moreover, TLR4 deficiency was protective against experimental acquired cholesteatoma-driven bone destruction and hearing loss, as it reduced local TNF-α and IL-1β expression and impaired osteoclast formation by decreasing expression of the osteoclast effectors receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). TLR2 deficiency did not relieve disease severity, inflammatory responses, or osteoclast formation. Moreover, neither TLR2 nor TLR4 deficiency had an effect on antimicrobial peptides, inducible iNOS,BD-2 expression or bacterial clearance. Therefore, TLR4 may promote cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction and deafness by enhancing inflammatory responses and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26639190

  6. [TLR-4 involvement in pyroptosis of mice with pulmonary inflammation infected by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Hu, Peipei; Huang, Fushen; Niu, Junchao; Tang, Zhaoshan

    2015-05-04

    Pyroptosis is a caspase-1 dependent programmed cell death and involves pathogenesis of infectious diseases by releasing many pro-inflammatory cytokines to induced inflammation. TLR-4 plays an important role in mediating pathogenesis of some infectious diseases. In this study, we detected the expression of TLR-4 and some molecules (e. g caspase-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 ) related with pyroptosis to determine its involvement and mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation in mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. Mice were intranasally infected by A. pleuropneumoniae and killed 48 hours post infection. Pulmonary gross lesion and histological pathology by H-E were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1 , caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, and TLR-4 in lung of mice were detected by RT-PCR and qPCR. Serious pulmonary hemorrhage and inflammation in infected mice were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1, caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and TLR-4 increased, and expression levels of caspase-3 were not changed in lung of infected mice. TLR-4 might be involved in pulmonary inflammation of mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. After induced by activated TLR-4 some cells in this lesion expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines would induce pulmonary inflammation. This lesion might involve pyroptosis with caspase-1 expression.

  7. Relationship between TLR4 and MCP2 expression levels and habitual abortion.

    PubMed

    Li, X P; Song, L N; Tian, L P; Zhang, Y S

    2016-04-25

    Habitual abortion is associated with the altered expression of multiple genes. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP2 or CCL8) and habitual abortion. This was done by detecting and comparing their relative expression in peripheral blood and placental villi of patients and healthy fertile women. Based on our previous research, 85 subjects with habitual abortion (study group) and 40 healthy fertile women (control group), who were admitted to our hospital between June 2013 and December 2014, were enrolled in this study. After these subjects signed written informed consent, peripheral blood samples and villous tissues were collected, from which the total RNA was extracted. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 was detected with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, using GAPDH as a reference control. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood and villous tissues of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the changes in expression levels of TLR4 and MCP2. In conclusion, TLR4 and MCP2 expression correlated with the occurrence of habitual abortion. Detecting expression changes in TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood is a feasible method for predicting the occurrence of abortion in women of child-bearing age.

  8. TLR4 expression in normal gallbladder, chronic cholecystitis and gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huan, Peng; Maosheng, Tang; Zhiqian, Hu; Long, Cui; Xiaojun, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for gallbladder carcinoma. The molecular mechanisms linking inflammation and gallbladder carcinogenesis are incompletely understood. Toll-like receptors are involved in inflammatory response and play an important role in the innate immune system by initiating and directing immune response to pathogens. We tested the hypothesis that TLR4 participated in the development of gallbladder carcinoma through investigating the expression of TLR4 in chronic cholecystitis, gallbladder carcinoma and normal gallbladder. The expression of TLR4 in 30 specimens of chronic calculous cholecystitis, 13 specimens of gallbladder adenocarcinoma and 10 specimens of normal gallbladder tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry, western blotting analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. We showed that TLR4 was mostly localized to the glandular and luminal epithelium of gallbladder. TLR4 expression was lower in gallbladder carcinoma tissue than in chronic cholecystitis and normal gallbladder tissue, whereas the difference between chronic cholecystitis tissue and normal gallbladder tissue was not statistically significant. The expression of TLR4 may be closely associated with the course of gallbladder carcinoma.

  9. Knockdown of Tlr4 in the Arcuate Nucleus Improves Obesity Related Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongli; Li, Guohua; Li, Ying; Wang, Yuchuan; Liu, Zhengjuan

    2017-08-07

    High-fat diet-induced hypothalamic metabolic inflammation is emerging as a cause for the development of obesity. It is acknowledged that Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4) signaling plays a crucial role in triggering of the hypothalamic metabolic inflammation during the course of diet-induced obesity. Whether hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC)-restricted TLR4 knockdown improves obesity-related metabolic disorders remains unexplored. In this study, we used TLR4 shRNA lentiviral particles to suppress the TLR4 expression in the hypothalamic ARC of diet-induced obese rat model by stereotaxic injection. Our results demonstrate that ARC-restricted TLR4 knockdown protects obese rats from diet-induced weight gain and energy intake, from diet-induced impaired glucose homeostasis and peripheral insulin resistance, and from high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adipocyte hypertrophy. Thus, we define ARC-restricted TLR4 knockdown as a potential strategy to combat metabolic disorders associated with obesity.

  10. Cigarette smoke regulates the expression of TLR4 and IL-8 production by human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sarir, Hadi; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Karimi, Khalil; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Rahman, Irfan; Caldenhoven, Eric; Nijkamp, Frans P; Folkerts, Gert

    2009-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are present on monocytes and alveolar macrophages that form the first line of defense against inhaled particles. The importance of those cells in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has well been documented. Cigarette smoke contains high concentration of oxidants which can stimulate immune cells to produce reactive oxygen species, cytokines and chemokines. Methods In this study, we evaluated the effects of cigarette smoke medium (CSM) on TLR4 expression and interleukin (IL)-8 production by human macrophages investigating the involvement of ROS. Results and Discussion TLR4 surface expression was downregulated on short term exposure (1 h) of CSM. The downregulation could be explained by internalization of the TLR4 and the upregulation by an increase in TLR4 mRNA. IL-8 mRNA and protein were also increased by CSM. CSM stimulation increased intracellular ROS-production and decreased glutathione (GSH) levels. The modulation of TLR4 mRNA and surface receptors expression, IRAK activation, IκB-α degradation, IL-8 mRNA and protein, GSH depletion and ROS production were all prevented by antioxidants such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Conclusion TLR4 may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema and oxidative stress and seems to be a crucial contributor in lung inflammation. PMID:19409098

  11. Hierarchical Generalized Linear Models for Multiple Groups of Rare and Common Variants: Jointly Estimating Group and Individual-Variant Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Nengjun; Liu, Nianjun; Zhi, Degui; Li, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Complex diseases and traits are likely influenced by many common and rare genetic variants and environmental factors. Detecting disease susceptibility variants is a challenging task, especially when their frequencies are low and/or their effects are small or moderate. We propose here a comprehensive hierarchical generalized linear model framework for simultaneously analyzing multiple groups of rare and common variants and relevant covariates. The proposed hierarchical generalized linear models introduce a group effect and a genetic score (i.e., a linear combination of main-effect predictors for genetic variants) for each group of variants, and jointly they estimate the group effects and the weights of the genetic scores. This framework includes various previous methods as special cases, and it can effectively deal with both risk and protective variants in a group and can simultaneously estimate the cumulative contribution of multiple variants and their relative importance. Our computational strategy is based on extending the standard procedure for fitting generalized linear models in the statistical software R to the proposed hierarchical models, leading to the development of stable and flexible tools. The methods are illustrated with sequence data in gene ANGPTL4 from the Dallas Heart Study. The performance of the proposed procedures is further assessed via simulation studies. The methods are implemented in a freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/). PMID:22144906

  12. Common variants in FOXP1 are associated with generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A.; Fain, Pamela R.; Mailloux, Christina M.; Riccardi, Sheri L.; Gowan, Katherine; Holland, Paulene J.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Wallace, Margaret R.; McCormack, Wayne T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Gawkrodger, David J.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; van Geel, Nanny; Lambert, Jo; Overbeck, Andreas; Spritz, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent genome-wide association study of generalized vitiligo (GV) we identified 10 confirmed susceptibility loci. By testing additional loci that showed suggestive association in the genome-wide study, using two replication cohorts of European descent, we observed replicated association of GV with variants at 3p13 encompassing FOXP1 (rs17008723, combined P = 1.04 × 10-8) and with variants at 6q27 encompassing CCR6 (rs6902119, combined P = 3.94 × 10-7). PMID:20526340

  13. Enhanced Calvarial Bone Healing in CD11c-TLR4-/- and MyD88-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Taylor, Gwen M; Gilbert, James R; Losee, Joseph E; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Hackam, David J; Billiar, Timothy R; Cooper, Gregory M

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation is integral to the injury response. The inflammatory response is essential to the host defense against infection and also to tissue regeneration and repair. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical activators of the innate immune response and present attractive therapeutic targets for inflammation-modulated tissue regeneration. The authors' previous study showed that depletion of TLR4 resulted in accelerated skull bone healing concurrent with increased expression of osteoclastogenic genes. As such, in the present study, the authors used various knockout mouse models for TLR4 and its associated signaling mediators as tools to further understand the role of Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammation in calvarial bone healing. Calvarial defects (1.8-mm diameter) were created in wild-type, TLR4 knockout (TLR4), TLR2, MyD88, TRIF, TLR4 knockout in myeloid cell (Lyz-TLR4), and TLR4 knockout in dendritic-lineage cell (CD11c-TLR4) mice. Bone healing was examined using micro-computed tomographic, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses. Micro-computed tomographic and histomorphometric analyses revealed that TLR4-deficient mice (TLR4, Lyz-TLR4, and CD11c-TLR4) exhibited a faster intramembraneous healing response at postoperative day 7, whereas MyD88 and CD11c-TLR4 mice showed enhanced bone healing at day 28. The authors' data suggest a detrimental role for TLR4 in CD11c cells, mediated by Myd88 signaling, during calvarial bone healing. The authors have demonstrated that Toll-like receptor signaling components affect calvarial bone healing, establishing a link between the skeletal and immune systems during craniofacial bone healing. Toll-like receptor signaling components might be used to initiate enhanced healing in bone defects to improve clinical outcomes.

  14. Sequence Kernel Association Tests for the Combined Effect of Rare and Common Variants

    PubMed Central

    Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Lee, Seunggeun; Makarov, Vlad; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Lin, Xihong

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in sequencing technologies have made it possible to uncover both rare and common genetic variants. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) can test for the effect of common variants, whereas sequence-based association studies can evaluate the cumulative effect of both rare and common variants on disease risk. Many groupwise association tests, including burden tests and variance-component tests, have been proposed for this purpose. Although such tests do not exclude common variants from their evaluation, they focus mostly on testing the effect of rare variants by upweighting rare-variant effects and downweighting common-variant effects and can therefore lose substantial power when both rare and common genetic variants in a region influence trait susceptibility. There is increasing evidence that the allelic spectrum of risk variants at a given locus might include novel, rare, low-frequency, and common genetic variants. Here, we introduce several sequence kernel association tests to evaluate the cumulative effect of rare and common variants. The proposed tests are computationally efficient and are applicable to both binary and continuous traits. Furthermore, they can readily combine GWAS and whole-exome-sequencing data on the same individuals, when available, and are also applicable to deep-resequencing data of GWAS loci. We evaluate these tests on data simulated under comprehensive scenarios and show that compared with the most commonly used tests, including the burden and variance-component tests, they can achieve substantial increases in power. We next show applications to sequencing studies for Crohn disease and autism spectrum disorders. The proposed tests have been incorporated into the software package SKAT. PMID:23684009

  15. TLR4 ligands lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid a differentially regulate effector and memory CD8+ T Cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiguo; Joshi, Nikhil S; Liu, Ying; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Kaech, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    Vaccines formulated with nonreplicating pathogens require adjuvants to help bolster immunogenicity. The role of adjuvants in Ab production has been well studied, but how they influence memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation remains poorly defined. In this study we implemented dendritic cell-mediated immunization to study the effects of commonly used adjuvants, TLR ligands, on effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation in mice. Intriguingly, we found that the TLR4 ligand LPS was far more superior to other TLR ligands in generating memory CD8(+) T cells upon immunization. LPS boosted clonal expansion similar to the other adjuvants, but fewer of the activated CD8(+) T cells died during contraction, generating a larger pool of memory cells. Surprisingly, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), another TLR4 ligand, enhanced clonal expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells, but it also promoted their terminal differentiation and contraction; thus, fewer memory CD8(+) T cells formed, and MPLA-primed animals were less protected against secondary infection compared with those primed with LPS. Furthermore, gene expression profiling revealed that LPS-primed effector cells displayed a stronger pro-memory gene expression signature, whereas the gene expression profile of MPLA-primed effector cells aligned closer with terminal effector CD8(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrated that the LPS-TLR4-derived "pro-memory" signals were MyD88, but not Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β, dependent. This study reveals the influential power of adjuvants on the quantity and quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, and that attention to adjuvant selection is crucial because boosting effector cell expansion may not always equate with more memory T cells or greater protection.

  16. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns initiate inflammation and perturb the endocrine function of bovine granulosa cells from ovarian dominant follicles via TLR2 and TLR4 pathways.

    PubMed

    Price, Jennifer C; Bromfield, John J; Sheldon, I Martin

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial infections of the uterus or mammary gland commonly cause disease and infertility by perturbing growth and steroidogenesis of the dominant follicle in the ovary of cattle. Cells of the innate immune system use Toll-like receptors TLR2, TLR4, and TLR5 to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed by bacteria, leading to activation of MAPK and nuclear factor-κBκ pathways and production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6, and the chemokine IL-8. The present study tested whether granulosa cells from dominant follicles have functional TLR2, TLR4, and TLR5 pathways. Supernatants of primary bovine granulosa cells accumulated IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 when treated for 24 hours with Pam3CSK4 (PAM) that binds TLR2 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that binds TLR4 but not flagellin that binds TLR5. Granulosa cell responses to PAM or LPS were rapid, with increased phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 within 30 minutes and increased abundance of IL6, IL1B, IL10, TNF, IL8, and CCL5 mRNA after 3 hours of treatment. Accumulation of IL-6 in response to PAM and LPS was attenuated using small interfering RNA targeting TLR2 and TLR4, respectively. Furthermore, treating granulosa cells with inhibitors targeting MAPK or nuclear factor-κB reduced the accumulation of IL-6 in response to LPS or PAM. Treatment with LPS or PAM reduced the accumulation of estradiol and progesterone, and the PAMPs reduced granulosa cell expression of CYP19A1 mRNA and protein. In conclusion, bacterial PAMPs initiate inflammation and perturb the endocrine function of bovine granulosa cells from dominant follicles via TLR2 and TLR4 pathways.

  17. Palmitic acid increases invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells AsPC-1 through TLR4/ROS/NF-κB/MMP-9 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Binker-Cosen, Makena J; Richards, Daniel; Oliver, Brenda; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Binker, Marcelo G; Cosen-Binker, Laura I

    2017-02-26

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive malady with proclivity for early metastasis. Overexpression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the most common type of pancreatic malignancy, correlates to tumor size, lymph node involvement, venous invasion and pathological stage. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are natural TLR4 ligands that have been shown to increase the invasive ability of PC cells. However, rapid inactivation of circulating LPS and low systemic absorption of inhaled LPS from the bronchoalveolar compartment make other agonists such as saturated fatty acids more suitable to be considered for TLR4-related cell invasiveness. Interestingly, PC risk was strongly associated to intake of saturated fat from animal food sources, in particular to consumption of saturated palmitic acid (PA). In the present study, we investigated the influence of PA on the invasive capacity of human PC cells AsPC-1. Using specific inhibitors, we found that PA stimulation of these tumor cells induced a TLR4-mediated cell invasion. Our results also indicate that the signaling events downstream of TLR4 involved generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of nuclear factor-kappa beta, and secretion and activation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Furthermore, PA stimulation decreased the levels of the micro RNA 29c (miR-29c). Of note, while inhibition of miR-29c increased MMP-9 mRNA levels, MMP-9 secretion and activation, and invasiveness, miR-29c mimic abrogated all these PA-stimulated effects. These results strongly suggest that miR-29c could be an attractive potential pharmacological agent for antitumoral therapy in PC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanism of action of Zhuyu Annao pill in mice with cerebral intrahemorrhage based on TLR4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Hu, Yue-Qiang; Jiang, Ling-Fei; Wu, Lin

    2016-11-01

    To explore the protective effect and possible mechanism of action of Zhuyu Annao pill in mice with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Sixty mice were divided into the control group, hemorrhage group, drug-treated group (after hemorrhage), TLR4-knockout hemorrhage group and TLR4-knockout hemorrhage + drug-treated group (after hemorrhage) with 12 in each group. Model of autologous ICH was established in all groups. After drilling and 12 h of fasting, models in the control group hemorrhage group and TLR4-knockout hemorrhage group were all drenched with 10 mL/kg distilled water by intragastric administration. Models in the drug-treated group and TLR4-knockout hemorrhage + drug-treated group were drenched with 6.25 g/kg of Zhuyu Annao pill. All groups were treated for 7 d. Longa scoring method was used to measure the neurological defect scores and determine the brain water contents of all groups; ELISA was employed to detect the inflammatory factor interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β in brain tissues; and Western blot was applied to test the expression quantities of apoptotic protein Bax and anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in brain tissues. At day 3 and 7, compared with the hemorrhage group, the neurological defect scores of the drug-treated group, TLR4-knockout hemorrhage group and TLR4-knockout hemorrhage + drug-treated group decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with the hemorrhage group, the brain water contents of the drug-treated group, TLR4-knockout hemorrhage group and TLR4-knockout hemorrhage + drug-treated group reduced significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with the hemorrhage group, the inflammatory factor IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β of the drug-treated group, TLR4-knockout hemorrhage group and TLR4-knockout hemorrhage + drug-treated group decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with the hemorrhage group, the expression of apoptotic protein Bax of the drug-treated group, TLR4-knockout hemorrhage group and TLR4

  19. Targeting the TLR4 signaling pathway by polyphenols: A novel therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rahimifard, Mahban; Maqbool, Faheem; Moeini-Nodeh, Shermineh; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Braidy, Nady; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel

    2017-02-21

    A wide array of cell signaling mediators and their interactions play vital roles in neuroinflammation associated with ischemia, brain trauma, developmental disorders and age-related neurodegeneration. Along with neurons, microglia and astrocytes are also affected by the inflammatory cascade by releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen species. The release of pro-inflammatory mediators in response to neural dysfunction may be helpful, neutral or even deleterious to normal cellular survival. Moreover, the important role of NF-κB factors in the central nervous system (CNS) through toll-like receptor (TLR) activation has been well established. This review demonstrates recent findings regarding therapeutic aspects of polyphenolic compounds for the treatment of neuroinflammation, with the aim of regulating TLR4. Polyphenols including flavonoids, phenolic acids, phenolic alcohols, stilbenes and lignans, can target TLR4 signaling pathways in multiple ways. Toll interacting protein expression could be modulated by epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Resveratrol may also exert neuroprotective effects via the TLR4/NF-κB/STAT signaling cascade. Its role in activation of cascade via interfering with TLR4 oligomerization upon receptor stimulation has also been reported. Curcumin, another polyphenol, can suppress overexpression of inflammatory mediators via inhibiting the TLR4-MAPK/NF-κB pathway. It can also reduce neuronal apoptosis via a mechanism concerning the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia/macrophages. Despite a symphony of in vivo and in vitro studies, many molecular and pharmacological aspects of neuroinflammation remain unclear. It is proposed that natural compounds targeting TLR4 may serve as important pharmacophores for the development of potent drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  20. Skeletal muscle TLR4 and TACE are associated with body fat percentage in older adults.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Kyle L; Connors, Ian D; Deal, Michael A; Mott, Rachael E

    2016-04-01

    Elevated skeletal muscle expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been linked to increased inflammation in clinical populations. TNFα converting enzyme (TACE), which cleaves membrane-bound TNFα (mTNFα) to its soluble (sTNFα) and more bioactive form, has been linked to chronic disease. In contrast, higher physical activity level is associated with decreased chronic disease risk and inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and skeletal muscle TLR4, TACE, and TNFα in older adults. In 26 older adults (age = 68 ± 4 years, body mass index = 26 ± 3 kg·m(-2)), self-reported physical activity (kcal·week(-1)), estimated maximal oxygen consumption, and body composition (air plethysmography) were measured. TLR4, TACE, mTNFα, and sTNFα were measured in skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) using western blot analyses. Pearson product-moment correlations were run between variables. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Skeletal muscle TACE was directly associated with sTNFα (r = 0.53, p < 0.01). Linear regression modeling showed that mTNFα and TACE expression were predictive of sTNFα expression. No correlations were observed between physical activity and TLR4, TACE, or sTNFα. Percent body fat was directly associated with skeletal muscle TLR4 (r = 0.52, p < 0.01) and TACE (r = 0.50, p < 0.01), whereas fasting blood glucose was directly associated with TACE and sTNFα. In conclusion, we found that percent body fat was directly associated with TLR4 and TACE expression in skeletal muscle of older adults. These findings suggest that elevated skeletal muscle expression of TLR4 and TACE may contribute to the augmented inflammation and chronic disease risk observed with increased adiposity.

  1. Glial TLR4 signaling does not contribute to opioid-induced depression of respiration

    PubMed Central

    Zwicker, Jennifer D.; Zhang, Yong; Ren, Jun; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.; Greer, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids activate glia in the central nervous system in part by activating the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2) complex. TLR4/MD2-mediated activation of glia by opioids compromises their analgesic actions. Glial activation is also hypothesized as pivotal in opioid-mediated reward and tolerance and as a contributor to opioid-mediated respiratory depression. We tested the contribution of TLR4 to opioid-induced respiratory depression using rhythmically active medullary slices that contain the pre-Bötzinger Complex (preBötC, an important site of respiratory rhythm generation) and adult rats in vivo. Injection with DAMGO (μ-opioid receptor agonist; 50 μM) or bath application of DAMGO (500 nM) or fentanyl (1 μM) slowed frequency recorded from XII nerves to 40%, 40%, or 50% of control, respectively. This DAMGO-mediated frequency inhibition was unaffected by preapplication of lipopolysaccharides from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (a TLR4 antagonist, 2,000 ng/ml) or (+)naloxone (1–10 μM, a TLR4-antagonist). Bath application of (−)naloxone (500 nM; a TLR4 and μ-opioid antagonist), however, rapidly reversed the opioid-mediated frequency decrease. We also compared the opioid-induced respiratory depression in slices in vitro in the absence and presence of bath-applied minocycline (an inhibitor of microglial activation) and in slices prepared from mice injected (ip) 18 h earlier with minocycline or saline. Minocycline had no effect on respiratory depression in vitro. Finally, the respiratory depression evoked in anesthetized rats by tail vein infusion of fentanyl was unaffected by subsequent injection of (+)naloxone, but completely reversed by (−)naloxone. These data indicate that neither activation of microglia in preBötC nor TLR4/MD2-activation contribute to opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:25103966

  2. CD40 Negatively Regulates ATP-TLR4-Activated Inflammasome in Microglia.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sagar; Patel, Divyesh; Agrawal-Rajput, Reena

    2017-03-01

    During acute brain injury and/or sterile inflammation, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activates pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Microglial toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 activated by DAMPs potentiates neuroinflammation through inflammasome-induced IL-1β and pathogenic Th17 polarization which critically influences brain injury. TLR4 activation accompanies increased CD40, a cognate costimulatory molecule, involved in microglia-mediated immune responses in the brain. During brain injury, excessive release of extracellular ATP (DAMPs) is involved in promoting the damage. However, the regulatory role of CD40 in microglia during ATP-TLR4-mediated inflammasome activation has never been explored. We report that CD40, in the absence of ATP, synergizes TLR4-induced proinflammatory cytokines but not IL-1β, suggesting that the response is independent of inflammasome. The presence of ATP during TLR4 activation leads to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and caspase-1-mediated IL-1β secretion which was inhibited during CD40 activation, accompanied with inhibition of ERK1/2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Experiments using selective inhibitors prove indispensability of ERK 1/2 and ROS for inflammasome activation. The ATP-TLR4-primed macrophages polarize the immune response toward pathogenic Th17 cells, whereas CD40 activation mediates Th1 response. Exogenous supplementation of IFN-γ (a Th1 cytokine and CD40 inducer) results in decreased IL-1β, suggesting possible feedback loop mechanism of inflammasome inhibition, whereby IFN-γ-mediated increase in CD40 expression and activation suppress neurotoxic inflammasome activation required for Th17 response. Collectively, the findings indicate that CD40 is a novel negative regulator of ATP-TLR4-mediated inflammasome activation in microglia, thus providing a checkpoint to regulate excessive inflammasome activation and Th17 response during DAMP-mediated brain injury.

  3. Increased TLR4 expression in murine placentas after oral infection with periodontal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Arce, R.M.; Barros, S.P.; Wacker, B.; Peters, B.; Moss, K.; Offenbacher, S.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal periodontitis has emerged as a putative risk factor for preterm births in humans. The periodontitis-associated dental biofilm is thought to serve as an important source of oral bacteria and related virulence factors that hematogenously disseminate and affect the fetoplacental unit; however the underlying biological mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated. This study hypothesized that an oral infection with the human periodontal pathogens Campylobacter rectus and Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to induce fetal growth restriction, placental inflammation and enhance Toll-like receptors type 4 (TLR4) expression in a murine pregnancy model. Female Balb/C mice (n=40) were orally infected with C. rectus and/or P. gingivalis over a 16-week period and mated once per week. Pregnant mice were sacrificed at embryonic day (E) 16.5 and placentas were collected and analyzed for TLR4 mRNA levels and qualitative protein expression by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. TLR4 mRNA expression was found to be increased in C. rectus-infected group (1.98±0.886 fold difference, P<0.01, ANOVA) compared to controls. Microscopic analysis of murine placentas showed enhanced immunofluorescence of TLR4 in trophoblasts, mainly in the placental labyrinth layer. Also, combined oral infection with C. rectus and P. gingivalis significantly reduced the overall fecundity compared to controls (16.7% vs. 75%, infected vs. non-infected mice respectively, P=0.03, Kaplan-Meier). The results supported an enhanced placental TLR4 expression after oral infection with periodontal pathogens. The TLR4 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of preterm births; therefore the abnormal regulation of placental TLR4 may give new insights into how maternal periodontitis and periodontal pathogens might be linked to placental inflammation and preterm birth pathogenesis. PMID:19101032

  4. A TLR4-interacting SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Kosanke, Stanley; Awasthi, Shanjana

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between surfactant protein-A (SP-A) and TLR4 is important for host defense. We have recently identified an SPA4 peptide region from the interface of SP-A-TLR4 complex. Here, we studied the involvement of the SPA4 peptide region in SP-A-TLR4 interaction using a two-hybrid system, and biological effects of SPA4 peptide in cell systems and a mouse model. HEK293 cells were transfected with plasmid DNAs encoding SP-A or a SP-A-mutant lacking SPA4 peptide region and TLR4. Luciferase activity was measured as the end-point of SP-A-TLR4 interaction. NF-κB activity was also assessed simultaneously. Next, the dendritic cells or mice were challenged with Escherichia coli-derived LPS and treated with SPA4 peptide. Endotoxic shock-like symptoms and inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, NF-κB, leukocyte influx) were assessed. Our results reveal that the SPA4 peptide region contributes to the SP-A-TLR4 interaction and inhibits the LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α. We also observed that the SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced expression of TNF-α, nuclear localization of NF-κB-p65 and cell influx, and alleviates the endotoxic shock-like symptoms in a mouse model. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of the SPA4 peptide through its binding to TLR4 can be of therapeutic benefit.

