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Sample records for common wild rice

  1. [Cloning and analyzing of rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta+ allele from Jinghong erect type of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff) in Yunnan].

    PubMed

    Geng, Xian-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Zhi; Huang, Xing-Qi; Cheng, Zai-Quan; Fu, Jian; Sun, Tao; Li, Jun

    2008-01-01

    A 4,672 bp DNA sequence including the whole coding region and partial non-coding region of rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta+ has been cloned from Jinghong erect type of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff) in Yunnan by polymerase chain reaction method. The coding region shares 99.86% and 98.78% identity with the corresponding regions of the reported cultivated rice Yashiro-mochi and Yuanjiang type of common wild rice respectively. There are 4 nucleotides difference in the coding region and 6 in intron of the cloned Pi-ta+ gene,compared with Pi-ta from Yashiro-mochi. Pi-ta+ gene in Jinghong erect type of common wild rice has been proved to be a rare existing Pi-ta+ allele, because there was a alanine rather than a serine at the position 918 within the predicted amino acid sequence of PITA. Pi-ta+ allele can cause disease resistance response to rice blast pathogens in plant cells. Differences in DNA sequence, deduced amino acid sequence and antibacterial spectrum may make the Pi-ta+ allele new resistant characteristics. Finding and cloning of Pi-ta+ allele from Jinghong erect type of common wild rice in Yunnan provides a basement for further utilization of the wild rice resources.

  2. Genetic-basis analysis of heterotic loci in Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Jin; Xin, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Jin-Shui

    2012-04-01

    Heterosis is widely used in genetic crop improvement; however, the genetic basis of heterosis is incompletely understood. The use of whole-genome segregating populations poses a problem for establishing the genetic basis of heterosis, in that interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. However, introgression line (IL) populations permit the partitioning of heterosis into defined genomic regions, eliminating a major part of the genome-wide epistasis. In our previous study, based on mid-parental heterosis (HMP) value with single-point analysis, 42 heterotic loci (HLs) associated with six yield-related traits were detected in wild and cultivated rice using a set of 265 ILs of Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.). In this study, the genetic effects of HLs were determined as the combined effects of both additive and dominant gene actions, estimated from the performance values of testcross F1s and the dominance effects estimated from the HMP values of testcross F1s. We characterized the gene action type at each HL. Thirty-eight of the 42 HLs were over-dominant, and in the absence of epistasis, four HLs were dominant. Therefore, we favour that over-dominance is a major genetic basis of 'wild-cultivar' crosses at the single functional Mendelian locus level.

  3. Identification of heterotic loci associated with yield-related traits in Chinese common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaojin; Wu, Shuang; Tian, Feng; Xin, Xiaoyun; Zha, Xiaojun; Dong, Xianxin; Fu, Yongcai; Wang, Xiangkun; Yang, Jinshui; Sun, Chuanqing

    2011-07-01

    Many rice breeding programs have currently reached yield plateaus as a result of limited genetic variability in parental strains. Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) is the progenitor of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) and serves as an important gene pool for the genetic improvement of rice cultivars. In this study, heterotic loci (HLs) associated with six yield-related traits were identified in wild and cultivated rice and investigated using a set of 265 introgression lines (ILs) of O. rufipogon Griff. in the background of the Indica high-yielding cultivar Guichao 2 (O. sativa L.). Forty-two HLs were detected by a single point analysis of mid-parent heterosis values from test cross F(1) offspring, and 30 (71.5%) of these HLs showed significantly positive effects, consistent with the superiority shown by the F(1) test cross population in the six yield-related traits under study. Genetic mapping of hsp11, a locus responsible for the number of spikelets per panicle, confirmed the utility of these HLs. The results indicate that favorable HLs capable of improving agronomic traits are available. The identification of HLs between wild rice and cultivated rice could lead to a new strategy for the application of heterosis in rice breeding.

  4. De novo Transcriptome Assembly of Common Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) and Discovery of Drought-Response Genes in Root Tissue Based on Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-wen; Wang, Yan-yan; Li, Wei-min; Peng, Yu-fa; Yuan, Qian-hua; Pei, Xin-wu

    2015-01-01

    Background The perennial O. rufipogon (common wild rice), which is considered to be the ancestor of Asian cultivated rice species, contains many useful genetic resources, including drought resistance genes. However, few studies have identified the drought resistance and tissue-specific genes in common wild rice. Results In this study, transcriptome sequencing libraries were constructed, including drought-treated roots (DR) and control leaves (CL) and roots (CR). Using Illumina sequencing technology, we generated 16.75 million bases of high-quality sequence data for common wild rice and conducted de novo assembly and annotation of genes without prior genome information. These reads were assembled into 119,332 unigenes with an average length of 715 bp. A total of 88,813 distinct sequences (74.42% of unigenes) significantly matched known genes in the NCBI NT database. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis showed that 3617 genes were up-regulated and 4171 genes were down-regulated in the CR library compared with the CL library. Among the DEGs, 535 genes were expressed in roots but not in shoots. A similar comparison between the DR and CR libraries showed that 1393 genes were up-regulated and 315 genes were down-regulated in the DR library compared with the CR library. Finally, 37 genes that were specifically expressed in roots were screened after comparing the DEGs identified in the above-described analyses. Conclusion This study provides a transcriptome sequence resource for common wild rice plants and establishes a digital gene expression profile of wild rice plants under drought conditions using the assembled transcriptome data as a reference. Several tissue-specific and drought-stress-related candidate genes were identified, representing a fully characterized transcriptome and providing a valuable resource for genetic and genomic studies in plants. PMID:26134138

  5. Identification of microRNAs in Response to Drought in Common Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) Shoots and Roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-wen; Long, Yan; Xue, Man-de; Xiao, Xing-guo; Pei, Xin-wu

    2017-01-01

    Background Drought is the most important factor that limits rice production in drought-prone environments. Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) contains abundant drought-resistant genes, which provide an opportunity to explore these excellent resources as contributors to improve rice resistance, productivity, and quality. Results In this study, we constructed four small RNA libraries, called CL and CR from PEG6000-free samples and DL and DR from PEG6000-treated samples, where ‘R’ indicates the root tissue and ‘L’ indicates the shoot tissue. A total of 200 miRNAs were identified to be differentially expressed under the drought-treated conditions (16% PEG6000 for 24 h), and the changes in the miRNA expression profile of the shoot were distinct from those of the root. At the miRNA level, 77 known miRNAs, which belong to 23 families, including 40 up-regulated and 37 down-regulated in the shoot, and 85 known miRNAs in 46 families, including 65 up-regulated and 20 down-regulated in the root, were identified as differentially expressed. In addition, we predicted 26 new miRNA candidates from the shoot and 43 from the root that were differentially expressed during the drought stress. The quantitative real-time PCR analysis results were consistent with high-throughput sequencing data. Moreover, 88 miRNAs that were differentially-expressed were predicted to match with 197 targets for drought-stress. Conclusion Our results suggest that the miRNAs of O. rufipogon are responsive to drought stress. The differentially expressed miRNAs that are tissue-specific under drought conditions could play different roles in the regulation of the auxin pathway, the flowering pathway, the drought pathway, and lateral root formation. Thus, the present study provides an account of tissue-specific miRNAs that are involved in the drought adaption of O. rufipogon. PMID:28107426

  6. Health-Promoting Compounds in Pigmented Thai and Wild Rice

    PubMed Central

    Melini, Valentina; Acquistucci, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Organic pigmented Thai rice and wild rice are commonly available in specialized Italian markets and food shops, and they are gaining popularity among consumers demanding healthy foods. Indeed, the typical colour of kernels, which is the unique characteristic of pigmented cereals, is due to the accumulation of pigments that are also responsible for a number of healthy effects. The aim of this study was to provide a portrait of two organic pigmented Thai rice varieties from Thailand and one wild rice variety from Canada, imported into Italy and at Italian consumers’ disposal. To this end, the proximate composition and the content of health-promoting compounds, such as carotenoids, anthocyanins and phenolic compounds, were determined in Thai and wild rice. Moreover, the effect of cooking on phytochemicals was assessed, in order to provide reliable data on the dietary intake of bioactive compounds by samples under investigation. Results show that studied samples have a content of phytochemicals higher than white rice and comparable to other cereals. The cooking process determined a decrease of bioactive compounds in all varieties under investigation. However, some samples were found more resistant to cooking stress, and some phytochemicals were little affected by this process. Therefore, pigmented Thai and wild rice may represent a valuable source of healthy compounds and an alternative to other wholesome foods required by consumers. PMID:28231088

  7. Nutritional constituents and health benefits of wild rice (Zizania spp.).

    PubMed

    Surendiran, Gangadaran; Alsaif, Maha; Kapourchali, Fatemeh Ramezani; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2014-04-01

    Wild rice (Zizania spp.) seems to have originated in North America and then dispersed into Eastern Asia and other parts of the world. Nutritional analysis shows that wild rice is rich in minerals, vitamins, protein, starch, dietary fiber, and various antioxidant phytochemicals, while it is low in fat. Wild rice has been recognized as a whole grain by the US Food and Drug Administration; in the North American marketplace it is currently sold as and considered to be a health-promoting food. Recent scientific studies have revealed antioxidant and lipid-lowering properties of wild rice, while others have documented cardiovascular benefits associated with the long-term consumption of wild rice in experimental settings. The present review article summarizes various features of wild rice and its cultivation, including its plantation, harvest, nutritional composition, and biological properties. While evidence for the cardiovascular benefits of wild rice consumption is accumulating, additional studies are warranted to determine the clinical benefits of regular consumption of wild rice.

  8. Development and GBS-genotyping of introgression lines (ILs) using two wild species of rice, O. meridionalis and O. rufipogon, in a common recurrent parent, O. sativa cv. Curinga.

    PubMed

    Arbelaez, Juan D; Moreno, Laura T; Singh, Namrata; Tung, Chih-Wei; Maron, Lyza G; Ospina, Yolima; Martinez, César P; Grenier, Cécile; Lorieux, Mathias; McCouch, Susan

    Two populations of interspecific introgression lines (ILs) in a common recurrent parent were developed for use in pre-breeding and QTL mapping. The ILs were derived from crosses between cv Curinga, a tropical japonica upland cultivar, and two different wild donors, Oryza meridionalis Ng. accession (W2112) and Oryza rufipogon Griff. accession (IRGC 105491). The lines were genotyped using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) and SSRs. The 32 Curinga/O. meridionalis ILs contain 76.73 % of the donor genome in individual introgressed segments, and each line has an average of 94.9 % recurrent parent genome. The 48 Curinga/O. rufipogon ILs collectively contain 97.6 % of the donor genome with an average of 89.9 % recurrent parent genome per line. To confirm that these populations were segregating for traits of interest, they were phenotyped for pericarp color in the greenhouse and for four agronomic traits-days to flowering, plant height, number of tillers, and number of panicles-in an upland field environment. Seeds from these IL libraries and the accompanying GBS datasets are publicly available and represent valuable genetic resources for exploring the genetics and breeding potential of rice wild relatives.

  9. Red River of the North, Reconnaissance Report: Wild Rice River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Stations Along the Wild Rice River, October, 1977 to September, 1977 ... 30 7 Groundwater Quality of Eight Communities Within the Wild Rice River Subbasin...impair fish propagation (Upper Mississippi River Basin Commission, 1977; North Dakota Statewide 208 Water Quality Management Plan, 1978). The groundwater ...given to this reach not because of its stream fisheries, which only provide moderate amounts of northern pike, yellow perch , crappie, and several

  10. LABA1, a Domestication Gene Associated with Long, Barbed Awns in Wild Rice.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lei; Wang, Diane R; Tan, Lubin; Fu, Yongcai; Liu, Fengxia; Xiao, Langtao; Zhu, Zuofeng; Fu, Qiang; Sun, Xianyou; Gu, Ping; Cai, Hongwei; McCouch, Susan R; Sun, Chuanqing

    2015-07-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon), the wild relative of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), flaunts long, barbed awns, which are necessary for efficient propagation and dissemination of seeds. By contrast, O. sativa cultivars have been selected to be awnless or to harbor short, barbless awns, which facilitate seed processing and storage. The transition from long, barbed awns to short, barbless awns was a crucial event in rice domestication. Here, we show that the presence of long, barbed awns in wild rice is controlled by a major gene on chromosome 4, LONG AND BARBED AWN1 (LABA1), which encodes a cytokinin-activating enzyme. A frame-shift deletion in LABA1 of cultivated rice reduces the cytokinin concentration in awn primordia, disrupting barb formation and awn elongation. Sequencing analysis demonstrated low nucleotide diversity and a selective sweep encompassing an ∼800-kb region around the derived laba1 allele in cultivated rice. Haplotype analysis revealed that the laba1 allele originated in the japonica subspecies and moved into the indica gene pool via introgression, suggesting that humans selected for this locus in early rice domestication. Identification of LABA1 provides new insights into rice domestication and also sheds light on the molecular mechanism underlying awn development.

  11. Phylogeography of Asian wild rice, Oryza rufipogon, reveals multiple independent domestications of cultivated rice, Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Londo, Jason P; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Hung, Kuo-Hsiang; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Schaal, Barbara A

    2006-06-20

    Cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., represents the world's most important staple food crop, feeding more than half of the human population. Despite this essential role in world agriculture, the history of cultivated rice's domestication from its wild ancestor, Oryza rufipogon, remains unclear. In this study, DNA sequence variation in three gene regions is examined in a phylogeographic approach to investigate the domestication of cultivated rice. Results indicate that India and Indochina may represent the ancestral center of diversity for O. rufipogon. Additionally, the data suggest that cultivated rice was domesticated at least twice from different O. rufipogon populations and that the products of these two independent domestication events are the two major rice varieties, Oryza sativa indica and Oryza sativa japonica. Based on this geographical analysis, O. sativa indica was domesticated within a region south of the Himalaya mountain range, likely eastern India, Myanmar, and Thailand, whereas O. sativa japonica was domesticated from wild rice in southern China.

  12. 7 CFR 1412.62 - Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting... Contract Violations and Reduction in Payments § 1412.62 Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations. (a)(1) If an acreage report of fruits, vegetables, or wild rice planted on base acreage of a...

  13. 7 CFR 1412.62 - Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting... Contract Violations and Reduction in Payments § 1412.62 Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations. (a)(1) If an acreage report of fruits, vegetables, or wild rice planted on base acreage of a...

  14. 7 CFR 1412.62 - Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting... Contract Violations and Reduction in Payments § 1412.62 Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations. (a)(1) If an acreage report of fruits, vegetables, or wild rice planted on base acreage of a...

  15. 7 CFR 1412.62 - Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting... Contract Violations and Reduction in Payments § 1412.62 Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations. (a)(1) If an acreage report of fruits, vegetables, or wild rice planted on base acreage of a...

  16. 7 CFR 1412.62 - Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting... Contract Violations and Reduction in Payments § 1412.62 Fruit, vegetable, and wild rice acreage reporting violations. (a)(1) If an acreage report of fruits, vegetables, or wild rice planted on base acreage of a...

  17. Fungicide sensitivity in the wild rice pathogen Bipolaris oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years the occurrence of fungal brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae has increased in cultivated wild rice (Zizania palustris) paddies in spite of the use of fungicides. To implement an efficient integrated disease management system, we are exploring whether field isolates have developed ...

  18. Modern elite rice varieties of the 'Green Revolution' have retained a large introgression from wild rice around the Pi33 rice blast resistance locus.

    PubMed

    Ballini, Elsa; Berruyer, Romain; Morel, Jean-Benoît; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Nottéghem, Jean-Loup; Tharreau, Didier

    2007-01-01

    During the breeding process of cultivated crops, resistance genes to pests and diseases are commonly introgressed from wild species. The size of these introgressions is predicted by theoretical models but has rarely been measured in cultivated varieties. By combining resistance tests with isogenic strains, genotyping and sequencing of different rice accessions, it was shown that, in the elite rice variety IR64, the resistance conferring allele of the rice blast resistance gene Pi33 was introgressed from the wild rice Oryza rufipogon (accession IRGC101508). Further characterization of this introgression revealed a large introgression at this locus in IR64 and the related variety IR36. The introgressed fragment represents approximately half of the short arm of rice chromosome 8. This is the first report of a large introgression in a cultivated variety of rice. Such a large introgression is likely to have been maintained during backcrossing only if a selection pressure was exerted on this genomic region. The possible traits that were selected are discussed.

  19. Genomic dissection of small RNAs in wild rice (Oryza rufipogon): lessons for rice domestication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Bai, Xuefei; Yan, Chenghai; Gui, Yiejie; Wei, Xinghua; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Guo, Longbiao; Fan, Longjiang

    2012-11-01

    The lack of a MIRNA set and genome sequence of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) has prevented us from determining the role of MIRNA genes in rice domestication. In this study, a genome, three small RNA populations and a degradome of O. rufipogon were sequenced by Illumina platform and the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) were investigated by miRNA chips. A de novo O. rufipogon genome was assembled using c. 55× coverage of raw sequencing data and a total of 387 MIRNAs were identified in the O. rufipogon genome based on c. 5.2 million unique small RNA reads from three different tissues of O. rufipogon. Of these, O. rufipogon MIRNAs, 259 were not found in the cultivated rice, suggesting a loss of these MIRNAs in the cultivated rice. We also found that 48 MIRNAs were novel in the cultivated rice, suggesting that they were potential targets of domestication selection. Some miRNAs showed significant expression differences between wild and cultivated rice, suggesting that expression of miRNA could also be a target of domestication, as demonstrated for the miR164 family. Our results illustrated that MIRNA genes, like protein-coding genes, might have been significantly shaped during rice domestication and could be one of the driving forces that contributed to rice domestication.

  20. Heavy metals in wild rice from northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Chiriboga, E.; Coleman, J.; Waller, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Wild rice grain samples from various parts of the world have been found to have elevated concentrations of heavy metals, raising concern for potential effects on human health. It was hypothesized that wild rice from north-central Wisconsin could potentially have elevated concentrations of some heavy metals because of possible exposure to these elements from the atmosphere or from water and sediments. In addition, no studies of heavy metals in wild rice from Wisconsin had been performed, and a baseline study was needed for future comparisons. Wild rice plants were collected from four areas in Bayfield, Forest, Langlade, Oneida, Sawyer and Wood Counties in September, 1997 and 1998 and divided into four plant parts for elemental analyses: roots, stems, leaves and seeds. A total of 194 samples from 51 plants were analyzed across the localities, with an average of 49 samples per part depending on the element. Samples were cleaned of soil, wet digested, and analyzed by ICP for Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Pb, Se and Zn. Roots contained the highest concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se. Copper was highest in both roots and seeds, while Zn was highest just in seeds. Magnesium was highest in leaves. Seed baseline ranges for the 10 elements were established using the 95% confidence intervals of the medians. Wild rice plants from northern Wisconsin had normal levels of the nutritional elements Cu, Mg and Zn in the seeds. Silver, Cd, Hg, Cr, and Se were very low in concentration or within normal limits for food plants. Arsenic and Pb, however, were elevated and could pose a problem for human health. The pathway for As, Hg and Pb to the plants could be atmospheric.

  1. Evaluation of genetic variation among wild rice populations in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Orn, Chhourn; Shishido, Rieko; Akimoto, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Ryo; Htun, Than Myint; Nonomura, Ken-Ichi; Koide, Yohei; Sarom, Men; Vang, Seng; Sophany, Sakhan; Makara, Ouk; Ishii, Takashige

    2015-01-01

    A total of 448 samples in five natural populations of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) were collected in Cambodia. They were examined using 12 SSR and two chloroplast markers to evaluate the degree of variation among populations and the genetic structure within populations. In the two annual populations, the number of plants with homozygous alleles at all 12 SSR loci were high (66.3% and 79.5%), suggesting that these plants propagate mainly through self-pollination. In the three perennial populations, no individuals had all homozygous genotypes, but redundant genotypes resulted from clonal propagation were observed. Percentages of the redundant genotypes were highly varied (3.6%, 29.2% and 86.0%). This may be due to the different stable levels of environmental conditions. As for chloroplast genome, most of the wild plants showed the same chloroplast types as most Indica-type cultivars have. However, plants with different chloroplast types were maintained, even in the same population. In tropical Asian countries, many wild rice populations were observed under similar ecological conditions examined in this study. Therefore, the present results concerning population structure will be important to further elucidate genetic features of wild rice, and will also give strong clues to utilize and conserve wild natural genetic resources. PMID:26719746

  2. Infanticide and cannibalism in wild common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Melo, L; Mendes Pontes, A R; Monteiro da Cruz, M A O

    2003-01-01

    Infanticide has been observed in many different species [1], including common marmosets [2-4], due to sexual selection, reproductive strategies or resource competition [3, 5, 6], which may ultimately lead to exploitation (cannibalism) [1, 7]. Wild callithrichids have a very flexible mating system, including monogamy, polygynandry, polyandry and polygyny [4, 8, 9], with Monteiro da Cruz [10] finding all these patterns within the same population. This results from the high degree of deforestation of their habitat [4], but non-monogamous groups cannot ensure successful rearing of infants, since helpers are crucial and should be present in high numbers [11]. In this study, we show for the first time that cannibalism can follow infanticide, and we hypothesise that it is a result of both competition for scarce resources and the need for animal protein, exacerbated by forest degradation.

  3. Sequencing of Australian wild rice genomes reveals ancestral relationships with domesticated rice.

    PubMed

    Brozynska, Marta; Copetti, Dario; Furtado, Agnelo; Wing, Rod A; Crayn, Darren; Fox, Glen; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Henry, Robert J

    2016-11-27

    The related A genome species of the Oryza genus are the effective gene pool for rice. Here, we report draft genomes for two Australian wild A genome taxa: O. rufipogon-like population, referred to as Taxon A, and O. meridionalis-like population, referred to as Taxon B. These two taxa were sequenced and assembled by integration of short- and long-read next-generation sequencing (NGS) data to create a genomic platform for a wider rice gene pool. Here, we report that, despite the distinct chloroplast genome, the nuclear genome of the Australian Taxon A has a sequence that is much closer to that of domesticated rice (O. sativa) than to the other Australian wild populations. Analysis of 4643 genes in the A genome clade showed that the Australian annual, O. meridionalis, and related perennial taxa have the most divergent (around 3 million years) genome sequences relative to domesticated rice. A test for admixture showed possible introgression into the Australian Taxon A (diverged around 1.6 million years ago) especially from the wild indica/O. nivara clade in Asia. These results demonstrate that northern Australia may be the centre of diversity of the A genome Oryza and suggest the possibility that this might also be the centre of origin of this group and represent an important resource for rice improvement.

  4. Molecular evolution of the Pi-ta gene resistant to rice blast in wild rice (Oryza rufipogon).

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Lin; Hwang, Shih-Ying; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2008-07-01

    Rice blast disease resistance to the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea is triggered by a physical interaction between the protein products of the host R (resistance) gene, Pi-ta, and the pathogen Avr (avirulence) gene, AVR-pita. The genotype variation and resistant/susceptible phenotype at the Pi-ta locus of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon), the ancestor of cultivated rice (O. sativa), was surveyed in 36 locations worldwide to study the molecular evolution and functional adaptation of the Pi-ta gene. The low nucleotide polymorphism of the Pi-ta gene of O. rufipogon was similar to that of O. sativa, but greatly differed from what has been reported for other O. rufipogon genes. The haplotypes can be subdivided into two divergent haplogroups named H1 and H2. H1 is derived from H2, with nearly no variation and at a low frequency. H2 is common and is the ancestral form. The leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain has a high pi(non)/pi(syn) ratio, and the low polymorphism of the Pi-ta gene might have primarily been caused by recurrent selective sweep and constraint by other putative physiological functions. Meanwhile, we provide data to show that the amino acid Ala-918 of H1 in the LRR domain has a close relationship with the resistant phenotype. H1 might have recently arisen during rice domestication and may be associated with the scenario of a blast pathogen-host shift from Italian millet to rice.

  5. Development and Evaluation of Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines Carrying Overlapping Chromosome Segments of the Whole Wild Rice Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dewei; Ye, Xinfu; Zheng, Xianghua; Cheng, Chaoping; Ye, Ning; Huang, Fenghuang

    2016-01-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) represents an important resource for rice improvement. Genetic populations provide the basis for a wide range of genetic and genomic studies. In particular, chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are most powerful tools for the detection and precise mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). In this study, 146 CSSLs were produced; they were derived from the crossing and back-crossing of two rice cultivars: Dongnanihui 810 (Oryza sativa L.), an indica rice cultivar as the recipient, and ZhangPu wild rice, a wild rice cultivar as the donor. First, a physical map of the 146 CSSLs was constructed using 149 molecular markers. Based on this map, the total size of the 147 substituted segments in the population was 1145.65 Mb, or 3.04 times that of the rice genome. To further facilitate gene mapping, heterozygous chromosome segment substitution lines (HCSSLs) were also produced, which were heterozygous in the target regions. Second, a physical map of the 244 HCSSLs was produced using 149 molecular markers. Based on this map, the total length of substituted segments in the HCSSLs was 1683.75 Mb, or 4.47 times the total length of the rice genome. Third, using the 146 CSSLs, two QTLs for plant height, and one major QTL for apiculus coloration were identified. Using the two populations of HCSSLs, the qPa-6-2 gene was precisely mapped to an 88 kb region. These CSSLs and HCSSLs may, therefore, provide powerful tools for future whole genome large-scale gene discovery in wild rice, providing a foundation enabling the development of new rice varieties. This research will also facilitate fine mapping and cloning of quantitative trait genes, providing for the development of superior rice varieties. PMID:27933072

  6. Bulliform Phytolith Research in Wild and Domesticated Rice Paddy Soil in South China.

    PubMed

    Huan, Xiujia; Lu, Houyuan; Wang, Can; Tang, Xiangan; Zuo, Xinxin; Ge, Yong; He, Keyang

    2015-01-01

    Bulliform phytoliths play an important role in researching rice origins as they can be used to distinguish between wild and domesticated rice. Rice bulliform phytoliths are characterized by numerous small shallow fish-scale decorations on the lateral side. Previous studies have shown that domesticated rice has a larger number of these decorations than wild rice and that the number of decorations ≥9 is a useful feature for identifying domesticated rice. However, this standard was established based on limited samples of modern rice plants. In this study, we analyzed soil samples from both wild and domesticated rice paddies. Results showed that, in wild rice soil samples, the proportion of bulliform phytoliths with ≥9 decorations was 17.46% ± 8.29%, while in domesticated rice soil samples, the corresponding proportion was 63.70% ± 9.22%. This suggests that the proportion of phytoliths with ≥9 decorations can be adopted as a criterion for discriminating between wild and domesticated rice in prehistoric soil. This indicator will be of significance in improving the application of fish-scale decorations to research into rice origins and the rice domestication process.

  7. Bulliform Phytolith Research in Wild and Domesticated Rice Paddy Soil in South China

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Xiujia; Lu, Houyuan; Wang, Can; Tang, Xiangan; Zuo, Xinxin; Ge, Yong; He, Keyang

    2015-01-01

    Bulliform phytoliths play an important role in researching rice origins as they can be used to distinguish between wild and domesticated rice. Rice bulliform phytoliths are characterized by numerous small shallow fish-scale decorations on the lateral side. Previous studies have shown that domesticated rice has a larger number of these decorations than wild rice and that the number of decorations ≥9 is a useful feature for identifying domesticated rice. However, this standard was established based on limited samples of modern rice plants. In this study, we analyzed soil samples from both wild and domesticated rice paddies. Results showed that, in wild rice soil samples, the proportion of bulliform phytoliths with ≥9 decorations was 17.46% ± 8.29%, while in domesticated rice soil samples, the corresponding proportion was 63.70% ± 9.22%. This suggests that the proportion of phytoliths with ≥9 decorations can be adopted as a criterion for discriminating between wild and domesticated rice in prehistoric soil. This indicator will be of significance in improving the application of fish-scale decorations to research into rice origins and the rice domestication process. PMID:26488583

  8. Studies on mineral nutrition and safety of wild rice (Oryza L.).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuli; Shi, Chunhai; Wu, Jianguo

    2009-01-01

    Mineral element contents of five wild rice were analyzed, including mineral nutrient elements such as phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn) and selenium (Se), and the potential toxic elements arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd). The results showed that the contents of K, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn and Se in five wild rice materials were much higher than the cultivate variety Zhou 903 in both brown and milled rice. Wild rice also had lower potential toxic element contents of Hg, Pb and Cd compared with Zhou 903 in brown rice and milled rice, respectively. Among five wild rice samples, WR-3 from Uganda had the highest level of P, K, Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn and Se, and the lowest contents of Hg, Pb and Cd.

  9. Small brown planthopper resistance loci in wild rice (Oryza officinalis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weilin; Dong, Yan; Yang, Ling; Ma, Bojun; Ma, Rongrong; Huang, Fudeng; Wang, Changchun; Hu, Haitao; Li, Chunshou; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2014-06-01

    Host-plant resistance is the most practical and economical approach to control the rice planthoppers. However, up to date, few rice germplasm accessions that are resistant to the all three kinds of planthoppers (1) brown planthopper (BPH; Nilaparvata lugens Stål), (2) the small brown planthopper (SBPH; Laodelphax striatellus Fallen), and (3) the whitebacked planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera Horvath) have been identified; consequently, the genetic basis for host-plant broad spectrum resistance to rice planthoppers in a single variety has been seldom studied. Here, one wild species, Oryza officinalis (Acc. HY018, 2n = 24, CC), was detected showing resistance to the all three kinds of planthoppers. Because resistance to WBPH and BPH in O. officinalis has previously been reported, the study mainly focused on its SBPH resistance. The SBPH resistance gene(s) was (were) introduced into cultivated rice via asymmetric somatic hybridization. Three QTLs for SBPH resistance detected by the SSST method were mapped and confirmed on chromosomes 3, 7, and 12, respectively. The allelic/non-allelic relationship and relative map positions of the three kinds of planthopper resistance genes in O. officinalis show that the SBPH, WBPH, and BPH resistance genes in O. officinalis were governed by multiple genes, but not by any major gene. The data on the genetics of host-plant broad spectrum resistance to planthoppers in a single accession suggested that the most ideally practical and economical approach for rice breeders is to screen the sources of broad spectrum resistance to planthoppers, but not to employ broad spectrum resistance gene for the management of planthoppers. Pyramiding these genes in a variety can be an effective way for the management of planthoppers.

  10. Malaysian weedy rice shows its true stripes: wild Oryza and elite rice cultivars shape agricultural weed evolution in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Song, Beng-Kah; Chuah, Tse-Seng; Tam, Sheh May; Olsen, Kenneth M

    2014-10-01

    Weedy rice is a close relative of domesticated rice (Oryza sativa) that competes aggressively with the crop and limits rice productivity worldwide. Most genetic studies of weedy rice have focused on populations in regions where no reproductively compatible wild Oryza species occur (North America, Europe and northern Asia). Here, we examined the population genetics of weedy rice in Malaysia, where wild rice (O. rufipogon) can be found growing in close proximity to cultivated and weedy rice. Using 375 accessions and a combined analysis of 24 neutral SSR loci and two rice domestication genes (sh4, controlling seed shattering, and Bh4, controlling hull colour), we addressed the following questions: (i) What is the relationship of Malaysian weedy rice to domesticated and wild rice, and to weedy rice strains in the USA? (ii) To what extent does the presence of O. rufipogon influence the genetic and phenotypic diversity of Malaysian weeds? (iii) What do the distributions of sh4 and Bh4 alleles and associated phenotypes reveal about the origin and contemporary evolution of Malaysian weedy rice? Our results reveal the following: independent evolutionary origins for Malaysian weeds and US strains, despite their very close phenotypic resemblance; wild-to-weed gene flow in Malaysian weed populations, including apparent adaptive introgression of seed-shattering alleles; and a prominent role for modern Malaysian cultivars in the origin and recent proliferation of Malaysian weeds. These findings suggest that the genetic complexity and adaptability of weedy crop relatives can be profoundly influenced by proximity to reproductively compatible wild and domesticated populations.

  11. Genetic diversity in Oryza glumaepatula wild rice populations in Costa Rica and possible gene flow from O. sativa

    PubMed Central

    Meneses Martínez, Allan; Calvo, Amanda; Muñoz, Melania

    2016-01-01

    Wild crop relatives are an important source of genetic diversity for crop improvement. Diversity estimates are generally lacking for many wild crop relatives. The objective of the present study was to analyze how genetic diversity is distributed within and among populations of the wild rice species Oryza glumaepatula in Costa Rica. We also evaluated the likelihood of gene flow between wild and commercial rice species because the latter is commonly sympatric with wild rice populations. Introgression may change wild species by incorporating alleles from domesticated species, increasing the risk of losing original variation. Specimens from all known O. glumaepatula populations in Costa Rica were analyzed with 444 AFLP markers to characterize genetic diversity and structure. We also compared genetic diversity estimates between O. glumaepatula specimens and O. sativa commercial rice. Our results showed that O. glumaepatula populations in Costa Rica have moderately high levels of genetic diversity, comparable to those found in South American populations. Despite the restricted distribution of this species in Costa Rica, populations are fairly large, reducing the effects of drift on genetic diversity. We found a dismissible but significant structure (θ = 0.02 ± 0.001) among populations. A Bayesian structure analysis suggested that some individuals share a significant proportion of their genomes with O. sativa. These results suggest that gene flow from cultivated O. sativa populations may have occurred in the recent past. These results expose an important biohazard: recurrent hybridization may reduce the genetic diversity of this wild rice species. Introgression may transfer commercial traits into O. glumaepatula, which in turn could alter genetic diversity and increase the likelihood of local extinction. These results have important implications for in situ conservation strategies of the only wild populations of O. glumaepatula in Costa Rica. PMID:27077002

  12. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Development of a Core Collection of Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) Populations in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Bai, Lin; Lu, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yuhong; Jiang, Lan; Diao, Mengyang; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.), the progenitor of Asian cultivated rice (O. sativa L.), is endangered due to habitat loss. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the genetic diversity of wild rice species in isolated populations and to develop a core collection of representative genotypes for ex situ conservation. We collected 885 wild rice accessions from eight geographically distinct regions and transplanted these accessions in a protected conservation garden over a period of almost two decades. We evaluated these accessions for 13 morphological or phenological traits and genotyped them for 36 DNA markers evenly distributed on the 12 chromosomes. The coefficient of variation of quantitative traits was 0.56 and ranged from 0.37 to 1.06. SSR markers detected 206 different alleles with an average of 6 alleles per locus. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.64 in all populations, indicating that the marker loci have a high level of polymorphism and genetic diversity in all populations. Phylogenetic analyses based on morphological and molecular data revealed remarkable differences in the genetic diversity of common wild rice populations. The results showed that the Zengcheng, Gaozhou, and Suixi populations possess higher levels of genetic diversity, whereas the Huilai and Boluo populations have lower levels of genetic diversity than do the other populations. Based on their genetic distance, 130 accessions were selected as a core collection that retained over 90% of the alleles at the 36 marker loci. This genetically diverse core collection will be a useful resource for genomic studies of rice and for initiatives aimed at developing rice with improved agronomic traits.

  13. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J

    2016-08-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara.

  14. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A.; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J.

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara. PMID:27345721

  15. Herbivory by resident geese: The loss and recovery of wild rice along the tidal Patuxent River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Kearns, G.D.

    2007-01-01

    Well known for a fall spectacle of maturing wild rice (Zizania aquatica) and migrant waterbirds, the tidal freshwater marshes of the Patuxent River, Maryland, USA, experienced a major decline in wild rice during the 1990s. We conducted experiments in 1999 and 2000 with fenced exclosures and discovered herbivory by resident Canada geese (Branta canadensis). Grazing by geese eliminated rice outside exclosures, whereas protected plants achieved greater size, density, and produced more panicles than rice occurring in natural stands. The observed loss of rice on the Patuxent River reflects both the sensitivity of this annual plant to herbivory and the destructive nature of an overabundance of resident geese on natural marsh vegetation. Recovery of rice followed 2 management actions: hunting removal of approximately 1,700 geese during a 4-year period and reestablishment of rice through a large-scale fencing and planting program.

  16. Screening and Expression of a Silicon Transporter Gene (Lsi1) in Wild-Type Indica Rice Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Abiri, Rambod; Kalhori, Nahid; Atabaki, Narges

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most prevalent elements in the soil. It is beneficial for plant growth and development, and it contributes to plant defense against different stresses. The Lsi1 gene encodes a Si transporter that was identified in a mutant Japonica rice variety. This gene was not identified in fourteen Malaysian rice varieties during screening. Then, a mutant version of Lsi1 was substituted for the native version in the three most common Malaysian rice varieties, MR219, MR220, and MR276, to evaluate the function of the transgene. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of Lsi1 in the three transgenic rice varieties. Silicon concentrations in the roots and leaves of transgenic plants were significantly higher than in wild-type plants. Transgenic varieties showed significant increases in the activities of the enzymes SOD, POD, APX, and CAT; photosynthesis; and chlorophyll content; however, the highest chlorophyll A and B levels were observed in transgenic MR276. Transgenic varieties have shown a stronger root and leaf structure, as well as hairier roots, compared to the wild-type plants. This suggests that Lsi1 plays a key role in rice, increasing the absorption and accumulation of Si, then alters antioxidant activities, and improves morphological properties. PMID:28191468

  17. Screening and Expression of a Silicon Transporter Gene (Lsi1) in Wild-Type Indica Rice Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Rafii, M Y; Azizi, Parisa; Abiri, Rambod; Kalhori, Nahid; Atabaki, Narges

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most prevalent elements in the soil. It is beneficial for plant growth and development, and it contributes to plant defense against different stresses. The Lsi1 gene encodes a Si transporter that was identified in a mutant Japonica rice variety. This gene was not identified in fourteen Malaysian rice varieties during screening. Then, a mutant version of Lsi1 was substituted for the native version in the three most common Malaysian rice varieties, MR219, MR220, and MR276, to evaluate the function of the transgene. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of Lsi1 in the three transgenic rice varieties. Silicon concentrations in the roots and leaves of transgenic plants were significantly higher than in wild-type plants. Transgenic varieties showed significant increases in the activities of the enzymes SOD, POD, APX, and CAT; photosynthesis; and chlorophyll content; however, the highest chlorophyll A and B levels were observed in transgenic MR276. Transgenic varieties have shown a stronger root and leaf structure, as well as hairier roots, compared to the wild-type plants. This suggests that Lsi1 plays a key role in rice, increasing the absorption and accumulation of Si, then alters antioxidant activities, and improves morphological properties.

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Salt Stress Responsiveness in the Seedlings of Dongxiang Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Yang, Ping; Cui, Fenglei; Zhang, Fantao; Luo, Xiangdong; Xie, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) is the progenitor of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), and is well known for its superior level of tolerance against cold, drought and diseases. To date, however, little is known about the salt-tolerant character of Dongxiang wild rice. To elucidate the molecular genetic mechanisms of salt-stress tolerance in Dongxiang wild rice, the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was used to analyze the transcriptome profiles of the leaves and roots at the seedling stage under salt stress compared with those under normal conditions. The analysis results for the sequencing data showed that 6,867 transcripts were differentially expressed in the leaves (2,216 up-regulated and 4,651 down-regulated) and 4,988 transcripts in the roots (3,105 up-regulated and 1,883 down-regulated). Among these differentially expressed genes, the detection of many transcription factor genes demonstrated that multiple regulatory pathways were involved in salt stress tolerance. In addition, the differentially expressed genes were compared with the previous RNA-Seq analysis of salt-stress responses in cultivated rice Nipponbare, indicating the possible specific molecular mechanisms of salt-stress responses for Dongxiang wild rice. A large number of the salt-inducible genes identified in this study were co-localized onto fine-mapped salt-tolerance-related quantitative trait loci, providing candidates for gene cloning and elucidation of molecular mechanisms responsible for salt-stress tolerance in rice.

  19. Rice production systems and avian influenza: Interactions between mixed-farming systems, poultry and wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muzaffar, S.B.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Prosser, D.J.; Newman, S.H.; Xiao, X.

    2010-01-01

    Wild waterfowl are the reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIVs), a family of RNA viruses that may cause mild sickness in waterbirds. Emergence of H5N1, a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) strain, causing severe disease and mortality in wild birds, poultry and humans, had raised concerns about the role of wild birds in possible transmission of the disease. In this review, the link between rice production systems, poultry production systems, and wild bird ecology is examined to assess the extent to which these interactions could contribute towards the persistence and evolution of HPAI H5N1. The rice (Oryza sativa) and poultry production systems in Asia described, and then migration and movements of wild birds discussed. Mixed farming systems in Asia and wild bird movement and migration patterns create opportunities for the persistence of low pathogenic AIVs in these systems. Nonetheless, there is no evidence of long-term persistence of HPAI viruses (including the H5N1 subtype) in the wild. There are still significant gaps in the understanding of how AIVs circulate in rice systems. A better understanding of persistence of AIVs in rice farms, particularly of poultry origins, is essential in limiting exchange of AIVs between mixed-farming systems, poultry and wild birds.

  20. The oryza map alignment project: the golden path to unlocking the genetic potential of wild rice species.

    PubMed

    Wing, Rod A; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Luo, Meizhong; Kim, Hyeran; Yu, Yeisoo; Kudrna, Dave; Goicoechea, Jose L; Wang, Wenming; Nelson, Will; Rao, Kiran; Brar, Darshan; Mackill, Dave J; Han, Bin; Soderlund, Cari; Stein, Lincoln; SanMiguel, Phillip; Jackson, Scott

    2005-09-01

    The wild species of the genus Oryza offer enormous potential to make a significant impact on agricultural productivity of the cultivated rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima. To unlock the genetic potential of wild rice we have initiated a project entitled the 'Oryza Map Alignment Project' (OMAP) with the ultimate goal of constructing and aligning BAC/STC based physical maps of 11 wild and one cultivated rice species to the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project's finished reference genome--O. sativa ssp. japonica c. v. Nipponbare. The 11 wild rice species comprise nine different genome types and include six diploid genomes (AA, BB, CC, EE, FF and GG) and four tetrapliod genomes (BBCC, CCDD, HHKK and HHJJ) with broad geographical distribution and ecological adaptation. In this paper we describe our strategy to construct robust physical maps of all 12 rice species with an emphasis on the AA diploid O. nivara--thought to be the progenitor of modern cultivated rice.

  1. Could abiotic stress tolerance in wild relatives of rice be used to improve Oryza sativa?

    PubMed

    Atwell, Brian J; Wang, Han; Scafaro, Andrew P

    2014-02-01

    Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima have been selected to acquire and partition resources efficiently as part of the process of domestication. However, genetic diversity in cultivated rice is limited compared to wild Oryza species, in spite of 120,000 genotypes being held in gene banks. By contrast, there is untapped diversity in the more than 20 wild species of Oryza, some having been collected from just a few coastal locations (e.g. Oryza schlechteri), while others are widely distributed (e.g. Oryza nivara and Oryza rufipogon). The extent of DNA sequence diversity and phenotypic variation is still being established in wild Oryza, with genetic barriers suggesting a vast range of morphologies and function even within species, such as has been demonstrated for Oryza meridionalis. With increasing climate variability and attempts to make more marginal land arable, abiotic and biotic stresses will be managed over the coming decades by tapping into the genetic diversity of wild relatives of O. sativa. To help create a more targeted approach to sourcing wild rice germplasm for abiotic stress tolerance, we have created a climate distribution map by plotting the natural occurrence of all Oryza species against corresponding temperature and moisture data. We then discuss interspecific variation in phenotype and its significance for rice, followed by a discussion of ways to integrate germplasm from wild relatives into domesticated rice.

  2. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis of Wild Rice (Oryza minuta) and Its Comparison with Other Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad Aaqil; Shahzad, Raheem; Seo, Chang-Woo; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Oryza minuta (Poaceae family) is a tetraploid wild relative of cultivated rice with a BBCC genome. O. minuta has the potential to resist against various pathogenic diseases such as bacterial blight (BB), white backed planthopper (WBPH) and brown plant hopper (BPH). Here, we sequenced and annotated the complete mitochondrial genome of O. minuta. The mtDNA genome is 515,022 bp, containing 60 protein coding genes, 31 tRNA genes and two rRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome organization and the gene content at the nucleotide level are highly similar (89%) to that of O. rufipogon. Comparison with other related species revealed that most of the genes with known function are conserved among the Poaceae members. Similarly, O. minuta mt genome shared 24 protein-coding genes, 15 tRNA genes and 1 ribosomal RNA gene with other rice species (indica and japonica). The evolutionary relationship and phylogenetic analysis revealed that O. minuta is more closely related to O. rufipogon than to any other related species. Such studies are essential to understand the evolutionary divergence among species and analyze common gene pools to combat risks in the current scenario of a changing environment. PMID:27045847

  3. Relationships of wild and domesticated rices (Oryza AA genome species) based upon whole chloroplast genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Wambugu, Peterson W; Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Waters, Daniel L; Henry, Robert J

    2015-09-10

    Rice is the most important crop in the world, acting as the staple food for over half of the world's population. The evolutionary relationships of cultivated rice and its wild relatives have remained contentious and inconclusive. Here we report on the use of whole chloroplast sequences to elucidate the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships in the AA genome Oryza species, representing the primary gene pool of rice. This is the first study that has produced a well resolved and strongly supported phylogeny of the AA genome species. The pan tropical distribution of these rice relatives was found to be explained by long distance dispersal within the last million years. The analysis resulted in a clustering pattern that showed strong geographical differentiation. The species were defined in two primary clades with a South American/African clade with two species, O glumaepatula and O longistaminata, distinguished from all other species. The largest clade was comprised of an Australian clade including newly identified taxa and the African and Asian clades. This refined knowledge of the relationships between cultivated rice and the related wild species provides a strong foundation for more targeted use of wild genetic resources in rice improvement and efforts to ensure their conservation.

  4. Relationships of wild and domesticated rices (Oryza AA genome species) based upon whole chloroplast genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wambugu, Peterson W.; Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Waters, Daniel L.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Rice is the most important crop in the world, acting as the staple food for over half of the world’s population. The evolutionary relationships of cultivated rice and its wild relatives have remained contentious and inconclusive. Here we report on the use of whole chloroplast sequences to elucidate the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships in the AA genome Oryza species, representing the primary gene pool of rice. This is the first study that has produced a well resolved and strongly supported phylogeny of the AA genome species. The pan tropical distribution of these rice relatives was found to be explained by long distance dispersal within the last million years. The analysis resulted in a clustering pattern that showed strong geographical differentiation. The species were defined in two primary clades with a South American/African clade with two species, O glumaepatula and O longistaminata, distinguished from all other species. The largest clade was comprised of an Australian clade including newly identified taxa and the African and Asian clades. This refined knowledge of the relationships between cultivated rice and the related wild species provides a strong foundation for more targeted use of wild genetic resources in rice improvement and efforts to ensure their conservation. PMID:26355750

  5. Expression profiling of common and specific defense responses of rice to Magnaporthe oryzae infection using deep sequencing technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious disease in rice production. Wild type Nipponbare and transgenic rice plants (carrying the Pi9 blast resistance gene) were challenged with the rice blast strain KJ201 to identify the early, mid and late host responses to M. oryzae infection at the ...

  6. Variation in the nucleotide sequence of a prolamin gene family in wild rice.

    PubMed

    Barbier, P; Ishihama, A

    1990-07-01

    Variation in the DNA sequence of the 10 kDa prolamin gene family within the wild rice species Oryza rufipogon was probed using the direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genes. A comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino-acid sequences of eight Asian strains of O. rufipogon and one strain of the related African species O. longistaminata is presented.

  7. Population Genetic Structure of Cochliobolus miyabeanus on Cultivated Wild Rice (Zizania palustris L.) in Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cochliobolus miyabeanus (Bipolaris oryzae) is the causal agent of fungal brown spot (FBS) in wild rice (Zizania palustris L.), an aquatic grass, endemic in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and parts of Canada. Grain yield losses can reach up to 74% when the disease starts at the boot stage and continues until ...

  8. Collection and comparative analysis of 1888 full-length cDNAs from wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. W1943.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tingting; Yu, Shuliang; Fan, Danlin; Mu, Jie; Shangguan, Yingying; Wang, Zixuan; Minobe, Yuzo; Lin, Zhixin; Han, Bin

    2008-10-01

    A huge amount of cDNA and EST resources have been developed for cultivated rice species Oryza sativa; however, only few cDNA resources are available for wild rice species. In this study, we isolated and completely sequenced 1888 putative full-length cDNA (FLcDNA) clones from wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. W1943 for comparative analysis between wild and cultivated rice species. Two cDNA libraries were constructed from 3-week-old leaf samples under either normal or cold-treated conditions. Homology searching of these cDNA sequences revealed that >96.8% of the wild rice cDNAs were matched to the cultivated rice O. sativa ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare genome sequence. However, <22% of them were fully matched to the cv. Nipponbare genome sequence. The comparative analysis showed that O. rufipogon W1943 had greater similarity to O. sativa ssp. japonica than to ssp. indica cultivars. In addition, 17 novel rice cDNAs were identified, and 41 putative tissue-specific expression genes were defined through searching the rice massively parallel signature-sequencing database. In conclusion, these FLcDNA clones are a resource for further function verification and could be broadly utilized in rice biological studies.

  9. Ethnobotanical investigation of 'wild' food plants used by rice farmers in Kalasin, Northeast Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Wild food plants are a critical component in the subsistence system of rice farmers in Northeast Thailand. One of the important characteristics of wild plant foods among farming households is that the main collection locations are increasingly from anthropogenic ecosystems such as agricultural areas rather than pristine ecosystems. This paper provides selected results from a study of wild food conducted in several villages in Northeast Thailand. A complete botanical inventory of wild food plants from these communities and surrounding areas is provided including their diversity of growth forms, the different anthropogenic locations were these species grow and the multiplicity of uses they have. Methods Data was collected using focus groups and key informant interviews with women locally recognized as knowledgeable about contemporarily gathered plants. Plant species were identified by local taxonomists. Results A total of 87 wild food plants, belonging to 47 families were reported, mainly trees, herbs (terrestrial and aquatic) and climbers. Rice fields constitute the most important growth location where 70% of the plants are found, followed by secondary woody areas and home gardens. The majority of species (80%) can be found in multiple growth locations, which is partly explained by villagers moving selected species from one place to another and engaging in different degrees of management. Wild food plants have multiple edible parts varying from reproductive structures to vegetative organs. More than two thirds of species are reported as having diverse additional uses and more than half of them are also regarded as medicine. Conclusions This study shows the remarkable importance of anthropogenic areas in providing wild food plants. This is reflected in the great diversity of species found, contributing to the food and nutritional security of rice farmers in Northeast Thailand. PMID:22067578

  10. Sequence polymorphisms in wild, weedy, and cultivated rice suggest seed-shattering locus sh4 played a minor role in Asian rice domestication

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongqing; Ellstrand, Norman C; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The predominant view regarding Asian rice domestication is that the initial origin of nonshattering involved a single gene of large effect, specifically, the sh4 locus via the evolutionary replacement of a dominant allele for shattering with a recessive allele for reduced shattering. Data have accumulated to challenge this hypothesis. Specifically, a few studies have reported occasional seed-shattering plants from populations of the wild progenitor of cultivated rice (Oryza rufipogon complex) being homozygous for the putative “nonshattering” sh4 alleles. We tested the sh4 hypothesis for the domestication of cultivated rice by obtaining genotypes and phenotypes for a diverse set of samples of wild, weedy, and cultivated rice accessions. The cultivars were fixed for the putative “nonshattering” allele and nonshattering phenotype, but wild rice accessions are highly polymorphic for the putative “nonshattering” allele (frequency ∼26%) with shattering phenotype. All weedy rice accessions are the “nonshattering” genotype at the sh4 locus but with shattering phenotype. These data challenge the widely accepted hypothesis that a single nucleotide mutation (“G”/“T”) of the sh4 locus is the major driving force for rice domestication. Instead, we hypothesize that unidentified shattering loci are responsible for the initial domestication of cultivated rice through reduced seed shattering. PMID:23139871

  11. Analysis of Rhizome Development in Oryza longistaminata, a Wild Rice Species.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akiko; Terada, Yasuhiko; Toriba, Taiyo; Kose, Katsumi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kyozuka, Junko

    2016-10-01

    Vegetative reproduction is a form of asexual propagation in plants. A wide range of plants develop rhizomes, modified stems that grow underground horizontally, as a means of vegetative reproduction. In rhizomatous species, despite their distinct developmental patterns, both rhizomes and aerial shoots derive from axillary buds. Therefore, it is of interest to understand the basis of rhizome initiation and development. Oryza longistaminata, a wild rice species, develops rhizomes. We analyzed bud initiation and growth of O. longistaminata rhizomes using various methods of morphological observation. We show that, unlike aerial shoot buds that contain a few leaves only, rhizome buds initiate several leaves and bend to grow at right angles to the original rhizome. Rhizomes are maintained in the juvenile phase irrespective of the developmental phase of the aerial shoot. Stem elongation and reproductive transition are tightly linked in the aerial shoots, but are uncoupled in the rhizome. Our findings indicate that developmental programs operate independently in the rhizomes and aerial shoots. Temporal modification of the developmental pathways that are common to rhizomes and aerial shoots may be the source of developmental plasticity. Furthermore, the creation of new developmental systems appears to be necessary for rhizome development.

  12. Study on Analysis of Variance on the indigenous wild and cultivated rice species of Manipur Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhabati, K.; Rohinikumar, M.; Rajiv Das, K.; Henary, Ch.; Dikash, Th.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of variance revealed considerable variation among the cultivars and the wild species for yield and other quantitative characters in both the years of investigation. The highly significant differences among the cultivars in year wise and pooled analysis of variance for all the 12 characters reveal that there are enough genetic variabilities for all the characters studied. The existence of genetic variability is of paramount importance for starting a judicious plant breeding programme. Since introduced high yielding rice cultivars usually do not perform well. Improvement of indigenous cultivars is a clear choice for increase of rice production. The genetic variability of 37 rice germplasms in 12 agronomic characters estimated in the present study can be used in breeding programme

  13. Phylogenetic relationships of annual and perennial wild rice: probing by direct DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barbier, P; Morishima, H; Ishihama, A

    1991-05-01

    The phylogenetic relationships between Asian wild rice strains were analyzed by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA fragments. The sequence of three introns located in the phytochrome gene was determined for eight strains of the Asian wild rice, Oryza rufipogon, and one strain of the related African species, Oryza longistaminata. The number of nucleotide substitutions per site between various strains within a single species, O. rufipogon, ranged between 0.0017 and 0.0050, while those between two related species, O. rufipogon and O. longistaminate, were 0.043-0.049 (23-26 within 532 bp). Taken together with the sequence differences of the 10-kDa prolamin gene, a model is proposed for the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of annuals and perennials within O. rufipogon.

  14. Chloroplast genome sequence confirms distinctness of Australian and Asian wild rice.

    PubMed

    Waters, Daniel L E; Nock, Catherine J; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Rice, Nicole; Henry, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) is an AA genome Oryza species that was most likely domesticated from wild populations of O. rufipogon in Asia. O. rufipogon and O. meridionalis are the only AA genome species found within Australia and occur as widespread populations across northern Australia. The chloroplast genome sequence of O. rufipogon from Asia and Australia and O. meridionalis and O. australiensis (an Australian member of the genus very distant from O. sativa) was obtained by massively parallel sequencing and compared with the chloroplast genome sequence of domesticated O. sativa. Oryza australiensis differed in more than 850 sites single nucleotide polymorphism or indel from each of the other samples. The other wild rice species had only around 100 differences relative to cultivated rice. The chloroplast genomes of Australian O. rufipogon and O. meridionalis were closely related with only 32 differences. The Asian O. rufipogon chloroplast genome (with only 68 differences) was closer to O. sativa than the Australian taxa (both with more than 100 differences). The chloroplast sequences emphasize the genetic distinctness of the Australian populations and their potential as a source of novel rice germplasm. The Australian O. rufipogon may be a perennial form of O. meridionalis.

  15. Toxicity of sulfate and chloride to early life stages of wild rice (Zizania palustris).

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Mathis, Michael B; Walker, Rachel; Tuominen, Lindsey K; Hansel, Mike; Hall, Scott; Richards, Robin; Grattan, S R; Anderson, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    Despite the importance of wild rice (Zizania palustris) in the Great Lakes region of North America, its sensitivity to sulfate is not well understood. A 21-d hydroponic experiment was performed to determine the toxicity of sulfate to wild rice seeds and seedlings. Effects of 6 sulfate concentrations ranging from 10 mg/L to 5000 mg/L and of chloride salts at equivalent conductivity were evaluated to determine whether adverse effects were attributable to sulfate or to conductivity-related stress. Sulfate treatment decreased root length, shoot length, and leaf number, and increased phytotoxic effects at concentrations of 5000 mg/L relative to a 50 mg/L control. The time to 30% mesocotyl emergence decreased at 2500 mg/L sulfate, indicating a potential stimulatory effect. Sulfate exposures of ≤ 5000 mg/L had no effect on 5 additional end points. Multiple regression analysis indicated that most observed changes could be attributed to conductivity-related stress rather than sulfate per se, with the exception of shoot length and leaf number. Chloride was more toxic than sulfate, as determined by root length and phytotoxicity. In summary, sulfate concentrations below 5000 mg/L did not adversely affect early-life stage wild rice during a 21-d period, and effects at 5000 mg/L sulfate were attributable to conductivity-related stress rather than sulfate toxicity in 2 of 4 end points.

  16. Differential analyses of major allergen proteins in wild-type rice and rice producing a fragment of anti-rotavirus antibody.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Mejima, Mio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Oyama, Masaaki; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Teshima, Reiko; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    To develop oral antibody therapy against rotavirus infection, we previously produced a recombinant fragment of llama heavy-chain antibody to rotavirus (ARP1) in rice seeds (MucoRice-ARP1). We intend to use a purification-free rice powder for clinical application but needed to check whether MucoRice-ARP1 had increased levels of known allergen proteins. For this purpose, we used two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis to compare the allergen protein levels in MucoRice-ARP1 and wild-type rice. We detected no notable differences, except in the levels of α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like family proteins. Because by this approach we could not completely separate ARP1 from the proteins of this family, we confirmed the absence of changes in the levels of these allergens by using shotgun mass spectrometry as well as immunoblot. By using immunoelectron microscopy, we also showed that RAG2, a member of the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family, was relocated from protein bodies II to the plasma membrane or cell wall in MucoRice-ARP1 seed. The relocation did not affect the level of RAG2. We demonstrated that most of the known rice allergens were not considerably upregulated by the genetic modification in MucoRice-ARP1. Our data suggest that MucoRice-ARP1 is a potentially safe oral antibody for clinical application.

  17. Analysis of common canopy vegetation indices for indicating leaf nitrogen accumulations in wheat and rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan; Yao, Xia; Tian, YongChao; Liu, XiaoJun; Cao, WeiXing

    2008-02-01

    The common spectra wavebands and vegetation indices (VI) were identified for indicating leaf nitrogen accumulation (LNA), and the quantitative relationships of LNA to canopy reflectance spectra were determined in both wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) and rice ( Oryza sativa L.). The 810 and 870 nm are two common spectral wavebands indicating LNA in both wheat and rice. Among all ratio vegetation indices (RVI), difference vegetation indices (DVI) and normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI) of 16 wavebands from the MSR16 radiometer, RVI (870, 660) and RVI (810, 660) were most highly correlated to LNA in both wheat and rice. In addition, the relations between VIs and LNA gave better results than relations between single wavebands and LNA in both wheat and rice. Thus LNA in both wheat and rice could be indicated with common VIs, but separate regression equations are better for LNA monitoring.