  5. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Patrick CA; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham AR; Ádány, Róza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H; Bockett, Nicholas A; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Bárbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf SN; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M; Groen, Harry JM; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick HJ; Hunt, Sarah E; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Mäki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T; Mearin, M Luisa; Mein, Charles A; Mirza, Muddassar M; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I; Mulder, Chris J; Murray, Joseph A; Núñez, Concepción; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H; Verbeek, Wieke HM; Weersma, Rinse K; Wolters, Victorien M; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A

    2010-01-01

    We performed a second-generation genome wide association study of 4,533 celiac disease cases and 10,750 controls. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with PGWAS<10−4, and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci, in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions reached genome wide significance (Pcombined<5×10−8), most contain immune function genes (BACH2, CCR4, CD80, CIITA/SOCS1/CLEC16A, ICOSLG, ZMIZ1) with ETS1, RUNX3, THEMIS and TNFRSF14 playing key roles in thymic T cell selection. A further 13 regions had suggestive association evidence. In an expression quantitative trait meta-analysis of 1,469 whole blood samples, 20 of 38 (52.6%) tested loci had celiac risk variants correlated (P<0.0028, FDR 5%) with cis gene expression. PMID:20190752

  6. Intramembrane attenuation of the TLR4-TLR6 dimer impairs receptor assembly and reduces microglia-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Shmuel-Galia, Liraz; Klug, Yoel; Porat, Ziv; Charni, Meital; Zarmi, Batya; Shai, Yechiel

    2017-08-11

    Recently, a single study revealed a new complex composed of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR6, and CD36 induced by fibrillary Aβ peptides, the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Unlike TLRs located on the plasma membrane that dimerize on the membrane after ligand binding to their extracellular domain, the TLR4-TLR6-CD36 complex assembly has been suggested to be induced by intracellular signals from CD36, similar to integrin inside-out signaling. However, the assembly site of TLR4-TLR6-CD36 and the domains participating in Aβ-induced signaling is still unknown. By interfering with TLR4-TLR6 dimerization using a TLR4-derived peptide, we show that receptor assembly is abrogated within the plasma membrane. Furthermore, we reveal that the transmembrane domains of TLR4 and TLR6 have an essential role in receptor dimerization and activation. Inhibition of TLR4-TLR6 assembly was associated with reduced secretion of proinflammatory mediators from microglia cells, ultimately rescuing neurons from death. Our findings support TLR4-TLR6 dimerization induced by Aβ. Moreover, we shed new light on TLR4-TLR6 assembly and localization and show the potential of inhibiting TLR4-TLR6 dimerization as a treatment of Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. TLR4-mediated inflammation is a key pathogenic event leading to kidney damage and fibrosis in cyclosporine nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    González-Guerrero, Cristian; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Guerri, Consuelo; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ramos, Adrián M

    2017-04-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) successfully prevents allograft rejection, but nephrotoxicity is still a dose-limiting adverse effect. TLR4 activation promotes kidney damage but whether this innate immunity receptor mediates CsA nephrotoxicity is unknown. The in vivo role of TLR4 during CsA nephrotoxicity was studied in mice co-treated with CsA and the TLR4 inhibitor TAK242 and also in TLR4(-/-) mice. CsA-induced renal TLR4 expression in wild-type mice. Pharmacological or genetic targeting of TLR4 reduced the activation of proinflammatory signaling, including JNK/c-jun, JAK2/STAT3, IRE1α and NF-κB and the expression of Fn14. Expression of proinflammatory factors and cytokines was also decreased, and kidney monocyte and lymphocyte influx was prevented. TLR4 inhibition also reduced tubular damage and drastically prevented the development of kidney fibrosis. In vivo and in vitro CsA promoted secretion of the TLR ligand HMGB1 by tubular cells upstream of TLR4 activation, and prevention of HMGB1 secretion significantly reduced CsA-induced synthesis of MCP-1, suggesting that HMGB1 may be one of the mediators of CsA-induced TLR4 activation. These results suggest that TLR4 is a potential pharmacological target in CsA nephrotoxicity.

  8. Mice that exclusively express TLR4 on endothelial cells can efficiently clear a lethal systemic Gram-negative bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Andonegui, Graciela; Zhou, Hong; Bullard, Daniel; Kelly, Margaret M; Mullaly, Sarah C; McDonald, Braedon; Long, Elizabeth M; Robbins, Stephen M; Kubes, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Recognition of LPS by TLR4 on immune sentinel cells such as macrophages is thought to be key to the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection with Gram-negative bacteria. To explore whether endothelial TLR4 plays a role in this process, we engineered and imaged mice that expressed TLR4 exclusively on endothelium (known herein as EndotheliumTLR4 mice). Local administration of LPS into tissue induced comparable neutrophil recruitment in EndotheliumTLR4 and wild-type mice. Following systemic LPS or intraperitoneal E. coli administration, most neutrophils were sequestered in the lungs of wild-type mice and did not accumulate at primary sites of infection. In contrast, EndotheliumTLR4 mice showed reduced pulmonary capillary neutrophil sequestration over the first 24 hours; as a result, they mobilized neutrophils to primary sites of infection, cleared bacteria, and resisted a dose of E. coli that killed 50% of wild-type mice in the first 48 hours. In fact, the only defect we detected in EndotheliumTLR4 mice was a failure to accumulate neutrophils in the lungs following intratracheal administration of LPS; this response required TLR4 on bone marrow-derived immune cells. Therefore, endothelial TLR4 functions as the primary intravascular sentinel system for detection of bacteria, whereas bone marrow-derived immune cells are critical for pathogen detection at barrier sites. Nonendothelial TLR4 contributes to failure to accumulate neutrophils at primary infection sites in a disseminated systemic infection.

  9. Decreased TLR4 expression on monocytes may cause regulatory T cells abnormality in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yating; Li, Huiyuan; Li, Yang; Lyu, Mingen; Zhang, Donglei; Fu, Rongfeng; Guan, Yue; Wang, Shixuan; Sun, Boyang; Dou, Xueqing; Yang, Renchi

    2017-08-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease with many immune dysfunctions including T helper type 1 cell (Th1) polarization and regulatory T cells (Tregs) deficiency. This study aimed to determine the effects of TLR4 on Treg differentiation and the cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with ITP. We found that expression of TLR4 on monocytes was significantly decreased in patients with active ITP than that in healthy controls and it had positive correlation with platelet count. However, there was no expression of TLR4 on CD4(+) T cells. The result of further experiments in vitro showed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation could enhance TLR4 expression on monocytes. Additionally, activation of TLR4 with LPS could promote differentiation of Treg cells and anti-TLR4 attenuated this effect. There was no significant difference about Th17 cells among three subgroups. However, the Th17/Treg cell ratio was decreased after stimulation with LPS and increased with anti-TLR4. Moreover, activation of TLR4 with LPS could significantly promote the secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFB1), while anti-TLR4 significantly suppressed the secretion of them. Nevertheless, the secretion of IL-17A did not reach the statistical difference among three subgroups. In summary, decreased TLR4 appears to cause Tregs abnormality in ITP by modulating Tregs differentiation and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  10. Involvement of TLR4/MD-2 complex in species-specific lipopolysaccharide-mimetic signal transduction by Taxol.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, K; Akashi, S; Shimazu, R; Yoshida, T; Miyake, K; Nishijima, M

    2001-01-01

    Taxol, an antitumor agent derived from a plant, mimics the action of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice, but not in humans. The LPS-mimetic activity of Taxol is not observed in LPS-hyporesponsive C3H/HeJ mice which possess a point mutation in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4); therefore, TLR4 appears to be involved in both Taxol and LPS signaling. In addition, TLR4 was recently shown to physically associate with MD-2, a molecule that confers LPS-responsiveness on TLR4. Here we examined whether or not TLR4/MD-2 complex mediates a Taxol-induced signal by using transformants of the mouse pro-B cell line, Ba/F3, expressing mouse TLR4 alone, both mouse TLR4 and mouse MD-2, and both mouse MD-2 and mouse TLR4 lacking the cytoplasmic portion. Our results demonstrated that co-expression of mouse TLR4 and mouse MD-2 was required for Taxol responsiveness, and that the TLR4/MD-2 complex is the shared molecule in Taxol and LPS signal transduction in mice. We also found that mouse MD-2, but not human MD-2, is involved in Taxol signaling, suggesting that MD-2 is responsible for the species-specific responsiveness to Taxol.

  11. sTLR4/MD-2 complex inhibits colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo by targeting LPS

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jie; Wei, Liuhua; Wu, Chunlin; Zhang, Qiaoyun; Wei, Dong; Chen, Xiang; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiaoli; Dai, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is aggressive and associated with TLR4-MD-2 signaling. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) were highly expressed in human CRC. The soluble form of extracellular TLR4 domain (sTLR4) and MD-2 may have important roles in binding lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, sTLR4 and MD-2 protein and prepared sTLR4/MD-2 complex were synthesized successfully to restrain LPS-TLR4/MD-2 activation by competing with cellular membrane TLR4 for binding LPS. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex can significantly attenuate LPS induced pro-inflammatory and migration cytokine production in vitro and in vivo, and inhibit the effect of LPS on the cell cycle, migration and invasion of human CRC cells in vitro. Administration of sTLR4/MD-2 complex protected mice from tumor both in xenograft and implantation metastasis model. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex treated mice had smaller tumor, less body weight loss and lower expression of inflammatory cytokines. Here, the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium salt (AOM/DSS) murine model was used as an experimental platform to simulate the physiological and pathological processes of cancers associated with chronic intestinal inflammation. AOM/DSS-induced tumors were inhibited in mice treated by sTLR4/MD-2 complex. It is demonstrated in our study that sTLR4/MD-2 complex could inhibit CRC by competing with binding LPS, raising the complex's possibility of a new prevention agent against CRC. PMID:27409669

  12. Constitutive activation of epithelial TLR4 augments inflammatory responses to mucosal injury and drives colitis-associated tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fukata, Masayuki; Shang, Limin; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Sotolongo, John; Pastorini, Cristhine; España, Cecilia; Ungaro, Ryan; Harpaz, Noam; Cooper, Harry S.; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Zaias, Julia; Perez, Maria T.; Mayer, Lloyd; Vamadevan, Arunan S.; Lira, Sergio A.; Abreu, Maria T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation culminates in cancer and a link to TLR4 has been suggested by our observation that TLR4 deficiency prevents colitis-associated neoplasia. In the current study, we address the effect of the aberrant activation of epithelial TLR4 on induction of colitis and colitis-associated tumor development. We take a translational approach to address the consequences of increased TLR signaling in the intestinal mucosa. Mice transgenic for a constitutively-active TLR4 under the intestine-specific villin promoter (villin-TLR4 mice) were treated with DSS for acute colitis and azoxymethane-dextran sulfate sodium. TLR4 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in colonic tissue from patients with ulcerative colitis and ulcerative colitis associated cancer. The effect of an antagonist TLR4 Ab was tested in prevention of colitis-associated neoplasia in the AOM-DSS model. Villin-TLR4 mice were highly susceptible to both acute colitis and colitis-associated neoplasia. Villin-TLR4 mice had increased epithelial expression of COX-2 and mucosal PGE2 production at baseline. Increased severity of colitis in villin-TLR4 mice was characterized by enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators and increased neutrophilic infiltration. In human UC samples, TLR4 expression was upregulated in almost all CAC and progressively increases with grade of dysplasia. As a proof of principle, a TLR4/MD-2 antagonist antibody inhibited colitis-associated neoplasia in the mouse model. Our results show that regulation of TLR's can affect the outcome of both acute colitis and its consequences—cancer. Targeting TLR4 and other TLR's may ultimately play a role in prevention or treatment of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:21674704

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T.-C.; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  14. Superoxide Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in a TLR-4 and NOX-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza Obaid; Miller, David; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the early innate immune response to perceived infectious and sterile threats. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a novel mechanism to counter pathogenic invasion and sequelae of ischemia, including cell death and oxidative stress. Superoxide is a radical intermediate of oxygen metabolism produced by parenchymal and nonparenchymal hepatic cells, and is a hallmark of oxidative stress after liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). While extracellular superoxide recruits neutrophils to the liver and initiates sterile inflammatory injury, it is unknown whether superoxide induces the formation of NETs. We hypothesize that superoxide induces NET formation through a signaling cascade involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and neutrophil NADPH oxidase (NOX). We treated neutrophils with extracellular superoxide and observed NET DNA release, histone H3 citrullination and increased levels of MPO-DNA complexes occurring in a TLR-4–dependent manner. Inhibition of superoxide generation by allopurinol and inhibition of NOX by diphenyleneiodonium prevented NET formation. When mice were subjected to warm liver I/R, we found significant NET formation associated with liver necrosis and increased serum ALT in TLR-4 WT but not TLR-4 KO mice. To reduce circulating superoxide, we pretreated mice undergoing I/R with allopurinol and N-acetylcysteine, which resulted in decreased NETs and ameliorated liver injury. Our study demonstrates a requirement for TLR-4 and NOX in superoxide-induced NETs, and suggests involvement of superoxide-induced NETs in pathophysiologic settings. PMID:27453505

  15. [The role of TLR4 receptor in the stress response of lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Novoselova, E G; Khrenov, M O; Cherenkov, D A; Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, T V; Lunin, S M; Lysenko, E A; Fesenko, E E

    2008-01-01

    In vitro effects of low-level electromagnetic waves (8.18 GHz, frequency swings within 1 s, intensity 1 microW/cm, exposure for 1 h) and low-energy laser light (He-Ne laser with 632.8 nm, 0.2 mW/cm, dose 1.2 x 10(-2) J/cm2) on the expression of receptor protein TLR4, which is known as a part of the system for microbal toxin recognition, were studied in mouse lymphocytes. In addition, TLR4 expression was examined in situations when stress responses to low-level nonionizing radiation were modified by the antibiotic geldanamycin, which suppresses the activity of the heat shock protein Hsp90. It was found that low-level microwaves significantly raised the amount of TLR4; in contrast, laser light decreased the expression of the receptor in lymphocytes. In cells pretreated with geldanamycin, the TLR4 expression in irradiated cells was reduced to minimum levels, much lower than control values. The results showed that TLR4, which is involved in specific binding of toxin from gram-negative bacteria, can regulate cell responses to signals of other origin, in particular to nonionizig radiation, including low-level microwaves and laser light.

  16. Inhibition of Corneal Inflammation by the TLR4 Antagonist Eritoran Tetrasodium (E5564)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Pearlman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of the TLR4/MD-2 antagonist eritoran tetrasodium in a murine model of contact lens–associated corneal infiltrates. Methods C57BL/6 mouse corneas were abraded and treated with eritoran tetrasodium or placebo, either before or after stimulation with either LPS, the TLR2 ligand Pam3Cys, or antibiotic-killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A 2-mm punch from a silicon hydrogel contact lens was used to cover the corneal surface throughout the inhibition and stimulation period. Corneal infiltrates were detected by in vivo confocal microscopy and by immunohistochemistry for neutrophils. The effect of eritoran tetrasodium on stimulated human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs), macrophages, and neutrophils was also assessed. Results Eritoran tetrasodium significantly inhibited CXC chemokine production in the cornea and development of corneal infiltrates, specifically neutrophils, in response to stimulation with LPS (TLR4), but not Pam3Cys (TLR2). When the antagonist was applied after LPS stimulation, neutrophil infiltration was also inhibited, although a higher concentration was needed. Furthermore, IL-8 production by TLR4- but not TLR2-stimulated HCECs, macrophages and neutrophils was also significantly reduced. Corneal inflammation induced by P. aeruginosa in the presence of tobramycin was found to be dependent on expression of TLR4 and MD-2 and is inhibited by eritoran tetrasodium. Conclusions Eritoran tetrasodium is a highly effective antagonist of TLR4/MD-2-dependent corneal inflammation. PMID:18936141

  17. Modulation of CD14 and TLR4.MD-2 activities by a synthetic lipid A mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Cighetti, Roberto; Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Sestito, Stefania Enza; Zanoni, Ivan; Kubik, Łukasz; Ardá-Freire, Ana; Calabrese, Valentina; Granucci, Francesca; Jerala, Roman; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Monosaccharide lipid A mimetics composed by a glucosamine core linked to two fatty acid chains and bearing one or two phosphates have been synthesized. While compounds 1 and 2, with one phosphate group, were practically inactive in inhibiting LPS-induced TLR4 signaling and cytokine production in HEK-blue™ cells and murine macrophages, compound 3 with two phosphates was found to be active in efficiently inhibiting TLR4 signal in both cell types. The direct interaction of molecule 3 with MD-2 co-receptor has been investigated by means of NMR and molecular modeling/docking analysis. This compound also interacts directly with CD14 receptor, stimulating its internalization by endocytosis. Experiments on macrophages show that the effect on CD14 reinforces the activity on MD-2.TLR4, because compound 3 activity is higher when CD14 is important for TLR4 signaling i,e, at low LPS concentration. The dual MD-2 and CD14 targeting, accompanied by good solubility in water and lack of toxicity, suggests the use of monosaccharide 3 as a lead compound to develop drugs directed against TLR4-related syndromes. PMID:24339336

  18. TLR4 is a target of environmentally relevant concentration of lead.

    PubMed

    Luna, Ana L; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Martínez, Marcela; Torres-Avilés, Nallely; Gómez, Rocío; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S

    2012-11-15

    Lead (Pb) alters the susceptibility to different pathogens suggesting that macrophage-mediated defense mechanisms, through activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs), may be affected by Pb. The aim of this study was to test whether activation of TLR4 is a targeted molecule to the effect of environmentally relevant Pb concentrations (0.05, 0.5 and 5μg/dL). The function of macrophages activated through TLR4 was evaluated using as TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from two different pathogens: Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Pb induced proliferation, increased the NO(-) baseline, IL-1β and IL-6 secretion. Interestingly, Pb exposure induced differential effects on cells stimulated with the two LPS used: in macrophages stimulated with LPS from E. coli, Pb caused an early decrease in proliferation, increase NO(-) production, and decrease IL-6 and TNF-α secretion; in macrophages stimulated with LPS from S. typhimurium, Pb decreased proliferation after 36h, induced a biphasic effect on NO(-) production, and enhance the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Results suggest that TLR4 is a target for the Pb effect, which up to 5.0μg/dL affect immune competence against pathogens, dependent on the bacterial species. This effect may be attributable to structural differences that determine LPS affinity for TLR4.

  19. Role of TLR2- and TLR4-mediated signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage death.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Dulfary; Rojas, Mauricio; Hernández, Israel; Radzioch, Danuta; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Infection of macrophages with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. TLRs 2 and 4 recognition of mycobacterial ligands has been independently associated to apoptosis induction. To try to understand the particular contribution of these receptors to apoptotic or necrotic signaling upon infection with live Mtb H37Rv, we used macrophage lines derived from wild-type or TLR2-, TLR4-, and MyD88-deficient mouse strains. Mtb-infection triggered apoptosis depending on a TLR2/TLR4/MyD88/p38/ERK/PI-3K/NF-kB pathway; however, necrosis was favored in absence of TLR4 signaling independently of p38, ERK1/2, PI-3K or NF-kappaB activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that cooperation between TLR2- and TLR4-dependent mediated signals play a critical role in macrophage apoptosis induced by Mtb and the TLR4-mediated signaling has important role in the maintenance of the balance between apoptotic vs. necrotic cell death induced by macrophage infection with Mtb.

  20. TLR4-Mediated Placental Pathology and Pregnancy Outcome in Experimental Malaria.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Renato; Lima, Flávia Afonso; Reis, Aramys Silva; Murillo, Oscar Javier; Peixoto, Erika Paula Machado; Bandeira, Carla Letícia; Fotoran, Wesley Luzetti; Sardinha, Luis Roberto; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Bevilacqua, Estela; Lima, Maria Regina D'Império; Alvarez, José Maria; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Marinho, Cláudio Romerso Farias

    2017-08-17

    Malaria-associate pregnancy has a significant impact on infant morbidity and mortality. The detrimental effects of malaria infection during pregnancy have been shown to correlate with immune activation in the placental tissue. Herein we sought to evaluate the effect of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activation on placental malaria (PM) development by using the Plasmodium berghei NK65(GFP) infection model. We observed that activation of the innate immune system by parasites leads to PM due to local inflammation. We identified TLR4 activation as the main pathway involved in the inflammatory process in the placental tissue since the absence of functional TLR4 in mice leads to a decrease in the pro-inflammatory responses, which resulted in an improved pregnancy outcome. Additionally, a similar result was obtained when infected pregnant mice were treated with IAXO-101, a TLR4/CD14 blocker. Together, this study illustrates the importance of TLR4 signalling for the generation of the severe inflammatory response involved in PM pathogenesis. Therefore, our results implicate that TLR4 blockage could be a potential candidate for therapeutic interventions to reduce malaria-induced pathology both in the mother and the fetus.

  1. MD-2 is required for disulfide HMGB1-dependent TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Haichao; Ju, Zhongliang; Ragab, Ahmed A; Lundbäck, Peter; Long, Wei; Valdes-Ferrer, Sergio I; He, Mingzhu; Pribis, John P; Li, Jianhua; Lu, Ben; Gero, Domokos; Szabo, Csaba; Antoine, Daniel J; Harris, Helena E; Golenbock, Doug T; Meng, Jianmin; Roth, Jesse; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Andersson, Ulf; Billiar, Timothy R; Tracey, Kevin J; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2015-01-12

    Innate immune receptors for pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and DAMPs) orchestrate inflammatory responses to infection and injury. Secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by damaged cells, HMGB1 is subjected to redox modification that distinctly influences its extracellular functions. Previously, it was unknown how the TLR4 signalosome distinguished between HMGB1 isoforms. Here we demonstrate that the extracellular TLR4 adaptor, myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2), binds specifically to the cytokine-inducing disulfide isoform of HMGB1, to the exclusion of other isoforms. Using MD-2-deficient mice, as well as MD-2 silencing in macrophages, we show a requirement for HMGB1-dependent TLR4 signaling. By screening HMGB1 peptide libraries, we identified a tetramer (FSSE, designated P5779) as a specific MD-2 antagonist preventing MD-2-HMGB1 interaction and TLR4 signaling. P5779 does not interfere with lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine/chemokine production, thus preserving PAMP-mediated TLR4-MD-2 responses. Furthermore, P5779 can protect mice against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury, chemical toxicity, and sepsis. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which innate systems selectively recognize specific HMGB1 isoforms. The results may direct toward strategies aimed at attenuating DAMP-mediated inflammation while preserving antimicrobial immune responsiveness.

  2. MD-2 is required for disulfide HMGB1–dependent TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Ju, Zhongliang; Ragab, Ahmed A.; Lundbäck, Peter; Long, Wei; Valdes-Ferrer, Sergio I.; He, Mingzhu; Pribis, John P.; Li, Jianhua; Lu, Ben; Gero, Domokos; Szabo, Csaba; Antoine, Daniel J.; Harris, Helena E.; Golenbock, Doug T.; Meng, Jianmin; Roth, Jesse; Chavan, Sangeeta S.; Andersson, Ulf; Billiar, Timothy R.; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune receptors for pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and DAMPs) orchestrate inflammatory responses to infection and injury. Secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by damaged cells, HMGB1 is subjected to redox modification that distinctly influences its extracellular functions. Previously, it was unknown how the TLR4 signalosome distinguished between HMGB1 isoforms. Here we demonstrate that the extracellular TLR4 adaptor, myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2), binds specifically to the cytokine-inducing disulfide isoform of HMGB1, to the exclusion of other isoforms. Using MD-2–deficient mice, as well as MD-2 silencing in macrophages, we show a requirement for HMGB1-dependent TLR4 signaling. By screening HMGB1 peptide libraries, we identified a tetramer (FSSE, designated P5779) as a specific MD-2 antagonist preventing MD-2–HMGB1 interaction and TLR4 signaling. P5779 does not interfere with lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine/chemokine production, thus preserving PAMP-mediated TLR4–MD-2 responses. Furthermore, P5779 can protect mice against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury, chemical toxicity, and sepsis. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which innate systems selectively recognize specific HMGB1 isoforms. The results may direct toward strategies aimed at attenuating DAMP-mediated inflammation while preserving antimicrobial immune responsiveness. PMID:25559892

  3. A structure-function approach to optimizing TLR4 ligands for human vaccines.

    PubMed

    Carter, Darrick; Fox, Christopher B; Day, Tracey A; Guderian, Jeffrey A; Liang, Hong; Rolf, Tom; Vergara, Julie; Sagawa, Zachary K; Ireton, Greg; Orr, Mark T; Desbien, Anthony; Duthie, Malcolm S; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-11-01

    Adjuvants are combined with vaccine antigens to enhance and modify immune responses, and have historically been primarily crude, undefined entities. Introducing toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands has led to a new generation of adjuvants, with TLR4 ligands being the most extensively used in human vaccines. The TLR4 crystal structures demonstrate extensive contact with their ligands and provide clues as to how they discriminate a broad array of molecules and activate or attenuate innate, as well as adaptive, responses resulting from these interactions. Leveraging this discerning ability, we made subtle chemical alterations to the structure of a synthetic monophosphoryl lipid-A molecule to produce SLA, a designer TLR4 ligand that had a number of desirable adjuvant effects. The SLA molecule stimulated human TLR4 and induced Th1 biasing cytokines and chemokines. On human cells, the activity of SLA plateaued at lower concentrations than the lipid A comparator, and induced cytokine profiles distinct from other known TLR4 agonists, indicating the potential for superior adjuvant performance. SLA was formulated in an oil-in-water emulsion, producing an adjuvant that elicited potent Th1-biased adaptive responses. This was verified using a recombinant Leishmania vaccine antigen, first in mice, then in a clinical study in which the antigen-specific Th1-biased responses observed in mice were recapitulated in humans. These results demonstrated that using structure-based approaches one can predictably design and produce modern adjuvant formulations for safe and effective human vaccines.

  4. A structure-function approach to optimizing TLR4 ligands for human vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Darrick; Fox, Christopher B; Day, Tracey A; Guderian, Jeffrey A; Liang, Hong; Rolf, Tom; Vergara, Julie; Sagawa, Zachary K; Ireton, Greg; Orr, Mark T; Desbien, Anthony; Duthie, Malcolm S; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are combined with vaccine antigens to enhance and modify immune responses, and have historically been primarily crude, undefined entities. Introducing toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands has led to a new generation of adjuvants, with TLR4 ligands being the most extensively used in human vaccines. The TLR4 crystal structures demonstrate extensive contact with their ligands and provide clues as to how they discriminate a broad array of molecules and activate or attenuate innate, as well as adaptive, responses resulting from these interactions. Leveraging this discerning ability, we made subtle chemical alterations to the structure of a synthetic monophosphoryl lipid-A molecule to produce SLA, a designer TLR4 ligand that had a number of desirable adjuvant effects. The SLA molecule stimulated human TLR4 and induced Th1 biasing cytokines and chemokines. On human cells, the activity of SLA plateaued at lower concentrations than the lipid A comparator, and induced cytokine profiles distinct from other known TLR4 agonists, indicating the potential for superior adjuvant performance. SLA was formulated in an oil-in-water emulsion, producing an adjuvant that elicited potent Th1-biased adaptive responses. This was verified using a recombinant Leishmania vaccine antigen, first in mice, then in a clinical study in which the antigen-specific Th1-biased responses observed in mice were recapitulated in humans. These results demonstrated that using structure-based approaches one can predictably design and produce modern adjuvant formulations for safe and effective human vaccines. PMID:27990284

  5. TLR4-Mediated Blunting of Inflammatory Responses to Eccentric Exercise in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    De Paz, José A.; Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Cuevas, María J.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the inflammatory response mediated by the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway after acute eccentric exercise before and after an eccentric training program in women. Twenty women performed two acute eccentric bouts using a squat machine over a ~9 week interval. The training group (TG) carried out an eccentric training program during 6 weeks, while the control group (CG) did not follow any training. Protein content of markers involved in the TLR4-mediated activation of several nuclear transcription factors, such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3), was analyzed. The inflammatory response after the first acute bout was similar between TG and CG, showing an upregulation of all the markers analyzed, with the exception of IRF3. After the second bout, the upregulation of TLR4 signaling pathway was blunted in TG, but not in CG, through both the myeloid differentiation factor 88- and toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain containing adapter inducing interferon-β-dependent pathways. These results highlight the role of the TLR4 in controlling the exercise-induced inflammatory response in young women. More importantly, these data suggest eccentric training may help to prevent TLR4 activation principally through NF-κB, and perhaps IRF3, downstream signaling in this population. PMID:25294957

  6. TLR4-mediated blunting of inflammatory responses to eccentric exercise in young women.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; De Paz, José A; Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Cuevas, María J; González-Gallego, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the inflammatory response mediated by the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway after acute eccentric exercise before and after an eccentric training program in women. Twenty women performed two acute eccentric bouts using a squat machine over a ~9 week interval. The training group (TG) carried out an eccentric training program during 6 weeks, while the control group (CG) did not follow any training. Protein content of markers involved in the TLR4-mediated activation of several nuclear transcription factors, such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3), was analyzed. The inflammatory response after the first acute bout was similar between TG and CG, showing an upregulation of all the markers analyzed, with the exception of IRF3. After the second bout, the upregulation of TLR4 signaling pathway was blunted in TG, but not in CG, through both the myeloid differentiation factor 88- and toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain containing adapter inducing interferon-β-dependent pathways. These results highlight the role of the TLR4 in controlling the exercise-induced inflammatory response in young women. More importantly, these data suggest eccentric training may help to prevent TLR4 activation principally through NF-κB, and perhaps IRF3, downstream signaling in this population.

  7. Corilagin ameliorates the extreme inflammatory status in sepsis through TLR4 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Rong; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Shu-Ling; Luo, Tao; Wu, Fei; Dong, Ji-Hua; Guo, Yuan-Jin; Zhao, Lei

    2017-01-05

    Sepsis is one of the serious disorders in clinical practice. Recent studies found toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) played an important role in sepsis. In this study, we tried to find the influence of Corilagin on TLR4 signal pathways in vitro and in vivo. The cellular and animal models of sepsis were established by LPS and then interfered with Corilagin. Real-time PCR and western blot were employed to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of TLR4, MyD88, TRIF and TRAF6. ELISA was used to determine the IL-6 and IL-1β levels in supernatant and serum. The survival rate was improved in the LPS + Corilagin group, and the mRNA and protein expressions of TLR4, MyD88, TRIF and TRAF6 were significantly decreased than that in the LPS group both in cellular and animal models (P < 0.01). The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β were greatly decreased in the LPS + Corilagin group both in supernatant and serum (P < 0.01). Corilagin exerts the anti-inflammatory effects by down-regulating the TLR4 signaling molecules to ameliorate the extreme inflammatory status in sepsis.