  18. Ultrastructure of Oryza glumaepatula, a wild rice species endemic of tropical America.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ethel; Espinoza, Ana M

    2005-01-01

    Orv'za gluniaepatula is a perennial wild rice species, endemic to tropical America, previously known as the Latin American race of Orrza rufipogon. In Costa Rica, it is found in the northern region of the country, mainly in the wetland of the Medio Queso River, Los Chiles, Alajuela. It is diploid, of AA type genome and because of its genetic relatedness to cultivated rice it is included in the O. saliva complex. We describe the ultrastructure of leaf blade, spikelet, ligule and auricles. Special emphasis is given to those traits of major taxonomic value for O. glumaepatula and to those characters that distinguish this species from O. rufipogon and O. sativa. O. glumaepatula has a leaf blade covered with tombstone-shaped, oblong and spheroid epicuticular wax papillae. It has diamond-shaped stomata surrounded by spherical papillae, rows of zipper-like silica cells, bulky prickle trichomes of ca. 40 microm in length and small hirsute trichomes of ca. 32 tpm in length. The central vein is covered with large, globular papillae of ca. 146 microm in length, a characteristic that distinguishes this species from O. rufipogon and O. sativa. The border of the leaf blade exhibits a row of even-sized bulky prickle trichomes of ca. 42.5 microm in length. Auricles have attenuated trichomes of ca. 5.5 mm in length on the edges and small bicellular trichomes of 120 microm in length on the surface. The ligule has a large number of short attenuated trichomes on its surface of 100 microm in length. These latter two traits have important taxonomic value since they were found in O. glumaepatula but not found in O. sativa or in O. rufipogon. The spikelet has the typical morphology of the Oryza genus. Fertile lemmas have abundant spines, a trait shared with O. rufipogon but not with O. sativa. The sterile lemmas are wing-shaped with serrated borders, a characteristic that distinguishes this species from O. rufipogon and O. sativa. All the ultrastructure characters observed in O

  19. Growth promotion and inhibition of the Amazonian wild rice species Oryza grandiglumis to survive flooding.

    PubMed

    Okishio, Takuma; Sasayama, Daisuke; Hirano, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Masahiro; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Azuma, Tetsushi

    2014-09-01

    In Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), distinct mechanisms to survive flooding are activated in two groups of varieties. Submergence-tolerant rice varieties possessing the SUBMERGENCE1A (SUB1A) gene display reduced growth during flash floods at the seedling stage and resume growth after the flood recedes, whereas deepwater rice varieties possessing the SNORKEL1 (SK1) and SNORKEL2 (SK2) genes display enhanced growth based on internodal elongation during prolonged submergence at the mature stage. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of these growth responses to submergence in the wild rice species Oryza grandiglumis, which is native to the Amazon floodplains. When subjected to gradual submergence, adult plants of O. grandiglumis accessions showed enhanced internodal elongation with rising water level and their growth response closely resembled that of deepwater varieties of O. sativa with high floating capacity. On the other hand, when subjected to complete submergence, seedlings of O. grandiglumis accessions displayed reduced shoot growth and resumed normal growth after desubmergence, similar to the response of submergence-tolerant varieties of O. sativa. Neither SUB1A nor the SK genes were detected in the O. grandiglumis accessions. These results indicate that the O. grandiglumis accessions are capable of adapting successfully to flooding by activating two contrasting mechanisms as the situation demands and that each mechanism of adaptation to flooding is not mediated by SUB1A or the SK genes.

  20. Water resources of the Wild Rice River watershed, northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Thomas C.; Bidwell, L.E.; Maclay, Robert W.

    1970-01-01

    The area of the watershed is about 2,600 square miles and includes most of Mahnomen and Norman Counties and parts of Becker, Clay, Clearwater, and Polk Counties. The population of the area is about 37,000 people of which about 70 percent live on farms. The economy is based principally on farming. The area of lake clay and silt is used mostly for raising sugar beets and wheat; and potatoes are grown largely on the sandy soils. In the western part of the morainal area small grain, dairy, and cattle farming is the most common. The eastern part of the morainal area is important for forest products and recreation. Industries in the area are small and are based on agricultural processing and service.

  1. Effects of different treatments of fly ash and mining soil on growth and antioxidant protection of Indian wild rice.

    PubMed

    Bisoi, Sidhanta Sekhar; Mishra, Swati S; Barik, Jijnasa; Panda, Debabrata

    2017-05-04

    The aim of the present study was investigation of the effects of fly ash and mining soil on growth and antioxidant protection of two cultivars of Indian wild rice (Oryza nivara and Oryza rufipogon) for possible phytoremediation and restoration of metal-contaminated site. In this study, Indian wild rice showed significant changes in germination, growth, and biochemical parameters after exposure to different ratio of fly ash and mining soil with garden soil. There was significant reduction of germination, fresh weight, dry weight, leaf chlorophyll content, leaf area, Special Analysis Device Chlorophyll (SPAD) Index, proteins, and activities of antioxidant enzymes in both cultivars of the wild rice grown in 100% fly ash and mining soil compared to the plants grown in 100% garden soil. Results from this study showed that in both cultivars of wild rice, all growth and antioxidant parameters increased when grown in 50% fly ash and mining soil. Taken together, Indian wild rice has the capacity to tolerate 50% of fly ash and mining soil, and can be considered as a good candidate for possible phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

  2. Toxicity of sulfide to early life-stages of wild rice (Zizania palustris).

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Todhunter, Kevin; Fort, Troy D; Mathis, Michael B; Walker, Rachel; Hansel, Mike; Hall, Scott; Richards, Robin; Anderson, Kurt

    2017-02-07

    Wild rice (Zizania palustris) sensitivity to sulfide is not well understood. Since sulfate in surface waters is reduced to sulfide by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and historical information indicated that 10 mg/L sulfate in Minnesota surface water reduced Z. palustris abundance, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) established 10 mg/L sulfate as a water quality criterion in 1973. A 21-day daily-renewal hydroponic study was conducted to evaluate sulfide toxicity to wild rice and the potential mitigation of sulfide toxicity by Fe. The hydroponic design used hypoxic test media for seed and root exposure and aerobic headspace for the vegetative portion of the plant. Test concentrations were 0.3, 1.6, 3.1, 7.8, and 12.5 mg/L sulfide in test media with 0.8, 2.8, and 10.8 mg/L total Fe used to evaluate the impact of iron on sulfide toxicity. Visual assessments (i.e., no plants harvested) of seed activation, mesocotyl emergence, seedling survival, and phytoxicity were conducted 10 days following dark-phase exposure. Each treatment was also evaluated for time to 30% emergence (ET30), total plant biomass, root and shoot lengths, and signs of phytotoxicity at study conclusion (21 days). Results from this study indicated that exposure of developing wild rice to sulfide at ≥3.1 mg sulfide/L in the presence of 0.8 mg/L iron reduced mesocotyl emergence. Sulfide toxicity was mitigated by the addition of iron at 2.8 and 10.8 mg /L relative to the control value of 0.8 mg Fe/L, demonstrating the importance of iron in mitigating sulfide toxicity to wild rice. Ultimately, determination of site-specific sulfate criteria that consider factors that alter toxicity, including sediment Fe and organic carbon, are necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics and structure of the rice blast resistance locus Pi-ta in wild, cultivated, and US weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice has been used to control rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryza, in rice growing areas worldwide for decades. To understand the evolutionary process and natural selection of Pi-ta during rice domestication, we first examined sequences of the genomic region of Pi-ta in geograph...

  4. Arteriviruses, Pegiviruses, and Lentiviruses Are Common among Wild African Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Ghai, Ria R.; Nelson, Chase W.; Heimbruch, Katelyn; Hughes, Austin L.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Jasinska, Anna J.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are a historically important source of zoonotic viruses and are a gold-standard model for research on many human pathogens. However, with the exception of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (family Retroviridae), the blood-borne viruses harbored by these animals in the wild remain incompletely characterized. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of two novel simian pegiviruses (family Flaviviridae) and two novel simian arteriviruses (family Arteriviridae) in wild African green monkeys from Zambia (malbroucks [Chlorocebus cynosuros]) and South Africa (vervet monkeys [Chlorocebus pygerythrus]). We examine several aspects of infection, including viral load, genetic diversity, evolution, and geographic distribution, as well as host factors such as age, sex, and plasma cytokines. In combination with previous efforts to characterize blood-borne RNA viruses in wild primates across sub-Saharan Africa, these discoveries demonstrate that in addition to SIV, simian pegiviruses and simian arteriviruses are widespread and prevalent among many African cercopithecoid (i.e., Old World) monkeys. IMPORTANCE Primates are an important source of viruses that infect humans and serve as an important laboratory model of human virus infection. Here, we discover two new viruses in African green monkeys from Zambia and South Africa. In combination with previous virus discovery efforts, this finding suggests that these virus types are widespread among African monkeys. Our analysis suggests that one of these virus types, the simian arteriviruses, may have the potential to jump between different primate species and cause disease. In contrast, the other virus type, the pegiviruses, are thought to reduce the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in humans. However, we did not observe a similar protective effect in SIV-infected African monkeys coinfected with pegiviruses, possibly because SIV causes little to no disease in these hosts

  5. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  6. Signatures of adaptation in the weedy rice genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice is a common problem of by product of domestication that has evolved multiple times from cultivated and wild rice relatives. Here we use whole genome sequences to examine the origin and adaptation of the two major US weedy red rice strains, with a comparison to Chinese weedy red rice. We f...

  7. Characterization of seeds of selected wild species of rice (Oryza) stored under high temperature and humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Das, Smruti; Nayak, Monalisa; Patra, B C; Ramakrishnan, B; Krishnan, P

    2010-06-01

    Wild progenitors of rice (Oryza) are an invaluable resource for restoring genetic diversity and incorporating useful traits back into cultivars. Studies were conducted to characterize the biochemical changes, including SDS-PAGE banding pattern of storage proteins in seeds of six wild species (Oryza alta, O. grandiglumis, O. meridionalis, O. nivara, O. officinalis and O. rhizomatis) of rice stored under high temperature (45 degrees C) and humidity (approixmately 100%) for 15 days, which facilitated accelerated deterioration. Under the treated conditions, seeds of different wild rice species showed decrease in per cent germination and concentrations of protein and starch, but increase in conductivity of leachate and content of sugar. The SDS-PAGE analysis of seed proteins showed that not only the total number of bands, but also their intensity in terms of thickness differed for each species under storage. The total number of bands ranged from 11 to 22, but none of the species showed all the bands. Similarity index for protein bands between the control and treated seeds was observed to be least in O. rhizomatis and O. alta, while the indices were 0.7 and 0.625 for O. officinalis and O. nivara, respectively. This study clearly showed that seed deterioration led to distinctive biochemical changes, including the presence or absence as well as altered levels of intensity of proteins. Hence, SDS-PAGE protein banding pattern can be used effectively to characterize deterioration of seeds of different wild species of rice.

  8. Greenhouse validation of yield component transgressive variation effects of wild Oryza species introgressions in an elite US rice cultivar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of global studies have been conducted which have shown that the wild ancestral species, Oryza rufipogon, possesses beneficial alleles that can be used to improve cultivated rice, O. sativa, for biotic and abiotic stress tolerance as well as yield. Introgression lines (IL) were developed thr...

  9. Research on the ultrafast fluorescence property of thylakoid membranes of the wild-type and mutant rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhao-Yu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shui-Cai; Xin, Yue-Yong; He, Jun-Fang; Hou, Xun

    2003-10-01

    A high yielding rice variety mutant (Oryza sativa L., Zhenhui 249) with low chlorophyll b (Chl b) has been discovered in natural fields. It has a quality character controlled by a pair of recessive genes (nuclear gene). The partial loss of Chl b in content affects the efficiency of light harvest in a light harvest complex (LHC), thus producing the difference of the exciting energy transfer and the efficiency of photochemistry conversion between the mutant and wild-type rice in photosynthetic unit. The efficiency of utilizing light energy is higher in the mutant than that in the wild-type rice relatively. For further discussion of the above-mentioned difference and learning about the mechanism of the increase in the photochemical efficiency of the mutant, the pico-second resolution fluorescence spectrum measurement with delay-frame-scanning single photon counting technique is adopted. Thylakoid membranes of the mutant and the wild-type rice are excited by an Ar+ laser with a pulse width of 120 ps, repetition rate of 4 MHz and wavelength of 514 nm. Compared with the time and spectrum property of exciting fluorescence, conclusions of those ultrafast dynamic experiments are: 1) The speeds of the exciting energy transferred in photo-system I are faster than that in photo-system II in both samples. 2) The speeds of the exciting energy transfer of mutant sample are faster than those of the wild-type. This might be one of the major reasons why the efficiency of photosynthesis is higher in mutant than that in the wild-type rice.

  10. Evidence for divergence of response in Indica, Japonica, and wild rice to high CO2 × temperature interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diane R; Bunce, James A; Tomecek, Martha B; Gealy, David; McClung, Anna; McCouch, Susan R; Ziska, Lewis H

    2016-07-01

    High CO2 and high temperature have an antagonistic interaction effect on rice yield potential and present a unique challenge to adapting rice to projected future climates. Understanding how the differences in response to these two abiotic variables are partitioned across rice germplasm accessions may be key to identifying potentially useful sources of resilient alleles for adapting rice to climate change. In this study, we evaluated eleven globally diverse rice accessions under controlled conditions at two carbon dioxide concentrations (400 and 600 ppm) and four temperature environments (29 °C day/21 °C night; 29 °C day/21 °C night with additional heat stress at anthesis; 34 °C day/26 °C night; and 34 °C day/26 °C night with additional heat stress at anthesis) for a suite of traits including five yield components, five growth characteristics, one phenological trait, and four photosynthesis-related measurements. Multivariate analyses of mean trait data from these eight treatments divide our rice panel into two primary groups consistent with the genetic classification of INDICA/INDICA-like and JAPONICA populations. Overall, we find that the productivity of plants grown under elevated [CO2 ] was more sensitive (negative response) to high temperature stress compared with that of plants grown under ambient [CO2 ] across this diversity panel. We report differential response to CO2 × temperature interaction for INDICA/INDICA-like and JAPONICA rice accessions and find preliminary evidence for the beneficial introduction of exotic alleles into cultivated rice genomic background. Overall, these results support the idea of using wild or currently unadapted gene pools in rice to enhance breeding efforts to secure future climate change adaptation.

  11. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Wild Rice (Oryza minuta) and Its Comparison to Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul L.; Khan, Muhammad A.; Kang, Sang-Mo; Imran, Qari M.; Shahzad, Raheem; Bilal, Saqib; Yun, Byung-Wook; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Oryza minuta, a tetraploid wild relative of cultivated rice (family Poaceae), possesses a BBCC genome and contains genes that confer resistance to bacterial blight (BB) and white-backed (WBPH) and brown (BPH) plant hoppers. Based on the importance of this wild species, this study aimed to understand the phylogenetic relationships of O. minuta with other Oryza species through an in-depth analysis of the composition and diversity of the chloroplast (cp) genome. The analysis revealed a cp genome size of 135,094 bp with a typical quadripartite structure and consisting of a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, 139 representative genes, and 419 randomly distributed microsatellites. The genomic organization, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to those of typical angiosperm cp genomes. Approximately 30 forward, 28 tandem and 20 palindromic repeats were detected in the O. minuta cp genome. Comparison of the complete O. minuta cp genome with another eleven Oryza species showed a high degree of sequence similarity and relatively high divergence of intergenic spacers. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted based on the complete genome sequence, 65 shared genes and matK gene showed same topologies and O. minuta forms a single clade with parental O. punctata. Thus, the complete O. minuta cp genome provides interesting insights and valuable information that can be used to identify related species and reconstruct its phylogeny. PMID:28326093

  12. A gene block causing cross-incompatibility hidden in wild and cultivated rice.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Kazuki; Khin-Thidar; Sano, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    Unidirectional cross-incompatibility was detected in advanced generations of backcrossing between wild (Oryza rufipogon) and cultivated (O. sativa) rice strains. The near-isogenic line (NIL) of T65wx (Japonica type) carrying an alien segment of chromosome 6 from a wild strain gave a reduced seed setting only when crossed with T65wx as the male. Cytological observations showed that abortion of hybrid seeds occurred as a consequence of a failure of early endosperm development followed by abnormalities in embryo development. The genetic basis of cross-incompatibility reactions in the female and male was investigated by testcrosses using recombinant inbred lines (RILs) that were established through dissecting the introgressed segments of wild and cultivated (Indica type) strains. The results revealed that the cross-incompatibility reaction was controlled by Cif in the female and by cim in the male. When the female plant with Cif was crossed with the male plant with cim, a failure of early endosperm development was observed in the hybrid zygotes. Among cultivars of O. sativa, cim was distributed predominantly in the Japonica type but not in the Indica type. In addition, a dominant suppressor, Su-Cif, which changes the reaction in the female from incompatible to compatible was proposed to present near the centromere of chromosome 6 of the Indica type. Further, the death of young F(1) zygotes was controlled by the parental genotypes rather than by the genotype of the hybrid zygote itself since all three genes acted sporophytically, which strongly suggests an involvement of parent-of-origin effects. We discuss the results in relation to the origin of a crossing barrier as well as their maintenance within the primary gene pool. PMID:14504241

  13. A Tribal Story Written in Silica: Using Phytoliths to Research the Effects of Mining on Past Wild Rice (Zizania palustris) Abundance in Sandy Lake, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, I. R.; Jones, M. A.; Yost, C. L.; Drake, C.; Ladwig, J. L.; Myrbo, A.; Howes, T.

    2014-12-01

    Wild rice (Zizania palustris, manoomin) is an emergent aquatic plant that grows annually in the northern Great Lakes region of North America. This region is also rich in iron ore deposits and correspondingly has an extensive history of mining activities. Wild rice no longer grows in some areas where it was previously abundant. Sandy Lake, located in St. Louis County on federally protected lands that are ceded territory of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Minnesota and downstream of the nearby U.S. Steel Minntac mine, was selected as a test site. This lake has a history of ricing activities by the Ojibwe (Chippewa) People, for whom manoomin has cultural importance. Lake cores were taken on June 17, 2014 by LacCore and FDLRM staff and samples were obtained. This project used phytolith analysis to answer the question of past wild rice presence and abundance in Sandy Lake. Phytoliths are microscopic opal silica deposits produced in some plants. Zizania palustris produces phytolith morphotypes that are unequivocally diagnostic of this species in this region. Microscopic slides were prepared and analyzed for wild rice phytoliths. Concentration values ranged from 25 to 4379 phytoliths per cm3/year, and wild rice accumulation figures ranged from 7 to 789 phytoliths/cm2/year, the maximum values of which occurred in the 1920s and generally declined to the current lowest levels observed. Mining has likely impacted wild rice populations by causing increased sulfate levels and possibly contributing to higher lake levels.

  14. Mechanisms of resistance in wild riceOryza brachyantha to rice leaffolderCnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, R; Khan, Z R

    1991-01-01

    A wild rice,Oryza brachyantha, was rated as highly resistant to rice leaffolder,Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée), while its F1 hybrid from a cross with a high-yielding, leaffolder-susceptible rice, IR31917-45-3-2, was rated resistant in a standard screening test. In comparison with IR31917-45-3-2,O. brachyantha and the F1 hybrid were unsuitable for oviposition, survival, and growth ofC. medinalis. However, growth and survival of larvae in artificial diets containing lyophilized leaf powder of IR31917-45-3-2 andO. brachyantha were comparable. Studies on the feeding and settling preference of the larval stages suggested that the mechanism of resistance ofO. brachyantha is that of antixenosis type. Olfactometer tests with first-instar larvae and electroantennogram responses of adults indicated a lack or low levels of volatile attractants inO. brachyantha and the F1 hybrid in comparison with IR31917-45-3-2. Bioassays of sequential solvent extracts of these plants indicated that larval preference for IR31917-45-3-2 and nonpreference forO. brachyantha and the F1 hybrid were due partly to chemical factors present in hexane and methylene chloride extractables. Closer arrangement of silica cells in the epidermal layer ofO. brachyantha and a higher mandibular wear in larvae reared onO. brachyantha suggested that physical resistance due to silica may be an additional cause of resistance. It was hypothesized that the high levels of resistance observed inO. brachyantha may be due to an additive or synergistic action of the absence of attractants or feeding stimulants, the presence of deterrents, and the physical resistance offered by silica. The significance of these results to a successful wide hybridization program aimed at transferring resistance factors from wild rice to cultivated rice is discussed.

  15. The biosynthesis, structure and gelatinization properties of starches from wild and cultivated African rice species (Oryza barthii and Oryza glaberrima).

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wambugu, Peterson W; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Alex Chi; Henry, Robert J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2015-09-20

    The molecular structure and gelatinization properties of starches from domesticated African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and its wild progenitor (Oryza barthii) are determined and comparison made with Asian domesticated rice (Oryza sativa), the commonest commercial rice. This suggests possible enzymatic processes contributing to the unique traits of the African varieties. These have similar starch structures, including smaller amylose molecules, but larger amounts of amylose chains across the whole amylose chain-length distribution, and higher amylose contents, than O. sativa. They also show a higher proportion of two- and three-lamellae spanning amylopectin branch chains (degree of polymerization 34-100) than O. sativa, which contributes to their higher gelatinization temperatures. Fitting amylopectin chain-length distribution with a biosynthesis-based mathematical model suggests that the reason for this difference might be because O. glaberrima and O. barthii have more active SSIIIa and/or less active SBEIIb enzymes.

  16. Lowered Diversity and Increased Inbreeding Depression within Peripheral Populations of Wild Rice Oryza rufipogon

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li-Zhi; Gao, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background The distribution of genetic variability from the interior towards the periphery of a species’ range is of great interest to evolutionary biologists. Although it has been long presumed that population genetic variation should decrease as a species’ range is approached, results of empirical investigations still remain ambiguous. Knowledge regarding patterns of genetic variability as well as affected factors is particularly not conclusive in plants. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine genetic divergence in peripheral populations of the wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. from China, genetic diversity and population structure were studied in five northern & northeastern peripheral and 16 central populations using six microsatellite loci. We found that populations resided at peripheries of the species possessed markedly decreased microsatellite diversity than those located in its center. Population size was observed to be positively correlated with microsatellite diversity. Moreover, there are significantly positive correlations between levels of microsatellite diversity and distances from the northern and northeastern periphery of this species. To investigate genetic structure and heterozygosity variation between generations of O. rufipogon, a total of 2382 progeny seeds from 186 maternal families were further assayed from three peripheral and central populations, respectively. Peripheral populations exhibited significantly lower levels of heterozygosities than central populations for both seed and maternal generations. In comparisons with maternal samples, significantly low observed heterozygosity (HO) and high heterozygote deficit within populations (FIS) values were detected in seed samples from both peripheral and central populations. Significantly lower observed heterozygosity (HO) and higher FIS values were further observed in peripheral populations than those in central populations for seed samples. The results indicate an excess of

  17. Selection pressures have driven population differentiation of domesticated and wild common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, L H; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Dong, Z J; Ma, Y Q; Yang, X X

    2012-09-12

    Selection pressures are the principle evolutionary forces for the genetic differentiation of populations. Recent changes in selection pressures on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite have been described in a wide variety of organisms. The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) has experienced strong selection pressure, in particular artificial selection, during its domestication. However, the contribution and extent of artificial selection in driving genome-wide population differentiation remain unclear. We investigated the genetic differentiation of 4 domesticated strains (Xingguo red common carp, Glass red common carp, Purse red common carp, and Jian common carp, which have been generated by artificial selection since 1970s) and 2 wild populations (Shishou section in Hubei and Yangzhou section in Jiangsu of the Yangtze River) of common carp in China by sequencing the mitochondrial DNA D-loop and by genotyping 10 microsatellite loci. It was found that the domesticated strains exhibited linkage disequilibrium within the population and less genetic variability, higher inbreeding coefficients (F(IS) = 0.101 vs 0.038), and higher genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.087 vs 0.001) than the wild populations, which indicates strong selection pressures in the process of domestication. Of the 10 loci, 5 appeared to be under positive directional selection in the domesticated strains, and all 10 loci in wild populations were potentially under balancing selection. We conclude that strong selection pressures, artificial selection in particular, have caused genetic differentiation between populations of domesticated and wild common carp.

  18. Identification of neutral genes at pollen sterility loci Sd and Se of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) with wild rice (O. rufipogon) origin.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Li, J Q; Liu, X D; Shahid, M Q; Shi, L G; Lu, Y G

    2011-10-31

    Pollen sterility is one of the main hindrances against the utilization of strong intersubspecific (indica-japonica) heterosis in rice. We looked for neutral alleles at known pollen sterility loci Sd and Se that could overcome this pollen sterility characteristic. Taichung 65, a typical japonica cultivar, and its near isogenic lines E7 and E8 for pollen sterility loci Sd and Se were employed as tester lines for crossing with 13 accessions of wild rice (O. rufipogon). Pollen fertility and genotypic segregations of the molecular markers tightly linked with Sd and Se loci were analyzed in the paired F(1)s and F(2) populations. One accession of wild rice (GZW054) had high pollen fertility in the paired F(1)s between Taichung 65 and E7 or E8. Genotypic segregations of the molecular markers tightly linked with Sd and Se loci fit the expected Mendelian ratio (1:2:1), and non-significances were shown among the mean pollen fertilities with the maternal, parental, and heterozygous genotypes of each molecular markers tightly linked with Sd and Se loci. Evidentially, it indicated that the alleles of Sd and Se loci for GZW054 did not interact with those of Taichung 65 and its near isogenic lines, and, thus were identified as neutral alleles Sd(n) and Se(n). These neutral genes could become important germplasm resources for overcoming pollen sterility in indica-japonica hybrids, making utilization of strong heterosis in such hybrids viable.

  19. Drought stress-induced compositional changes in tolerant transgenic rice and its wild type.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Do-Young; Shin, Hee Jae; Nam, Ki Jung; An, Joo Hee; Pack, In-Soon; Park, Jung-Ho; Jeong, Soon-Chun; Kim, Ho Bang; Kim, Chang-Gi

    2014-06-15

    Comparing well-watered versus deficit conditions, we evaluated the chemical composition of grains harvested from wild-type (WT) and drought-tolerant, transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.). The latter had been developed by inserting AtCYP78A7, which encodes a cytochrome P450 protein. Two transgenic Lines, '10B-5' and '18A-4', and the 'Hwayoung' WT were grown under a rainout shelter. After the harvested grains were polished, their levels of key components, including proximates, amino acids, fatty acids, minerals and vitamins were analysed to determine the effect of watering system and genotype. Drought treatment significantly influenced the levels of some nutritional components in both transgenic and WT grains. In particular, the amounts of lignoceric acid and copper in the WT decreased by 12.6% and 39.5%, respectively, by drought stress, whereas those of copper and potassium in the transgenics rose by 88.1-113.3% and 10.4-11.9%, respectively, under water-deficit conditions.

  20. Ultrastructure of the wild rice Oryza grandiglumis (Gramineae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ethel; Quesada, Tania; Espinoza, Ana M

    2006-06-01

    Oryza grandiglumis is a wild species of rice endemic to tropical America. This species was first found in 1998 in the wetlands of Caño Negro, located in the northern part of Costa Rica. Twenty five plants of O. grandiglumis were processed for scanning electron microscope. An ultrastructural description of the leaf blade, ligule, auricles, spikelet and caryopsis, with an emphasis on structures of taxonomic value. The leaf blade has a characteristic cuticular wax pattern, composed of dense rod-like structures, and is surrounded by papillae, zipper-like silica cells, abundant bulky prickle trichomes, and hooked trichomes. The blade's edge has three rows of hooked prickle trichomes of various sizes. The auricles wrapped the culm, with long attenuated trichomes at the edges; the base was surrounded by oblong cells. The ligule is a blunt membrane covered by short prickle trichomes. Spikelet morphology is characteristic of the Poaceae family, but the sterile lemmas were nearly as long as the fertile lemmas, and they have an unique crown-like structure of lignified spines between the rachilla and the fertile lemmas. Comparison with Brazilian specimens of O. grandiglumis revealed little differences in the ultrastructural characteristics.

  1. Genetic architecture for the adaptive origin of annual wild rice, oryza nivara.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Michael A; Li, Changbao; Fowlkes, Angela M; Briggeman, Trevor M; Zhou, Ailing; Schemske, Douglas W; Sang, Tao

    2009-04-01

    The wild progenitors of cultivated rice, Oryza nivara and Oryza rufipogon, provide an experimental system for characterizing the genetic basis of adaptation. The evolution of annual O. nivara from a perennial ancestor resembling its sister species, O. rufipogon, was associated with an ecological shift from persistently wet to seasonally dry habitats. Here we report a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of phenotypic differentiation in life history, mating system, and flowering time between O. nivara and O. rufipogon. The exponential distribution of effect sizes of QTL fits the prediction of a recently proposed population genetic model of adaptation. More than 80% of QTL alleles of O. nivara acted in the same direction of phenotypic evolution, suggesting that they were fixed under directional selection. The loss of photoperiod sensitivity, which might be essential to the survival of the ancestral populations of O. nivara in the new environment, was controlled by QTL of relatively large effect. Mating system evolution from cross- to self-fertilization through the modification of panicle and floral morphology was controlled by QTL of small-to-moderate effect. The lack of segregation of the recessive annual habit in the F(2) mapping populations suggested that the evolution of annual from perennial life form had a complex genetic basis. The study captured the genetic architecture for the adaptive origin of O. nivara and provides a foundation for rigorous experimental tests of population genetic theories of adaptation.

  2. Preimpoundment water quality of the Wild Rice River, Norman County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Water samples have been collected at two sites on the Wild Rice River since September 1974 to establish baseline water-quality characteristics before construction of a reservoir for recreation and flood control near Twin Valley, Minn. A decline in water quality between the sites is shown by mean total phosphorus concentrations, which increase from 0.06 to 0.10 milligram per liter downstream, and mean turbidity, which increases from 12 to 24 units downstream. Phosphorus and ammonia concentrations, as high as 0.31 and 2.7 milligrams per liter, respectively, could be the result of domestic waste input to the river upstream from Hendrum. Biochemical oxygen demand concentrations were significantly higher during spring runoff than during the rest of the year. Four out of 90 bacteria samples taken at Twin Valley indicate the presence of human fecal material, though bacteria densities do not exceed recommendations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for public-water supplies. The dominace of organic-pollution tolerant phytoplankton in 49 out of 78 samples also indicates degradation of the river quality at Twin Valley. Nutrient concentrations at Twin Valley have no apparent effect on phytoplankton concentrations. None of the consitituents sampled were found to exceed recommended concentrations for public-water supplies.

  3. Are common symbiosis genes required for endophytic rice-rhizobial interactions?

    PubMed

    Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Hongyan

    2013-09-01

    Legume plants are able to establish root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, called rhizobia. Recent studies revealed that the root nodule symbiosis has co-opted the signaling pathway that mediates the ancestral mycorrhizal symbiosis that occurs in most land plants. Despite being unable to induce nodulation, rhizobia have been shown to be able to infect and colonize the roots of non-legumes such as rice. One fascinating question is whether establishment of such associations requires the common symbiosis (Sym) genes that are essential for infection of plant cells by mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia in legumes. Here, we demonstrated that the common Sym genes are not required for endophytic colonization of rice roots by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia.

  4. Fine mapping and characterization of BPH27, a brown planthopper resistance gene from wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    PubMed

    Huang, D; Qiu, Y; Zhang, Y; Huang, F; Meng, J; Wei, S; Li, R; Chen, B

    2013-01-01

    The brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stål; BPH) is one of the most serious rice pests worldwide. Growing resistant varieties is the most effective way to manage this insect, and wild rice species are a valuable source of resistance genes for developing resistant cultivars. BPH27 derived from an accession of Guangxi wild rice, Oryza rufipogon Griff. (Accession no. 2183, hereafter named GX2183), was primarily mapped to a 17-cM region on the long arm of the chromosome four. In this study, fine mapping of BPH27 was conducted using two BC(1)F(2) populations derived from introgression lines of GX2183. Insect resistance was evaluated in the BC(1)F(2) populations with 6,010 individual offsprings, and 346 resistance extremes were obtained and employed for fine mapping of BPH27. High-resolution linkage analysis defined the BPH27 locus to an 86.3-kb region in Nipponbare. Regarding the sequence information of rice cultivars, Nipponbare and 93-11, all predicted open reading frames (ORFs) in the fine-mapping region have been annotated as 11 types of proteins, and three ORFs encode disease-related proteins. Moreover, the average BPH numbers showed significant differences in 96-120 h after release in comparisons between the preliminary near-isogenic lines (pre-NILs, lines harboring resistance genes) and BaiR54. BPH growth and development were inhibited and survival rates were lower in the pre-NIL plants compared with the recurrent parent BaiR54. The pre-NIL exhibited 50.7% reductions in population growth rates (PGR) compared to BaiR54. The new development in fine mapping of BPH27 will facilitate the efforts to clone this important resistant gene and to use it in BPH-resistance rice breeding.

  5. A Dichotomous Key for the Identification of Common British Wild Flower Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Piers

    2004-01-01

    This article argues the need for, and provides, a dichotomous single access key for the identification of common British wild flower families. A minimum of technical vocabulary is used while at the same time retaining most of the recent botanical names of families. The key provides a user-friendly opportunity for school pupils to become familiar…

  6. Coordination of Leaf Photosynthesis, Transpiration, and Structural Traits in Rice and Wild Relatives (Genus Oryza).

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Rita; Koteyeva, Nuria; Voznesenskaya, Elena; Evans, Marc A; Cousins, Asaph B; Edwards, Gerald E

    2013-07-01

    The genus Oryza, which includes rice (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) and wild relatives, is a useful genus to study leaf properties in order to identify structural features that control CO(2) access to chloroplasts, photosynthesis, water use efficiency, and drought tolerance. Traits, 26 structural and 17 functional, associated with photosynthesis and transpiration were quantified on 24 accessions (representatives of 17 species and eight genomes). Hypotheses of associations within, and between, structure, photosynthesis, and transpiration were tested. Two main clusters of positively interrelated leaf traits were identified: in the first cluster were structural features, leaf thickness (Thick(leaf)), mesophyll (M) cell surface area exposed to intercellular air space per unit of leaf surface area (S(mes)), and M cell size; a second group included functional traits, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, M conductance to CO(2) diffusion (g(m)), stomatal conductance to gas diffusion (g(s)), and the g(m)/g(s) ratio.While net photosynthetic rate was positively correlated with gm, neither was significantly linked with any individual structural traits. The results suggest that changes in gm depend on covariations of multiple leaf (S(mes)) and M cell (including cell wall thickness) structural traits. There was an inverse relationship between Thick(leaf) and transpiration rate and a significant positive association between Thick(leaf) and leaf transpiration efficiency. Interestingly, high g(m) together with high g(m)/g(s) and a low S(mes)/g(m) ratio (M resistance to CO(2) diffusion per unit of cell surface area exposed to intercellular air space) appear to be ideal for supporting leaf photosynthesis while preserving water; in addition, thick M cell walls may be beneficial for plant drought tolerance.

  7. Allelic diversification at the C (OsC1) locus of wild and cultivated rice: nucleotide changes associated with phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kumi; Onishi, Kazumitsu; Mikami, Ichiho; Thidar, Khin; Sano, Yoshio

    2004-10-01

    Divergent phenotypes are often detected in domesticated plants despite the existence of invariant phenotypes in their wild forms. One such example in rice is the occurrence of varying degrees of apiculus coloration due to anthocyanin pigmentation, which was previously reported to be caused by a series of alleles at the C locus. The present study reveals, on the basis of comparison of its maps, that the C gene appears to be the rice homolog (OsC1) of maize C1, which belongs to the group of R2R3-Myb factors. Two different types of deletions causing a frameshift were detected in the third exon, and both of the deleted nucleotides corresponded to the positions of putative base-contacting residues, suggesting that the Indica and Japonica types carry loss-of-function mutations with independent origins. In addition, replacement substitutions were frequently detected in OsC1 of strains carrying the previously defined C alleles. Molecular population analysis revealed that 17 haplotypes were found in 39 wild and cultivated rices, and the haplotypes of most cultivated forms could be classified into one of three distinct groups, with few shared haplotypes among taxa, including Indica and Japonica types. The genealogy of the OsC1 gene suggests that allelic diversification causing phenotypic change might have resulted from mutations in the coding region rather than from recombination between preexisting alleles. The McDonald and Kreitman test revealed that the changes in amino acids might be associated with selective forces acting on the lineage of group A whose haplotypes were carried by most Asian cultivated forms. The results regarding a significant implication for genetic diversity in landraces of rice are also discussed.

  8. Analysis of suspended-sediment concentrations and radioisotope levels in the Wild Rice River basin, northwestern Minnesota, 1973-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Mark E.; McCullough, Carolyn J.; Wilkinson, Philip M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined historical suspended-sediment data and activities of fallout radioisotopes (lead-210 [210Pb], cesium-137 [137Cs], and beryllium-7 [7Be]) associated with suspended sediments and source-area sediments (cultivated soils, bank material, and reference soils) in the Wild Rice River Basin, a tributary to the Red River of the North, to better understand sources of suspended sediment to streams in the region. Multiple linear regression analysis of suspended-sediment concentrations from the Wild Rice River at Twin Valley, Minnesota indicated significant relations between suspended-sediment concentrations and streamflow. Flow-adjusted sediment concentrations tended to be slightly higher in spring than summer-autumn. No temporal trends in concentration were observed during 1973-98. The fallout radioisotopes were nearly always detectable in suspended sediments during spring-summer 1998. Mean 210Pb and 7Be activities in suspended sediment and surficial, cultivated soils were similar, perhaps indicating little dilution of suspended sediment from low-isotopic-activity bank sediments. In contrast, mean 137Cs activities in suspended sediment indicated a mixture of sediment originating from eroded soils and from eroded bank material, with bank material being a somewhat more important source upstream of Twin Valley, Minnesota; and approximately equal fractions of bank material and surficial soils contributing to the suspended load downstream at Hendrum, Minnesota. This study indicates that, to be effective, efforts to reduce sediment loading to the Wild Rice River should include measures to control soil erosion from cultivated fields.

  9. Transcriptome analysis confers a complex disease resistance network in wild rice Oryza meyeriana against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Jie; He, Bin; Chen, Lin; Xiao, Su-qin; Fu, Jian; Chen, Yue; Yu, Teng-qiong; Cheng, Zai-Quan; Feng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight (BB), caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the devastating diseases of rice. It is well established that the wild rice Oryza meyeriana is immune to BB. In this study, the transcriptomic analysis was carried out by RNA sequencing of O. meyeriana leaves, inoculated with Xoo to understand the transcriptional responses and interaction between the host and pathogen. Totally, 57,313 unitranscripts were de novo assembled from 58.7 Gb clean reads and 14,143 unitranscripts were identified after Xoo inoculation. The significant metabolic pathways related to the disease resistance enriched by KEGG, were revealed to plant-pathogen interaction, phytohormone signaling, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Further, many disease resistance genes were also identified to be differentially expressed in response to Xoo infection. Conclusively, the present study indicated that the induced innate immunity comprise the basal defence frontier of O. meyeriana against Xoo infection. And then, the resistance genes are activated. Simultaneously, the other signaling transduction pathways like phytohormones and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis may contribute to the disease defence through modulation of the disease-related genes or pathways. This could be an useful information for further investigating the molecular mechanism associated with disease resistance in O. meyeriana. PMID:27905546

  10. Transcriptome analysis confers a complex disease resistance network in wild rice Oryza meyeriana against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-Jie; He, Bin; Chen, Lin; Xiao, Su-Qin; Fu, Jian; Chen, Yue; Yu, Teng-Qiong; Cheng, Zai-Quan; Feng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Rice bacterial blight (BB), caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the devastating diseases of rice. It is well established that the wild rice Oryza meyeriana is immune to BB. In this study, the transcriptomic analysis was carried out by RNA sequencing of O. meyeriana leaves, inoculated with Xoo to understand the transcriptional responses and interaction between the host and pathogen. Totally, 57,313 unitranscripts were de novo assembled from 58.7 Gb clean reads and 14,143 unitranscripts were identified after Xoo inoculation. The significant metabolic pathways related to the disease resistance enriched by KEGG, were revealed to plant-pathogen interaction, phytohormone signaling, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Further, many disease resistance genes were also identified to be differentially expressed in response to Xoo infection. Conclusively, the present study indicated that the induced innate immunity comprise the basal defence frontier of O. meyeriana against Xoo infection. And then, the resistance genes are activated. Simultaneously, the other signaling transduction pathways like phytohormones and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis may contribute to the disease defence through modulation of the disease-related genes or pathways. This could be an useful information for further investigating the molecular mechanism associated with disease resistance in O. meyeriana.

  11. Memory, transmission and persistence of alternative foraging techniques in wild common marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Gunhold, Tina; Massen, Jorg J.M.; Schiel, Nicola; Souto, Antonio; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies on traditions in animals have focused almost entirely on the initial transmission phase in captive populations. We conducted an open diffusion field experiment with 13 groups of wild common marmosets, Callithrix jacchus. Seven groups contained individuals that were already familiar with the task (‘push or pull’ box) and thus served as potential models for naïve individuals. Additionally, in four groups one individual was trained for one of the two possible techniques and in two control groups no skilled individuals were present. First, we investigated whether experienced individuals would remember how to solve the task even after 2 years without exposure and whether they would still prefer their learned technique. Second, we tested whether naïve individuals would learn socially from their skilled family members and, more importantly, whether they would use the same technique. Third, we conducted several test blocks to see whether the individual and/or group behaviour would persist over time. Our results show that wild common marmosets were able to memorize, learn socially and maintain preferences of foraging techniques. This field experiment thus reveals a promising approach to studying social learning in the wild and provides the basis for long-term studies on tradition formation. PMID:24910466

  12. Severity of Bovine Tuberculosis Is Associated with Co-Infection with Common Pathogens in Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Risco, David; Serrano, Emmanuel; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M.; Gonçalves, Pilar; García-Jiménez, Waldo L.; Martínez, Remigio; Cerrato, Rosario; Velarde, Roser; Gómez, Luis; Segalés, Joaquím; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa), a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes), or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs), was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures under

  13. Severity of bovine tuberculosis is associated with co-infection with common pathogens in wild boar.

    PubMed

    Risco, David; Serrano, Emmanuel; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M; Gonçalves, Pilar; García-Jiménez, Waldo L; Martínez, Remigio; Cerrato, Rosario; Velarde, Roser; Gómez, Luis; Segalés, Joaquím; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa), a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes), or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs), was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures under

  14. Insight into the salt tolerance factors of a wild halophytic rice, Porteresia coarctata: a physiological and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sonali; Majumder, Arun Lahiri

    2009-03-01

    Salinity poses a serious threat to yield performance of cultivated rice in South Asian countries. To understand the mechanism of salt-tolerance of the wild halophytic rice, Porteresia coarctata in contrast to the salt-sensitive domesticated rice Oryza sativa, we have compared P. coarctata with the domesticated O. sativa rice varieties under salinity stress with respect to several physiological parameters and changes in leaf protein expression. P. coarctata showed a better growth performance and biomass under salinity stress. Relative water content was conserved in Porteresia during stress and sodium ion accumulation in leaves was comparatively lesser. Scanning electron microscopy revealed presence of two types of salt hairs on two leaf surfaces, each showing a different behaviour under stress. High salt stress for prolonged period also revealed accumulation of extruded NaCl crystals on leaf surface. Changes induced in leaf proteins were studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent quantitative image analysis. Out of more than 700 protein spots reproducibly detected and analyzed, 60% spots showed significant changes under salinity. Many proteins showed steady patterns of up- or downregulation in response to salinity stress. Twenty protein spots were analyzed by MALDI-TOF, leading to identification of 16 proteins involved in osmolyte synthesis, photosystem functioning, RubisCO activation, cell wall synthesis and chaperone functions. We hypothesize that some of these proteins confer a physiological advantage on Porteresia under salinity, and suggest a pattern of salt tolerance strategies operative in salt-marsh grasses. In addition, such proteins may turn out to be potential targets for recombinant cloning and introgression in salt-sensitive plants.

  15. Characterization of Salinity Tolerance of Transgenic Rice Lines Harboring HsCBL8 of Wild Barley (Hordeum spontanum) Line from Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wanli; Chen, Tianlong; Hussain, Nazim; Zhang, Guoping; Jiang, Lixi

    2016-01-01

    Rice is more sensitive to salinity, particularly at its early vegetative and later productive stages. Wild plants growing in harsh environments such as wild barley from Qinghai-Tibet Plateau adapt to the adverse environment with allelic variations at the loci responsible for stressful environment, which could be used for rice genetic improvement. In this study, we overexpressed HsCBL8 encoding a calcium-sensor calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein in rice. The gene was isolated from XZ166, a wild-barley (Hordeum spontanum) line originated from Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. We found that XZ166 responded to high NaCl concentration (200 mM) with more HsCBL8 transcripts than CM72, a cultivated barley line known for salinity tolerance. XZ166 is significantly different from CM72 with nucleotide sequences at HsCBL8. The overexpression of HsCBL8 in rice resulted in significant improvement of water protection in vivo and plasma membrane, more proline accumulation, and a reduction of overall Na+ uptake but little change in K+ concentration in the plant tissues. Notably, HsCBL8 did not act on some genes downstream of the rice CBL family genes, suggesting an interesting interaction between HsCBL8 and unknown factors to be further investigated. PMID:27891136

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions, irrigation water use, and arsenic concentrations; a common thread in rice water management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice has historically been grown as a flooded crop in the United States. As competition for water resources has grown, there is interest in reducing water use in rice production so as to maintain a viable and sustainable rice industry into the future. An irrigation study was established in 2011 at ...

  17. Alteration of leaf metabolism in Bt-transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) and its wild type under insecticide stress.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Yuwei; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Zhen; Xu, Guowang

    2012-08-03

    Insecticide is always used to control the damage from pests, while the potential influence on plants is rarely known. Time-course metabolic changes of wild and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants after insecticide treatment were investigated by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A combined statistical strategy of 2-way ANOVA and multivariate analyses (principal component analysis and hierarchal cluster analysis) was performed to find the stress-associated effects. The results reveal that a wide range of metabolites were dynamically varied in both varieties as a response to insecticide, in multiple metabolic pathways, such as biosynthesis and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, TCA cycle, and the shikimate/phenylpropanoid pathway, and most of the changes were correlated with the exposure time and dependent on the variety. A set of stress defenses were activated, including phytohormone signaling pathway, antioxidant defense system, shikimate-mediated secondary metabolism, and so on. In particular, insecticide led to much stronger regulations of signaling molecules (salicylate and the precursor of jasmonate) and antioxidants (α-tocopherol and dehydroascorbate/ascorbate) in Bt-transgenic variety at the early stage. Our results demonstrated that the Bt-transgenic rice had a more acute and drastic response to insecticide stress than its non-transgenic counterpart in antioxidant system and signaling regulation.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polycistronic MicroRNAs in Cultivated and Wild Rice

    PubMed Central

    Baldrich, Patricia; Hsing, Yue-Ie Caroline; San Segundo, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that direct posttranscriptional gene silencing in eukaryotes. They are frequently clustered in the genomes of animals and can be independently transcribed or simultaneously transcribed into single polycistronic transcripts. Only a few miRNA clusters have been described in plants, and most of them are generated from independent transcriptional units. Here, we used a combination of bioinformatic tools and experimental analyses to discover new polycistronic miRNAs in rice. A genome-wide analysis of clustering patterns of MIRNA loci in the rice genome was carried out using a criterion of 3 kb as the maximal distance between two miRNAs. This analysis revealed 28 loci with the ability to form the typical hairpin structure of miRNA precursors in which 2 or more mature miRNAs mapped along the same structure. RT-PCR provided evidence for the polycistronic nature of seven miRNA precursors containing homologous or nonhomologous miRNA species. Polycistronic miRNAs and candidate polycistronic miRNAs are located across different rice chromosomes, except chromosome 12, and resided in both duplicated and nonduplicated chromosomal regions. Finally, most polycistronic and candidate polycistronic miRNAs showed a pattern of conservation in the genome of rice species with an AA genome. The diversity in the organization of MIR genes that are transcribed as polycistrons suggests a versatile mechanism for the control of gene expression in different biological processes and supports additional levels of complexity in miRNA functioning in plants. PMID:27190137

  19. Wild Rice-Marsh Rivers Subbasin, Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Twin Valley 6 Faith WMA Norman Co. 885.0 380.0 71 14443W26 Twin Valley PJ Dalby WMA Norman Co. 120.0 120.0 71 -14345W11 Twin Valley r-81 Neal WMA...Clearwater Co. 26.7 27.0 71 14438W07 SlrSimon Lake R Clearwater-26 WMA Clearwater Co. 14.3 14.0 71 14438W07 S. " Simon Lake ’, 38 Lower Rice WMA

  20. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli from common European wild bird species.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sebastian; Grobbel, Mirjam; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Goedecke, Andreas; Friedrich, Nicole D; Wieler, Lothar H; Ewers, Christa

    2010-07-29

    The emergence and spread of multiresistant bacteria in natural environments constitute a serious impact on animal and human health. To gain more insight into the role of wild birds as carriers and reservoir of multiresistant Escherichia coli we tested a broad spectrum of common European bird species for the occurrence of E. coli strains and their antimicrobial resistance by minimal inhibitory concentration testing and PCR analysis of several resistance genes. Nine of the 187 E. coli isolates (4.8%) exhibited multiresistant phenotypes including resistances against beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines and sulfonamides. By comparing avian E. coli resistance frequencies with frequencies known for E. coli isolated from livestock and companion animals analogous profiles were identified. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from synanthropic avian species as well as from birds of prey, waterfowl and passerines. By that, all these avian hosts are suggested to represent a considerable reservoir of resistant E. coli strains. Consequently wild birds might constitute a potential hazard to human and animal health by transmitting multiresistant strains to waterways and other environmental sources via their faecal deposits.

  1. Video demonstrations seed alternative problem-solving techniques in wild common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Gunhold, Tina; Whiten, Andrew; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Studies of social learning and tradition formation under field conditions have recently gained momentum, but suffer from the limited control of socio-ecological factors thought to be responsible for transmission patterns. The use of artificial visual stimuli is a potentially powerful tool to overcome some of these problems. Here, in a field experiment, we used video images of unfamiliar conspecifics performing virtual demonstrations of foraging techniques. We tested 12 family groups of wild common marmosets. Six groups received video demonstrations (footage of conspecifics either pulling a drawer open or pushing a lid upwards, in an 'artificial fruit'); the other six groups served as controls (exposed to a static image of a conspecific next to the fruit). Subjects in video groups were more manipulative and successful in opening the fruit than controls; they were also more likely to use the technique they had witnessed and thus could serve as live models for other family members. To our knowledge, this is the first study that used video demonstrations in the wild and demonstrated the potent force of social learning, even from unfamiliar conspecifics, under field conditions.

  2. qEMF3, a novel QTL for the early-morning flowering trait from wild rice, Oryza officinalis, to mitigate heat stress damage at flowering in rice, O. sativa.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Kambe, Takashi; Gannaban, Ritchel B; Miras, Monaliza A; Mendioro, Merlyn S; Simon, Eliza V; Lumanglas, Patrick D; Fujita, Daisuke; Takemoto-Kuno, Yoko; Takeuchi, Yoshinobu; Kaji, Ryota; Kondo, Motohiko; Kobayashi, Nobuya; Ogawa, Tsugufumi; Ando, Ikuo; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Ishimaru, Tsutomu

    2015-03-01

    A decline in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production caused by heat stress is one of the biggest concerns resulting from future climate change. Rice spikelets are most susceptible to heat stress at flowering. The early-morning flowering (EMF) trait mitigates heat-induced spikelet sterility at the flowering stage by escaping heat stress during the daytime. We attempted to develop near-isogenic lines (NILs) for EMF in the indica-type genetic background by exploiting the EMF locus from wild rice, O. officinalis (CC genome). A stable quantitative trait locus (QTL) for flower opening time (FOT) was detected on chromosome 3. A QTL was designated as qEMF3 and it shifted FOT by 1.5-2.0 h earlier for cv. Nanjing 11 in temperate Japan and cv. IR64 in the Philippine tropics. NILs for EMF mitigated heat-induced spikelet sterility under elevated temperature conditions completing flower opening before reaching 35°C, a general threshold value leading to spikelet sterility. Quantification of FOT of cultivars popular in the tropics and subtropics did not reveal the EMF trait in any of the cultivars tested, suggesting that qEMF3 has the potential to advance FOT of currently popular cultivars to escape heat stress at flowering under future hotter climates. This is the first report to examine rice with the EMF trait through marker-assisted breeding using wild rice as a genetic resource.

  3. qEMF3, a novel QTL for the early-morning flowering trait from wild rice, Oryza officinalis, to mitigate heat stress damage at flowering in rice, O. sativa

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Kambe, Takashi; Gannaban, Ritchel B.; Miras, Monaliza A.; Mendioro, Merlyn S.; Simon, Eliza V.; Lumanglas, Patrick D.; Fujita, Daisuke; Takemoto-Kuno, Yoko; Takeuchi, Yoshinobu; Kaji, Ryota; Kondo, Motohiko; Kobayashi, Nobuya; Ogawa, Tsugufumi; Ando, Ikuo; Jagadish, Krishna S. V.; Ishimaru, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    A decline in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production caused by heat stress is one of the biggest concerns resulting from future climate change. Rice spikelets are most susceptible to heat stress at flowering. The early-morning flowering (EMF) trait mitigates heat-induced spikelet sterility at the flowering stage by escaping heat stress during the daytime. We attempted to develop near-isogenic lines (NILs) for EMF in the indica-type genetic background by exploiting the EMF locus from wild rice, O. officinalis (CC genome). A stable quantitative trait locus (QTL) for flower opening time (FOT) was detected on chromosome 3. A QTL was designated as qEMF3 and it shifted FOT by 1.5–2.0h earlier for cv. Nanjing 11 in temperate Japan and cv. IR64 in the Philippine tropics. NILs for EMF mitigated heat-induced spikelet sterility under elevated temperature conditions completing flower opening before reaching 35°C, a general threshold value leading to spikelet sterility. Quantification of FOT of cultivars popular in the tropics and subtropics did not reveal the EMF trait in any of the cultivars tested, suggesting that qEMF3 has the potential to advance FOT of currently popular cultivars to escape heat stress at flowering under future hotter climates. This is the first report to examine rice with the EMF trait through marker-assisted breeding using wild rice as a genetic resource. PMID:25534925

  4. DNA polymorphism in the SUPERWOMAN1 (SPW1) locus of the wild rice Oryza rufipogon and its related species.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Chika; Yoshida, Kentaro; Miyashita, Naohiko T

    2008-10-01

    The level and pattern of nucleotide variation in the SUPERWOMAN1(SPW1) locus of the wild rice Oriza rufipogon and its related species were analyzed. SPW1 is orthologous to APETELA3(AP3) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The estimated level of nucleotide variation for the entire region (pi = 0.0046) was intermediate among those for other genes of O. rufipogon, although the estimates varied considerably among the SPW1 domains. Complicated haplotype structure was detected, resulting in a high proportion of significant linkage disequilibrium. Deviation from the neutrality was not detected. However, purifying selection was suggested by lack of replacement variation in the MADS-box and I-domain regions, which function as DNA-binding domain. On the other hand, an excess of drastic amino acid changes was detected in the C-domain, as in the AP3 region of A. thaliana. Taken together, these results imply that different types of natural selection are acting among different domains of a single protein. In the phylogenetic tree, O. sativa strains were included in the same cluster of O. rufipogon, supporting the hypothesis that O. rufipogon is the wild ancestor of O. sativa.

  5. Gene tree discordance of wild and cultivated Asian rice deciphered by genome-wide sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-chia; Sakai, Hiroaki; Numa, Hisataka; Itoh, Takeshi

    2011-05-15

    Although a large number of genes are expected to correctly solve a phylogenetic relationship, inconsistent gene tree topologies have been observed. This conflicting evidence in gene tree topologies, known as gene tree discordance, becomes increasingly important as advanced sequencing technologies produce an enormous amount of sequence information for phylogenomic studies among closely related species. Here, we aim to characterize the gene tree discordance of the Asian cultivated rice Oryza sativa and its progenitor, O. rufipogon, which will be an ideal case study of gene tree discordance. Using genome and cDNA sequences of O. sativa and O. rufipogon, we have conducted the first in-depth analyses of gene tree discordance in Asian rice. Our comparison of full-length cDNA sequences of O. rufipogon with the genome sequences of the japonica and indica cultivars of O. sativa revealed that 60% of the gene trees showed a topology consistent with the expected one, whereas the remaining genes supported significantly different topologies. Moreover, the proportions of the topologies deviated significantly from expectation, suggesting at least one hybridization event between the two subgroups of O. sativa, japonica and indica. In fact, a genome-wide alignment between japonica and indica indicated that significant portions of the indica genome are derived from japonica. In addition, literature concerning the pedigree of the indica cultivar strongly supported the hybridization hypothesis. Our molecular evolutionary analyses deciphered complicated evolutionary processes in closely related species. They also demonstrated the importance of gene tree discordance in the era of high-speed DNA sequencing.

  6. Rice Bran Amendment Suppresses Potato Common Scab by Increasing Antagonistic Bacterial Community Levels in the Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Tomihama, Tsuyoshi; Nishi, Yatsuka; Mori, Kiyofumi; Shirao, Tsukasa; Iida, Toshiya; Uzuhashi, Shihomi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ikeda, Seishi

    2016-07-01

    Potato common scab (PCS), caused by pathogenic Streptomyces spp., is a serious disease in potato production worldwide. Cultural practices, such as optimizing the soil pH and irrigation, are recommended but it is often difficult to establish stable disease reductions using these methods. Traditionally, local farmers in southwest Japan have amended soils with rice bran (RB) to suppress PCS. However, the scientific mechanism underlying disease suppression by RB has not been elucidated. The present study showed that RB amendment reduced PCS by repressing the pathogenic Streptomyces population in young tubers. Amplicon sequencing analyses of 16S ribosomal RNA genes from the rhizosphere microbiome revealed that RB amendment dramatically changed bacterial composition and led to an increase in the relative abundance of gram-positive bacteria such as Streptomyces spp., and this was negatively correlated with PCS disease severity. Most actinomycete isolates derived from the RB-amended soil showed antagonistic activity against pathogenic Streptomyces scabiei and S. turgidiscabies on R2A medium. Some of the Streptomyces isolates suppressed PCS when they were inoculated onto potato plants in a field experiment. These results suggest that RB amendment increases the levels of antagonistic bacteria against PCS pathogens in the potato rhizosphere.