  8. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  9. TLR4 signaling induces TLR3 up-regulation in alveolar macrophages during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Zhixia; Mei, Shuya; Zhang, Liming; Billiar, Timothy R.; Li, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. Toll-like receptors in alveolar macrophages (AMΦ) recognize the molecular constituents of pathogens and activate the host’s innate immune responses. Numerous studies have documented the importance of TLR-TLR cross talk, but few studies have specifically addressed the relationship between TLR4 and TLR3. We explored a novel mechanism of TLR3 up-regulation that is induced by LPS-TLR4 signaling in a dose- and time-dependent manner in AMΦ from C57BL/6 mice, while the LPS-induced TLR3 expression was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− and Myd88−/− mice and following pretreatment with a NF-κB inhibitor. The enhanced TLR3 up-regulation in AMΦ augmented the expression of cytokines and chemokines in response to sequential challenges with LPS and Poly I:C, a TLR3 ligand, which was physiologically associated with amplified AMΦ-induced PMN migration into lung alveoli. Our study demonstrates that the synergistic effect between TLR4 and TLR3 in macrophages is an important determinant in acute lung injury and, more importantly, that TLR3 up-regulation is dependent on TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB signaling. These results raise the possibility that bacterial infections can induce sensitivity to viral infections, which may have important implications for the therapeutic manipulation of the innate immune system. PMID:28198368

  10. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid affects PPARγ and TLR4 in Steatotic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Elias-Miro, M; Mendes-Braz, M; Lemoine, A; Rimola, A; Rodés, J; Casillas-Ramírez, A; Peralta, C

    2012-12-01

    Numerous steatotic livers are discarded for transplantation because of their poor tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). We examined whether tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a known inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, protects steatotic and nonsteatotic liver grafts preserved during 6 h in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and transplanted. The protective mechanisms of TUDCA were also examined. Neither unfolded protein response (UPR) induction nor ER stress was evidenced in steatotic and nonsteatotic liver grafts after 6 h in UW preservation solution. TUDCA only protected steatotic livers grafts and did so through a mechanism independent of ER stress. It reduced proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and damage. When PPARγ was activated, TUDCA did not reduce damage. TUDCA, which inhibited PPARγ, and the PPARγ antagonist treatment up-regulated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), specifically the TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFNβ (TRIF) pathway. TLR4 agonist treatment reduced damage in steatotic liver grafts. When TLR4 action was inhibited, PPARγ antagonists did not protect steatotic liver grafts. In conclusion, TUDCA reduced PPARγ and this in turn up-regulated the TLR4 pathway, thus protecting steatotic liver grafts. TLR4 activating-based strategies could reduce the inherent risk of steatotic liver failure after transplantation.

  11. Childhood allergic rhinitis, traffic-related air pollution, and variability in the GSTP1, TNF, TLR2, and TLR4 genes: results from the TAG Study.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Elaine; Brauer, Michael; MacIntyre, Elaina; Bauer, Mario; Bellander, Tom; von Berg, Andrea; Berdel, Dietrich; Brunekreef, Bert; Chan-Yeung, Moira; Gehring, Ulrike; Herbarth, Olf; Hoffmann, Barbara; Kerkhof, Marjan; Klümper, Claudia; Koletzko, Sibylle; Kozyrskyj, Anita; Kull, Inger; Heinrich, Joachim; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Postma, Dirkje; Tiesler, Carla M T; Carlsten, Chris

    2013-08-01

    Associations between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and allergic rhinitis remain inconsistent, possibly because of unexplored gene-environment interactions. In a pooled analysis of 6 birth cohorts (Ntotal = 15,299), we examined whether TRAP and genetic polymorphisms related to inflammation and oxidative stress predict allergic rhinitis and sensitization. Allergic rhinitis was defined with a doctor diagnosis or reported symptoms at age 7 or 8 years. Associations between nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) mass, PM2.5 absorbance, and ozone, estimated for each child at the year of birth, and single nucleotide polymorphisms within the GSTP1, TNF, TLR2, or TLR4 genes with allergic rhinitis and aeroallergen sensitization were examined with logistic regression. Models were stratified by genotype and interaction terms tested for gene-environment associations. Point estimates for associations between nitrogen dioxide, PM2.5 mass, and PM2.5 absorbance with allergic rhinitis were elevated, but only that for PM2.5 mass was statistically significant (1.37 [1.01, 1.86] per 5 μg/m(3)). This result was not robust to single-cohort exclusions. Carriers of at least 1 minor rs1800629 (TNF) or rs1927911 (TLR4) allele were consistently at an increased risk of developing allergic rhinitis (1.19 [1.00, 1.41] and 1.24 [1.01, 1.53], respectively), regardless of TRAP exposure. No evidence of gene-environment interactions was observed. The generally null effect of TRAP on allergic rhinitis and aeroallergen sensitization was not modified by the studied variants in the GSTP1, TNF, TLR2, or TLR4 genes. Children carrying a minor rs1800629 (TNF) or rs1927911 (TLR4) allele may be at a higher risk of allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Burden of Common Complex Disease Variants in the Exomes of Two Healthy Centenarian Brothers.

    PubMed

    Tindale, Lauren C; Zeng, Andy; Bretherick, Karla L; Leach, Stephen; Thiessen, Nina; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R

    2015-01-01

    It is not understood whether long-term good health is promoted by the absence of disease risk variants, the presence of protective variants, or both. We characterized the exomes of two exceptionally healthy centenarian brothers aged 106 and 109 years who had never been diagnosed with cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, or major pulmonary disease. The aim of this study was to gain insight into whether exceptional health and longevity are a result of carrying fewer disease-associated variants than typical individuals. We compared the number of disease-associated alleles, and the proportion of alleles predicted to be functionally damaging, between the centenarian brothers and published population data. Mitochondrial sequence reads were extracted from the exome data in order to analyze mitochondrial variants. The brothers carry a similar number of common disease-associated variants and predicted damaging variants compared to reference groups. They did not carry any high-penetrance clinically actionable variants. They carry mitochondrial haplogroup T, and one brother has a single heteroplasmic variant. Although our small sample size does not allow for definitive conclusions, a healthy aging and longevity phenotype is not necessarily due to a decreased burden of common disease-associated variants. Instead, it may be rare 'positive' variants that play a role in this desirable phenotype. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Soluble alpha-enolase activates monocytes by CD14-dependent TLR4 signalling pathway and exhibits a dual function

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Clément; Fréret, Manuel; Fondard, Emeline; Derambure, Céline; Avenel, Gilles; Golinski, Marie-Laure; Verdet, Mathieu; Boyer, Olivier; Caillot, Frédérique; Musette, Philippe; Lequerré, Thierry; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common form of chronic inflammatory rheumatism. Identifying auto-antigens targeted by RA auto-antibodies is of major interest. Alpha-enolase (ENO1) is considered to be a pivotal auto-antigen in early RA but its pathophysiologic role remains unknown. The main objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of soluble ENO1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and RA patients in order to determine the potential pathogenic role of ENO1. ELISA, transcriptomic analysis, experiments of receptor inhibition and flow cytometry analysis were performed to determine the effect, the target cell population and the receptor of ENO1. We showed that ENO1 has the ability to induce early production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines with delayed production of IL-10 and to activate the innate immune system. We demonstrated that ENO1 binds mainly to monocytes and activates the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway both in healthy subjects and in RA patients. Our results establish for the first time that ENO1 is able to activate in vitro the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway on monocytes involving a dual mechanism firstly pro-inflammatory and secondly anti-inflammatory. These results contribute to elucidating the role of this auto-antigen in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of RA. PMID:27025255

  14. Fisetin Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via TLR4-Mediated NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Ze-Yu; Sun, Bo; Fu, Jie; Li, Tian-Zuo

    2016-02-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), a common component of systemic inflammatory disease, is a life-threatening condition without many effective treatments. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, was reported to have wide pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of fisetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury and investigate the potential mechanism. Fisetin was injected (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min before LPS administration (5 mg/kg, i.v.). Our results showed that fisetin effectively reduced the inflammatory cytokine release and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF), decreased the lung wet/dry ratios, and obviously improved the pulmonary histology in LPS-induced ALI. Furthermore, fisetin inhibited LPS-induced increases of neutrophils and macrophage infiltration and attenuated MPO activity in lung tissues. Additionally, fisetin could significantly inhibit the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and the activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Our data indicates that fisetin has a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI via suppression of TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways, and fisetin may be a promising candidate for LPS-induced ALI treatment.

  15. LPS-TLR4 Pathway Mediates Ductular Cell Expansion in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Odena, Gemma; Chen, Jiegen; Lozano, Juan Jose; Altamirano, Jose; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affo, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Matsushita, Hiroshi; Zou, Jian; Dumitru, Raluca; Caballeria, Juan; Gines, Pere; Arroyo, Vicente; You, Min; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique; Crews, Fulton; Seki, Ekihiro; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Bataller, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most severe form of alcoholic liver disease for which there are no effective therapies. Patients with AH show impaired hepatocyte proliferation, expansion of inefficient ductular cells and high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. It is unknown whether LPS mediates ductular cell expansion. We performed transcriptome studies and identified keratin 23 (KRT23) as a new ductular cell marker. KRT23 expression correlated with mortality and LPS serum levels. LPS-TLR4 pathway role in ductular cell expansion was assessed in human and mouse progenitor cells, liver slices and liver injured TLR4 KO mice. In AH patients, ductular cell expansion correlated with portal hypertension and collagen expression. Functional studies in ductular cells showed that KRT23 regulates collagen expression. These results support a role for LPS-TLR4 pathway in promoting ductular reaction in AH. Maneuvers aimed at decreasing LPS serum levels in AH patients could have beneficial effects by preventing ductular reaction development. PMID:27752144

  16. Resistin Induces Hypertension and Insulin Resistance in Mice via a TLR4-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Linfang; Hu, Youtao; Li, Qiang; An, Chaoqiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Shu, Le; Chen, Ao; Niu, Congcong; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipokine involved in insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes, has recently been reported to play a role in cardiovascular events. However, its effect on blood pressure (BP) and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we showed that resistin induces hypertension and IR in wild type (WT) mice, but not in tlr4−/− mice. Resistin upregulated angiotensinogen (Agt) expression in WT mice, whereas it had no effect on tlr4−/− mice, or in mice treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril. Real-time PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation further confirmed that resistin activates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the TLR4/P65/Agt pathway. This finding suggested an essential role of resistin in linking IR and hypertension, which may offer a novel target in clinic on the study of the association between diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26917360

  17. Resistin Induces Hypertension and Insulin Resistance in Mice via a TLR4-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Linfang; Hu, Youtao; Li, Qiang; An, Chaoqiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Shu, Le; Chen, Ao; Niu, Congcong; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-02-26

    Resistin, an adipokine involved in insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes, has recently been reported to play a role in cardiovascular events. However, its effect on blood pressure (BP) and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we showed that resistin induces hypertension and IR in wild type (WT) mice, but not in tlr4(-/-) mice. Resistin upregulated angiotensinogen (Agt) expression in WT mice, whereas it had no effect on tlr4(-/-) mice, or in mice treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril. Real-time PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation further confirmed that resistin activates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the TLR4/P65/Agt pathway. This finding suggested an essential role of resistin in linking IR and hypertension, which may offer a novel target in clinic on the study of the association between diabetes and hypertension.

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated signaling through TLR4 mediates persistent HIV infection of primary macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Agosto, Luis M.; Hirnet, Juliane B.; Michaels, Daniel H.; Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B.; Gibson, Frank C.; Viglianti, Gregory; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal infections contribute to HIV-associated co-morbidities in the oral cavity and provide a model to interrogate the dysregulation of macrophage function, inflammatory disease progression, and HIV replication during co-infections. We investigated the effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis on the establishment of HIV infection in monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV replication in macrophages was significantly repressed in the presence of P. gingivalis. This diminished viral replication was due partly to a decrease in the expression of integrated HIV provirus. HIV repression depended upon signaling through TLR4 as knock-down of TLR4 with siRNA rescued HIV expression. Importantly, HIV expression was reactivated upon removal of P. gingivalis. Our observations suggest that exposure of macrophages to Gram-negative bacteria influence the establishment and maintenance of HIV persistence in macrophages through a TLR4-dependent mechanism. PMID:27639573

  19. Sesamin Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibition of TLR4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Li; Yuan, Jiang; Shouyin, Jiang; Yulin, Li; Libing, Jiang; Jian-An, Wang

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies suggested that TLR4 signaling pathways played an important role in the development of LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Sesamin, a sesame lignan exacted from sesame seeds, has been shown to exhibit significant anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on LPS-induced ALI in mice. Mice ALI model was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS. Sesamin was given 1 h after LPS challenge. Our results showed that sesamin inhibited LPS-induced lung pathological change, edema, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Sesamin suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Furthermore, sesamin inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that sesamin protected against LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of TLR4 signaling pathways.

  20. Utilizing mutual information for detecting rare and common variants associated with a categorical trait.

    PubMed

    Sun, Leiming; Wang, Chan; Hu, Yue-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Genome-wide association studies have succeeded in detecting novel common variants which associate with complex diseases. As a result of the fast changes in next generation sequencing technology, a large number of sequencing data are generated, which offers great opportunities to identify rare variants that could explain a larger proportion of missing heritability. Many effective and powerful methods are proposed, although they are usually limited to continuous, dichotomous or ordinal traits. Notice that traits having nominal categorical features are commonly observed in complex diseases, especially in mental disorders, which motivates the incorporation of the characteristics of the categorical trait into association studies with rare and common variants. Methods. We construct two simple and intuitive nonparametric tests, MIT and aMIT, based on mutual information for detecting association between genetic variants in a gene or region and a categorical trait. MIT and aMIT can gauge the difference among the distributions of rare and common variants across a region given every categorical trait value. If there is little association between variants and a categorical trait, MIT or aMIT approximately equals zero. The larger the difference in distributions, the greater values MIT and aMIT have. Therefore, MIT and aMIT have the potential for detecting functional variants. Results.We checked the validity of proposed statistics and compared them to the existing ones through extensive simulation studies with varied combinations of the numbers of variants of rare causal, rare non-causal, common causal, and common non-causal, deleterious and protective, various minor allele frequencies and different levels of linkage disequilibrium. The results show our methods have higher statistical power than conventional ones, including the likelihood based score test, in most cases: (1) there are multiple genetic variants in a gene or region; (2) both protective and deleterious

  1. Elevated muscle TLR4 expression and metabolic endotoxemia in human aging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sangeeta; Lertwattanarak, Raweewan; Garduño, Jose de Jesus; Galeana, Joaquin Joya; Li, Jinqi; Zamarripa, Frank; Lancaster, Jack L; Mohan, Sumathy; Hussey, Sophie; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in glucose metabolism and sarcopenia that jointly contribute to a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Because aging is considered as a state of low-grade inflammation, in this study we examined whether older, healthy (lean, community-dwelling) participants have altered signaling flux through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a key mediator of innate and adaptive immune responses. We also examined whether a 4-month aerobic exercise program would have an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing TLR4 expression and signaling. At baseline, muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB p50 and nuclear factor κB p65 protein content, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation were significantly elevated in older versus young participants. The plasma concentration of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide and its binding protein also were significantly elevated in older participants, indicative of metabolic endotoxemia, which is a recently described phenomenon of increased plasma endotoxin level in metabolic disease. These alterations in older participants were accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity, quadriceps muscle volume, and muscle strength. The exercise training program increased insulin sensitivity, without affecting quadriceps muscle volume or strength. Muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and plasma lipopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide binding protein were not changed by exercise. In conclusion, insulin resistance and sarcopenia of aging are associated with increased TLR4 expression/signaling, which may be secondary to metabolic endotoxemia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Studies of the TLR4-associated protein MD-2 using yeast-display and mutational analyses.

    PubMed

    Mattis, Daiva M; Chervin, Adam S; Ranoa, Diana R; Kelley, Stacy L; Tapping, Richard I; Kranz, David M

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the innate immune system by forming a complex with myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which is present on antigen presenting cells. MD-2 plays an essential role in this activation of the innate immune system as a member of the ternary complex, TLR4:MD-2:LPS. With the goal of further understanding the molecular details of the interaction of MD-2 with LPS and TLR4, and possibly toward engineering dominant negative regulators of the MD-2 protein, here we subjected MD-2 to a mutational analysis using yeast display. The approach included generation of site-directed alanine mutants, and ligand-driven selections of MD-2 mutant libraries. Our findings showed that: (1) proline mutations in the F119-K132 loop that binds LPS were strongly selected for enhanced yeast surface stability, (2) there was a preference for positive-charged side chains (R/K) at residue 120 for LPS binding, and negative-charged side chains (D/E) for TLR4 binding, (3) aromatic residues were strongly preferred at F119 and F121 for LPS binding, and (4) an MD-2 mutant (T84N/D101A/S118A/S120D/K122P) exhibited increased binding to TLR4 but decreased binding to LPS. These studies revealed the impact of specific residues and regions of MD-2 on the binding of LPS and TLR4, and they provide a framework for further directed evolution of the MD-2 protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Studies of the TLR4-associated protein MD-2 using yeast-display and mutational analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mattis, Daiva M.; Chervin, Adam; Ranoa, Diana; Kelley, Stacy; Tapping, Richard; Kranz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the innate immune system by forming a complex with myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which is present on antigen presenting cells. MD-2 plays an essential role in this activation of the innate immune system as a member of the ternary complex, TLR4:MD-2:LPS. With the goal of further understanding the molecular details of the interaction of MD-2 with LPS and TLR4, and possibly toward engineering dominant negative regulators of the MD-2 protein, here we subjected MD-2 to a mutational analysis using yeast display. The approach included generation of site-directed alanine mutants, and ligand-driven selections of MD-2 mutant libraries. Our findings showed that: 1) proline mutations in the F119-K132 loop that binds LPS were strongly selected for enhanced yeast surface stability, 2) there was a preference for positive-charged side chains (R/K) at residue 120 for LPS binding, and negative-charged side chains (D/E) for TLR4 binding, 3) aromatic residues were strongly preferred at F119 and F121 for LPS binding, and 4) an MD-2 mutant (T84N/D101A/S118A/S120D/K122P) exhibited increased binding to TLR4 but decreased binding to LPS. These studies revealed the impact of specific residues and regions of MD-2 on the binding of LPS and TLR4, and they provide a framework for further directed evolution of the MD-2 protein. PMID:26320630

  4. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  5. Hypertensive rats are susceptible to TLR4-mediated signaling following exposure to combustion source particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Peter S; Schladweiler, Mette C; Richards, Judy H; Ledbetter, Allen D; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been shown to play a role in cell signaling that results in neutrophilic inflammation in response to lipopolysaccharide and respiratory syncytial virus infection. TLR4 also interacts with CD14, which upon complex formation triggers TLR4-associated signaling pathways to produce a proinflammatory response. This mechanism results in the activation of NF-kappa B and subsequent inflammatory gene induction. In order to determine the effect of combustion source particle matter (PM), rich in zinc and nickel but with negligible endotoxin, on a possible activation of TLR4-mediated cell signaling and inflammation, we intratracheally (IT) instilled 3.3 mg/kg of PM into 12-w-old healthy male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and susceptible spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. Inflammation, inflammatory-mediator gene expression, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein and LDH, TLR4 and CD14 protein, and NF-kappa B activation in the lung were determined after 24 h. Dose-response data (0.0, 0.83, 3.33, and 8.3 mg/kg PM) for BALF LDH were obtained as a marker of lung cell injury in SH rats. BALF neutrophils, but not macrophages, were significantly increased in the PM-exposed WKY and SH rats. SH rats showed a greater PMN increase than WKY rats. Similarly, BALF protein and LDH levels were also increased following PM exposure but to a significantly greater extent in SH rats. Plasma fibrinogen was increased only in SH rats exposed to PM. The increased inflammation seen in PM-exposed SH rats was accompanied by a significant increase in TLR4 protein in the lung tissue, which was primarily localized in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. CD14 was also increased by PM exposure in both SH and WKY rats but was significantly greater in the SH rats. These increases were associated with greater translocation of NF-kappa B in the lungs of SH rather than WKY rats. This was accompanied by increased macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-2 mRNA expression at 24 h of

  6. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning activates TLR4-TRIF signaling to induce protection of ischemic retina.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sebok Kumar; Matsunaga, Hayato; Ishii, Ken J; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Prothymosin-alpha protects the brain and retina from ischemic damage. Although prothymosin-alpha contributes to toll-like receptor (TLR4)-mediated immnunopotentiation against viral infection, the beneficial effects of prothymosin-alpha-TLR4 signaling in protecting against ischemia remain to be elucidated. In this study, intravitreal administration of prothymosin-alpha 48 h before induction of retinal ischemia prevented retinal cellular damage as evaluated by histology, and retinal functional deficits as evaluated by electroretinography. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning completely prevented the ischemia-induced loss of ganglion cells with partial survival of bipolar and photoreceptor cells, but not amacrine cells, in immunohistochemistry experiments. Prothymosin-alpha treatment in the absence of ischemia caused mild activation, proliferation, and migration of retinal microglia, whereas the ischemia-induced microglial activation was inhibited by prothymosin-alpha preconditioning. All these preventive effects of prothymosin-alpha preconditioning were abolished in TLR4 knock-out mice and by pre-treatments with anti-TLR4 antibodies or minocycline, a microglial inhibitor. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning inhibited the retinal ischemia-induced up-regulation of TLR4-related injury genes, and increased expression of TLR4-related protective genes. Furthermore, the prothymosin-alpha preconditioning-induced prevention of retinal ischemic damage was abolished in TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β knock-out mice, but not in myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 knock-out mice. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that prothymosin-alpha preconditioning selectively drives TLR4-TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β signaling and microglia in the prevention of retinal ischemic damage. We propose the following mechanism for prothymosin-alpha (ProTα) preconditioning-induced retinal prevention against ischemia: Pro

  7. Inhibition of TLR4 Signalling-Induced Inflammation Attenuates Secondary Injury after Diffuse Axonal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonglin; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Junjie; Ma, Xudong; Huang, Tingqin; Pang, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that secondary injury after diffuse axonal injury (DAI) damages more axons than the initial insult, but the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are not fully understood. Recent studies show that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role in promoting adaptive immune responses and have been shown to be associated with brain damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the TLR4 signalling pathway in secondary axonal injury in the cortices of DAI rats. TLR4 was mainly localized in microglial cells and neurons, and the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules, including TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, toll/IR-1-(TIR-) domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-beta, interferon regulatory factor 3, interferon β, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65, and phospho-NF-κB p65, significantly increased and peaked at 1 d after DAI. Inhibition of TLR4 by TAK-242 attenuated apoptosis, neuronal and axonal injury, and glial responses. The neuroprotective effects of TLR4 inhibition were associated with decreases in the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules and inflammatory factors, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-α. These results suggest that the TLR4 signalling pathway plays an important role in secondary injury and may be an important therapeutic target following DAI. PMID:27478307

  8. Humanized TLR4/MD-2 mice reveal LPS recognition differentially impacts susceptibility to Yersinia pestis and Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Adeline M; Ernst, Robert K; Fortuno, Edgardo S; Brasfield, Alicia S; Yam, Cathy S; Newlon, Lindsay A; Kollmann, Tobias R; Miller, Samuel I; Wilson, Christopher B

    2012-01-01

    Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation through the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4/MD-2 receptor complex activates host defense against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, how species-specific differences in LPS recognition impact host defense remains undefined. Herein, we establish how temperature dependent shifts in the lipid A of Yersinia pestis LPS that differentially impact recognition by mouse versus human TLR4/MD-2 dictate infection susceptibility. When grown at 37°C, Y. pestis LPS is hypo-acylated and less stimulatory to human compared with murine TLR4/MD-2. By contrast, when grown at reduced temperatures, Y. pestis LPS is more acylated, and stimulates cells equally via human and mouse TLR4/MD-2. To investigate how these temperature dependent shifts in LPS impact infection susceptibility, transgenic mice expressing human rather than mouse TLR4/MD-2 were generated. We found the increased susceptibility to Y. pestis for "humanized" TLR4/MD-2 mice directly paralleled blunted inflammatory cytokine production in response to stimulation with purified LPS. By contrast, for other Gram-negative pathogens with highly acylated lipid A including Salmonella enterica or Escherichia coli, infection susceptibility and the response after stimulation with LPS were indistinguishable between mice expressing human or mouse TLR4/MD-2. Thus, Y. pestis exploits temperature-dependent shifts in LPS acylation to selectively evade recognition by human TLR4/MD-2 uncovered with "humanized" TLR4/MD-2 transgenic mice.

  9. Discovery and Validation of a New Class of Small Molecule Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Eyer, Benjamin; Good, Misty; Guerriero, Christopher J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Afrazi, Amin; Prindle, Thomas; Ma, Congrong; Branca, Maria; Ozolek, John; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Wipf, Peter; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases may be linked to pathologically elevated signaling via the receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). There has thus been great interest in the discovery of TLR4 inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Recently, the structure of TLR4 bound to the inhibitor E5564 was solved, raising the possibility that novel TLR4 inhibitors that target the E5564-binding domain could be designed. We utilized a similarity search algorithm in conjunction with a limited screening approach of small molecule libraries to identify compounds that bind to the E5564 site and inhibit TLR4. Our lead compound, C34, is a 2-acetamidopyranoside (MW 389) with the formula C17H27NO9, which inhibited TLR4 in enterocytes and macrophages in vitro, and reduced systemic inflammation in mouse models of endotoxemia and necrotizing enterocolitis. Molecular docking of C34 to the hydrophobic internal pocket of the TLR4 co-receptor MD-2 demonstrated a tight fit, embedding the pyran ring deep inside the pocket. Strikingly, C34 inhibited LPS signaling ex-vivo in human ileum that was resected from infants with necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings identify C34 and the β-anomeric cyclohexyl analog C35 as novel leads for small molecule TLR4 inhibitors that have potential therapeutic benefit for TLR4-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23776545

  10. Exome Array Analysis Identifies a Common Variant in IL27 Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Margaret M.; Chen, Han; Lao, Taotao; Hardin, Megan; Qiao, Dandi; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Castaldi, Peter J.; Hersh, Craig P.; Morrow, Jarrett; Celli, Bartolome R.; Pinto-Plata, Victor M.; Criner, Gerald J.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Bueno, Raphael; Agustí, Alvar; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.; Calverley, Peter M.; Donner, Claudio F.; Lomas, David A.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Vestbo, Jorgen; Paré, Peter D.; Levy, Robert D.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Laird, Nan M.; Lin, Xihong; Beaty, Terri H.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility is in part related to genetic variants. Most genetic studies have been focused on genome-wide common variants without a specific focus on coding variants, but common and rare coding variants may also affect COPD susceptibility. Objectives: To identify coding variants associated with COPD. Methods: We tested nonsynonymous, splice, and stop variants derived from the Illumina HumanExome array for association with COPD in five study populations enriched for COPD. We evaluated single variants with a minor allele frequency greater than 0.5% using logistic regression. Results were combined using a fixed effects meta-analysis. We replicated novel single-variant associations in three additional COPD cohorts. Measurements and Main Results: We included 6,004 control subjects and 6,161 COPD cases across five cohorts for analysis. Our top result was rs16969968 (P = 1.7 × 10−14) in CHRNA5, a locus previously associated with COPD susceptibility and nicotine dependence. Additional top results were found in AGER, MMP3, and SERPINA1. A nonsynonymous variant, rs181206, in IL27 (P = 4.7 × 10−6) was just below the level of exome-wide significance but attained exome-wide significance (P = 5.7 × 10−8) when combined with results from other cohorts. Gene expression datasets revealed an association of rs181206 and the surrounding locus with expression of multiple genes; several were differentially expressed in COPD lung tissue, including TUFM. Conclusions: In an exome array analysis of COPD, we identified nonsynonymous variants at previously described loci and a novel exome-wide significant variant in IL27. This variant is at a locus previously described in genome-wide associations with diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and obesity and appears to affect genes potentially related to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:26771213

  11. Pigmented Pheochromocytoma: an Unusual Variant of a Common Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Kaur, Kavneet; Kumar, Tarun; Cherian, Libin Babu; Kaushal, Rohit; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Dhar, Anita; Seth, Amlesh; Jain, Deepali

    2016-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumor arising from the adrenal medulla. A number of variants of pheochromocytoma are known; however, pigmented pheochromocytoma is extremely rare, with only few cases reported in literature. We report the cases of two patients with pigmented pheochromocytoma. Case 1 was a 28-year-old female who presented with complaints of breathlessness, palpitations, and anxiety for 5 years, which had worsened over the last 8 months. Computed tomography (CT) abdomen showed a right suprarenal mass. Case 2 was that of an 18-year-old girl who presented with similar complaints and was diagnosed with hypertension. CT abdomen showed bilateral adrenal masses. Urinary vanillyl mandelic acid was raised in both patients. Sections examined from all three tumors showed cells arranged in Zellballen pattern, separated by thin fibrovascular septae. Tumor cells showed moderate to marked nuclear pleomorphism in case 1. Mitoses were, however, not seen. There was no evidence of capsular or vascular invasion. Many of the tumor cells showed intracytoplasmic black pigment, which was positive for Fontana-Masson and was bleach-labile, confirming it as melanin. Hemosiderin deposition was also identified. Large areas of hemorrhagic necrosis were seen in case 1. Tumor cells were immunopositive for chromogranin and synaptophysin, while they were negative for HMB-45. Electron microscopy was performed. A final diagnosis of pigmented pheochromocytoma was rendered in both cases. Pigmented pheochromocytoma is a very rare tumor, which needs to be differentiated from other pigmented tumors like malignant melanoma of adrenal gland and pigmented adrenal adenoma. Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry help in making this distinction.