  7. Identity, Diversity, and Molecular Phylogeny of the Endophytic Mycobiota in the Roots of Rare Wild Rice (Oryza granulate) from a Nature Reserve in Yunnan, China▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-lin; Zhang, Chu-long; Lin, Fu-cheng; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2010-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is, on a global scale, one of the most important food crops. Although endophytic fungi and bacteria associated with rice have been investigated, little is known about the endophytic fungi of wild rice (Oryza granulate) in China. Here we studied the root endophytic mycobiota residing in roots of O. granulate by the use of an integrated approach consisting of microscopy, cultivation, ecological indices, and direct PCR. Microscopy confirmed the ubiquitousness of dark septate endophytes (DSEs) and sclerotium-like structures in root tissues. Isolations from 204 root segments from 15 wild rice plants yielded 58 isolates, for which 31 internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based genotypes were recorded. The best BLAST match indicated that 34.5% of all taxa encountered may represent hitherto undescribed species. Most of the fungi were isolated with a very low frequency. Calculation of ecological indices and estimation of taxon accumulation curves indicated a high diversity of fungal species. A culture-independent approach was also performed to analyze the endophytic fungal community. Three individual clone libraries were constructed. Using a threshold of 90% similarity, 35 potentially different sequences (phylotypes) were found among 186 positive clones. Phylogenetic analysis showed that frequently detected clones were classified as Basidiomycota, and 60.2% of total analyzed clones were affiliated with unknown taxa. Exophiala, Cladophialophora, Harpophora, Periconia macrospinosa, and the Ceratobasidium/Rhizoctonia complex may act as potential DSE groups. A comparison of the fungal communities characterized by the two approaches demonstrated distinctive fungal groups, and only a few taxa overlapped. Our findings indicate a complex and rich endophytic fungal consortium in wild rice roots, thus offering a potential bioresource for establishing a novel model of plant-fungal mutualistic interactions. PMID:20038691

  8. Characterization of rhizobia isolates obtained from nodules of wild genotypes of common bean.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Aline Assis; Andraus, Michel de Paula; Borba, Tereza Cristina de Oliveira; Martin-Didonet, Claudia Cristina Garcia; Ferreira, Enderson Petrônio de Brito

    This study aimed to evaluate the tolerance to salinity and temperature, the genetic diversity and the symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia isolates obtained from wild genotypes of common bean cultivated in soil samples from the States of Goiás, Minas Gerais and Paraná. The isolates were subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 6%) at different temperatures (28°C, 33°C, 38°C, 43°C and 48°C). Genotypic characterization was performed based on BOX-PCR, REP-PCR markers and 16S rRNA sequencing. An evaluation of symbiotic efficiency was carried out under greenhouse conditions in autoclaved Leonard jars. Among 98 isolates about 45% of them and Rhizobium freirei PRF81 showed a high tolerance to temperature, while 24 isolates and Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 were able to use all of the carbon sources studied. Clustering analysis based on the ability to use carbon sources and on the tolerance to salinity and temperature grouped 49 isolates, R. tropici CIAT899 and R. tropici H12 with a similarity level of 76%. Based on genotypic characterization, 65% of the isolates showed an approximately 66% similarity with R. tropici CIAT899 and R. tropici H12. About 20% of the isolates showed symbiotic efficiency similar to or better than the best Rhizobium reference strain (R. tropici CIAT899). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA revealed that two efficient isolates (ALSG5A1 and JPrG6A8) belong to the group of strains used as commercial inoculant for common bean in Brazil and must be assayed in field experiments.

  9. A vacuolar antiporter is differentially regulated in leaves and roots of the halophytic wild rice Porteresia coarctata (Roxb.) Tateoka.

    PubMed

    Kizhakkedath, Praseetha; Jegadeeson, Vidya; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2015-06-01

    Vacuolar NHX-type antiporters play a role in Na(+)/K(+) uptake that contributes to growth, nutrition and development. Under salt/osmotic stress they mediate the vacuolar compartmentalization of K(+)/Na(+), thereby preventing toxic Na(+)K(+) ratios in the cytosol. Porteresia coarctata (Roxb.) Tateoka, a mangrove associate, is a distant wild relative of cultivated rice and is saline as well as submergence tolerant. A vacuolar NHX homolog isolated from a P. coarctata cDNA library (PcNHX1) shows 96 % identity (nucleotide level) to OsNHX1. Diurnal PcNHX1 expression in leaves was found to be largely unaltered, though damped by salinity. PcNHX1 promoter directed GUS expression is phloem-specific in leaves, stem and roots of transgenic plants in the absence of stress. Under NaCl stress, GUS expression was also seen in the epidermal and sub-epidermal layers (mesophyll, guard cells and trichomes) of leaves, root tip. The salinity in the rhizosphere of P. coarctata varies considerably due to diurnal/semi-diurnal tidal inundation. The diurnal expression of PcNHX1 in leaves and salinity induced expression in roots may have evolved in response to dynamic changes in salinity of in the P. coarctata rhizosphere. Despite high sequence conservation between OsNHX1 and PcNHX1, the distinctive expression pattern of PcNHX1 exemplifies how variation in expression is fine tuned to suit the halophytic growth habitat of a plant.

  10. Contribution of individual phenolics to antioxidant activity and in vitro digestibility of wild rices (Zizania aquatica L.).

    PubMed

    Sumczynski, Daniela; Kotásková, Eva; Orsavová, Jana; Valášek, Pavel

    2017-03-01

    Zizania aquatica L. was analysed for total flavonoids, phenolics and HPLC profile in both free and bound phenolic fractions. The highest content of flavonoids (378-455mgRE/kg) was detected in bound fractions, while the highest polyphenols content (1061-2988mgGAE/kg) was determined in free fractions. Additionally, predominant phenolics were identified. To understand the contribution of individual phenolics to an antioxidant activity their mutual correlations were evaluated. Regarding free flavonoids, the main contributors to an antioxidant activity (r>0.7111) were epigallocatechin, epicatechin and rutin; while epicatechin, quercetin and rutin were the main contributors in bound fractions (r>0.6868). Concerning free phenolic acids, the main contributors to an antioxidant activity (r>0.7585) were ferulic, vanillic, ellagic, sinapic and syringic acids; while caffeic, sinapic, syringic, o-coumaric, p-hydroxy benzoic, vanillic, protocatechuic, gallic and cinnamic acids were the main contributors in bound fractions of wild rice (r>0.6538). Finally, in vitro organic matter and dry matter digestibility were assessed.

  11. Ethylene is not involved in adaptive responses to flooding in the Amazonian wild rice species Oryza grandiglumis.

    PubMed

    Okishio, Takuma; Sasayama, Daisuke; Hirano, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Masahiro; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Azuma, Tetsushi

    2015-02-01

    The Amazonian wild rice Oryza grandiglumis has two contrasting adaptation mechanisms to flooding submergence: a quiescence response to complete submergence at the seedling stage and an escape response based on internodal elongation to partial submergence at the mature stage. We investigated possible factors that trigger these responses. In stem segments excised from mature O. grandiglumis plants, complete submergence only slightly promoted internodal elongation with increased ethylene levels in the internodes, while partial submergence substantially promoted internodal elongation without increased ethylene levels in the internodes. Incubation of non-submerged stem segments under a continuous flow of humidified ethylene-free air promoted internodal elongation to the same extent as that observed for partially submerged segments. Applied ethylene had little effect on the internodal elongation of non-submerged segments irrespective of humidity conditions. These results indicate that the enhanced internodal elongation of submerged O. grandiglumis plants is not triggered by ethylene accumulated during submergence but by the moist surroundings provided by submergence. The growth of shoots in O. grandiglumis seedlings was not promoted by ethylene or complete submergence, as is the case in O. sativa cultivars possessing the submergence-tolerant gene SUB1A. However, because the genome of O. grandiglumis lacks the SUB1A gene, the quiescence response of O. grandiglumis seedlings to complete submergence may be regulated by a mechanism distinct from that involved in the response of submergence-tolerant O. sativa cultivars.

  12. Oral administration of hydrolyzed rice bran prevents the common cold syndrome in the elderly based on its immunomodulatory action.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroaki; Ichihashi, Kenichi; Fujii, Takako; Omura, Kazunobu; Zhu, Xia; Anazawa, Mari; Tazawa, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    The preventive effect of Hydrolyzed Rice Bran against the common cold syndrome was examined in elderly people. Arabinoxylan derivatives of Hydrolyzed Rice Bran (HRB) were prepared from water-soluble rice bran through partial processing using a carbohydrate complex. Using the water-soluble Rice Bran (RB) as a control, a cross over double-blind study was conducted on both substances over a 6-week administration period. Fifty elderly people aged from 70 to 95 years participated in the study and the comparative data from 36 participants were analyzed. There were no withdrawals from in the study due to the side effects of the experimental foods. Symptoms were observed and scored. The total symptom score for the RB treatment group was three times higher than that for the HRB treatment group. The average duration of symptoms was 2.6 days for RB whereas it was only 1.2 days for HRB. Furthermore, some immunomodulatory action was observed in laboratory tests. HRB was shown to be useful in reducing the physical stress associated with acute respiratory tract infection.

  13. Nanda-gikendaasowin Naawij Gaa-izhiwebakin Manoomini-zaaga'iganiing: Core-based research by Native students on wild rice lakes in northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrbo, A.; Howes, T.; Defoe, R.; Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; McEathron, M.; Ito, E.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about how local and global environmental changes affect the habitat of wild rice (manoomin in Ojibwe; Zizania sp.). Using transects of sediment cores from wild rice lakes on the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Reservation (FDL) in Minnesota, undergraduate student researchers are working to reconstruct the lakes' ecological history in order to better manage future change. Reservation Resource Management personnel and University science mentors work together to develop research questions and mentor small groups of college-age students during short (two-week) and long (ten-week) summer internships. Cores are collected during the winter from the frozen lake surface with "Lake Teams" of mainly Native junior high and high school students attending weekend science camps, who also visit LacCore (the National Lacustrine Core Facility) in Minneapolis to conduct initial core description and basic analyses. At the same time as the Fond du Lac Band gains information about the long-term history and variability of the Reservation's lakes, young Native people are exposed to primary research, natural resources management and academia as occupations, and scientists as people. Scientific results, as well as the results of program evaluation, show clearly that this approach has so far been successful and eye-opening for both students and mentors. Lead-210 dated records of the past ~150 years cover the period of European settlement, logging, and the massive ditching of FDL lakes to convert wetlands to agricultural land. Phytolith, pollen, plant macrofossil, and diatom studies by interns, as well as sediment composition and mass accumulation rate data, show anthropogenic lake level and vegetation fluctuations associated with these activities. Earlier in the record (~10,000 years to ~100 years before present), the natural and slow processes of lake infilling and encroachment of shallow-water vegetation are the dominant processes controlling the ecology of the

  14. Molecular relationships between Australian annual wild rice, Oryza meridionalis, and two related perennial forms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The perennial, Oryza rufipogon distributed from Asia to Australia and the annual O. meridionalis indigenous to Australia are AA genome species in the Oryza. However, recent research has demonstrated that the Australian AA genome perennial populations have maternal genomes more closely related to those of O. meridionalis than to those found in Asian populations of O. rufipogon suggesting that the Australian perennials may represent a new distinct gene pool for rice. Results Analysis of an Oryza core collection covering AA genome species from Asia to Oceania revealed that some Oceania perennials had organellar genomes closely related to that of O meridionalis (meridionalis-type). O. rufipogon accessions from New Guinea carried either the meridionalis-type or rufirpogon-type (like O. rufipogon) organellar genomes. Australian perennials carried only the meridionalis-type organellar genomes when accompanied by the rufipogon-type nuclear genome. New accessions were collected to better characterize the Australian perennials, and their life histories (annual or perennial) were confirmed by field observations. All of the material collected carried only meridionalis-type organellar genomes. However, there were two distinct perennial groups. One of them carried an rufipogon-type nuclear genome similar to the Australian O. rufipogon in the core collection and the other carried an meridionalis-type nuclear genome not represented in the existing collection. Morphologically the rufipogon-type shared similarity with Asian O. rufipogon. The meridionalis-type showed some similarities to O. meridionalis such as the short anthers usually characteristic of annual populations. However, the meridionalis-type perennial was readily distinguished from O. meridionalis by the presence of a larger lemma and higher number of spikelets. Conclusion Analysis of current accessions clearly indicated that there are two distinct types of Australian perennials. Both of them differed

  15. Markers for Ongoing or Previous Hepatitis E Virus Infection Are as Common in Wild Ungulates as in Humans in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Anette; Lin, Jay; Magnius, Lars; Karlsson, Marie; Belák, Sándór; Widén, Frederik; Norder, Heléne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with zoonotic spread, infecting both domestic and wild animals. About 17% of the Swedish population is immune to HEV, but few cases are reported annually, indicating that most infections are subclinical. However, clinical hepatitis E may also be overlooked. For identified cases, the source of infection is mostly unknown. In order to identify whether HEV may be spread from wild game, the prevalence of markers for past and/or ongoing infection was investigated in sera and stool samples collected from 260 hunted Swedish wild ungulates. HEV markers were found in 43 (17%) of the animals. The most commonly infected animal was moose (Alces alces) with 19 out of 69 animals (28%) showing HEV markers, followed by wild boar (Sus scrofa) with 21 out of 139 animals (15%), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) with 2 out of 30 animals, red deer (Cervus elaphus) with 1 out of 15 animals, and fallow deer (Dama dama) 0 out of 7 animals. Partial open reading frame 1 (ORF1) of the viral genomes from the animals were sequenced and compared with those from 14 endemic human cases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that three humans were infected with HEV strains similar to those from wild boar. These results indicate that wild animals may be a source of transmission to humans and could be an unrecognized public health concern. PMID:27657108

  16. A novel blast resistance gene, Pi54rh cloned from wild species of rice, Oryza rhizomatis confers broad spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Das, Alok; Soubam, D; Singh, P K; Thakur, S; Singh, N K; Sharma, T R

    2012-06-01

    The dominant rice blast resistance gene, Pi54 confers resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in different parts of India. In our effort to identify more effective forms of this gene, we isolated an orthologue of Pi54 named as Pi54rh from the blast-resistant wild species of rice, Oryza rhizomatis, using allele mining approach and validated by complementation. The Pi54rh belongs to CC-NBS-LRR family of disease resistance genes with a unique Zinc finger (C(3)H type) domain. The 1,447 bp Pi54rh transcript comprises of 101 bp 5'-UTR, 1,083 bp coding region and 263 bp 3'-UTR, driven by pathogen inducible promoter. We showed the extracellular localization of Pi54rh protein and the presence of glycosylation, myristoylation and phosphorylation sites which implicates its role in signal transduction process. This is in contrast to other blast resistance genes that are predicted to be intracellular NBS-LRR-type resistance proteins. The Pi54rh was found to express constitutively at basal level in the leaves, but upregulates 3.8-fold at 96 h post-inoculation with the pathogen. Functional validation of cloned Pi54rh gene using complementation test showed high degree of resistance to seven isolates of M. oryzae collected from different geographical locations of India. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrated that a rice blast resistance gene Pi54rh cloned from wild species of rice provides broad spectrum resistance to M. oryzae hence can be used in rice improvement breeding programme.

  17. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Shin, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung; Oh, Boung-Jun; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  18. Identification of Novel and Conserved miRNAs from Extreme Halophyte, Oryza coarctata, a Wild Relative of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Ganie, Showkat Ahmad; Debnath, Ananda Bhusan

    2015-01-01

    Oryza coarctata, a halophyte and wild relative of rice, is grown normally in saline water. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that play pivotal roles in every domain of life including stress response. There are very few reports on the discovery of salt-responsive miRNAs from halophytes. In this study, two small RNA libraries, one each from the control and salt-treated (450 mM NaCl for 24 h) leaves of O. coarctata were sequenced, which yielded 338 known and 95 novel miRNAs. Additionally, we used publicly available transcriptomics data of O. coarctata which led to the discovery of additional 48 conserved miRNAs along with their pre-miRNA sequences through in silico analysis. In total, 36 known and 7 novel miRNAs were up-regulated whereas, 12 known and 7 novel miRNAs were down-regulated under salinity stress. Further, 233 and 154 target genes were predicted for 48 known and 14 novel differentially regulated miRNAs respectively. These targets with the help of gene ontology analysis were found to be involved in several important biological processes that could be involved in salinity tolerance. Relative expression trends of majority of the miRNAs as detected by real time-PCR as well as predicted by Illumina sequencing were found to be coherent. Additionally, expression of most of the target genes was negatively correlated with their corresponding miRNAs. Thus, the present study provides an account of miRNA-target networking that is involved in salinity adaption of O. coarctata. PMID:26506249

  19. [Index screening and comprehensive evaluation of phenotypic traits of low nitrogen tolerance using BILs population derived from Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff)].

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao-lin; Li, Xia; Wan, Yong; Qiu, Zai-hui; Nie, Yuan-yuan; Xie, Jian-kun

    2015-08-01

    To identify the low nitrogen tolerance of Dongxiang wild rice (DXWR) and its progenies, ten phenotypic traits including plant height (PH), heading day (HD), panicle length (PL), number of effective tillers per plant (NETP), number of filled grains per panicle (NFGP), number of grains per panicle (NGP), grain density (GD), spikelet fertility (SF), 1000-grain mass (TGM) and grain yield per plant (GYP) were studied under normal and low nitrogen treatments, using backcross inbred lines (BILs) of Xieqingzao B//DXWR/Xieqingzao B in BC1 F12. Comprehensive evaluation on the low nitrogen tolerance of the BILs population was conducted using principal component analysis and the subordinate function. The evaluation results indicated that the low nitrogen tolerance of the line 116, 143 and 157 was the strongest, which could be served as the intermediate materials for genetic studies on the low nitrogen tolerance of DXWR and breeding for the low nitrogen tolerance in rice. The optimal regression equation of the low nitrogen tolerance in rice was established using stepwise regression analysis. The relative values of five traits including PH, NGP, SF, TGM and GYP were screened out and could be used as comprehensive evaluation indices for the low nitrogen tolerance in the whole growth stage. Therefore, more attention should be paid to the relative values of these five traits, especially for NGP and GYP, in the genetic improvement of the low nitrogen tolerance in rice.

  20. Recent and Projected Increases in Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Can Enhance Gene Flow between Wild and Genetically Altered Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Ziska, Lewis H.; Gealy, David R.; Tomecek, Martha B.; Jackson, Aaron K.; Black, Howard L.

    2012-01-01

    Although recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide can alter plant phenological development, these changes have not been quantified in terms of floral outcrossing rates or gene transfer. Could differential phenological development in response to rising CO2 between genetically modified crops and wild, weedy relatives increase the spread of novel genes, potentially altering evolutionary fitness? Here we show that increasing CO2 from an early 20th century concentration (300 µmol mol−1) to current (400 µmol mol−1) and projected, mid-21st century (600 µmol mol−1) values, enhanced the flow of genes from wild, weedy rice to the genetically altered, herbicide resistant, cultivated population, with outcrossing increasing from 0.22% to 0.71% from 300 to 600 µmol mol−1. The increase in outcrossing and gene transfer was associated with differential increases in plant height, as well as greater tiller and panicle production in the wild, relative to the cultivated population. In addition, increasing CO2 also resulted in a greater synchronicity in flowering times between the two populations. The observed changes reported here resulted in a subsequent increase in rice dedomestication and a greater number of weedy, herbicide-resistant hybrid progeny. Overall, these data suggest that differential phenological responses to rising atmospheric CO2 could result in enhanced flow of novel genes and greater success of feral plant species in agroecosystems. PMID:22649533

  1. A genetic resource for early-morning flowering trait of wild rice Oryza officinalis to mitigate high temperature-induced spikelet sterility at anthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Tsutomu; Hirabayashi, Hideyuki; Ida, Masashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; San-Oh, Yumiko A.; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Ando, Ikuo; Ogawa, Tsugufumi; Kondo, Motohiko

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims High temperatures over 32–36 °C at anthesis induce spikelet sterility in rice. The use of a germplasm with an early-morning flowering (EMF) trait has been hypothesized as a way of avoiding this problem. In this study, the effect of the EMF trait on avoiding high temperature-induced sterility at anthesis by flowering at a cooler temperature in the early morning was evaluated. Methods The EMF trait was introgressed from wild rice (Oryza officinalis) into the rice cultivar ‘Koshihikari’ (O. sativa). First, spikelets of the EMF line and Koshihikari were subjected to rising temperatures during the daytime in the greenhouse to test for differences in spikelet sterility. Secondly, spikelets of both plants were exposed to 26, 34 and 38 °C at anthesis and to 38 °C beginning at least 1 h after flowering, in the growth chambers at 70 % relative humidity, to test for differences in tolerance to high temperatures. Key Results Spikelets of the EMF line started and completed flowering a few hours earlier than Koshihikari. In a greenhouse experiment, spikelets of Koshihikari opened after the air temperature reached 35 °C, but those of the EMF line could open at cooler temperatures. Under these conditions, spikelet sterility significantly increased in Koshihikari, but did not in the EMF line. The number of sterile spikelets increased as their flowering time was delayed in Koshihikari. Furthermore, the chamber experiments revealed that 60 % of the spikelets from both lines were sterile when exposed to 38 °C at anthesis, indicating that tolerance of high temperature was similar in both genotypes. Conclusions Reduced sterility in the EMF line subjected to rising temperatures at anthesis in the greenhouse was attributed to an earlier flowering time compared with Koshihikari. The EMF trait of wild rice is effective in mitigating anticipated yield loss due to global warming by escaping high-temperature stress at anthesis during the daytime. PMID:20566680

  2. The common ecotoxicology laboratory strain of Hyalella azteca is genetically distinct from most wild strains sampled in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Major, Kaley; Soucek, David J; Giordano, Rosanna; Wetzel, Mark J; Soto-Adames, Felipe

    2013-11-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is commonly used as a model for determining safe concentrations of contaminants in freshwaters. The authors sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for representatives of 38 populations of this species complex from US and Canadian toxicology research laboratories and eastern North American field sites to determine their genetic relationships. With 1 exception, all US and Canadian laboratory cultures sampled were identified as conspecific. In 22 wild populations spanning 5 US states and 1 Canadian province, the commonly occurring laboratory species was found only in northern Florida, USA. Therefore, the diversity of the H. azteca species complex detected in the wild is not accurately represented in North American laboratories, questioning the reliability of H. azteca cultures currently in use to accurately predict the responses of wild populations in ecotoxicological assays. The authors also examined the utility of different COI nucleotide fragments presently in use to determine phylogenetic relationships in this group and concluded that saturation in DNA sequences leads to inconsistent relationships between clades. Amino acid sequences for COI were not saturated and may allow a more accurate phylogeny estimate. Hyalella azteca is crucial for developing water-quality regulations; therefore, laboratories should know and standardize the strain(s) they use to confidently compare toxicity tests across laboratories and determine whether they are an appropriate surrogate for their regions.

  3. Behavioral strategies and hormonal profiles of dominant and subordinate common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) females in wild monogamous groups.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Bernardete Cordeiro; Albuquerque, Ana Claudia Sales da Rocha; Albuquerque, Fabiola da Silva; Araujo, Arrilton; Yamamoto, Maria Emilia; Arruda, Maria de Fatima

    2005-09-01

    New insights into the mating systems of common marmosets suggest that they are mainly monogamous, although polygyny and polyandry occasionally occur. Long-term monitoring of wild common marmosets has shown that some reports of polygynous groups (i.e., groups that contain more than one reproducing female) in fact indicate an unbalanced reproductive output associated with extragroup copulation. In this study we describe the behavioral and hormonal profiles of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) females living in three wild monogamous groups (Q, PBf, and T), varying from five to 11 individuals, at Nísia Floresta field station, RN, Brazil. The mating system of the groups was previously characterized in terms of affiliative, sexual, and mate-guarding behaviors. Behavioral data were collected once a week, and fecal samples were collected at least twice a week for 10-16 months, depending on the group. A preferential allogrooming relationship was recorded between dominant males and females. Under field conditions the reproductive inhibition of subordinate females appears to be more behavioral than hormonal, since subordinate females of the three groups ovulated and two conceived during the study. In these cases, the subordinate and dominant females reproduced 1 month apart, and infanticide (one case confirmed and one suspected) appeared to be part of the reproductive strategy of dominant females. Following the infanticide, ovarian inhibition (group T) or emigration and return to the natal group (group PBf) were observed. In the third group (Q) the subordinate female showed hormonal profiles compatible with pregnancy, but no infants were seen. These findings reflect the different alternatives that wild subordinate common marmoset females use to reproduce.

  4. Phylogenetic diversity of culturable endophytic fungi in Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff), detection of polyketide synthase gene and their antagonistic activity analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Gao, Bo Liang; Li, Xi Xi; Zhang, Zhi Bin; Yan, Ri Ming; Yang, Hui Lin; Zhu, Du

    2015-11-01

    The biodiversity of plant endophytic fungi is enormous, numerous competent endophytic fungi are capable of providing different forms of fitness benefits to host plants and also could produce a wide array of bioactive natural products, which make them a largely unexplored source of novel compounds with potential bioactivity. In this study, we provided a first insights into revealing the diversity of culturable endophytic fungi in Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) from China using rDNA-ITS phylogenetic analysis. Here, the potential of fungi in producing bioactive natural products was estimated based on the beta-ketosynthase detected in the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster and on the bioassay of antagonistic activity against two rice phytopathogens Thanatephorus cucumeris and Xanthomonas oryzae. A total of 229 endophytic fungal strains were validated in 19 genera. Among the 24 representative strains, 13 strains displayedantagonistic activity against the phytopathogens. Furthermore, PKS genes were detected in 9 strains, indicating their potential for synthesising PKS compounds. Our study confirms the phylogenetic diversity of endophytic fungi in O. rufipogon G. and highlights that endophytic fungi are not only promising resources of biocontrol agents against phytopathogens of rice plants, but also of bioactive natural products and defensive secondary metabolites.

  5. Map-based Cloning and Characterization of the BPH18 Gene from Wild Rice Conferring Resistance to Brown Planthopper (BPH) Insect Pest

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyeonso; Kim, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Yul-Ho; Suh, Jung-Pil; Park, Hyang-Mi; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Misra, Gopal; Kim, Suk-Man; Hechanova, Sherry Lou; Kim, Hakbum; Lee, Gang-Seob; Yoon, Ung-Han; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Hyemin; Suh, Suk-Chul; Yang, Jungil; An, Gynheung; Jena, Kshirod K.

    2016-01-01

    Brown planthopper (BPH) is a phloem sap-sucking insect pest of rice which causes severe yield loss. We cloned the BPH18 gene from the BPH-resistant introgression line derived from the wild rice species Oryza australiensis. Map-based cloning and complementation test revealed that the BPH18 encodes CC-NBS-NBS-LRR protein. BPH18 has two NBS domains, unlike the typical NBS-LRR proteins. The BPH18 promoter::GUS transgenic plants exhibited strong GUS expression in the vascular bundles of the leaf sheath, especially in phloem cells where the BPH attacks. The BPH18 proteins were widely localized to the endo-membranes in a cell, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, trans-Golgi network, and prevacuolar compartments, suggesting that BPH18 may recognize the BPH invasion at endo-membranes in phloem cells. Whole genome sequencing of the near-isogenic lines (NILs), NIL-BPH18 and NIL-BPH26, revealed that BPH18 located at the same locus of BPH26. However, these two genes have remarkable sequence differences and the independent NILs showed differential BPH resistance with different expression patterns of plant defense-related genes, indicating that BPH18 and BPH26 are functionally different alleles. These findings would facilitate elucidation of the molecular mechanism of BPH resistance and the identified novel alleles to fast track breeding BPH resistant rice cultivars. PMID:27682162

  6. Are habitat fragmentation, local adaptation and isolation-by-distance driving population divergence in wild rice Oryza rufipogon?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yao; Vrieling, Klaas; Liao, Hui; Xiao, Manqiu; Zhu, Yongqing; Rong, Jun; Zhang, Wenju; Wang, Yuguo; Yang, Ji; Chen, Jiakuan; Song, Zhiping

    2013-11-01

    Habitat fragmentation weakens the connection between populations and is accompanied with isolation by distance (IBD) and local adaptation (isolation by adaptation, IBA), both leading to genetic divergence between populations. To understand the evolutionary potential of a population and to formulate proper conservation strategies, information on the roles of IBD and IBA in driving population divergence is critical. The putative ancestor of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) is endangered in China due to habitat loss and fragmentation. We investigated the genetic variation in 11 Chinese Oryza rufipogon populations using 79 microsatellite loci to infer the effects of habitat fragmentation, IBD and IBA on genetic structure. Historical and current gene flows were found to be rare (mh  = 0.0002-0.0013, mc  = 0.007-0.029), indicating IBD and resulting in a high level of population divergence (FST  = 0.343). High within-population genetic variation (HE  = 0.377-0.515), relatively large effective population sizes (Ne  = 96-158), absence of bottlenecks and limited gene flow were found, demonstrating little impact of recent habitat fragmentation on these populations. Eleven gene-linked microsatellite loci were identified as outliers, indicating local adaptation. Hierarchical AMOVA and partial Mantel tests indicated that population divergence of Chinese O. rufipogon was significantly correlated with environmental factors, especially habitat temperature. Common garden trials detected a significant adaptive population divergence associated with latitude. Collectively, these findings imply that IBD due to historical rather than recent fragmentation, followed by local adaptation, has driven population divergence in O. rufipogon.

  7. Fipronil application on rice paddy fields reduces densities of common skimmer and scarlet skimmer.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takehiko I; Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazutaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Goka, Koichi

    2016-03-16

    Several reports suggested that rice seedling nursery-box application of some systemic insecticides (neonicotinoids and fipronil) is the cause of the decline in dragonfly species noted since the 1990s in Japan. We conducted paddy mesocosm experiments to investigate the effect of the systemic insecticides clothianidin, fipronil and chlorantraniliprole on rice paddy field biological communities. Concentrations of all insecticides in the paddy water were reduced to the limit of detection within 3 months after application. However, residuals of these insecticides in the paddy soil were detected throughout the experimental period. Plankton species were affected by clothianidin and chlorantraniliprole right after the applications, but they recovered after the concentrations decreased. On the other hand, the effects of fipronil treatment, especially on Odonata, were larger than those of any other treatment. The number of adult dragonflies completing eclosion was severely decreased in the fipronil treatment. These results suggest that the accumulation of these insecticides in paddy soil reduces biodiversity by eliminating dragonfly nymphs, which occupy a high trophic level in paddy fields.

  8. Fipronil application on rice paddy fields reduces densities of common skimmer and scarlet skimmer

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takehiko I.; Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazutaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Goka, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Several reports suggested that rice seedling nursery-box application of some systemic insecticides (neonicotinoids and fipronil) is the cause of the decline in dragonfly species noted since the 1990s in Japan. We conducted paddy mesocosm experiments to investigate the effect of the systemic insecticides clothianidin, fipronil and chlorantraniliprole on rice paddy field biological communities. Concentrations of all insecticides in the paddy water were reduced to the limit of detection within 3 months after application. However, residuals of these insecticides in the paddy soil were detected throughout the experimental period. Plankton species were affected by clothianidin and chlorantraniliprole right after the applications, but they recovered after the concentrations decreased. On the other hand, the effects of fipronil treatment, especially on Odonata, were larger than those of any other treatment. The number of adult dragonflies completing eclosion was severely decreased in the fipronil treatment. These results suggest that the accumulation of these insecticides in paddy soil reduces biodiversity by eliminating dragonfly nymphs, which occupy a high trophic level in paddy fields. PMID:26979488

  9. Use of wild relatives and closely-related species to adapt common bean to climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume crop worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stress limits bean yields less than 600 kg/ha in low-income countries. Current low yields result in food insecurity, while demands for increased yields to match the rate of population growth combin...

  10. Evidence for divergence of response in Indica, Japonica, and wild rice to high CO2 x temperature interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies suggest that the intraspecific variability of rice yield response to rising carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2], could serve as a basis of selection to improve genotypes for future high CO2 conditions. However, assessment of responses to elevated [CO2] must consider air temperature,...

  11. The semifossorial function of the forelimb in the common rice tenrec (Oryzorictes hova) and the streaked tenrec (Hemicentetes hemispinosus).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Oishi, M; Yonezawa, T; Rakotondraparany, F; Hasegawa, M

    2007-12-01

    The forelimb muscles of the two semifossorial species of Tenrecidae (Oryzoryctinae: common rice tenrec; and Tenrecinae: streaked tenrec) were compared macroscopically with those of the unspecialized terrestrial-arboreal species, the Talazac long-tailed tenrec. The structure of the hand was also observed using three-dimensional reconstructed images from computed tomography data. The two semifossorial species had similar muscle weight ratios in the lateral and long heads of M. triceps brachii and M. teres major. A similar hand skeleton structure (in which the second, third and fourth metacarpals and phalanges act as a digging apparatus) was observed in both species. Our observations confirm that both these species have muscular-skeletal adaptations supporting fossorial locomotion. As each species belongs to a monophyletic subfamily within the Tenrecidae isolated in Madagascar, such semifossorial adaptations are assumed to have evolved convergently.

  12. Increasing cadmium and zinc levels in wild common eiders breeding along Canada's remote northern coastline.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Mark L; Braune, Birgit M; Robertson, Gregory J; Gilchrist, H Grant; Mallory, Conor D; Forbes, Mark R; Wells, Regina

    2014-04-01

    The common eider (Somateria mollissima) is an abundant sea duck breeding around the circumpolar Arctic, and is an important component of subsistence and sport harvest in some regions. We determined hepatic cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentrations in the livers of breeding females sampled during three time periods including 1992/3, 2001/2 and 2008 at three sites spanning 53.7°N-75.8°N in the eastern Canadian Arctic. At all sites, concentrations of both Cd and Zn increased ~300% over this time period. The reasons for this rapid increase in concentrations are unclear.

  13. Manoomin: place-based research with Native American students on wild rice lakes on the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Reservation, northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Myrbo, A.; Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; Greensky, L.; Howes, T.; Wold, A.; McEathron, M. A.; Shanker, V.

    2010-12-01

    The manoomin project is a collaboration between Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College (Cloquet, MN), the Reservation’s Resource Management Division, and the University of Minnesota funded by the NSF GEO-OEDG Program. It builds on a successful seven-year history of collaboration between these parties, including regular science camps (gidaakiimanaanimigawig, Our Earth Lodge) for students of a wide range of ages. We are working as a team with Native students to study the history of wild rice (manoomin; Zizania palustris), a culturally important resource, growing on Reservation lakes. The joint project takes two main approaches: study of sediment core samples collected from Reservation lakes; and the collection of traditional knowledge about wild rice from the Elders. Science campers collect lake cores during winter with the assistance of the U of MN’s LacCore (National Lacustrine Core Facility) and Resource Management and visit LacCore to log, split and describe cores soon thereafter. Academic mentors with a range of specialties (phytoliths, pollen, plant macrofossils, sedimentology, geochemistry, magnetics) spend 1-2 weeks during the summer with small groups of college-age (>18, many nontraditional) student interns working on a particular paleoenvironmental proxy from the sediment cores. Younger students (middle and high school) also work in small teams in half day units with the same mentors. All campers become comfortable in an academic setting, gain experience working in research labs learning and practicing techniques, and jointly interpret collective results. The continuation of the project over five years (2009-2014) will allow these students to develop relationships with scientists and to receive mentoring beyond the laboratory as they make transitions into 2- and 4-year colleges and into graduate school. Their research provides historical and environmental information that is relevant to their own land that will be used by Resource Management which is

  14. Optimization of synthesis and characterization of nanosilica produced from rice husk (a common waste material)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Ezzat; Shahebrahimi, Shabnam; Feyzi, Mostafa; Shaterzadeh, Mahdi

    2012-10-01

    Rice husk (RH), an inexpensive waste material, was used to produce nanosilica. Acid treatment of RH followed by thermal combustion under controlled conditions gave 22.50% ash of which 90.469% was silica. Various chemical treatments in varied conditions for controlled combustion were investigated in order to produce highly purified nanosilica. The structural properties (such as X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy) of the silica were studied. The method was optimized, and the chemical composition of the product was determined by X-ray fluorescence and carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen analysis. Lime reactivity of the ashes was determined. At optimized conditions, a nanosized, highly purified silica (98.8 mass percentage) was produced with a high surface area, high reactivity, and 99.9% amorphous in form. Strength and number of acidic sites were measured by potentiometric titration. This nanosilica showed strong and a large number of acidic sites in comparison with commercial silica, making it as a good support for catalysts. This economic technology, as applied to waste material, also provides many benefits to the local agro-industry.

  15. In search of the last common ancestor: new findings on wild chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    McGrew, W. C.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling the behaviour of extinct hominins is essential in order to devise useful hypotheses of our species' evolutionary origins for testing in the palaeontological and archaeological records. One approach is to model the last common ancestor (LCA) of living apes and humans, based on current ethological and ecological knowledge of our closest living relations. Such referential modelling is based on rigorous, ongoing field studies of the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). This paper reviews recent findings from nature, focusing on those with direct implications for hominin evolution, e.g. apes, using elementary technology to access basic resources such as food and water, or sheltering in caves or bathing as thermoregulatory adaptations. I give preference to studies that directly address key issues, such as whether stone artefacts are detectible before the Oldowan, based on the percussive technology of hammer and anvil use by living apes. Detailed comparative studies of chimpanzees living in varied habitats, from rainforest to savannah, reveal that some behavioural patterns are universal (e.g. shelter construction), while others show marked (e.g. extractive foraging) or nuanced (e.g. courtship) cross-populational variation. These findings allow us to distinguish between retained, primitive traits of the LCA versus derived ones in the human lineage. PMID:20855301

  16. Effects of dietary carbohydrate replaced with wild rice (Zizania latifolia (Griseb) Turcz) on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Shufen; Zhang, Hong; Qin, Liqiang; Zhai, Chengkai

    2013-02-15

    Wild rice (WR) is a very nutritious grain that has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese medicinal practice. City diet (CD) is based on the diet consumed by Asian area residents in modern society, which is rich in saturated fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of replacing white rice and processed wheat starch of CD with WR as the chief source of dietary carbohydrates on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet. Except the rats of the low-fat (LF) diet group, the rats of the other three groups, including to high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet, CD and WR diet, were fed with high-fat/cholesterol diets for eight weeks. The rats fed with CD exhibited higher weight gain and lower insulin sensitivity compared to the rats consuming a HFC diet. However, WR suppressed high-fat/cholesterol diet-induced insulin resistance. WR decreased liver homogenate triglyceride and free fatty acids levels, raised serum adiponectin concentration and reduced serum lipocalin-2 and visfatin concentrations. In addition, the WR diet potently augmented the relative expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, alpha and gamma, and abated relative expressions of leptin and lipocalin-2 in the tissues of interest. These findings indicate that WR is effective in ameliorating abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in rats, even when the diet consumed is high in fat and cholesterol.

  17. A new species of Harpophora (Magnaporthaceae) recovered from healthy wild rice (Oryza granulata) roots, representing a novel member of a beneficial dark septate endophyte.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Lin; Lin, Fu-Cheng; Zhang, Chu-Long; Kubicek, Christian P

    2010-06-01

    A survey of the endophytic fungal community of wild rice (Oryza granulata) in China was conducted. Two isolates recovered from healthy roots are assumed to be dark septate endophytes (DSEs). They are morphologically similar to species from the genus Harpophora and are identified as a new species, Harpophora oryzae, based on the molecular phylogeny and morphological characteristics. A neighbor-joining tree constructed from ITS-5.8S rRNA gene regions reveals that H. oryzae forms a distinctive subclade within the genus Harpophora, and is not genetically close to other species of Harpophora. Harpophora oryzae exhibits a moderate growth rate, with a frequent production of rope-like strands. It sporulates readily on artificial medium. Phialides are usually flask or bottle shaped and occur singly along hyphae or laterally and terminally on branched, hyaline to brown conidiophores, and also form whorls on metulae. Conidiophores are mostly branched with a slightly thickened wall, varying in dimensions. Conidia are one-celled and hyaline, most of them being falcate and strongly curved. The morphological differences between Harpophora spp. and Harpophora-like anamorphs representing different orders are also discussed. An in vitro inoculation test showed that H. oryzae may contribute towards improving rice (Oryza sativa L.) growth. Microscopic inspection of roots and phylogenetic placement of isolates further confirmed that H. oryzae represents a novel member of DSEs.

  18. Human-Mediated Emergence as a Weed and Invasive Radiation in the Wild of the CD Genome Allotetraploid Rice Species (Oryza, Poaceae) in the Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    Second, Gérard; Rouhan, Germinal

    2008-01-01

    Background The genus Oryza is being used as a model in plant genomic studies although there are several issues still to be resolved regarding the spatio-temporal evolution of this ancient genus. Particularly contentious is whether undated transoceanic natural dispersal or recent human interference has been the principal agent determining its present distribution and differentiation. In this context, we studied the origin and distribution history of the allotetraploid CD rice genome. It is endemic to the Neotropics but the genus is thought to have originated in the Paleotropics, and there is relatively little genetic divergence between some orthologous sequences of the C genome component and their Old World counterparts. Methodology/Principal Findings Because of its allotetraploidy, there are several potential pitfalls in trying to date the formation of the CD genome using molecular data and this could lead to erroneous estimates. Therefore, we rather chose to rely on historical evidence to determine whether or not the CD genome was present in the Neotropics before the arrival of Columbus. We searched early collections of herbarium specimens and studied the reports of explorers of the tropical Americas for references to rice. In spite of numerous collectors traveling inland and collecting Oryza, plants determined as CD genome species were not observed away from cultivated rice fields until 1869. Various arguments suggest that they only consisted of weedy forms until that time. Conclusions/Significance The spatio-temporal distribution of herbarium collections fits a simple biogeographical scenario for the emergence in cultivated rice fields followed by radiation in the wild of the CD genome in the Neotropics during the last four centuries. This probably occurred from species introduced to the Americas by humans and we found no evidence that the CD genome pre-existed in the Old World. We therefore propose a new evolutionary hypothesis for such a recent origin of the

  19. Characterization and evolutionary analysis of ent-kaurene synthase like genes from the wild rice species Oryza rufipogon.

    PubMed

    Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Miyamoto, Koji; Shenton, Matthew R; Sakai, Arisa; Sugawara, Chizu; Horie, Kiyotaka; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Morifumi; Chuba, Masaru; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Yamane, Hisakazu; Kurata, Nori; Okada, Kazunori

    2016-11-18

    Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) possesses various labdane-related diterpene synthase genes, homologs of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS) that are responsible for the biosynthesis of phytohormone gibberellins. The CPS homologs and KS like (KSL) homologs successively converted geranylgeranyl diphosphate to cyclic diterpene hydrocarbons via ent-copalyl diphosphate or syn-copalyl diphosphate in O. sativa. Consequently, a variety of labdane-related diterpenoids, including phytoalexin phytocassanes, momilactones and oryzalexins, have been identified from cultivated rice. Our previous report indicated that the biosynthesis of phytocassanes and momilactones is conserved in Oryza rufipogon, the progenitor of Asian cultivated rice. Moreover, their biosynthetic gene clusters, containing OsCPS2 and OsKSL7 for phytocassane biosynthesis and OsCPS4 and OsKSL4 for momilactone biosynthesis, are also present in the O. rufipogon genome. We herein characterized O. rufipogon homologs of OsKSL5, OsKSL6, OsKSL8 responsible for oryzalexin S biosynthesis, and OsKSL10 responsible for oryzalexins A-F biosynthesis, to obtain more evolutionary insight into diterpenoid biosynthesis in O. sativa. Our phytoalexin analyses showed that no accumulation of oryzalexins was detected in extracts from O. rufipogon leaf blades. In vitro functional analyses indicated that unlike OsKSL10, O. rufipogon KSL10 functions as an ent-miltiradiene synthase, which explains the lack of accumulation of oryzalexins A-F in O. rufipogon. The different functions of KSL5 and KSL8 in O. sativa japonica to those in indica are conserved in each type of O. rufipogon, while KSL6 functions (ent-isokaurene synthases) are well conserved. Our study suggests that O. sativa japonica has evolved distinct specialized diterpenoid metabolism, including the biosynthesis of oryzalexins.

  20. Structural characterization of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from a wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): insight into the common structural features of leguminous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, T; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Ishimoto, M; Yamaguchi, H

    1997-02-01

    The primary structures of two subunits of an alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI-2) from a wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) were revealed by a comparison of the amino acid sequence previously deduced from the nucleotide sequence with the amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acid sequences determined by conventional methods. The polypeptide molecular weight of alpha AI-2 obtained by the light-scattering technique, considered together with the sequence molecular weights revealed for the subunits, indicated that alpha AI-2 has the subunit stoichiometry of an alpha 2 beta 2 complex. These structural features were closely similar to those recently elucidated for a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor, which is quite different in the inhibitory specificity from alpha AI-2. The post-translational processing of the precursor glycoproteins to form the tetrameric structure appeared to require an Arg residue close to the processing site. Further, the proper associations of the subunits into the tetrameric structures seemed to be strictly controlled by a few amino acids on the subunit interfaces.

  1. Constitutive activity of G-protein-coupled receptors: cause of disease and common property of wild-type receptors.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Roland; Wenzel-Seifert, Katharina

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a systematic overview on constitutively active G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), a rapidly evolving area in signal transduction research. We will discuss mechanisms, pharmacological tools and methodological approaches to analyze constitutive activity. The two-state model defines constitutive activity as the ability of a GPCR to undergo agonist-independent isomerization from an inactive (R) state to an active (R*) state. While the two-state model explains basic concepts of constitutive GPCR activity and inverse agonism, there is increasing evidence for multiple active GPCR conformations with distinct biological activities. As a result of constitutive GPCR activity, basal G-protein activity increases. Until now, constitutive activity has been observed for more than 60 wild-type GPCRs from the families 1-3 and from different species including humans and commonly used laboratory animal species. Additionally, several naturally occurring and disease-causing GPCR mutants with increased constitutive activity relative to wild-type GPCRs have been identified. Alternative splicing, RNA editing, polymorphisms within a given species, species variants and coupling to specific G-proteins all modulate the constitutive activity of GPCRs, providing multiple regulatory switches to fine-tune basal cellular activities. The most important pharmacological tools to analyze constitutive activity are inverse agonists and Na(+) that stabilize the R state, and pertussis toxin that uncouples GPCRs from G(i)/G(o)-proteins. Constitutive activity is observed at low and high GPCR expression levels, in native systems and in recombinant systems, and has been reported for GPCRs coupled to G(s)-, G(i)- and G(q)-proteins. Constitutive activity of neurotransmitter GPCRs may provide a tonic support for basal neuronal activity. For the majority of GPCRs known to be constitutively active, inverse agonists have already been identified. Inverse agonists may be useful

  2. Validation of a sensitive DNA walking strategy to characterise unauthorised GMOs using model food matrices mimicking common rice products.

    PubMed

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Roosens, Nancy H

    2015-04-15

    To identify unauthorised GMOs in food and feed matrices, an integrated approach has recently been developed targeting pCAMBIA family vectors, highly present in transgenic plants. Their presence is first assessed by qPCR screening and is subsequently confirmed by characterising the transgene flanking regions, using DNA walking. Here, the DNA walking performance has been thoroughly tested for the first time, regarding the targeted DNA quality and quantity. Several assays, on model food matrices mimicking common rice products, have allowed to determine the limit of detection as well as the potential effects of food mixture and processing. This detection system allows the identification of transgenic insertions as low as 10 HGEs and was not affected by the presence of untargeted DNA. Moreover, despite the clear impact of food processing on DNA quality, this method was able to cope with degraded DNA. Given its specificity, sensitivity, reliability, applicability and practicability, the proposed approach is a key detection tool, easily implementable in enforcement laboratories.

  3. Effects of water management practices on residue decomposition and degradation of Cry1Ac protein from crop-wild Bt rice hybrids and parental lines during winter fallow season.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Manqiu; Dong, Shanshan; Li, Zhaolei; Tang, Xu; Chen, Yi; Yang, Shengmao; Wu, Chunyan; Ouyang, Dongxin; Fang, Changming; Song, Zhiping

    2015-12-01

    Rice is the staple diet of over half of the world's population and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) rice expressing insecticidal Cry proteins is ready for deployment. An assessment of the potential impact of Bt rice on the soil ecosystem under varied field management practices is urgently required. We used litter bags to assess the residue (leaves, stems and roots) decomposition dynamics of two transgenic rice lines (Kefeng6 and Kefeng8) containing stacked genes from Bt and sck (a modified CpTI gene encoding a cowpea trypsin inhibitor) (Bt/CpTI), a non-transgenic rice near-isoline (Minghui86), wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) and crop-wild Bt rice hybrid under contrasting conditions (drainage or continuous flooding) in the field. No significant difference was detected in the remaining mass, total C and total N among cultivars under aerobic conditions, whereas significant differences in the remaining mass and total C were detected between Kefeng6 and Kefeng8 and Minghui86 under the flooded condition. A higher decomposition rate constant (km) was measured under the flooded condition compared with the aerobic condition for leaf residues, whereas the reverse was observed for root residues. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which was used to monitor the changes in the Cry1Ac protein in Bt rice residues, indicated that (1) the degradation of the Cry1Ac protein under both conditions best fit first-order kinetics, and the predicted DT50 (50% degradation time) of the Cry1Ac protein ranged from 3.6 to 32.5 days; (2) the Cry1Ac protein in the residue degraded relatively faster under aerobic conditions; and (3) by the end of the study (~154 days), the protein was present at a low concentration in the remaining residues under both conditions. The degradation rate constant was negatively correlated with the initial carbon content and positively correlated with the initial Cry1Ac protein concentration, but it was only correlated with the mass decomposition rate constants under

  4. Origin, dispersal, cultivation and variation of rice.

    PubMed

    Khush, G S

    1997-09-01

    There are two cultivated and twenty-one wild species of genus Oryza. O. sativa, the Asian cultivated rice is grown all over the world. The African cultivated rice, O. glaberrima is grown on a small scale in West Africa. The genus Oryza probably originated about 130 million years ago in Gondwanaland and different species got distributed into different continents with the breakup of Gondwanaland. The cultivated species originated from a common ancestor with AA genome. Perennial and annual ancestors of O. sativa are O. rufipogon and O. nivara and those of O. glaberrima are O. longistaminata, O. breviligulata and O. glaberrima probably domesticated in Niger river delta. Varieties of O. sativa are classified into six groups on the basis of genetic affinity. Widely known indica rices correspond to group I and japonicas to group VI. The so called javanica rices also belong to group VI and are designated as tropical japonicas in contrast to temperate japonicas grown in temperate climate. Indica and japonica rices had a polyphyletic origin. Indicas were probably domesticated in the foothills of Himalayas in Eastern India and japonicas somewhere in South China. The indica rices dispersed throughout the tropics and subtropics from India. The japonica rices moved northward from South China and became the temperate ecotype. They also moved southward to Southeast Asia and from there to West Africa and Brazil and became tropical ecotype. Rice is now grown between 55 degrees N and 36 degrees S latitudes. It is grown under diverse growing conditions such as irrigated, rainfed lowland, rainfed upland and floodprone ecosystems. Human selection and adaptation to diverse environments has resulted in numerous cultivars. It is estimated that about 120,000 varieties of rice exist in the world. After the establishment of International Rice Research Institute in 1960, rice varietal improvement was intensified and high yielding varieties were developed. These varieties are now planted to 70

  5. Analysis of random and specific sequences of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA in diploid and tetraploid american wild rice species (Oryza spp.).

    PubMed

    Buso, G S; Rangel, P H; Ferreira, M E

    2001-06-01

    A sample of American wild rice and other accessions of the genus Oryza were studied at polymorphic regions of nuclear, mitochondrial, and chloroplastic genomes. First, flow cytometry, genome-specific RAPD markers, and chromosome counting were utilized to verify the original ploidy and classification of 230 accessions studied. Based on these methods, 8% of the accessions were considered to be misclassified either taxonomically or as a result of contamination. Second, a fine resolution analysis was conducted at genomic regions sampled at random by RAPD markers and at specific sites of the chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA by cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) analysis. Phylogenetic trees resulting from phenetic and cladistic analyses of RAPD, cpDNA, and mtDNA polymorphisms were obtained. The results indicated that the American diploid species O. glumaepatula should be considered an individual species, distinct from O. rufipogon, and confirmed that the American tetraploid species (O. alta, O. grandiglumis, and O. latifolia) belong to the O. officinalis complex. The data indicate that these species should still be treated as a group rather than as three distinct species and that their closest relative is a CC-genome species. It was estimated that the diploid and tetraploid American species diverged from O. sativa - O. nivara (AA genome) and CC- and BBCC-genome species, respectively, 20 million years ago.

  6. A Comparative Study of the Common Protozoan Parasites of Clarias gariepinus from the Wild and Cultured Environments in Benue State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omeji, S; Solomon, S G; Idoga, E S

    2011-01-01

    A total of one hundred and twenty Clarias gariepinus comprising 30 dead and 30 live fishes were examined for protozoan parasites infestation, sixty each from the wild and a pond (cultured environment) over a period of six months. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis was the most common protozoan parasites found in C. gariepinus from the wild (River Benue) and cultured (pond) environments. These protozoan parasites constitute 37.08% of the total parasites encountered for fishes in the pond and 42.51% of fishes in the wild. Among the body parts of the sampled fishes from the pond, the gills had the highest parasite load (38.86%). Also, the gills had the highest parasite load (40.54%) among the body parts of the fishes sampled from the wild. Fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the pond constituted 36.70% of the total fish sampled. On the other hand, fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the wild constituted 31.65% of the total fish sampled. Female fishes had more protozoan parasites than the male fishes. Bigger fishes of total length (25-48 cm) had more parasite load than the smaller ones (19-24 cm). Also, fishes between 150-750 g had more parasite load than the smaller ones of less than 150 g. Protozoan parasite load of fish from the cultured environment (pond) did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) from those from River Benue (wild).

  7. Asymmetry of gene flow and differential geographical structure of molecular diversity in wild and domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Papa, R; Gepts, P

    2003-01-01

    Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), we analyzed the genetic structure of wild and domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mesoamerica at different geographical levels to test the hypothesis of asymmetric gene flow and investigate the origin of weedy populations. We showed both by phenetic and admixture population analyses that gene flow is about three- to four-fold higher from domesticated to wild populations than in the reverse direction. This result, combined with other work, points to a displacement of genetic diversity in wild populations due to gene flow from the domesticated populations. The weedy populations appear to be genetically intermediate between domesticated and wild populations, suggesting that they originated by hybridization between wild and domesticated types rather than by escape from cultivation. In addition, the domesticated bean races were genetically similar confirming a single domestication event for the Mesoamerican gene pool. Finally, the genetic diversity of the domesticated bean population showed a lower level of geographic structure in comparison to that of the wild populations.

  8. Commonality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Albert E., Jr.

    Commonality analysis is an attempt to understand the relative predictive power of the regressor variables, both individually and in combination. The squared multiple correlation is broken up into elements assigned to each individual regressor and to each possible combination of regressors. The elements have the property that the appropriate sums…

  9. Molecular ecology and selection in the drought-related Asr gene polymorphisms in wild and cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The abscisic acid (ABA) pathway plays an important role in the plants’ reaction to drought stress and ABA-stress response (Asr) genes are important in controlling this process. In this sense, we accessed nucleotide diversity at two candidate genes for drought tolerance (Asr1 and Asr2), involved in an ABA signaling pathway, in the reference collection of cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and a core collection of wild common bean accessions. Results Our wild population samples covered a range of mesic (semi-arid) to very dry (desert) habitats, while our cultivated samples presented a wide spectrum of drought tolerance. Both genes showed very different patterns of nucleotide variation. Asr1 exhibited very low nucleotide diversity relative to the neutral reference loci that were previously surveyed in these populations. This suggests that strong purifying selection has been acting on this gene. In contrast, Asr2 exhibited higher levels of nucleotide diversity, which is indicative of adaptive selection. These patterns were more notable in wild beans than in cultivated common beans indicting that natural selection has played a role over long time periods compared to farmer selection since domestication. Conclusions Together these results suggested the importance of Asr1 in the context of drought tolerance, and constitute the first steps towards an association study between genetic polymorphism of this gene family and variation in drought tolerance traits. Furthermore, one of our major successes was to find that wild common bean is a reservoir of genetic variation and selection signatures at Asr genes, which may be useful for breeding drought tolerance in cultivated common bean. PMID:22799462

  10. Evaluation of various QuEChERS based methods for the analysis of herbicides and other commonly used pesticides in polished rice by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Lucía; Cesio, Verónica; Heinzen, Horacio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2011-02-15

    Four different extraction and clean-up protocols based on the QuEChERS method were compared for the development of an optimized sample preparation procedure for the multiresidue analysis of 16 commonly applied herbicides in rice crops using LC-QqQ/MS. Additionally the methods were evaluated for the analysis of 26 insecticides and fungicides currently used in rice crops. The methods comprise, in general, the hydratation of the sample with water followed by the extraction with acetonitrile, phase separation with the addition of different salts and finally a clean-up step with various sorbents. Matrix effects were evaluated for the 4 studied methods using LC-QqQ/MS. Additionally LC-TOF/MS was used to compare the co-extractants obtained with the four assayed methodologies. Thirty-six pesticides presented good performance with recoveries in the range 70-120% and relative standard deviations below 20% using 7.5 g of milled polished rice and the buffered acetate QuEChERS method without clean-up at both fortification levels: 10 and 300 μg kg(-1). The other six pesticides presented low recovery rates, nevertheless all these analytes could be analyzed with at least one of the other three studied procedures.

  11. Escape to Ferality: The Endoferal Origin of Weedy Rice from Crop Rice through De-Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Gettler, Kyle A.; Burgos, Nilda R.; Fischer, Albert J.