  12. Rare versus common variants in pharmacogenetics: SLCO1B1 variation and methotrexate disposition.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Bruun, Gitte H; Yang, Wenjian; Treviño, Lisa R; Vattathil, Selina; Scheet, Paul; Cheng, Cheng; Rosner, Gary L; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Fan, Yiping; Sparreboom, Alex; Mikkelsen, Torben S; Corydon, Thomas J; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2012-01-01

    Methotrexate is used to treat autoimmune diseases and malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Inter-individual variation in clearance of methotrexate results in heterogeneous systemic exposure, clinical efficacy, and toxicity. In a genome-wide association study of children with ALL, we identified SLCO1B1 as harboring multiple common polymorphisms associated with methotrexate clearance. The extent of influence of rare versus common variants on pharmacogenomic phenotypes remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that rare variants in SLCO1B1 could affect methotrexate clearance and compared the influence of common versus rare variants in addition to clinical covariates on clearance. From deep resequencing of SLCO1B1 exons in 699 children, we identified 93 SNPs, 15 of which were non-synonymous (NS). Three of these NS SNPs were common, with a minor allele frequency (MAF) >5%, one had low frequency (MAF 1%-5%), and 11 were rare (MAF <1%). NS SNPs (common or rare) predicted to be functionally damaging were more likely to be found among patients with the lowest methotrexate clearance than patients with high clearance. We verified lower function in vitro of four SLCO1B1 haplotypes that were associated with reduced methotrexate clearance. In a multivariate stepwise regression analysis adjusting for other genetic and non-genetic covariates, SLCO1B1 variants accounted for 10.7% of the population variability in clearance. Of that variability, common NS variants accounted for the majority, but rare damaging NS variants constituted 17.8% of SLCO1B1's effects (1.9% of total variation) and had larger effect sizes than common NS variants. Our results show that rare variants are likely to have an important effect on pharmacogenetic phenotypes.

  13. Unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans: Uncommon variant of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Kumar, Piyush; Gayen, Tirthankar; Roy, Kunal; Das, Nilay K.; Gharami, Ramesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a fairly common dermatosis characterized by hyperpigmented velvety plaques, having a predilection for the intertriginous areas. We herein present a case of unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans over the left lateral chest, in an adult male. The rarity of documentation of this entity in the world literature prompted us to report the case. PMID:25506563

  14. TLR4 Activation Promotes Bone Marrow MSC Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation via Wnt3a and Wnt5a Signaling.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoqing; Wang, Hai; Jin, Tao; Xu, Yongqing; Mei, Liangbin; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow maintain their self-renewal ability and the ability to differentiate into osteoblast. Thus, adult bone marrow MSCs play a key role in the regeneration of bone tissue. Previous studies indicated that TLR4 is expressed in MSCs and is critical in regulating the fate decision of MSCs. However, the exact functional role and underlying mechanisms of how TLR4 regulate bone marrow MSC proliferation and differentiation are unclear. Here, we found that activated TLR4 by its ligand LPS promoted the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. TLR4 activation by LPS also increased cytokine IL-6 and IL-1β production in MSCs. In addition, LPS treatment has no effect on inducing cell death of MSCs. Deletion of TLR4 expression in MSCs completely eliminated the effects of LPS on MSC proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and cytokine production. We also found that the mRNA and protein expression of Wnt3a and Wnt5a, two important factors in regulating MSC fate decision, was upregulated in a TLR4-dependent manner. Silencing Wnt3a with specific siRNA remarkably inhibited TLR4-induced MSC proliferation, while Wnt5a specific siRNA treatment significantly antagonized TLR4-induced MSC osteogenic differentiation. These results together suggested that TLR4 regulates bone marrow MSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation through Wnt3a and Wnt5a signaling. These finding provide new data to understand the role and the molecular mechanisms of TLR4 in regulating bone marrow MSC functions. These data also provide new insight in developing new therapy in bone regeneration using MSCs by modulating TLR4 and Wnt signaling activity.

  15. TLR4 signaling promotes a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ang; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Huajun; Zhang, Yuyi; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can be expressed by tumor cells, and each TLR exhibits different biological functions. Evidences showed the activation of some certain TLRs could promote tumor progression. One of which TLR4 has been found to promote hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells proliferation, but the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we verified that TLR4 was functionally expressed on HCC cells, and TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could stimulate the proliferation and clone formation of HCC cells. Most importantly, we found a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop exists in HCC cells, which could be provoked by TLR4 activation. Consistently, the expression of TLR4, COX-2 and p-STAT3(Y705) was positively correlated with each other in liver tumor tissues from patients with primary HCC. Further investigation demonstrated this loop played a dominant role in TLR4-induced HCC cell proliferation and multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy. Inhibition of TLR4 or COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop would attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and proliferation of HCC cells, and enhance the sensitivity of HCC cells to chemotherapeutics in vitro. By using a primary HCC model, we observed COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop was significantly blocked in TLR4(-/-) mice compared to wild type mice, and there was no obvious tumorgenesis sign in TLR4(-/-) mice. Therefore, these findings provided the precise molecular mechanism of TLR4 signaling pathway involved in HCC progress, and suggested that TLR4 may be a promising target for HCC treatment.

  16. An unusual dimeric structure and assembly for TLR4 regulator RP105-MD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-16

    RP105-MD-1 modulates the TLR4-MD-2-mediated, innate immune response against bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The crystal structure of the bovine 1:1 RP105-MD-1 complex bound to a putative endogenous lipid at 2.9 Å resolution shares a similar overall architecture to its homolog TLR4-MD-2 but assembles into an unusual 2:2 homodimer that differs from any other known TLR-ligand assembly. The homodimer is assembled in a head-to-head orientation that juxtaposes the N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of the two RP105 chains, rather than the usual tail-to-tail configuration of C-terminal LRRs in ligand-activated TLR dimers, such as TLR1-TRL2, TLR2-TLR6, TLR3-TLR3 and TLR4-TLR4. Another unusual interaction is mediated by an RP105-specific asparagine-linked glycan, which wedges MD-1 into the co-receptor binding concavity on RP105. This unique mode of assembly represents a new paradigm for TLR complexes and suggests a molecular mechanism for regulating LPS responses.

  17. Role of TLR4 and MAPK in the local effect of LPS on intestinal contractility.

    PubMed

    Barona, Inés; Fagundes, Diego Santos; Gonzalo, Sergio; Grasa, Laura; Arruebo, María Pilar; Plaza, Miguel Ángel; Murillo, María Divina

    2011-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to alter intestinal contractility. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), K(+) channels and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been proposed to be involved in the mechanism of action of LPS. The aim of this study was to determine the role of TLR4, K(+) channels and MAPKs (p38, JNK and MEK1/2) in the local effect of LPS on the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions in rabbit small intestine in vitro. Segments of rabbit duodenum were suspended in the direction of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle fibres in a thermostatically controlled organ bath. LPS (0.3 µg/ml) reduced the contractions induced by ACh (100 µm) in the longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of the duodenum after 90 min of incubation. Polymyxin (TLR4 inhibitor), SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK1/2 inhibitor) and U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) antagonized the effects of the LPS on ACh-induced contractions in duodenal smooth muscle. Incubation with the blockers of K(+) channels, TEA, apamin, charybdotoxin, iberiotoxin, glibenclamide or quinine, did not reverse the effect of LPS on ACh-induced contractions. These results suggest that the effect of LPS on ACh-induced contractions in the rabbit duodenum might be mediated by TLR4 and p38, JNK1/2 and MEK1/2 MAPKs. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Recognition of LPS by TLR4: Potential for Anti-Inflammatory Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Nijland, Reindert; Hofland, Tom; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    LPS molecules of marine bacteria show structures distinct from terrestrial bacteria, due to the different environment that marine bacteria live in. Because of these different structures, lipid A molecules from marine bacteria are most often poor stimulators of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. Due to their low stimulatory potential, these lipid A molecules are suggested to be applicable as antagonists of TLR4 signaling in sepsis patients, where this immune response is amplified and unregulated. Antagonizing lipid A molecules might be used for future therapies against sepsis, therapies that currently do not exist. In this review, we will discuss these differences in lipid A structures and their recognition by the immune system. The modifications present in marine lipid A structures are described, and their potential as LPS antagonists will be discussed. Finally, since clinical trials built on antagonizing lipid A molecules have proven unsuccessful, we propose to also focus on different aspects of the TLR4 signaling pathway when searching for new potential drugs. Furthermore, we put forward the notion that bacteria probably already produce inhibitors of TLR4 signaling, making these bacterial products interesting molecules to investigate for future sepsis therapies. PMID:25056632

  19. The Role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key players in the pathogenesis of inflammatory conditions including coronary arterial disease (CAD). They are expressed by a variety of immune cells where they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs recruit adaptor molecules, including myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MYD88) and TIRF-related adaptor protein (TRAM), to mediate activation of MAPKs and NF-kappa B pathways. They are associated with the development of CAD through various mechanisms. TLR4 is expressed in lipid-rich and atherosclerotic plaques. In TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice, atherosclerosis-associated inflammation was diminished. Moreover, TLR2 and TLR4 may induce expression of Wnt5a in advanced staged atheromatous plaque leading to activation of the inflammatory processes. TLR9 is activated by CpG motifs in nucleic acids and have been implicated in macrophage activation and the uptake of oxLDL from the circulation. Furthermore, TLR9 also stimulates interferon-α (INF-α) secretion and increases cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T-cells towards coronary artery tunica media smooth muscle cells. This review outlines the pathophysiological role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in atherosclerosis, focusing on evidence from animal models of the disease. PMID:27795867

  20. Physicochemical characterization and biological activity of synthetic TLR4 agonist formulations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ryan C; Fox, Christopher B; Dutill, Timothy S; Shaverdian, Narek; Evers, Tara L; Poshusta, Garrett R; Chesko, James; Coler, Rhea N; Friede, Martin; Reed, Steven G; Vedvick, Thomas S

    2010-01-01

    Immunostimulatory molecules such as monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, can be formulated to enhance vaccine adjuvant effects and to promote a Th1-type immune response. This study compares the in vitro and in vivo potency of aqueous and emulsion formulations containing a synthetic MPL analogue. In addition, formulation structure and association of the synthetic TLR-4 agonist and antigen with the formulation are characterized using dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurement, HPLC, and SDS-PAGE. The biological and biophysical effects of formulating the agonist with different oil and surfactant components from animal, plant, and synthetic sources are examined. These findings have important implications for the formulation of TLR4 agonists as well as the influence of formulation component substitution on adjuvant activity. The results indicate that (1) the agonist is associated with the oil droplets in emulsion formulations, (2) the emulsion formulations containing synthetic TLR4 agonist induce higher IgG2a/IgG1 antibody ratios than aqueous formulations or an emulsion formulation without the agonist, and (3) appropriate plant-derived components can be substituted for animal-derived components in oil-in-water emulsions without loss of biological activity.

  1. Structural insights into TIR domain specificity of the bridging adaptor Mal in TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijie; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Weihong; Shen, Yuequan

    2012-01-01

    MyD88 adaptor-like protein (Mal) is a crucial adaptor that acts as a bridge to recruit the MyD88 molecule to activated TLR4 receptors in response to invading pathogens. The specific assembly of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains of TLR4, Mal and MyD88 is responsible for proper signal transduction in the TLR4 signaling pathway. However, the molecular mechanism for the specificity of these TIR domains remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TIR domain of the human Mal molecule (Mal-TIR) at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Unexpectedly, Mal-TIR exhibits an extraordinarily long AB loop, but no αB helix or BB loop, distinguishing it from other TIR domains. More importantly, the Mal-TIR AB loop is capable of mediating direct binding to the TIR domains of TLR4 and MyD88 simultaneously. We also found that Mal-TIR can form a back-to-back dimer that may resemble the dimeric assembly of the entire Mal molecule. Our data demonstrate the bridge role of the Mal-TIR domain and provide important information about TIR domain specificity.

  2. Structural Insights into TIR Domain Specificity of the Bridging Adaptor Mal in TLR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhijie; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Weihong; Shen, Yuequan

    2012-01-01

    MyD88 adaptor-like protein (Mal) is a crucial adaptor that acts as a bridge to recruit the MyD88 molecule to activated TLR4 receptors in response to invading pathogens. The specific assembly of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains of TLR4, Mal and MyD88 is responsible for proper signal transduction in the TLR4 signaling pathway. However, the molecular mechanism for the specificity of these TIR domains remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TIR domain of the human Mal molecule (Mal-TIR) at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Unexpectedly, Mal-TIR exhibits an extraordinarily long AB loop, but no αB helix or BB loop, distinguishing it from other TIR domains. More importantly, the Mal-TIR AB loop is capable of mediating direct binding to the TIR domains of TLR4 and MyD88 simultaneously. We also found that Mal-TIR can form a back-to-back dimer that may resemble the dimeric assembly of the entire Mal molecule. Our data demonstrate the bridge role of the Mal-TIR domain and provide important information about TIR domain specificity. PMID:22485159

  3. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key receptor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria; genetic variation in this specific gene has been linked with the host’s response to bacterial infections and disease resistance. Since colonization and ...

  4. TLR4 genotype and environmental LPS mediate RSV bronchiolitis through Th2 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Mauricio T.; Serra, M. Elina; Acosta, Patricio L.; Marzec, Jacqui; Gibbons, Luz; Salim, Maximiliano; Rodriguez, Andrea; Reynaldi, Andrea; Garcia, Alejandro; Bado, Daniela; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Hijano, Diego R.; Coviello, Silvina; Newcomb, Dawn; Bellabarba, Miguel; Ferolla, Fausto M.; Libster, Romina; Berenstein, Ada; Siniawaski, Susana; Blumetti, Valeria; Echavarria, Marcela; Pinto, Leonardo; Lawrence, Andrea; Ossorio, M. Fabiana; Grosman, Arnoldo; Mateu, Cecilia G.; Bayle, Carola; Dericco, Alejandra; Pellegrini, Mariana; Igarza, Ignacio; Repetto, Horacio A.; Grimaldi, Luciano Alva; Gudapati, Prathyusha; Polack, Norberto R.; Althabe, Fernando; Shi, Min; Ferrero, Fernando; Bergel, Eduardo; Stein, Renato T.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Boothby, Mark; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Polack, Fernando P.

    2015-01-01

    While 30%–70% of RSV-infected infants develop bronchiolitis, 2% require hospitalization. It is not clear why disease severity differs among healthy, full-term infants; however, virus titers, inflammation, and Th2 bias are proposed explanations. While TLR4 is associated with these disease phenotypes, the role of this receptor in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pathogenesis is controversial. Here, we evaluated the interaction between TLR4 and environmental factors in RSV disease and defined the immune mediators associated with severe illness. Two independent populations of infants with RSV bronchiolitis revealed that the severity of RSV infection is determined by the TLR4 genotype of the individual and by environmental exposure to LPS. RSV-infected infants with severe disease exhibited a high GATA3/T-bet ratio, which manifested as a high IL-4/IFN-γ ratio in respiratory secretions. The IL-4/IFN-γ ratio present in infants with severe RSV is indicative of Th2 polarization. Murine models of RSV infection confirmed that LPS exposure, Tlr4 genotype, and Th2 polarization influence disease phenotypes. Together, the results of this study identify environmental and genetic factors that influence RSV pathogenesis and reveal that a high IL-4/IFN-γ ratio is associated with severe disease. Moreover, these molecules should be explored as potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25555213

  5. Euodenine A: a small-molecule agonist of human TLR4.

    PubMed

    Neve, Juliette E; Wijesekera, Hasanthi P; Duffy, Sandra; Jenkins, Ian D; Ripper, Justin A; Teague, Simon J; Campitelli, Marc; Garavelas, Agatha; Nikolakopoulos, George; Le, Phuc V; de A Leone, Priscila; Pham, Ngoc B; Shelton, Philip; Fraser, Neil; Carroll, Anthony R; Avery, Vicky M; McCrae, Christopher; Williams, Nicola; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-02-27

    A small-molecule natural product, euodenine A (1), was identified as an agonist of the human TLR4 receptor. Euodenine A was isolated from the leaves of Euodia asteridula (Rutaceae) found in Papua New Guinea and has an unusual U-shaped structure. It was synthesized along with a series of analogues that exhibit potent and selective agonism of the TLR4 receptor. SAR development around the cyclobutane ring resulted in a 10-fold increase in potency. The natural product demonstrated an extracellular site of action, which requires the extracellular domain of TLR4 to stimulate a NF-κB reporter response. 1 is a human-selective agonist that is CD14-independent, and it requires both TLR4 and MD-2 for full efficacy. Testing for immunomodulation in PBMC cells shows the induction of the cytokines IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p40 as well as suppression of IL-5 from activated PBMCs, indicating that compounds like 1 could modulate the Th2 immune response without causing lung damage.

  6. A role for intestinal TLR4-driven inflammatory response during activity-based anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Liliana; Achamrah, Najate; Nobis, Séverine; Guérin, Charlène; Riou, Gaëtan; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Boyer, Olivier; Richard, Vincent; Rego, Jean Claude Do; Déchelotte, Pierre; Goichon, Alexis; Coëffier, Moïse

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation and altered gut microbiota. However, the molecular origin of the inflammation remains unknown. Toll-like receptors are key regulators of innate immune response and their activation seems also to be involved in the control of food intake. We used activity-based anorexia (ABA) model to investigate the role of TLR4 and its contribution in anorexia-associated low-grade inflammation. Here, we found that ABA affected early the intestinal inflammatory status and the hypothalamic response. Indeed, TLR4 was upregulated both on colonic epithelial cells and intestinal macrophages, leading to elevated downstream mucosal cytokine production. These mucosal changes occurred earlier than hypothalamic changes driving to increased levels of IL-1β and IL-1R1 as well as increased levels of plasma corticosterone. Paradoxically, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited greater vulnerability to ABA with increased mortality rate, suggesting a major contribution of TLR4-mediated responses during ABA-induced weight loss. PMID:27779218

  7. Polymorphism of the CD14 and TLR4 genes and post-treatment apical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F; Del Aguila, Camila A; Provenzano, José C; Guilherme, Bianca P S; Gonçalves, Lucio S

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the association of CD14 -260C>T and TLR4 +896A>G gene polymorphisms with post-treatment apical periodontitis in Brazilian individuals. The study population consisted of 41 patients with post-treatment apical periodontitis and 42 individuals with root canal-treated teeth exhibiting healed/healing periradicular tissues (controls). All teeth had apical periodontitis lesions at the time of treatment, which was completed at least 1 year previously. Saliva was collected from the participants; DNA was extracted and used for CD14 and TLR4 genotyping using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism approach and a real-time polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assay (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA), respectively. No specific genotype or allele of the CD14 and TLR4 genes or any combination thereof was positively associated with post-treatment apical periodontitis (P > .05). Data from the present study suggest that polymorphisms in the CD14 and TLR4 genes do not influence the response to endodontic treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Haplotype-based methods for detecting uncommon causal variants with common SNPs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Yu; Yi, Nengjun; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Kui; Gao, Guimin; Tiwari, Hemant K; Liu, Nianjun

    2012-09-01

    Detecting uncommon causal variants (minor allele frequency [MAF] < 5%) is difficult with commercial single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays that are designed to capture common variants (MAF > 5%). Haplotypes can provide insights into underlying linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure and can tag uncommon variants that are not well tagged by common variants. In this work, we propose a wei-SIMc-matching test that inversely weights haplotype similarities with the estimated standard deviation of haplotype counts to boost the power of similarity-based approaches for detecting uncommon causal variants. We then compare the power of the wei-SIMc-matching test with that of several popular haplotype-based tests, including four other similarity-based tests, a global score test for haplotypes (global), a test based on the maximum score statistic over all haplotypes (max), and two newly proposed haplotype-based tests for rare variant detection. With systematic simulations under a wide range of LD patterns, the results show that wei-SIMc-matching and global are the two most powerful tests. Among these two tests, wei-SIMc-matching has reliable asymptotic P-values, whereas global needs permutations to obtain reliable P-values when the frequencies of some haplotype categories are low or when the trait is skewed. Therefore, we recommend wei-SIMc-matching for detecting uncommon causal variants with surrounding common SNPs, in light of its power and computational feasibility. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory response by macrophage class A scavenger receptor (CD204)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takemura, Kenichi; Lei, XiaoFeng; Nakagawa, Takenobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} We focused on the interaction between SR-A and TLR4 signaling in this study. {yields} SR-A deletion promoted NF{kappa}B activation in macrophages in septic model mouse. {yields} SR-A suppresses both MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR4 signaling in vitro. {yields} SR-A clears LPS binding to TLR4 which resulting in the suppression of TLR4 signals. -- Abstract: The class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, CD204), one of the principal receptors expressed on macrophages, has been found to regulate inflammatory response and attenuate septic endotoxemia. However, the detailed mechanism of this process has not yet been well characterized. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation by SR-A, we evaluated the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling molecules in SR-A-deficient (SR-A{sup -/-}) macrophages. In a septic shock model, the blood levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-{beta} were significantly increased in SR-A{sup -/-} mice compared to wild-type mice, and elevated nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation was detected in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. SR-A deletion increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF{kappa}B in vitro. SR-A deletion also promoted the nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B and IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-3. In addition, a competitive binding assay with acetylated low-density lipoprotein, an SR-A-specific ligand, and anti-SR-A antibody induced significant activation of TLR4-mediated signaling molecules in wild-type macrophages but not in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. These results suggest that SR-A suppresses the macrophage activation by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 in a competitive manner and it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  10. TLR4 activates NF-{kappa}B in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Dori C.; Johnson, A.L.

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} TLR4 is expressed in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} Acting through TLR4, LPS and HSP60 induce a NF{kappa}B signaling cascade in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation or inhibition did not alter chemosensitivity to TRAIL or cisplatin. -- Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the surface epithelium of normal ovaries (OSE) and in epithelial ovarian tumors. Most notably, OSE-derived cancers express TLR4, which activates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling cascade as a mediator of inflammatory response. Currently, there is considerable interest in elucidating the role of TLR-mediated signaling in cancers. Nevertheless, the expression of TLRs in granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary, and the extent to which GCT expression of TLRs may influence cell-signaling pathways and/or modulate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, has yet to be determined. In the present study, human GCT lines (COV434 and KGN) were utilized to evaluate expression of functional TLR4. TLR4 is expressed in GCT cell lines and ligation of TLR4 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to I{kappa}B degradation and activation of NF-{kappa}B. NF-{kappa}B activation was confirmed by nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65 following treatment with LPS and the naturally occurring ligand, HSP60. Notably, immunoneutralization of TLR4 blocked nuclear localization, and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling attenuated LPS-induced TNF{alpha} plus increased doubling time in both cell lines. Contradictory to reports using human OSE cell lines, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling failed to sensitize GCT lines to TRAIL or cisplatin. In summary, findings herein are the first to demonstrate a functional TLR-signaling pathway specifically in GCTs, and indicate that in contrast to OSE-derived cancers, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B does not sensitize GCTs to TRAIL or cisplatin.

  11. The Heme Metabolite Carbon Monoxide Facilitates KSHV Infection by Inhibiting TLR4 Signaling in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Botto, Sara; Gustin, Jean K; Moses, Ashlee V

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and certain rare B cell lymphoproliferative disorders. KSHV infection of endothelial cells (EC) in vitro increases expression of the inducible host-encoded enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which is also strongly expressed in KS tumors. HO-1 catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the conversion of heme into iron, biliverdin and the gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO), all of which share anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, pro-survival, and tumorigenic activities. Our previous work has shown that HO-1 expression in KSHV-infected EC is characterized by a rapid yet transient induction at early times post-infection, followed by a sustained upregulation co-incident with establishment of viral latency. These two phases of expression are independently regulated, suggesting distinct roles for HO-1 in the virus life cycle. Here, we investigated the role of HO-1 during acute infection, prior to the onset of viral gene expression. The early infection phase involves a series of events that culminate in delivery of the viral genome to the nucleus. Primary infection also leads to activation of host innate immune effectors, including the pattern recognition receptor TLR4, to induce an antiviral response. It has been shown that TLR4-deficient EC are more susceptible to KSHV infection than wild-type controls, suggesting an important inhibitory role for TLR4 in the KSHV life cycle. TLR4 signaling is in turn subject to regulation by several virus-encoded immune evasion factors. In this report we identify HO-1 as a host protein co-opted by KSHV as part of a rapid immune evasion strategy. Specifically, we show that early HO-1 induction by KSHV results in increased levels of endogenous CO, which functions as a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. In addition, we show that CO-mediated inhibition of TLR4 signaling leads to reduced expression of TLR4-induced antiviral genes, thus dampening the host antiviral response and

  12. α1-Acid Glycoprotein Up-regulates CD163 via TLR4/CD14 Protein Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Hisakazu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Kodama, Azusa; Maeda, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kai, Hirofumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2012-01-01

    CD163, a scavenger receptor that is expressed at high levels in the monocyte-macrophage system, is a critical factor for the efficient extracellular hemoglobin (Hb) clearance during hemolysis. Because of the enormous detrimental effect of liberated Hb on our body by its ability to induce pro-inflammatory signals and tissue damage, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with CD163 expression during the acute phase response is a central issue. We report here that α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), an acute phase protein, the serum concentration of which is elevated under various inflammatory conditions, including hemolysis, up-regulates CD163 expression in both macrophage-like differentiated THP-1 (dTHP-1) cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the subsequent induction of Hb uptake was also observed in AGP-treated dTHP-1 cells. Among representative acute phase proteins such as AGP, α1-antitrypsin, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin, only AGP increased CD163 expression, suggesting that AGP plays a specific role in the regulation of CD163. Consistently, the physiological concentrations of AGP induced CD163, and the subsequent induction of Hb uptake as well as the reduction of oxidative stress in plasma were observed in phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic model mice, confirming the in vivo role of AGP. Finally, AGP signaling through the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and CD14, the common innate immune receptor complex that normally recognizes bacterial components, was identified as a crucial stimulus that induces the autocrine regulatory loops of IL-6 and/or IL-10 via NF-κB, p38, and JNK pathways, which leads to an enhancement in CD163 expression. These findings provide possible insights into how AGP exerts anti-inflammatory properties against hemolysis-induced oxidative stress. PMID:22807450

  13. TLR polymorphisms in FMF: association of TLR-2 (Arg753Gln) and TLR-4 (Asp299Gly, Thre399Ile) polymorphisms and myeloid cell TLR-2 and TLR-4 expression with the development of secondary amyloidosis in FMF.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Alper; Ateş, Halil; Cingöz, Sultan; Türkmen, Mehmet; Demir, Belde Kasap; Tunca, Mehmet; Sakızlı, Meral; Cirit, Mustafa; Ersoy, Rıfkı; Ulgenalp, Ayfer; Kavukçu, Salih

    2011-10-01

    Amyloidosis is the major complication of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Toll-like receptors (TLR) are involved in the activation of an innate immune system TLR-2 and TLR-4 recognize lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), respectively. While TLR-2 Arg753Gln polymorphism upregulates, TLR-4 Asp299Gly and Thre399Ile polymorphisms downregulate inflammation. We investigated the effect of these polymorphisms on the development of amyloidosis in FMF patients. We also investigated myeloid cell TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions in these patients. We studied 26 FMF patients and 13 FMF patients with amyloidosis. TLR-2 Arg753Gln and TLR-4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms were analyzed with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Myeloid cell baseline TLR-2 and TLR-4 and LPS-induced TLR-4 expressions were evaluated. The TLR-2 and TLR-4 polymorphism rate was compared with the results of 100 healthy subjects in our previous study. In addition, 13 healthy controls were enrolled for leukocyte TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions. Serum amyloid A (SAA) levels were measured in these 13 control cases and in FMF patients during attack-free periods. The frequency of TLR-2 Arg753Gln, TLR-4 Asp299Gly, and Thr399Ile polymorphisms in healthy controls in our previous study were 1%, 3%, and 2%, respectively. The frequency of these polymorphisms were not different in FMF patients (with or without amyloidosis) compared to the control group. Likewise, myeloid cell TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions were not different among the controls and FMF patients. However, LPS-induced TLR-4 expression in granulocytes was more prominent in FMF patients. There was no correlation between TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions and SAA levels. Neither myeloid cell TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions nor TLR-2 Arg753Gln, TLR-4 Asp299Gly, and Thr399Ile polymorphisms seem to affect the development of secondary amyloidosis in FMF patients in our study population.