    2016-01-01

    Domestication is the hallmark of evolution and civilization and harnesses biodiversity through selection for specific traits. In regions where domesticated lines are grown near wild relatives, congeneric sources of aggressive weedy genotypes cause major economic losses. Thus, the origins of weedy genotypes where no congeneric species occur raise questions regarding management effectiveness and evolutionary mechanisms responsible for weedy population success. Since eradication in the 1970s, California growers avoided weedy rice through continuous flood culture and zero-tolerance guidelines, preventing the import, presence, and movement of weedy seeds. In 2003, after decades of no reported presence in California, a weedy rice population was confirmed in dry-seeded fields. Our objectives were to identify the origins and establishment of this population and pinpoint possible phenotypes involved. We show that California weedy rice is derived from a different genetic source among a broad range of AA genome Oryzas and is most recently diverged from O. sativa temperate japonica cultivated in California. In contrast, other weedy rice ecotypes in North America (Southern US) originate from weedy genotypes from China near wild Oryza, and are derived through existing crop-wild relative crosses. Analyses of morphological data show that California weedy rice subgroups have phenotypes like medium-grain or gourmet cultivars, but have colored pericarp, seed shattering, and awns like wild relatives, suggesting that reversion to non-domestic or wild-like traits can occur following domestication, despite apparent fixation of domestication alleles. Additionally, these results indicate that preventive methods focused on incoming weed sources through contamination may miss burgeoning weedy genotypes that rapidly adapt, establish, and proliferate. Investigating the common and unique evolutionary mechanisms underlying global weed origins and subsequent interactions with crop relatives sheds

  12. Escape to Ferality: The Endoferal Origin of Weedy Rice from Crop Rice through De-Domestication.

    PubMed

    Kanapeckas, Kimberly L; Vigueira, Cynthia C; Ortiz, Aida; Gettler, Kyle A; Burgos, Nilda R; Fischer, Albert J; Lawton-Rauh, Amy L

    Domestication is the hallmark of evolution and civilization and harnesses biodiversity through selection for specific traits. In regions where domesticated lines are grown near wild relatives, congeneric sources of aggressive weedy genotypes cause major economic losses. Thus, the origins of weedy genotypes where no congeneric species occur raise questions regarding management effectiveness and evolutionary mechanisms responsible for weedy population success. Since eradication in the 1970s, California growers avoided weedy rice through continuous flood culture and zero-tolerance guidelines, preventing the import, presence, and movement of weedy seeds. In 2003, after decades of no reported presence in California, a weedy rice population was confirmed in dry-seeded fields. Our objectives were to identify the origins and establishment of this population and pinpoint possible phenotypes involved. We show that California weedy rice is derived from a different genetic source among a broad range of AA genome Oryzas and is most recently diverged from O. sativa temperate japonica cultivated in California. In contrast, other weedy rice ecotypes in North America (Southern US) originate from weedy genotypes from China near wild Oryza, and are derived through existing crop-wild relative crosses. Analyses of morphological data show that California weedy rice subgroups have phenotypes like medium-grain or gourmet cultivars, but have colored pericarp, seed shattering, and awns like wild relatives, suggesting that reversion to non-domestic or wild-like traits can occur following domestication, despite apparent fixation of domestication alleles. Additionally, these results indicate that preventive methods focused on incoming weed sources through contamination may miss burgeoning weedy genotypes that rapidly adapt, establish, and proliferate. Investigating the common and unique evolutionary mechanisms underlying global weed origins and subsequent interactions with crop relatives sheds

  13. Common cancer in a wild animal: the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) as an emerging model for carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Browning, Helen M; Gulland, Frances M D; Hammond, John A; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Hall, Ailsa J

    2015-07-19

    Naturally occurring cancers in non-laboratory species have great potential in helping to decipher the often complex causes of neoplasia. Wild animal models could add substantially to our understanding of carcinogenesis, particularly of genetic and environmental interactions, but they are currently underutilized. Studying neoplasia in wild animals is difficult and especially challenging in marine mammals owing to their inaccessibility, lack of exposure history, and ethical, logistical and legal limits on experimentation. Despite this, California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) offer an opportunity to investigate risk factors for neoplasia development that have implications for terrestrial mammals and humans who share much of their environment and diet. A relatively accessible California sea lion population on the west coast of the USA has a high prevalence of urogenital carcinoma and is regularly sampled during veterinary care in wildlife rehabilitation centres. Collaborative studies have revealed that genotype, persistent organic pollutants and a herpesvirus are all associated with this cancer. This paper reviews research to date on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of urogenital carcinoma in this species, and presents the California sea lion as an important and currently underexploited wild animal model of carcinogenesis.

  14. Common cancer in a wild animal: the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) as an emerging model for carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Helen M.; Gulland, Frances M. D.; Hammond, John A.; Colegrove, Kathleen M.; Hall, Ailsa J.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring cancers in non-laboratory species have great potential in helping to decipher the often complex causes of neoplasia. Wild animal models could add substantially to our understanding of carcinogenesis, particularly of genetic and environmental interactions, but they are currently underutilized. Studying neoplasia in wild animals is difficult and especially challenging in marine mammals owing to their inaccessibility, lack of exposure history, and ethical, logistical and legal limits on experimentation. Despite this, California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) offer an opportunity to investigate risk factors for neoplasia development that have implications for terrestrial mammals and humans who share much of their environment and diet. A relatively accessible California sea lion population on the west coast of the USA has a high prevalence of urogenital carcinoma and is regularly sampled during veterinary care in wildlife rehabilitation centres. Collaborative studies have revealed that genotype, persistent organic pollutants and a herpesvirus are all associated with this cancer. This paper reviews research to date on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of urogenital carcinoma in this species, and presents the California sea lion as an important and currently underexploited wild animal model of carcinogenesis. PMID:26056370

  15. Effects of physical and biogeochemical processes on aquatic ecosystems at the groundwater-surface water interface: An evaluation of a sulfate-impacted wild rice stream in Minnesota (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, G. H. C.; Yourd, A. R.; Myrbo, A.; Johnson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Significant uncertainty and variability in physical and biogeochemical processes at the groundwater-surface water interface complicate how surface water chemistry affects aquatic ecosystems. Questions surrounding a unique 10 mg/L sulfate standard for wild rice (Zizania sp.) waters in Minnesota are driving research to clarify conditions controlling the geochemistry of shallow sediment porewater in stream- and lake-beds. This issue raises the need and opportunity to carry out in-depth, process-based analysis into how water fluxes and coupled C, S, and Fe redox cycles interact to impact aquatic plants. Our study builds on a recent state-wide field campaign that showed that accumulation of porewater sulfide from sulfate reduction impairs wild rice, an annual grass that grows in shallow lakes and streams in the Great Lakes region of North America. Negative porewater sulfide correlations with organic C and Fe quantities also indicated that lower redox rates and greater mineral precipitation attenuate sulfide. Here, we focus on a stream in northern Minnesota that receives high sulfate loading from iron mining activity yet maintains wild rice stands. In addition to organic C and Fe effects, we evaluate the degree to which streambed hydrology, and in particular groundwater contributions, accounts for the active biogeochemistry. We collect field measurements, spanning the surrounding groundwater system to the stream, to constrain a reactive-transport model. Observations from seepage meters, temperature probes, and monitoring wells delineate upward flow that may lessen surface water impacts below the stream. Geochemical analyses of groundwater, porewater, and surface water samples and of sediment extractions reveal distinctions among the different domains and stream banks, which appear to jointly control conditions in the streambed. A model based on field conditions can be used to evaluate the relative the importance and the spatiotemporal scales of diverse flux and

  16. Genome-wide identification of microRNAs and their targets in wild type and phyB mutant provides a key link between microRNAs and the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway in rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Xu, Xiao Hui; Wu, Xiu; Wang, Yong; Lu, Xingbo; Sun, Hongwei; Xie, Xianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Phytochrome B (phyB), a member of the phytochrome family in rice, plays important roles in regulating a range of developmental processes and stress responses. However, little information about the mechanisms involved in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway has been reported in rice. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) also perform important roles in plant development and stress responses. Thus, it is intriguing to explore the role of miRNAs in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway in rice. In this study, comparative high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis were used to identify candidate miRNAs and their targets that participate in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway. A total of 720 known miRNAs, 704 novel miRNAs and 1957 target genes were identified from the fourth leaves of wild-type (WT) and phyB mutant rice at the five-leaf stage. Among them, 135 miRNAs showed differential expression, suggesting that the expression of these miRNAs is directly or indirectly under the control of phyB. In addition, 32 out of the 135 differentially expressed miRNAs were found to slice 70 genes in the rice genome. Analysis of these target genes showed that members of various transcription factor families constituted the largest proportion, indicating miRNAs are probably involved in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway mainly by regulating the expression of transcription factors. Our results provide new clues for functional characterization of miRNAs in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway, which should be helpful in comprehensively uncovering the molecular mechanisms of phytochrome-mediated photomorphogenesis and stress responses in plants. PMID:26074936

  17. An injury equivalency system for establishing a common economic threshold for three species of rice planthoppers (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shou-Horng; Chen, Ching-Huan; Chen, Chiou-Nan; Wu, Wen-Jer

    2013-04-01

    The economic threshold (ET) for multiple pest species that share the same injury type on host plants (feeding guild) has been proposed for decision-making in integrated management framework of many defoliating insect pests. However, only a few consider agricultural pests with sucking mouthparts. This study presents the first injury equivalency system for the feeding guild made up of three rice (Oryza sativa L.) planthopper (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) species--Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), Sogatella furcifera (Harváth), and Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén)--by using relative amount of honeydew excretion of each species. The intraspecific injury equivalent coefficient was determined; this coefficient provides an exchange rate for different developmental stages in a species. N. lugens was chosen as the standard species to obtain interspecific injury equivalents for other individuals in the guild, allowing estimates of total guild injury feasible. For extension purposes, the injury equivalency was simplified by pooling all nymphs and adults in the guild to mitigate the potential confusion resulting from uncertainty of instars or wing form. A matrix of ETs established on previous studies and incorporating changes of management cost and rice price was used and served as a control decision guide for the guild samples. The validity of the proposed injury equivalency system was tested using several field data sets, and the results are generally promising and meaningfully elevate the accuracy of estimating combined injury and damage to rice, suggesting that the proposed system is a better integrated pest management decision-making system compared with conventional practices.

  18. 29 CFR 780.114 - Wild commodities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... harvesting of wild commodities such as mosses, wild rice, burls and laurel plants, the trapping of wild... in “the production, cultivation, growing, and harvesting of agricultural or horticultural commodities... ordinarily grows wild without being cultivated does not preclude them from being classed as “agricultural...

  19. 29 CFR 780.114 - Wild commodities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... harvesting of wild commodities such as mosses, wild rice, burls and laurel plants, the trapping of wild... in “the production, cultivation, growing, and harvesting of agricultural or horticultural commodities... ordinarily grows wild without being cultivated does not preclude them from being classed as “agricultural...

  20. 29 CFR 780.114 - Wild commodities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... harvesting of wild commodities such as mosses, wild rice, burls and laurel plants, the trapping of wild... in “the production, cultivation, growing, and harvesting of agricultural or horticultural commodities... ordinarily grows wild without being cultivated does not preclude them from being classed as “agricultural...

  1. 29 CFR 780.114 - Wild commodities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... harvesting of wild commodities such as mosses, wild rice, burls and laurel plants, the trapping of wild... in “the production, cultivation, growing, and harvesting of agricultural or horticultural commodities... ordinarily grows wild without being cultivated does not preclude them from being classed as “agricultural...

  2. 29 CFR 780.114 - Wild commodities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... harvesting of wild commodities such as mosses, wild rice, burls and laurel plants, the trapping of wild... in “the production, cultivation, growing, and harvesting of agricultural or horticultural commodities... ordinarily grows wild without being cultivated does not preclude them from being classed as “agricultural...

  3. The effect of salinity on chlorophyll, proline and mineral nutrients in common weeds of coastal rice fields in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hakim, M A; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M M; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Rafii, M Y; Aslani, Fazad; Selamat, A

    2014-09-01

    Six weed species (Leptochola chinensis, Echinochloa crus-galli, Echinochloa colona, Jussiaea linifolia, Oryza sativa (weedy rice) and Cyperus iria) were tested for their salt tolerant traits in terms of chlorophyll, proline and mineral nutrients accumulation against different salinity levels (0, 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 dS m(-1)). Chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll content, proline and mineral nutrients accumulation were determined. Salt stress showed prominent effect on all the parameters investigated and there were significant variations between the all weed species. Chlorophyll content, K+, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions in both shoots and roots significantly decreased; while proline and Na+ accumulation significantly increased with increasing salinity up to 40 dS m(-1). In terms of overall performance, Cyperus iria and E. crus-galliwere relatively more tolerant; E. colona and J. linifolia were tolerant; L. chinensis and O. sativa L were salt sensitive, respectively.

  4. A common Caatinga cactus, Pilosocereus gounellei, is an important ecotope of wild Triatoma brasiliensis populations in the Jaguaribe valley of northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Lima, Marli M; Sarquis, Otília; Bezerra, Claudia M; Abad-Franch, Fernando

    2014-06-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis is the most important vector of Chagas disease in the Caatinga eco-region of northeastern Brazil. Wild T. brasiliensis populations have been reported only from rocky outcrops. However, this species frequently infests/re-infests houses in rock-free sedimentary lowlands. We therefore hypothesized that it should also occupy other natural ecotopes. We show that a common Caatinga cactus, Pilosocereus gounellei, locally known as xiquexique, often harbors T. brasiliensis breeding colonies apparently associated with rodents (n = 44 cacti, infestation rate = 47.7%, 157 bugs captured). Our findings suggest that infested cacti might be involved in house re-infestation by T. brasiliensis in the Caatinga region.

  5. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J J P; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Giraud, Sophie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Eisinger, François; Bressac de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Delnatte, Capucine; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alex; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Buys, Saundra; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Hansen, Thomas V O; Johannsson, Oskar; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Basil, Jack B; Blank, Stephanie; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Isaacs, Claudine; Blanco, Ignacio; Gayther, Simon A; Moysich, Kirsten B; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Fiebig, Britta; Caldes, Trinidad; Laframboise, Rachel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA1 gene would modify the risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 mutations. A total of 9874 BRCA1 mutation carriers were available in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) for haplotype analyses of BRCA1. Women carrying the rare allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs16942 on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 were at decreased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.95, P = 0.003). Promoter in vitro assays of the major BRCA1 haplotypes showed that common polymorphisms in the regulatory region alter its activity and that this effect may be attributed to the differential binding affinity of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, variants on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 modify risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1 mutations, possibly by altering the efficiency of BRCA1 transcription.

  6. Genetic and comparative genomics mapping reveals that a powdery mildew resistance gene Ml3D232 originating from wild emmer co-segregates with an NBS-LRR analog in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongtao; Guan, Haiying; Li, Jingting; Zhu, Jie; Xie, Chaojie; Zhou, Yilin; Duan, Xiayu; Yang, Tsomin; Sun, Qixin; Liu, Zhiyong

    2010-11-01

    Powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici is one of the most important wheat diseases worldwide and breeding for resistance using diversified disease resistance genes is the most promising approach to prevent outbreaks of powdery mildew. A powdery mildew resistance gene, originating from wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum var. dicoccoides) accessions collected from Israel, has been transferred into the hexaploid wheat line 3D232 through crossing and backcrossing. Inoculation results with 21 B. graminis f. sp. tritici races indicated that 3D232 is resistant to all of the powdery mildew isolates tested. Genetic analyses of 3D232 using an F(2) segregating population and F(3) families indicated that a single dominant gene, Ml3D232, confers resistance in the host seedling stage. By applying molecular markers and bulked segregant analysis (BSA), we have identified polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSR), expressed sequence tags (EST) and derived sequence tagged site (STS) markers to determine that the Ml3D232 is located on chromosome 5BL bin 0.59-0.76. Comparative genetic analyses using mapped EST markers and genome sequences of rice and Brachypodium established co-linearity of the Ml3D232 genomic region with a 1.4 Mb genomic region on Brachypodium distachyon chromosome 4, and a 1.2 Mb contig located on the Oryza sativa chromosome 9. Our comparative approach enabled us to develop new EST-STS markers and to delimit the genomic region carrying Ml3D232 to a 0.8 cM segment that is collinear with a 558 kb region on B. distachyon. Eight EST markers, including an NBS-LRR analog, co-segregated with Ml3D232 to provide a target site for fine genetic mapping, chromosome landing and map-based cloning of the powdery mildew resistance gene. This newly developed common wheat germplasm provides broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew and a valuable resource for wheat breeding programs.

  7. Identification of common inhibitors of wild-type and T315I mutant of BCR-ABL through the parallel structure-based virtual screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hwangseo; Hong, Seunghee; Hong, Sungwoo

    2012-08-01

    Although the constitutively activated break-point cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) tyrosine kinase was well known to be responsible for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the existence of drug-resistant mutants of BCR-ABL has made it difficult to develop effective anti-CML drugs. Here, we report the first example for a successful application of the structure-based virtual screening to identify two common inhibitors equipotent for the wild type and the most drug-resistant T315I mutant of BCR-ABL. Because both inhibitors were screened for having desirable physicochemical properties as a drug candidate and revealed micromolar inhibitory activities, they deserve consideration for further development by structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies to optimize the anti-CML activity. We also address the structural features relevant to the stabilizations of the identified inhibitors in the ATP-binding sites. The results indicate that the inhibitors should be less stabilized by the hydrogen-bond interactions with the change of the receptor from the wild type to T315I mutant due to the replacement of the hydroxy group with the ethyl moiety in the ATP-binding site. Nonetheless, the inhibitors are found to be capable of maintaining the potency for the mutant through the strengthening of hydrophobic interactions to the extent sufficient to compensate for the loss of some hydrogen bonds. This differential binding mode may serve as key information for designing new common inhibitors of the wild type and T315I mutant of BCR-ABL.

  8. Evidence for Directional Selection at a Novel Major Histocompatibility Class I Marker in Wild Common Frogs (Rana temporaria) Exposed to a Viral Pathogen (Ranavirus)

    PubMed Central

    Teacher, Amber G. F.; Garner, Trenton W. J.; Nichols, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Whilst the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is well characterized in the anuran Xenopus, this region has not previously been studied in another popular model species, the common frog (Rana temporaria). Nor, to date, have there been any studies of MHC in wild amphibian host-pathogen systems. We characterise an MHC class I locus in the common frog, and present primers to amplify both the whole region, and specifically the antigen binding region. As no more than two expressed haplotypes were found in over 400 clones from 66 individuals, it is likely that there is a single class I locus in this species. This finding is consistent with the single class I locus in Xenopus, but contrasts with the multiple loci identified in axolotls, providing evidence that the diversification of MHC class I into multiple loci likely occurred after the Caudata/Anura divergence (approximately 350 million years ago) but before the Ranidae/Pipidae divergence (approximately 230 mya). We use this locus to compare wild populations of common frogs that have been infected with a viral pathogen (Ranavirus) with those that have no history of infection. We demonstrate that certain MHC supertypes are associated with infection status (even after accounting for shared ancestry), and that the diseased populations have more similar supertype frequencies (lower FST) than the uninfected. These patterns were not seen in a suite of putatively neutral microsatellite loci. We interpret this pattern at the MHC locus to indicate that the disease has imposed selection for particular haplotypes, and hence that common frogs may be adapting to the presence of Ranavirus, which currently kills tens of thousands of amphibians in the UK each year. PMID:19240796

  9. Common Genetic Pathways Regulate Organ-Specific Infection-Related Development in the Rice Blast Fungus[W

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Sara L.; Besi, Maria I.; Galhano, Rita; Franceschetti, Marina; Goetz, Stephan; Lenhert, Steven; Osbourn, Anne; Sesma, Ane

    2010-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the most important fungal pathogen of rice (Oryza sativa). Under laboratory conditions, it is able to colonize both aerial and underground plant organs using different mechanisms. Here, we characterize an infection-related development in M. oryzae produced on hydrophilic polystyrene (PHIL-PS) and on roots. We show that fungal spores develop preinvasive hyphae (pre-IH) from hyphopodia (root penetration structures) or germ tubes and that pre-IH also enter root cells. Changes in fungal cell wall structure accompanying pre-IH are seen on both artificial and root surfaces. Using characterized mutants, we show that the PMK1 (for pathogenicity mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) pathway is required for pre-IH development. Twenty mutants with altered pre-IH differentiation on PHIL-PS identified from an insertional library of 2885 M. oryzae T-DNA transformants were found to be defective in pathogenicity. The phenotypic analysis of these mutants revealed that appressorium, hyphopodium, and pre-IH formation are genetically linked fungal developmental processes. We further characterized one of these mutants, M1373, which lacked the M. oryzae ortholog of exportin-5/Msn5p (EXP5). Mutants lacking EXP5 were much less virulent on roots, suggesting an important involvement of proteins and/or RNAs transported by EXP5 during M. oryzae root infection. PMID:20348434

  10. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Flint, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 μg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  11. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders.

    PubMed

    Franson, J Christian; Hoffman, David J; Flint, Paul L

    2011-06-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 µg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  12. Wild Marshmallows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallas, John N.

    1984-01-01

    Provides information for teaching a unit on wild plants, including resources to use, plants to learn, safety considerations, list of plants (with scientific name, edible parts, and uses), list of plants that might cause allergic reactions when eaten. Also describes the chickweed, bull thistle, and common mallow. (BC)

  13. Genome assembly of the fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus, and transcriptome analysis during early stages of infection on American wild rice (Zizania palustris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cochliobolus miyabeanus causes a severe, yield-reducing leaf spot disease on rice (Oryza sativa) and two North American specialty crops, American wildrice (Zizania palustris) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Despite the importance of the pathogen in wildrice, little is known about mechanisms of p...

  14. Wild-type and mutant SOD1 share an aberrant conformation and a common pathogenic pathway in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Daryl A.; Morfini, Gerardo; Karabacak, N. Murat; Song, Yuyu; Gros-Louis, Francois; Pasinelli, Piera; Goolsby, Holly; Fontaine, Benjamin A.; Lemay, Nathan; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Frosch, Matthew P.; Agar, Jeffery N.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Brady, Scott T.; Brown, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Many mutations confer upon copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) one or more toxic function(s) that impair motor neuron viability and cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Using a conformation-specific antibody that detects misfolded SOD1 (C4F6), we demonstrate that oxidized WT-SOD1 and mutant-SOD1 share a conformational epitope that is not present in normal WT-SOD1. In a subset of human sporadic ALS (SALS) cases, motor neurons in the lumbosacral spinal cord displayed striking C4F6 immunoreactivity, denoting the presence of aberrant WT-SOD1 species. Recombinant, oxidized WT-SOD1 and WT-SOD1 immunopurified from SALS tissues inhibited kinesin-based fast axonal transport in a manner similar to FALS-linked mutant SOD1. Studies here suggest that WT-SOD1 can be pathogenic in SALS and identifies an SOD1-dependent pathogenic mechanism common to FALS and SALS. PMID:20953194

  15. Cross-species bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library screening via overgo-based hybridization and BAC-contig mapping of a yield enhancement quantitative trait locus (QTL) yld1.1 in the Malaysian wild rice Oryza rufipogon.

    PubMed

    Song, Beng-Kah; Nadarajah, Kalaivani; Romanov, Michael N; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2005-01-01

    The construction of BAC-contig physical maps is an important step towards a partial or ultimate genome sequence analysis. Here, we describe our initial efforts to apply an overgo approach to screen a BAC library of the Malaysian wild rice species, Oryza rufipogon. Overgo design is based on repetitive element masking and sequence uniqueness, and uses short probes (approximately 40 bp), making this method highly efficient and specific. Pairs of 24-bp oligos that contain an 8-bp overlap were developed from the publicly available genomic sequences of the cultivated rice, O. sativa, to generate 20 overgo probes for a 1-Mb region that encompasses a yield enhancement QTL yld1.1 in O. rufipogon. The advantages of a high similarity in melting temperature, hybridization kinetics and specific activities of overgos further enabled a pooling strategy for library screening by filter hybridization. Two pools of ten overgos each were hybridized to high-density filters representing the O. rufipogon genomic BAC library. These screening tests succeeded in providing 69 PCR-verified positive hits from a total of 23,040 BAC clones of the entire O. rufipogon library. A minimal tilling path of clones was generated to contribute to a fully covered BAC-contig map of the targeted 1-Mb region. The developed protocol for overgo design based on O. sativa sequences as a comparative genomic framework, and the pooled overgo hybridization screening technique are suitable means for high-resolution physical mapping and the identification of BAC candidates for sequencing.

  16. Natural variation of rice blast resistance gene Pi-d2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studying natural variation of rice resistance (R) genes in cultivated and wild rice relatives can predict resistance stability to rice blast fungus. In the present study, the protein coding regions of rice R gene Pi-d2 in 35 rice accessions of subgroups, aus (AUS), indica (IND), temperate japonica (...

  17. Analysis of nucleotide diversity among alleles of the major bacterial blight resistance gene Xa27 in cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) and its wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Shankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Reddy, Gajjala Ashok; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2013-08-01

    Xa27 is one of the important R-genes, effective against bacterial blight disease of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Using natural population of Oryza, we analyzed the sequence variation in the functionally important domains of Xa27 across the Oryza species. DNA sequences of Xa27 alleles from 27 rice accessions revealed higher nucleotide diversity among the reported R-genes of rice. Sequence polymorphism analysis revealed synonymous and non-synonymous mutations in addition to a number of InDels in non-coding regions of the gene. High sequence variation was observed in the promoter region including the 5'UTR with 'π' value 0.00916 and 'θ w ' = 0.01785. Comparative analysis of the identified Xa27 alleles with that of IRBB27 and IR24 indicated the operation of both positive selection (Ka/Ks > 1) and neutral selection (Ka/Ks ≈ 0). The genetic distances of alleles of the gene from Oryza nivara were nearer to IRBB27 as compared to IR24. We also found the presence of conserved and null UPT (upregulated by transcriptional activator) box in the isolated alleles. Considerable amino acid polymorphism was localized in the trans-membrane domain for which the functional significance is yet to be elucidated. However, the absence of functional UPT box in all the alleles except IRBB27 suggests the maintenance of single resistant allele throughout the natural population.

  18. Characterization of functional trait diversity among Indian cultivated and weedy rice populations

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, M.; Singh, Raghwendra; Kumar, B.; Chauhan, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Weedy rice, a menace in rice growing areas globally, is biosimilar having attributes similar to cultivated and wild rice, and therefore is difficult to manage. A study was initiated to characterize the functional traits of 76 weedy rice populations and commonly grown rice cultivars from different agro-climatic zones for nine morphological, five physiological, and three phenological parameters in a field experiment under an augmented block design. Comparison between weedy and cultivated rice revealed a difference in duration (days) from panicle emergence to heading as the most variable trait and awn length as the least variable one, as evidenced from their coefficients of variation. The results of principal component analysis revealed the first three principal components to represent 47.3% of the total variation, which indicates an important role of transpiration, conductance, leaf-air temperature difference, days to panicle emergence, days to heading, flag leaf length, SPAD (soil-plant analysis development), grain weight, plant height, and panicle length to the diversity in weedy rice populations. The variations existing in weedy rice population are a major reason for its wider adaptability to varied environmental conditions and also a problem while trying to manage it. PMID:27072282

  19. PDH45 overexpressing transgenic tobacco and rice plants provide salinity stress tolerance via less sodium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Nath, Manoj; Garg, Bharti; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress negatively affects the crop productivity worldwide, including that of rice. Coping with these losses is a major concern for all countries. The pea DNA helicase, PDH45 is a unique member of helicase family involved in the salinity stress tolerance. However, the exact mechanism of the PDH45 in salinity stress tolerance is yet to be established. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of PDH45-mediated salinity stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco and rice lines along with wild type (WT) plants using CoroNa Green dye based sodium localization in root and shoot sections. The results showed that under salinity stress root and shoot of PDH45 overexpressing transgenic tobacco and rice accumulated less sodium (Na(+)) as compared to their respective WT. The present study also reports salinity tolerant (FL478) and salinity susceptible (Pusa-44) varieties of rice accumulated lowest and highest Na(+) level, respectively. All the varieties and transgenic lines of rice accumulate differential Na(+) ions in root and shoot. However, roots accumulate high Na(+) as compared to the shoots in both tobacco and rice transgenic lines suggesting that the Na(+) transport in shoot is somehow inhibited. It is proposed that the PDH45 is probably involved in the deposition of apoplastic hydrophobic barriers and consequently inhibit Na(+) transport to shoot and therefore confers salinity stress tolerance to PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines. This study concludes that tobacco (dicot) and rice (monocot) transgenic plants probably share common salinity tolerance mechanism mediated by PDH45 gene.

  20. A knowledge-based molecular screen uncovers a broad-spectrum OsSWEET14 resistance allele to bacterial blight from wild rice.

    PubMed

    Hutin, Mathilde; Sabot, François; Ghesquière, Alain; Koebnik, Ralf; Szurek, Boris

    2015-11-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are type III-delivered transcription factors that enhance the virulence of plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species through the activation of host susceptibility (S) genes. TAL effectors recognize their DNA target(s) via a partially degenerate code, whereby modular repeats in the TAL effector bind to nucleotide sequences in the host promoter. Although this knowledge has greatly facilitated our power to identify new S genes, it can also be easily used to screen plant genomes for variations in TAL effector target sequences and to predict for loss-of-function gene candidates in silico. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we screened a germplasm of 169 rice accessions for polymorphism in the promoter of the major bacterial blight susceptibility S gene OsSWEET14, which encodes a sugar transporter targeted by numerous strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. We identified a single allele with a deletion of 18 bp overlapping with the binding sites targeted by several TAL effectors known to activate the gene. We show that this allele, which we call xa41(t), confers resistance against half of the tested Xoo strains, representative of various geographic origins and genetic lineages, highlighting the selective pressure on the pathogen to accommodate OsSWEET14 polymorphism, and reciprocally the apparent limited possibilities for the host to create variability at this particular S gene. Analysis of xa41(t) conservation across the Oryza genus enabled us to hypothesize scenarios as to its evolutionary history, prior to and during domestication. Our findings demonstrate that resistance through TAL effector-dependent loss of S-gene expression can be greatly fostered upon knowledge-based molecular screening of a large collection of host plants.

  1. Suppressor of rid1 (SID1) shares common targets with RID1 on florigen genes to initiate floral transition in rice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianqiang; Xiao, Jinghua; Wu, Changyin

    2017-01-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive growth is a critical process in the life cycle of higher plants. Previously, we cloned Rice Indeterminate 1 (RID1), which acts as the master switch for the transition from the vegetative to reproductive phase in rice. Although the photoperiod pathway of RID1 inducing expression of the florigen genes Hd3a and RFT1 via Ehd1 has been established, the alternative pathways for the essential flowering transition need to be further examined. Here, we identified a Suppressor of rid1 (SID1), which rescues the never-flowering phenotype of rid1. SID1 encodes an INDETERMINATE DOMAIN (IDD) transcription factor. Mutation in SID1 showed the delayed flowering phenotype. Gain-of-function of SID1, OsIDD1, or OsIDD6 could restore the rid1 to flowering. Further analyses showed SID1 and RID1 directly target the promoter regions of Hd3a and RFT1, two florigen genes in rice. Taken together, our results reveal an autonomous flowering pathway might be mediated by RID1, thereby controlling the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive development in rice. PMID:28234896

  2. Using the rice diversity panel 1 to develop novel germplasm for breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rice Diversity Project aims to explore the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic variation in a panel of rice (Oryza sativa) landraces, elite cultivars, and wild ancestors to utilize this broad range of natural variation in rice improvement. The ‘Rice Diversity Panel 1’ (RDP1) is compose...

  3. Oryzabase. An integrated biological and genome information database for rice.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Nori; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2006-01-01

    The aim of Oryzabase is to create a comprehensive view of rice (Oryza sativa) as a model monocot plant by integrating biological data with molecular genomic information (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/rice/oryzabase/top/top.jsp). The database contains information about rice development and anatomy, rice mutants, and genetic resources, especially for wild varieties of rice. The anatomical description of rice development is unique and is the first known representation for rice. Developmental and anatomical descriptions include in situ gene expression data serving as stage and tissue markers. The systematic presentation of a large number of rice mutant and mutant trait genes is indispensable, as is description of research in wild strains, core collections, and their detailed characterization. Several genetic, physical, and expression maps with full genome and cDNA sequences are also combined with biological data in Oryzabase. These datasets, when pooled together, could provide a useful tool for gaining greater knowledge about the life cycle of rice, the relationship between phenotype and gene function, and rice genetic diversity. For exchanging community information, Oryzabase publishes the Rice Genetics Newsletter organized by the Rice Genetics Cooperative and provides a mailing service, rice-e-net/rice-net.

  4. Golden Rice is an effective source for vitamin A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetically engineered "Golden Rice" contains up to 35 ug Beta-carotene per gram of rice. It is important to determine the vitamin A equivalency of Golden Rice Beta-carotene to project the potential effect of this biofortified grain in rice-consuming populations that commonly exhibit low vitamin A s...

  5. Identification of SNPs in the waxy gene among glutinous rice cultivars and their evolutionary significance during the domestication process of rice.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo N; Sato, Yo-Ichiro

    2004-05-01

    Common non-waxy ( Wx) rice cultivars contain two different alleles at the waxy locus, designated Wx(a) and Wx(b), which encode different levels of granule-bound starch synthases and are hence involved in the control of endosperm amylose content. The Wx(a) allele was predominant in non-waxy indica cultivars, whereas the Wx(b) allele was common to the non-waxy japonica variety. Recently, some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of Wx(a) from Wx(b) have been characterized. One structural difference between these two alleles was shown to be due to alternative splicing caused by a single-base substitution (AG GT to AG TT) at a donor site of the first intron within the Wx gene. In the case of waxy ( wx) rice, it was not possible to distinguish whether the each wx allele was derived from Wx(a) or Wx(b) alleles by phenotypic analysis. However, we succeeded in developing a derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (dCAPS) marker for the detection of the one-base splicing mutation without the need for sequencing. A mismatch primer was used to generate a restriction site in the Wx(a) allele (AGGT) but not in the Wx(b) allele (AGTT). Three hundred fifty-three waxy rice strains that are widely found in Asia were then employed for analysis using this dCAPS marker. Our findings suggested that waxy rice strains have both Wx(a)- and Wx(b)-derived alleles, but that the Wx(b)-derived allele was predominant, and its distribution was independent of indica- japonica differentiation. The wild relatives of cultivated rice all possessed the AGGT allele. It was concluded that the waxy mutations, and the corresponding rice cultivation, originated from japonica during the evolution and domestication process of rice and was preferentially selected by most Asian peoples.

  6. Changes in rice allelopathy and rhizosphere microflora by inhibiting rice phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changxun; Zhuang, Yuee; Xu, Tiecheng; Li, Yingzhe; Li, Yue; Lin, Wenxiong

    2013-02-01

    Gene expression of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) in allelopathic rice PI312777 was inhibited by RNA interference (RNAi). Transgenic rice showed lower levels of PAL gene expression and PAL activity than wild type rice (WT). The concentrations of phenolic compounds were lower in the root tissues and root exudates of transgenic rice than in those of wild type plants. When barndyardgrass (BYG) was used as the receiver plant, the allelopathic potential of transgenic rice was reduced. The sizes of the bacterial and fungal populations in rice rhizospheric soil at the 3-, 5-, and 7-leaf stages were estimated by using quantitative PCR (qPCR), which showed a decrease in both populations at all stages of leaf development analyzed. However, PI312777 had a larger microbial population than transgenic rice. In addition, in T-RFLP studies, 14 different groups of bacteria were detected in WT and only 6 were detected in transgenic rice. This indicates that there was less rhizospheric bacterial diversity associated with transgenic rice than with WT. These findings collectively suggest that PAL functions as a positive regulator of rice allelopathic potential.

  7. Relative competitive ability of rice with strawhull and blackhull red rice biotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed interference depends largely upon the species composition of the weed community and an ability to compete with the cultured crop. Weedy red rice is a major weed pest of rice in the southern U.S. The focus of this study was to evaluate the competitive ability of rice against common, genetically ...

  8. Timing is everything: early degradation of abscission layer is associated with increased seed shattering in U.S. weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Seed shattering, or shedding, is an important fitness trait for wild and weedy grasses. U.S. weedy rice (Oryza sativa) is a highly shattering weed, thought to have evolved from non-shattering cultivated ancestors. All U.S. weedy rice individuals examined to date contain a mutation in the sh4 locus associated with loss of shattering during rice domestication. Weedy individuals also share the shattering trait with wild rice, but not the ancestral shattering mutation at sh4; thus, how weedy rice reacquired the shattering phenotype is unknown. To establish the morphological basis of the parallel evolution of seed shattering in weedy rice and wild, we examined the abscission layer at the flower-pedicel junction in weedy individuals in comparison with wild and cultivated relatives. Results Consistent with previous work, shattering wild rice individuals possess clear, defined abscission layers at flowering, whereas non-shattering cultivated rice individuals do not. Shattering weedy rice from two separately evolved populations in the U.S. (SH and BHA) show patterns of abscission layer formation and degradation distinct from wild rice. Prior to flowering, the abscission layer has formed in all weedy individuals and by flowering it is already degrading. In contrast, wild O. rufipogon abscission layers have been shown not to degrade until after flowering has occurred. Conclusions Seed shattering in weedy rice involves the formation and degradation of an abscission layer in the flower-pedicel junction, as in wild Oryza, but is a developmentally different process from shattering in wild rice. Weedy rice abscission layers appear to break down earlier than wild abscission layers. The timing of weedy abscission layer degradation suggests that unidentified regulatory genes may play a critical role in the reacquisition of shattering in weedy rice, and sheds light on the morphological basis of parallel evolution for shattering in weedy and wild rice. PMID:21235796

  9. The Tomato Wilt Fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici shares Common Ancestors with Nonpathogenic F. oxysporum isolated from Wild Tomatoes in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Inami, Keigo; Kashiwa, Takeshi; Kawabe, Masato; Onokubo-Okabe, Akiko; Ishikawa, Nobuko; Pérez, Enrique Rodríguez; Hozumi, Takuo; Caballero, Liliana Aragón; de Baldarrago, Fatima Cáceres; Roco, Mauricio Jiménez; Madadi, Khalid A.; Peever, Tobin L.; Teraoka, Tohru; Kodama, Motoichiro; Arie, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an ascomycetous fungus that is well-known as a soilborne plant pathogen. In addition, a large population of nonpathogenic F. oxysporum (NPF) inhabits various environmental niches, including the phytosphere. To obtain an insight into the origin of plant pathogenic F. oxysporum, we focused on the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and its pathogenic F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL). We collected F. oxysporum from wild and transition Solanum spp. and modern cultivars of tomato in Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Mexico, Afghanistan, Italy, and Japan, evaluated the fungal isolates for pathogenicity, VCG, mating type, and distribution of SIX genes related to the pathogenicity of FOL, and constructed phylogenies based on ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer sequences. All F. oxysporum isolates sampled were genetically more diverse than FOL. They were not pathogenic to the tomato and did not carry SIX genes. Certain NPF isolates including those from wild Solanum spp. in Peru were grouped in FOL clades, whereas most of the NPF isolates were not. Our results suggested that the population of NPF isolates in FOL clades gave rise to FOL by gaining pathogenicity. PMID:24909710

  10. Little white lies: pericarp color provides insights into the origins and evolution of Southeast Asian weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice is a conspecific form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) that infests rice fields and results in severe crop losses. Weed strains in different world regions appear to have originated multiple times from different domesticated and/or wild rice progenitors. In the case of Malaysian weedy ...

  11. Population genomics identifies the origin and signatures of selection of Korean weedy rice.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-03-01

    Weedy rice is the same biological species as cultivated rice (Oryza sativa); it is also a noxious weed infesting rice fields worldwide. Its formation and population-selective or -adaptive signatures are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phylogenetics, population structure and signatures of selection of Korean weedy rice by determining the whole genomes of 30 weedy rice, 30 landrace rice and ten wild rice samples. The phylogenetic tree and results of ancestry inference study clearly showed that the genetic distance of Korean weedy rice was far from the wild rice and near with cultivated rice. Furthermore, 537 genes showed evidence of recent positive or divergent selection, consistent with some adaptive traits. This study indicates that Korean weedy rice originated from hybridization of modern indica/indica or japonica/japonica rather than wild rice. Moreover, weedy rice is not only a notorious weed in rice fields, but also contains many untapped valuable traits or haplotypes that may be a useful genetic resource for improving cultivated rice.

  12. Twin Valley, Wild Rice River, Minnesota. Addendum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    David Rockwell, TSB, EPA Billy Fairless, CRL. EPA Gary Schenzel, Water Div, EPA Charlie Delos, Planning. EPA Michael Sullivan, Planning, EPA Harlan Hirt...Twin Valley-Norman 868 " WRR Hahnomen-Mahn 1,312 " WRR Felton-Clay 232 " Felton D. WRR Borup-Norman 128 " Ditch SBWRR Begon -Mahnomen 157 None Marsh WRR

  13. A map of rice genome variation reveals the origin of cultivated rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuehui; Kurata, Nori; Wei, Xinghua; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Wang, Ahong; Zhao, Qiang; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Kunyan; Lu, Hengyun; Li, Wenjun; Guo, Yunli; Lu, Yiqi; Zhou, Congcong; Fan, Danlin; Weng, Qijun; Zhu, Chuanrang; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yongchun; Feng, Lei; Furuumi, Hiroyasu; Kubo, Takahiko; Miyabayashi, Toshie; Yuan, Xiaoping; Xu, Qun; Dong, Guojun; Zhan, Qilin; Li, Canyang; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Lu, Tingting; Feng, Qi; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Han, Bin

    2012-10-25

    Crop domestications are long-term selection experiments that have greatly advanced human civilization. The domestication of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) ranks as one of the most important developments in history. However, its origins and domestication processes are controversial and have long been debated. Here we generate genome sequences from 446 geographically diverse accessions of the wild rice species Oryza rufipogon, the immediate ancestral progenitor of cultivated rice, and from 1,083 cultivated indica and japonica varieties to construct a comprehensive map of rice genome variation. In the search for signatures of selection, we identify 55 selective sweeps that have occurred during domestication. In-depth analyses of the domestication sweeps and genome-wide patterns reveal that Oryza sativa japonica rice was first domesticated from a specific population of O. rufipogon around the middle area of the Pearl River in southern China, and that Oryza sativa indica rice was subsequently developed from crosses between japonica rice and local wild rice as the initial cultivars spread into South East and South Asia. The domestication-associated traits are analysed through high-resolution genetic mapping. This study provides an important resource for rice breeding and an effective genomics approach for crop domestication research.

  14. Genetic and physiological analysis of a novel type of interspecific hybrid weakness in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Chen, Hao; Shan, Jun-Xiang; Zhu, Mei-Zhen; Shi, Min; Gao, Ji-Ping; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2013-05-01

    Hybrid weakness is an important reproductive barrier that hinders genetic exchange between different species at the post-zygotic stage. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid weakness is limited. In this study, we report discovery of a novel interspecific hybrid weakness in a rice chromosome segment substitution line (CSSL) library derived from a cross between the indica variety Teqing (Oryza sativa) and common wild rice (O. rufipogon). The dominant Hybrid weakness i1 (Hwi1) gene from wild rice is genetically incompatible with Teqing and induced a set of weakness symptoms, including growth suppression, yield decrease, impaired nutrient absorption, and the retardation of crown root initiation. Phytohormone treatment showed that salicylic acid (SA) could restore the height of plants expressing hybrid weakness, while other phytohormones appear to have little effect. Fine mapping indicated that Hwi1 is located in a tandem leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK) gene cluster. Within the 13.2-kb candidate region on the short arm of chromosome 11, there are two annotated LRR-RLK genes, LOC_Os11g07230 and LOC_Os11g07240. The Teqing allele of LOC_Os11g07230 and the wild rice allele of LOC_Os11g07240 encode predicted functional proteins. Based on the genetic inheritance of hybrid weakness, LOC_Os11g07240 is implicated as the candidate gene for Hwi1. Functional analysis of Hwi1 will expand our knowledge of the regulation of hybrid weakness in rice.

  15. Nucleotide diversity of a genomic sequence similar to SHATTERPROOF (PvSHP1) in domesticated and wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Nanni, L; Bitocchi, E; Bellucci, E; Rossi, M; Rau, D; Attene, G; Gepts, P; Papa, R

    2011-12-01

    Evolutionary studies in plant and animal breeding are aimed at understanding the structure and organization of genetic variations of species. We have identified and characterized a genomic sequence in Phaseolus vulgaris of 1,200 bp (PvSHP1) that is homologous to SHATTERPROOF-1 (SHP1), a gene involved in control of fruit shattering in Arabidopsis thaliana. The PvSHP1 fragment was mapped to chromosome Pv06 in P. vulgaris and is linked to the flower and seed color gene V. Amplification of the PvSHP1 sequence from the most agronomically important legume species showed a high degree of interspecies diversity in the introns within the Phaseoleae, while the coding region was conserved across distant taxa. Sequencing of the PvSHP1 sequence in a sample of 91 wild and domesticated genotypes that span the geographic distribution of this species in the centers of origin showed that PvSHP1 is highly polymorphic and, therefore, particularly useful to further investigate the origin and domestication history of P. vulgaris. Our data confirm the gene pool structure seen in P. vulgaris along with independent domestication processes in the Andes and Mesoamerica; they provide additional evidence for a single domestication event in Mesoamerica. Moreover, our results support the Mesoamerican origin of this species. Finally, we have developed three indel-spanning markers that will be very useful for bean germplasm characterization, and particularly to trace the distribution of the domesticated Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools.

  16. Cultivated and weedy rice interactions and the domestication process.

    PubMed

    Lawton-Rauh, Amy; Burgos, Nilda

    2010-08-01

    Examining the targets of selection in crop species and their wild and weedy relatives sheds light on the evolutionary processes underlying differentiation of cultivars from progenitor lineages. On one hand, human-mediated directional selection in crops favours traits associated with the streamlining of controllable and predictable monoculture practices alongside selection for desired trait values. On the other hand, natural selection in wild and especially weedy relatives presumably favours trait values that increase the probability of escaping eradication. Gene flow between crops and wild species may also counter human-mediated selection, promoting the evolution and persistence of weedy forms. In this issue, two studies from a group of collaborators examine diversity and divergence patterns of genes underlying two traits associated with red rice (Oryza sp.), the conspecific relative of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that is a non-native weed (see Fig. 1). In the first study by Gross et al. (2010), genetic variation in the major gene underlying the hallmark red pigmentation characterizing most weedy rice (Rc) is found to have a pattern consistent with non-reversion from U.S. cultivated rice (i.e. the cultivar did not 'go feral'). This suggests that U.S. weedy rice is not an escaped lineage derived from U.S. cultivated rice populations; weedy rice likely differentiated prior to the selective sweep occurred in this gene within cultivated rice populations. Using the major seed shattering locus sh4 gene and the neighbouring genomic region, Thurber et al. (2010) track the molecular evolutionary history of the high shattering phenotype, a trait contributing dramatically to the success of crop selection in cultivated rice as well as the persistence and expansion of weedy red rice. In this study, the shared fixation of a sh4 mutation in both cultivated rice and weedy rice indicates that weedy rice arose subsequent to the strong selective sweep leading to significant

  17. Fine mapping of a gene causing hybrid pollen sterility between Yunnan weedy rice and cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) and phylogenetic analysis of Yunnan weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhong, Zheng Zheng; Zhao, Zhi Gang; Jiang, Ling; Bian, Xiao Feng; Zhang, Wen Wei; Liu, Ling Long; Ikehashi, H; Wan, Jian Min

    2010-02-01

    Weedy rice represents an important resource for rice improvement. The F(1) hybrid between the japonica wide compatibility rice cultivar 02428 and a weedy rice accession from Yunnan province (SW China) suffered from pollen sterility. Pollen abortion in the hybrid occurred at the early bicellular pollen stage, as a result of mitotic failure in the microspore, although the tapetum developed normally. Genetic mapping in a BC(1)F(1) population (02428//Yunnan weedy rice (YWR)/02428) showed that a major QTL for hybrid pollen sterility (qPS-1) was present on chromosome 1. qPS-1 was fine-mapped to a 110 kb region known to contain the hybrid pollen sterility gene Sa, making it likely that qPS-1 is either identical to, or allelic with Sa. Interestingly, F(1) hybrid indicated that Dular and IR36 were assumed to carry the sterility-neutral allele, Sa ( n ). Re-sequencing SaM and SaF, the two component genes present at Sa, suggested that variation for IR36 and Dular may be responsible for the loss of male sterility, and the qPS-1 sequence might be derived from wild rice or indica cultivars. A phylogenetic analysis based on microsatellite genotyping suggested that the YWR accession is more closely related to wild rice and indica type cultivars than to japonica types. Thus it is probable that the YWR accession evolved from a spontaneous hybrid between wild rice and an ancient cultivated strain of domesticated rice.

  18. Evidence for common ancestry among viruses isolated from wild birds in Beringia and highly pathogenic intercontinental reassortant H5N1 and H5N2 influenza A viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew; Teslaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Donnelly, Tyrone F.; Bahl, Justin; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic clade 2.3.4.4 H5N8, H5N2, and H5N1 influenza A viruses were first detected in wild, captive, and domestic birds in North America in November–December 2014. In this study, we used wild waterbird samples collected in Alaska prior to the initial detection of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 influenza A viruses in North America to assess the evidence for: (1) dispersal of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses from East Asia to North America by migratory birds via Alaska and (2) ancestral origins of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 reassortant viruses in Beringia. Although we did not detect highly pathogenic influenza A viruses in our sample collection from western Alaska, we did identify viruses that contained gene segments sharing recent common ancestry with intercontinental reassortant H5N2 and H5N1 viruses. Results of phylogenetic analyses and estimates for times of most recent common ancestry support migratory birds sampled in Beringia as maintaining viral diversity closely related to novel highly pathogenic influenza A virus genotypes detected in North America. Although our results do not elucidate the route by which highly pathogenic influenza A viruses were introduced into North America, genetic evidence is consistent with the hypothesized trans-Beringian route of introduction via migratory birds.

  19. Cytoplasmic-genetic male sterility gene provides direct evidence for some hybrid rice recently evolving into weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxu; Lu, Zuomei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Peng, Yufa; Valverde, Bernal E.; Qiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Weedy rice infests paddy fields worldwide at an alarmingly increasing rate. There is substantial evidence indicating that many weedy rice forms originated from or are closely related to cultivated rice. There is suspicion that the outbreak of weedy rice in China may be related to widely grown hybrid rice due to its heterosis and the diversity of its progeny, but this notion remains unsupported by direct evidence. We screened weedy rice accessions by both genetic and molecular marker tests for the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes (Wild abortive, WA, and Boro type, BT) most widely used in the production of indica and japonica three-line hybrid rice as a diagnostic trait of direct parenthood. Sixteen weedy rice accessions of the 358 tested (4.5%) contained the CMS-WA gene; none contained the CMS-BT gene. These 16 accessions represent weedy rices recently evolved from maternal hybrid rice derivatives, given the primarily maternal inheritance of this trait. Our results provide key direct evidence that hybrid rice can be involved in the evolution of some weedy rice accessions, but is not a primary factor in the recent outbreak of weedy rice in China. PMID:26012494

  20. Cytoplasmic-genetic male sterility gene provides direct evidence for some hybrid rice recently evolving into weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxu; Lu, Zuomei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Peng, Yufa; Valverde, Bernal E; Qiang, Sheng

    2015-05-27

    Weedy rice infests paddy fields worldwide at an alarmingly increasing rate. There is substantial evidence indicating that many weedy rice forms originated from or are closely related to cultivated rice. There is suspicion that the outbreak of weedy rice in China may be related to widely grown hybrid rice due to its heterosis and the diversity of its progeny, but this notion remains unsupported by direct evidence. We screened weedy rice accessions by both genetic and molecular marker tests for the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes (Wild abortive, WA, and Boro type, BT) most widely used in the production of indica and japonica three-line hybrid rice as a diagnostic trait of direct parenthood. Sixteen weedy rice accessions of the 358 tested (4.5%) contained the CMS-WA gene; none contained the CMS-BT gene. These 16 accessions represent weedy rices recently evolved from maternal hybrid rice derivatives, given the primarily maternal inheritance of this trait. Our results provide key direct evidence that hybrid rice can be involved in the evolution of some weedy rice accessions, but is not a primary factor in the recent outbreak of weedy rice in China.

  1. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei; He, Qiang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-03-03

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucleotide diversity than landrace and/or weedy, and landrace rice has higher diversity than weedy rice. Genetic distance was suggestive of a high level of breeding between landrace and weedy rice, and the landrace showing a closer association with wild rice than weedy rice. Population structure and principal component analyses showed no obvious difference in the genetic backgrounds of landrace and weedy rice in mitochondrial genome level. Phylogenetic, population split, and haplotype network evaluations were suggestive of independent origins of the indica and japonica varieties. The origin of weedy rice is supposed to be more likely from cultivated rice rather than from wild rice in mitochondrial genome level.

  2. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wei; He, Qiang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucleotide diversity than landrace and/or weedy, and landrace rice has higher diversity than weedy rice. Genetic distance was suggestive of a high level of breeding between landrace and weedy rice, and the landrace showing a closer association with wild rice than weedy rice. Population structure and principal component analyses showed no obvious difference in the genetic backgrounds of landrace and weedy rice in mitochondrial genome level. Phylogenetic, population split, and haplotype network evaluations were suggestive of independent origins of the indica and japonica varieties. The origin of weedy rice is supposed to be more likely from cultivated rice rather than from wild rice in mitochondrial genome level. PMID:28256554

  3. Identification of rice sheath blight QTLs in a Bengal/O. nivara advanced backcross population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice wild relatives contain novel genes for important biotic and abiotic stresses. Rice sheath blight disease, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is a very important disease of rice worldwide. We screened 67 accessions from 15 Oryza species, and identified seven moderately resistant accessions. Using the...

  4. Rice Domestication Revealed by Reduced Shattering of Archaeological rice from the Lower Yangtze valley

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunfei; Crawford, Gary W.; Jiang, Leping; Chen, Xugao

    2016-01-01

    Plant remains dating to between 9000 and 8400 BP from a probable ditch structure at the Huxi site include the oldest rice (Oryza sativa) spikelet bases and associated plant remains recovered in China. The remains document an early stage of rice domestication and the ecological setting in which early cultivation was taking place. The rice spikelet bases from Huxi include wild (shattering), intermediate, and domesticated (non-shattering) forms. The relative frequency of intermediate and non-shattering spikelet bases indicates that selection for, at the very least, non-shattering rice was underway at Huxi. The rice also has characteristics of japonica rice (Oryza sativa subsp. japonica), helping to clarify the emergence of a significant lineage of the crop. Seeds, phytoliths and their context provide evidence of increasing anthropogenesis and cultivation during the occupation. Rice spikelet bases from Kuahuqiao (8000–7700 BP), Tianluoshan (7000–6500 BP), Majiabang (6300–6000 BP), and Liangzhu (5300–4300 BP) sites indicate that rice underwent continuing selection for reduced shattering and japonica rice characteristics, confirming a prolonged domestication process for rice. PMID:27324699

  5. Rice domestication: histories and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Briana L

    2012-09-01

    Domesticated rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the world's most important food crops, culturally, nutritionally and economically (Khush 1997). Thus, it is no surprise that there is intense curiosity about its genetic and geographical origins, its response to selection under domestication, and the genetic structure of its wild relative, Oryza rufipogon. Studies of Oryza attempting to answer these questions have accompanied each stage of the development of molecular markers, starting with allozymes and continuing to genome sequencing. While many of these studies have been restricted to small sample sizes, in terms of either the number of markers used or the number and distribution of the accessions, costs are now low enough that researchers are including large numbers of molecular markers and accessions. How will these studies relate to previous findings and long-held assumptions about rice domestication and evolution? If the paper in this issue of Molecular Ecology (Huang et al. 2012) is any indication, there will be some considerable surprises in store. In this study, a geographically and genomically thorough sampling of O. rufipogon and O. sativa revealed two genetically distinct groups of wild rice and also indicated that only one of these groups appears to be related to domesticated rice. While this fits well with previous studies indicating that there are genetic subdivisions within O. rufipogon, it stands in contrast to previous findings that the two major varieties of O. sativa (indica and japonica) were domesticated from two (or more) subpopulations of wild rice.

  6. Wild Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and other resources focuses on wild animals. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines, and professional resources, as well as a class activity. (LRW)

  7. Wild birds as biological indicators of environmental pollution: antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from common buzzards (Buteo buteo).

    PubMed

    Radhouani, Hajer; Poeta, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Pacheco, Rui; Sargo, Roberto; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2012-06-01

    A total of 36 Escherichia coli and 31 enterococci isolates were recovered from 42 common buzzard faecal samples. The E. coli isolates showed high levels of resistance to streptomycin and tetracycline. The following resistance genes were detected: bla(TEM) (20 of 22 ampicillin-resistant isolates), tet(A) and/or tet(B) (16 of 27 tetracycline-resistant isolates), aadA1 (eight of 27 streptomycin-resistant isolates), cmlA (three of 15 chloramphenicol-resistant isolates), aac(3)-II with/without aac(3)-IV (all seven gentamicin-resistant isolates) and sul1 and/or sul2 and/or sul3 [all eight sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim-resistant (SXT) isolates]. intI1 and intI2 genes were detected in four SXT-resistant isolates. The virulence-associated genes fimA (type 1 fimbriae), papC (P fimbriae) and aer (aerobactin) were detected in 61.1, 13.8 and 11.1% of the isolates, respectively. The isolates belonged to phylogroups A (47.2%), B1 (8.3%), B2 (13.9%) and D (30.5%). For the enterococci isolates, Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (48.4%). High levels of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance were found among our isolates (87 and 81%, respectively). Most of the tetracycline-resistant strains carried the tet(M) and/or tet(L) genes. The erm(B) gene was detected in 80% of erythromycin-resistant isolates. The vat(D) and/or vat(E) genes were found in nine of the 17 quinupristin-dalfopristin-resistant isolates. The enterococcal isolates showing high-level resistance for kanamycin, gentamicin and streptomycin contained the aph(3')-IIIa, aac(6')-aph(2″) and ant(6)-Ia genes, respectively. This report reveals that common buzzards seem to represent an important reservoir, or at least a source, of multi-resistant E. coli and enterococci isolates, and consequently may represent a considerable hazard to human and animal health by transmission of these isolates to waterways and other environmental sources via their faecal deposits.

  8. Molecular evolution of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in invasive weedy rice in the USA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonghee; Jia, Yulin; Jia, Melissa; Gealy, David R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Caicedo, Ana L

    2011-01-01

    The Pi-ta gene in rice has been effectively used to control rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae worldwide. Despite a number of studies that reported the Pi-ta gene in domesticated rice and wild species, little is known about how the Pi-ta gene has evolved in US weedy rice, a major weed of rice. To investigate the genome organization of the Pi-ta gene in weedy rice and its relationship to gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US, we analyzed nucleotide sequence variation at the Pi-ta gene and its surrounding 2 Mb region in 156 weedy, domesticated and wild rice relatives. We found that the region at and around the Pi-ta gene shows very low genetic diversity in US weedy rice. The patterns of molecular diversity in weeds are more similar to cultivated rice (indica and aus), which have never been cultivated in the US, rather than the wild rice species, Oryza rufipogon. In addition, the resistant Pi-ta allele (Pi-ta) found in the majority of US weedy rice belongs to the weedy group strawhull awnless (SH), suggesting a single source of origin for Pi-ta. Weeds with Pi-ta were resistant to two M. oryzae races, IC17 and IB49, except for three accessions, suggesting that component(s) required for the Pi-ta mediated resistance may be missing in these accessions. Signatures of flanking sequences of the Pi-ta gene and SSR markers on chromosome 12 suggest that the susceptible pi-ta allele (pi-ta), not Pi-ta, has been introgressed from cultivated to weedy rice by out-crossing.