  14. Activation of Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Attenuates Adaptive Thermogenesis via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Okla, Meshail; Wang, Wei; Kang, Inhae; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carr, Timothy; Chung, Soonkyu

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive thermogenesis is the cellular process transforming chemical energy into heat in response to cold. A decrease in adaptive thermogenesis is a contributing factor to obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the compromised adaptive thermogenesis in obese subjects have not yet been elucidated. In this study we hypothesized that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation and subsequent inflammatory responses are key regulators to suppress adaptive thermogenesis. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were either fed a palmitate-enriched high fat diet or administered with chronic low-dose LPS before cold acclimation. TLR4 stimulation by a high fat diet or LPS were both associated with reduced core body temperature and heat release. Impairment of thermogenic activation was correlated with diminished expression of brown-specific markers and mitochondrial dysfunction in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). Defective sWAT browning was concomitant with elevated levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. Consistently, TLR4 activation by LPS abolished cAMP-induced up-regulation of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in primary human adipocytes, which was reversed by silencing of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Moreover, the inactivation of ER stress by genetic deletion of CHOP or chemical chaperone conferred a resistance to the LPS-induced suppression of adaptive thermogenesis. Collectively, our data indicate the existence of a novel signaling network that links TLR4 activation, ER stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby antagonizing thermogenic activation of sWAT. Our results also suggest that TLR4/ER stress axis activation may be a responsible mechanism for obesity-mediated defective brown adipose tissue activation. PMID:26370079

  15. Hyaluronic Acid Oligosaccharides Suppress TLR3-Dependent Cytokine Expression in a TLR4-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The release of endogenous molecules from the skin after injury has been proposed to influence inflammation. Recent studies have found that pro-inflammatory signals can be generated by damaged endogenous self-RNA, and this event is detected by TLR3. Conversely, release of endogenous fragments of hyaluronic acid (HA) after injury has been proposed to inhibit LPS induced inflammation driven by TLR4. In this study we investigated if HA oligomers could also influence inflammation mediated by TLR3. A tetramer form of HA (oligo-HA) was added to MH-S cells (mouse alveolar macrophage cell line) that were then activated by poly(I:C). ELISA analysis of culture supernatants showed that the presence of oligo-HA suppressed the poly(I:C) induced release of IL-6 and TNFα. IL-6 mRNA expression was also suppressed as measured by quantitative RT-PCR. To determine the mechanism of action for oligo-HA to inhibit poly(I:C), macrophages derived from wild-type (WT), Tlr2−/− or Tlr4−/− mice were treated with oligo-HA and poly(I:C). Similar to WT cells, Tlr2−/− macrophages were inhibited by oligo-HA and retained suppression of cytokine release. In contrast, Tlr4−/− macrophages lost the capacity to be suppressed by oligo-HA. An increase in Traf1 (TLR negative regulator) mRNA was observed after oligo-HA treatment of WT but not in Tlr4−/− macrophages, and oligo-HA did not suppress cytokine responsiveness in Traf1−/− macrophages. These results show that oligo-HA acts through TLR4 and TRAF1 to inhibit TLR3-dependent inflammation. This observation illustrates the complex immunomodulatory action of endogenous products released after injury. PMID:24058413

  16. Paeoniflorin abrogates DSS-induced colitis via a TLR4-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Dou, Wei; Zhang, Eryun; Sun, Aning; Ding, Lili; Wei, Xiaohui; Chou, Guixin; Mani, Sridhar; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-01-01

    Paeonia lactiflora Pall is one of the most well-known herbs in China, Korea, and Japan for more than 1,200 years. Paeoniflorin, the major bioactive component of peony root, has recently been reported to have anticolitic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. The present study was to explore the possible mechanism of paeoniflorin in attenuating dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Pre- and coadministration of paeoniflorin significantly reduced the severity of colitis and resulted in downregulation of several inflammatory parameters in the colon, including the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, and the mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators (MCP-1, Cox2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17). The decline in the activation of NF-κB p65, ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK correlated with a decrease in mucosal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) but not TLR2 or TLR5 expression. In accordance with the in vivo results, paeoniflorin downregulated TLR4 expression, blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, and reduced the production of IL-6 in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Transient transfection assay performed in LPS-stimulated human colon cancer HT-29 cells indicated that paeoniflorin inhibits NF-κB transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrated a requirement for TLR4 in paeoniflorin-mediated downregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, for the first time, the present study indicates that paeoniflorin abrogates DSS-induced colitis via decreasing the expression of TLR4 and suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

  17. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  18. HBD-3 regulation of the immune response and the LPS/TLR4-mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Bao, Ni-Rong; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the mechanisms of human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3) regulation of the immune response and the lipopolysaccharide/Toll-like receptor-4 (LPS/TLR4)-mediated signaling pathway. A TLR4 extracellular gene fragment was cloned into the pET32a plasmid to determine its expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and purification. A dialysis labeling method was used to stain HBD-3 with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). FITC-HBD-3 was used to induce the differentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) into immature dendritic cells (imDC) in vitro. Binding reactions were established using FITC-HBD-3 and sTLR4 into cell suspensions. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to analyze the results. Western blot analysis confirmed the identity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and was used to quantify its nuclear translocation. The results showed that, HBD-3 bound to imDC in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and sTLR4 and LPS competitively inhibited the binding. HBD-3 competitively blocked the binding of LPS and imDC by binding to imDC. HBD-3 significantly decreased the translocation of LPS-induced NF-κB into the nucleus. In conclusion, HBD-3 can competitively inhibit the binding of LPS and imDC through its binding to TLR4 molecules, which are expressed in imDC, thereby preventing LPS from inducing the maturity of the imDCs. PMID:27703496

  19. The Role of TLR4 Activation in Photoreceptor Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ko, MinHee K.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Parikh, Jignesh G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Herein the authors investigated whether the activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the innate immune response causes retinal photoreceptor oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. Methods. On day 5 after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant containing heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (CFA), retinas were submitted to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array focused on the TLR signaling, or apoptosis, pathway. CFA-mediated TLR4 activation, oxidative stress, and mtDNA damage were determined in B10.RIII and knockout (KO) mice (recombination activation gene [Rag] 1KO, TLR4KO, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 [MyD88]KO, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-αKO, or caspase 7KO mice) using quantitative real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. The mycobacterial DNA load on the retina, brain, liver, and spleen was determined by real-time PCR after intracardiac perfusion. Results. PCR array demonstrated the upregulation of TLRs and their signaling molecules in retinas of CFA-injected mice compared with those of control animals without inflammatory cell infiltration in the retina and uvea. Mycobacterial DNA was detected in the retinas of CFA-injected mice. Retinas of CFA-injected animals showed oxidative stress and mtDNA damage, primarily in the photoreceptor inner segments. Upregulated TLR4 was localized with CD11b+MHCII+ cells but not with GFAP+ astrocytes. This oxidative stress/damage was similar in CFA-injected Rag1KO mice compared with wild-type controls. Such damage was absent in the retinas of CFA-injected TLR4KO, MyD88KO, and TNF-αKO mice. CFA-mediated inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in the retina was significantly decreased in TNF-αKO mice. Conclusions. Retinal photoreceptors are susceptible to mitochondrial oxidative stress/mtDNA damage in robust TLR4-mediated innate immune response. PMID:21666244

  20. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony R; Sweeten, Thayne L; Johnson, Randall C; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C; Davies, Christopher J; Thomas, Aaron J; Croen, Lisa A; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The "common variant-common disease" hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the "common variant-common disease" hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in autism over

  1. Epigenetic modification of TLR4 promotes activation of NF-κB by regulating methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 and Sp1 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Moo; Lee, Heesoo; Uhm, Tae Gi; Min, Jeong-Ki; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Jong Wan; Choe, Yong-Kyung; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in promoting the immune response in various cancers. Recently, TLR4 is highly expressed in a stage-dependent manner in gastric cancer, but the regulatory mechanism of TLR4 expression has been not elucidated it. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying regulation of TLR4 expression through promoter methylation and histone modification between transcriptional regulation and silencing of the TLR4 gene in gastric cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was carried out to screen for factors related to TLR4 methylation such as MeCP2, HDAC1, and Sp1 on the TLR4 promoter. Moreover, DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induced demethylation of the TLR4 promoter and increased H3K4 trimethylation and Sp1 binding to reactivate silenced TLR4. In contrast, although the silence of TLR4 activated H3K9 trimethylation and MeCP2 complex, combined treatment with TLR4 agonist and 5-aza-dC upregulated H3K4 trimethylation and activated with transcription factors as Sp1 and NF-κB. This study demonstrates that recruitment of the MeCP2/HDAC1 repressor complex increases the low levels of TLR4 expression through epigenetic modification of DNA and histones on the TLR4 promoter, but Sp1 activates TLR4 high expression by hypomethylation and NF-κB signaling in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26675260

  2. Thirty-five common variants for coronary artery disease: the fruits of much collaborative labour

    PubMed Central

    Peden, John F.; Farrall, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Affected individuals cluster in families in patterns that reflect the sharing of numerous susceptibility genes. Genome-wide and large-scale gene-centric genotyping studies that involve tens of thousands of cases and controls have now mapped common disease variants to 34 distinct loci. Some coronary disease common variants show allelic heterogeneity or copy number variation. Some of the loci include candidate genes that imply conventional or emerging risk factor-mediated mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Quantitative trait loci associations with risk factors have been informative in Mendelian randomization studies as well as fine-mapping of causative variants. But, for most loci, plausible mechanistic links are uncertain or obscure at present but provide potentially novel directions for research into this disease's pathogenesis. The common variants explain ∼4% of inter-individual variation in disease risk and no more than 13% of the total heritability of coronary disease. Although many CAD genes are presently undiscovered, it is likely that larger collaborative genome-wide association studies will map further common/low-penetrance variants and hoped that low-frequency or rare high-penetrance variants will also be identified in medical resequencing experiments. PMID:21875899

  3. Diversity of the TLR4 Immunity Receptor in Czech Native Cattle Breeds Revealed Using the Pacific Biosciences Sequencing Platform.

    PubMed

    Novák, Karel; Pikousová, Jitka; Czerneková, Vladimíra; Mátlová, Věra

    2017-07-03

    The allelic variants of immunity genes in historical breeds likely reflect local infection pressure and therefore represent a reservoir for breeding. Screening to determine the diversity of the Toll-like receptor gene TLR4 was conducted in two conserved cattle breeds: Czech Red and Czech Red Pied. High-throughput sequencing of pooled PCR amplicons using the PacBio platform revealed polymorphisms, which were subsequently confirmed via genotyping techniques. Eight SNPs found in coding and adjacent regions were grouped into 18 haplotypes, representing a significant portion of the known diversity in the global breed panel and presumably exceeding diversity in production populations. Notably, the ancient Czech Red breed appeared to possess greater haplotype diversity than the Czech Red Pied breed, a Simmental variant, although the haplotype frequencies might have been distorted by significant crossbreeding and bottlenecks in the history of Czech Red cattle. The differences in haplotype frequencies validated the phenotypic distinctness of the local breeds. Due to the availability of Czech Red Pied production herds, the effect of intensive breeding on TLR diversity can be evaluated in this model. The advantages of the Pacific Biosciences technology for the resequencing of long PCR fragments with subsequent direct phasing were independently validated.

  4. Stimulation of TLR4 by LMW-HA induces metastasis in human papillary thyroid carcinoma through CXCR7.

    PubMed

    Dang, Shipeng; Peng, Yongde; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yanan; Qian, Zhongqing; Chen, Yuqing; Wang, Xiaojing; Lin, Yunzhi; Zhang, Xiaomei; Sun, Xiyan; Wu, Qiong; Cheng, Yiji; Nie, Hong; Jin, Min; Xu, Huanbai

    2013-01-01

    In inflammatory sites, high molecular weight hyaluronan fragments are degraded into lower molecular weight hyaluronan fragments (LMW-HA) to regulate immune responses. However, the function of LMW-HA in PTC progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that receptor of LMW-HA, TLR4, was aberrantly overexpressed in PTC tissues and cell line W3. Exposure of W3 cells to LMW-HA promoted cell proliferation and migration via TLR4. Knockdown of TLR4 has provided evidence that TLR4 is essential for LMW-HA-induced CXCR7 expression, which is responsible for LMW-HA-induced proliferation and migration of W3 cells. In tumor-bearing adult nude mice, stimulation of LMW-HA on W3 cells promotes CXCR7 expression in tumor masses (P = 0.002) and tumor growth (P < 0.001). To further confirm our findings, we investigated the clinicopathologic significance of TLR4 and CXCR7 expression using immumohistochemistry in 135 human PTC tissues and 56 normal thyroid tissue samples. Higher rates of TLR4 (53%) and CXCR7 (24%) expression were found in PTC tissues than in normal tissues. Expression of TLR4 or CXCR7 is associated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis. Therefore, LMW-HA may contribute to the development of PTC via TLR4/CXCR7 pathway, which may be a novel target for PTC immunomodulatory therapy.

  5. Spatiotemporal expression of endogenous TLR4 ligands leads to inflammation and bone erosion in mouse collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kiyeko, Gaëlle Wambiekele; Hatterer, Eric; Herren, Suzanne; Di Ceglie, Irene; van Lent, Peter L; Reith, Walter; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Ferlin, Walter; Shang, Limin

    2016-11-01

    Increased expression of endogenous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands (e.g., Tenascin-C, S100A8/A9, citrullinated fibrinogen (cFb) immune complexes) has been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their roles in RA pathogenesis are not well understood. Here, we investigated the expression kinetics and role of endogenous TLR4 ligands in the murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Tenascin-C was upregulated in blood early in CIA, and correlated positively with the clinical score at day 56. Levels of S100A8/A9 increased starting from day 28, peaking at day 42, and correlated positively with joint inflammation. Levels of anti-cFb antibodies increased during the late phase of CIA and correlated positively with both joint inflammation and cartilage damage. Blockade of TLR4 activation at the time of the first TLR4 ligand upregulation prevented clinical and histological signs of arthritis. A TLR4-dependent role was also observed for Tenascin-C and cFb immune complexes in osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Taken together, our data suggests that the pathogenic contribution of TLR4 in promoting joint inflammation and bone erosion during CIA occurs via various TLR4 ligands arising at different stages of disease. The data also suggests that Blockade of TLR4 with monoclonal antibodies is a promising strategy in RA treatment. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Stimulation of TLR4 by LMW-HA Induces Metastasis in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma through CXCR7

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yongde; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yanan; Qian, Zhongqing; Chen, Yuqing; Wang, Xiaojing; Lin, Yunzhi; Zhang, Xiaomei; Sun, Xiyan; Wu, Qiong; Cheng, Yiji; Nie, Hong; Jin, Min; Xu, Huanbai

    2013-01-01

    In inflammatory sites, high molecular weight hyaluronan fragments are degraded into lower molecular weight hyaluronan fragments (LMW-HA) to regulate immune responses. However, the function of LMW-HA in PTC progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that receptor of LMW-HA, TLR4, was aberrantly overexpressed in PTC tissues and cell line W3. Exposure of W3 cells to LMW-HA promoted cell proliferation and migration via TLR4. Knockdown of TLR4 has provided evidence that TLR4 is essential for LMW-HA-induced CXCR7 expression, which is responsible for LMW-HA-induced proliferation and migration of W3 cells. In tumor-bearing adult nude mice, stimulation of LMW-HA on W3 cells promotes CXCR7 expression in tumor masses (P = 0.002) and tumor growth (P < 0.001). To further confirm our findings, we investigated the clinicopathologic significance of TLR4 and CXCR7 expression using immumohistochemistry in 135 human PTC tissues and 56 normal thyroid tissue samples. Higher rates of TLR4 (53%) and CXCR7 (24%) expression were found in PTC tissues than in normal tissues. Expression of TLR4 or CXCR7 is associated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis. Therefore, LMW-HA may contribute to the development of PTC via TLR4/CXCR7 pathway, which may be a novel target for PTC immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:24363762

  7. Inducible Lentivirus-Mediated siRNA against TLR4 Reduces Nociception in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ruirui; Di, Huiting; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Zhangxiang; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Weifeng; Wu, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Although bone cancer pain is still not fully understood by scientists and clinicians alike, studies suggest that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in the initiation and/or maintenance of pathological pain state in bone cancer pain. A promising treatment for bone cancer pain is the downregulation of TLR4 by RNA interference; however, naked siRNA (small interference RNA) is not effective in long-term treatments. In order to concoct a viable prolonged treatment for bone cancer pain, an inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 (tetracycline inducible lentivirus carrying siRNA targeting TLR4) was prepared and the antinociception effects were observed in bone cancer pain rats induced by Walker 256 cells injection in left leg. Results showed that LvOn-siTLR4 intrathecal injection with doxycycline (Dox) oral administration effectively reduced the nociception induced by Walker 256 cells while inhibiting the mRNA and protein expression of TLR4. Proinflammatory cytokines as TNF-α and IL-1β in spinal cord were also decreased. These findings suggest that TLR4 could be a target for bone cancer pain treatment and tetracycline inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 represents a new potential option for long-term treatment of bone cancer pain.

  8. Isoflurane preconditioning provides neuroprotection against stroke by regulating the expression of the TLR4 signalling pathway to alleviate microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Gao, Changjun; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Daihua; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Lixian; Chen, Lei; Sun, Xude

    2015-01-01

    Excessive microglial activation often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity in the ischemic penumbra during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation via the NF-κB pathway. Isoflurane preconditioning (IP) can provide neuroprotection and inhibit microglial activation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the TLR4 signalling pathway in IP to exert neuroprotection following ischemic stroke in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that 2% IP alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, attenuated apoptosis and weakened microglial activation in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, IP down-regulated the expression of HSP 60, TLR4 and MyD88 and up-regulated inhibitor of IκB-α expression compared with I/R group in vivo. In vitro, 2% IP and a specific inhibitor of TLR4, CLI-095, down-regulated the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, and up-regulated IκB-α and Bcl-2 expression compared with OGD group. Moreover, IP and CLI-095 attenuated microglial activation-induced neuronal apoptosis, and overexpression of the TLR4 gene reversed the neuroprotective effects of IP. In conclusion, IP provided neuroprotection by regulating TLR4 expression directly, alleviating microglial activation and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the activation of microglial activation via TLR4 may be a new avenue for stroke treatment. PMID:26086415

  9. TLR4-defective (C3H/HeJ) mice are not protected from cast immobilization-induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Noriaki; Nozaki, Risa; Naito, Hisashi; Machida, Shuichi

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 signaling may be an important factor in muscle atrophy and excessive inflammatory response associated with immobilization. To examine the role of TLR4 signaling on cast immobilization-induced skeletal muscle atrophy, we tested the hypothesis that muscle atrophy and inflammation after cast immobilization is reduced in TLR4-defective mice. TLR4-defective (C3H/HeJ) and wild type (C3H/HeN) mice were divided into control and cast-immobilization groups. Cast immobilization was imposed for 14 days. Cast immobilization increased TLR4 mRNA expression in the gastrocnemius and decreased muscle mass and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the gastrocnemius fibers. However, there was no difference in the gastrocnemius muscle mass and CSA between TLR4-defective and wild type mice. Cast immobilization-induced increase in ubiquitin E3 ligases (MAFbx/Atrogin-1 and MuRF1), inflammatory cytokines, and macrophage/monocyte marker mRNAs were unaffected by defective TLR4. Our findings in C3H/HeJ mice suggested that TLR4 signaling might not play an essential role in immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) deficient mice are protected from adipose tissue inflammation in aging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amiya K; O'Brien, Martin; Mau, Theresa; Yung, Raymond

    2017-09-07

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is a central mechanism for metabolic dysfunction in both diet-induced obesity and age-associated obesity. Studies in diet-induced obesity have characterized the role of Fetuin A (Fet A) in Free Fatty Acids (FFA)-mediated TLR4 activation and adipose tissue inflammation. However, the role of Fet A & TLR4 in aging-related adipose tissue inflammation is unknown. In the current study, analysis of epidymymal fat pads of C57/Bl6 male mice, we found that, in contrast to data from diet-induced obesity models, adipose tissue from aged mice have normal Fet A and TLR4 expression. Interestingly, aged TLR4-deficient mice have diminished adipose tissue inflammation compared to normal controls. We further demonstrated that reduced AT inflammation in old TLR4-deficient mice is linked to impaired ER stress, augmented autophagy activity, and diminished senescence phenomenon. Importantly, old TLR4-deficient mice have improved glucose tolerance compared to age-matched wild type mice, suggesting that the observed reduced AT inflammation in aged TLR4-deficient mice has important physiological consequences. Taken together, our present study establishes novel aspect of aging-associated AT inflammation that is distinct from diet-induced AT inflammation. Our results also provide strong evidence that TLR4 plays a significant role in promoting aging adipose tissue inflammation.

  11. Amphiphilic Guanidinocalixarenes Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and Lectin-Stimulated Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Sestito, Stefania E; Facchini, Fabio A; Morbioli, Ilaria; Billod, Jean-Marc; Martin-Santamaria, Sonsoles; Casnati, Alessandro; Sansone, Francesco; Peri, Francesco

    2017-06-22

    We recently reported on the activity of cationic amphiphiles in inhibiting TLR4 activation and subsequent production of inflammatory cytokines in cells and in animal models. Starting from the assumption that opportunely designed cationic amphiphiles can behave as CD14/MD-2 ligands and therefore modulate the TLR4 signaling, we present here a panel of amphiphilic guanidinocalixarenes whose structure was computationally optimized to dock into MD-2 and CD14 binding sites. Some of these calixarenes were active in inhibiting, in a dose-dependent way, the LPS-stimulated TLR4 activation and TLR4-dependent cytokine production in human and mouse cells. Moreover, guanidinocalixarenes also inhibited TLR4 signaling when TLR4 was activated by a non-LPS stimulus, the plant lectin PHA. While the activity of guanidinocalixarenes in inhibiting LPS toxic action has previously been related to their capacity to bind LPS, we suggest a direct antagonist effect of calixarenes on TLR4/MD-2 dimerization, pointing at the calixarene moiety as a potential scaffold for the development of new TLR4-directed therapeutics.

  12. The expression of Foxp3 and TLR4 in cervical cancer: association with immune escape and clinical pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijie; Zhang, Shulan

    2017-03-01

    To explore the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3(Foxp3) and toll-like receptor 4(TLR4) in cervical cancer and evaluate their clinical significance. Foxp3 and TLR4 protein expression was detected in 105 cervical tissue specimens including cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and healthy control samples using immunohistochemistry. Their relationship with clinicopathologic parameters was also determined. Foxp3 and TLR4 had high levels of expression in cervical cancer cells (91.43 and 82.86%, respectively). Foxp3 levels were significantly associated with FIGO stage (P < 0.001) and tumor size (P = 0.034), while TLR4 levels were associated with clinical FIGO stage (P = 0.033) and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.031). Their expression levels were not correlated with age, histologic type, or differentiation (all P > 0.05). These findings suggest that Foxp3 and TLR4 may be useful prognostic indicators of cervical carcinoma. In addition, there were significant positive relationships between Foxp3 and TLR4 expression (r = 0.703, P < 0.001), which shows a possible link and synergistic role of Foxp3 and TLR4 in promoting the immune escape of cervical cancer. Foxp3 and TLR4 may be useful biomarkers for patient prognosis and cervical cancer prediction and treatment.

  13. Contribution of TLR4 and MyD88 for adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) activity in a DNA prime-protein boost HIV-1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Kimberly; Buglione-Corbett, Rachel; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Montminy-Paquette, Sara; West, Kim; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Lien, Egil

    2014-09-03

    Recombinant protein vaccines are commonly formulated with an immune-stimulatory compound, or adjuvant, to boost immune responses to a particular antigen. Recent studies have shown that, through recognition of molecular motifs, receptors of the innate immune system are involved in the functions of adjuvants to generate and direct adaptive immune responses. However, it is not clear to which degree those receptors are also important when the adjuvant is used as part of a novel heterologous prime-boost immunization process in which the priming and boosting components are not the same type of vaccines. In the current study, we compared the immune responses elicited by a pentavalent HIV-1 DNA prime-protein boost vaccine in mice deficient in either Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) to wildtype mice. HIV gp120 protein administered in the boost phase was formulated with either monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), QS-21, or Al(OH)3. Endpoint antibody titer, serum cytokine response and T-cell memory response were assessed. Neither TLR4 nor MyD88 deficiency had a significant effect on the immune response of mice given vaccine formulated with QS-21 or Al(OH)3. However, TLR4- and MyD88-deficiency decreased both the antibody and T-cell responses in mice administered HIV gp120 formulated with MPLA. These results further our understanding of the activation of TLR4 and MyD88 by MPLA in the context of a DNA prime/protein boost immunization strategy.

  14. Radioiodination of an endotoxin·MD-2 complex generates a novel sensitive, high affinity ligand for TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Teghanemt, Athmane; Weiss, Jerrold P.; Gioannini, Theresa L.

    2013-01-01

    A purified complex of metabolically labeled endotoxin ([3H] lipooligosaccharide, LOS) and insect-cell derived recombinant human myeloid differentiation factor 2, (MD-2), [3H] LOS·MD-2, has been used to demonstrate pM affinity binding interactions with soluble Toll-like receptor 4 ectodomain (TLR4ecd). Measurement of the binding parameters of membrane-bound TLR4 has been hampered by the paucity of TLR4 on cell surfaces and inadequate sensitivity of available reagents. We took advantage of the stability of endotoxin·MD-2 and tyrosine(s) present on the surface of MD-2 to radioiodinate LOS·MD-2. Radioiodinated LOS·MD-2 generated a reagent with an estimated 1:1 molar ratio of [125I] to sMD-2 with 20-fold higher specific radioactivity and TLR4-activating properties comparable to metabolically labeled LOS·MD-2. LOS·MD-2[125I] and [3H]LOS·MD-2 have similar affinities for soluble FLAGTLR4ecd and for membrane-bound TLR4 in transiently transfected HEK293T/TLR4 cells. In a similar dose-dependent manner, sMD-2 and LOS·MD-2 inhibit LOS·MD-2[125I] binding to TLR4 indicating the pM affinity binding of LOS·MD-2[125I] is agonist-independent. LOS·MD-2[125I] allowed measurement of low levels of cell-surface human or murine TLR4 expressed by stable cell lines (2,000–3,000 sites/cell) and quantitatively measures low levels of “MD-2-free” TLR4 (est. 250 molecules/cell) in cells co-expressing TLR4 and MD-2. Occupation of 50–100 TLR4/cell by LOS·MD-2 is sufficient to trigger measurable TLR4-dependent cell activation. LOS·MD-2[125I] provides a powerful reagent to measure quantitatively functional cell-surface TLR4 in human and murine cells, including cells where surface TLR4 are potentially functionally significant but too low to detect by other methods. PMID:23439691

  15. Rare and low-frequency variants in human common diseases and other complex traits.

    PubMed

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    In humans, most of the genetic variation is rare and often population-specific. Whereas the role of rare genetic variants in familial monogenic diseases is firmly established, we are only now starting to explore the contribution of this class of genetic variation to human common diseases and other complex traits. Such large-scale experiments are possible due to the development of next-generation DNA sequencing. Early findings suggested that rare and low-frequency coding variation might have a large effect on human phenotypes (eg, PCSK9 missense variants on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and coronary heart diseases). This observation sparked excitement in prognostic and diagnostic medicine, as well as in genetics-driven strategies to develop new drugs. In this review, I describe results and present initial conclusions regarding some of the recent rare and low-frequency variant discoveries. We can already assume that most phenotype-associated rare and low-frequency variants have modest-to-weak phenotypical effect. Thus, we will need large cohorts to identify them, as for common variants in genome-wide association studies. As we expand the list of associated rare and low-frequency variants, we can also better recognise the current limitations: we need to develop better statistical methods to optimally test association with rare variants, including non-coding variation, and to account for potential confounders such as population stratification.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide induces proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro via TLR4 activation.

    PubMed

    Herzmann, Nicole; Salamon, Achim; Fiedler, Tomas; Peters, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are capable of multi-lineage differentiation and support regenerative processes. In bacterial infections, resident MSC can come intocontact with and need to react to bacterial components. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a typical structure of Gram-negative bacteria, increases the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSC. LPS is usually recognized by the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and induces pro-inflammatory reactions in numerous cell types. In this study, we quantified the protein expression of TLR4 and CD14 on adipose-derived MSC (adMSC) in osteogenic differentiation and investigated the effect of TLR4 activation by LPS on NF-κB activation, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. We found that TLR4 is expressed on adMSC whereas CD14 is not, and that osteogenic differentiation induced an increase of the amount of TLR4 protein whereas LPS stimulation did not. Moreover, we could show that NF-κB activation via TLR4 occurs upon LPS treatment. Furthermore, we were able to show that competitive inhibition of TLR4 completely abolished the stimulatory effect of LPS on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. In addition, the inhibition of TLR4 leads to the complete absence of osteogenic differentiation of adMSC, even when osteogenically stimulated. Thus, we conclude that LPS induces proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC in vitro through the activation of TLR4 and that the TLR4 receptor seems to play a role during osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  17. Obesity-associated hypertension is ameliorated in patients with TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4986790.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Simon; Hoppmann, Petra; Koch, Werner; Kemmner, Stephan; Schmaderer, Christoph; Renders, Lutz; Kastrati, Adnan; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Heemann, Uwe; Baumann, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with hypertension. Despite numerous mechanistic links the association is not fully understood. Western diet increases uptake of Toll-Like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands such as free fatty acids or endotoxin. We recently demonstrated that TLR4 ligands are involved in the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that TLR4 ligands are involved in obesity-associated hypertension and investigated the TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs 498790). This SNP is frequent, associated with cardiovascular disease and characterized by blunted response upon exposure to TLR4 ligands. We investigated 3657 patients undergoing coronary angiography. Blood pressure was determined in standardized manner prior angiography. The diagnosis of hypertension was based on record data. Patients were characterized for TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4986790. Patients were stratified according to quartiles of Body mass index (BMI) and according to the polymorphism. The association between the TLR4 polymorphism and blood pressure in obese patients (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)) was investigated by multivariate regression analysis. Out of 3657 patients 3017 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. In the whole cohort a significant increase of SBP, pulse pressure and diagnosis of hypertension was observed across BMI quartiles. By contrast, no significant increase of SBP, pulse pressure or diagnosis of hypertension was observed in the 319 cases with TLR4 SNP rs4986790 across BMI quartiles. These obese cases had significantly lower SBP, lower pulse pressure (7.0 and 7.6 mmHg) and less diagnosis of hypertension as controls. In obesity the TLR4 SNP rs4986790 was an independent predictor of SBP. Systolic blood pressure increase with obesity was blunted in cases with TLR4 SNP rs4986790.

  18. Resveratrol enhances cell-mediated immune response to DMBA through TLR4 and prevents DMBA induced cutaneous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Nasti, Tahseen H; Meleth, Sreelatha; Elmets, Craig A

    2009-01-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) activate signals that are critically involved in innate immune responses and that contribute to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Resveratrol (trans-3, 5,4-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenol found in red grapes and in several other plant sources, is an effective chemopreventive agent in cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether TLR4 was required for the chemopreventive action of resveratrol in DMBA skin carcinogenesis. For this purpose, mice with normal and deficient TLR4 function were compared when pretreated with resveratrol and then subjected to a DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis protocol. There were fewer tumors/group (p<0.001) in resveratrol treated TLR4 competent C3H/HeN mice than in TLR4 deficient C3H/HeJ mice. In addition, the size of tumors in C3H/HeN mice was reduced in vivo and their survival in vitro was inhibited by resveratrol to a significantly greater extent than in C3H/HeJ mice. Resveratrol inhibited angiogenesis to a much greater extent in the TLR4 competent mice than in TLR4 deficient mice. IFN-γ and IL-12 levels were also increased in TLR4 competent mice compared to TLR4 deficient mice, and TLR4 competent C3H/HeN mice exhibited a greater increase in the cell-mediated immune response to DMBA. The results of this study indicate that TLR4 is an important mediator of resveratrol chemoprevention in DMBA skin tumorigenesis. PMID:19142898

  19. LOX-1 and TLR4 affect each other and regulate the generation of ROS in A. fumigatus keratitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinran; Zhao, Guiqiu; Li, Cui; Lin, Jing; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Qian; Hu, Liting; Xu, Qiang; Peng, Xudong; He, Kun; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-11-01

    To explore the relationship between LOX-1 and TLR4 in Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) keratitis. To determine LOX-1 and TLR4 can affect each other and regulate inflammation through regulation of the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. fumigatus keratitis. The cornea and abdominal cavity extracted neutrophils of susceptible C57BL/6 mice were infected with A. fumigatus. The cornea and neutrophils were pretreated with LOX-1 neutralizing antibody, Polyinosinic acid (Poly(I)) (the inhibitor of LOX-1) or CLI-095 (the inhibitor of TLR4) separately before infection. LOX-1, TLR4 and IL-1β expression were detected in normal and infected cornea by PCR and Western Blot, while ROS was detected in the neutrophils by flow cytometry. LOX-1, TLR4, IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in C57BL/6 cornea after infection. LOX-1 neutralizing antibody or Poly(I) pretreatment decreased the expression of LOX-1, TLR4 and IL-1β in C57BL/6 cornea after infection and CLI-095 pretreatment decreased the expression of LOX-1, TLR4 and IL-1β in C57BL/6 cornea after infection. ROS generation was increased in C57BL/6 neutrophils after infection, however, ROS generation was decreased in C57BL/6 neutrophils after infection by LOX-1 neutralizing antibody or Poly(I) or CLI-095 pretreatment. LOX-1, TLR4 and IL-1β expression and ROS generation are increased after infection. LOX-1 and TLR4 can affect each other and regulate the generation of ROS in A. fumigatus keratitis. Inhibition of LOX-1 and TLR4 can reduce ROS generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. TLR4 induces tumor growth and inhibits paclitaxel activity in MyD88-positive human ovarian carcinoma in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WANG, AN-CONG; MA, YUE-BING; WU, FENG-XIA; MA, ZHI-FANG; LIU, NAI-FU; GAO, RONG; GAO, YONG-SHENG; SHENG, XIU-GUI

    2014-01-01

    In ovarian cancer patients, chemotherapy resistance is the principal factor restricting long-term treatment. Paclitaxel (Pac) has been previously reported to be a ligand to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). It was determined that TLR4 signaling is divided into the following two pathways: Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent and MyD88-independent. The present study investigated the effect of TLR4 ligation by Pac in MyD88-positive (MyD88+) and MyD88-negative (MyD88−) human ovarian cancer cell lines. An RNA interference expression vector was specifically constructed to target TLR4 mRNA, which was stably transfected into the human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, OVCAR3, A2780 and 3AO). Cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, were detected. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in the cells transfected with scramble control and TLR4 shRNA to explore the possible functions of TLR4 in ovarian cancer cell growth. It was found that lipopolysaccharide and Pac significantly increase the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in the SKOV3 cell line. Similarly, Pac resulted in a significant upregulation of IL-6 and IL-8 in OVCAR3 cells, but not in A2780 and 3AO cells. These results suggested that in MyD88+ ovarian cancer cell lines, TLR4 depletion shows increased sensitivity to Pac treatment in inhibiting cell proliferation compared with in cells without TLR4 knockdown. On the contrary, such changes were not found in MyD88− cells (A2780 and 3AO). TLR4 negatively regulates Pac chemotherapy, particularly in terms of cell proliferation, and TLR4 may be a novel treatment target in Pac-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24527095

  1. RETRACTED: Sophocarpine displays anti-inflammatory effect via inhibiting TLR4 and TLR4 downstream pathways on LPS-induced mastitis in the mammary gland of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehai; Xu, Niannian; Zhang, Zhenbiao; Yang, Shijin; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen; Guo, Mengyao

    2016-06-01

    Mastitis is defined as the inflammation of the mammary gland. LPS, which is widely used to induce mastitis models for the study of this disease, triggers similar inflammation as Escherichia coli. Sophocarpine, isolated from Sophora alopecuroides L., exhibits multiple biological properties. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of sophocarpine on mastitis within an LPS-induced mouse model. ELISA and western blotting were performed to detect protein levels. The qPCR was performed to detect mRNA levels. The ELISA and qRT-PCR results showed that sophocarpine inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. However, sophocarpine suppressed TLR4 expression. Further study showed that sophocarpine could suppress the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65 and p38. These results confirm that sophocarpine played an anti-inflammatory role in LPS-induced mastitis by regulating TLR4 and the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in mammary gland tissues. Therefore, sophocarpine may be a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of mastitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A common missense variant in BRCA2 predisposes to early onset breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Górski, Bohdan; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA2 gene are one of the two major causes of hereditary breast cancer. Protein-truncating mutations of BRCA2 are usually deleterious and increase the risk of breast cancer up to 80% over a lifetime. A few missense mutations in BRCA2 are believed to have a similarly high penetrance, apart from more common neutral polymorphisms. It is often difficult to classify a particular sequence variant as a mutation or a polymorphism. For a deleterious variant, one would expect a greater allele frequency in breast cancer cases than in ethnic-matched controls. In contrast, neutral polymorphic variants should be equally frequent in the two groups. We genotyped 3,241 cases of breast cancer diagnosed at under 51 years of age, unselected for family history, from 18 hospitals throughout Poland and 2,791 ethnic-matched controls for a single BRCA2 C5972T variant. The variant was present in approximately 6% of the Polish population. In the study, 13 women (11 cases and two controls (OR = 4.7; p = 0.02)) were homozygous for the variant allele. The overall odds ratio for breast cancer in women with a single copy of the BRCA2 C5972T variant was 1.1 (p = 0.7); however, the effect was significant for patients diagnosed at or before age 40 (OR = 1.4; p = 0.04). We reviewed the association between the BRCA2 variant in different histologic subgroups and found the effect most pronounced in women who had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with micro-invasion (OR = 2.8; p < 0.0001). The BRCA2 C5972T allele is a common variant in Poland that increases the risk of DCIS with micro-invasion. The homozygous state is rare but increases the risk of breast cancer five-fold.

  3. TLR4 is involved in the pathogenic effects observed in a murine model of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongxiang; Kong, Xiangmin; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Yachao; Sheng, Liangju; Wang, Ting; Xia, Longfei; Yan, Jinchuan

    2015-10-01

    Antiphospholipid (aPL)/anti-β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) antibodies are considered to play a pivotal pathogenic role in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) by inducing an intracellular signaling and procoagulant/proinflammatory phenotype that leads to thrombosis. There is increasing evidence that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) could serve as an important molecule for anti-β2GPI recognition on target cells. However, few studies have focused on the effects of TLR4 in in vivo models. Here, we investigated the role of TLR4 in the pathogenic effects of aPL/anti-β2GPI more precisely using TLR4-intact (C3H/HeN) and TLR4-defective (C3H/HeJ) mice. C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice were injected with either IgG isolated from patient with APS (IgG-APS) or epitope-specific anti-β2GPI purified from β2GPI peptide-immunized rabbits. We found that, following anti-β2GPI injections and vascular injury, thrombus formation in both the carotid artery and femoral vein was markedly reduced in C3H/HeJ mice when compared with C3H/HeN mice. IgG-APS or anti-β2GPI-induced carotid artery and peritoneal macrophage tissue factor activity/expression was significantly lesser in C3H/HeJ than in C3H/HeN mice. Furthermore, the IgG-APS or anti-β2GPI induced expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin in the aorta and of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in peritoneal macrophages of C3H/HeJ mice was also significantly reduced compared to C3H/HeN mice. Together, these data suggest that TLR4 is involved in the pathogenic effects of aPL/anti-β2GPI antibodies in vivo.

  4. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  5. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

  6. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  7. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Johnson, Randall C.; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C.; Davies, Christopher J.; Thomas, Aaron J.; Croen, Lisa A.; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The “common variant—common disease” hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the “common variant—common disease” hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in

  8. Detection of Abnormal Hemoglobin Variants by HPLC Method: Common Problems with Suggested Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Leela; Kalita, Dipti; Singh, Sompal; Kudesia, Madhur; Mendiratta, Sumanlata; Mittal, Meenakshi; Mathur, Alka

    2014-01-01

    Thalassemia and thalassemic hemoglobinopathies pose serious health problem leading to severe morbidity and mortality in Indian population. Plethora of hemoglobin variants is prevalent in multiethnic Indian population. The aim of the present study was to analyze laboratory aspects, namely, hematological profile and HPLC findings of the hemoglobin variants detected, and to discuss problems that we faced in diagnosis in a routine clinical laboratory. We screened a total of 4800 cases in a hospital based population of North India in a 2-years period of by automated HPLC method using the Variant Hemoglobin Testing System (Variant II Beta Thalassemia Short Program, Bio-Rad Laboratories) under the experimental conditions specified by the manufacturer. Whole blood in EDTA was used and red cell indices were determined using automated hematology analyzer. We detected 290 cases with abnormal variants in which beta thalassemia was the most common followed by hemoglobin E. Here, we discuss the laboratory aspects of various hemoglobin disorders and diagnostic difficulties in cases like borderline HbA2 values, presence of silent mutation, alpha thalassemia gene, and few rare variants which at times require correlation with genetic study. Special attention was given to HbA2 level even in presence of a structural variant to rule out coinheritance of beta thalassemia gene. PMID:27351019

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein Promotes TLR-4–Dependent Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Funchal, Giselle A.; Jaeger, Natália; Czepielewski, Rafael S.; Machado, Mileni S.; Muraro, Stéfanie P.; Stein, Renato T.; Bonorino, Cristina B. C.; Porto, Bárbara N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis. PMID:25856628

  10. Optimum designs for next-generation sequencing to discover rare variants for common complex disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gang; Rao, D C

    2011-09-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies make it affordable to search for rare and functional variants for common complex diseases systematically. We investigated strategies for enriching rare variants in the samples selected for sequencing so as to optimize the power for their discovery. In particular, we investigated the roles of alternative sources of enrichment in families through computer simulations. We showed that linkage information, extreme phenotype, and nonrandom ascertainment, such as multiply affected families, constitute different sources for enriching rare and functional variants in a sequencing study design. Linkage is well known to have limited power for detecting small genetic effects, and hence not considered to be a powerful tool for discovering variants for common complex diseases. However, those families with some degree of family-specific linkage evidence provide an effective sampling strategy to sub-select the most linkage-informative families for sequencing. Compared with selecting subjects with extreme phenotypes, linkage evidence performs better with larger families, while extreme-phenotype method is more efficient with smaller families. Families with multiple affected siblings were found to provide the largest enrichment of rare variants. Finally, we showed that combined strategies, such as selecting linkage-informative families from multiply affected families, provide much higher enrichment of rare functional variants than either strategy alone.

  11. TLR2 and TLR4 in the Brain Injury Caused by Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhu, Yuhong

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury caused by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion is a complicated pathophysiological course, in which inflammation is thought to play an important role. Toll-like receptors are a type of transmembrane proteins, which can recognize either exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns or endogenous stress or damage-associated molecular patterns in the innate immune system and initiate inflammatory responses. Among Toll-like receptors, TLR2 and TLR4 are found to be more important than others in the pathological progression of cerebral injury due to ischemia and reperfusion. This review will focus on the biological characteristics and functions of TLR2 and TLR4 and their downstream signal pathways. PMID:23864765

  12. Correlation of TLR4 and KLF7 in Inflammation Induced by Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuizhe; Ha, Xiaodan; Li, Wei; Xu, Peng; Gu, Yajuan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Yan; Xie, Jianxin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Objective Recent studies have revealed a link between toll-like receptors (TLRs), Kruppel-like factors (KLFs), and the adipose tissue inflammation associated with obesity. TLR4 is associated with chronic inflammation in obesity. KLF7 is known to play an important role in the differentiation of adipocytes, but its role in visceral adipose tissue inflammation has not yet been investigated. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the correlation of TLR4 and KLF7 in inflammation induced by obesity. Methods A total of 32 Wistar male rat subjects were fed in the center for experimental animals of Shihezi University. The rats were divided into normal control (NC) and high-fat diet (HFD) group. Surgical instruments were used to collect rats' visceral adipose tissue samples in the 10th week after HFD feeding. Ninety-five Uygur subjects between 20 and 90 years old were enrolled in the present study. The subjects were divided into two groups: the normal control group (NC, 18.0 kg/m(2) ≤ BMI ≤ 23.9 kg/m(2), n = 50) and the obesity group (OB, BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2), n = 45), and visceral adipose tissue was collected from the subjects. Anthropometric and clinical parameters were measured using standard procedures; biochemical indices were detected using the glucose oxidase-peroxidase method and a standardized automatic biochemistry analyzer; the plasma levels of inflammatory factors and adipocytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); the mRNA and protein expression levels of key genes involved in the inflammatory signaling pathway were measured by real-time PCR and Western blot. Results In rats, compared with the NC group, the weight, Lee's index, waist circumference, visceral fat mass, and the plasma level of Glu, TG, FFA, and TNF-α were higher in the HFD group, while the plasma levels of LPT and APN were significantly lower in the HFD group in the 10th week. Furthermore, compared with the NC group, visceral adipose

  13. Polymorphisms in NFKB1 and TLR4 and Interaction with Dietary and Life Style Factors in Relation to Colorectal Cancer in a Danish Prospective Case-Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Andersen, Vibeke; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of a balance between commensal bacteria and the mucosal immune system is crucial and intestinal dysbiosis may be a key event in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important pattern-recognition receptor that regulates inflammation and barrier function in the gut by a mechanism that involves activation of the nuclear factor–κB (NF-κB) transcription factor. Dietary and life style factors may impact these functions. We therefore used a Danish prospective case-cohort study of 1010 CRC cases and 1829 randomly selected participants from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort to investigate three polymorphisms in NFKB1 and TLR4 and their possible interactions with diet and life style factors in relation to risk of CRC. Homozygous carriage of the variant allele of the TLR4/rs5030728 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of CRC (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.60; P = 0.02 (gene-dose model); IRR = 1.24; 95%CI: 1.01–1.51; P = 0.04 (recessive model)). Del-carriers of the NFKB1/rs28362491 polymorphism had a 17% (95%CI: 1.03–1.34; P = 0.02) increased risk of CRC compared to homozygous carriers of the ins-allele. However, none of these risk estimates withstood adjustment for multiple comparisons. We found no strong gene-environment interactions between the examined polymorphism and diet and life style factors in relation to CRC risk. PMID:25705893

  14. Polymorphisms in NFKB1 and TLR4 and interaction with dietary and life style factors in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Andersen, Vibeke; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of a balance between commensal bacteria and the mucosal immune system is crucial and intestinal dysbiosis may be a key event in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important pattern-recognition receptor that regulates inflammation and barrier function in the gut by a mechanism that involves activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor. Dietary and life style factors may impact these functions. We therefore used a Danish prospective case-cohort study of 1010 CRC cases and 1829 randomly selected participants from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort to investigate three polymorphisms in NFKB1 and TLR4 and their possible interactions with diet and life style factors in relation to risk of CRC. Homozygous carriage of the variant allele of the TLR4/rs5030728 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of CRC (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.60; P = 0.02 (gene-dose model); IRR = 1.24; 95%CI: 1.01-1.51; P = 0.04 (recessive model)). Del-carriers of the NFKB1/rs28362491 polymorphism had a 17% (95%CI: 1.03-1.34; P = 0.02) increased risk of CRC compared to homozygous carriers of the ins-allele. However, none of these risk estimates withstood adjustment for multiple comparisons. We found no strong gene-environment interactions between the examined polymorphism and diet and life style factors in relation to CRC risk.

  15. Differential outcome of TRIF-mediated signaling in TLR4 and TLR3 induced DC maturation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Jain, Aakanksha; Gao, Yajing; Dozmorov, Igor M; Mandraju, Rajakumar; Wakeland, Edward K; Pasare, Chandrashekhar

    2015-11-10

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on dendritic cells (DCs) leads to DC maturation, a process involving up-regulation of MHC and costimulatory molecules and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. All TLRs except TLR3 achieve these outcomes by using the signaling adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88. TLR4 and TLR3 can both use the Toll-IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF)-dependent signaling pathway leading to IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and induction of IFN-β and -α4. The TRIF signaling pathway, downstream of both of these TLRs, also leads to DC maturation, and it has been proposed that the type I IFNs act in cis to induce DC maturation and subsequent effects on adaptive immunity. The present study was designed to understand the molecular mechanisms of TRIF-mediated DC maturation. We have discovered that TLR4-TRIF-induced DC maturation was independent of both IRF3 and type I IFNs. In contrast, TLR3-mediated DC maturation was completely dependent on type I IFN feedback. We found that differential activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by the TLR4- and TLR3-TRIF axes determined the type I IFN dependency for DC maturation. In addition, we found that the adjuvanticity of LPS to induce T-cell activation is completely independent of type I IFNs. The important distinction between the TRIF-mediated signaling pathways of TLR4 and TLR3 discovered here could have a major impact in the design of future adjuvants that target this pathway.

  16. Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharides induce inflammatory responses via TLR2 and TLR4-MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.

    2011-01-01

    CPS are major virulence factors in infections caused by Neisseria meningitidis and form the basis for meningococcal serogroup designation and protective meningococcal vaccines. CPS polymers are anchored in the meningococcal outer membrane through a 1,2-diacylglycerol moiety, but the innate immunostimulatory activity of CPS is largely unexplored. Well-established human and murine macrophage cell lines and HEK/TLR stably transfected cells were stimulated with CPS, purified from an endotoxin-deficient meningococcal serogroup B NMB-lpxA mutant. CPS induced inflammatory responses via TLR2- and TLR4-MD-2. Meningococcal CPS induced a dose-dependent release of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and CXCL10) and NO from human and murine macrophages, respectively. CPS induced IL-8 release from HEK cells stably transfected with TLR2/6, TLR2, TLR2/CD14, and TLR4/MD-2/CD14 but not HEK cells alone. mAb to TLR2 but not an isotype control antibody blocked CPS-induced IL-8 release from HEK-TLR2/6-transfected cells. A significant reduction in TNF-α and IL-8 release was seen when THP-1- and HEK-TLR4/MD-2-CD14- but not HEK-TLR2- or HEK-TLR2/6-transfected cells were stimulated with CPS in the presence of Eritoran (E5564), a lipid A antagonist that binds to MD-2, and a similar reduction in NO and TNF-α release was also seen in RAW 264.7 cells in the presence of Eritoran. CD14 and LBP enhanced CPS bioactivity, and NF-κB was, as anticipated, the major signaling pathway. Thus, these data suggest that innate immune recognition of meningococcal CPS by macrophages can occur via TLR2- and TLR4-MD-2 pathways. PMID:21191086

  17. Combined Tlr2 and Tlr4 Deficiency Increases Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paun, Alexandra; Fox, Jessica; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Qureshi, Salman T.; Haston, Christina K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether Toll-like receptor 2 or 4 genotype alters the lung response to irradiation in C57BL/6 mice using a model developing a phenotype that resembles radiotherapy-induced fibrosis in both histological characteristics and onset post-treatment. Methods and Materials: The pulmonary phenotype of C57BL/6 mice deficient in each or both of these genes was assessed after an 18-Gy single dose to the thoracic cavity by survival time postirradiation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential, histological evidence of alveolitis and fibrosis, and gene expression levels, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Results: The lung phenotype of Tlr4-deficient and Tlr2-deficient mice did not differ from that of wild-type mice in terms of survival time postirradiation, or by histological evidence of alveolitis or fibrosis. In contrast, mice deficient in both receptors developed respiratory distress at an earlier time than did wild-type mice and presented an enhanced fibrotic response (13.5% vs. 5.8% of the lung by image analysis of histological sections, p < 0.001). No differences in bronchoalveolar cell differential counts, nor in numbers of apoptotic cells in the lung as detected through active caspase-3 staining, were evident among the irradiated mice grouped by Tlr genotype. Gene expression analysis of lung tissue revealed that Tlr2,4-deficient mice have increased levels of hyaluronidase 2 compared with both wild-type mice and mice lacking either Tlr2 or Tlr4. Conclusion: We conclude that a combined deficiency in both Tlr2 and Tlr4, but not Tlr2 or Tlr4 alone, leads to enhanced radiation-induced fibrosis in the C57BL/6 mouse model.

  18. Stimulation through CD40 and TLR-4 Is an Effective Host Directed Therapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Pahari, Susanta; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Aqdas, Mohammad; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among all infectious diseases. Failure of Bacillus Calmette Guerin as a vaccine and serious side-effects and toxicity due to long-term TB drug regime are the major hurdles associated with TB control. The problem is further compounded by the emergence of drug-resistance strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Consequently, it demands a serious attempt to explore safer and superior treatment approaches. Recently, an improved understanding of host–pathogen interaction has opened up new avenues for immunotherapy for treating TB. Although, dendritic cells (DCs) show a profound role in generating immunity against Mtb, their immunotherapeutic potential needs to be precisely investigated in controlling TB. Here, we have devised an approach of bolstering DCs efficacy against Mtb by delivering signals through CD40 and TLR-4 molecules. We found that DCs triggered through CD40 and TLR-4 showed increased secretion of IL-12, IL-6, and TNF-α. It also augmented autophagy. Interestingly, CD40 and TLR-4 stimulation along with the suboptimal dose of anti-TB drugs significantly fortified their efficacy to kill Mtb. Importantly, animals treated with the agonists of CD40 and TLR-4 boosted Th1 and Th17 immunity. Furthermore, it amplified the pool of memory CD4 T cells as well as CD8 T cells. Furthermore, substantial reduction in the bacterial burden in the lungs was observed. Notably, this adjunct therapy employing immunomodulators and chemotherapy can reinvigorate host immunity suppressed due to drugs and Mtb. Moreover, it would strengthen the potency of drugs in curing TB. PMID:27729911

  19. Cereblon negatively regulates TLR4 signaling through the attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6.

    PubMed

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae Mi; Kang, Jung-Ah; Yang, Taewoo; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Chung, Sungkwon; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-07-28

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor protein for the CRL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. In this study, we report on a new regulatory role of CRBN in TLR4 signaling. CRBN overexpression leads to suppression of NF-κB activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and IL-1β in response to TLR4 stimulation. Biochemical studies revealed interactions between CRBN and TAK1, and TRAF6 proteins. The interaction between CRBN and TAK1 did not affect the association of the TAB1 and TAB2 proteins, which have pivotal roles in the activation of TAK1, whereas the CRBN-TRAF6 interaction critically affected ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Binding mapping results revealed that CRBN interacts with the Zinc finger domain of TRAF6, which contains the ubiquitination site of TRAF6, leading to attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Functional studies revealed that CRBN-knockdown THP-1 cells show enhanced NF-κB activation and p65- or p50-DNA binding activities, leading to up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in response to TLR4 stimulation. Furthermore, Crbn(-/-) mice exhibit decreased survival in response to LPS challenge, accompanied with marked enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CRBN negatively regulates TLR4 signaling via attenuation of TRAF6 and TAB2 ubiquitination.