  9. Glycaemic index of some commercially available rice and rice products in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Ranawana, D V; Henry, C J K; Lightowler, H J; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    The glycaemic response to nine types of rice (white basmati, brown basmati, white and brown basmati, easy-cook basmati, basmati and wild rice, long-grain rice, easy-cook long-grain rice, Thai red rice, Thai glutinous rice) and two types of rice vermicelli (Guilin rice vermicelli, Jiangxi rice vermicelli) commercially available in the United Kingdom were compared against a glucose standard in a non-blind, randomized, repeated-measure, crossover design trial. Fourteen healthy subjects (six males, eight females), mean age 38 (standard deviation 16) years and mean body mass index 21.3 (standard deviation 2.3) kg/m(2), were recruited for the study. Subjects were served portions of the test foods and a standard food (glucose), on separate occasions, each containing 50 g available carbohydrates. Capillary blood glucose was measured from finger-prick samples in fasted subjects (-5 and 0 min) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the consumption of each test food. For each type of food, its glycaemic index (GI) was calculated geometrically by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose curve as a percentage of each subject's average incremental area under the blood glucose curve for the standard food. The 10 foods exhibited a range of GI values from 37 to 92. The study indicated that rice noodles, long-grain rice, easy-cook long-grain rice and white basmati rice were low-GI foods, whilst all of the other foods were medium-GI and high-GI foods. The information presented in this paper may be useful in helping people select low-GI foods from the customary foods consumed by the British and Asian populations.

  10. Evolutionary and social consequences of introgression of nontransgenic herbicide resistance from rice to weedy rice in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Merotto, Aldo; Goulart, Ives C G R; Nunes, Anderson L; Kalsing, Augusto; Markus, Catarine; Menezes, Valmir G; Wander, Alcido E

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have expressed concerns about the effects of gene flow from transgenic herbicide-resistant crops to their wild relatives, but no major problems have been observed. This review describes a case study in which what has been feared in transgenics regarding gene flow has actually changed biodiversity and people's lives. Nontransgenic imidazolinone-resistant rice (IMI-rice) cultivars increased the rice grain yield by 50% in southern Brazil. This increase was beneficial for life quality of the farmers and also improved the regional economy. However, weedy rice resistant to imidazolinone herbicides started to evolve three years after the first use of IMI-rice cultivars. Population genetic studies indicate that the herbicide-resistant weedy rice was mainly originated from gene flow from resistant cultivars and distributed by seed migration. The problems related with herbicide-resistant weedy rice increased the production costs of rice that forced farmers to sell or rent their land. Gene flow from cultivated rice to weedy rice has proven to be a large agricultural, economic, and social constraint in the use of herbicide-resistant technologies in rice. This problem must be taken into account for the development of new transgenic or nontransgenic rice technologies.

  11. A rhamnose-deficient lipopolysaccharide mutant of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 is defective in root colonization and beneficial interactions with its flooding-tolerant hosts Sesbania cannabina and wetland rice.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Shubhajit; Mukherjee, Arijit; Wiley-Kalil, Audrey; Das, Seema; Owen, Heather; Reddy, Pallavolu M; Ané, Jean-Michel; James, Euan K; Gyaneshwar, Prasad

    2016-10-01

    Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 develops a classical nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the aquatic legume Sesbania cannabina (Retz.). It also promotes the growth of wetland rice (Oryza sativa L.), but little is known about the rhizobial determinants important for these interactions. In this study, we analyzed the colonization of S. cannabina and rice using a strain of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 dually marked with β-glucuronidase and the green fluorescent protein. This bacterium colonized S. cannabina by crack entry and through root hair infection under flooded and non-flooded conditions, respectively. Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 colonized the surfaces of wetland rice roots, but also entered them at the base of lateral roots. It became endophytically established within intercellular spaces in the rice cortex, and intracellularly within epidermal and hypodermal cells. A mutant of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 altered in the synthesis of the rhamnose-containing O-antigen exhibited significant defects, not only in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation with S. cannabina, but also in rice colonization and plant growth promotion. Supplementation with purified lipopolysaccharides from the wild-type strain, but not from the mutant, restored the beneficial colonization of rice roots, but not fully effective nodulation of S. cannabina Commonalities and differences in the rhizobial colonization of the roots of wetland legume and rice hosts are discussed.

  12. MucoRice-cholera toxin B-subunit, a rice-based oral cholera vaccine, down-regulates the expression of α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family as major rice allergens.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Shiho; Nakamura, Rika; Mejima, Mio; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Kuroda, Masaharu; Takeyama, Natsumi; Oyama, Masaaki; Satoh, Shigeru; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Masumura, Takehiro; Teshima, Reiko; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-07-05

    To develop a cold chain- and needle/syringe-free rice-based cholera vaccine (MucoRice-CTB) for human use, we previously advanced the MucoRice system by introducing antisense genes specific for endogenous rice storage proteins and produced a molecularly uniform, human-applicable, high-yield MucoRice-CTB devoid of plant-associated sugar. To maintain the cold chain-free property of this vaccine for clinical application, we wanted to use a polished rice powder preparation of MucoRice-CTB without further purification but wondered whether this might cause an unexpected increase in rice allergen protein expression levels in MucoRice-CTB and prompt safety concerns. Therefore, we used two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and shotgun MS/MS proteomics to compare rice allergen protein expression levels in MucoRice-CTB and wild-type (WT) rice. Both proteomics analyses showed that the only notable change in the expression levels of rice allergen protein in MucoRice-CTB, compared with those in WT rice, was a decrease in the expression levels of α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family such as the seed allergen protein RAG2. Real-time PCR analysis showed mRNA of RAG2 reduced in MucoRice-CTB seed. These results demonstrate that no known rice allergens appear to be up-reregulated by genetic modification of MucoRice-CTB, suggesting that MucoRice-CTB has potential as a safe oral cholera vaccine for clinical application.

  13. Indica rice (Oryza sativa, BR29 and IR64).

    PubMed

    Datta, Karabi; Datta, Swapan Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Rice is the world's most important food crop. Indica-type rice provides the staple food for more than half of the world population. To satisfy the growing demand of the ever-increasing population, more sustained production of indica-type rice is needed. In addition, because of the high per capita consumption of indica rice, improvement of any traits including its nutritive value may have a significant positive health outcome for the rice-consuming population. Rice yield productivity is greatly affected by different biotic stresses, like diseases and insect pests, and abiotic stresses like drought, cold, and salinity. Attempts to improve resistance in rice to these stresses by conventional breeding through introgression of traits have limited success owing to a lack of resistance germplasm in the wild relatives. Gene transfer technology with genes from other sources can be used to make rice plants resistant or tolerant to insect pests, diseases, and different environmental stresses. For improving the nutritional value of the edible endosperm part of the rice, genes for increasing iron, beta-carotene, or better quality protein can be introduced in rice plants by genetic engineering. Different crops have been transformed using various gene transfer methods, such as protoplast transformation, biolistic, and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This chapter describes the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol for indica-type rice. The selectable marker genes used are hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt), neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII), or phosphomannose isomerase (pmi), and, accordingly, the selection agents are hygromycin, kanamycin (G418), or mannose, respectively.

  14. Correlation analysis of simulated MODIS vegetation indices and the red edge and rice agricultural parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Xiuju

    2007-10-01

    In this study, Hyperspectral data of two variety of rice (common rice and hybrid rice) in whole growing stage during 2002 and 2003 was measured using the ASD FieldSpec UV/VNIR Spectroradiometer with resolution of 3 nm, and the LAI and leaf chlorophyll content of rice agricultural parameter were obtained. Analyses of the correlation between rice agricultural parameter, and hyperspectal data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and the red-edge position (REP) were studied. Results showed that a strong non-linear correlation was found between the rice LAI of two varieties and REP. The REP, EVI and NDVI were well related with LAI for the common rice, but the REP and EVI were more sensitive than the NDVI to rice LAI for the hybrid rice because of different body for two variety rice.

  15. Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (RICE) | New ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    RICE use pistons that alternatively move back and forth to convert pressure into rotating motion. They're commonly used at power and manufacturing plants to generate electricity and to power pumps and compressors.

  16. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  17. Elemental composition of Malawian rice.

    PubMed

    Joy, Edward J M; Louise Ander, E; Broadley, Martin R; Young, Scott D; Chilimba, Allan D C; Hamilton, Elliott M; Watts, Michael J

    2016-07-20

    Widespread potential dietary deficiencies of calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) have been identified in Malawi. Several deficiencies are likely to be compounded by high phytic acid (PA) consumption. Rice (Oryza sativa) is commonly consumed in some Malawian populations, and its mineral micronutrient content is important for food security. The considerable irrigation requirements and flooded conditions of paddy soils can also introduce or mobilise potentially toxic elements including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). The aim of this study was to determine the mineral composition of rice sampled from farmers' fields and markets in Malawi. Rice was sampled from 18 extension planning areas across Malawi with 21 white (i.e. polished) and 33 brown samples collected. Elemental composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Arsenic speciation was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-MS. Concentration of PA was determined using a PA-total phosphorus assay. Median total concentrations (mg kg(-1), dry weight) of elements important for human nutrition in brown and white rice, respectively, were: Ca = 66.5 and 37.8; Cu = 3.65 and 2.49; Fe = 22.1 and 7.2; I = 0.006 and <0.005; Mg = 1130 and 265; Mn = 18.2 and 9.6; Se = 0.025 and 0.028; and Zn = 17.0 and 14.4. In brown and white rice samples, respectively, median PA concentrations were 5438 and 1906 mg kg(-1), and median PA:Zn molar ratios were 29 and 13. Concentrations of potentially toxic elements (mg kg(-1), dry weight) in brown and white rice samples, respectively, were: As = 0.030 and 0.006; Cd  ≤ 0.002 and 0.006; Pb = 0.008 and 0.008. Approximately 95 % of As was found to be inorganic As, where this could be quantified. Malawian rice, like the more widely consumed staple grain maize, contains inadequate Ca, I, Se or Zn to meet dietary requirements. Biofortification strategies could

  18. Genetic shift in local rice populations during rice breeding programs in the northern limit of rice cultivation in the world.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Kenji; Obara, Mari; Ikegaya, Tomohito; Tamura, Kenichi

    2015-09-01

    The rapid accumulation of pre-existing mutations may play major roles in the establishment and shaping of adaptability for local regions in current rice breeding programs. The cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., which originated from tropical regions, is now grown worldwide due to the concerted efforts of breeding programs. However, the process of establishing local populations and their origins remain unclear. In the present study, we characterized DNA polymorphisms in the rice variety KITAAKE from Hokkaido, one of the northern limits of rice cultivation in the world. Indel polymorphisms were attributed to transposable element-like insertions, tandem duplications, and non-TE deletions as the original mutation events in the NIPPONBARE and KITAAKE genomes. The allele frequencies of the KITAAKE alleles markedly shifted to the current variety types among the local population from Hokkaido in the last two decades. The KITAAKE alleles widely distributed throughout wild rice and cultivated rice over the world. These have accumulated in the local population from Hokkaido via Japanese landraces as the ancestral population of Hokkaido. These results strongly suggested that combinations of pre-existing mutations played a role in the establishment of adaptability. This approach using the re-sequencing of local varieties in unique environmental conditions will be useful as a genetic resource in plant breeding programs in local regions.

  19. Relationship between disease resistance and rice oxalate oxidases in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian Yong; Nie, Zhuan Hua; Wang, Wen Juan; Leung, David W M; Xu, Da Gao; Chen, Bai Ling; Chen, Zhe; Zeng, Lie Xian; Liu, E E

    2013-01-01

    Differential expression of rice oxalate oxidase genes (OsOxO1-4) in rice leaves (Oryza sativa L.) in response to biotic stress was assayed using RT-PCR. OsOxO4 was induced transiently at 12 h in plants inoculated with the pathogens of bacterial blight and that of the wounding control. Inoculation with the rice blast pathogen induced OsOxO2 expression compared to the mock spray control. Overexpressing OsOxO1 or OsOxO4 in rice resulted in elevated transcript levels of the respective transgene as well as OsOxO3 in leaves compared to that in untransformed wild type (WT). In a line of RNA-i transgenic rice plants (i-12), expression of all four OsOxO genes except that of OsOxO2 was severely inhibited. Oxalate oxidase (OxO, EC 1.2.3.4) activity in plants overexpressing OsOxO1 or OsOxO4 was substantially higher than that in WT and the RNA-i lines. It was found that transgenic rice plants with substantially higher OxO activity were not more resistant to rice blast and bacterial blight than WT. In contrast, some RNA-i lines with less OxO activity seemed to be more resistant to rice blast while some overexpressing lines were more susceptible to rice blast than WT. Therefore, OxO might not be a disease resistance factor in rice.

  20. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  1. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs.

  2. Association of Rice and Rice-Product Consumption With Arsenic Exposure Early in Life

    PubMed Central

    Karagas, Margaret R.; Punshon, Tracy; Sayarath, Vicki; Jackson, Brian P.; Folt, Carol L.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Rice—a typical first food and major ingredient in various infant foods—contains inorganic arsenic (As), but the extent of As exposure from these foods has not been well characterized in early childhood. OBJECTIVE To determine the types and frequency of rice and rice-containing products consumed by infants in the first year of life and the association with As biomarker concentrations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Included were infants from singleton births of pregnant women enrolled in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study from 2011 to 2014 whose parents were interviewed during their first year of life. Enrolled women from selected clinics were aged 18 to 45 years, living in the same residence since their last menstrual period, in households served by a private water system, and had no plans to move during pregnancy. Data on infants’ intake of rice and rice products were collected from interviews with their parents at 4, 8, and 12 months’ follow-up and from a 3-day food diary at 12 months from March 2013 to August 2014. EXPOSURES Infants’ intake of rice and rice products. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total urinary As and the sum of As species measured using inductively coupled mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Commonly reported infant rice snacks were tested for As. RESULTS We obtained dietary data on 759 of 951 infants (79.8% participation rate). Of these, 391 infants (51.7%) were male, and the mean (SD) gestational age was 39.4 (1.7) weeks. An estimated 80% were introduced to rice cereal during their first year. At 12 months, 32.6% of infants (42 of 129) were fed rice snacks. Among infants aged 12 months who did not eat fish or seafood, the geometric mean total urinary As concentrations were higher among those who ate infant rice cereal (9.53 μg/L) or rice snacks (4.97 μg/L) compared with those who did not eat rice or rice products (2.85 μg/L; all P < .01). Infant rice

  3. Lead in rice: analysis of baseline lead levels in market and field collected rice grains.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Williams, Paul N; Adomako, Eureka E; Price, Adam H; Zhu, Yongguan; Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve; Deacon, Claire M; Villada, Antia; Sommella, Alessia; Lu, Ying; Ming, Lei; De Silva, P Mangala C S; Brammer, Hugh; Dasgupta, Tapash; Islam, M Rafiqul; Meharg, Andrew A

    2014-07-01

    In a large scale survey of rice grains from markets (13 countries) and fields (6 countries), a total of 1578 rice grain samples were analysed for lead. From the market collected samples, only 0.6% of the samples exceeded the Chinese and EU limit of 0.2 μg g(-1) lead in rice (when excluding samples collected from known contaminated/mine impacted regions). When evaluating the rice grain samples against the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) provisional total tolerable intake (PTTI) values for children and pregnant women, it was found that only people consuming large quantities of rice were at risk of exceeding the PTTI from rice alone. Furthermore, 6 field experiments were conducted to evaluate the proportion of the variation in lead concentration in rice grains due to genetics. A total of 4 of the 6 field experiments had significant differences between genotypes, but when the genotypes common across all six field sites were assessed, only 4% of the variation was explained by genotype, with 9.5% and 11% of the variation explained by the environment and genotype by environment interaction respectively. Further work is needed to identify the sources of lead contamination in rice, with detailed information obtained on the locations and environments where the rice is sampled, so that specific risk assessments can be performed.

  4. Improving folate (vitamin B9) stability in biofortified rice through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Blancquaert, Dieter; Van Daele, Jeroen; Strobbe, Simon; Kiekens, Filip; Storozhenko, Sergei; De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Lambert, Willy; Stove, Christophe; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Biofortification of staple crops could help to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies in humans. We show that folates in stored rice grains are unstable, which reduces the potential benefits of folate biofortification. We obtain folate concentrations that are up to 150 fold higher than those of wild-type rice by complexing folate to folate-binding proteins to improve folate stability, thereby enabling long-term storage of biofortified high-folate rice grains.

  5. Comparison on cellular mechanisms of iron and cadmium accumulation in rice: prospects for cultivating Fe-rich but Cd-free rice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Chang, Jiadong; Chen, Ruijie; Li, Hubo; Lu, Hongfei; Tao, Longxing; Xiong, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for rice growth and humans consuming as their staple food but is often deficient because of insoluble Fe(III) in soil for rice growth and limited assimilation for human bodies, while cadmium (Cd) is non-essential and toxic for rice growth and humans if accumulating at high levels. Over-accumulated Cd can cause damage to human bodies. Selecting and breeding Fe-rich but Cd-free rice cultivars are ambitious, challenging and meaningful tasks for researchers. Although evidences show that the mechanisms of Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice are common to some extent as a result of similar entry routes within rice, an increasing number of researchers have discovered distinct mechanisms between Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice. This comprehensive review systematically elaborates and compares cellular mechanisms of Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice, respectively. Mechanisms for maintaining Fe homeostasis and Cd detoxicification are also elucidated. Then, effects of different fertilizer management on Fe/Cd accumulation in rice are discussed. Finally, this review enumerates various approaches for reducing grain Cd accumulation and enhancing Fe content in rice. In summary, understanding of discrepant cellular mechanisms of Fe/Cd accumulation in rice provides guidance for cultivating Fe-fortified rice and has paved the way to develop rice that are tolerant to Cd stress, aiming at breeding Fe-rich but Cd-free rice.

  6. Nutritionally enhanced rice to combat malnutrition disorders of the poor.

    PubMed

    Potrykus, Ingo

    2003-06-01

    Major deficiency disorders, including vitamin A deficiency, are especially common in countries in which rice is the staple food. In response to the devastating effects of vitamin A deficiency, which may include blindness and, even death, "Golden Rice" has been developed to deliver this nutrient to those populations who need it most. The case of Golden Rice is used to demonstrate the challenges of radical GMO opposition, consumer acceptance, and regulation of biotechnology-derived foods.

  7. Ecotoxicology of Wild Mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2001-01-01

    An international group of 32 scientists has critically reviewed the scientific literature on exposure and effects of environmental contaminants in wild mammals. The underlying theme of this text is encompassed by the following four questions: What exactly do we know about environmental contaminants in mammals? What are the commonalities and differences between mammal orders/species in the effects that contaminants have? How and to what degree of accuracy can we predict the adverse effects of environmental contaminants on mammalian wildlife? How significant are contaminant insults compared with other density-independent and -dependent factors such as habitat loss, climatic factors and disease? The book is organized three topical sections including introductory chapters that provide a background on environmental contaminants and the mammalian orders, eight taxonomic chapters discussing all aspects of the exposure to and effects of contaminants in mammalian orders, and four thematic chapters that review and discuss generic issues including biomarkers, prediction and extrapolation of exposure and effects, hazard and risk assessment, and the relative significance of contaminants on mammals compared with other commonly encountered stressors. A final a summary chapter identifies phylogenetic trends, critical data gaps, and overarching research needs. Although the absolute number of toxicological studies in domesticated and wild mammals eclipses that wildlife species, a detailed examination of our knowledge base reveals that information for 'wild' birds is actually greater than that for 'wild' mammals. Of the various mammalian taxa, ecotoxicological data is most noticeably lacking for marsupials and monotremes. In contrast, rodents (comprising 43% of all mammal species) have been studied extensively, despite evidence of their tolerance to some organochlorine compounds, rodenticides, and even radionuclides. Mammalian species at greatest risk of exposure include those that

  8. Conserving waste rice for wintering waterfowl in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kross, J.P.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.; Pearse, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Rice lost before or during harvest operations (hereafter waste rice) provides important food for waterfowl in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA, but >70% of waste rice is lost during autumn. We conducted experiments in 19 production rice fields in Arkansas and Mississippi during autumns 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the ability of common postharvest practices (i.e., burn, mow, roll, disk, or standing stubble) to conserve waste rice. We detected a postharvest treatment effect and a positive effect of initial abundance of waste rice on late-autumn abundance of waste rice (P ??? 0.022). Standing stubble contained the greatest abundance of waste rice followed by burned, mowed, rolled, and disked stubble. We recommend standing stubble or burning to maximize waste rice abundance for wintering waterfowl.

  9. Conserving waste rice for wintering waterfowl in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kross, J.P.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.; Pearse, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Rice lost before or during harvest operations (hereafter waste rice) provides important food for waterfowl in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA, but >70% of waste rice is lost during autumn. We conducted experiments in 19 production rice fields in Arkansas and Mississippi during autumns 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the ability of common postharvest practices (i.e., burn, mow, roll, disk, or standing stubble) to conserve waste rice. We detected a postharvest treatment effect and a positive effect of initial abundance of waste rice on late-autumn abundance of waste rice (P < 0.022). Standing stubble contained the greatest abundance of waste rice followed by burned, mowed, rolled, and disked stubble. We recommend standing stubble or burning to maximize waste rice abundance for wintering waterfowl.

  10. Comparative proteomics reveals differential induction of both biotic and abiotic stress response associated proteins in rice during Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anirudh; Bimolata, Waikhom; Kannan, Monica; Kirti, P B; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight disease in rice and brutally affects the yield up to 50 % of total production. Here, we report a comparative proteomics analysis of total foliar protein isolated from infected rice leaves of susceptible Pusa Basmati 1 (PB1) and resistant Oryza longistaminata genotypes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) approaches identified 29 protein spots encoding unique proteins from both the genotypes. Identified proteins belonged to a large number of biological and molecular functions related to biotic and abiotic stress proteins which are potentially involved during Xoo infection. Biotic and abiotic stress-related proteins were induced during Xoo infection, indicating the activation of common stress pathway during bacterial blight infection. Candidate genes conferring tolerance against bacterial blight, which include germin-like protein, putative r40c1, cyclin-dependent kinase C, Ent-isokaur-15-ene synthase and glutathione-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase 1 (GSH-DHAR1), were also induced, with germin-like proteins induced only in the resistant rice genotype O. longistaminata. Energy, metabolism and hypothetical proteins were common among both the genotypes. Further, host defence/stress-related proteins were mostly expressed in resistant genotype O. longistaminata, indicating possible co-evolution of the pathogen and the wild rice, O. longistaminata.

  11. Hybrid male sterility in rice controlled by interaction between divergent alleles of two adjacent genes.

    PubMed

    Long, Yunming; Zhao, Lifeng; Niu, Baixiao; Su, Jing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Yuanling; Zhang, Qunyu; Guo, Jingxin; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Mei, Mantong; Xia, Jixing; Wang, Lan; Wu, Haibin; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2008-12-02

    Sterility is common in hybrids between divergent populations, such as the indica and japonica subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa). Although multiple loci for plant hybrid sterility have been identified, it remains unknown how alleles of the loci interact at the molecular level. Here we show that a locus for indica-japonica hybrid male sterility, Sa, comprises two adjacent genes, SaM and SaF, encoding a small ubiquitin-like modifier E3 ligase-like protein and an F-box protein, respectively. Most indica cultivars contain a haplotype SaM(+)SaF(+), whereas all japonica cultivars have SaM(-)SaF(-) that diverged by nucleotide variations in wild rice. Male semi-sterility in this heterozygous complex locus is caused by abortion of pollen carrying SaM(-). This allele-specific gamete elimination results from a selective interaction of SaF(+) with SaM(-), a truncated protein, but not with SaM(+) because of the presence of an inhibitory domain, although SaM(+) is required for this male sterility. Lack of any one of the three alleles in recombinant plants does not produce male sterility. We propose a two-gene/three-component interaction model for this hybrid male sterility system. The findings have implications for overcoming male sterility in inter-subspecific hybrid rice breeding.

  12. Avian influenza, domestic ducks and rice agriculture in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Marius; Xiao, Xiangming; Chaitaweesub, Prasit; Kalpravidh, Wantanee; Premashthira, Sith; Boles, Stephen; Slingenbergh, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) caused by H5N1 viruses has become a global scale problem which first emerged in southern China and from there spread to other countries in Southeast and East Asia, where it was first confirmed in end 2003. In previous work, geospatial analyses demonstrated that free grazing ducks played critical role in the epidemiology of the disease in Thailand in the winter 2004/2005, both in terms of HPAI emergence and spread. This study explored the geographic association between free grazing duck census counts and current statistics on the spatial distribution of rice crops in Thailand, in particular the crop calendar of rice production. The analysis was carried out using both district level rice statistics and rice distribution data predicted with the aid of remote sensing, using a rice-detection algorithm. The results indicated a strong association between the number of free grazing ducks and the number of months during which second-crop rice harvest takes place, as well as with the rice crop intensity as predicted by remote sensing. These results confirmed that free grazing duck husbandry was strongly driven by agricultural land use and rice crop intensity, and that this later variable can be readily predicted using remote sensing. Analysis of rice cropping patterns may provide an indication of the location of populations of free grazing ducks in other countries with similar mixed duck and rice production systems and less detailed duck census data. Apart from free ranging ducks and rice cropping, the role of hydrology and seasonality of wetlands and water bodies in the HPAI risk analysis is also discussed in relation to the presumed dry season aggregation of wild waterfowl and aquatic poultry offering much scope for virus transmission.

  13. Avian influenza, domestic ducks and rice agriculture in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marius; Xiao, Xiangming; Chaitaweesub, Prasit; Kalpravidh, Wantanee; Premashthira, Sith; Boles, Stephen; Slingenbergh, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) caused by H5N1 viruses has become a global scale problem which first emerged in southern China and from there spread to other countries in Southeast and East Asia, where it was first confirmed in end 2003. In previous work, geospatial analyses demonstrated that free grazing ducks played critical role in the epidemiology of the disease in Thailand in the winter 2004/2005, both in terms of HPAI emergence and spread. This study explored the geographic association between free grazing duck census counts and current statistics on the spatial distribution of rice crops in Thailand, in particular the crop calendar of rice production. The analysis was carried out using both district level rice statistics and rice distribution data predicted with the aid of remote sensing, using a rice-detection algorithm. The results indicated a strong association between the number of free grazing ducks and the number of months during which second-crop rice harvest takes place, as well as with the rice crop intensity as predicted by remote sensing. These results confirmed that free grazing duck husbandry was strongly driven by agricultural land use and rice crop intensity, and that this later variable can be readily predicted using remote sensing. Analysis of rice cropping patterns may provide an indication of the location of populations of free grazing ducks in other countries with similar mixed duck and rice production systems and less detailed duck census data. Apart from free ranging ducks and rice cropping, the role of hydrology and seasonality of wetlands and water bodies in the HPAI risk analysis is also discussed in relation to the presumed dry season aggregation of wild waterfowl and aquatic poultry offering much scope for virus transmission. PMID:18418464

  14. Microsatellite markers reveal multiple origins for Italian weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Annabelle; Fogliatto, Silvia; Nick, Peter; Ferrero, Aldo; Vidotto, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Weedy rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the major issues of rice cultivation worldwide. In Italy, it infests about 70% of the total rice area. Different Weedy Rice populations can be distinguished based on variable morphological and physiological traits; however, little is known about genetic differentiation and origin of Italian weedy rice populations. The objective of this study was to genetically and morphologically characterize and compare different Italian weedy rice populations selected on the basis of different phenotypes. The main Italian rice territory was divided into 10 geographical areas in which 40 weedy rice populations were collected and grouped according to the awn traits. All the individuals of the populations were morphologically characterized according to plant and seed traits. Genetic characterization was performed using 19 SSR markers on all the collected accessions, and several rice cultivars, including some very old (late 19th century), nowadays are no longer cultivated. ANOVA showed that morphological plant and seed traits were significantly affected by the collection area and awnedness group. The importance of the awn morphology was also reflected in the Bayesian clustering where, despite a relatively low genetic diversity, the clusters displayed different awn types. An UPGMA dendrogram confirmed the clusters detected in STRUCTURE analysis and also revealed a grouping of certain old cultivars with the weedy rice, suggesting a common origin. PMID:24363904

  15. Rice_Phospho 1.0: a new rice-specific SVM predictor for protein phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shoukai; Song, Qi; Tao, Huan; Wang, Wei; Wan, Weifeng; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Chebii, Vivien; Kitony, Justine; Que, Shufu; Harrison, Andrew; He, Huaqin

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally-determined or computationally-predicted protein phosphorylation sites for distinctive species are becoming increasingly common. In this paper, we compare the predictive performance of a novel classification algorithm with different encoding schemes to develop a rice-specific protein phosphorylation site predictor. Our results imply that the combination of Amino acid occurrence Frequency with Composition of K-Spaced Amino Acid Pairs (AF-CKSAAP) provides the best description of relevant sequence features that surround a phosphorylation site. A support vector machine (SVM) using AF-CKSAAP achieves the best performance in classifying rice protein phophorylation sites when compared to the other algorithms. We have used SVM with AF-CKSAAP to construct a rice-specific protein phosphorylation sites predictor, Rice_Phospho 1.0 (http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn/rice_phospho1.0). We measure the Accuracy (ACC) and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of Rice_Phospho 1.0 to be 82.0% and 0.64, significantly higher than those measures for other predictors such as Scansite, Musite, PlantPhos and PhosphoRice. Rice_Phospho 1.0 also successfully predicted the experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in LOC_Os03g51600.1, a protein sequence which did not appear in the training dataset. In summary, Rice_phospho 1.0 outputs reliable predictions of protein phosphorylation sites in rice, and will serve as a useful tool to the community. PMID:26149854

  16. Flood Control Twin Valley Lake, Wild Rice River, Norman County Minnesota. Part 1. Fish and Wildlife Compensation Plan. Part 2. Water Quality Evaluation. Part 3. Section 404(b)(1) Evaluation. Draft Supplement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    acquisition and passive management should in- crease wildlife values over those resulting from more intensive economic uses. o. Needs for downstream...MPU’s that could be obtained through a more passive management program. fh. [o Corp; (f Fngint.,er should investigate the possibilitv of pro- vid in...common habitat management practice bv the Minnesota I)NR and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in western Minnesota. Trained fire crews usually accomplish

  17. Research in rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1999, 2.4-3 million acres of rice were planted annually nationwide. Rice fields are a major component of the contemporary landscapes in the Gulf Coastal Plain, the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, and Central Valley of California. In 1998, approximately 600,000 acres of rice were planted in Louisiana. In the Louisiana plant commodities report for 1998, total value for rice was over $350 million; sugarcane was the only plant commodity that exceeded this value. Louisiana has over 2,000 rice farmers supporting over 12,000 jobs in the state. Rice fields in the United States receive high use by wildlife, especially shorebirds, wading birds, and waterfowl. Waterbirds use rice fields for food, shelter, and breeding habitat.

  18. Statistical inference of selection and divergence of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta.

    PubMed

    Amei, Amei; Lee, Seonghee; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Jia, Yulin

    2014-10-21

    The resistance gene Pi-ta has been effectively used to control rice blast disease, but some populations of cultivated and wild rice have evolved resistance. Insights into the evolutionary processes that led to this resistance during crop domestication may be inferred from the population history of domesticated and wild rice strains. In this study, we applied a recently developed statistical method, time-dependent Poisson random field model, to examine the evolution of the Pi-ta gene in cultivated and weedy rice. Our study suggests that the Pi-ta gene may have more recently introgressed into cultivated rice, indica and japonica, and U.S. weedy rice from the wild species, O. rufipogon. In addition, the Pi-ta gene is under positive selection in japonica, tropical japonica, U.S. cultivars and U.S. weedy rice. We also found that sequences of two domains of the Pi-ta gene, the nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat domain, are highly conserved among all rice accessions examined. Our results provide a valuable analytical tool for understanding the evolution of disease resistance genes in crop plants.

  19. A systems-wide comparison of red rice (Oryza longistaminata) tissues identifies rhizome specific genes and proteins that are targets for cultivated rice improvement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rhizome, the original stem of land plants, enables species to invade new territory and is a critical component of perenniality, especially in grasses. Red rice (Oryza longistaminata) is a perennial wild rice species with many valuable traits that could be used to improve cultivated rice cultivars, including rhizomatousness, disease resistance and drought tolerance. Despite these features, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that contribute to rhizome growth, development and function in this plant. Results We used an integrated approach to compare the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of the rhizome to other tissues of red rice. 116 Gb of transcriptome sequence was obtained from various tissues and used to identify rhizome-specific and preferentially expressed genes, including transcription factors and hormone metabolism and stress response-related genes. Proteomics and metabolomics approaches identified 41 proteins and more than 100 primary metabolites and plant hormones with rhizome preferential accumulation. Of particular interest was the identification of a large number of gene transcripts from Magnaportha oryzae, the fungus that causes rice blast disease in cultivated rice, even though the red rice plants showed no sign of disease. Conclusions A significant set of genes, proteins and metabolites appear to be specifically or preferentially expressed in the rhizome of O. longistaminata. The presence of M. oryzae gene transcripts at a high level in apparently healthy plants suggests that red rice is resistant to this pathogen, and may be able to provide genes to cultivated rice that will enable resistance to rice blast disease. PMID:24521476

  20. Cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties; impacted by rice temperature during milling.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed; Meullenet, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Rice milling plays a key factor in determining rice quality and value. Therefore accurate quality assessments are critical to the rice industry. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of exposing rice to elevated temperatures during milling, on cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties. Two long (Cybonnett and Francis) and one medium (Jupiter) rice (oryzae sativa L.) cultivars were milled using McGill laboratory mill for 30 and 40 s after warmed up the mill before milling. Four different milling temperatures per milling duration were achieved. Cooked rice texture properties were assessed using a uniaxial compression test and rice flour pasting properties measured using a TA-2000 rheometer. Results of this study showed that exposure of rice to high temperatures during milling significantly decreased cooked rice firmness. An increase in milled rice temperature after milling from 10.0 to 13.3 °C resulted in a 5.4 and 8.1 N decrease in cooked rice firmness. Although not always significant, the increase in milled rice temperature during milling resulted in an increase in cooked rice stickiness. The increase in milling temperature also showed significant increase in rice flour pasting properties. Changes in rice functional characteristics were attributed to the changes occurring to rice chemical constituents due to temperature exposure as indicated by the increase in rice protein hydrophobicity. Proteins are known to affect rice starch water holding capacity and other starch gelatinization properties.

  1. Prevalence of intestinal and blood parasites among wild rats in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti Shafiyyah, C O; Jamaiah, I; Rohela, M; Lau, Y L; Siti Aminah, F

    2012-12-01

    A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of intestinal and blood parasites among wild rats in urban area of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 137 stool and blood samples were collected from wild rats from Sentul and Chow Kit areas. Five species of rats were captured and supplied by Kuala Lumpur City Hall. The most common was Rattus rattus diardii (Malayan Black rat), 67%, followed by Rattus norvegicus (Norway rat), 10%, Rattus argentiventer (rice-field rat), 10%, Rattus tiomanicus (Malaysian field rat), 9% and Rattus exulans (Polynesian rat), 4%. Rattus rattus diardii is commonly known to live in human environment and they are normally identified as pests to human community. More male rats were captured (61%) compared to female (39%). Out of 137 samples, 81.8% samples were positive with intestinal parasites, with 86.2% from Sentul area and 78.5% from Chow Kit area. Six different parasites were detected. The most common intestinal helminth parasite detected was Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (80.3%), followed by Hymenolepis nana (23.4%), Capillaria hepatica (13.9%) and Hymenolepis diminuta (2.9%). Intestinal protozoan detected was Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (8.8%). Trypanosoma lewisi (1.5%) was the only blood parasite detected.

  2. Wild Plants Used by the Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nature Study, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes 10 wild plants used by Native Americans. They include: rose hips; the common milkweed; cattails; elderberries; cactus fruits; lamb's quarters pigweeds (Chenopodium sp.); persimmons; mints (Monardo sp.); the yucca; and the hawthorn. Illustrations of each plant are included. (JN)

  3. Mapping QTLs for Fertility Restoration of Different Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Types in Rice Using Two Oryza sativa ×O. rufipogon Backcross Inbred Line Populations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao-Lin; Xie, Jian-Kun; Wan, Yong; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Zhang, Fan-Tao; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice breeding using cytoplasmic male sterility/fertility restoration (CMS/Rf) systems plays an important role in ensuring global food security. Two backcross inbred line (BIL) populations derived from either Xieqingzao B (XB)//XB/Dongxiang wild rice (DWR) (XXD) or XB//DWR/XB (XDX) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fertility restoration of Dwarf wild abortive- (DA-), Indonesia Paddy- (ID-), and DWR-type CMS in rice. Lines with ID- and DA-type CMS were testcrossed with both the XXD- and XDX-BILs, while the line with DWR-type CMS was testcrossed with the XDX-BILs only. A total of 16 QTLs for fertility restoration of CMS systems were identified, including three for DWR-type CMS, six for DA-type CMS, and seven for ID-type CMS. All of the additive alleles in the QTLs were derived from Oryza rufipogon. Eleven QTLs were clustered in five chromosomal regions, indicating that common Rf loci restored different CMS systems, and the favorable O. rufipogon alleles could be used to develop restorer lines for various CMS types by marker-assisted selection.

  4. Mapping QTLs for Fertility Restoration of Different Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Types in Rice Using Two Oryza sativa ×O. rufipogon Backcross Inbred Line Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biao-lin; Wan, Yong; Zhang, Jin-wei; Zhang, Fan-tao; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice breeding using cytoplasmic male sterility/fertility restoration (CMS/Rf) systems plays an important role in ensuring global food security. Two backcross inbred line (BIL) populations derived from either Xieqingzao B (XB)//XB/Dongxiang wild rice (DWR) (XXD) or XB//DWR/XB (XDX) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fertility restoration of Dwarf wild abortive- (DA-), Indonesia Paddy- (ID-), and DWR-type CMS in rice. Lines with ID- and DA-type CMS were testcrossed with both the XXD- and XDX-BILs, while the line with DWR-type CMS was testcrossed with the XDX-BILs only. A total of 16 QTLs for fertility restoration of CMS systems were identified, including three for DWR-type CMS, six for DA-type CMS, and seven for ID-type CMS. All of the additive alleles in the QTLs were derived from Oryza rufipogon. Eleven QTLs were clustered in five chromosomal regions, indicating that common Rf loci restored different CMS systems, and the favorable O. rufipogon alleles could be used to develop restorer lines for various CMS types by marker-assisted selection. PMID:27872859

  5. Convergent Loss of Awn in Two Cultivated Rice Species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima Is Caused by Mutations in Different Loci.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Tomoyuki; Komeda, Norio; Asano, Kenji; Uehara, Kanako; Gamuyao, Rico; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B; Nagai, Keisuke; Doi, Kazuyuki; Wang, Diane R; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Wu, Jianzhong; McCouch, Susan R; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2015-09-02

    A long awn is one of the distinct morphological features of wild rice species. This organ is thought to aid in seed dispersal and prevent predation by animals. Most cultivated varieties of Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, however, have lost the ability to form long awns. The causal genetic factors responsible for the loss of awn in these two rice species remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated three sets of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) in a common O. sativa genetic background (cv. Koshihikari) that harbor genomic fragments from Oryza nivara, Oryza rufipogon, and Oryza glaberrima donors. Phenotypic analyses of these libraries revealed the existence of three genes, Regulator of Awn Elongation 1 (RAE1), RAE2, and RAE3, involved in the loss of long awns in cultivated rice. Donor segments at two of these genes, RAE1 and RAE2, induced long awn formation in the CSSLs whereas an O. sativa segment at RAE3 induced long awn formation in O. glaberrima. These results suggest that the two cultivated rice species, O. sativa and O. glaberrima, have taken independent paths to become awnless.

  6. Teosinte Branched 1 modulates tillering in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Seon; Woo, Mi-Ok; Koh, Eun-Byeol; Lee, Joohyun; Ham, Tae-Ho; Seo, Hak Soo; Koh, Hee-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Tillering is an important trait of cereal crops that optimizes plant architecture for maximum yield. Teosinte Branched 1 (TB1) is a negative regulator of lateral branching and an inducer of female inflorescence formation in Zea mays (maize). Recent studies indicate that TB1 homologs in Oryza sativa (rice), Sorghum bicolor and Arabidopsis thaliana act downstream of the auxin and MORE AUXILIARY GROWTH (MAX) pathways. However, the molecular mechanism by which rice produces tillers remains unknown. In this study, transgenic rice plants were produced that overexpress the maize TB1 (mTB1) or rice TB1 (OsTB1) genes and silence the OsTB1 gene through RNAi-mediated knockdown. Because lateral branching in rice is affected by the environmental conditions, the phenotypes of transgenic plants were observed in both the greenhouse and the paddy field. Compared to wild-type plants, the number of tillers and panicles was reduced and increased in overexpressed and RNAi-mediated knockdown OsTB1 rice plants, respectively, under both environmental conditions. However, the effect was small for plants grown in paddy fields. These results demonstrate that both mTB1 and OsTB1 moderately regulate the tiller development in rice.

  7. Unravelling the proteomic profile of rice meiocytes during early meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Romero, Melania; Alós, Enriqueta; Prieto, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of genetic traits from wild or related species into cultivated rice is nowadays an important aim in rice breeding. Breeders use genetic crosses to introduce desirable genes from exotic germplasms into cultivated rice varieties. However, in many hybrids there is only a low level of pairing (if existing) and recombination at early meiosis between cultivated rice and wild relative chromosomes. With the objective of getting deeper into the knowledge of the proteins involved in early meiosis, when chromosomes associate correctly in pairs and recombine, the proteome of isolated rice meiocytes has been characterized by nLC-MS/MS at every stage of early meiosis (prophase I). Up to 1316 different proteins have been identified in rice isolated meiocytes in early meiosis, being 422 exclusively identified in early prophase I (leptotene, zygotene, or pachytene). The classification of proteins in functional groups showed that 167 were related to chromatin structure and remodeling, nucleic acid binding, cell-cycle regulation, and cytoskeleton. Moreover, the putative roles of 16 proteins which have not been previously associated to meiosis or were not identified in rice before, are also discussed namely: seven proteins involved in chromosome structure and remodeling, five regulatory proteins [such as SKP1 (OSK), a putative CDK2 like effector], a protein with RNA recognition motifs, a neddylation-related protein, and two microtubule-related proteins. Revealing the proteins involved in early meiotic processes could provide a valuable tool kit to manipulate chromosome associations during meiosis in rice breeding programs. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with the PXD001058 identifier. PMID:25104955

  8. Post-harvest field manipulations to conserve waste rice for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, J.D.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.; Kurtz, M.E.; Manley, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    Rice seeds escaping collection by combines during harvest (hereafter, waste rice) provide quality forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) and other rice growing regions in the United States. Recent sample surveys across the MAV have revealed abundance of waste rice in fields declined an average of 71% between harvest and late autumn. Thus, we evaluated the ability of common post-harvest, field-management practices to conserve waste rice for waterfowl until early winter via controlled experiments in Mississippi rice test plots in 2001 and 2003 and analyses of data from MAV-wide surveys of waste rice in rice production fields in 2000-2002. Our experiments indicated test plots with burned rice stubble that were not flooded during autumn contained more waste rice than other treatments in 2001 (P?0.10). Waste-rice abundance in test plots did not differ among postharvest treatments in 2003 (P = 0.97). Our analyses of data from the MAV sample surveys did not detect differences in abundance of waste rice among fields burned, rolled, disked, or left in standing stubble post-harvest (P?0.04; Bonferroni corrected critical ( a= 0.017). Because results from test-plot experiments were inconclusive, we based our primary inference regarding best post-harvest treatments on patterns of rice abundance identified from the MAV surveys and previously documented environmental and agronomic benefits of managing harvested rice fields for wintering waterfowl. Therefore, we recommend leaving standing stubble in rice fields after harvest as a preliminary beneficial management practice. We suggest future research evaluate potential of postharvest practices to conserve waste rice for waterfowl and reduce straw in production rice fields managed for wintering waterfowl throughout the MAV.

  9. The archaeobotany of Asian rice expansion and the development of wet-field cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, D.

    2008-12-01

    Archaeobotanical evidence provides direct data on past human diet and agriculture, including a geographical and chronological framework for studying the expansion of rice agriculture. The growth of systematic archaeobotanical sampling in recent years has allowed for the past presence of rice to be seen in relation to cultivation of other crops and associated weeds. The weed flora provides a basis for inferring the nature of cultivation systems, whether rain-fed dry rice or wetland "paddy" rice, a key distinction for considerations of past methane production. Nevertheless, current data is very unevenly distributed. This poster will summarize available evidence for the origins and spread of rice in South Asia (India and Pakistan), and mainland and Island Southeast Asia deriving from an earlier Chinese domestication. Where possible, such as in India or China, the potential of the weed flora remains for distinguishing wetland rice crops will be summarized. In broad terms, although the origins of rice use and cultivation begins by or during the Middle Holocene (6000- 3000 BC), rice cultivation spread outside the regions of the wild progenitor after this time. Two phases of rice expansion can be distinguished. Phase 1, between 3000 and 1500 BC, introduced rice to Southeast Asia, probably under wetland cultivation, and the spread of dry rice over northern India and Pakistan. Phase 2, taking place between 1000 and 0 BC, sees the spread of rice throughout the Southern Indian Peninsula, with weed evidence suggesting irrigated wetland rice. Similarly, this period sees the spread of intensive paddy agriculture through Korea and Japan, but in Southeast Asia is probably related to a spread of rice in upland, dry field systems.

  10. Determinants for grading Malaysian rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChePa, Noraziah; Yusoff, Nooraini; Ahmad, Norhayati

    2016-08-01

    Due to un-uniformity of rice grading practices in Malaysia, zones which actively producing rice in Malaysia are using their own way of grading rice. Rice grading is important in determining rice quality and its subsequent price in the market. It is an important process applied in the rice production industry with the purpose of ensuring that the rice produced for the market meets the quality requirements of consumer. Two important aspects that need to be considered in determining rice grades are grading technique and determinants to be used for grading (usually referred as rice attributes). This article proposes the list of determinants to be used in grading Malaysian rice. Determinants were explored through combination of extensive literature review and series of interview with the domain experts and practitioners. The proposed determinants are believed to be beneficial to BERNAS in improving the current Malaysian rice grading process.

  11. Molecular evolution of shattering loci in U.S. weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Carrie S.; Reagon, Michael; Gross, Briana L.; Olsen, Kenneth M.; Jia, Yulin; Caicedo, Ana L.

    2010-01-01

    Cultivated rice fields worldwide are plagued with weedy rice, a conspecific weed of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). The persistence of weedy rice has been attributed, in part, to its ability to shatter (disperse) seed prior to crop harvesting. In the United States, separately evolved weedy rice groups have been shown to share genomic identity with exotic domesticated cultivars. Here, we investigate the shattering phenotype in a collection of U.S. weedy rice accessions, as well as wild and cultivated relatives. We find that all U.S. weedy rice groups shatter seeds easily, despite multiple origins, and in contrast to a decrease in shattering ability seen in cultivated groups. We assessed allelic identity and diversity at the major shattering locus, sh4, in weedy rice; we find that all cultivated and weedy rice, regardless of population, share similar haplotypes at sh4, and all contain a single derived mutation associated with decreased seed shattering. Our data constitute the strongest evidence to date of an evolution of weeds from domesticated backgrounds. The combination of a shared cultivar sh4 allele and a highly shattering phenotype, suggests that U.S. weedy rice have re-acquired the shattering trait after divergence from their progenitors through alternative genetic mechanisms. PMID:20584132

  12. Relating raw rice color and composition to cooked rice color.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, the color of milled rice is economically important. The whiter the rice the more it is preferred by consumers and the more value it has in the market place. Little attention has been given to relating raw rice color to cooked milled rice color and, specifically, to determining the i...

  13. Crop management strategies and disease resistance control the severity of false smut and kernel smut of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    False smut and kernel smut are common diseases of rice capable of severe epidemics with dramatic yield losses. The importance of rice smuts is often overlooked in the US, and highly susceptible varieties are now being grown on the majority of production acres in the southern rice producing states. O...

  14. Crop water use predictions available on-line for sprinkler irrigated rice in the United States and South Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is an important food source for people in most of the world. Traditional rice culture requires flood irrigation which commonly uses 60 to 150 cm of water per growing season. Rice production is limited to fields with enough clay in the soils to retain 5 to 10 cm floodwater on the surface and p...

  15. Why is golden rice golden (yellow) instead of red?

    PubMed

    Schaub, Patrick; Al-Babili, Salim; Drake, Rachel; Beyer, Peter

    2005-05-01

    The endosperm of Golden Rice (Oryza sativa) is yellow due to the accumulation of beta-carotene (provitamin A) and xanthophylls. The product of the two carotenoid biosynthesis transgenes used in Golden Rice, phytoene synthase (PSY) and the bacterial carotene desaturase (CRTI), is lycopene, which has a red color. The absence of lycopene in Golden Rice shows that the pathway proceeds beyond the transgenic end point and thus that the endogenous pathway must also be acting. By using TaqMan real-time PCR, we show in wild-type rice endosperm the mRNA expression of the relevant carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes encoding phytoene desaturase, zeta-carotene desaturase, carotene cis-trans-isomerase, beta-lycopene cyclase, and beta-carotene hydroxylase; only PSY mRNA was virtually absent. We show that the transgenic phenotype is not due to up-regulation of expression of the endogenous rice pathway in response to the transgenes, as was suggested to be the case in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit, where CRTI expression resulted in a similar carotenoid phenomenon. This means that beta-carotene and xanthophyll formation in Golden Rice relies on the activity of constitutively expressed intrinsic rice genes (carotene cis-trans-isomerase, alpha/beta-lycopene cyclase, beta-carotene hydroxylase). PSY needs to be supplemented and the need for the CrtI transgene in Golden Rice is presumably due to insufficient activity of the phytoene desaturase and/or zeta-carotene desaturase enzyme in endosperm. The effect of CRTI expression was also investigated in leaves of transgenic rice and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, again, the mRNA levels of intrinsic carotenogenic enzymes remained unaffected; nevertheless, the carotenoid pattern changed, showing a decrease in lutein, while the beta-carotene-derived xanthophylls increased. This shift correlated with CRTI-expression and is most likely governed at the enzyme level by lycopene-cis-trans-isomerism. Possible implications are

  16. The Evolutionary Basis of Naturally Diverse Rice Leaves Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Jolly; Dionora, Jacqueline; Elmido-Mabilangan, Abigail; Wanchana, Samart; Thakur, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Anindya; Brar, Darshan S.; Quick, William Paul

    2016-01-01

    Rice contains genetically and ecologically diverse wild and cultivated species that show a wide variation in plant and leaf architecture. A systematic characterization of leaf anatomy is essential in understanding the dynamics behind such diversity. Therefore, leaf anatomies of 24 Oryza species spanning 11 genetically diverse rice genomes were studied in both lateral and longitudinal directions and possible evolutionary trends were examined. A significant inter-species variation in mesophyll cells, bundle sheath cells, and vein structure was observed, suggesting precise genetic control over these major rice leaf anatomical traits. Cellular dimensions, measured along three growth axes, were further combined proportionately to construct three-dimensional (3D) leaf anatomy models to compare the relative size and orientation of the major cell types present in a fully expanded leaf. A reconstruction of the ancestral leaf state revealed that the following are the major characteristics of recently evolved rice species: fewer veins, larger and laterally elongated mesophyll cells, with an increase in total mesophyll area and in bundle sheath cell number. A huge diversity in leaf anatomy within wild and domesticated rice species has been portrayed in this study, on an evolutionary context, predicting a two-pronged evolutionary pathway leading to the ‘sativa leaf type’ that we see today in domesticated species. PMID:27792743

  17. Global Identification of Genes Specific for Rice Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingwei; Xu, Meng; Bian, Shiquan; Hou, Lili; Tang, Ding; Li, Yafei; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yu, Hengxiu

    2015-01-01

    The leptotene-zygotene transition is a major step in meiotic progression during which pairing between homologous chromosomes is initiated and double strand breaks occur. OsAM1, a homologue of maize AM1 and Arabidopsis SWI1, encodes a protein with a coiled-coil domain in its central region that is required for the leptotene-zygotene transition during rice meiosis. To gain more insight into the role of OsAM1 in rice meiosis and identify additional meiosis-specific genes, we characterized the transcriptomes of young panicles of Osam1 mutant and wild-type rice plants using RNA-Seq combined with bioinformatic and statistical analyses. As a result, a total of 25,750 and 28,455 genes were expressed in young panicles of wild-type and Osam1 mutant plants, respectively, and 4,400 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; log2 Ratio ≥ 1, FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Of these DEGs, four known rice meiosis-specific genes were detected, and 22 new putative meiosis-related genes were found by mapping these DEGs to reference biological pathways in the KEGG database. We identified eight additional well-conserved OsAM1-responsive rice meiotic genes by comparing our RNA-Seq data with known meiotic genes in Arabidopsis and fission yeast.

  18. Little White Lies: Pericarp Color Provides Insights into the Origins and Evolution of Southeast Asian Weedy Rice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yongxia; Song, Beng Kah; Li, Lin-Feng; Li, Ya-Ling; Huang, Zhongyun; Caicedo, Ana L; Jia, Yulin; Olsen, Kenneth M

    2016-12-07

    Weedy rice is a conspecific form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) that infests rice fields and results in severe crop losses. Weed strains in different world regions appear to have originated multiple times from different domesticated and/or wild rice progenitors. In the case of Malaysian weedy rice, a multiple-origin model has been proposed based on neutral markers and analyses of domestication genes for hull color and seed shattering. Here, we examined variation in pericarp (bran) color and its molecular basis to address how this trait evolved in Malaysian weeds and its possible role in weed adaptation. Functional alleles of the Rc gene confer proanthocyanidin pigmentation of the pericarp, a trait found in most wild and weedy Oryzas and associated with seed dormancy; nonfunctional rc alleles were strongly favored during rice domestication, and most cultivated varieties have nonpigmented pericarps. Phenotypic characterizations of 52 Malaysian weeds revealed that most strains are characterized by the pigmented pericarp; however, some weeds have white pericarps, suggesting close relationships to cultivated rice. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Rc haplotypes present in Malaysian weeds likely have at least three distinct origins: wild O. rufipogon, white-pericarp cultivated rice, and red-pericarp cultivated rice. These diverse origins contribute to high Rc nucleotide diversity in the Malaysian weeds. Comparison of Rc allelic distributions with other rice domestication genes suggests that functional Rc alleles may confer particular fitness benefits in weedy rice populations, for example, by conferring seed dormancy. This may promote functional Rc introgression from local wild Oryza populations.

  19. Little White Lies: Pericarp Color Provides Insights into the Origins and Evolution of Southeast Asian Weedy Rice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yongxia; Song, Beng Kah; Li, Lin-Feng; Li, Ya-Ling; Huang, Zhongyun; Caicedo, Ana L.; Jia, Yulin; Olsen, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    Weedy rice is a conspecific form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) that infests rice fields and results in severe crop losses. Weed strains in different world regions appear to have originated multiple times from different domesticated and/or wild rice progenitors. In the case of Malaysian weedy rice, a multiple-origin model has been proposed based on neutral markers and analyses of domestication genes for hull color and seed shattering. Here, we examined variation in pericarp (bran) color and its molecular basis to address how this trait evolved in Malaysian weeds and its possible role in weed adaptation. Functional alleles of the Rc gene confer proanthocyanidin pigmentation of the pericarp, a trait found in most wild and weedy Oryzas and associated with seed dormancy; nonfunctional rc alleles were strongly favored during rice domestication, and most cultivated varieties have nonpigmented pericarps. Phenotypic characterizations of 52 Malaysian weeds revealed that most strains are characterized by the pigmented pericarp; however, some weeds have white pericarps, suggesting close relationships to cultivated rice. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Rc haplotypes present in Malaysian weeds likely have at least three distinct origins: wild O. rufipogon, white-pericarp cultivated rice, and red-pericarp cultivated rice. These diverse origins contribute to high Rc nucleotide diversity in the Malaysian weeds. Comparison of Rc allelic distributions with other rice domestication genes suggests that functional Rc alleles may confer particular fitness benefits in weedy rice populations, for example, by conferring seed dormancy. This may promote functional Rc introgression from local wild Oryza populations. PMID:27729434

  20. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  1. Making rice even healthier!

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is a naturally healthy food, but what if it could be made even healthier? Would Americans eat more rice if it could be advertised to be a 'New and Improved' source of calcium to promote bone growth, or iron to prevent anemia? Grocery stores are full of foods that are vitamin enhanced to attract...

  2. A rice chloroplast transit peptide sequence does not alter the cytoplasmic localization of sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase expressed in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Lee, Kyungjin; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-09-01

    Ectopic overexpression of melatonin biosynthetic genes of animal origin has been used to generate melatonin-rich transgenic plants to examine the functional roles of melatonin in plants. However, the subcellular localization of these proteins expressed in the transgenic plants remains unknown. We studied the localization of sheep (Ovis aries) serotonin N-acetyltransferase (OaSNAT) and a translational fusion of a rice SNAT transit peptide to OaSNAT (TS:OaSNAT) in plants. Laser confocal microscopy analysis revealed that both OaSNAT and TS:OaSNAT proteins were localized to the cytoplasm even with the addition of the transit sequence to OaSNAT. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing the TS:OaSNAT fusion transgene exhibited high SNAT enzyme activity relative to untransformed wild-type plants, but lower activity than transgenic rice plants expressing the wild-type OaSNAT gene. Melatonin levels in both types of transgenic rice plant corresponded well with SNAT enzyme activity levels. The TS:OaSNAT transgenic lines exhibited increased seminal root growth relative to wild-type plants, but less than in the OaSNAT transgenic lines, confirming that melatonin promotes root growth. Seed-specific OaSNAT expression under the control of a rice prolamin promoter did not confer high levels of melatonin production in transgenic rice seeds compared with seeds from transgenic plants expressing OaSNAT under the control of the constitutive maize ubiquitin promoter.

  3. Rice Agriculture in the River Parishes: The Historical Archeology of the Vacherie Site (16 SJ 40), St. James Parish, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    successfully along the Gulf coast because of the climate. Rice was preferable to maize as a substitute for wheat. In a letter to the King dated May 12, 1733...Williamson 1940:11). Row rice was grown on the outer edge of the natural levee, where the wet clay soils prohibited the growing of sugar or maize . The...Another variation of upland rice farming involved planting the rice between rows of maize . This practice remained common 47 along Bayou Teche and

  4. Physical and thermochemical properties of rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Mansaray, K.G.; Ghaly, A.E.

    1997-11-01

    Rice husk a major by-product of the rice milling industry, is one of the most commonly available lignocellulosic materials that can be converted to different types of fuels and chemical feedstocks through a variety of thermochemical conversion processes. Proper understanding of the physical and thermochemical properties of rice husk is necessary for the design of thermochemical conversion systems. This study provides information on moisture content, bulk density, particle size, heating values, proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, ash composition, and ash fusibility characteristics for six rice husk varieties. The moisture content ranged from 8.68 to 10.44%, and the bulk density ranged from 86 to 114 kg/m{sup 3}. The results showed excessive volatile release of over 60%, high ash content ranging from 15.30 to 24.60% (dry weight basis), and high silica content of the ash ranging from 90 to 97%. The lower heating values ranged from 13.24 to 16.20 MJ/kg (dry weight basis). The ash fusion temperatures of all the varieties were found to be over 1,600 C. The differences in varietal characteristics have significant effects on the chemical properties of rice husk.