  20. Cereblon negatively regulates TLR4 signaling through the attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae Mi; Kang, Jung-Ah; Yang, Taewoo; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Chung, Sungkwon; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor protein for the CRL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. In this study, we report on a new regulatory role of CRBN in TLR4 signaling. CRBN overexpression leads to suppression of NF-κB activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and IL-1β in response to TLR4 stimulation. Biochemical studies revealed interactions between CRBN and TAK1, and TRAF6 proteins. The interaction between CRBN and TAK1 did not affect the association of the TAB1 and TAB2 proteins, which have pivotal roles in the activation of TAK1, whereas the CRBN-TRAF6 interaction critically affected ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Binding mapping results revealed that CRBN interacts with the Zinc finger domain of TRAF6, which contains the ubiquitination site of TRAF6, leading to attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Functional studies revealed that CRBN-knockdown THP-1 cells show enhanced NF-κB activation and p65- or p50-DNA binding activities, leading to up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in response to TLR4 stimulation. Furthermore, Crbn−/− mice exhibit decreased survival in response to LPS challenge, accompanied with marked enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CRBN negatively regulates TLR4 signaling via attenuation of TRAF6 and TAB2 ubiquitination. PMID:27468689

  1. Inflammation, longevity, and cardiovascular diseases: role of polymorphisms of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Candore, Giuseppina; Aquino, Alessandra; Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Bulati, Matteo; Di Carlo, Daniele; Grimaldi, Maria Paola; Listì, Florinda; Orlando, Valentina; Vasto, Sonya; Caruso, Marco; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Lio, Domenico; Caruso, Calogero

    2006-05-01

    The total burden of infection at various sites may affect the progression of atherosclerosis, the risk being modulated by host genotype. The role of lipopolysaccaride receptor TLR4 is paradigmatic. It initiates the innate immune response against gram-negative bacteria; and TLR4 polymorphisms, as ASP299GLY, suggested to attenuate receptor signaling, have been described. We demonstrated that TLR4 ASP299GLY polymorphism shows a significantly lower frequency in patients affected by myocardial infarction compared to controls, whereas centenarians show a higher frequency. Thus, people genetically predisposed to developing weak inflammatory activity, seem to have fewer chances of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and, subsequently, live longer if they do not become affected by serious infectious diseases. These results are in agreement with our other data demonstrating how genetic background may exert the opposite effect with respect to inflammatory components in CVD and longevity. In the present report, to validate this hypothesis, the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in atherosclerosis and longevity, were determined by an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) in supernatants from a whole blood assay after stimulation with subliminal doses of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) from Escherichia coli (E. coli). The samples, genotyped for the ASP299GLY polymorphism, were challenged with LPS for 4, 24, and 48 h. What we found was that Il-6 values were significantly lower in carriers bearing TLR4 mutation. Therefore, the pathogen burden, by interacting with host genotype, determines the type and intensity of the immune-inflammatory responses accountable for pro-inflammatory status, CVD, and unsuccessful aging. On the other hand, our present data seem to explain the inconclusive results obtained in case-control studies taking into account the role of functional IL-6 polymorphisms in successful and unsuccessful aging. In fact, IL6 levels seem

  2. Differential expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in the epithelial cells in oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Janardhanam, Srihari B; Prakasam, Sivaraman; Swaminathan, Venkatesh T; Kodumudi, Krithika N; Zunt, Susan L; Srinivasan, Mythily

    2012-05-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the mucosa mediated by a complex signalling network between the keratinocytes and the sub-epithelial lymphocytes. Since OLP occurs in constantly renewing epithelium continuously exposed to commensals, we hypothesised that the epithelial cell microflora interactions may mediate the persistent inflammation. By virtue of their ability to respond to most oral commensal microorganisms, the toll like receptor-2 (TLR-2) and TLR-4 are the most widely investigated receptors in oral diseases. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the role of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in OLP. Systemically healthy OLP and control subjects were recruited after obtaining the institutional review board approval. Expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 proteins and transcripts in the tissue epithelium and in the epithelial cells isolated from saliva were determined by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction respectively. The tissue epithelium and the salivary epithelial cells expressed reduced TLR-2 and increased TLR-4 proteins and transcripts in OLP. The salivary epithelial cells from OLP subjects secreted elevated IL-12. However, upon stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide the epithelial cells from OLP exhibited a mixed Th1 (IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4) response. Presence of dexamethasone significantly reduced inflammatory cytokines in the in vitro stimulated cultures of salivary epithelial cells from OLP subjects. Collectively, our data support a critical role for the host-microbial interactions in the OLP pathogenesis. The potential use of exfoliated oral epithelial cells in saliva for functional analysis exponentially increases its value as biological specimen for clinical research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. GM-CSF increases LPS-induced production of proinflammatory mediators via upregulation of TLR4 and CD14 in murine microglia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microglia are resident macrophage-like cells in the central nervous system (CNS) and cause innate immune responses via the LPS receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and CD14, in a variety of neuroinflammatory disorders including bacterial infection, Alzheimer’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activates microglia and induces inflammatory responses via binding to GM-CSF receptor complex composed of two different subunit GM-CSF receptor α (GM-CSFRα) and common β chain (βc). GM-CSF has been shown to be associated with neuroinflammatory responses in multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanisms how GM-CSF promotes neuroinflammation still remain unclear. Methods Microglia were stimulated with 20 ng/ml GM-CSF and the levels of TLR4 and CD14 expression were evaluated by RT-PCR and flowcytometry. LPS binding was analyzed by flowcytometry. GM-CSF receptor complex was analyzed by immunocytechemistry. The levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in culture supernatant of GM-CSF-stimulated microglia and NF-κB nuclear translocation were determined by ELISA. Production of nitric oxide (NO) was measured by the Griess method. The levels of p-ERK1/2, ERK1/2, p-p38 and p38 were assessed by Western blotting. Statistically significant differences between experimental groups were determined by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test for multiple comparisons. Results GM-CSF receptor complex was expressed in microglia. GM-CSF enhanced TLR4 and CD14 expressions in microglia and subsequent LPS-binding to the cell surface. In addition, GM-CSF priming increased LPS-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and NO by microglia. GM-CSF upregulated the levels of p-ERK1/2 and p-p38, suggesting that induction of TLR4 and CD14 expression by GM-CSF was mediated through ERK1/2 and p38, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest that GM-CSF upregulates TLR4 and

  4. Electroacupuncture Improved Hippocampal Neurogenesis following Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice through Inhibition of TLR4 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Li, Ze; Jia, Yanfeng; Wang, Chaoxian

    2017-01-01

    The protective role of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment in diverse neurological diseases such as ischemic stroke is well acknowledged. However, whether and how EA act on hippocampal neurogenesis following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the effect of EA on hippocampal neurogenesis and neurological functions, as well as its underlying association with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in TBI mice. BrdU/NeuN immunofluorescence was performed to label newborn neurons in the hippocampus after EA treatment. Water maze test and neurological severity score were used to evaluate neurological function posttrauma. The hippocampal level of TLR4 and downstream molecules and inflammatory cytokines were, respectively, detected by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EA enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibited TLR4 expression at 21, 28, and 35 days after TBI, but the beneficial effects of EA on posttraumatic neurogenesis and neurological functions were attenuated by lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 activation. In addition, EA exerted an inhibitory effect on both TLR4/Myd88/NF-κB and TLR4/TRIF/NF-κB pathways, as well as the inflammatory cytokine expression in the hippocampus following TBI. In conclusion, EA promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and neurological recovery through inhibition of TLR4 signaling pathway posttrauma, which may be a potential approach to improve the outcome of TBI. PMID:28848607

  5. LPS/TLR4-mediated stromal cells acquire an invasive phenotype and are implicated in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Li, Caixia; Chen, Rong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Kang, Le; Cheng, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested whether the LPS/TLR4 signal pathway in endometrial stromal cells is essential for the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. We tested the expression of TLR4, MD2 in the endometrium without adenomyosis (CE), the eutopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EuE) and the ectopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EE). We isolated the stromal cells from CE, EuE and EE (CESC, EuESC, EESC), treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TLR4 antagonist and detected the cell viability. And we also measured the key protein of the TLR4 signal pathway and inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth of experimental cells. We found that the viability of experimental cells treated with LPS was significantly greater than that of the non-treated cells, blocked by the TLR4 antagonist VIPER. TLR4 signal pathway and inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth of experimental cells stimulated by LPS, and it was inhibited by VIPER. This study suggested that stromal cells were activated by the TLR4 signalling pathway, which processed the cellular inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth involved in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. PMID:26898650

  6. TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role in monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jin; Choi, Eun Kyoung; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is known to mediate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, however, its role on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TLR4 on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules, and determined the functional role of TLR4-induced adhesion molecules on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. When THP-1 monocytes were stimulated with Kdo2-Lipid A (KLA), a specific TLR4 agonist, Mac-1 expression was markedly increased in association with an increased adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. These were attenuated by anti-Mac-1 antibody, suggesting a functional role of TLR4-induced Mac-1 on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In monocytes treated with MK886, a 5-lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitor, both Mac-1 expression and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by KLA were markedly attenuated. Moreover, KLA increased the expression of mRNA and protein of 5-LO, suggesting a pivotal role of 5-LO on these processes. In in vivo studies, KLA increased monocyte adhesion to aortic endothelium of wild-type (WT) mice, which was attenuated in WT mice treated with anti-Mac-1 antibody as well as in TLR4-deficient mice. Taken together, TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role on monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, leading to increased foam cell formation in the development of atherosclerosis.

  7. A TLR4/MD2 fusion protein inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling in hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schnabl, Bernd Brandl, Katharina; Fink, Marina; Gross, Philipp; Taura, Kojiro; Gaebele, Erwin; Hellerbrand, Claus; Falk, Werner

    2008-10-17

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in hepatic fibrogenesis. In injured liver they are the main extracellular matrix protein producing cell type and further perpetuate hepatic injury by secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators. Since LPS-mediated signaling through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been identified as key fibrogenic signal in HSCs we aimed to test TLR4 as potential target of therapy via ligand-binding soluble receptors. Incubation of human HSCs with a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of TLR4 and MD2 which binds LPS inhibited LPS-induced NF{kappa}B and JNK activation. TLR4/MD2 abolished LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8, MCP1, and RANTES in HSCs. In addition, TLR4/MD2 fused to human IgG-Fc neutralized LPS activity. Since TLR4 mutant mice are resistant to liver fibrosis, the TLR4/MD2 soluble receptor might represent a new therapeutic molecule for liver fibrogenesis in vivo.

  8. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Nieuwenhuysen, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10–7). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r 2 with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11–1.24, P = 1.1×10−7). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10−8). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r 2 = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10-8). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  9. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.

  10. Kukoamine B promotes TLR4-independent lipopolysaccharide uptake in murine hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Zheng, Xinchuan; Wang, Ning; Fan, Shijun; Yang, Yongjun; Lu, Yongling; Chen, Qian; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Free bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is generally removed from the bloodstream through hepatic uptake via TLR4, the LPS pattern recognition receptor, but mechanisms for internalization and clearance of conjugated LPS are less clear. Kukoamine B (KB) is a novel cationic alkaloid that interferes with LPS binding to TLR4. In this study, KB accelerated blood clearance of LPS. KB also enhanced LPS distribution in the hepatic tissues of C57 BL/6 mice, along with LPS uptake in primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. By contrast, KB inhibited LPS internalization in Kupffer and RAW 264.7 cells. Loss of TLR4 did not affect LPS uptake into KB-treated hepatocytes. We also detected selective upregulation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) upon KB treatment, and ASGPR colocalized with KB in cultured hepatocytes. Molecular docking showed that KB bound to ASGPR in a manner similar to GalNAc, a known ASGPR agonist. GalNAc dose-dependently reduced KB internalization, suggesting it competes with KB for ASGPR binding, and ASGPR knockdown also impaired LPS uptake into hepatocytes. Finally, while KB enhanced LPS uptake, it was protective against LPS-induced inflammation and hepatocyte injury. Our study provides a new mechanism for conjugated LPS hepatic uptake induced by the LPS neutralizer KB and mediated by membrane ASGPR binding. PMID:27542278

  11. Histones from dying renal cells aggravate kidney injury via TLR2 and TLR4.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-08-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI.

  12. Effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} inhibitor, on TLR-4-dependent activation of murine microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Min-Woo; Baek, Nam-in; Kim, Kyong-Tai . E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr

    2005-11-11

    In microglia, Toll-like receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiate innate immune responses upon interaction with infectious agents. The effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} specific inhibitor, on TLR-4-mediated signaling was investigated in murine microglia stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and taxol. Pretreatment of microglia cells with rottlerin decreased LPS- and taxol-induced nitric oxide production in a concentration-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 99.1 {+-} 1.5 nM). Through MTT and FACS analysis, we found that the inhibition effect of rottlerin was not due to microglial cell death. Rottlerin pretreatment also attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and expression of type II nitric oxide synthase. In addition, microglial phagocytosis in response to TLR-4 activation was diminished in which rottlerin was pretreated. Together, these data raise the possibility that certain PKC-{delta} specific inhibitors can modulate TLR-4-derived signaling and inflammatory target gene expression, and can alter susceptibility to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases in central nervous system.

  13. Histones from Dying Renal Cells Aggravate Kidney Injury via TLR2 and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A.; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI. PMID:22677551

  14. CD16 regulates TRIF-dependent TLR4 response in human monocytes and their subsets.

    PubMed

    Shalova, Irina N; Kajiji, Tasneem; Lim, Jyue Yuan; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Fernández-Ruíz, Irene; Arnalich, Francisco; Iau, Philip Tsau Choong; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Wong, Siew-Cheng; Biswas, Subhra K

    2012-04-15

    Blood monocytes recognize Gram-negative bacteria through the TLR4, which signal via MyD88- and TRIF-dependent pathway to trigger an immune-inflammatory response. However, a dysregulated inflammatory response by these cells often leads to severe pathologies such as sepsis. We investigated the role of CD16 in the regulation of human monocyte response to Gram-negative endotoxin and sepsis. Blood monocytes from sepsis patients demonstrated an upregulation of several TRIF-dependent genes as well as a selective expansion of CD16-expressing (CD16(+)) monocytes. Gene expression and biochemical studies revealed CD16 to regulate the TRIF-dependent TLR4 pathway in monocytes by activating Syk, IFN regulatory factor 3, and STAT1, which resulted in enhanced expression of IFNB, CCL5, and CXCL10. CD16 also upregulated the expression of IL-1R-associated kinase M and IL-1 receptor antagonist, which are negative regulators of the MyD88-dependent pathway. CD16 overexpression or small interfering RNA knockdown in monocytes confirmed the above findings. Interestingly, these results were mirrored in the CD16(+) monocyte subset isolated from sepsis patients, providing an in vivo confirmation to our findings. Collectively, the results from the current study demonstrate CD16 as a key regulator of the TRIF-dependent TLR4 pathway in human monocytes and their CD16-expressing subset, with implications in sepsis.

  15. The interaction between HMGB1 and TLR4 dictates the outcome of anticancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Tesniere, Antoine; Criollo, Alfredo; Ortiz, Carla; Lidereau, Rosette; Mariette, Christophe; Chaput, Nathalie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Delaloge, Suzette; André, Fabrice; Tursz, Thomas; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2007-12-01

    For the last four decades, the treatment of cancer has relied on four treatment modalities, namely surgery, radiotherapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and hormonotherapy. Most of these therapies are believed to directly attack and eradicate tumor cells. The emerging concept that cancer is not just a disease of a tissue or an organ but also a host disease relies on evidence of tumor-induced immunosuppression and polymorphisms in genes involved in host protection against tumors. This theory is now gaining new impetus, based on our recent data showing that optimal therapeutic effects require the immunoadjuvant effect of tumor cell death induced by cytotoxic anticancer agents. Here, we show that the release of the high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) by dying tumor cells is mandatory to license host dendritic cells (DCs) to process and present tumor antigens. HMGB1 interacts with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on DCs, which are selectively involved in the cross-priming of anti-tumor T lymphocytes in vivo. A TLR4 polymorphism that affects the binding of HMGB1 to TLR4 predicts early relapse after anthracycline-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. This knowledge may be clinically exploited to predict the immunogenicity and hence the efficacy of chemotherapeutic regimens.

  16. Dectin-1 Regulates Hepatic Fibrosis and Hepatocarcinogenesis by Suppressing TLR4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Deutsch, Michael; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Werba, Gregor; Pansari, Mridul; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Levie, Elliot; Tippens, Daniel; Greco, Stephanie H; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Eisenthal, Andrew; van Heerden, Eliza; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Rendon, Mauricio; Daley, Donnele; Pachter, H Leon; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2015-12-01

    Dectin-1 is a C-type lectin receptor critical in anti-fungal immunity, but Dectin-1 has not been linked to regulation of sterile inflammation or oncogenesis. We found that Dectin-1 expression is upregulated in hepatic fibrosis and liver cancer. However, Dectin-1 deletion exacerbates liver fibro-inflammatory disease and accelerates hepatocarcinogenesis. Mechanistically, we found that Dectin-1 protects against chronic liver disease by suppressing TLR4 signaling in hepatic inflammatory and stellate cells. Accordingly, Dectin-1(-/-) mice exhibited augmented cytokine production and reduced survival in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated sepsis, whereas Dectin-1 activation was protective. We showed that Dectin-1 inhibits TLR4 signaling by mitigating TLR4 and CD14 expression, which are regulated by Dectin-1-dependent macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) expression. Our study suggests that Dectin-1 is an attractive target for experimental therapeutics in hepatic fibrosis and neoplastic transformation. More broadly, our work deciphers critical cross-talk between pattern recognition receptors and implicates a role for Dectin-1 in suppression of sterile inflammation, inflammation-induced oncogenesis, and LPS-mediated sepsis.

  17. A Light-Controlled TLR4 Agonist and Selectable Activation of Cell Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Stutts, Lalisa

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and temporal aspects of immune cell signalling are key parameters in defining the magnitude of an immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on innate immune cells are important in early detection of pathogens and initiation of an immune response. Controlling the spatial and temporal signalling of TLRs would enable further study of immune synergies and assist in the development of new vaccines. Here, we show a light-based method for spatial control of TLR4 signalling. A TLR4 agonist, pyrimido[5,4-b]indole, was protected with a cage at a position critical for receptor binding. This afforded a photo-controllable agonist that was inactive while caged, yet effected NF-κB activity in cells following UV photo-controlled deprotection. We demonstrated spatial control of NF-κB activation within a population of cells by treating all cells with the caged TLR4 agonist and constraining light exposure, thereby activation, to a region of interest. PMID:26097006

  18. Central Resistin/TLR4 Impairs Adiponectin Signaling, Contributing to Insulin and FGF21 Resistance.

    PubMed

    Benomar, Yacir; Amine, Hamza; Crépin, Délphine; Al Rifai, Sarah; Riffault, Laure; Gertler, Arieh; Taouis, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Adiponectin, an insulin-sensitizing hormone, and resistin, known to promote insulin resistance, constitute a potential link between obesity and type 2 diabetes. In addition, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)21 has effects similar to those of adiponectin in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. However, the interplay between adiponectin, FGF21, and resistin signaling pathways during the onset of insulin resistance is unknown. Here, we investigated whether central resistin promotes insulin resistance through the impairment of adiponectin and FGF21 signaling. We show that chronic intracerebroventricular resistin infusion downregulated both hypothalamic and hepatic APPL1, a key protein in adiponectin signaling, associated with decreased Akt-APPL1 interaction and an increased Akt association with its endogenous inhibitor tribbles homolog 3. Resistin treatment also decreased plasma adiponectin levels and reduced both hypothalamic and peripheral expression of adiponectin receptors. Additionally, we report that intracerebroventricular resistin increased plasma FGF21 levels and downregulated its receptor components in the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues, promoting FGF21 resistance. Interestingly, we also show that resistin effects were abolished in TLR4 knockout mice and in neuronal cells expressing TLR4 siRNAs. Our study reveals a novel mechanism of insulin resistance onset orchestrated by a central resistin-TLR4 pathway that impairs adiponectin signaling and promotes FGF21 resistance. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Pharmacological TLR4 Inhibition Protects against Acute and Chronic Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Liang, Hanyu; Farese, Robert V.; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate whether pharmacological TLR4 inhibition protects against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in rats. Materials and Methods For the acute experiment, rats received a TLR4 inhibitor [TAK-242 or E5564 (2x5 mg/kg i.v. bolus)] or vehicle, and an 8-h Intralipid (20%, 8.5 mg/kg/min) or saline infusion, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. For the chronic experiment, rats were subcutaneously implanted with a slow-release pellet of TAK-242 (1.5 mg/d) or placebo. Rats then received a high fat diet (HFD) or a low fat control diet (LFD) for 10 weeks, followed by a two-step insulin clamp. Results Acute experiment; the lipid-induced reduction (18%) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) was attenuated by TAK-242 and E5564 (the effect of E5564 was more robust), suggesting improved peripheral insulin action. Insulin was able to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in saline- but not lipid-treated rats. TAK-242, but not E5564, partially restored this effect, suggesting improved HGP. Chronic experiment; insulin-stimulated Rd was reduced ~30% by the HFD, but completely restored by TAK-242. Insulin could not suppress HGP in rats fed a HFD and TAK-242 had no effect on HGP. Conclusions Pharmacological TLR4 inhibition provides partial protection against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:26196892

  20. TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host immune responses in major infectious diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Suprabhat; Karmakar, Subhajit; Babu, Santi Prasad Sinha

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, multicellular organisms have been orchestrated with an efficient and versatile immune system to counteract diverse group of pathogenic organisms. Pathogen recognition is considered as the most critical step behind eliciting adequate immune response during an infection. Hitherto Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially the surface ones viz. TLR2 and TLR4 have gained immense importance due to their extreme ability of identifying distinct molecular patterns from invading pathogens. These pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) not only act as innate sensor but also shape and bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, they also play a pivotal role in regulating the balance between Th1 and Th2 type of response essential for the survivability of the host. In this work, major achievements rather findings made on the typical signalling and immunopathological attributes of TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host response against the major infectious diseases have been reviewed. Infectious diseases like tuberculosis, trypanosomiasis, malaria, and filariasis are still posing myriad threat to mankind. Furthermore, increasing resistance of the causative organisms against available therapeutics is also an emerging problem. Thus, stimulation of host immune response with TLR2 and TLR4 agonist can be the option of choice to treat such diseases in future.

  1. TLR4-dependant pro-inflammatory effects of HMGB1 on human adipocyte.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Manoj Kumar; Virama-Latchoumy, Anne-Laurence; Girard, Anne-Claire; Planesse, Cynthia; Guérin-Dubourg, Alexis; Ottosson, Lars; Andersson, Ulf; Césari, Maya; Roche, Régis; Hoareau, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is one of the major metabolic disorders in case of obesity and associated pathologies. By its important secretion function, the role of adipose tissue in this metabolic low grade inflammation is well known. Recently, it was demonstrated that the alarmin high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is involved in obesity-related pathologies by its increased serum levels in obese compared to normal weight individuals, and by its pro-inflammatory effects. However, the role of HMGB1 on adipocytes inflammation is poorly documented and we propose to investigate this point. Primary culture of human subcutaneous adipocytes were performed from human adipose tissue samples. Cells were treated with recombinant HMGB1 with/without anti-TLR4 antibody and inhibitors of NF-κB and P38 MAPK. Supernatants were collected for IL-6 and MCP-1 ELISA. HMGB1 initiates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent activation of inflammation through the downstream NF-κB and P38 MAPK signaling pathway to upregulate the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. HMGB1 has pro-inflammatory effects on adipocytes. This reinforces the role of TLR4 in adipose tissue inflammation and antagonizing the HMGB1 inflammatory pathway could bring on new therapeutic targets to counteract obesity-associated pathologies.

  2. The helminth Trichuris suis suppresses TLR4-induced inflammatory responses in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ottow, M K; Klaver, E J; van der Pouw Kraan, T C T M; Heijnen, P D; Laan, L C; Kringel, H; Vogel, D Y S; Dijkstra, C D; Kooij, G; van Die, I

    2014-10-01

    Recent clinical trials in patients with inflammatory diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have shown the beneficial effects of probiotic helminth administration, although the underlying mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Potential cellular targets may include innate immune cells that propagate inflammation in these diseases, like pro-inflammatory macrophages. We here investigated the effects of the helminth Trichuris suis soluble products (SPs) on the phenotype and function of human inflammatory (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-differentiated) macrophages. Interestingly, we here show that T. suis SPs potently skew inflammatory macrophages into a more anti-inflammatory state in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner, and less effects are seen when stimulating macrophages with TLR2 or -3 ligands. Gene microarray analysis of GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages further revealed that many TLR4-induced inflammatory mediators, including interleukin (IL)-12B, CCL1 and CXCL9, are downregulated by T. suis SPs. In particular, we observed a strong reduction in the expression and function of P2RX7, a purinergic receptor involved in macrophage inflammation, leading to reduced IL-1β secretion. In conclusion, we show that T. suis SPs suppress a broad range of inflammatory pathways in GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages in a TLR4-dependent manner, thereby providing enhanced mechanistic insight into the therapeutic potential of this helminth for patients with inflammatory diseases.

  3. Administration of a Synthetic TLR4 Agonist Protects Mice from Pneumonic Tularemia1

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, Annalisa; Pelletier, Mark; Iyer, Ravi; Timko, Michele; Dudda, Jan C.; West, T. Eoin; Wilson, Christopher B.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Skerrett, Shawn J.

    2011-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes the zoonosis tularemia. Because F. tularensis LPS causes weak TLR4 activation, we hypothesized that administration of a synthetic TLR4 agonist, aminoalkyl glucosaminide phosphate (AGP), would boost the innate immune system and compensate for reduced TLR4 stimulation. Intranasal administration of AGPs induced intrapulmonary production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Mice treated with AGPs before and after inhalation of Francisella novicida exhibited augmented cytokine and inflammatory responses to infection; reduced bacterial replication in lung, liver, and spleen; and increased survival, whereas all PBS-treated control mice died within 4 days of infection, all AGP-treated mice showed prolonged time-to-death, and 30–60% of AGP-treated mice survived. The protective effect of AGP was lost in mice lacking IFN-γ. Long-term survivors developed specific Th1 splenocyte responses and specific Abs dominated by IgG2 isotypes. Survivors were fully protected from rechallenge with aerosolized F. novicida. Thus, preventive administration of AGP successfully modulated innate immune responses to aerosolized F. novicida, leading to protective immunity to pneumonic tularemia. This is the first report of the protective effect of a TLR ligand on resistance to F. novicida-induced pneumonic tularemia. PMID:18490759

  4. TLR4 polymorphisms, infectious diseases, and evolutionary pressure during migration of modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Ferwerda, Bart; McCall, Matthew B. B.; Alonso, Santos; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.; Mouktaroudi, Maria; Izagirre, Neskuts; Syafruddin, Din; Kibiki, Gibson; Cristea, Tudor; Hijmans, Anneke; Hamann, Lutz; Israel, Shoshana; ElGhazali, Gehad; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Kumpf, Oliver; Maiga, Boubacar; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.; van Crevel, Reinout; Brunner, Han G.; Oh, Djin-Ye; Schumann, Ralf R.; de la Rúa, Concepcion; Sauerwein, Robert; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van der Ven, André J. A. M.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious diseases exert a constant evolutionary pressure on the genetic makeup of our innate immune system. Polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) have been related to susceptibility to Gram-negative infections and septic shock. Here we show that two polymorphisms of TLR4, Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile, have unique distributions in populations from Africa, Asia, and Europe. Genetic and functional studies are compatible with a model in which the nonsynonymous polymorphism Asp299Gly has evolved as a protective allele against malaria, explaining its high prevalence in subSaharan Africa. However, the same allele could have been disadvantageous after migration of modern humans into Eurasia, putatively because of increased susceptibility to severe bacterial infections. In contrast, the Asp299Gly allele, when present in cosegregation with Thr399Ile to form the Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile haplotype, shows selective neutrality. Polymorphisms in TLR4 exemplify how the interaction between our innate immune system and the infectious pressures in particular environments may have shaped the genetic variations and function of our immune system during the out-of-Africa migration of modern humans. PMID:17925445

  5. MicroRNA-181b negatively regulates the proliferation of human epidermal keratinocytes in psoriasis through targeting TLR4.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng; Bai, Ming; Yu, Nan-Ze; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Zeng

    2017-02-01

    Our study aims to explore the role of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) and TLR in the regulation of cell proliferation of human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) in psoriasis. Twenty-eight patients diagnosed with psoriasis vulgaris were selected as a case group with their lesional and non-lesional skin tissues collected. A control group consisted of 20 patients who underwent plastic surgery with their healthy skin tissues collected. Real-time quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expressions of miR-181b and TLR4 in HEKs of healthy skin, psoriatic lesional skin and non-lesional skin respectively. The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TLR4 combined with miR-181b was verified by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. Western blotting and bromodeoxyuridine were applied for corresponding detection of TLR4 expression and cell mitosis. The expression of miR-181b in HEKs of psoriatic lesional skin was less than healthy skin and psoriatic non-lesional skin. In psoriatic lesional and non-lesional skin, TLR4-positive cell rates and the number of positive cells per square millimetre were higher than healthy skin. The dual-luciferase reporter assay verified that miR-181b targets TLR4. HEKs transfected with miR-181b mimics had decreased expression of TLR4, along with the decrease of mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. However, HEKs transfected with miR-181b inhibitors showed increased TLR4 expression, mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. HEKs transfected with both miR-181b inhibitors and siTLR4 had decreased mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. These results indicate that miR-181b can negatively regulate the proliferation of HEKs in psoriasis by targeting TLR4.

  6. TLR4 Influences Hepatitis B Virus Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Regulating the Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Fei; Li, Songlin; Cai, Jingjing; Shi, Jing; Jiang, Youhong

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and β-catenin for disclosing the potential pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immunohistochemical toolkit was implemented to measure the expression of TLR4 and β-catenin in 98 cases of HCC tissues and adjacent tissues. After setting up the HepG2.2.15 hepatitis B virus (HBV) related HCC cell line, we divided the cells into the control group, TLR4 siRNA group, β-catenin siRNA group, and pcDNA.3.1 TLR4 + β-catenin siRNA group. Western blot, CCK-8 method, Transwell and flow cytometry were used to detect protein expression, cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as cell apoptosis, respectively. Nude mice tumor model was established to observe the effects of TLR4 and β-catenin on the progression of HBV-related HCC in vivo. The positive rates of TLR4 and β-catenin were higher in HCC tissues compared with normal tissues. Both the TLR4 siRNA group and β-catenin siRNA group exhibited a decreased expression of β-catenin. The proliferation, migration and invasion of tumor cells in the above two groups were suppressed, while the cell apoptosis appeared to be stimulated. As suggested by the results from in vivo and in vitro experiments, the up-regulation of TLR4 could antagonize the corresponding effect of β-catenin siRNA. TLR4 can affect the expression of β-catenin and hence influence the progression of HBV-related HCC. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Intraspinal TLR4 activation promotes iron storage but does not protect neurons or oligodendrocytes from progressive iron-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Evan Z; Church, Jamie S; Pukos, Nicole; Gottipati, Manoj K; Popovich, Phillip G; McTigue, Dana M

    2017-08-26

    Iron is essential for basic cellular functions but in excess is highly toxic. For this reason, free iron and iron storage are controlled in the periphery by elaborate regulatory mechanisms. In contrast, iron regulation in the central nervous system (CNS) is not well defined. Given that excess iron is present after trauma, hemorrhagic stroke and neurodegeneration, understanding normal iron regulation and promoting iron uptake in CNS pathology is crucial. Peripherally, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation promotes iron sequestration by macrophages. Notably, iron-rich sites of CNS pathology typically contain TLR4 agonists, which may promote iron uptake. Indeed, our recent work showed impaired iron storage after acute spinal cord injury in mice with TLR4 deficiency. Here we used a reductionist model to ask if TLR4 activation in the CNS stimulates iron uptake and promotes neuroprotection from iron-induced toxicity. For this, we measured the ability of microglia/macrophages to sequester exogenous iron and prevent pathology with and without concomitant intraspinal TLR4 activation. Results show that, similar to the periphery, activating intraspinal TLR4 via focal LPS injection increased mRNA encoding iron uptake and storage proteins and promoted iron sequestration into ferritin-expressing macrophages. However, this did not prevent oligodendrocyte and neuron loss. Moreover, replacement of oligodendrocytes by progenitor cells - a normally robust response to in vivo macrophage TLR4 activation - was significantly reduced if iron was present concomitant with TLR4 activation. Thus, while TLR4 signaling promotes CNS iron uptake, future work needs to determine ways to enhance iron removal without blocking the reparative effects of innate immune receptor signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An Endothelial Hsp70-TLR4 Axis Limits Nox3 Expression and Protects Against Oxidant Injury in Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Shan, Peiying; Srivastava, Anup; Jiang, Ge; Zhang, Xuchen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidants play a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Nox3 is a novel member of the NADPH oxidase (Nox) family of oxidant-generating enzymes, which our laboratory had previously identified to be induced in the lungs of TLR4−/− mice. However, the physiologic role of Nox3 induction in lungs and its precise relationship to TLR4 are unknown. Furthermore, the cell compartment involved and the signaling mechanisms of Nox3 induction are unknown. Results: We identified that Nox3 is regulated by heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) signaling via a TLR4-Trif-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) pathway and that Nox3 induction leads to increased oxidant injury and death in mice and lung endothelial cells. We generated Nox3−/−/TLR4−/− double knockout mice, endothelial-targeting lentiviral silencing constructs, and endothelial-targeted Stat3−/− mice to specifically demonstrate that Nox3 induction is responsible for the pro-oxidant, proapoptotic phenotype of TLR4−/− mice. We also show that an endothelial Hsp70-TLR4-Trif-Stat3 axis is required to suppress deleterious Nox3 induction. Innovation: To date, a physiologic role for Nox3 in oxidant-induced ALI has not been identified. In addition, we generated unique double knockout mice and endothelial-targeted lentiviral silencing constructs to specifically demonstrate the role of a TLR4 signaling pathway in regulating pro-oxidant generation. Conclusions: We identified an endothelial TLR4-Trif antioxidant pathway that leads to the inhibition of a novel NADPH oxidase, Nox3, in lungs and lung endothelial cells. We also identified the role of a TLR4 ligand, Hsp70, in suppressing Nox3 in basal and pro-oxidant conditions. These studies identify potentially new therapeutic targets in oxidant-induced ALI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 991–1012. PMID:26905942

  9. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum activates beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer via a TLR4/P-PAK1 cascade.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyu; Peng, Yan; Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin; Shi, Lei; Li, Qing; Wu, Jiao; Fu, Xiangsheng

    2017-05-09

    The underlying mechanism of Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is poorly understood. Here, we examined Fn abundance in CRC tissues, as well as β-catenin, TLR4 and PAK1 protein abundance in Fn positive and Fn negative CRCs. Furthermore, we isolated a strain of Fn (F01) from a CRC tissue and examined whether Fn (F01) infection of colon cancer cells activated β-catenin signaling via the TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675 cascade. Invasive Fn was abundant in 62.2% of CRC tissues. TLR4, PAK1 and nuclear β-catenin proteins were more abundant within Fn-positive over Fn-negative CRCs (P < 0.05). Fn and its lipopolysaccharide induced a significant increase in TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675/C-myc/CyclinD1 protein abundance, as well as in the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Furthermore, inhibition of TLR4 or PAK1 prior to challenge with Fn significantly decreased protein abundance of P-β-catenin S675, C-myc and Cyclin D1, as well as nuclear β-catenin accumulation. Inhibition of TLR4 significantly decreased P-PAK1 protein abundance, and for the first time, we observed an interaction between TLR4 and P-PAK1 using immunoprecipitation. Our data suggest that invasive Fn activates β-catenin signaling via a TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675 cascade in CRC. Furthermore, TLR4 and PAK1 could be potential pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of Fn-related CRCs.