  5. Oscar Wilde and the brain cell.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Elisha

    2013-01-01

    This chapter considers Oscar Wilde's interest in the brain cell as an aesthetic object. Offering an account of Wilde's career that analyzes his early interest in physiology and philosophy, this chapter argues that Wilde's uniquely aesthetic take on the brain suggests that he rejects an account of the self as autonomous or self-determining. For many late Victorians brain science threatened both the freedom of human action and the legitimacy of beauty because it had the potential to invalidate conscious experience. But writers whose work Wilde knew, like John Ruskin, W. K. Clifford, and John Tyndall, avoided the despair of materialism by using aesthetic terms in their own discussions of life's invisible materials. Wilde's art collaborates with the contemporary sciences. His depictions of the cell direct the senses to a new field of being that emphasizes the molecular life all humans have in common, in which individual responsibility and activity matter less than the necessity of beauty.

  6. The role of aquaporin RWC3 in drought avoidance in rice.

    PubMed

    Lian, Hong-Li; Yu, Xin; Ye, Qin; Ding, Xiaodong; Kitagawa, Yoshichika; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Su, Wei-Ai; Tang, Zhang-Cheng; Ding, Xiao-Song

    2004-04-01

    Although the discovery of aquaporins in plants has resulted in a paradigm shift in the understanding of plant water relations, the relationship between aquaporins and drought resistance still remains elusive. From an agronomic viewpoint, upland rice is traditionally considered as showing drought avoidance. In the investigation of different morphological and physiological responses of upland rice (Oryza sativa L. spp indica cv. Zhonghan 3) and lowland rice (O. sativa L. spp japonica cv. Xiushui 63) to water deficit, we observed young leaf rolling and the remarkable decline of cumulative transpiration in the upland rice. The expression of water channel protein RWC3 mRNA was increased in upland rice at the early response (up to 4 h) to the 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 treatment, whereas there was no significant expression changes in lowland rice. Protein levels were increased in upland rice and decreased in lowland rice at 10 h after the water deficit. The up-regulation of RWC3 in upland rice fits well with the knowledge that upland rice adopts the mechanism of drought avoidance. The physiological significance of this RWC3 up-regulation was then explored with the over-expression of RWC3 in transgenic lowland rice (O. sativa L. spp japonica cv. Zhonghua 11) controlled by a stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter. Compared to the wild-type plant, the transgenic lowland rice exhibited higher root osmotic hydraulic conductivity (Lp), leaf water potential and relative cumulative transpiration at the end of 10 h PEG treatment. These results indicated that RWC3 probably played a role in drought avoidance in rice.

  7. Evaluation of caspofungin susceptibility testing by the new Vitek 2 AST-YS06 yeast card using a unique collection of FKS wild-type and hot spot mutant isolates, including the five most common candida species.

    PubMed

    Astvad, Karen M; Perlin, David S; Johansen, Helle K; Jensen, Rasmus H; Arendrup, Maiken C

    2013-01-01

    FKS mutant isolates associated with breakthrough or failure cases are emerging in clinical settings. Discrimination of these from wild-type (wt) isolates in a routine laboratory setting is complicated. We evaluated the ability of caspofungin MIC determination using the new Vitek 2 AST-Y06 yeast susceptibility card to correctly identify the fks mutants from wt isolates and compared the performance to those of the CLSI and EUCAST reference methods. A collection of 98 Candida isolates, including 31 fks hot spot mutants, were included. Performance was evaluated using the FKS genotype as the "gold standard" and compared to those of the CLSI and EUCAST methodologies. The categorical agreement for Vitek 2 was 93.9%, compared to 88.4% for the CLSI method and 98.7% for the EUCAST method. Vitek 2 misclassified 19.4% (6/31) of the fks mutant isolates as susceptible, in contrast to <4% for each of the reference methods. The overall essential agreement between the CLSI method and Vitek 2 MICs was 92.6% (88/95) but was substantially lower for fks mutant isolates (78.6% [22/28]). Correct discrimination between susceptible and intermediate Candida glabrata isolates was not possible, as the revised species-specific susceptibility breakpoint was not included in the Vitek 2 detection range (MIC of ≤0.250 to ≥4 mg/liter). In conclusion, the Vitek 2 allowed correct categorization of all wt isolates as susceptible. However, despite an acceptable categorical agreement, it failed to reliably classify isolates harboring fks hot spot mutations as intermediate or resistant, which was in part due to the fact that the detection range did not span the susceptibility breakpoint for C. glabrata.

  8. Scorpion peptide LqhIT2 activates phenylpropanoid pathways via jasmonate to increase rice resistance to rice leafrollers.

    PubMed

    Tianpei, Xiuzi; Li, Dong; Qiu, Ping; Luo, Jie; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2015-01-01

    LqhIT2 is an insect-specific toxin peptide identified in Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus that can be toxic to lepidoptera pests. However, whether LqhIT2 induces insect resistance in rice, and how the LqhIT2 influences the biochemical metabolism of rice plants remains unknown. Here, purified LqhIT2-GST fusion protein had toxicity to rice leafrollers. Meanwhile, in vitro and field trials showed that LqhIT2 transgenic rice plants were less damaged by rice leafrollers compared to the wild type plants. Introducing LqhIT2 primed the elevated expression of lipoxygenase, a key component of the jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathway, together with enhanced linolenic acid, cis-(+)-12-oxophytodienoic acid, jasmonic acid, and jasmonic acid-isoleucine levels. In addition, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a key gene of the phenylpropanoid pathway, was up-regulated. Correspondingly, the contents of downstream products of the phenylpropanoid pathway such as flavonoids and lignins, were also increased in LqhIT2 transgenic plants. These changes were paralleled by decreased starch, glucose, and glucose-6-phosphate accumulation, the key metabolites of glycolysis pathway that supplies the raw material and intermediate carbon products for phenylpropanoids biosyntheses. These findings suggest that, in addition to its own toxicity against pests, LqhIT2 activate the phenylpropanoid pathway via jasmonate-mediated priming, which subsequently increases flavonoid and lignin content and improves insect resistance in rice.

  9. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  10. GAD1 Encodes a Secreted Peptide That Regulates Grain Number, Grain Length, and Awn Development in Rice Domestication[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Lei; Zhao, Xinhui; Zhang, Weifeng; Liu, Fengxia; Fu, Yongcai; Cai, Hongwei; Sun, Xianyou; Gu, Ping; Xie, Daoxin

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) was domesticated from wild rice (Oryza rufipogon), which typically displays fewer grains per panicle and longer grains than cultivated rice. In addition, wild rice has long awns, whereas cultivated rice has short awns or lacks them altogether. These changes represent critical events in rice domestication. Here, we identified a major gene, GRAIN NUMBER, GRAIN LENGTH AND AWN DEVELOPMENT1 (GAD1), that regulates those critical changes during rice domestication. GAD1 is located on chromosome 8 and is predicted to encode a small secretary signal peptide belonging to the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR-LIKE family. A frame-shift insertion in gad1 destroyed the conserved cysteine residues of the peptide, resulting in a loss of function, and causing the increased number of grains per panicle, shorter grains, and awnless phenotype characteristic of cultivated rice. Our findings provide a useful paradigm for revealing functions of peptide signal molecules in plant development and helps elucidate the molecular basis of rice domestication. PMID:27634315

  11. A Phylogenetically Informed Comparison of GH1 Hydrolases between Arabidopsis and Rice Response to Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yun-Ying; Yang, Jing-Fang; Liu, Tie-Yuan; Su, Zhen-Feng; Zhu, Fu-Yuan; Chen, Mo-Xian; Fan, Tao; Ye, Neng-Hui; Feng, Zhen; Wang, Ling-Juan; Hao, Ge-Fei; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Ying-Gao

    2017-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases Family 1 (GH1) comprises enzymes that can hydrolyze β-O-glycosidic bond from a carbohydrate moiety. The plant GH1 hydrolases participate in a number of developmental processes and stress responses, including cell wall modification, plant hormone activation or deactivation and herbivore resistance. A large number of members has been observed in this family, suggesting their potential redundant functions in various biological processes. In this study, we have used 304 sequences of plant GH1 hydrolases to study the evolution of this gene family in plant lineage. Gene duplication was found to be a common phenomenon in this gene family. Although many members of GH1 hydrolases showed a high degree of similarity in Arabidopsis and rice, they showed substantial tissue specificity and differential responses to various stress treatments. This differential regulation implies each enzyme may play a distinct role in plants. Furthermore, some of salt-responsive Arabidopsis GH1 hydrolases were selected to test their genetic involvement in salt responses. The knockout mutants of AtBGLU1 and AtBGLU19 were observed to be less-sensitive during NaCl treatment in comparison to the wild type seedlings, indicating their participation in salt stress response. In summary, Arabidopsis and rice GH1 glycoside hydrolases showed distinct features in their evolutionary path, transcriptional regulation and genetic functions. PMID:28392792

  12. The accumulation of deleterious mutations in rice genomes: a hypothesis on the cost of domestication.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Tang, Tian; Tang, Hua; Huang, Jianzi; Shi, Suhua; Wu, Chung-I

    2006-03-01

    The extent of molecular differentiation between domesticated animals or plants and their wild relatives is postulated to be small. The availability of the complete genome sequences of two subspecies of the Asian rice, Oryza sativa (indica and japonica) and their wild relatives have provided an unprecedented opportunity to study divergence following domestication. We observed significantly more amino acid substitutions during rice domestication than can be expected from a comparison among wild species. This excess is disproportionately larger for the more radical kinds of amino acid changes (e.g. Cys<-->Tyr). We estimate that approximately a quarter of the amino acid differences between rice cultivars are deleterious, not accountable by the relaxation of selective constraints. This excess is negatively correlated with the rate of recombination, suggesting that 'hitchhiking' has occurred. We hypothesize that during domestication artificial selection increased the frequency of many deleterious mutations.

  13. Overexpression of rice serotonin N-acetyltransferase 1 in transgenic rice plants confers resistance to cadmium and senescence and increases grain yield.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungjin; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2017-04-01

    While ectopic overexpression of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) in plants has been accomplished using animal SNAT genes, ectopic overexpression of plant SNAT genes in plants has not been investigated. Because the plant SNAT protein differs from that of animals in its subcellular localization and enzyme kinetics, its ectopic overexpression in plants would be expected to give outcomes distinct from those observed from overexpression of animal SNAT genes in transgenic plants. Consistent with our expectations, we found that transgenic rice plants overexpressing rice (Oryza sativa) SNAT1 (OsSNAT1) did not show enhanced seedling growth like that observed in ovine SNAT-overexpressing transgenic rice plants, although both types of plants exhibited increased melatonin levels. OsSNAT1-overexpressing rice plants did show significant resistance to cadmium and senescence stresses relative to wild-type controls. In contrast to tomato, melatonin synthesis in rice seedlings was not induced by selenium and OsSNAT1 transgenic rice plants did not show tolerance to selenium. T2 homozygous OsSNAT1 transgenic rice plants exhibited increased grain yield due to increased panicle number per plant under paddy field conditions. These benefits conferred by ectopic overexpression of OsSNAT1 had not been observed in transgenic rice plants overexpressing ovine SNAT, suggesting that plant SNAT functions differently from animal SNAT in plants.

  14. STV11 encodes a sulphotransferase and confers durable resistance to rice stripe virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Yuqiang; He, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoming; Hu, Jinlong; Liu, Yanling; Dai, Huimin; Zhang, Yingxin; Wang, Baoxiang; Wu, Weixun; Gao, He; Zhang, Yunhui; Tao, Xiaorong; Deng, Huafeng; Yuan, Dingyang; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Cheng, Xianian; Wu, Chuanyin; Wang, Haiyang; Yuan, Longping; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-09-09

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) causes one of the most serious viral diseases of rice (Oryza sativa L.), but the molecular basis of RSV resistance has remained elusive. Here we show that the resistant allele of rice STV11 (STV11-R) encodes a sulfotransferase (OsSOT1) catalysing the conversion of salicylic acid (SA) into sulphonated SA (SSA), whereas the gene product encoded by the susceptible allele STV11-S loses this activity. Sequence analyses suggest that the STV11-R and STV11-S alleles were predifferentiated in different geographic populations of wild rice, Oryza rufipogon, and remained prevalent in cultivated indica and japonica rice varieties, respectively. Introgression of the STV11-R allele into susceptible cultivars or heterologous transfer of STV11-R into tobacco plants confers effective resistance against RSV. Our results shed new insights into plant viral defense mechanisms and suggest effective means of breeding RSV-resistant crops using molecular marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering.

  15. Unavailability of wild relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The unavailability of crop wild relatives may come in many forms, including limited possibilities of gene flow with related species due to clonality, differing ploidy levels, or other crossing barriers between species. Alternatively, it may simply mean that we lack information about the wild relativ...

  16. Resistance of Rice Varieties to the Stored-Product Insect, Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Antunes, Catarina; Mendes, Raquel; Lima, Arlindo; Barros, Graça; Fields, Paul; Da Costa, Luísa Beirão; Rodrigues, José Carlos; Silva, Maria José; Correia, Augusto Manuel; Carvalho, Maria Otilia

    2016-02-01

    Four common Portuguese rice varieties--Thaibonnet, Gladio, Albatros, and Eurosis--were tested for their relative susceptibility to Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, a common pest of stored rice in Portugal and in tropical countries. Physical (moisture content, hardness, length, and width) and chemical (by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) properties of rice kernels were measured. Insect bioassays measured median developmental time, Dobie's index of susceptibility, percentage of damaged grains and weight loss, and progeny developed. This was done for paddy, brown rice, and polished rice for each variety. There were small, but significant, differences in insect resistance among the varieties. However, it was different for paddy and polished rice. In paddy, these differences were correlated with hull damage, and Eurosis was the most susceptible variety. In polished rice, resistance was correlated with hardness, and Thaibonnet was the most susceptible variety. In general, paddy rice was more resistant to insect attack, followed by polished rice and then brown rice. Paddy kernels selected with undamaged hull were completely resistant to attack. Implications for IPM and breeding for resistant varieties are discussed.

  17. Overexpression of acetylcholinesterase gene in rice results in enhancement of shoot gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kosuke; Shida, Satoshi; Honda, Yoshihiro; Shono, Mariko; Miyake, Hiroshi; Oguri, Suguru; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Momonoki, Yoshie S

    2015-09-25

    Acetylcholine (ACh), a known neurotransmitter in animals and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) exists widely in plants, although its role in plant signal transduction is unclear. We previously reported AChE in Zea mays L. might be related to gravitropism based on pharmacological study using an AChE inhibitor. Here we clearly demonstrate plant AChE play an important role as a positive regulator in the gravity response of plants based on a genetic study. First, the gene encoding a second component of the ACh-mediated signal transduction system, AChE was cloned from rice, Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare. The rice AChE shared high homology with maize, siratro and Salicornia AChEs. Similar to animal and other plant AChEs, the rice AChE hydrolyzed acetylthiocholine and propionylthiocholine, but not butyrylthiocholine. Thus, the rice AChE might be characterized as an AChE (E.C.3.1.1.7). Similar to maize and siratro AChEs, the rice AChE exhibited low sensitivity to the AChE inhibitor, neostigmine bromide, compared with the electric eel AChE. Next, the functionality of rice AChE was proved by overexpression in rice plants. The rice AChE was localized in extracellular spaces of rice plants. Further, the rice AChE mRNA and its activity were mainly detected during early developmental stages (2 d-10 d after sowing). Finally, by comparing AChE up-regulated plants with wild-type, we found that AChE overexpression causes an enhanced gravitropic response. This result clearly suggests that the function of the rice AChE relate to positive regulation of gravitropic response in rice seedlings.

  18. Wild Mammalian Biomonitors for Assessing Impacts of Environmental Contamination on Population and Community Ecology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    rice seed germination, and Ceriodaphnia assays. At the ecosystem level, in situ small mammal total biomass, sex ratios, reproduction , recruit- ment...toxic study sites, which was reflected in common laboratory bioassay results using fathead minnow, microtox, rice seed germination, and Ceriodaphnia ...assays. At the ecosystem level, in situ small mammal total biomass, sex ratios, reproduction , recruitment, survival, and density were measured as

  19. Identification of rice sheath blight and blast quantitative trait loci in two different O. satival/O. nivara advanced backcross populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two accessions of the rice (Oryza sativa) wild ancestral species, O. nivara identified as being moderately resistant to sheath blight and leaf blast diseases, were used as donor parents to develop two advanced backcross populations with the U.S. rice cultivar, Bengal, as the recurrent parent. The O...

  20. Rayada specialty: the forgotten resource of elite features of rice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Crop domestication and thereafter gradual selection or directional breeding have narrowed the genetic diversity of elite varieties and even promoted gathering of deleterious mutations in their stress response mechanisms, whereas local ecotypes, landraces and wild relatives still growing on native environment and preferences keep the genetic diversities for features like stress tolerance. Rayada is such an exceptional ecotype, variant of typical deepwater rice, completely endemic to certain areas of Madhumati river tracts of Bangladesh and still shares some features of wild rices. Multiple physiological features of Rayadas are distinctly different from typical deepwater rice. Tolerance to prolonged flood, submergence and cold are special features along with strong photoperiod sensitivity and lack of dormancy. Moreover, longer root system and prompt recovery capacity make it as an elite resource of stress tolerance. However, it has long been neglected because of mainly its long life cycle and poor yield. This review examines the specialty of Rayada rice and the potential use of its unique traits. PMID:24359642

  1. Sugarcane rice residue biochars and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sugarcane production in U.S. involves either pre-harvest burning or after-harvest burning of the residue. Approximately 70-90% of the dry matter of harvested sugarcane trash is lost through open field burning. This practice has caused considerable concerns over air quality and soil sustainability. We propose an alternative conservation approach to convert the sugarcane residue to biochar and used as soil amendment to conserve carbon and potentially improve soil fertility. In this study, fundamental properties of biochars made from sugarcane residue along with rice residues were tested for agronomic and environmental benefits. Sugarcane and rice harvest residues and milling processing byproducts bagasse and rice husk were converted to biochars at different pyrolysis temperatures and characterized. In general, sugarcane leave biochar contained more P, K, Ca and Mg than sugarcane bagasse biochar. Rice straw biochar had more S, K Ca but less P than rice husk biochar. Both biochars had higher available fraction of total P than that of total K. Sugarcane leave biochar converted at 450oC was dominated with various lignin derived phenols as well as non-specific aromatic compounds whereas bagasse biochar was with both lignin derived phenol and poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Rice straw char was dominated with non-specific aromatic compounds. At 750oC, charred material was dominated with aromatic ethers while losing the aromatic C=C structures. These molecular and surface property differences likely contributed to the difference in water holding capacities observed with these biochars. On the other hand, rice straw biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures had no significant effect on rice germination. Soils treated with sugarcane leave/trash biochar significantly enhanced sugarcane growth especially the root length. Treating soil with either sugarcane leave or bagasse char also enhanced soil adsorption capacity of atrazine; a common herbicide used in sugarcane

  2. Wheel running in the wild.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Johanna H; Robbers, Yuri

    2014-07-07

    The importance of exercise for health and neurogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Wheel running is often used in the laboratory for triggering enhanced activity levels, despite the common objection that this behaviour is an artefact of captivity and merely signifies neurosis or stereotypy. If wheel running is indeed caused by captive housing, wild mice are not expected to use a running wheel in nature. This however, to our knowledge, has never been tested. Here, we show that when running wheels are placed in nature, they are frequently used by wild mice, also when no extrinsic reward is provided. Bout lengths of running wheel behaviour in the wild match those for captive mice. This finding falsifies one criterion for stereotypic behaviour, and suggests that running wheel activity is an elective behaviour. In a time when lifestyle in general and lack of exercise in particular are a major cause of disease in the modern world, research into physical activity is of utmost importance. Our findings may help alleviate the main concern regarding the use of running wheels in research on exercise.

  3. Shaping a better rice plant.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan

    2010-06-01

    Two studies describe how regulatory variation at the rice gene OsSPL14 can lead to altered plant morphology and improve grain yield. These studies support the possibility of improving rice yield through changing plant architecture.

  4. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000678.htm Common cold To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, ...

  5. Golden Rice is an effective source of vitamin A1234

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jian; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Russell, Robert M; Grusak, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Genetically engineered “Golden Rice” contains up to 35 μg β-carotene per gram of rice. It is important to determine the vitamin A equivalency of Golden Rice β-carotene to project the potential effect of this biofortified grain in rice-consuming populations that commonly exhibit low vitamin A status. Objective: The objective was to determine the vitamin A value of intrinsically labeled dietary Golden Rice in humans. Design: Golden Rice plants were grown hydroponically with heavy water (deuterium oxide) to generate deuterium-labeled [2H]β-carotene in the rice grains. Golden Rice servings of 65–98 g (130–200 g cooked rice) containing 0.99–1.53 mg β-carotene were fed to 5 healthy adult volunteers (3 women and 2 men) with 10 g butter. A reference dose of [13C10]retinyl acetate (0.4–1.0 mg) in oil was given to each volunteer 1 wk before ingestion of the Golden Rice dose. Blood samples were collected over 36 d. Results: Our results showed that the mean (±SD) area under the curve for the total serum response to [2H]retinol was 39.9 ± 20.7 μg·d after the Golden Rice dose. Compared with that of the [13C10]retinyl acetate reference dose (84.7 ± 34.6 μg·d), Golden Rice β-carotene provided 0.24–0.94 mg retinol. Thus, the conversion factor of Golden Rice β-carotene to retinol is 3.8 ± 1.7 to 1 with a range of 1.9–6.4 to 1 by weight, or 2.0 ± 0.9 to 1 with a range of 1.0–3.4 to 1 by moles. Conclusion: β-Carotene derived from Golden Rice is effectively converted to vitamin A in humans. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00680355. PMID:19369372

  6. Does the presence of microplastics influence the acute toxicity of chromium(VI) to early juveniles of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps)? A study with juveniles from two wild estuarine populations.

    PubMed

    Luís, Luís G; Ferreira, Pedro; Fonte, Elsa; Oliveira, Miguel; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-07-01

    presence of MP, the negative effect caused by high concentrations of Cr(VI) on the predatory performance was significantly reduced in L-est fish but not in M-est fish, and Cr(VI) concentrations higher than 3.9mg/l caused oxidative damage in L-est fish but not in M-est fish. The acclimatization and test conditions were similar for fish from the two estuaries and these ecosystems have environmental differences. Thus, long-term exposure to distinct environmental conditions in the natural habitat during previous developmental phases influenced the sensitivity and responses of juveniles to Cr(VI), therefore, we rejected hypothesis 3. Overall, the results of this study indicate toxicological interactions between MP and Cr(VI) highlighting the importance of further investigating the combined effects of MP and other common contaminants.

  7. [Anopheles funestus and rice agriculture in the Madagascar highlands].

    PubMed

    Marrama, L; Rajaonarivelo, E; Laventure, S; Rabarison, P

    1995-01-01

    An exhaustive study of the potential habitats of Anopheles funestus was led during 1992 in Ankazobe on the Plateau of Madagascar, 95 km northwest of the capital Tananarive. The rice fields provide more than 90% of the positive habitats versus less than 10% for the nonhuman biotopes. Larva are especially abundant on the surfaces of the rice during grain head formation and maturation. The dense vegetation coverage provides them with shade and protection against predators. After harvesting, the follows can be filled with water and wild vegetation, and then also provide an important share of the habitats. The rice fields are omnipresent on the Plateau where they supply the basis of local alimentation. A. funestus then constitutes a serious risk for all of the villages. The role of the rice fields as habitats for A. funestus has already been noted in Kenya but in West Africa the rice fields do not host this species, even if this species is very abundant in the other types of habitats.

  8. Dark septate endophyte decreases stress on rice plants.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvana Gomes Dos; Silva, Paula Renata Alves da; Garcia, Andres Calderin; Zilli, Jerri Édson; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    Abiotic stress is one of the major limiting factors for plant development and productivity, which makes it important to identify microorganisms capable of increasing plant tolerance to stress. Dark septate endophytes can be symbionts of plants. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of dark septate endophytes isolates to reduce the effects of water stress in the rice varieties Nipponbare and Piauí. The experiments were performed under gnotobiotic conditions, and the water stress was induced with PEG. Four dark septate endophytes were isolated from the roots of wild rice (Oryza glumaepatula) collected from the Brazilian Amazon. Plant height as well as shoot and root fresh and dry matter were measured. Leaf protein concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activity were also estimated. The dark septate endophytes were grown in vitro in Petri dishes containing culture medium; they exhibited different levels of tolerance to salinity and water stress. The two rice varieties tested responded differently to inoculation with dark septate endophytes. Endophytes promoted rice plant growth both in the presence and in the absence of a water deficit. Decreased oxidative stress in plants in response to inoculation was observed in nearly all inoculated treatments, as indicated by the decrease in antioxidant enzyme activity. Dark septate endophytes fungi were shown to increase the tolerance of rice plants to stress caused by water deficiency.

  9. Molecular analysis of rice plant mutated after space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z.; Li, C.; Wei, L.; Xu, D.; Gu, D.; Guan, S.; Zhao, H.; Xin, P.; Sun, Y.

    We have obtained several rice mutants planted from seeds flown on recoverable satellites. Some new traits, such as good yields, diseases resistances and higher nutrient values, have been identified, putatively as consequences of the space environment. Radiation inside the Chinese recoverable satellite was composed of low flux of high energy particles (>40 Mev/u). To study the mechanisms of plant mutations induced by the space environment, we used dry rice seeds as a model to identify the phenotype of mutations, and used the wealth of the rice genome to identify the mutated genes in the mutants. The research included collecting rice plant mutants in the seeds flown on the satellites, identifying the nature of genomic and proteomic alterations, modifications and identifying the functional changes of the specific genes. The study showed that the rice seeds are a good model for exploring biological effect of space environment since 1) it is easy fly the seeds without specific hardware and crew work, 2) it is easy to obtain pure mutant breed lines for cloning DNA sequence in order to compare with the sequence in the wild type, and 3) it is easy to quantitatively analyze genetics using advanced molecular techniques.

  10. WILD and Healthy Classrooms!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Cheryl

    1989-01-01

    Project WILD is a K-12 conservation and environmental education program designed to provide teachers with instructional materials and techniques for integrating education about wildlife and the environment into all major curriculum areas. (IAH)

  11. The Wild Bunch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Bibi; Brook, Richard; Tisdale, Mary; Wooster, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes the history of wild horses in North America and explains the social structure of horses. Discusses issues related to wildlife management. Presents activities for classroom use and includes a list of references and resources. (YDS)

  12. Rice Body Formation Within a Peri-Articular Shoulder Mass.

    PubMed

    Edison, Michele N; Caram, Anthony; Flores, Miguel; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-08-01

    Most commonly associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, rice bodies represent an uncommon, nonspecific, often intra-articular inflammatory process. Presumably, rice bodies represent the sequelae of microvascular infarcts of the joint synovium. However, rice bodies have been seen in pleural fluid, in the setting of bursitis, and within the tendon sheath. The etiology and prognostic significance of rice bodies are not clear. MRI is the diagnostic imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of rice body formation. Here we present a case of a 28-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who presented to her primary care physician with a palpable mass around her right shoulder which was presumed to be a lipoma. An initial ultrasound showed a fluid filled structure with internal debris. Subsequent MRI evaluation was confirmatory for subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis with rice body formation. The salient point of this report is to highlight the importance of patient-specific differential diagnosis. While lipomas are a very common benign soft tissue tumor, patients with RA often have disease-specific sequelae that should be included in the diagnostic deliberation. Thus, when ordering diagnostic testing for patients with a palpable mass and rheumatoid arthritis, MRI--possibly preceded by conventional radiography--is the most appropriate diagnostic algorithm.

  13. Development and field performance of nitrogen use efficient rice lines for Africa.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Michael Gomez; Valencia, Milton Orlando; Ogawa, Satoshi; Lu, Yingzhi; Wu, Liying; Downs, Christopher; Skinner, Wayne; Lu, Zhongjin; Kridl, Jean C; Ishitani, Manabu; van Boxtel, Jos

    2016-11-27

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers are a major input cost in rice production, and its excess application leads to major environmental pollution. Development of rice varieties with improved nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is essential for sustainable agriculture. Here, we report the results of field evaluations of marker-free transgenic NERICA4 (New Rice for Africa 4) rice lines overexpressing barley alanine amino transferase (HvAlaAT) under the control of a rice stress-inducible promoter (pOsAnt1). Field evaluations over three growing seasons and two rice growing ecologies (lowland and upland) revealed that grain yield of pOsAnt1:HvAlaAT transgenic events was significantly higher than sibling nulls and wild-type controls under different N application rates. Our field results clearly demonstrated that this genetic modification can significantly increase the dry biomass and grain yield compared to controls under limited N supply. Increased yield in transgenic events was correlated with increased tiller and panicle number in the field, and evidence of early establishment of a vigorous root system in hydroponic growth. Our results suggest that expression of the HvAlaAT gene can improve NUE in rice without causing undesirable growth phenotypes. The NUE technology described in this article has the potential to significantly reduce the need for N fertilizer and simultaneously improve food security, augment farm economics and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from the rice ecosystem.

  14. Genetic structure and isolation by distance in a landrace of Thai rice

    PubMed Central

    Pusadee, Tonapha; Jamjod, Sansanee; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Rerkasem, Benjavan; Schaal, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    Rice is among the 3 most important crops worldwide. While much of the world's rice harvest is based on modern high-yield varieties, traditional varieties of rice grown by indigenous groups have great importance as a resource for future crop improvement. These local landraces represent an intermediate stage of domestication between a wild ancestor and modern varieties and they serve as reservoirs of genetic variation. Such genetic variation is influenced both by natural processes such as selection and drift, and by the agriculture practices of local farmers. How these processes interact to shape and change the population genetics of landrace rice is unknown. Here, we determine the population genetic structure of a single variety of landrace rice, Bue Chomee, cultivated by Karen people of Thailand. Microsatellite markers reveal high level of genetic variation despite predominant inbreeding in the crop. Bue Chomee rice shows slight but significant genetic differentiation among Karen villages. Moreover, genetically determined traits such as flowering time can vary significantly among villages. An unanticipated result was the overall pattern of genetic differentiation across villages which conforms to an isolation by distance model of differentiation. Isolation by distance is observed in natural plant species where the likelihood of gene flow is inversely related to distance. In Karen rice, gene flow is the result of farmers' seed sharing networks. Taken together, these data suggest that landrace rice is a dynamic genetic system that responds to evolutionary forces, both natural and those imposed by humans. PMID:19651617

  15. Characterization of resistance to three bruchid species (Callosobruchus spp., Coleoptera, Bruchidae) in cultivated rice bean (Vigna umbellata).

    PubMed

    Kashiwaba, K; Tomooka, N; Kaga, A; Han, O K; Vaughan, D A

    2003-02-01

    Resistance of wild and cultivated rice bean (Vigna umbellata [Thunberg] Ohwi and Ohashi) to three bruchid species, Callosobruchus chinensis L., Callosobruchus maculatus F., and Callosobruchus analis F., was evaluated. All but three accessions of cultivated, and all wild rice bean accessions tested, exhibited complete resistance to all three bruchid species. Rice bean seeds with seed coat removed also showed complete resistance to the three bruchid species. Results indicate that physical attributes and/or chemical(s) present in the seed coat of rice bean are not the main factors responsible for resistance. Feeding tests were performed by using artificial beans prepared with varying proportions of rice bean (resistant) and azuki bean (susceptible) flour. Number of bruchid adults that emerged decreased, and larval developmental period (days) was extended, when artificial beans with an increasing proportion of rice bean flour were used. These tests revealed that a chemical compound(s) contained in the cotyledon of rice bean has an inhibitory effect on the growth of these bruchid species. The results also indicate that the chemical(s) in rice bean cotyledon is most effective against C. maculatus.

  16. The Overproduction of Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) in Endophytes Upregulates Nitrogen Fixation in Both Bacterial Cultures and Inoculated Rice Plants.

    PubMed

    Defez, Roberto; Andreozzi, Anna; Bianco, Carmen

    2017-02-14

    Endophytic bacteria from roots and leaves of rice plants were isolated and identified in order to select the diazotrophs and improve their nitrogen-fixing abilities. The nitrogen-fixing endophytes were identified by PCR amplification of the nifH gene fragment. For this purpose, two isolates, Enterobacter cloacae RCA25 and Klebsiella variicola RCA26, and two model bacteria (Herbaspirillum seropedicae z67 and Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234) were transformed to increase the biosynthesis of the main plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). A significant increase in the production of IAA was observed for all strains. When the expression of nifH gene and the activity of the nitrogenase enzyme were analyzed in liquid cultures, we found that they were positively affected in the IAA-overproducing endophytes as compared to the wild-type ones. Rice plants inoculated with these modified strains showed a significant upregulation of the nitrogenase activity when plants infected with the wild-type strains were used as reference. Similar results were obtained too with common bean plants infected with the S. fredii NGR234 strain. These findings suggest that IAA overproduction improves nitrogen-fixing apparatus of endophytic bacteria both in liquid cultures and in inoculated host plants. The present study highlights new perspectives to enhance nitrogen-fixing ability in non-legume crops. These strains could be used as bioinoculants to improve the growth and the yield of agricultural crops, offering an alternative to the use of chemical nitrogen fertilizers.

  17. Organic rice disease management using genetic resistance, cover crop and organic fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strong market demand for organic rice has driven the continued increase of organic rice production in the US. However, growers still lack effective tools to manage narrow brown leaf spot (NBLS) caused by Cercospora janseana and brown spot caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, two common diseases af...

  18. A Double Built-In Containment Strategy for Production of Recombinant Proteins in Transgenic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sinan; Shen, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic rice as a bioreactor for mass production of pharmaceutical proteins could potentially reduce the cost of production significantly. However, a major concern over the bioreactor transgenic rice is the risk of its unintended spreading into environment and into food or feed supplies. Here we report a mitigating method to prevent unwanted transgenic rice spreading by a double built-in containment strategy, which sets a selectively termination method and a visual tag technology in the T-DNA for transformation. We created transgenic rice with an inserted T-DNA that harbors a human proinsulin gene fused with the far-red fluorescent protein gene mKate_S158A, an RNAi cassette suppressing the expression of the rice bentazon detoxification enzyme CYP81A6, and an EPSPS gene as the selection marker for transformation. Herbicide spray tests indicated that such transgenic rice plants can be killed selectively by a spray of bentazon at regular field application dosage for rice weed control. Moreover, the transgenic rice seeds were bright red in color due to the fused far-red fluorescent protein, and could be easily visualized under daylight by naked eyes. Thus, the transgenic rice plants reported in this study could be selectively killed by a commonly used herbicide during their growth stage, and their seeds may be detected visually during processing and consumption after harvest. This double built-in containment strategy may greatly enhance the confinement of the transgenic rice. PMID:25531447

  19. A double built-in containment strategy for production of recombinant proteins in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianwen; Wang, Dongfang; Zhao, Sinan; Shen, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic rice as a bioreactor for mass production of pharmaceutical proteins could potentially reduce the cost of production significantly. However, a major concern over the bioreactor transgenic rice is the risk of its unintended spreading into environment and into food or feed supplies. Here we report a mitigating method to prevent unwanted transgenic rice spreading by a double built-in containment strategy, which sets a selectively termination method and a visual tag technology in the T-DNA for transformation. We created transgenic rice with an inserted T-DNA that harbors a human proinsulin gene fused with the far-red fluorescent protein gene mKate_S158A, an RNAi cassette suppressing the expression of the rice bentazon detoxification enzyme CYP81A6, and an EPSPS gene as the selection marker for transformation. Herbicide spray tests indicated that such transgenic rice plants can be killed selectively by a spray of bentazon at regular field application dosage for rice weed control. Moreover, the transgenic rice seeds were bright red in color due to the fused far-red fluorescent protein, and could be easily visualized under daylight by naked eyes. Thus, the transgenic rice plants reported in this study could be selectively killed by a commonly used herbicide during their growth stage, and their seeds may be detected visually during processing and consumption after harvest. This double built-in containment strategy may greatly enhance the confinement of the transgenic rice.

  20. Synergism between southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus and rice ragged stunt virus enhances their insect vector acquisition.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Wang, Han; Zhou, Guohui

    2014-07-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a tentative species in the genus Fijivirus, family Reoviridae, is a novel rice virus transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (Sogatella furcifera). Since its discovery in 2001, SRBSDV has spread rapidly throughout eastern and southeastern Asia and caused large rice losses in China and Vietnam. Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) (genus Oryzavirus, family Reoviridae) is a common rice virus vectored by the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens). RRSV is also widely distributed in eastern and southeastern Asia but has not previously caused serious problems in China owing to its low incidence. With SRBSDV's spread, however, RRSV has become increasingly common in China, and is frequently found in co-infection with SRBSDV. In this study, we show that SRBSDV and RRSV interact synergistically, the first example of synergism between plant viruses in the family Reoviridae. Rice plants co-infected with both viruses displayed enhanced stunting, earlier symptoms, and higher virus titers compared with singly infected plants. Furthermore, white-backed and brown planthoppers acquired SRBSDV and RRSV, respectively, from co-infected plants at higher rates. We propose that increased RRSV incidence in Chinese fields is partly due to synergism between SRBSDV and RRSV.

  1. Microarray Analysis of Rice d1 (RGA1) Mutant Reveals the Potential Role of G-Protein Alpha Subunit in Regulating Multiple Abiotic Stresses Such as Drought, Salinity, Heat, and Cold.

    PubMed

    Jangam, Annie P; Pathak, Ravi R; Raghuram, Nandula

    2016-01-01

    The genome-wide role of heterotrimeric G-proteins in abiotic stress response in rice has not been examined from a functional genomics perspective, despite the availability of mutants and evidences involving individual genes/processes/stresses. Our rice whole transcriptome microarray analysis (GSE 20925 at NCBI GEO) using the G-alpha subunit (RGA1) null mutant (Daikoku 1 or d1) and its corresponding wild type (Oryza sativa Japonica Nipponbare) identified 2270 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Out of them, we mined for all the potentially abiotic stress-responsive genes using Gene Ontology terms, STIFDB2.0 and Rice DB. The first two approaches produced smaller subsets of the 1886 genes found at Rice DB. The GO approach revealed similar regulation of several families of stress-responsive genes in RGA1 mutant. The Genevestigator analysis of the stress-responsive subset of the RGA1-regulated genes from STIFDB revealed cold and drought-responsive clusters. Meta data analysis at Rice DB revealed large stress-response categories such as cold (878 up/810 down), drought (882 up/837 down), heat (913 up/777 down), and salt stress (889 up/841 down). One thousand four hundred ninety-eight of them are common to all the four abiotic stresses, followed by fewer genes common to smaller groups of stresses. The RGA1-regulated genes that uniquely respond to individual stresses include 111 in heat stress, eight each in cold only and drought only stresses, and two genes in salt stress only. The common DEGs (1498) belong to pathways such as the synthesis of polyamine, glycine-betaine, proline, and trehalose. Some of the common DEGs belong to abiotic stress signaling pathways such as calcium-dependent pathway, ABA independent and dependent pathway, and MAP kinase pathway in the RGA1 mutant. Gene ontology of the common stress responsive DEGs revealed 62 unique molecular functions such as transporters, enzyme regulators, transferases, hydrolases, carbon and protein metabolism

  2. Methane potential and biodegradability of rice straw, rice husk and rice residues from the drying process.

    PubMed

    Contreras, L M; Schelle, H; Sebrango, C R; Pereda, I

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural solid residues are a potential renewable energy source. Rice harvesting and production in Sancti Spíritus province, Cuba, currently generates residues without an environmentally sustainable disposal route. Rice residues (rice straw, rice husk and rice residues from the drying process) are potentially an important carbon source for anaerobic digestion. For this paper, rice residues were placed for 36 days retention time in anaerobic batch reactor environments at both mesophilic (37 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. Biogas and methane yield were determined as well as biogas composition. The results showed that rice straw as well as rice residues from the drying process had the highest biogas and methane yield. Temperature played an important role in determining both biogas yield and kinetics. In all cases, rice straw produced the highest yields; under mesophilic conditions the biogas yield was 0.43 m(3) kg(VS)(-1), under thermophilic conditions biogas yield reached 0.52 m(3) kg(VS)(-1). In the case of the rice husk, the biodegradability was very low. Methane content in all batches was kept above 55% vol. All digested material had a high carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio, even though significant biodegradation was recorded with the exception of rice husk. A first-order model can be used to describe the rice crop residues fermentation effectively.

  3. Effect of rice variety and nutrient management on rice productivity in organic rice system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for organic rice has been increasing for decades. However, the information on sustainable organic rice production systems is still lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of soil amendment products, nitrogen rate, and variety on rice grain yield, yield components, ...

  4. Reduced Dependence of Crested Ibis on Winter-Flooded Rice Fields: Implications for Their Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yiwen; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun; van Gils, Hein A. M. J.; Wang, Qi; Qing, Baoping; Ding, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    The Crested Ibis Nipponia nippon was once thought to be extinct in the wild until seven birds were discovered in a remote mountain village in China in 1981. Studies suggested that winter-flooded rice fields play an essential role in nest site selection by the Crested Ibis and hence in their survival. Considerable efforts were therefore made to conserve the winter-flooded rice fields, but these have caused conflicts between the agricultural and conservation communities. The population and geographical range of the wild Crested Ibis has expanded greatly since 1981, but there is no spatial information on the winter-flooded rice fields, nor on the current association of nest sites and winter-flooded rice fields. We mapped winter-flooded rice fields across the entire current range of Crested Ibis using innovative remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS) techniques. The spatial relationships between the nest site clusters and winter-flooded rice fields were quantified using Ward's hierarchical clustering method and Ripley's K-function. We show that both have significantly clumped distribution patterns and that they are positively associated. However, the dependence of Crested Ibis on the winter-flooded rice fields varied significantly among the nest site clusters and has decreased over the years, indicating the absence of winter-flooded rice fields is not constraining their recovery and population expansion. We therefore recommend that efforts should be made to protect the existing winter-flooded rice fields and to restore the functionality of natural and semi-natural wetlands, to encourage both in-situ conservation and the re-introduction of the Crested Ibis. In addition, we recommend that caution should be exercised when interpreting the habitat requirements of species with a narrow distribution, particularly when that interpretation is based only on their current habitat. PMID:24874870

  5. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  6. A single amino acid mutation of OsSBEIIb contributes to resistant starch accumulation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifang; Bai, Jianjiang; Fang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Lee, Gangseob; Piao, Zhongze

    2016-01-01

    Foods rich in resistant starch can help prevent various diseases, including diabetes, colon cancers, diarrhea, and chronic renal and hepatic diseases. Variations in starch biosynthesis enzymes could contribute to the high content of resistant starch in some cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Our previously published work indicated that the sbe3-rs gene in the rice mutant line, ‘Jiangtangdao1’ was a putative allele of the rice starch branching enzyme gene SBEIIb (previously known as SBE3); sbe3-rs might control the biosynthesis of the high resistant starch content in the rice line. Biomolecular analysis showed that the activity of SBEs was significantly lower in soluble extracts of immature seeds harvested from ‘Jiangtangdao1’ 15 days after flowering than in the extracts of the wild-type rice line ‘Huaqingdao’. We performed gene complementation assays by introducing the wild-type OsSBEIIb into the sbe3-rs mutant ‘Jiangtangdao1’. The genetically complemented lines demonstrated restored seed-related traits. The structures of endosperm amylopectin and the morphological and physicochemical properties of the starch granules in the transformants recovered to wild-type levels. This study provides evidence that sbe3-rs is a novel allele of OsSBEIIb, responsible for biosynthesis of high resistant starch in ‘Jiangtangdao1’. PMID:27795673

  7. A single amino acid mutation of OsSBEIIb contributes to resistant starch accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifang; Bai, Jianjiang; Fang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Lee, Gangseob; Piao, Zhongze

    2016-09-01

    Foods rich in resistant starch can help prevent various diseases, including diabetes, colon cancers, diarrhea, and chronic renal and hepatic diseases. Variations in starch biosynthesis enzymes could contribute to the high content of resistant starch in some cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Our previously published work indicated that the sbe3-rs gene in the rice mutant line, 'Jiangtangdao1' was a putative allele of the rice starch branching enzyme gene SBEIIb (previously known as SBE3); sbe3-rs might control the biosynthesis of the high resistant starch content in the rice line. Biomolecular analysis showed that the activity of SBEs was significantly lower in soluble extracts of immature seeds harvested from 'Jiangtangdao1' 15 days after flowering than in the extracts of the wild-type rice line 'Huaqingdao'. We performed gene complementation assays by introducing the wild-type OsSBEIIb into the sbe3-rs mutant 'Jiangtangdao1'. The genetically complemented lines demonstrated restored seed-related traits. The structures of endosperm amylopectin and the morphological and physicochemical properties of the starch granules in the transformants recovered to wild-type levels. This study provides evidence that sbe3-rs is a novel allele of OsSBEIIb, responsible for biosynthesis of high resistant starch in 'Jiangtangdao1'.

  8. Student Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  9. Genetic structure and diversity of indigenous rice (Oryza sativa) varieties in the Eastern Himalayan region of Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Baharul; Khan, Mohamed Latif; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2013-12-01

    The Eastern Himalayan region of Northeast (NE) India is home to a large number of indigenous rice varieties, which may serve as a valuable genetic resource for future crop improvement to meet the ever-increasing demand for food production. However, these varieties are rapidly being lost due to changes in land-use and agricultural practices, which favor agronomically improved varieties. A detailed understanding of the genetic structure and diversity of indigenous rice varieties is crucial for efficient utilization of rice genetic resources and for developing suitable conservation strategies. To explore the genetic structure and diversity of rice varieties in NE India, we genotyped 300 individuals of 24 indigenous rice varieties representing sali, boro, jum and glutinous types, 5 agronomically improved varieties, and one wild rice species (O. rufipogon) using seven SSR markers. A total of 85 alleles and a very high level of gene diversity (0.776) were detected among the indigenous rice varieties of the region. Considerable level of genetic variation was found within indigenous varieties whereas improved varieties were monoporphic across all loci. The comparison of genetic diversity among different types of rice revealed that sali type possessed the highest gene diversity (0.747) followed by jum (0.627), glutinous (0.602) and boro (0.596) types of indigenous rice varieties, while the lowest diversity was detected in agronomically improved varieties (0.459). The AMOVA results showed that 66% of the variation was distributed among varieties indicating a very high level of genetic differentiation in rice varieties in the region. Two major genetically defined clusters corresponding to indica and japonica groups were detected in rice varieties of the region. Overall, traditionally cultivated indigenous rice varieties in NE India showed high levels of genetic diversity comparable to levels of genetic diversity reported from wild rice populations in various parts of the

  10. Organic Rice Production: Challenges and Opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The market demand for organically produced rice has grown steadily with the majority of the acreage now being located in Texas and California. A wide range of organic products are marketed including conventional long and medium grain rice, aromatic or scented rice, rice with colored bran, and rice f...

  11. D-Psicose induces upregulation of defense-related genes and resistance in rice against bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Kano, Akihito; Hosotani, Kouji; Gomi, Kenji; Yamasaki-Kokudo, Yumiko; Shirakawa, Chikage; Fukumoto, Takeshi; Ohtani, Kouhei; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Izumori, Ken; Tanaka, Keiji; Ishida, Yutaka; Nishizawa, Yoko; Ichimura, Kazuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2011-10-15

    We examined rice responses to a rare sugar, d-psicose. Rice growth was inhibited by d-psicose but not by common sugars. Microarray analysis revealed that d-psicose treatment caused an upregulation of many defense-related genes in rice, and dose-dependent upregulation of these genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The level of upregulation of defense-related genes by d-psicose was low compared with that by d-allose, which is another rare sugar known to confer induction of resistance to rice bacterial blight in rice. Treatment with d-psicose conferred resistance to bacterial blight in rice in a dose-dependent manner, and the results indicate that d-psicose might be a candidate plant activator for reducing disease development in rice.

  12. Ecotoxicology of wild mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Shore, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    An international group of 32 scientists has critically reviewed the scientific literature on exposure and effects of environmental contaminants in wild mammals. Although the absolute number of toxicological studies in domesticated and wild mammals eclipses that for birds, a detailed examination of scientific publications and databases reveal that information for 'wild' birds is actually greater than that for 'wild' mammals. Of the various taxa of mammals, ecotoxicological data is most noticeably lacking for marsupials and monotremes. In contrast, rodents (comprising 43% of all mammal species) have been studied extensively, despite evidence of their tolerance to some organochlorine compounds, rodenticides, and even radionuclides. Mammalian species at greatest risk of exposure include those that consume a high percentage of their body weight on a daily basis (e.g., shrews, moles and bats). Aquatic mammals tend to bioaccumulate tremendous burdens of lipophilic contaminants, although storage in their fat depots may actually limit toxicity. Carnivores appear to be more sensitive to adverse effects of environmental contaminants than herbivores. Remarkably few of the thousands of compounds manufactured worldwide have been toxicologically evaluated in wild mammals, and concentrations of even fewer have been monitored in tissues. Overarching research needs include: development of new exposure/effects models and better methods for estimation of species sensitivities; generation of comparative data on contaminant bioavailability, sublethal responses and detoxication mechanisms; enhanced understanding of pesticide, industrial contaminant and metal interactions; identification of endocrine disruptive contaminants and their overall ecological significance; and finally, estimating the relative contribution of environmental contamination as a factor affecting wild mammal populations.

  13. Rice: chemistry and technology.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice has taken center stage this last decade, not only as an important provider of nourishment for the world’s population, but as a grain now recognized as having many unique nutritional and functional attributes with potential to be captured in a multitude of value-added food and non-food applicati...

  14. Rice bran phytonutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bran layer of the whole grain rice contains potential health-beneficial compounds. These include vitamin E homologs (tocopherols, tocotrienols), oryzanol fractions, simple phenolics and poly-phenolics. These are antioxidants that are believed to provide protection against diseases such as cancer...

  15. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  16. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  17. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  18. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  19. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  20. Elevated production of melatonin in transgenic rice seeds expressing rice tryptophan decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Kim, Young-Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-04-01

    A major goal of plant biotechnology is to improve the nutritional qualities of crop plants through metabolic engineering. Melatonin is a well-known bioactive molecule with an array of health-promoting properties, including potent antioxidant capability. To generate melatonin-rich rice plants, we first independently overexpressed three tryptophan decarboxylase isogenes in the rice genome. Melatonin levels were altered in the transgenic lines through overexpression of TDC1, TDC2, and TDC3; TDC3 transgenic seed (TDC3-1) had melatonin concentrations 31-fold higher than those of wild-type seeds. In TDC3 transgenic seedlings, however, only a doubling of melatonin content occurred over wild-type levels. Thus, a seed-specific accumulation of melatonin appears to occur in TDC3 transgenic lines. In addition to increased melatonin content, TDC3 transgenic lines also had enhanced levels of melatonin intermediates including 5-hydroxytryptophan, tryptamine, serotonin, and N-acetylserotonin. In contrast, expression levels of melatonin biosynthetic mRNA did not increase in TDC3 transgenic lines, indicating that increases in melatonin and its intermediates in these lines are attributable exclusively to overexpression of the TDC3 gene.

  1. Pygmy Rice Rat as Potential Host of Castelo dos Sonhos Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth S.; Medeiros, Daniele B. A.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.; Simith, Darlene B.; Pereira, Armando de Souza; Elkhoury, Mauro R.; Lavocat, Marília; Marques, Aparecido A.R.; Via, Alba Valéria; D’Andrea, Paulo; Bonvicino, Cibele R.; Lemos, Elba Regina S.

    2011-01-01

    To study the dynamics of wild rodent populations and identify potential hosts for hantavirus, we conducted an eco-epidemiologic study in Campo Novo do Parecis, Mato Grosso State, Brazil. We detected and genetically characterized Castelo dos Sonhos virus found in a species of pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys utiaritensis). PMID:21801642

  2. Rice Sheath Rot: An Emerging Ubiquitous Destructive Disease Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bigirimana, Vincent de P.; Hua, Gia K. H.; Nyamangyoku, Obedi I.; Höfte, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Around one century ago, a rice disease characterized mainly by rotting of sheaths was reported in Taiwan. The causal agent was identified as Acrocylindrium oryzae, later known as Sarocladium oryzae. Since then it has become clear that various other organisms can cause similar disease symptoms, including Fusarium sp. and fluorescent pseudomonads. These organisms have in common that they produce a range of phytotoxins that induce necrosis in plants. The same agents also cause grain discoloration, chaffiness, and sterility and are all seed-transmitted. Rice sheath rot disease symptoms are found in all rice-growing areas of the world. The disease is now getting momentum and is considered as an important emerging rice production threat. The disease can lead to variable yield losses, which can be as high as 85%. This review aims at improving our understanding of the disease etiology of rice sheath rot and mainly deals with the three most reported rice sheath rot pathogens: S. oryzae, the Fusarium fujikuroi complex, and Pseudomonas fuscovaginae. Causal agents, pathogenicity determinants, interactions among the various pathogens, epidemiology, geographical distribution, and control options will be discussed. PMID:26697031

  3. Rice Sheath Rot: An Emerging Ubiquitous Destructive Disease Complex.

    PubMed

    Bigirimana, Vincent de P; Hua, Gia K H; Nyamangyoku, Obedi I; Höfte, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Around one century ago, a rice disease characterized mainly by rotting of sheaths was reported in Taiwan. The causal agent was identified as Acrocylindrium oryzae, later known as Sarocladium oryzae. Since then it has become clear that various other organisms can cause similar disease symptoms, including Fusarium sp. and fluorescent pseudomonads. These organisms have in common that they produce a range of phytotoxins that induce necrosis in plants. The same agents also cause grain discoloration, chaffiness, and sterility and are all seed-transmitted. Rice sheath rot disease symptoms are found in all rice-growing areas of the world. The disease is now getting momentum and is considered as an important emerging rice production threat. The disease can lead to variable yield losses, which can be as high as 85%. This review aims at improving our understanding of the disease etiology of rice sheath rot and mainly deals with the three most reported rice sheath rot pathogens: S. oryzae, the Fusarium fujikuroi complex, and Pseudomonas fuscovaginae. Causal agents, pathogenicity determinants, interactions among the various pathogens, epidemiology, geographical distribution, and control options will be discussed.

  4. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  5. Wild mammalian biomonitors for assessing impacts of environmental contamination on population and community ecology. Final technical report, 1 June 1991-31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lochmiller, R.L.

    1994-10-31

    The overall objective of this research project was to explore the use of in situ bIomonitoring using wild mammalian animal models to assess ecotoxicity risks from petrochemical contaminants. We approached this objective by comparing the relative sensitivities of selected measures of metabolic, immunologic, genetic, and histopathologic toxicity (multiparameter model) in small-mammalian residents of terrestrial ecosystems contaminated with complex mixtures of petrochemicals (an abandoned oil refinery complex). Multiparameter response profiles of small mammals were evaluated relative to results from common laboratory bioassay tests (fathead minnow survival, rice seed germination test, etc.) and soil chemical analyses to determine their ability to predict ecotoxicity risks (as indexed by demographic changes in the small mammal community). Our principal in situ biomonitor was the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus), which is the dominant member of the small mammal community on 3 uncontaminated reference and 3 heavy metal-petrochemical contaminated study sites. Chemical analyses of soil and soil extracts identified a variety of heavy metal and organic contaminants on the 3 suspected toxic study sites, which was reflected in common laboratory bioassay results using fathead minnow, microtox, rice seed germination, and Ceriodaphnia assays.

  6. QCI Common

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alexander J.

    2016-11-18

    There are many common software patterns and utilities for the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute that can and should be shared across projects. Otherwise we find duplication of code which adds unwanted complexity. This is a software product seeks to alleviate this by providing common utilities such as object factories, graph data structures, parameter input mechanisms, etc., for other software products within the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute. This work enables pure basic research, has no export controlled utilities, and has no real commercial value.

  7. Development of Novel Glyphosate-Tolerant Japonica Rice Lines: A Step Toward Commercial Release

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ying; Huang, Shuqing; Liu, Ziduo; Yi, Shuyuan; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide for its low cost and high efficiency. However, it is rarely applied directly in rice field due to its toxicity to rice. Therefore, glyphosate-tolerant rice can greatly decrease the cost of rice production and provide a more effective weed management strategy. Although, several approaches to develop transgenic rice with glyphosate tolerance have been reported, the agronomic performances of these plants have not been well evaluated, and the feasibility of commercial production has not been confirmed yet. Here, a novel glyphosate-tolerant gene cloned from the bacterium Isoptericola variabilis was identified, codon optimized (designated as I. variabilis-EPSPS*), and transferred into Zhonghua11, a widely used japonica rice cultivar. After systematic analysis of the transgene integration via PCR, Southern blot and flanking sequence isolation, three transgenic lines with only one intact I. variabilis-EPSPS* expression cassette integrated into intergenic regions were identified. Seed test results showed that the glyphosate tolerance of the transgenic rice was about 240 times that of wild type on plant medium. The glyphosate tolerance of transgenic rice lines was further evaluated based on comprehensive agronomic performances in the field with T3 and T5generations in a 2-year assay, which showed that they were rarely affected by glyphosate even when the dosage was 8400 g ha−1. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the development of glyphosate-tolerant rice lines based on a comprehensive analysis of agronomic performances in the field. Taken together, the results suggest that the selected glyphosate-tolerant rice lines are highly tolerant to glyphosate and have the possibility of commercial release. I. variabilis-EPSPS* also can be a promising candidate gene in other species for developing glyphosate-tolerant crops. PMID:27625652

  8. Analysis of 142 genes resolves the rapid diversification of the rice genus

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Fu-Min; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zang, Li-Li; Tang, Liang; Wang, Jun; Sang, Tao; Ge, Song

    2008-01-01

    Background The completion of rice genome sequencing has made rice and its wild relatives an attractive system for biological studies. Despite great efforts, phylogenetic relationships among genome types and species in the rice genus have not been fully resolved. To take full advantage of rice genome resources for biological research and rice breeding, we will benefit from the availability of a robust phylogeny of the rice genus. Results Through screening rice genome sequences, we sampled and sequenced 142 single-copy genes to clarify the relationships among all diploid genome types of the rice genus. The analysis identified two short internal branches around which most previous phylogenetic inconsistency emerged. These represent two episodes of rapid speciation that occurred approximately 5 and 10 million years ago (Mya) and gave rise to almost the entire diversity of the genus. The known chromosomal distribution of the sampled genes allowed the documentation of whole-genome sorting of ancestral alleles during the rapid speciation, which was responsible primarily for extensive incongruence between gene phylogenies and persisting phylogenetic ambiguity in the genus. Random sample analysis showed that 120 genes with an average length of 874 bp were needed to resolve both short branches with 95% confidence. Conclusion Our phylogenomic analysis successfully resolved the phylogeny of rice genome types, which lays a solid foundation for comparative and functional genomic studies of rice and its relatives. This study also highlights that organismal genomes might be mosaics of conflicting genealogies because of rapid speciation and demonstrates the power of phylogenomics in the reconstruction of rapid diversification. PMID:18315873

  9. Development of Novel Glyphosate-Tolerant Japonica Rice Lines: A Step Toward Commercial Release.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Huang, Shuqing; Liu, Ziduo; Yi, Shuyuan; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide for its low cost and high efficiency. However, it is rarely applied directly in rice field due to its toxicity to rice. Therefore, glyphosate-tolerant rice can greatly decrease the cost of rice production and provide a more effective weed management strategy. Although, several approaches to develop transgenic rice with glyphosate tolerance have been reported, the agronomic performances of these plants have not been well evaluated, and the feasibility of commercial production has not been confirmed yet. Here, a novel glyphosate-tolerant gene cloned from the bacterium Isoptericola variabilis was identified, codon optimized (designated as I. variabilis-EPSPS (*)), and transferred into Zhonghua11, a widely used japonica rice cultivar. After systematic analysis of the transgene integration via PCR, Southern blot and flanking sequence isolation, three transgenic lines with only one intact I. variabilis-EPSPS (*) expression cassette integrated into intergenic regions were identified. Seed test results showed that the glyphosate tolerance of the transgenic rice was about 240 times that of wild type on plant medium. The glyphosate tolerance of transgenic rice lines was further evaluated based on comprehensive agronomic performances in the field with T3 and T5generations in a 2-year assay, which showed that they were rarely affected by glyphosate even when the dosage was 8400 g ha(-1). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the development of glyphosate-tolerant rice lines based on a comprehensive analysis of agronomic performances in the field. Taken together, the results suggest that the selected glyphosate-tolerant rice lines are highly tolerant to glyphosate and have the possibility of commercial release. I. variabilis-EPSPS (*) also can be a promising candidate gene in other species for developing glyphosate-tolerant crops.

  10. Over-expression of PsGPD, a mushroom glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, enhances salt tolerance in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Il; Lim, Hye-Min; Siddiqui, Zamin Shaheed; Park, Sung-Han; Kim, A-Ram; Kwon, Taek-Ryoun; Lee, Seong-Kon; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Gang-Seob

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic potatoes expressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), isolated from the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, had increased tolerance to salt stress (Jeong et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 278:192-196, 2000). To examine the physiological mechanisms enhancing salt tolerance in GPD-transgenic rice plants, the salt tolerance of five GPD transgenic rice lines (T1-T5) derived from Dongjin rice cultivar were evaluated in a fixed 150 mM saline environment in comparison to two known wild-type rice cultivars, Dongjin (salt sensitive) and Pokali (salt tolerant). Transgenic lines, T2, T3, and T5, had a substantial increase in biomass and relative water content compared to Dongjin. Stomatal conductance and osmotic potential were higher in the GPD transgenic lines and were similar to those in Pokali. The results are discussed based on the comparative physiological response of GPD transgenic lines with those of the salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant rice cultivars.

  11. The Rice Aquaporin Lsi1 Mediates Uptake of Methylated Arsenic Species1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ren-Ying; Ago, Yukiko; Liu, Wen-Ju; Mitani, Namiki; Feldmann, Jörg; McGrath, Steve P.; Ma, Jian Feng; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Pentavalent methylated arsenic (As) species such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] are used as herbicides or pesticides, and can also be synthesized by soil microorganisms or algae through As methylation. The mechanism of MMA(V) and DMA(V) uptake remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that arsenite is taken up by rice (Oryza sativa) roots through two silicon transporters, Lsi1 (the aquaporin NIP2;1) and Lsi2 (an efflux carrier). Here we investigated whether these two transporters also mediate the uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V). MMA(V) was partly reduced to trivalent MMA(III) in rice roots, but only MMA(V) was translocated to shoots. DMA(V) was stable in plants. The rice lsi1 mutant lost about 80% and 50% of the uptake capacity for MMA(V) and DMA(V), respectively, compared with the wild-type rice, whereas Lsi2 mutation had little effect. The short-term uptake kinetics of MMA(V) can be described by a Michaelis-Menten plus linear model, with the wild type having 3.5-fold higher Vmax than the lsi1 mutant. The uptake kinetics of DMA(V) were linear with the slope being 2.8-fold higher in the wild type than the lsi1 mutant. Heterologous expression of Lsi1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of MMA(V) but not DMA(V), possibly because of a very limited uptake of the latter. Uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V) by wild-type rice was increased as the pH of the medium decreased, consistent with an increasing proportion of the undissociated species. The results demonstrate that Lsi1 mediates the uptake of undissociated methylated As in rice roots. PMID:19542298

  12. William Wilde: Historian.

    PubMed

    Geary, L

    2016-05-01

    This essay attempts to assess William Wilde as a social historian. It examines some of his contributions to the discipline of history and looks particularly at 'The food of the Irish', which was published in the Dublin University Magazine in February 1854.

  13. Blastomycosis in wild wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiel, R.P.; Mech, L.D.; Ruth, G.R.; Archer, J.R.; Kaufman, L.

    1987-01-01

    Blastomycosis was fatal to a wild wolf in Minnesota, and serologic evidence of blastomycosis was found in a Wisconsin wolf. No unusual movements were detected in the Minnesota animal from October 1983 through October 1985. However, by early December 1985, this wolf was weak and debilitated, and it perished on 14 December after approaching a human residence.

  14. Marc Chagall: "Wild Poppies."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carolyn

    1987-01-01

    Based on a full-color reproduction of Marc Chagall's painting, "Wild Poppies," the goals of this lesson plan are to introduce students to artist's use of dreams and memories in making art, to communicate the idea that artists include their visual memories of people and things they love in their artwork, and to introduce the concepts of…

  15. Taming the Wild Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Pam

    2012-01-01

    As a well-known advocate for promoting wider reading and reading engagement among all children--and founder of a reading program for foster children--Pam Allyn knows that struggling readers often face any printed text with fear and confusion, like Max in the book Where the Wild Things Are. She argues that teachers need to actively create a…

  16. Endangered Species: Wild & Rare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Endangered Species: Wild and Rare." Contents are organized into the…

  17. Wild and Crafty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Wild & Crafty." It contains a variety of craft ideas related to…

  18. Project Wild (Project Tame).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, David

    For 37 states in the United States, Project Wild has become an officially sanctioned, distributed and funded "environemtnal and conservation education program." For those who are striving to implement focused, sequential, learning programs, as well as those who wish to promote harmony through a non-anthropocentric world view, Project…

  19. Echolocation signals of wild dolphins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, W. W. L.

    2004-07-01

    Most of our understanding of dolphin echolocation has come from studies of captive dolphins performing various echolocation tasks. Recently, measurements of echolocation signals in the wild have expanded our understanding of the characteristics of these signals in a natural setting. Measuring undistorted dolphin echolocation signals with free swimming dolphins in the field can be a challenging task. A four hydrophone array arranged in a symmetrical star pattern was used to measure the echolocation signals of four species of dolphins in the wild. Echolocation signals of the following dolphins have been measured with the symmetrical star array: white-beaked dolphins in Iceland, Atlantic spotted dolphins in the Bahamas, killer whales in British Columbia, and dusky dolphins in New Zealand. There are many common features in the echolocation signals of the different species. Most of the signals had spectra that were bimodal: two peaks, one at low frequencies and another about an octave higher in frequency. The source level of the sonar transmission varies as a function of 20log R, suggesting a form of time-varying gain but on the transmitting end of the sonar process rather than the receiving end. The results of the field work call into question the issue of whether the signals used by captive dolphins may be shaped by the task they are required to perform rather than what they would do more naturally.

  20. Biofortification of rice with the essential amino acid lysine: molecular characterization, nutritional evaluation, and field performance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-qing; Zhang, Chang-quan; Chan, Man-ling; Zhao, Dong-sheng; Chen, Jin-zhu; Wang, Qing; Li, Qian-feng; Yu, Heng-xiu; Gu, Ming-hong; Sun, Samuel Sai-ming; Liu, Qiao-quan

    2016-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major staple crop worldwide, has limited levels of the essential amino acid lysine. We previously produced engineered rice with increased lysine content by expressing bacterial aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase and inhibiting rice lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase activity. However, the grain quality, field performance, and integration patterns of the transgenes in these lysine-enriched lines remain unclear. In the present study, we selected several elite transgenic lines with endosperm-specific or constitutive regulation of the above key enzymes but lacking the selectable marker gene. All target transgenes were integrated into the intragenic region in the rice genome. Two pyramid transgenic lines (High Free Lysine; HFL1 and HFL2) with free lysine levels in seeds up to 25-fold that of wild type were obtained via a combination of the above two transgenic events. We observed a dramatic increase in total free amino acids and a slight increase in total protein content in both pyramid lines. Moreover, the general physicochemical properties were improved in pyramid transgenic rice, but the starch composition was not affected. Field trials indicated that the growth of HFL transgenic rice was normal, except for a slight difference in plant height and grain colour. Taken together, these findings will be useful for the potential commercialization of high-lysine transgenic rice. PMID:27252467

  1. Plant defence suppression is mediated by a fungal sirtuin during rice infection by Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jessie; Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Nandakumar, Renu; Shijo, Sara; Cornwell, Kathryn M; Li, Gang; Wilson, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    Crop destruction by the hemibiotrophic rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae requires plant defence suppression to facilitate extensive biotrophic growth in host cells before the onset of necrosis. How this is achieved at the genetic level is not well understood. Here, we report that a M. oryzae sirtuin, MoSir2, plays an essential role in rice defence suppression and colonization by controlling superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene expression. Loss of MoSir2 function in Δsir2 strains did not affect appressorial function, but biotrophic growth in rice cells was attenuated. Compared to wild type, Δsir2 strains failed to neutralize plant-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicited robust defence responses in rice epidermal cells that included elevated pathogenesis-related gene expression and granular depositions. Deletion of a SOD-encoding gene under MoSir2 control generated Δsod1 deletion strains that mimicked Δsir2 for impaired rice defence suppression, confirming SOD activity as a downstream output of MoSir2. In addition, comparative protein acetylation studies and forward genetic analyses identified a JmjC domain-containing protein as a likely target of MoSir2, and a Δsir2 Δjmjc double mutant was restored for MoSOD1 expression and defence suppression in rice epidermal cells. Together, this work reveals MoSir2 and MoJmjC as novel regulators of early rice cell infection.

  2. Biofortification of rice with the essential amino acid lysine: molecular characterization, nutritional evaluation, and field performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Chan, Man-Ling; Zhao, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Jin-Zhu; Wang, Qing; Li, Qian-Feng; Yu, Heng-Xiu; Gu, Ming-Hong; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major staple crop worldwide, has limited levels of the essential amino acid lysine. We previously produced engineered rice with increased lysine content by expressing bacterial aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase and inhibiting rice lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase activity. However, the grain quality, field performance, and integration patterns of the transgenes in these lysine-enriched lines remain unclear. In the present study, we selected several elite transgenic lines with endosperm-specific or constitutive regulation of the above key enzymes but lacking the selectable marker gene. All target transgenes were integrated into the intragenic region in the rice genome. Two pyramid transgenic lines (High Free Lysine; HFL1 and HFL2) with free lysine levels in seeds up to 25-fold that of wild type were obtained via a combination of the above two transgenic events. We observed a dramatic increase in total free amino acids and a slight increase in total protein content in both pyramid lines. Moreover, the general physicochemical properties were improved in pyramid transgenic rice, but the starch composition was not affected. Field trials indicated that the growth of HFL transgenic rice was normal, except for a slight difference in plant height and grain colour. Taken together, these findings will be useful for the potential commercialization of high-lysine transgenic rice.

  3. Transgenic rice as a novel production system for Melanocarpus and Pycnoporus laccases.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Chris; Uzan, Eva; Zhou, Zhongyi; Kruus, Kristiina; Andberg, Martina; Buchert, Johanna; Record, Eric; Asther, Marcel; Lomascolo, Anne

    2008-08-01

    Laccases have numerous biotechnological applications, among them food processing. The widespread use of laccases has increased the demand for an inexpensive and safe source of recombinant enzyme. We explored the use of a rice-based system for the production of two fungal laccases derived from the ascomycete Melanocarpus albomyces and the basidiomycete Pycnoporus cinnabarinus. High-expression levels of active recombinant laccases were achieved by targeting expression to the endosperm of rice seeds. The laccase cDNAs were fused to a plant-derived signal sequence for targeting to the secretory pathway, and placed under the control of a constitutive seed-specific promoter fused to an intron for enhanced expression. This construct enabled the recovery of on average 0.1-1% of soluble laccase in total soluble proteins (TSP). The highest yields of recombinant laccases obtained in rice seeds were 13 and 39 ppm for riceMaL and ricePycL, respectively. The rice-produced laccases were purified and characterized. The wild-type and the recombinant proteins showed similar biochemical features in terms of molecular mass, pI, temperature and optimal pH and the N-terminus was correctly processed. Although presenting lower kinetic parameters, the rice-produced laccases were also suitable for the oxidative cross-linking of a food model substrate [maize-bran feruloylated arabinoxylans (AX)].

  4. Accelerated Solvent Extraction of Insecticides from Rice Hulls, Rice Bran, and Polished Rice Grains.

    PubMed

    Teló, Gustavo Mack; Senseman, Scott Allen; Marchesan, Enio; Camargo, Edinalvo Rabaioli; Carson, Katherine

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of pesticide residues in irrigated rice grains is important for food security. In this study, we analyzed accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) conditions for the extraction of thiamethoxam and chlorantraniliprole insecticides from rice hulls, rice bran, and polished rice grains. Several variables, including extraction solvent, extraction temperature, extraction pressure, cell size, static extraction time, and sample concentration, were investigated. The average recoveries of the three matrixes were between 89.7 and 109.7% at the fortification level of 0.75 mg/kg. The optimum ASE operating conditions were acetonitrile (100%) as extraction solvent, extraction temperature of 75°C for rice hulls and 100°C for rice bran and polished rice grains, extraction cell pressure of 10.3 MPa, 22 mL cell size, and two extraction cycles. The total extraction time was approximately 25 min. The extracted volume was evaporated to dryness and the residues were redissolved in 2 mL acetonitrile after 1 min of vortex-shaking. Thiamethoxam and chlorantraniliprole were analyzed by ultra-HPLC with tandem MS. In conclusion, ASE in rice hulls, rice bran, and polished rice grains offers the possibility of a fast and simple method for obtaining a quantitative extraction of the studied pesticides.

  5. A novel reference plasmid for the qualitative detection of genetically modified rice in food and feed.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS), the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), the ubiquitin gene (Ubi), the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt), that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001) that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC). pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice.

  6. The integration of ground investigations and radar images on rice yield prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syu, Chien-Hui; Lo, Wei-Shen; Guo, Horng-Yuh

    2016-04-01

    Rice is the staple food and the largest crop in terms of area in Taiwan. Developing the real-time and accurate methods to predict rice yield of large area is important for food security. However, due to the size of rice fields is small and fragmented, and the disturbed weather in Taiwan. It difficult to acquire the information of cropping area and rice yield by optical satellite data, such as SPOT and FORMOSAT-2, because of the cloud cover commonly observed in the region. In contrast, the RADARSAT image data can overcome such problems due to which can penetrate through cloud. The aim of this study is to integrate the data of ground investigations and radar images to predict the rice yield of large area. We used the data of rice yield (ground investigation) and radar images to do regression analysis, and then predict the rice yield of large area. The results of ground investigation indicated that there were high correlation between sample sites yield and real harvest yield (R2 = 0.99), it reveals the investigating method has a high representativeness. The results of the prediction of rice yield by multi-temporal radar images indicated that there was high correlation between ground trust and yield estimation (R2 = 0.68, proof data, 6 fields), and the yield estimation accuracy is higher than 85%. Therefore, this study suggests the application of multi-temporal radar image data can effective and accurate to predict the paddy rice yield in Taiwan.

  7. A Novel Reference Plasmid for the Qualitative Detection of Genetically Modified Rice in Food and Feed

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS), the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), the ubiquitin gene (Ubi), the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt), that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001) that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC). pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice. PMID:26495318

  8. Mechanisms Controlling Arsenic Uptake in Rice Grown in Mining Impacted Regions in South China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Yan, Qiuyan; Shim, Hojae

    2014-01-01

    Foods produced on soils impacted by Pb-Zn mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the arsenic (As) associated with such mining. A field survey was undertaken in two Pb-Zn mining-impacted paddy fields in Guangdong Province, China to assess As accumulation and translocation, as well as other factors influencing As in twelve commonly grown rice cultivars. The results showed that grain As concentrations in all the surveyed rice failed national food standards, irrespective of As speciation. Among the 12 rice cultivars, “SY-89” and “DY-162” had the least As in rice grain. No significant difference for As concentration in grain was observed between the rice grown in the two areas that differed significantly for soil As levels, suggesting that the amount of As contamination in the soil is not necessarily the overriding factor controlling the As content in the rice grain. The iron and manganese plaque on the root surface curtailed As accumulation in rice roots. Based on our results, the accumulation of As within rice plants was strongly associated with such soil properties such as silicon, phosphorus, organic matter, pH, and clay content. Understanding the factors and mechanisms controlling As uptake is important to develop mitigation measures that can reduce the amount of As accumulated in rice grains produced on contaminated soils. PMID:25251438

  9. Plant architecture and grain yield are regulated by the novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Lin, Jian Zhong; Peng, Dan; Yang, Yuan Zhu; Guo, Ming; Tang, Dong Ying; Tan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xuan Ming

    2017-01-01

    In many plants, architecture and grain yield are affected by both the environment and genetics. In rice, the tiller is a vital factor impacting plant architecture and regulated by many genes. In this study, we cloned a novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene Os02g0819100 and its alternative splice variant OsDHHC1 from the cDNA of rice (Oryza sativa L.), which regulate plant architecture by altering the tiller in rice. The tillers increased by about 40% when this type of DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene was over-expressed in Zhong Hua 11 (ZH11) rice plants. Moreover, the grain yield of transgenic rice increased approximately by 10% compared with wild-type ZH11. These findings provide an important genetic engineering approach for increasing rice yields.

  10. Overexpression of OsEm1 encoding a group I LEA protein confers enhanced drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Lai, Yongmin; Wu, Xi; Wu, Gang; Guo, Changkui

    2016-09-16

    Drought is the greatest threat for crops, including rice. In an effort to identify rice genes responsible for drought tolerance, a drought-responsive gene OsEm1 encoding a group I LEA protein, was chosen for this study. OsEm1 was shown at vegetative stages to be responsive to various abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, cold and the hormone ABA. In this study, we generated OsEm1-overexpressing rice plants to explore the function of OsEm1 under drought conditions. Overexpression of OsEm1 increases ABA sensitivity and enhances osmotic tolerance in rice. Compared with wild type, the OsEm1-overexpressing rice plants showed enhanced plant survival ratio at the vegetative stage; moreover, over expression of OsEm1 in rice increased the expression of other LEA genes, including RAB16A, RAB16C, RAB21, and LEA3, likely protecting organ integrity against harsh environments. Interestingly, the elevated level of OsEm1 had no different phenotype compared with wild type under normal condition. Our findings suggest that OsEm1 is a positive regulator of drought tolerance and is potentially promising for engineering drought tolerance in rice.

  11. Neglecting rice milling yield and quality underestimates economic losses from high-temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Nathaniel B; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Nalley, L Lanier; Dixon, Bruce L; Siebenmorgen, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Future increases in global surface temperature threaten those worldwide who depend on rice production for their livelihoods and food security. Past analyses of high-temperature stress on rice production have focused on paddy yield and have failed to account for the detrimental impact of high temperatures on milling quality outcomes, which ultimately determine edible (marketable) rice yield and market value. Using genotype specific rice yield and milling quality data on six common rice varieties from Arkansas, USA, combined with on-site, half-hourly and daily temperature observations, we show a nonlinear effect of high-temperature stress exposure on yield and milling quality. A 1 °C increase in average growing season temperature reduces paddy yield by 6.2%, total milled rice yield by 7.1% to 8.0%, head rice yield by 9.0% to 13.8%, and total milling revenue by 8.1% to 11.0%, across genotypes. Our results indicate that failure to account for changes in milling quality leads to understatement of the impacts of high temperatures on rice production outcomes. These dramatic losses result from reduced paddy yield and increased percentages of chalky and broken kernels, which together decrease the quantity and market value of milled rice. Recently published estimates show paddy yield reductions of up to 10% across the major rice-producing regions of South and Southeast Asia due to rising temperatures. The results of our study suggest that the often-cited 10% figure underestimates the economic implications of climate change for rice producers, thus potentially threatening future food security for global rice producers and consumers.

  12. Influenza Infection in Wild Raccoons

    PubMed Central

    Bentler, Kevin T.; Landolt, Gabrielle; Elmore, Stacey A.; Minnis, Richard B.; Campbell, Tyler A.; Barras, Scott C.; Root, J. Jeffrey; Pilon, John; Pabilonia, Kristy; Driscoll, Cindy; Slate, Dennis; Sullivan, Heather; McLean, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are common, widely distributed animals that frequently come into contact with wild waterfowl, agricultural operations, and humans. Serosurveys showed that raccoons are exposed to avian influenza virus. We found antibodies to a variety of influenza virus subtypes (H10N7, H4N6, H4N2, H3, and H1) with wide geographic variation in seroprevalence. Experimental infection studies showed that raccoons become infected with avian and human influenza A viruses, shed and transmit virus to virus-free animals, and seroconvert. Analyses of cellular receptors showed that raccoons have avian and human type receptors with a similar distribution as found in human respiratory tracts. The potential exists for co-infection of multiple subtypes of influenza virus with genetic reassortment and creation of novel strains of influenza virus. Experimental and field data indicate that raccoons may play an important role in influenza disease ecology and pose risks to agriculture and human health. PMID:19046505

  13. Influenza infection in wild raccoons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Bentler, K.T.; Landolt, G.; Elmore, S.A.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.C.; Root, J.J.; Pilon, J.; Pabilonia, K.; Driscoll, C.; Slate, D.; Sullivan, H.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are common, widely distributed animals that frequently come into contact with wild waterfowl, agricultural operations, and humans. Serosurveys showed that raccoons are exposed to avian influenza virus. We found antibodies to a variety of influenza virus subtypes (H10N7, H4N6, H4N2, H3, and H1) with wide geographic variation in seroprevalence. Experimental infection studies showed that raccoons become infected with avian and human influenza A viruses, shed and transmit virus to virus-free animals, and seroconvert. Analyses of cellular receptors showed that raccoons have avian and human type receptors with a similar distribution as found in human respiratory tracts. The potential exists for co-infection of multiple subtypes of influenza virus with genetic reassortment and creation of novel strains of influenza virus. Experimental and field data indicate that raccoons may play an important role in influenza disease ecology and pose risks to agriculture and human health.

  14. Molecular identification of trypanosomatids in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Tenório, M S; Oliveira e Sousa, L; Alves-Martin, M F; Paixão, M S; Rodrigues, M V; Starke-Buzetti, W A; Araújo Junior, J P; Lucheis, S B

    2014-06-16

    Diverse wild animal species can be reservoirs of zoonotic flagellate parasites, which can cause pathologic Chagas disease. The present study aimed to detect the natural occurrence of flagellate parasites through direct microscopic examination of the parasites in blood samples and through PCR of whole blood and blood culture (haemoculture) samples from 38 captive and 65 free-living wild animals in the Centre for Conservation of Wild Fauna (CCWF), an area endemic for leishmaniasis. For this study, PCR was accomplished using primers for the ribosomal region (ITS-1) of the flagellate parasites. The amplified fragments were cloned and sequenced to identify DNA of the Trypanosomatid parasite species, observed in blood cultures from 3.9% (04/103) of the animals. Through these techniques, Trypanosoma cruzi was identified in haemoculture samples of the following three free-living species: common agouti (Dasyprocta aguti), white-eared opossum (Didelphis albiventris), and nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus). Furthermore, Trypanosoma minasense was identified in whole blood samples from 01 (0.9%) captive animal (black howler monkey-Alouatta caraya). These results demonstrated the first report of T. cruzi isolation in wild species from the CCWF using blood culture, which can be applied in addition to molecular tools for epidemiological studies and to identify trypanosomatids in wild animals.

  15. Polyphenols and antioxidant capacity: Rice versus other common cereal grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consumption of whole cereal grains has been strongly recommended by many governmental and non-profit health organizations based on epidemiological studies associating whole-grain consumption with reduced incidences of chronic diseases. Bioactive phytochemicals, such as polyphenolic compounds, ri...

  16. Effect of geometry of rice kernels on drying modeling results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geometry of rice grain is commonly represented by sphere, spheroid or ellipsoid shapes in the drying models. Models using simpler shapes are easy to solve mathematically, however, deviation from the true grain shape might lead to large errors in predictions of drying characteristics such as, moistur...

  17. Wild Duck Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On April 7, 2005, the Deep Impact spacecraft's Impactor Target Sensor camera recorded this image of M11, the Wild Duck cluster, a galactic open cluster located 6 thousand light years away. The camera is located on the impactor spacecraft, which will image comet Tempel 1 beginning 22 hours before impact until about 2 seconds before impact. Impact with comet Tempel 1 is planned for July 4, 2005.

  18. Bean and rice meals reduce postprandial glycemic response in adults with type 2 diabetes: a cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Around the world, beans and rice are commonly consumed together as a meal. With type 2 diabetes increasing, the effect of this traditional diet pattern on glycemic response has not been studied fully. Methods We evaluated the glycemic response of bean and rice traditional meals compared to rice alone in adults with type 2 diabetes. Seventeen men and women with type 2 diabetes controlled by metformin (n = 14) or diet/exercise (n = 3) aged 35–70 years participated in the randomized 4 × 4 crossover trial. The white long grain rice control, pinto beans/rice, black beans/rice, red kidney beans/rice test meals, matched for 50 grams of available carbohydrate, were consumed at breakfast after a 12 hour fast. Capillary blood glucose concentrations at baseline and at 30 minute intervals up to 180 minutes postprandial were collected. MANOVA for repeated measures established glucose differences between treatments. Paired t tests identified differences between bean types and the rice control following a significant MANOVA. Results Postprandial net glucose values were significantly lower for the three bean/rice treatments in contrast to the rice control at 90, 120 and 150 minutes. Incremental area under the curve values were significantly lower for the pinto and black bean/rice meals compared to rice alone, but not for kidney beans. Conclusions Pinto, dark red kidney and black beans with rice attenuate the glycemic response compared to rice alone. Promotion of traditional foods may provide non-pharmaceutical management of type 2 diabetes and improve dietary adherence with cultural groups. Trial registration Clinical Trials number NCT01241253 PMID:22494488

  19. Constitutive expression of McCHIT1-PAT enhances resistance to rice blast and herbicide, but does not affect grain yield in transgenic glutinous rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-Fang; Li, Lei; Li, Jian-Rong; Zhao, De-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To produce new rice blast- and herbicide-resistant transgenic rice lines, the McCHIT1 gene encoding the class I chitinase from Momordica charantia and the herbicide resistance gene PAT were introduced into Lailong (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica), a glutinous local rice variety from Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China. Transgenic lines were identified by ß-glucuronidase (GUS) histochemical staining, PCR, and Southern blot analyses. Agronomic traits, resistance to rice blast and herbicide, chitinase activities, and transcript levels of McCHIT1 were assessed in the T2 progeny of three transgenic lines (L1, L8, and L10). The results showed that the introduction of McCHIT1-PAT into Lailong significantly enhanced herbicide and blast resistance. After infection with the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, all of the T2 progeny exhibited less severe lesion symptoms than those of wild type. The disease indices were 100% for wild type, 65.66% for T2 transgenic line L1, 59.69% for T2 transgenic line L8, and 79.80% for T2 transgenic line L10. Transgenic lines expressing McCHIT1-PAT did not show a significant difference from wild type in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA) content, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the leaves. However, after inoculation with M. oryzae, transgenic plants showed significantly higher SOD and PPO activities and lower MDA contents in leaves, compared with those in wild-type leaves. The transgenic and the wild-type plants did not show significant differences in grain yield parameters including plant height, panicles per plant, seeds per panicle, and 1000-grain weight. Therefore, the transgenic plants showed increased herbicide and blast resistance, with no yield penalty.

  20. [The wild boar of Egypt].

    PubMed

    Manlius, N; Gautier, A

    1999-07-01

    The wild boar, Sus scrofa, is not a typical member of the Egyptian wild fauna, although it appears to have lived in the Nile Delta and other suitable regions in the north of the country. However, historic populations were probably of mixed origin, including feral domestic pigs. It is incorrect, as is sometimes still done, to include the wild boar in the iconographic bestiary of Ancient Egypt and assume that the domestic pigs of Ancient Egypt derive from local wild boars.

  1. Making the Common Good Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  2. Gathering and Preparing Wild Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, A. Dudley; Williams, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Discussed are the applications of gathering and preparing wild foods to environmental, survival, career, and community education programs. It recommends wild foods activities be used to stimulate social and historical studies of "return-to-nature" life styles. Wild food study also emphasizes man as part of the environment. (MR)

  3. Waterbird nest density and nest survival in rice fields of southwestern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierluissi, S.; King, Sammy L.; Kaller, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Rice fields in southwestern Louisiana provide breeding habitat for several waterbird species; however, little is known about nest density, nest survival and the importance of landscape context of rice fields in determining breeding activity. In 2004, 42 rice fields were searched for nests, and 40 were searched in 2005. Land uses surrounding rice fields, including irrigation canals, trees, crawfish ponds, rice, fallow and soybean fields, were examined to determine influence on nest density and survival. Nest densities were 13.5-16.0 nests/km2 for Purple Gallinules (Porphyrio martinica), 3.0-13.7 nests/km2 for Fulvous Whistling Ducks (Dendrocygna bicolor), 2.6-2.8 nests/km2 for Common Moorhens (Gallinula chloropus), 0.3-0.92 nests/km2 for Least Bitterns (Ixobrychus exilisi) and 0-0.6 nests/km2 for Mottled Ducks (Anas fulvigula). Nest survival was 52-79% for Purple Gallinules and 39-43% for Fulvous Whistling Ducks. Apparent nest success of Common Moorhens was 73-75%, 83% for Least Bitterns and 33% for Mottled Ducks. Purple Gallinule and Common Moorhen nest densities were highest in fields with a larger proportion of irrigation canals surrounding rice fields. Purple Gallinule nest densities were greater in fields devoid of trees and landscapes dominated by rice fields and pasture, rather than landscapes containing soybean fields and residential areas. Fulvous Whistling Duck nest densities were higher in agriculturally-dominated landscapes with few trees.

  4. Outcrossing Potential between U.S. Blackhull Red Rice and Indica Rice Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy red rice is a major weed pest of rice in the southern U.S. Outcrossing between red rice and commercial tropical japonica rice cultivars has resulted in new weed biotypes that further hinder the effectiveness of weed management. In recent years, indica rice has been used increasingly as a ger...

  5. Biosynthesis of anther cuticle and pollen exine in rice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The lipidic structures, anther cuticle (outer anther surface) and pollen exine (outer pollen wall), play a key protective role for the male gametophyte and pollen grain development. We recently identified ancient cytochrome P450 family member CYP704B2 in rice and proposed a common fatty acid ω-hydroxylation pathway for synthesizing anther cuticle and pollen exine during plant male reproductive development. Here, we propose developmental model of pollen exine formation and discuss key genes required for pollen exine synthesis in the important crop plant rice. PMID:20930527

  6. The heterotrimeric G protein α subunit acts upstream of the small GTPase Rac in disease resistance of rice

    PubMed Central

    Suharsono, Utut; Fujisawa, Yukiko; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Iwasaki, Yukimoto; Satoh, Hikaru; Shimamoto, Ko

    2002-01-01

    We used rice dwarf1 (d1) mutants lacking a single-copy Gα gene and addressed Gα's role in disease resistance. d1 mutants exhibited a highly reduced hypersensitive response to infection by an avirulent race of rice blast. Activation of PR gene expression in the leaves of the mutants infected with rice blast was delayed for 24 h relative to the wild type. H2O2 production and PR gene expression induced by sphingolipid elicitors (SE) were strongly suppressed in d1 cell cultures. Expression of the constitutively active OsRac1, a small GTPase Rac of rice, in d1 mutants restored SE-dependent defense signaling and resistance to rice blast. Gα mRNA was induced by an avirulent race of rice blast and SE application on the leaf. These results indicated the role of Gα in R gene-mediated disease resistance of rice. We have proposed a model for the defense signaling of rice in which the heterotrimeric G protein functions upstream of the small GTPase OsRac1 in the early steps of signaling. PMID:12237405

  7. Single-copy gene based 50 K SNP chip for genetic studies and molecular breeding in rice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Jayaswal, Pawan Kumar; Panda, Kabita; Mandal, Paritra; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Balwant; Mishra, Shefali; Singh, Yashi; Singh, Renu; Rai, Vandna; Gupta, Anita; Raj Sharma, Tilak; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is the most abundant DNA sequence variation present in plant genomes. Here, we report the design and validation of a unique genic-SNP genotyping chip for genetic and evolutionary studies as well as molecular breeding applications in rice. The chip incorporates 50,051 SNPs from 18,980 different genes spanning 12 rice chromosomes, including 3,710 single-copy (SC) genes conserved between wheat and rice, 14,959 SC genes unique to rice, 194 agronomically important cloned rice genes and 117 multi-copy rice genes. Assays with this chip showed high success rate and reproducibility because of the SC gene based array with no sequence redundancy and cross-hybridisation problems. The usefulness of the chip in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies of cultivated and wild rice germplasm was demonstrated. Furthermore, its efficacy was validated for analysing background recovery in improved mega rice varieties with submergence tolerance developed through marker-assisted backcross breeding. PMID:26111882

  8. Novel Phr1 mutations and the evolution of phenol reaction variation in US weedy rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Gross, Briana L; Skare, Karl J; Olsen, Kenneth M

    2009-12-01

    *Red rice, a major agricultural weed, is phenotypically diverse and possesses traits that are similar to both wild and cultivated rice. The genetic resources available for rice make it possible to examine the molecular basis and evolution of traits characterizing this weed. Here, we assess the phenol reaction - a classical trait for distinguishing among cultivated rice varieties - in red rice at the phenotypic and molecular levels. *We phenotyped more than 100 US weed samples for the phenol reaction and sequenced the underlying Phr1 locus in a subset of samples. Data were analyzed in combination with previously published Phr1 data for cultivated rice. *Most weed accessions (96.3%) are positive for the phenol reaction, and samples with a negative response carry loss-of-function alleles that are rare or heretofore undocumented. One such allele may have evolved through mutational convergence of a 1-bp frameshift insertion. Haplotype sharing between red rice and US cultivars suggests occasional crop-weed hybridization. *Our discovery of previously undocumented nonfunctional phr1 alleles suggests that there are likely to be other loss-of-function mutations segregating in Oryza sativa around the world. Red rice may provide a useful study system for understanding the adaptive significance of Phr1 variation in agricultural settings.

  9. miRNA: A Novel Link Between Rice Ragged Stunt Virus and Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Xiong; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wanhong

    2016-06-01

    Rice ragged stunt disease caused leads to severe loss of rice yield. Recently, rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) were found to be increasingly common in rice-growing regions of China and Vietnam. RRSV may cause problem by interacting with microRNAs (miRNAs) of host cells and the mechanism is not clear yet. In this study we identified 11 miRNAs in response to RRSV infection and predicted their possible targets to viral RNA segments (S1-S10) through the bioinformatics analysis. Interestingly, we found that Osa-miR-168b might bind to both the CDS region and 3'UTR of S5 and S8 and target eEF-1A to inhibit the activity of host cells to facilitate RRSV replication. These results suggest that miRNAs may be a potential target for developing rice against RRSV infection.

  10. From Early Domesticated Rice of the Middle Yangtze Basin to Millet, Rice and Wheat Agriculture: Archaeobotanical Macro-Remains from Baligang, Nanyang Basin, Central China (6700-500 BC).

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenhua; Qin, Ling; Gao, Yu; Weisskopf, Alison Ruth; Zhang, Chi; Fuller, Dorian Q

    2015-01-01

    Baligang is a Neolithic site on a northern tributary of the middle Yangtze and provides a long archaeobotanical sequence from the Seventh Millennium BC upto the First Millennium BC. It provides evidence for developments in rice and millet agriculture influenced by shifting cultural affiliation with the north (Yangshao and Longshan) and south (Qujialing and Shijiahe) between 4300 and 1800 BC. This paper reports on plant macro-remains (seeds), from systematic flotation of 123 samples (1700 litres), producing more than 10,000 identifiable remains. The earliest Pre-Yangshao occupation of the sites provide evidence for cultivation of rice (Oryza sativa) between 6300-6700 BC. This rice appears already domesticated in on the basis of a dominance of non-shattering spikelet bases. However, in terms of grain size changes has not yet finished, as grains are still thinner than more recent domesaticated rice and are closer in grain shape to wild rices. This early rice was cultivated alongside collection of wild staple foods, especially acorns (Quercus/Lithicarpus sensu lato). In later periods the sites has evidence for mixed farming of both rice and millets (Setaria italica and Panicum miliaceum). Soybean appears on the site in the Shijiahe period (ca.2500 BC) and wheat (Triticum cf. aestivum) in the Late Longshan levels (2200-1800 BC). Weed flora suggests an intensification of rice agriculture over time with increasing evidence of wetland weeds. We interpret these data as indicating early opportunistic cultivation of alluvial floodplains and some rainfed rice, developing into more systematic and probably irrigated cultivation starting in the Yangshao period, which intensified in the Qujialing and Shijiahe period, before a shift back to an emphasis on millets with the Late Longshan cultural influence from the north.

  11. From Early Domesticated Rice of the Middle Yangtze Basin to Millet, Rice and Wheat Agriculture: Archaeobotanical Macro-Remains from Baligang, Nanyang Basin, Central China (6700–500 BC)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhenhua; Qin, Ling; Gao, Yu; Weisskopf, Alison Ruth; Zhang, Chi; Fuller, Dorian Q.

    2015-01-01

    Baligang is a Neolithic site on a northern tributary of the middle Yangtze and provides a long archaeobotanical sequence from the Seventh Millennium BC upto the First Millennium BC. It provides evidence for developments in rice and millet agriculture influenced by shifting cultural affiliation with the north (Yangshao and Longshan) and south (Qujialing and Shijiahe) between 4300 and 1800 BC. This paper reports on plant macro-remains (seeds), from systematic flotation of 123 samples (1700 litres), producing more than 10,000 identifiable remains. The earliest Pre-Yangshao occupation of the sites provide evidence for cultivation of rice (Oryza sativa) between 6300–6700 BC. This rice appears already domesticated in on the basis of a dominance of non-shattering spikelet bases. However, in terms of grain size changes has not yet finished, as grains are still thinner than more recent domesaticated rice and are closer in grain shape to wild rices. This early rice was cultivated alongside collection of wild staple foods, especially acorns (Quercus/Lithicarpus sensu lato). In later periods the sites has evidence for mixed farming of both rice and millets (Setaria italica and Panicum miliaceum). Soybean appears on the site in the Shijiahe period (ca.2500 BC) and wheat (Triticum cf. aestivum) in the Late Longshan levels (2200–1800 BC). Weed flora suggests an intensification of rice agriculture over time with increasing evidence of wetland weeds. We interpret these data as indicating early opportunistic cultivation of alluvial floodplains and some rainfed rice, developing into more systematic and probably irrigated cultivation starting in the Yangshao period, which intensified in the Qujialing and Shijiahe period, before a shift back to an emphasis on millets with the Late Longshan cultural influence from the north. PMID:26460975

  12. Nature's Cholesterol-Lowering Drug: Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Lovastatin from Red Yeast Rice-Containing Dietary Supplements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazri, Maisarah Mohd; Samat, Farah D.; Kavanagh, Pierce V.; Walsh, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Red yeast rice, produced by fermenting the fungus, "Monascus purpureus", on rice ("Oryza sativa" L. gramineae), is commonly used as a dietary supplement. It contains lovastatin, a member of the statin family of compounds, and is licensed for use as a cholesterol-lowering agent. This experiment involves the isolation and structure elucidation of…

  13. Effect of steam-cooking and parboiling on phenolics and antioxidant capacities of red and purple rice cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red and purple rice cultivars contain high concentrations of phenolics, such as proanthocyanidins and anthocyanins, respectively. We investigated the effect of cooking processes on these antioxidants and antioxidant capacities of pigmented and common light-brown bran rice. The cooking processes incl...

  14. Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahner, Lesanna L.; Franson, J. Christian

    2009-01-01

    Lead in its various forms has been used for thousands of years, originally in cooking utensils and glazes and more recently in many industrial and commercial applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can affect all animals, including humans. By the mid 1990s, lead had been removed from many products in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland game birds, small mammals, and large game animals, as well as in fishing tackle. Wild birds, such as mourning doves, bald eagles, California condors, and loons, can die from the ingestion of one lead shot, bullet fragment, or sinker. According to a recent study on loon mortality, nearly half of adult loons found sick or dead during the breeding season in New England were diagnosed with confirmed or suspected lead poisoning from ingestion of lead fishing weights. Recent regulations in some states have restricted the use of lead ammunition on certain upland game hunting areas, as well as lead fishing tackle in areas frequented by common loons and trumpeter swans. A variety of alternatives to lead are available for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of early salt stress-responsive proteins in roots of SnRK2 transgenic rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The rice roots are highly salt-sensitive organ and primary root growth is rapidly suppressed by salt stress. Sucrose nonfermenting 1-related protein kinase2 (SnRK2) family is one of the key regulator of hyper-osmotic stress signalling in various plant cells. To understand early salt response of rice roots and identify SnRK2 signaling components, proteome changes of transgenic rice roots over-expressing OSRK1, a rice SnRK2 kinase were investigated. Results Proteomes were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein spots were identified by LC-MS/MS from wild type and OSRK1 transgenic rice roots exposed to 150 mM NaCl for either 3 h or 7 h. Fifty two early salt -responsive protein spots were identified from wild type rice roots. The major up-regulated proteins were enzymes related to energy regulation, amino acid metabolism, methylglyoxal detoxification, redox regulation and protein turnover. It is noted that enzymes known to be involved in GA-induced root growth such as fructose bisphosphate aldolase and methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase were clearly down-regulated. In contrast to wild type rice roots, only a few proteins were changed by salt stress in OSRK1 transgenic rice roots. A comparative quantitative analysis of the proteome level indicated that forty three early salt-responsive proteins were magnified in transgenic rice roots at unstressed condition. These proteins contain single or multiple potential SnRK2 recognition motives. In vitro kinase assay revealed that one of the identified proteome, calreticulin is a good substrate of OSRK1. Conclusions Our present data implicate that rice roots rapidly changed broad spectrum of energy metabolism upon challenging salt stress, and suppression of GA signaling by salt stress may be responsible for the rapid arrest of root growth and development. The broad spectrum of functional categories of proteins affected by over-expression of OSRK1 indicates that OSRK1 is an upstream regulator of

  16. Metabolite profiling of two low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas; Meuleye, Bertrand Seumo; Miller, Andreas; Shu, Qing-Yao; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2007-12-26

    Two low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutant lines, Os-lpa-XS110-1 and Os-lpa-XS110-2, were grown together with their parent wild-type variety Xiushui 110 in four field trials. HPLC analysis of inositol phosphates in the seeds produced demonstrated that compared to the wild-type, the reduction in phytic acid content in Os-lpa-XS110-1 (-46%) was more pronounced than that in Os-lpa-XS110-2 (-23%). Lower inositol phosphates (InsP 3, InsP 4, InsP 5) were not detected in the mutants. The lpa mutants and the wild-type rice were subjected to comparative metabolite profiling by capillary gas chromatography. On average, 34% (Os-lpa-XS110-1) and 42% (Os-lpa-XS110-2) of the detected peaks were statistically significantly different between wild-type and mutants. However, only a few of these differences could be consistently observed for all field trials. Identification and quantification of the consistently different metabolites revealed that contents of myo-inositol and raffinose were increased in Os-lpa-XS110-1 but decreased in Os-lpa-XS110-2 compared to the wild-type. In addition, Os-lpa-XS110-1 exhibited increased levels of galactose and galactinol. Consideration of these metabolic changes in light of the routes involved in the biosynthesis of phytic acid indicated a disturbance in the early biosynthetic pathway of phytic acid in Os-lpa-XS110-2 (similar to the lpa-1 type mutation in maize) and a mutation event affecting phosphorylation of myo-inositol in Os-lpa-XS110-1 (similar to the lpa-3-type mutation).

  17. 21 CFR 137.350 - Enriched rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enriched rice. 137.350 Section 137.350 Food and... Related Products § 137.350 Enriched rice. (a) The foods for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are forms of milled rice (except rice coated with talc and glucose...

  18. 21 CFR 137.350 - Enriched rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enriched rice. 137.350 Section 137.350 Food and... Related Products § 137.350 Enriched rice. (a) The foods for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are forms of milled rice (except rice coated with talc and glucose...

  19. 21 CFR 137.350 - Enriched rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enriched rice. 137.350 Section 137.350 Food and... Related Products § 137.350 Enriched rice. (a) The foods for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are forms of milled rice (except rice coated with talc and glucose...

  20. 21 CFR 137.350 - Enriched rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enriched rice. 137.350 Section 137.350 Food and... Related Products § 137.350 Enriched rice. (a) The foods for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are forms of milled rice (except rice coated with talc and glucose...

  1. 21 CFR 137.350 - Enriched rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enriched rice. 137.350 Section 137.350 Food and... Related Products § 137.350 Enriched rice. (a) The foods for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are forms of milled rice (except rice coated with talc and glucose...

  2. Retention of OsNMD3 in the cytoplasm disturbs protein synthesis efficiency and affects plant development in rice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanyun; Liu, Xiangling; Li, Rui; Gao, Yaping; Xu, Zuopeng; Zhang, Baocai; Zhou, Yihua

    2014-07-01

    The ribosome is the basic machinery for translation, and biogenesis of ribosomes involves many coordinated events. However, knowledge about ribosomal dynamics in higher plants is very limited. This study chose a highly conserved trans-factor, the 60S ribosomal subunit nuclear export adaptor NMD3, to characterize the mechanism of ribosome biogenesis in the monocot plant Oryza sativa (rice). O. sativa NMD3 (OsNMD3) shares all the common motifs and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm via CRM1/XPO1. A dominant negative form of OsNMD3 with a truncated nuclear localization sequence (OsNMD3(ΔNLS)) was retained in the cytoplasm, consequently interfering with the release of OsNMD3 from pre-60S particles and disturbing the assembly of ribosome subunits. Analyses of the transactivation activity and cellulose biosynthesis level revealed low protein synthesis efficiency in the transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants. Pharmaceutical treatments demonstrated structural alterations in ribosomes in the transgenic plants. Moreover, global expression profiles of the wild-type and transgenic plants were investigated using the Illumina RNA sequencing approach. These expression profiles suggested that overexpression of OsNMD3(ΔNLS) affected ribosome biogenesis and certain basic pathways, leading to pleiotropic abnormalities in plant growth. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that OsNMD3 is important for ribosome assembly and the maintenance of normal protein synthesis efficiency.

  3. Concentrations and health risks of lead, cadmium, arsenic, and mercury in rice and edible mushrooms in China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yong; Sun, Xinyang; Yang, Wenjian; Ma, Ning; Xin, Zhihong; Fu, Jin; Liu, Xiaochang; Liu, Meng; Mariga, Alfred Mugambi; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hu, Qiuhui

    2014-03-15

    In this study, four common heavy metals, lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) in rice and edible mushrooms of China were studied to evaluate contamination level and edible safety. Ninety two (92) rice samples were collected from the main rice growing regions in China, and 38 fresh and 21 dry edible mushroom samples were collected from typical markets in Nanjing City. The analyzed metal concentrations were significantly different between rice and edible mushroom samples (p<0.05). The results showed that Pb, Cd and As contents in 4.3%, 3.3% and 2.2% rice samples respectively, were above maximum allowable concentration (MAC). In fresh edible mushroom, Pb and Hg contents in 2.6% samples were above MAC, respectively. However, only Hg content in 4.8% dry edible mushroom samples was above its MAC. Therefore, more than 95% rice and edible mushroom samples in our test had high edible safety.

  4. Teaching in wild meerkats.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Alex; McAuliffe, Katherine

    2006-07-14

    Despite the obvious benefits of directed mechanisms that facilitate the efficient transfer of skills, there is little critical evidence for teaching in nonhuman animals. Using observational and experimental data, we show that wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta) teach pups prey-handling skills by providing them with opportunities to interact with live prey. In response to changing pup begging calls, helpers alter their prey-provisioning methods as pups grow older, thus accelerating learning without the use of complex cognition. The lack of evidence for teaching in species other than humans may reflect problems in producing unequivocal support for the occurrence of teaching, rather than the absence of teaching.

  5. Contribution of Ethylene Biosynthesis for Resistance to Blast Fungus Infection in Young Rice Plants1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Takayoshi; Miyasaka, Atsushi; Seo, Shigemi; Ohashi, Yuko

    2006-01-01

    The role of ethylene (ET) in resistance to infection with blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea) in rice (Oryza sativa) is poorly understood. To study it, we quantified ET levels after inoculation, using young rice plants at the four-leaf stage of rice cv Nipponbare (wild type) and its isogenic plant (IL7), which contains the Pi-i resistance gene to blast fungus race 003. Small necrotic lesions by hypersensitive reaction (HR) were formed at 42 to 72 h postinoculation (hpi) in resistant IL7 leaves, and whitish expanding lesions at 96 hpi in susceptible wild-type leaves. Notable was the enhanced ET emission at 48 hpi accompanied by increased 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) levels and highly elevated ACC oxidase (ACO) activity in IL7 leaves, whereas only an enhanced ACC increase at 96 hpi in wild-type leaves. Among six ACC synthase (ACS) and seven ACO genes found in the rice genome, OsACS2 was transiently expressed at 48 hpi in IL7 and at 96 hpi in wild type, and OsACO7 was expressed at 48 hpi in IL7. Treatment with an inhibitor for ACS, aminooxyacetic acid, suppressed enhanced ET emission at 48 hpi in IL7, resulting in expanding lesions instead of HR lesions. Exogenously supplied ACC compromised the aminooxyacetic acid-induced breakdown of resistance in IL7, and treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene and silver thiosulfate, inhibitors of ET action, did not suppress resistance. These findings suggest the importance of ET biosynthesis and, consequently, the coproduct, cyanide, for HR-accompanied resistance to blast fungus in young rice plants and the contribution of induced OsACS2 and OsACO7 gene expression to it. PMID:17012402

  6. International Consortium of Rice Mutagenesis: resources and beyond

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops in the world. The rice community needs to cooperate and share efforts and resources so that we can understand the functions of rice genes, especially those with a role in important agronomical traits, for application in agricultural production. Mutation is a major source of genetic variation that can be used for studying gene function. We will present here the status of mutant collections affected in a random manner by physical/chemical and insertion mutageneses. As of early September 2013, a total of 447, 919 flanking sequence tags from rice mutant libraries with T-DNA, Ac/Ds, En/Spm, Tos17, nDART/aDART insertions have been collected and publicly available. From these, 336,262 sequences are precisely positioned on the japonica rice chromosomes, and 67.5% are in gene interval. We discuss the genome coverage and preference of the insertion, issues limiting the exchange and use of the current collections, as well as new and improved resources. We propose a call to renew all mutant populations as soon as possible. We also suggest that a common web portal should be established for ordering seeds. PMID:24341871

  7. Comprehensive phenotypic analysis of rice (Oryza sativa) response to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Pires, Inês S; Negrão, Sónia; Oliveira, M Margarida; Purugganan, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Increase in soil salinity levels is becoming a major cause of crop yield losses worldwide. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the most salt-sensitive cereal crop, and many studies have focused on rice salinity tolerance, but a global understanding of this crop's response to salinity is still lacking. We systematically analyzed phenotypic data previously collected for 56 rice genotypes to assess the extent to which rice uses three known salinity tolerance mechanisms: shoot-ion independent tolerance (or osmotic tolerance), ion exclusion, and tissue tolerance. In general, our analyses of different phenotypic traits agree with results of previous rice salinity tolerance studies. However, we also established that the three salinity tolerance mechanisms mentioned earlier appear among rice genotypes and that none of them is predominant. Against the pervasive view in the literature that the K(+) /Na(+) ratio is the most important trait in salinity tolerance, we found that the K(+) concentration was not significantly affected by salt stress in rice, which puts in question the importance of K(+) /Na(+) when analyzing rice salt stress response. Not only do our results contribute to improve our global understanding of salt stress response in an important crop, but we also use our results together with an extensive literature research to highlight some issues commonly observed in salinity stress tolerance studies and to propose solutions for future experiments.

  8. Waterbird communities in rice fields subjected to different post-harvest treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, J.H.; Colwell, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In California's Sacramento Valley, the potential value of rice fields as habitat for waterbirds may vary with harvest method, post-harvest treatment of rice straw (chopped, burned, plowed), and extent of flooding. Recent changes in rice harvesting methods (i.e., use of stripper-headers) and a legislative mandate to decrease burning of rice straw after harvest may alter habitat availability and use. Thus, we investigated species richness and community composition of nonbreeding waterbirds during October-March 1993-94 and 1994-95 in rice fields of the northern Sacramento Valley. Most (85-91% of land area) rice was conventionally harvested (i.e., cutter bar), and the remainder was stripped. Rice straw was left untreated in more than half of fields (52% in 1994 and 54% in 1995), especially in stripped fields (56-70%). In fields where farmers treated straw, the most common management methods were plowing (15-21%), burning (19-24%), and chopping (3-5%). Fields became increasingly wet from October through March as seasonal precipitation accumulated and farmers flooded fields to facilitate straw decomposition and provide habitat for ducks. Species richness of waterbirds was greater (P 0.23). Species richness in stripped fields probably was low because foraging opportunities were limited by tall dense straw, decreased grain density, and infrequent flooding. We recommend that land managers wishing to provide habitat for a diverse waterbird community harvest rice using conventional methods and flood fields shallowly.

  9. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is a Determinant for Rice-Endophyte Colonization by Non-Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium.

    PubMed

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Songwattana, Pongpan; Greetatorn, Teerana; Okubo, Takashi; Kakizaki, Kaori Chiba; Prakamhang, Janpen; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    Plant associations by bradyrhizobia have been detected not only in leguminous plants, but also in non-leguminous species including rice. Bradyrhizobium sp. SUTN9-2 was isolated from Aeschynomene americana L., which is a leguminous weed found in the rice fields of Thailand. This strain promoted the highest total rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar Pathum Thani 1) dry weight among the endophytic bradyrhizobial strains tested, and was, thus, employed for the further characterization of rice-Bradyrhizobium interactions. Some known bacterial genes involved in bacteria-plant interactions were selected. The expression of the type III secretion component (rhcJ), type IV secretion component (virD4), and pectinesterase (peces) genes of the bacterium were up-regulated when the rice root exudate was added to the culture. When SUTN9-2 was inoculated into rice seedlings, the peces, rhcJ, virD4, and exopolysaccharide production (fliP) genes were strongly expressed in the bacterium 6-24 h after the inoculation. The gene for glutathione-S-transferase (gst) was slightly expressed 12 h after the inoculation. In order to determine whether type III secretion system (T3SS) is involved in bradyrhizobial infections in rice plants, wild-type SUTN9-2 and T3SS mutant strains were inoculated into the original host plant (A. americana) and a rice plant (cultivar Pathum Thani 1). The ability of T3SS mutants to invade rice tissues was weaker than that of the wild-type strain; however, their phenotypes in A. americana were not changed by T3SS mutations. These results suggest that T3SS is one of the important determinants modulating rice infection; however, type IV secretion system and peces may also be responsible for the early steps of rice infection.

  10. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is a Determinant for Rice-Endophyte Colonization by Non-Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium

    PubMed Central

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Songwattana, Pongpan; Greetatorn, Teerana; Okubo, Takashi; Kakizaki, Kaori Chiba; Prakamhang, Janpen; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    Plant associations by bradyrhizobia have been detected not only in leguminous plants, but also in non-leguminous species including rice. Bradyrhizobium sp. SUTN9-2 was isolated from Aeschynomene americana L., which is a leguminous weed found in the rice fields of Thailand. This strain promoted the highest total rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar Pathum Thani 1) dry weight among the endophytic bradyrhizobial strains tested, and was, thus, employed for the further characterization of rice-Bradyrhizobium interactions. Some known bacterial genes involved in bacteria-plant interactions were selected. The expression of the type III secretion component (rhcJ), type IV secretion component (virD4), and pectinesterase (peces) genes of the bacterium were up-regulated when the rice root exudate was added to the culture. When SUTN9-2 was inoculated into rice seedlings, the peces, rhcJ, virD4, and exopolysaccharide production (fliP) genes were strongly expressed in the bacterium 6–24 h after the inoculation. The gene for glutathione-S-transferase (gst) was slightly expressed 12 h after the inoculation. In order to determine whether type III secretion system (T3SS) is involved in bradyrhizobial infections in rice plants, wild-type SUTN9-2 and T3SS mutant strains were inoculated into the original host plant (A. americana) and a rice plant (cultivar Pathum Thani 1). The ability of T3SS mutants to invade rice tissues was weaker than that of the wild-type strain; however, their phenotypes in A. americana were not changed by T3SS mutations. These results suggest that T3SS is one of the important determinants modulating rice infection; however, type IV secretion system and peces may also be responsible for the early steps of rice infection. PMID:26582551

  11. Carry-over effect of captive breeding reduces reproductive fitness of wild-born descendants in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Hitoshi; Cooper, Becky; Blouin, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Supplementation of wild populations with captive-bred organisms is a common practice for conservation of threatened wild populations. Yet it is largely unknown whether such programmes actually help population size recovery. While a negative genetic effect of captive breeding that decreases fitness of captive-bred organisms has been detected, there is no direct evidence for a carry-over effect of captive breeding in their wild-born descendants, which would drag down the fitness of the wild population in subsequent generations. In this study, we use genetic parentage assignments to reconstruct a pedigree and estimate reproductive fitness of the wild-born descendants of captive-bred parents in a supplemented population of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The estimated fitness varied among years, but overall relative reproductive fitness was only 37 per cent in wild-born fish from two captive-bred parents and 87 per cent in those from one captive-bred and one wild parent (relative to those from two wild parents). Our results suggest a significant carry-over effect of captive breeding, which has negative influence on the size of the wild population in the generation after supplementation. In this population, the population fitness could have been 8 per cent higher if there was no carry-over effect during the study period. PMID:19515651

  12. Invertebrate mercury bioaccumulation in permanent, seasonal, and flooded rice wetlands within California's Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Miles, A. Keith; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined methylmercury (MeHg) bioavailability in four of the most predominant wetland habitats in California's Central Valley agricultural region during the spring and summer: white rice, wild rice, permanent wetlands, and shallowly-flooded fallow fields. We sampled MeHg and total mercury (THg) concentrations in two aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa at the inlets, centers, and outlets of four replicated wetland habitats (8 wetlands total) during two time periods bounding the rice growing season and corresponding to flood-up and pre-harvest (96 total samples). In general, THg concentrations (mean ± standard error) in Notonectidae (Notonecta, back swimmers; 1.18 ± 0.08 µg g− 1 dry weight [dw]) were higher than in Corixidae (Corisella, water boatmen; 0.89 ± 0.06 µg g− 1 dw, MeHg: 0.74 ± 0.05 µg g− 1 dw). MeHg concentrations were correlated with THg concentrations in Corixidae (R2 = 0.80) and 88% of THg was in the MeHg form. Wetland habitat type had an important influence on THg concentrations in aquatic invertebrates, but this effect depended on the sampling time period and taxa. In particular, THg concentrations in Notonectidae, but not Corixidae, were higher in permanent wetlands than in white rice, wild rice, or shallowly-flooded fallow fields. THg concentrations in Notonectidae were higher at the end of the rice growing season than near the time of flood-up, whereas THg concentrations in Corixidae did not differ between time periods. The effect of wetland habitat type was more prevalent near the end of the rice growing season, when Notonectidae THg concentrations were highest in permanent wetlands. Additionally, invertebrate THg concentrations were higher at water outlets than at inlets of wetlands. Our results indicate that although invertebrate THg concentrations increased from the time of flood-up to draw-down of wetlands, temporarily flooded habitats such as white rice, wild rice, and shallowly-flooded fallow fields did not

  13. Phytochromes are the sole photoreceptors for perceiving red/far-red light in rice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Makoto; Inagaki, Noritoshi; Xie, Xianzhi; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Baba-Kasai, Akiko; Tanabata, Takanari; Shinomura, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    Phytochromes are believed to be solely responsible for red and far-red light perception, but this has never been definitively tested. To directly address this hypothesis, a phytochrome triple mutant (phyAphyBphyC) was generated in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) and its responses to red and far-red light were monitored. Since rice only has three phytochrome genes (PHYA, PHYB and PHYC), this mutant is completely lacking any phytochrome. Rice seedlings grown in the dark develop long coleoptiles while undergoing regular circumnutation. The phytochrome triple mutants also show this characteristic skotomorphogenesis, even under continuous red or far-red light. The morphology of the triple mutant seedlings grown under red or far-red light appears completely the same as etiolated seedlings, and they show no expression of the light-induced genes. This is direct evidence demonstrating that phytochromes are the sole photoreceptors for perceiving red and far-red light, at least during rice seedling establishment. Furthermore, the shape of the triple mutant plants was dramatically altered. Most remarkably, triple mutants extend their internodes even during the vegetative growth stage, which is a time during which wild-type rice plants never elongate their internodes. The triple mutants also flowered very early under long day conditions and set very few seeds due to incomplete male sterility. These data indicate that phytochromes play an important role in maximizing photosynthetic abilities during the vegetative growth stage in rice. PMID:19706555

  14. Biosynthesis and emission of insect-induced methyl salicylate and methyl benzoate from rice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Nan; Guan, Ju; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Engle, Nancy L; Chern, Mawsheng; Ronald, Pamela; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Two benzenoid esters, methyl salicylate (MeSA) and methyl benzoate (MeBA), were detected from insect-damaged rice plants. By correlating metabolite production with gene expression analysis, five candidate genes encoding putative carboxyl methyltransferases were identified. Enzymatic assays with Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant proteins demonstrated that only one of the five candidates, OsBSMT1, has salicylic acid (SA) methyltransferase (SAMT) and benzoic acid (BA) methyltransferase (BAMT) activities for producing MeSA and MeBA, respectively. Whereas OsBSMT1 is phylogenetically relatively distant from dicot SAMTs, the three-dimensional structure of OsBSMT1, which was determined using homology-based structural modeling, is highly similar to those of characterized SAMTs. Analyses of OsBSMT1 expression in wild-type rice plants under various stress conditions indicate that the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating the production and emission of MeSA in rice. Further analysis using transgenic rice plants overexpressing NH1, a key component of the SA signaling pathway in rice, suggests that the SA signaling pathway also plays an important role in governing OsBSMT1 expression and emission of its products, probably through a crosstalk with the JA signaling pathway. The role of the volatile products of OsBSMT1, MeSA and MeBA, in rice defense against insect herbivory is discussed.