  10. Causal relationship between obesity-related traits and TLR4-driven responses at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohua; Li, Ming; Haghiac, Maricela; Catalano, Patrick M; O'Tierney-Ginn, Perrie; Hauguel-de Mouzon, Sylvie

    2016-11-01

    Obesity triggers complex inflammatory networks within the innate immune system. During pregnancy, the placenta amplifies the low-grade inflammation through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of obesity on placental TLR4 expression and inflammatory signals. The secondary aim was to analyse the placental cell type responsible for TLR4 activation. Thirty-nine women recruited at term-scheduled Caesarean section were grouped according to their pre-gravid BMI (<25 kg/m(2) and >30 kg/m(2)). Placenta, venous maternal and cord blood were obtained at delivery for analysis. Data were analysed with linear regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis. TLR4, IL6 and IL8 expression was increased three- to ninefold (p < 0.001) in the placenta of obese vs lean women. There was a positive correlation between placental TLR4 and maternal systemic and placental IL6 and IL8 concentrations. Placental TLR4 expression was correlated with maternal pre-gravid BMI, insulin resistance index, plasma insulin and C-reactive protein (r = 0.57, 0.31, 0.35, 0.53, respectively; p < 0.001) but not with plasma glucose, maternal age, gestational age and gestational weight gain (r < 0.2; p > 0.1). TLR4 was located in both trophoblast and macrovascular endothelial cells lining fetal vasculature. Lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 activation was more robust in trophoblasts than in endothelial vascular cells (100-fold vs tenfold; p < 0.001). Trophoblastic TLR4 is strongly implicated in the propagation of placental inflammation. Placental inflammation is related to maternal metabolic conditions such as pre-gravid BMI, whilst gestational weight gain or gestational age are not. These results implicate the pre-gravid condition as a significant contributor to metabolic inflammation in late pregnancy.

  11. Combining effects from rare and common genetic variants in an exome-wide association study of sequence data.

    PubMed

    Aschard, Hugues; Qiu, Weiliang; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Zaitlen, Noah; Cho, Michael H; Carey, Vincent

    2011-11-29

    Recent breakthroughs in next-generation sequencing technologies allow cost-effective methods for measuring a growing list of cellular properties, including DNA sequence and structural variation. Next-generation sequencing has the potential to revolutionize complex trait genetics by directly measuring common and rare genetic variants within a genome-wide context. Because for a given gene both rare and common causal variants can coexist and have independent effects on a trait, strategies that model the effects of both common and rare variants could enhance the power of identifying disease-associated genes. To date, little work has been done on integrating signals from common and rare variants into powerful statistics for finding disease genes in genome-wide association studies. In this analysis of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data, we evaluate various strategies for association of rare, common, or a combination of both rare and common variants on quantitative phenotypes in unrelated individuals. We show that the analysis of common variants only using classical approaches can achieve higher power to detect causal genes than recently proposed rare variant methods and that strategies that combine association signals derived independently in rare and common variants can slightly increase the power compared to strategies that focus on the effect of either the rare variants or the common variants.

  12. Heme activates TLR4-mediated inflammatory injury via MyD88/TRIF signaling pathway in intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammatory injury plays a critical role in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced neurological deficits; however, the signaling pathways are not apparent by which the upstream cellular events trigger innate immune and inflammatory responses that contribute to neurological impairments. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a role in inflammatory damage caused by brain disorders. Methods In this study, we investigate the role of TLR4 signaling in ICH-induced inflammation. In the ICH model, a significant upregulation of TLR4 expression in reactive microglia has been demonstrated using real-time RT-PCR. Activation of microglia was detected by immunohistochemistry, cytokines were measured by ELISA, MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB were measured by Western blot and EMSA, animal behavior was evaluated by animal behavioristics. Results Compared to WT mice, TLR4−/− mice had restrained ICH-induced brain damage showing in reduced cerebral edema and lower neurological deficit scores. Quantification of cytokines including IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β and assessment of macrophage infiltration in perihematoma tissues from TLR4−/−, MyD88−/− and TRIF−/− mice showed attenuated inflammatory damage after ICH. TLR4−/− mice also exhibited reduced MyD88 and TRIF expression which was accompanied by decreased NF-κB activity. This suggests that after ICH both MyD88 and TRIF pathways might be involved in TLR4-mediated inflammatory injury possibly via NF-κB activation. Exogenous hemin administration significantly increased TLR4 expression and microglial activation in cultures and also exacerbated brain injury in WT mice but not in TLR4−/− mice. Anti-TLR4 antibody administration suppressed hemin-induced microglial activation in cultures and in the mice model of ICH. Conclusions Our findings suggest that heme potentiates microglial activation via TLR4, in turn inducing NF-κB activation via the MyD88/TRIF signaling pathway, and ultimately increasing cytokine expression and

  13. Cumulative role of rare and common putative functional genetic variants at NPAS3 in schizophrenia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    González-Peñas, Javier; Arrojo, Manuel; Paz, Eduardo; Brenlla, Julio; Páramo, Mario; Costas, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia may be considered a human-specific disorder arisen as a maladaptive by-product of human-specific brain evolution. Therefore, genetic variants involved in susceptibility to schizophrenia may be identified among those genes related to acquisition of human-specific traits. NPAS3, a transcription factor involved in central nervous system development and neurogenesis, seems to be implicated in the evolution of human brain, as it is the human gene with most human-specific accelerated elements (HAEs), i.e., .mammalian conserved regulatory sequences with accelerated evolution in the lineage leading to humans after human-chimpanzee split. We hypothesize that any nucleotide variant at the NPAS3 HAEs may lead to altered susceptibility to schizophrenia. Twenty-one variants at these HAEs detected by the 1000 genomes Project, as well as five additional variants taken from psychiatric genome-wide association studies, were genotyped in 538 schizophrenic patients and 539 controls from Galicia. Analyses at the haplotype level or based on the cumulative role of the variants assuming different susceptibility models did not find any significant association in spite of enough power under several plausible scenarios regarding direction of effect and the specific role of rare and common variants. These results suggest that, contrary to our hypothesis, the special evolution of the NPAS3 HAEs in Homo relaxed the strong constraint on sequence that characterized these regions during mammalian evolution, allowing some sequence changes without any effect on schizophrenia risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. TLR4 Asp299Gly (rs4986790) polymorphism and coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Gao, Ying; Cen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have shown conflicting results on the association between toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) Asp299Gly (rs4986790) polymorphism and coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism on CAD risk, CRP level and the number of stenotic coronary arteries, as well as to investigate whether G allele carriers would benefit more from statin treatment. Methods. PubMed, EMBASE, and CNKI databases were searched until May 2015. All the statistical tests were performed using R version 3.1.2. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association between TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism and CAD risk, the number of stenotic vessels, and the incidence of cardiovascular events according to statin-treated patients. Weighted mean difference (WMD) was calculated for the association between Asp299Gly and CRP level. Results. Overall, 12 case-control studies with 10,258 cases and 5,891 controls were included, and no association of TLR4Asp299Gly polymorphism with CAD was found (G allele vs. A allele: OR = 0.97, 95% CI [0.81–1.17], P = 0.75; AA vs. GG + AG: OR = 0.97, 95% CI [0.80–1.18], P = 0.76; GG vs. AG + AA: OR = 1.08, 95% CI [0.57–2.02], P = 0.82; AG vs. AA + GG: OR = 1.03, 95% CI [0.85–1.25], P = 0.74). Also, no association was noted between Asp299Gly and CRP level (WMD = −0.10, 95% CI [−0.62, 0.41], P = 0.69). Furthermore, no synergistic effect of statin and 299Gly was reported (Statin_AA vs. Statin_AG/GG: OR = 1.12, 95% CI [0.41–3.09], P = 0.82). Discussion. This meta-analysis suggests no association of TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism with CAD and CRP level. It is further indicated that the G allele carriers may not benefit more from statin treatment. Further studies should include large sample size and high-quality literature to understand this issue in depth. PMID:26644971

  15. Human MD-2 discrimination of meningococcal lipid A structures and activation of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Shanta M; Zughaier, Susu M; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Stephens, David S

    2007-08-01

    MD-2, a eukaryotic accessory protein, is an essential component for the molecular pattern recognition of bacterial endotoxins. MD-2 interacts with lipid A of endotoxins [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipooligosaccharide (LOS)] to activate human toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. The structure of lipid A influences the subsequent activation of human TLR4 and the immune response, but the basis for the discrimination of lipid A structures is unclear. A recombinant human MD-2 (rMD-2) protein was produced in the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. Human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells were transfected with human TLR4 and were stimulated with highly purified LOS (0.56 pmol) from Neisseria meningitidis or LPS from other structurally defined bacterial endotoxins in the presence or absence of human rMD-2. Human rMD-2 restored, in a dose-dependent manner, interleukin (IL-8) responsiveness to LOS or LPS in TLR4-transfected HEK293 cells. The interaction of endotoxin with human rMD-2 was then assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Wild-type meningococcal LOS (Wt m LOS) bound human rMD-2, and binding was inhibited by an anti-MD-2 antibody to MD-2 dose-dependently (P < 0.005). Wt m LOS or meningococcal KDO(2)-lipid A had the highest binding affinity for human rMD-2; unglycosylated meningococcal lipid A produced by meningococci with defects in the 3-deoxy-d-manno-2-octulosonic acid (KDO) biosynthesis pathway did not appear to bind human rMD-2 (P < 0.005). The affinity of meningococcal LOS with a penta-acylated lipid A for human rMD-2 was significantly less than that for hexa-acylated LOS (P < 0.05). The hierarchy in the binding affinity of different lipid A structures for human rMD-2 was directly correlated with differences in TLR4 pathway activation and cytokine production by human macrophages.

  16. Common and Rare Variant Association Study for Plasma Lipids and Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Konno, Tetsuo; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Blood lipid levels are highly heritable and modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), and are the leading cause of death worldwide. These facts have motivated human genetic association studies that have the substantial potential to define the risk factors that are causal and to identify pathways and therapeutic targets for lipids and CAD.The success of the HapMap project that provided an extensive catalog of human genetic variations and the development of microarray based genotyping chips (typically containing variations with allele frequencies > 5%) facilitated common variant association study (CVAS; formerly termed genome-wide association study, GWAS) identifying disease-associated variants in a genome-wide manner. To date, 157 loci associated with blood lipids and 46 loci with CAD have been successfully identified, accounting for approximately 12%-14% of heritability for lipids and 10% of heritability for CAD. However, there is yet a major challenge termed "missing heritability problem," namely the observation that loci detected by CVAS explain only a small fraction of the inferred genetic variations. To explain such missing portions, focuses in genetic association studies have shifted from common to rare variants. However, it is challenging to apply rare variant association study (RVAS) in an unbiased manner because such variants typically lack the sufficient number to be identified statistically.In this review, we provide a current understanding of the genetic architecture mostly derived from CVAS, and several updates on the progress and limitations of RVAS for lipids and CAD.

  17. CLAMMS: a scalable algorithm for calling common and rare copy number variants from exome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Jonathan S.; Maxwell, Evan K.; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Lopez, Alexander E.; Dewey, Frederick E.; Chernomorsky, Rostislav; Baras, Aris; Overton, John D.; Habegger, Lukas; Reid, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Several algorithms exist for detecting copy number variants (CNVs) from human exome sequencing read depth, but previous tools have not been well suited for large population studies on the order of tens or hundreds of thousands of exomes. Their limitations include being difficult to integrate into automated variant-calling pipelines and being ill-suited for detecting common variants. To address these issues, we developed a new algorithm—Copy number estimation using Lattice-Aligned Mixture Models (CLAMMS)—which is highly scalable and suitable for detecting CNVs across the whole allele frequency spectrum. Results: In this note, we summarize the methods and intended use-case of CLAMMS, compare it to previous algorithms and briefly describe results of validation experiments. We evaluate the adherence of CNV calls from CLAMMS and four other algorithms to Mendelian inheritance patterns on a pedigree; we compare calls from CLAMMS and other algorithms to calls from SNP genotyping arrays for a set of 3164 samples; and we use TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction to validate CNVs predicted by CLAMMS at 39 loci (95% of rare variants validate; across 19 common variant loci, the mean precision and recall are 99% and 94%, respectively). In the Supplementary Materials (available at the CLAMMS Github repository), we present our methods and validation results in greater detail. Availability and implementation: https://github.com/rgcgithub/clamms (implemented in C). Contact: jeffrey.reid@regeneron.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26382196

  18. Sequencing of SCN5A identifies rare and common variants associated with cardiac conduction

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Prins, Bram P.; Arking, Dan E.; Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Morrison, Alanna C.; Zhang, Feng; Spector, Tim D.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Lubitz, Steven A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Pulit, Sara L.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Santibanez, Jireh; Taylor, Herman A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Lange, Leslie A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca; Rich, Stephen S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Jamshidi, Yalda; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Background The cardiac sodium channel SCN5A regulates atrioventricular and ventricular conduction. Genetic variants in this gene are associated with PR and QRS intervals. We sought to further characterize the contribution of rare and common coding variation in SCN5A to cardiac conduction. Methods and Results In the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Targeted Sequencing Study (CHARGE), we performed targeted exonic sequencing of SCN5A (n=3699, European-ancestry individuals) and identified 4 common (minor allele frequency >1%) and 157 rare variants. Common and rare SCN5A coding variants were examined for association with PR and QRS intervals through meta-analysis of European ancestry participants from CHARGE, NHLBI’s Exome Sequencing Project (ESP, n=607) and the UK10K (n=1275) and by examining ESP African-ancestry participants (N=972). Rare coding SCN5A variants in aggregate were associated with PR interval in European and African-ancestry participants (P=1.3×10−3). Three common variants were associated with PR and/or QRS interval duration among European-ancestry participants and one among African-ancestry participants. These included two well-known missense variants; rs1805124 (H558R) was associated with PR and QRS shortening in European-ancestry participants (P=6.25×10−4 and P=5.2×10−3 respectively) and rs7626962 (S1102Y) was associated with PR shortening in those of African ancestry (P=2.82×10−3). Among European-ancestry participants, two novel synonymous variants, rs1805126 and rs6599230, were associated with cardiac conduction. Our top signal, rs1805126 was associated with PR and QRS lengthening (P=3.35×10−7 and P=2.69×10−4 respectively), and rs6599230 was associated with PR shortening (P=2.67×10−5). Conclusions By sequencing SCN5A, we identified novel common and rare coding variants associated with cardiac conduction. PMID:24951663

  19. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  20. Common variants in Mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Siscovick, David S; Fox, Caroline S; Kao, W Linda; Böger, Carsten A

    2013-12-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.

  1. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; Jeanbart, Laura; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with its neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.

  2. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    DOE PAGES

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; ...

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with itsmore » neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.« less

  3. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    DOE PAGES

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; ...

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with itsmore » neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.« less

  4. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; Jeanbart, Laura; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with its neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.

  5. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kathryn L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Jacob J; Christiansen, Morten H; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population.

  6. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population. PMID:27064276

  7. Common variants of the vitamin D binding protein gene and adverse health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suneil; Fu, Lei; Juras, David James; Karmali, Mohamed; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Gozdzik, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is the major plasma carrier for vitamin D and its metabolites, but it is also an actin scavenger, and is the precursor to the immunomodulatory protein, Gc-MAF. Two missense variants of the DBP gene – rs7041 encoding Asp432Glu and rs4588 encoding Thr436Lys – change the amino acid sequence and alter the protein function. They are common enough to generate population-wide constitutive differences in vitamin D status, based on assay of the serum metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD). Whether these variants also influence the role of vitamin D in an immunologic milieu is not known. However, the issue is relevant, given the immunomodulatory effects of DBP and the role of protracted innate immune-related inflammation in response to tissue injury or repeated infection. Indeed, DBP and vitamin D may jointly or independently contribute to a variety of adverse health outcomes unrelated to classical notions of their function in bone and mineral metabolism. This review summarizes the reports to date of associations between DBP variants, and various chronic and infectious diseases. The available information leads us to conclude that DBP variants are a significant and common genetic factor in some common disorders, and therefore, are worthy of closer attention. In view of the heightened interest in vitamin D as a public health target, well-designed studies that look simultaneously at vitamin D and its carrier in relation to genotypes and adverse health outcome should be encouraged. PMID:23427793

  8. Independent effects of ADH1B and ALDH2 common dysfunctional variants on gout risk.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Akashi, Airi; Shimizu, Seiko; Higashino, Toshihide; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Naito, Mariko; Kawai, Sayo; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yutaka; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shimizu, Toru; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2017-05-31

    Gout is caused by hyperuricemia, with alcohol consumption being an established risk factor. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are crucial enzymes for alcohol metabolism. We recently performed a genome-wide association study of gout and a subsequent fine-mapping study which identified rs671 of ALDH2 as a gout locus. However, the association between gout and common variants of ADH1B has hitherto remained unreported, prompting us to investigate the association between gout and common dysfunctional variants of ADH1B (rs1229984) and ALDH2 (rs671). We used 1,048 clinically defined gout cases and 1,334 controls of Japanese male. The "His carrier" (His/His or His/Arg) of rs1229984 (His48Arg) of ADH1B significantly increased gout risk (P = 4.3 × 10(-4), odds ratio = 1.76), as did the "non-Lys carrier (Glu/Glu)" of rs671 (Glu504Lys) of ALDH2. Furthermore, common variants of ADH1B and ALDH2 are independently associated with gout. Our findings likewise suggest that genotyping these variants can be useful for the evaluation of gout risk.

  9. Glioblastoma Cancer Stem Cells Evade Innate Immune Suppression of Self-Renewal through Reduced TLR4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alvaro G; Thiagarajan, Praveena S; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Silver, Daniel J; Hale, James S; Alban, Tyler J; Turaga, Soumya M; Jarrar, Awad; Reizes, Ofer; Longworth, Michelle S; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-12-27

    Tumors contain hostile inflammatory signals generated by aberrant proliferation, necrosis, and hypoxia. These signals are sensed and acted upon acutely by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to halt proliferation and activate an immune response. Despite the presence of TLR ligands within the microenvironment, tumors progress, and the mechanisms that permit this growth remain largely unknown. We report that self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs) in glioblastoma have low TLR4 expression that allows them to survive by disregarding inflammatory signals. Non-CSCs express high levels of TLR4 and respond to ligands. TLR4 signaling suppresses CSC properties by reducing retinoblastoma binding protein 5 (RBBP5), which is elevated in CSCs. RBBP5 activates core stem cell transcription factors, is necessary and sufficient for self-renewal, and is suppressed by TLR4 overexpression in CSCs. Our findings provide a mechanism through which CSCs persist in hostile environments because of an inability to respond to inflammatory signals.

  10. TLR4-dependent immune response promotes radiation-induced liver disease by changing the liver tissue interstitial microenvironment during liver cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhi-Feng, Wu; Le-Yuan, Zhou; Xiao-Hui, Zhou; Ya-Bo, Gao; Jian-Ying, Zhang; Yong, Hu; Zhao-Chong, Zeng

    2014-12-01

    Liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) a special microenvironment around liver cells, which may play a vital role in cell communication during liver injury. Moreover, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important trigger of the immune response that may also play a role in liver injuries, including radiation-induced liver disease (RILD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the roles of the TLR4-dependent immune response and TIFs in RILD after radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancer. This study consisted of two phases, and in the primary phase, the livers of TLR4 mutant (TLR4(-)) and normal (TLR4(+)) mice were irradiated with 30 Gy. TIF was then obtained from mouse livers and assessed by cytokine array analysis 20 days after irradiation, and cytokines in the TIFs, TLR4 and RILD were analyzed. In the second or validation phase, hepatocytes were isolated from TLR4(+) or TLR4(-) mice irradiated with 8 Gy and were co-cultured with TIFs from mouse livers, apoptosis of the hepatocytes was then measured using flow cytometry. We found that severe RILD was accompanied by higher expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2(VEGFR-2) in liver TIFs, from in TLR4(+) mice compared with TLR4(-) mice (P < 0.05). In both TLR4(+) and TLR4(-) hepatocytes, apoptosis after irradiaton was increased significantly after co-culture in TIFs from TLR4(+) mice that had their livers irradiated, compared with TIFs from TLR4(-) mice that had their livers irradiated or TIFs from unirradiated mice (P < 0.05). In summary, these findings indicate that the TLR4-dependent immune response may promote RILD by enhancing the expression of GM-CSF, VEGFR-2 and TRAIL in liver TIFs.

  11. TLR4- and TLR9-dependent effects on cytokines, cell viability, and invasion in human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Olbert, Peter J; Kesch, Claudia; Henrici, Marcus; Subtil, Florentine S; Honacker, Astrid; Hegele, Axel; Hofmann, Rainer; Hänze, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Adjuvant immunotherapy of bladder cancer by instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is highly recommended within certain groups of non-muscle-invasive stages but only partially effective. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) TLR4 and TLR9 likely mediate BCG effects by triggering innate systemic immune cell responses. In addition, TLR4 and TLR9 expressed in bladder cancer cells may contribute to the outcome of BCG treatment. Here, we studied the expression and function of TLR4 and TLR9 in human bladder cancer cell lines. TLR4 and TLR9 messenger RNA and protein levels were determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Selected cell lines were analyzed with respect to cytokine induction, proliferation, and cell invasion after addition of BCG, TLR4-specific agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or TLR9 agonist (CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide [ODN]). TLR4 and TLR9 were expressed quite heterogeneously in human bladder cancer cells. BCG caused induction of interleukin (IL)-6 or IL-8 in BFTC905 and T24 cells as representatives for TLR4-/TLR9-expressing cells. The study aimed to dissect TLR4- and TLR9-mediated effects. For functional analysis of TLR4 with LPS, we selected T24 and BFTC905 cells with high and undetectable TLR4 levels, respectively. For TLR9 analysis with CpG-ODN, we selected UMUC3 and RT112 cells with high and low TLR9 levels, respectively. Addition of LPS caused significant induction of TNFα and IL-6 messenger RNA in T24 cells but not in BFTC905 cells. Addition of CpG-ODN induced interferon ß (INFß), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and the angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor-A and placental growth factor in UMUC3 cells; whereas in RT112 cells, induction of IL-8 and TNFα was noticed. Interestingly, addition of CpG-ODN significantly reduced cell viability and increased cell invasion in UMUC3 and RT112 cells. Our findings demonstrate that bladder cancer cell lines express functional TLR4 and TLR9 with

  12. The Cancer Chemotherapeutic Paclitaxel Increases Human and Rodent Sensory Neuron Responses to TRPV1 by Activation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Adamek, Pavel; Zhang, Haijun; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D.; Mrozkova, Petra; Li, Qin; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Cata, Juan P.; Sapire, Kenneth; Zhang, Hongmei; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Ghetti, Andre; Yan, Jiusheng; Palecek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting in paclitaxel cancer chemotherapy and can result in both acute pain during treatment and chronic persistent pain in cancer survivors. The hypothesis tested was that paclitaxel produces these adverse effects at least in part by sensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. The data show that paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity is prevented and reversed by spinal administration of a TRPV1 antagonist. The number of TRPV1+ neurons is increased in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in paclitaxel-treated rats and is colocalized with TLR4 in rat and human DRG neurons. Cotreatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS), a TLR4 inhibitor, prevents the increase in numbers of TRPV1+ neurons by paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of paclitaxel or the archetypal TLR4 agonist LPS activated both rat DRG and spinal neurons directly and produced acute sensitization of TRPV1 in both groups of cells via a TLR4-mediated mechanism. Paclitaxel and LPS sensitize TRPV1 in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TLR4 and transiently expressing human TRPV1. These physiological effects also are prevented by LPS-RS. Finally, paclitaxel activates and sensitizes TRPV1 responses directly in dissociated human DRG neurons. In summary, TLR4 was activated by paclitaxel and led to sensitization of TRPV1. This mechanism could contribute to paclitaxel-induced acute pain and chronic painful neuropathy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this original work, it is shown for the first time that paclitaxel activates peripheral sensory and spinal neurons directly and sensitizes these cells to transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-mediated capsaicin responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in multiple species. A direct functional interaction between TLR4 and TRPV1 is shown in rat and human dorsal root ganglion neurons, TLR4/TRPV1

  13. A common variant on chromosome 9p21 affects the risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Helgadottir, Anna; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Manolescu, Andrei; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Blondal, Thorarinn; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Baker, Adam; Palsson, Arnar; Masson, Gisli; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Magnusson, Kristinn P; Andersen, Karl; Levey, Allan I; Backman, Valgerdur M; Matthiasdottir, Sigurborg; Jonsdottir, Thorbjorg; Palsson, Stefan; Einarsdottir, Helga; Gunnarsdottir, Steinunn; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Vaccarino, Viola; Hooper, W Craig; Reilly, Muredach P; Granger, Christopher B; Austin, Harland; Rader, Daniel J; Shah, Svati H; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2007-06-08

    The global endemic of cardiovascular diseases calls for improved risk assessment and treatment. Here, we describe an association between myocardial infarction (MI) and a common sequence variant on chromosome 9p21. This study included a total of 4587 cases and 12,767 controls. The identified variant, adjacent to the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and CDKN2B, was associated with the disease with high significance. Approximately 21% of individuals in the population are homozygous for this variant, and their estimated risk of suffering myocardial infarction is 1.64 times as great as that of noncarriers. The corresponding risk is 2.02 times as great for early-onset cases. The population attributable risk is 21% for MI in general and 31% for early-onset cases.

  14. Statistical Colocalization of Genetic Risk Variants for Related Autoimmune Diseases in the Context of Common Controls

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Mary D.; Guo, Hui; Burren, Oliver; Schofield, Ellen; Walker, Neil M.; Ban, Maria; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Ann; Eyre, Steve; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying whether potential causal variants for related diseases are shared can identify overlapping etiologies of multifactorial disorders. Colocalization methods disentangle shared and distinct causal variants. However, existing approaches require independent datasets. Here we extend two colocalization methods to allow for the shared control design commonly used in comparison of genome-wide association study results across diseases. Our analysis of four autoimmune diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis, revealed 90 regions that were associated with at least one disease, 33 (37%) of which with two or more disorders. Nevertheless, for 14 of these 33 shared regions there was evidence that causal variants differed. We identified novel disease associations in 11 regions previously associated with one or more of the other three disorders. Four of eight T1D-specific regions contained known type 2 diabetes candidate genes: COBL, GLIS3, RNLS and BCAR1