  15. The Birth of a Black Rice Gene and Its Local Spread by Introgression

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Tetsuo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Oguchi, Taichi; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Tanabe, Noriko; Ebana, Kaworu; Yano, Masahiro; Izawa, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The origin and spread of novel agronomic traits during crop domestication are complex events in plant evolution. Wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) has red grains due to the accumulation of proanthocyanidins, whereas most cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) varieties have white grains induced by a defective allele in the Rc basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene. Although the events surrounding the origin and spread of black rice traits remain unknown, varieties with black grains due to anthocyanin accumulation are distributed in various locations throughout Asia. Here, we show that the black grain trait originated from ectopic expression of the Kala4 bHLH gene due to rearrangement in the promoter region. Both the Rc and Kala4 genes activate upstream flavonol biosynthesis genes, such as chalcone synthase and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase, and downstream genes, such as leucoanthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, to produce the respective specific pigments. Genome analysis of 21 black rice varieties as well as red- and white-grained landraces demonstrated that black rice arose in tropical japonica and its subsequent spread to the indica subspecies can be attributed to the causal alleles of Kala4. The relatively small size of genomic fragments of tropical japonica origin in some indica varieties indicates that refined introgression must have occurred by natural crossbreeding in the course of evolution of the black trait in rice. PMID:26362607

  16. Chlorella starch branching enzyme II (BEII) can complement the function of BEIIb in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takayuki; Francisco, Perigio B; Aihara, Satomi; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Mayumi; Oyama, Yasunori; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Satoh, Hikaru; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2009-06-01

    In monocots, starch branching enzyme II (BEII) was functionally differentiated into BEIIa and BEIIb after separation from the dicots, and in cereals BEIIb plays a distinct role in amylopectin biosynthesis in the endosperm. The present study was conducted to examine to what extent a green algal BEII has an overlapping function with BEIIb in starch biosynthesis by introducing the Chlorella BEII gene into an amylose-extender (ae) mutant of rice. Chlorella BEII was found to complement the contribution of the rice endosperm BEIIb to the structures of amylopectin and starch granules because these mutated phenotypes were recovered almost completely to those of the wild type by the expression of Chlorella BEII. When the recombinant BE enzymes were incubated with the rice ae amylopectin, the branching pattern of Chlorella BEII was much more similar to that of rice BEIIb rather than rice BEIIa. Detailed analyses of BE reaction products suggests that BEIIb and Chlorella BEII only transfer chains with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 6 and 7, whereas BEIIa preferably transfers short chains with a DP of about 6-11. These results show that the Chlorella BEII is functionally similar to rice BEIIb rather than BEIIa.

  17. Natural variation and artificial selection in four genes determine grain shape in rice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Shao, Di; Qiu, Xianjin; Sun, Liang; Yan, Wenhao; Zhou, Xiangchun; Yang, Lin; He, Yuqing; Yu, Sibin; Xing, Yongzhong

    2013-12-01

    The size of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) grains has been altered by both domestication and artificial selection over the course of evolutionary history. Several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for grain size have been cloned in the past 10 yr. To explore the natural variation in these QTLs, resequencing of grain width and weight 2 (GW2), grain size 5 (GS5) and QTL for seed width 5 (qSW5) and genotyping of grain size 3 (GS3) were performed in the germplasms of 127 varieties of rice (O. sativa) and 10-15 samples of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon). Ten, 10 and 15 haplotypes were observed for GW2, GS5 and qSW5. qSW5 and GS3 had the strongest effects on grain size, which have been widely utilized in rice production, whereas GW2 and GS5 showed more modest effects. GS5 showed small sequence variations in O. sativa germplasm and that of its progenitor O. rufipogon. qSW5 exhibited the highest level of nucleotide diversity. GW2 showed signs of purifying selection. The four grain size genes experienced different selection intensities depending on their genetic effects. In the indica population, linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected among GS3, qSW5 and GS5. The substantial genetic variation in these four genes provides the flexibility needed to design various rice grain shapes. These findings provide insight into the evolutionary features of grain size genes in rice.

  18. Facile fabrication of rice husk based silicon dioxide nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles as a rice antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianghu; Liang, You; Yang, Desong; Liu, Yingliang

    2016-02-18

    Bacterial leaf blight of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is a major disease of rice, leading to reduction in production by 10-50%. In order to control this disease, various chemical bactericides have been used. Wide and prolonged application of chemical bactericides resulted in the resistant strain of Xoo that was isolated from rice. To address this problem, we were searching for an environmentally friendly alternative to the commonly used chemical bactericides. In this work, we demonstrate that silicon dioxide nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles (SiO2-Ag) can be prepared by using rice husk as base material precursor. The results of the antibacterial tests showed that SiO2-Ag composites displayed antibacterial activity against Xoo. At cellular level, the cell wall/membrane was damaged and intercellular contents were leaked out by slow-releasing of silver ions from SiO2-Ag composites. At molecular level, this composite induced reactive oxygen species production and inhibited DNA replication. Based on the results above, we proposed the potential antibacterial mechanism of SiO2-Ag composites. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assay indicated that the composites showed mild toxicity with rice cells. Thus, this work provided a new strategy to develop biocide derived from residual biomass.

  19. Facile fabrication of rice husk based silicon dioxide nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles as a rice antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jianghu; Liang, You; Yang, Desong; Liu, Yingliang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial leaf blight of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is a major disease of rice, leading to reduction in production by 10–50%. In order to control this disease, various chemical bactericides have been used. Wide and prolonged application of chemical bactericides resulted in the resistant strain of Xoo that was isolated from rice. To address this problem, we were searching for an environmentally friendly alternative to the commonly used chemical bactericides. In this work, we demonstrate that silicon dioxide nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles (SiO2-Ag) can be prepared by using rice husk as base material precursor. The results of the antibacterial tests showed that SiO2-Ag composites displayed antibacterial activity against Xoo. At cellular level, the cell wall/membrane was damaged and intercellular contents were leaked out by slow-releasing of silver ions from SiO2-Ag composites. At molecular level, this composite induced reactive oxygen species production and inhibited DNA replication. Based on the results above, we proposed the potential antibacterial mechanism of SiO2-Ag composites. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assay indicated that the composites showed mild toxicity with rice cells. Thus, this work provided a new strategy to develop biocide derived from residual biomass. PMID:26888152

  20. OsFRDL1 expressed in nodes is required for distribution of iron to grains in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yokosho, Kengo; Yamaji, Naoki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for plant growth and development, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its distribution to different organs are poorly understood. We found that OsFRDL1 (FERRIC REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE LIKE 1), a plasma membrane-localized transporter for citrate, was highly expressed in the upper nodes of rice at the reproductive growth stage. OsFRDL1 was expressed in most cells of enlarged vascular bundles, diffuse vascular bundles, and the interjacent parenchyma cell bridges of uppermost node I, as well as vascular tissues of the leaf blade, leaf sheath, peduncle, rachis, husk, and stamen. Knockout of OsFRDL1 decreased pollen viability and grain fertility when grown in a paddy field. Iron was deposited in the parenchyma cell bridges, a few of the cell layers of the parenchyma tissues outside of the bundle sheath of enlarged vascular bundles in node I in both the wild-type rice and osfrdl1 mutant, but the mutant accumulated more Fe than the wild-type rice in this area. A stem-fed experiment with stable isotope 57Fe showed that the distribution of Fe in the anther and panicle decreased in the knockout line, but that in the flag leaf it increased compared with the wild-type rice. Taken together, our results show that OsFRDL1 expressed in the upper nodes is required for the distribution of Fe in the panicles through solubilizing Fe deposited in the apoplastic part of nodes in rice. PMID:27555544

  1. Effects of Seeding Rates and Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Density on Damage in Two Medium Grain Varieties of Rice.

    PubMed

    Aghaee, Mohammad-Amir; Espino, Luis; Goding, Kevin; Goldman, Evan; Godfrey, Larry D

    2016-04-01

    Rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel) is a common pest of rice production in the United States whose larvae cause yield loss by feeding on the roots. We conducted studies from 2011–2013 on M-202 and M-206, two commonly grown California medium grain rice varieties, to determine if M-206 demonstrated tolerance to rice water weevil damage. Observations from field studies suggested the possibility of a level of tolerance in M-206 that was more prevalent at high seeding rates. We did this study using two different experimental units, open and ring plots. In both units, we quantified grain yields across four levels, 56, 112, 168, and 224 kg/ha, of seeding rates to detect potential yield recovery by M-206. In the open plots, we used naturally occurring weevil populations compared with controls that reduced the populations with insecticides. In the ring plots, we tested three levels of weevil infestation, none, low, and high, to look at the weevil density effects on yield and scarred plants. Our studies showed that M-206 and M-202 had generally similar densities of immature weevils and yield. Compensation for yield loss did not occur at higher seeding rates. These results suggest that M-206 does not have the ability to tolerate rice water weevil damage better than M-202. There was weak evidence that the number of scarred plants increased as plant density was reduced. The results are discussed in relation to the utility of this study to grower choices of varieties for long-term rice water weevil management.

  2. Overexpression of the rice AKT1 potassium channel affects potassium nutrition and rice drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Izhar; Mian, Afaq; Maathuis, Frans J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K+) is the most important cationic nutrient for all living organisms and has roles in most aspects of plant physiology. To assess the impact of one of the main K+ uptake components, the K+ inward rectifying channel AKT1, we characterized both loss of function and overexpression of OsAKT1 in rice. In many conditions, AKT1 expression correlated with K+ uptake and tissue K+ levels. No salinity-related growth phenotype was observed for either loss or gain of function mutants. However, a correlation between AKT1 expression and root Na+ when the external Na/K ratio was high suggests that there may be a role for AKT1 in Na+ uptake in such conditions. In contrast to findings with Arabidopsis thaliana, we did not detect any change in growth of AKT1 loss of function mutants in the presence of NH4 +. Nevertheless, NH4 +-dependent inhibition was detected during K+ uptake assays in loss of function and wild type plants, depending on pre-growth conditions. The most prominent result of OsAKT1 overexpression was a reduction in sensitivity to osmotic/drought stress in transgenic plants: the data suggest that AKT1 overexpression improved rice osmotic and drought stress tolerance by increasing tissue levels of K+, especially in the root. PMID:26969743

  3. Transgressive variation for yield components measured throughout the growth cycle of Jefferson rice (Oryza sativa) x O. rufipogon introgression lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies demonstrated alleles introduced into elite rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars from the wild ancestral species, O. rufipogon, enhanced yield and yield components as a result of transgressive variation. A study was conducted to unveil phenological and agronomic mechanisms that underlie in...

  4. Evaluating the Effect of Expressing a Peanut Resveratrol Synthase Gene in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Wang, Qingguo; Yao, Fangyin; Yang, Lianqun; Pan, Jiaowen; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (Res) is a type of natural plant stilbenes and phytoalexins that only exists in a few plant species. Studies have shown that the Res could be biosynthesized and accumulated within plants, once the complete metabolic pathway and related enzymes, such as the key enzyme resveratrol synthase (RS), existed. In this study, a RS gene named PNRS1 was cloned from the peanut, and the activity was confirmed in E. coli. Using transgenic approach, the PNRS1 transgenic rice was obtained. In T3 generation, the Res production and accumulation were further detected by HPLC. Our data revealed that compared to the wild type rice which trans-resveratrol was undetectable, in transgenic rice, the trans-resveratrol could be synthesized and achieved up to 0.697 μg/g FW in seedlings and 3.053 μg/g DW in seeds. Furthermore, the concentration of trans-resveratrol in transgenic rice seedlings could be induced up to eight or four-fold higher by ultraviolet (UV-C) or dark, respectively. Simultaneously, the endogenous increased of Res also showed the advantages in protecting the host plant from UV-C caused damage or dark-induced senescence. Our data indicated that Res was involved in host-defense responses against environmental stresses in transgenic rice. Here the results describes the processes of a peanut resveratrol synthase gene transformed into rice, and the detection of trans-resveratrol in transgenic rice, and the role of trans-resveratrol as a phytoalexin in transgenic rice when treated by UV-C and dark. These findings present new outcomes of transgenic approaches for functional genes and their corresponding physiological functions, and shed some light on broadening available resources of Res, nutritional improvement of crops, and new variety cultivation by genetic engineering. PMID:26302213

  5. Imitation and traditions in wild banded mongooses.

    PubMed

    Müller, Corsin A; Cant, Michael A

    2010-07-13

    Evidence has accumulated in recent years indicating that traditions are not a unique feature of human societies but may be common in primates and some other mammals. However, most documented cases remain contentious because observational studies of free-living animals suffer from interpretive weaknesses, whereas social diffusion experiments performed in captivity may not reflect conditions found in nature. Here we use experiments under natural conditions to demonstrate that wild banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) pass preferences for one of two possible foraging techniques on to the next generation through contextual imitation. Notably, both techniques coexisted within the same groups and were transmitted concurrently between adults and pups, which form close one-to-one associations during the period of pup dependency. This experimental demonstration of a foraging tradition in wild mammals provides critical evidence to support previous accounts of traditions in nonhuman animals based on distribution patterns of natural behaviors. Moreover, our data provide the first experimental demonstration of imitation in wild mammals and, contrary to common assumption, show that social learning need not lead to an increased behavioral homogeneity within groups.

  6. Rice Dwarf Virus P2 Protein Hijacks Auxin Signaling by Directly Targeting the Rice OsIAA10 Protein, Enhancing Viral Infection and Disease Development

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lian; Qin, Qingqing; Wang, Yu; Pu, Yingying; Liu, Lifang; Wen, Xing; Ji, Shaoyi; Wu, Jianguo; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays critical roles in regulating myriads of plant growth and developmental processes. Microbe infection can disturb auxin signaling resulting in defects in these processes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Auxin signaling begins with perception of auxin by a transient co-receptor complex consisting of an F-box transport inhibitor response 1/auxin signaling F-box (TIR1/AFB) protein and an auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) protein. Auxin binding to the co-receptor triggers ubiquitination and 26S proteasome degradation of the Aux/IAA proteins, leading to subsequent events, including expression of auxin-responsive genes. Here we report that Rice dwarf virus (RDV), a devastating pathogen of rice, causes disease symptoms including dwarfing, increased tiller number and short crown roots in infected rice as a result of reduced sensitivity to auxin signaling. The RDV capsid protein P2 binds OsIAA10, blocking the interaction between OsIAA10 and OsTIR1 and inhibiting 26S proteasome-mediated OsIAA10 degradation. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing wild-type or a dominant-negative (degradation-resistant) mutant of OsIAA10 phenocopy RDV symptoms are more susceptible to RDV infection; however, knockdown of OsIAA10 enhances the resistance of rice to RDV infection. Our findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism of viral protein reprogramming of a key step in auxin signaling initiation that enhances viral infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27606959

  7. Structure-function analyses of the Pth11 receptor reveal an important role for CFEM motif and redox regulation in rice blast.

    PubMed

    Kou, Yanjun; Tan, Yi Han; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2017-04-01

    The interaction of Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus, and rice begins when M. oryzae establishes contact with the host plant surface. On perception of appropriate surface signals, M. oryzae forms appressoria and initiates host invasion. Pth11, an important G-protein-coupled receptor necessary for appressorium formation in M. oryzae, contains seven transmembrane regions and a CFEM (common in several fungal extracellular membrane proteins) domain with the characteristic eight cysteine residues. We focused on gaining further insight into the role of the CFEM domain in the putative surface sensing/response function of Pth11. Increased/constitutive expression of CFEM resulted in precocious, albeit defective, appressoria formation in wild-type M. oryzae. The Pth11(C63A/C65A) mutant, probably with disrupted disulfide bonds in the CFEM, showed delayed appressorium formation and reduced virulence. Furthermore, the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be altered in the pth11Δ strain. Strikingly, antioxidant treatment induced appressorium formation in pth11Δ. The Gα subunit MagB and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase Pmk1 were required for the formation of antioxidant-induced appressoria. We conclude that the CFEM domain of Pth11 is required for proper development of the appressoria, appressoria-like structures and pathogenicity. Highly regulated ROS homeostasis is important for Pth11-mediated appressorium formation in M. oryzae.

  8. RNAi-directed down-regulation of RSV results in increased resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Yuan, Yuan; Yuan, Fuhai; Wang, Man; Zhong, Huan; Gu, Minghong; Liang, Guohua

    2012-05-01

    Rice stripe disease (RSD), caused by rice stripe virus (RSV), is a serious disease in temperate rice-growing areas. We have created an RNAi construct containing coat protein gene (CP) and disease specific protein gene (SP) sequences from RSV. The RNAi construct was transformed into two susceptible japonica varieties, Suyunuo and Guanglingxiangjing, to develop resistance against RSD. The homozygous progeny of rice plants in the T(5) and T(7) generations containing RNAi constructs, after self-fertilization were strongly resistant to viral infection. RT-PCR indicated that viral replication of SP and CP in the transgenic plants was significantly inhibited. There were no obvious morphological or developmental differences between the transgenic and wild-type plants from seedling stage to maturity. The excellent agronomic traits of these two varieties, such as high yield and good quality were maintained. Suppression of virus genes using RNAi is therefore a practical and effective strategy for controlling viral infection in crops.

  9. Suppression of the rice fatty-acid desaturase gene OsSSI2 enhances resistance to blast and leaf blight diseases in rice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Shimono, Masaki; Maeda, Satoru; Inoue, Haruhiko; Mori, Masaki; Hasegawa, Morifumi; Sugano, Shoji; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    Fatty acids and their derivatives play important signaling roles in plant defense responses. It has been shown that suppressing a gene for stearoyl acyl carrier protein fatty-acid desaturase (SACPD) enhances the resistance of Arabidopsis (SSI2) and soybean to multiple pathogens. In this study, we present functional analyses of a rice homolog of SSI2 (OsSSI2) in disease resistance of rice plants. A transposon insertion mutation (Osssi2-Tos17) and RNAi-mediated knockdown of OsSSI2 (OsSSI2-kd) reduced the oleic acid (18:1) level and increased that of stearic acid (18:0), indicating that OsSSI2 is responsible for fatty-acid desaturase activity. These plants displayed spontaneous lesion formation in leaf blades, retarded growth, slight increase in endogenous free salicylic acid (SA) levels, and SA/benzothiadiazole (BTH)-specific inducible genes, including WRKY45, a key regulator of SA/BTH-induced resistance, in rice. Moreover, the OsSSI2-kd plants showed markedly enhanced resistance to the blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea and leaf-blight bacteria Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. These results suggest that OsSSI2 is involved in the negative regulation of defense responses in rice, as are its Arabidopsis and soybean counterparts. Microarray analyses identified 406 genes that were differentially expressed (>or=2-fold) in OsSSI2-kd rice plants compared with wild-type rice and, of these, approximately 39% were BTH responsive. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of SA-responsive genes, including WRKY45, is likely responsible for enhanced disease resistance in OsSSI2-kd rice plants.

  10. Soil Incorporation of Silica-Rich Rice Husk Decreases Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Grain.

    PubMed

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Morris, Andrew H; Gill, Rattandeep; Kearns, Kelli A; Mann, Jessica N; Paukett, Michelle; Leskanic, Corey

    2016-05-18

    Arsenic decreases rice yield, and inorganic grain As threatens human health; thus, strategies to decrease rice As are critically needed. Increased plant-available silica (Si) can decrease rice As, yet the source of Si matters. Rice husk, an underutilized and Si-rich byproduct of rice production that contains less labile C and an order of magnitude less As than rice straw, may be an economically viable Si resource to decrease rice As, yet the impact of rice husk incorporation on As in the rice-soil nexus has not been reported. This proof-of-concept study shows that rice husk incorporation to soil (1% w/w) decreases inorganic grain As by 25-50% without negatively affecting grain Cd, yield, or dissolved CH4 levels. Rice husk is a critical yet perhaps overlooked resource to improve soil quality through enhanced nutrient availability and attenuate human health risks through consumption of As-laden grain.

  11. Identification of major rice allergen and their clinical significance in children

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, You Hoon; Oh, Se Jo; Yang, Hyeon Jong; Lee, Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Recently, an increase in the number of patients sensitized to rice allergen with or without clinical symptoms has been reported. This study was designed to determine the major allergens in rice and their clinical significance. Methods Twenty-four children (15 boys and 9 girls; mean age, 16.3 months) with allergic disease, who were sensitized to rice antigen (by UniCAP) in the Pediatric Allergy Respiratory Center at Soonchunhyang University Hospital, were enrolled in this study. The allergenicity of various types of rice (raw, cooked, and heat-treated, simulated gastric fluid [SGF], and simulated intestinal fluid [SIF]) was investigated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoblots. The patients' medical records, including laboratory data and allergy symptoms after ingestion of rice were reviewed. Results Patients were sensitized to an average of 13.5 food antigens and their mean total IgE was 6,888.7 kU/L. In SDS-PAGE, more than 16 protein bands were observed in the raw rice, whereas only 14-16 kDa and 31-35 kDa protein bands were observed in cooked rice. The common SDS-PAGE protein bands observed in SGF-, SIF-, and heat-treated rice were 9, 14, and 31 kDa. In a heated-rice IgE immunoblot, protein bands of 9, 14, and 31-33 kDa were found in 27.8%, 38.9%, and 38.9% of all sera, respectively, and in 50%, 50%, and 75%, of ser a from the 4 symptomatic patients, respectively. Conclusion The 9-, 14-, and 31-kDa protein bands appeared to be the major allergens responsible for rice allergy symptoms. PMID:22232624

  12. Rice scene radiation research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Data requirements, tasks to be accomplished, and the technical approaches to be used in identifying the characteristics of rice for crop inventories are listed as well as methods for estimating crop development and assessing its conditions.

  13. Rice in an interdependent world.

    PubMed

    Falck, V T

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcome of the increasing need and dependence on rice as an essential food, and the potential hazards of this trajectory in an interdependent world, and to propose the need for a supranational system to guide decisions made in areas of mutual dependency among nations. All rice producing countries of the world should be responsible for assuring sufficient quantities and qualities of rice for the world's population. However, there are hazards related to emphasis on rice yields associated with the neglect of overall nutritional needs and also the potential for environmental impact given the need for sustainable development. Scientific measurement and data analyses of interdependent supranational variables are needed to guide policies and practices to insure conditions for life will be favorable for people everywhere.

  14. Differentiation of weedy traits in ALS-resistant red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a weedy form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that competes aggressively with rice in the southern U.S., reduces yields and contaminates rice grains. The introduction of ClearfieldTM rice, a nontransgenic, herbicide-resistant rice cultivar a decade ago has led to increased use of imazet...

  15. Metaproteomic identification of diazotrophic methanotrophs and their localization in root tissues of field-grown rice plants.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study by our group, CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation were simultaneously activated in the roots of wild-type rice plants in a paddy field with no N input; both processes are likely controlled by a rice gene for microbial symbiosis. The present study examined which microorganisms in rice roots were responsible for CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation under the field conditions. Metaproteomic analysis of root-associated bacteria from field-grown rice (Oryza sativa Nipponbare) revealed that nitrogenase complex-containing nitrogenase reductase (NifH) and the alpha subunit (NifD) and beta subunit (NifK) of dinitrogenase were mainly derived from type II methanotrophic bacteria of the family Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp. Minor nitrogenase proteins such as Methylocella, Bradyrhizobium, Rhodopseudomonas, and Anaeromyxobacter were also detected. Methane monooxygenase proteins (PmoCBA and MmoXYZCBG) were detected in the same bacterial group of the Methylocystaceae. Because these results indicated that Methylocystaceae members mediate both CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation, we examined their localization in rice tissues by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The methanotrophs were localized around the epidermal cells and vascular cylinder in the root tissues of the field-grown rice plants. Our metaproteomics and CARD-FISH results suggest that CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation are performed mainly by type II methanotrophs of the Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp., inhabiting the vascular bundles and epidermal cells of rice roots.

  16. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis FD and FD PARALOGUE in rice results in dwarfism with size reduction of spikelets

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seonghoe; Li, Hsing-Yi; Kuo, Mei-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Key flowering genes, FD and FD PARALOGUE (FDP) encoding bZIP transcription factors that interact with a FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis were ectopically expressed in rice since we found AtFD and AtFDP also interact with HEADING DATE 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1). Transgenic rice plants overexpressing AtFD and AtFDP caused reduction in plant height and spikelet size with decreased expression of genes involved in cell elongation without significant flowering time alteration in spite of increased expression of OsMADS14 and OsMADS15, rice homologues of APETALA1 (AP1) in the leaves. Simultaneous overexpression of AtFD and AtFDP enhanced phenotypes seen with overexpression of either single gene while transgenic rice plants expressing AtFD or AtFDP under the control of phloem-specific Hd3a promoter were indistinguishable from wild-type rice. Candidate genes responsible for the phenotypes were identified by comparison of microarray hybridization and their expression pattern was also examined in WT and transgenic rice plants. It has so far not been reported that AtFD and AtFDP affect cell elongation in plants, and our findings provide novel insight into the possible roles of AtFD and AtFDP in the mesophyll cells of plants, and potential genetic tools for manipulation of crop architecture. PMID:28290557

  17. In silico simulation modeling reveals the importance of the Casparian strip for efficient silicon uptake in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Gen; Satake, Akiko; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani-Ueno, Namiki; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Feugier, François Gabriel; Ma, Jian Feng

    2015-04-01

    Silicon (Si) uptake by the roots is mediated by two different transporters, Lsi1 (passive) and Lsi2 (active), in rice (Oryza sativa). Both transporters are polarly localized in the plasma membranes of exodermal (outer) and endodermal (inner) cells with Casparian strips. However, it is unknown how rice is able to take up large amounts of Si compared with other plants, and why rice Si transporters have a characteristic cellular localization pattern. To answer these questions, we simulated Si uptake by rice roots by developing a mathematical model based on a simple diffusion equation that also accounts for active transport by Lsi2. In this model, we calibrated the model parameters using in vivo experimental data on the Si concentrations in the xylem sap and a Monte Carlo method. In our simulation experiments, we compared the Si uptake between roots with various transporter and Casparian strip locations and estimated the Si transport efficiency of roots with different localization patterns and quantities of the Lsi transporters. We found that the Si uptake by roots that lacked Casparian strips was lower than that of normal roots. This suggests that the double-layer structure of the Casparian strips is an important factor in the high Si uptake by rice. We also found that among various possible localization patterns, the most efficient one was that of the wild-type rice; this may explain the high Si uptake capacity of rice.

  18. Detection algorithm for multiple rice seeds images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, F.; Ying, Y. B.

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a digital image analysis algorithm for detection of multiple rice seeds images. The rice seeds used for this study involved a hybrid rice seed variety. Images of multiple rice seeds were acquired with a machine vision system for quality inspection of bulk rice seeds, which is designed to inspect rice seeds on a rotating disk with a CCD camera. Combining morphological operations and parallel processing gave improvements in accuracy, and a reduction in computation time. Using image features selected based on classification ability; a highly acceptable defects classification was achieved when the algorithm was implemented for all the samples to test the adaptability.

  19. Increasing rice plant growth by Trichoderma sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doni, Febri; Isahak, Anizan; Zain, Che Radziah Che Mohd; Sulaiman, Norela; Fathurahman, F.; Zain, Wan Nur Syazana Wan Mohd.; Kadhimi, Ahsan A.; Alhasnawi, Arshad Naji; Anhar, Azwir; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma sp. is a plant growth promoting fungi in many crops. Initial observation on the ability to enhance rice germination and vigor have been reported. In this study, the effectiveness of a local isolate Trichoderma asprellum SL2 to enhance rice seedling growth was assessed experimentally under greenhouse condition using a completely randomized design. Results showed that inoculation of rice plants with Trichoderma asprellum SL2 significantly increase rice plants height, root length, wet weight, leaf number and biomass compared to untreated rice plants (control). The result of this study can serve as a reference for further work on the application of beneficial microorganisms to enhance rice production.

  20. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot

    PubMed Central

    Quibod, Ian Lorenzo; Grande, Genelou; Oreiro, Eula Gems; Borja, Frances Nikki; Dossa, Gerbert Sylvestre; Mauleon, Ramil; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI) and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments. PMID:26422147

  1. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot.

    PubMed

    Quibod, Ian Lorenzo; Grande, Genelou; Oreiro, Eula Gems; Borja, Frances Nikki; Dossa, Gerbert Sylvestre; Mauleon, Ramil; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI) and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments.

  2. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  3. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  4. Pullulanase from rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Susumu; Konno, Haruyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41) in non-germinating seeds was compared with that in germinating seeds. Moreover, pullulanase from the endosperm of rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Hinohikari) seeds was isolated and its properties investigated. The pI value of pullulanase from seeds after 8 days of germination was almost equal to that from non-germinating seeds, which shows that these two enzymes are the same protein. Therefore, the same pullulanase may play roles in both starch synthesis during ripening and starch degradation during germination in rice seeds. The enzyme was isolated by a procedure that included ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-cellulofine column chromatography, preparative isoelectric focusing, and preparative disc gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was homogeneous by SDS/PAGE. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 100 000 based on its mobility on SDS/PAGE and 105 000 based on gel filtration with TSKgel super SW 3000, which showed that it was composed of a single unit. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 4.7. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by beta-cyclodextrin. The enzyme was not activated by thiol reagents such as dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol or glutathione. The enzyme most preferably hydrolyzed pullulan and liberated only maltotriose. The pullulan hydrolysis was strongly inhibited by the substrate at a concentration higher than 0.1%. The degree of inhibition increased with an increase in the concentration of pullulan. However, the enzyme hydrolyzed amylopectin, soluble starch and beta-limit dextrin more rapidly as their concentrations increased. The enzyme exhibited alpha-glucosyltransfer activity and produced an alpha-1,6-linked compound of two maltotriose molecules from pullulan.

  5. Genetic analysis of atypical U.S. red rice phenotypes: indications of prior gene flow in rice fields?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a troublesome weed problem in rice fields of the southern U.S. Outcrossing between rice and red rice occurs at low rates, resulting in a broad array of plant types. SSR markers were used to evaluate the genetic backgrounds of atypical red rice types obtained from rice farms in comparis...

  6. Outcrossing potential between U.S. red rice (Oryza sativa) and Chinese indica rice (Oryza sativa) lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice in southern U.S. rice fields remains a widespread, economically challenging problem despite nearly a decade of rice production systems that include true-breeding rice cultivars and indica-derived hybrid rice with resistance to imazethapyr. Both of these herbicide-resistant rice systems hav...

  7. Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) emergence characteristics and influence on rice (O. sativa) yield at different planting dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice yield losses due to red rice infestation vary by cultivar, red rice density, and duration of interference. The competition effects of red rice could be influenced further by emergence characteristics, red rice biotype, and planting time of cultivated rice. We aimed to characterize th...

  8. The Wilde analyst.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) took on the challenge of teaching us how to live artfully. From the dynamic successes and tragedies of his own life Oscar knew that everything worthy of existence is worthy of art, including its ugliness and suffering. Oscar observed much about human nature, especially his own, in an era when convention was not challenged, knowledge was taught and appearances were everything. For him, "The supreme vice is shallowness."(1) Society and psychoanalysis can still be honored and shaken by his words. The paradoxical and complex nature of Oscar's insights was as good as any coming from a thoughtful psychoanalyst. After the first two attempts to write about Oscar fell flat, it became clear that I must engage with him and try to match the unsparing commitment to explore his unconscious and interior life. In the process of creating the array of sketches of my psychoanalytic encounters with Oscar, I also found the words to describe what drew me to the field some 20 years ago-the art of psychoanalysis.

  9. OsCHX14 is Involved in the K+ Homeostasis in Rice (Oryza sativa) Flowers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Ma, Jingkun; Miller, Anthony J; Luo, Bingbing; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Zhen; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F

    2016-07-01

    Previously we showed in the osjar1 mutants that the lodicule senescence which controls the closing of rice flowers was delayed. This resulted in florets staying open longer when compared with the wild type. The gene OsJAR1 is silenced in osjar1 mutants and is a key member of the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway. We found that K concentrations in lodicules and flowers of osjar1-2 were significantly elevated compared with the wild type, indicating that K(+) homeostasis may play a role in regulating the closure of rice flowers. The cation/H(+) exchanger (CHX) family from rice was screened for potential K(+) transporters involved as many members of this family in Arabidopsis were exclusively or preferentially expressed in flowers. Expression profiling confirmed that among 17 CHX genes in rice, OsCHX14 was the only member that showed an expression polymorphism, not only in osjar1 mutants but also in RNAi (RNA interference) lines of OsCOI1, another key member of the JA signaling pathway. This suggests that the expression of OsCHX14 is regulated by the JA signaling pathway. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCHX14 protein was preferentially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. Promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) analysis of transgenic rice revealed that OsCHX14 is mainly expressed in lodicules and the region close by throughout the flowering process. Characterization in yeast and Xenopus laevis oocytes verified that OsCHX14 is able to transport K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) in vivo. Our data suggest that OsCHX14 may play an important role in K(+) homeostasis during flowering in rice.

  10. Processing Conditions, Rice Properties, Health and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Poritosh; Orikasa, Takahiro; Okadome, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR). Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR) seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled), and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43–54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society. PMID:21776212

  11. Diversity of global rice markets and the science required for consumer-targeted rice breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of different quality traits that make up the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice ...

  12. Volatiles induction in rice stink bug host grasses and rice plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice stink bug (RSB), Oebalus pugnax F., is an important pest of heading rice in the United States. Little is known about plant volatiles production following herbivory by the rice stink bug. RSB feeding induced volatiles production in different RSB host grasses and rice varieties, and may help expl...

  13. Utilization of weedy rice for development of japonica hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Ma, Dian Rong; Xu, Zheng Jin; Deng, Hua Feng; Chen, Wen Fu; Yuan, Long Ping

    2011-05-01

    Two representative weedy rice lines, three typical japonica varieties and three typical indica varieties were used for 6 pairs of reciprocal crosses. The morphological traits of twelve F(1) hybrid lines, their parents and four elite cultivars were investigated for heterosis over mid-parent (HM), over parent (HP) and competitive heterosis (CH) analysis. Traits detected in weedy rice lines seemed larger than those in cultivars and excellent heterosis was produced in weedy rice crossing with japonica rice. Although weedy rice kept closer relationships with japonica rice compared to indica rice. But the heterosis of reciprocal crosses between weedy rice and japonica was closed to those of crosses between indica rice and japonica rice. In six of one hundred and eighteen weedy rice lines, the fertility restore gene for BT type cytoplasmic male sterility (BT-CMS) were detected. Weedy rice was very valuable germplasm resources with the abundant polymorphism. Meanwhile, the disadvantage, lodging, shattering and incompact plant type, should be modified by hybridization, backcross and multiple cross with japonica rice. Although it is difficult to use weedy rice directly, weedy rice may be available to breed both male sterile line and restorer line through improvement, developing japonica hybrid rice.

  14. The impact of planting date on management of the rice water weevil in Louisiana rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus, is the most destructive insect pest of rice in the United States. Early planting of rice to avoid damaging infestations of the rice water weevil has long been suggested as a management tactic. A five-year study was conducted to characterize the influ...

  15. Genetic diversity for rice grain mineral concentrations observed among genetically and geographically giverse rice accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With about half of the world’s people dependent on rice as their main food source, improving the nutritional value of rice could have major impact on human health. While rice in the USA is often artificially fortified, natural enhancement of the rice grain’s nutritional value, i.e. from genetic impr...

  16. Melatonin promotes seminal root elongation and root growth in transgenic rice after germination.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2012-11-01

    The effect of melatonin on root growth after germination was examined in transgenic rice seedlings expressing sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT). Enhanced melatonin levels were found in T(3) homozygous seedlings because of the ectopic overexpression of sheep NAT, which is believed to be the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in animals. Compared with wild-type rice seeds, the transgenic rice seeds showed enhanced seminal root growth and an analogous number of adventitious roots 4 and 10 days after seeding on half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium. The enhanced initial seminal root growth in the transgenic seedlings matched their increased root biomass well. We also found that treatment with 0.5 and 1 μM melatonin promoted seminal root growth of the wild type under continuous light. These results indicate that melatonin plays an important role in regulating both seminal root length and root growth after germination in monocotyledonous rice plants. This is the first report on the effects of melatonin on root growth in gain-of-function mutant plants that produce high levels of melatonin.

  17. Hepatoprotective effects of rice-derived peptides against acetaminophen-induced damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Moritani, Chie; Uraji, Misugi; Fujita, Akiko; Kawakami, Koji; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Suzaki, Etsuko; Tsuboi, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Glutathione, the most abundant intracellular antioxidant, protects cells against reactive oxygen species induced oxidative stress and regulates intracellular redox status. We found that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic. However, an overdose of acetaminophen causes severe hepatotoxicity via depletion of hepatic glutathione. Here, we investigated the protective effects of rice peptides on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. ICR mice were orally administered rice peptides (0, 100 or 500 mg/kg) for seven days, followed by the induction of hepatotoxicity via intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg). Pretreatment with rice peptides significantly prevented increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels and protected against hepatic glutathione depletion. The expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key regulatory enzyme in the synthesis of glutathione, was decreased by treatment with acetaminophen, albeit rice peptides treatment recovered its expression compared to that achieved treatment with acetaminophen. In addition, histopathological evaluation of the livers also revealed that rice peptides prevented acetaminophen-induced centrilobular necrosis. These results suggest that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels and could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

  18. Variation of grain Cd and Zn concentrations of 110 hybrid rice cultivars grown in a low-Cd paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Li, Lianqing; Pan, Genxing

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced Cd uptake and Zn depletion in rice grains and high potential for food Cd exposure by the high-yielding hybrid cultivars of China had been addressed. A field experiment was conducted in 2006 to determine the difference in grain Cd and Zn between cultivars. Total 110 cultivars including super rice and common hybrid rice cultivars were grown on a single paddy soil (Entic Haplaquept) with a neutral reaction and low total Cd content. Grain Cd and Zn concentrations were determined with graphite atomic adsorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) and flame atomic adsorption spectrophotometer (AAS) respectively. Wide variation of Cd content in grain was found in a range of 0.004-0.057 mg/kg, while the Zn content in a range of 10.25-30.06 mg/kg among the cultivars. Higher Cd but lower Zn concentration in grains of super rice cultivars was observed compared to the common hybrid ones. A highly significant positive linear correlation of grain Cd/Zn with grain Cd was found for super rice and common hybrid cultivars, meanwhile much higher slope for these hybrid cultivars than the reported non-hybrid cultivars was also observed. Using the limit value of the Chinese chemical guidelines for foods (MOHC and SSC, 2005), calculated potential risk of food Cd exposure with "Zn hungry" through diet intake was prominent with all the studied 110 hybrid rice cultivars, possessing high potential health problems for rice production in South China using the super rice cultivars. Breeding of genotypes of rice cultivars with low grain Cd and low Cd/Zn ratio is needed for rice production in acidic red soils where Cd bioavailability is prevalently high.

  19. Rice protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome with transient specific IgE to boiled rice but not to retort-processed rice.

    PubMed

    Yasutomi, Motoko; Kosaka, Takuya; Kawakita, Akiko; Hayashi, Hisako; Okazaki, Shintaro; Murai, Hiroki; Miyagawa, Kazuhiko; Mayumi, Mitsufumi; Ohshima, Yusei

    2014-02-01

    Described herein is the case of an 8-month-old girl with atypical food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome due to rice. She presented with vomiting and poor general activity 2 h after ingestion of boiled rice. Oral food challenge test using high-pressure retort-processed rice was negative, but re-exposure to boiled rice elicited gastrointestinal symptoms. On western blot analysis the patient's serum was found to contain IgE bound to crude protein extracts from rice seed or boiled rice, but not from retort-processed rice. The major protein bands were not detected in the electrophoresed gel of retort-processed rice extracts, suggesting decomposition by high-temperature and high-pressure processing. Oral food challenge for diagnosing rice allergy should be performed with boiled rice to avoid a false negative. Additionally, some patients with rice allergy might be able to ingest retort-processed rice as a substitute for boiled rice.

  20. Development of a novel aluminum tolerance phenotyping platform used for comparisons of cereal aluminum tolerance and investigations into rice aluminum tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Famoso, Adam N; Clark, Randy T; Shaff, Jon E; Craft, Eric; McCouch, Susan R; Kochian, Leon V

    2010-08-01

    The genetic and physiological mechanisms of aluminum (Al) tolerance have been well studied in certain cereal crops, and Al tolerance genes have been identified in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and wheat (Triticum aestivum). Rice (Oryza sativa) has been reported to be highly Al tolerant; however, a direct comparison of rice and other cereals has not been reported, and the mechanisms of rice Al tolerance are poorly understood. To facilitate Al tolerance phenotyping in rice, a high-throughput imaging system and root quantification computer program was developed, permitting quantification of the entire root system, rather than just the longest root. Additionally, a novel hydroponic solution was developed and optimized for Al tolerance screening in rice and compared with the Yoshida's rice solution commonly used for rice Al tolerance studies. To gain a better understanding of Al tolerance in cereals, comparisons of Al tolerance across cereal species were conducted at four Al concentrations using seven to nine genetically diverse genotypes of wheat, maize (Zea mays), sorghum, and rice. Rice was significantly more tolerant than maize, wheat, and sorghum at all Al concentrations, with the mean Al tolerance level for rice found to be 2- to 6-fold greater than that in maize, wheat, and sorghum. Physiological experiments were conducted on a genetically diverse panel of more than 20 rice genotypes spanning the range of rice Al tolerance and compared with two maize genotypes to determine if rice utilizes the well-described Al tolerance mechanism of root tip Al exclusion mediated by organic acid exudation. These results clearly demonstrate that the extremely high levels of rice Al tolerance are mediated by a novel mechanism, which is independent of root tip Al exclusion.

  1. Thermal characteristics of ohmically heated rice starch and rice flours.

    PubMed

    An, H J; King, J M

    2007-01-01

    Thermal properties of conventionally and ohmically heated rice starch and rice flours at various frequencies and voltages were studied. There was an increase in gelatinization temperature for conventionally heated rice starches since they were pregelatinized and became more rigid due to starch-chain interactions. In addition, there was a decrease in enthalpy (energy needed) for conventionally and ohmically heated starches during gelatinization; thus, the samples required less energy for gelatinization during DSC analysis. Ohmically heated commercial starch showed the greatest decrease in enthalpy probably because of the greatest extent of pregelatinization through ohmic heating. Brown rice flour showed the greatest gelatinization temperature resulting from the delay of starch granule swelling by lipid and protein. Enthalpy of ohmically heated starches at 20 V/cm was the lowest, which was most likely due to the lower voltage resulting in a more complete pregelatinization from a longer heating time required to reach 100 degrees C. Ohmic treatment at 70 V/cm decreased onset gelatinization temperature of white flour; therefore, it produced rice flour that swelled faster, whereas the conventionally heated sample showed a better thermal resistance.

  2. A Rice Mutant Defective in Si Uptake1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian Feng; Tamai, Kazunori; Ichii, Masahiko; Wu, Guo Feng

    2002-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) accumulates silicon (Si) in the tops to levels up to 10.0% of shoot dry weight, but the mechanism responsible for high Si uptake by rice roots is not understood. We isolated a rice mutant (GR1) that is defective in active Si uptake by screening M2 seeds (64,000) of rice cv Oochikara that were treated with 10−3 m sodium azide for 6 h at 25oC. There were no phenotypic differences between wild type (WT) and GR1 except that the leaf blade of GR1 remained droopy when Si was supplied. Uptake experiments showed that Si uptake by GR1 was significantly lower than that by WT at both low and high Si concentrations. However, there was no difference in the uptake of other nutrients such as phosphorus and potassium. Si concentration in the xylem sap of WT was 33-fold that of the external solution, but that of GR1 was 3-fold higher than the external solution at 0.15 mm Si. Si uptake by WT was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors including NaCN and 2,4-dinitrophenol and by low temperature, whereas Si uptake by GR1 was not inhibited by these agents. These results suggest that an active transport system for Si uptake is disrupted in GR1. Analysis of F2 populations between GR1 and WT showed that roots with high Si uptake and roots with low Si uptake segregated at a 3:1 ratio, suggesting that GR1 is a recessive mutant of Si uptake. PMID:12481095

  3. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Warren; Smith, Charles F.; Eskridge, Pamela H.; Hoss, Shannon K.; Mendelson, Joseph R.; Schuett, Gordon W.

    2012-01-01

    Facultative parthenogenesis (FP)—asexual reproduction by bisexual species—has been documented in a variety of multi-cellular organisms but only recently in snakes, varanid lizards, birds and sharks. Unlike the approximately 80 taxa of unisexual reptiles, amphibians and fishes that exist in nature, FP has yet to be documented in the wild. Based on captive documentation, it appears that FP is widespread in squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards and amphisbaenians), and its occurrence in nature seems inevitable, yet the task of detecting FP in wild individuals has been deemed formidable. Here we show, using microsatellite DNA genotyping and litter characteristics, the first cases of FP in wild-collected pregnant females and their offspring of two closely related species of North American pitviper snakes—the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). Our findings support the view that non-hybrid origins of parthenogenesis, such as FP, are more common in squamates than previously thought. With this confirmation, FP can no longer be viewed as a rare curiosity outside the mainstream of vertebrate evolution. Future research on FP in squamate reptiles related to proximate control of induction, reproductive competence of parthenogens and population genetics modelling is warranted. PMID:22977071

  4. Zebrafish Social Behavior in the Wild.

    PubMed

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S; Shelton, Delia S; Shukla, Rohitashva; Roy, Tamal; Bhat, Anuradha; Martins, Emília P

    2016-02-01

    Wild zebrafish exhibit a wide range of behavior. We found abundant wild zebrafish in flowing rivers and still water, in large, tightly-knit groups of hundreds of individuals, as well as in small, loose shoals. In two still-water populations, zebrafish were quite small in body size, common, and in tight groups of up to 22 fish. As in earlier laboratory studies, these zebrafish exhibited very low levels of aggression. In slowly flowing water in central India, zebrafish were relatively rare and gathered in small shoals (4-12 fish), often with other small fish, such as Rasbora daniconius. These stream zebrafish were larger in body size (27 mm TL) and much more aggressive than those in still water. In a second river population with much faster flowing water, zebrafish were abundant and again relatively large (21 mm TL). These zebrafish occurred in very large (up to 300 individuals) and tightly-knit (nearest-neighbor distances up to 21 mm) groups that exhibited collective rheotaxis and almost no aggression. This remarkable variation in social behavior of wild zebrafish offers an opportunity for future studies of behavioral genetics, development, and neuroscience.

  5. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Sharon L.; Sher, Andrew W.; Fleck, Neil D.; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W. K.; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees. PMID:27196608

  6. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Smith, Charles F; Eskridge, Pamela H; Hoss, Shannon K; Mendelson, Joseph R; Schuett, Gordon W

    2012-12-23

    Facultative parthenogenesis (FP)-asexual reproduction by bisexual species-has been documented in a variety of multi-cellular organisms but only recently in snakes, varanid lizards, birds and sharks. Unlike the approximately 80 taxa of unisexual reptiles, amphibians and fishes that exist in nature, FP has yet to be documented in the wild. Based on captive documentation, it appears that FP is widespread in squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards and amphisbaenians), and its occurrence in nature seems inevitable, yet the task of detecting FP in wild individuals has been deemed formidable. Here we show, using microsatellite DNA genotyping and litter characteristics, the first cases of FP in wild-collected pregnant females and their offspring of two closely related species of North American pitviper snakes-the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). Our findings support the view that non-hybrid origins of parthenogenesis, such as FP, are more common in squamates than previously thought. With this confirmation, FP can no longer be viewed as a rare curiosity outside the mainstream of vertebrate evolution. Future research on FP in squamate reptiles related to proximate control of induction, reproductive competence of parthenogens and population genetics modelling is warranted.

  7. Respiration hastens maturation and lowers yield in rice.

    PubMed

    Sitaramam, V; Bhate, R; Kamalraj, P; Pachapurkar, S

    2008-07-01

    Role of respiration in plant growth remains an enigma. Growth of meristematic cells, which are not photosynthetic, is entirely driven by endogenous respiration. Does respiration determine growth and size or does it merely burn off the carbon depleting the biomass? We show here that respiration of the germinating rice seed, which is contributed largely by the meristematic cells of the embryo, quantitatively correlates with the dynamics of much of plant growth, starting with the time for germination to the time for flowering and yield. Seed respiration appears to define the quantitative phenotype that contributes to yield via growth dynamics that could be discerned even in commercial varieties, which are biased towards higher yield, despite considerable susceptibility of the dynamics to environmental perturbations. Intrinsic variation, irreducible despite stringent growth conditions, required independent validation of relevant physiological variables both by critical sampling design and by constructing dendrograms for the interrelationships between variables that yield high consensus. More importantly, seed respiration, by mediating the generation clock time via variable time for maturation as seen in rice, directly offers the plausible basis for the phenotypic variation, a major ecological stratagem in a variable environment with uncertain water availability. Faster respiring rice plants appear to complete growth dynamics sooner, mature faster, resulting in a smaller plant with lower yield. Counter to the common allometric views, respiration appears to determine size in the rice plant, and offers a valid physiological means, within the limits of intrinsic variation, to help parental selection in breeding.

  8. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus alters insect vectors' host orientation preferences to enhance spread and increase rice ragged stunt virus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Xu, Donglin; Pu, Lingling; Zhou, Guohui

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a tentative species in the genus Fijivirus (family Reoviridae), has spread rapidly and caused serious rice losses in eastern and southeastern Asia. With this virus spread, Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV, genus Oryzavirus, family Reoviridae) became more common in southern China, usually in co-infection with the former. SRBSDV and RRSV are transmitted by two different species of planthoppers, white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) and brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens), respectively, in a persistent, circulative, propagative manner. In this study, using a Y-shape olfactometer-based device, we tested the host preference of three types of macropterous WBPH adults for healthy or SRBSDV-infected rice plants. The results showed that virus-free WBPHs significantly preferred infected rice plants to healthy plants, whereas both the viruliferous and nonviruliferous WBPHs preferred healthy plants to infected plants. In additional tests, we found that the BPHs significantly preferred healthy plants when they were virus free, whereas RRSV-carrying BPHs preferred SRBSDV-infected rice plants. From these findings, we propose that plant viruses may alter host selection preference of vectors to enhance their spread and that of insects vectoring another virus to result in co-infection with more than one virus.

  9. Sago-Type Palms Were an Important Plant Food Prior to Rice in Southern Subtropical China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Barton, Huw J.; Wan, Zhiwei; Li, Quan; Ma, Zhikun; Li, Mingqi; Zhang, Dan; Wei, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Poor preservation of plant macroremains in the acid soils of southern subtropical China has hampered understanding of prehistoric diets in the region and of the spread of domesticated rice southwards from the Yangtze River region. According to records in ancient books and archaeological discoveries from historical sites, it is presumed that roots and tubers were the staple plant foods in this region before rice agriculture was widely practiced. But no direct evidences provided to test the hypothesis. Here we present evidence from starch and phytolith analyses of samples obtained during systematic excavations at the site of Xincun on the southern coast of China, demonstrating that during 3,350–2,470 aBC humans exploited sago palms, bananas, freshwater roots and tubers, fern roots, acorns, Job's-tears as well as wild rice. A dominance of starches and phytoliths from palms suggest that the sago-type palms were an important plant food prior to the rice in south subtropical China. We also believe that because of their reliance on a wide range of starch-rich plant foods, the transition towards labour intensive rice agriculture was a slow process. PMID:23667584

  10. A mutation in the rice chalcone isomerase gene causes the golden hull and internode 1 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lilan; Qian, Qian; Tang, Ding; Wang, Kejian; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2012-07-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids, important secondary plant metabolites, has been investigated extensively, but few mutants of genes in this pathway have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa). The rice gold hull and internode (gh) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown pigmentation in the hull and internode and their phenotype has long been used as a morphological marker trait for breeding and genetic study. Here, we characterized that the gh1 mutant was a mutant of the rice chalcone isomerase gene (OsCHI). The result showed that gh1 had a Dasheng retrotransposon inserted in the 5′ UTR of the OsCHI gene, which resulted in the complete loss of OsCHI expression. gh1 exhibited golden pigmentation in hulls and internodes once the panicles were exposed to light. The total flavonoid content in gh1 hulls was increased threefold compared to wild type. Consistent with the gh1 phenotype, OsCHI transcripts were expressed in most tissues of rice and most abundantly in internodes. It was also expressed at high levels in panicles before heading, distributed mainly in lemmas and paleae, but its expression decreased substantially after the panicles emerged from the sheath. OsCHI encodes a protein functionally and structurally conserved to chalcone isomerases in other species. Our findings demonstrated that the OsCHI gene was indispensable for flux of the flavonoid pathway in rice.

  11. Enhanced drought tolerance of transgenic rice plants expressing a pea manganese superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Zheng; Wang, Qing-Bin; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Su, Wei-Ai

    2005-04-01

    We investigated the role that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), an important antioxidant enzyme, may play in the drought tolerance of rice. MnSOD from pea (Pisum sativum) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter was introduced into chloroplasts of rice (Oryza sativa) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to develop drought-tolerant rice plants. Functional expression of the pea MnSOD in transgenic rice plants (T1) was revealed under drought stress induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. After PEG treatment the transgenic leaf slices showed reduced electrolyte leakage compared to wild type (WT) leaf slices, whether they were exposed to methyl viologen (MV) or not, suggesting that transgenic plants were more resistant to MV- or PEG-induced oxidative stress. Transgenic plants also exhibited less injury, measured by net photosynthetic rate, when treated with PEG. Our data suggest that SOD is a critical component of the ROS scavenging system in plant chloroplasts and that the expression of MnSOD can improve drought tolerance in rice.

  12. Optimized scorpion polypeptide LMX: a pest control protein effective against rice leaf folder.

    PubMed

    Tianpei, Xiuzi; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Lepidopteran insect pests are the main class of pests causing significant damage to crop plant yields. Insecticidal scorpion peptides exhibit toxicity specific for insects. Here, we report that a peptide LMX, optimized from the insect-specific scorpion neurotoxin LqhIT2, showed high levels of activity against rice leaf folder in vitro and in planta. Oral ingestion of LMX protein led to a significant decrease in feeding on rice leaves, repression of larval growth and development, delay in molting, and increase in larval lethality. Compared with LqhIT2 protein, the stability and insecticidal efficacy of LMX was better. Meanwhile, biochemical analysis showed that LMX protein ingestion dramatically decreased ecdysone content in rice leaf folder larvae, and down-regulated enzymatic activities of the detoxification system (α-naphthyl acetate esterase and glutathione S-transferase), the digestive system (tryptase and chymotrypsin), and the antioxidant system (catalase). These changes were tightly correlated with the dosage of LMX protein. Transgene analysis showed that the rate of leaf damage, and the number of damaged tillers and leaves in the transgenic line were greatly reduced relative to wild type plants and empty vector plants. Based on these observations, we propose that the insect-specific scorpion neurotoxin peptide LMX is an attractive and effective alternative molecule for the protection of rice from rice leaf folder.

  13. Optimized Scorpion Polypeptide LMX: A Pest Control Protein Effective against Rice Leaf Folder

    PubMed Central

    Tianpei, Xiuzi; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Lepidopteran insect pests are the main class of pests causing significant damage to crop plant yields. Insecticidal scorpion peptides exhibit toxicity specific for insects. Here, we report that a peptide LMX, optimized from the insect-specific scorpion neurotoxin LqhIT2, showed high levels of activity against rice leaf folder in vitro and in planta. Oral ingestion of LMX protein led to a significant decrease in feeding on rice leaves, repression of larval growth and development, delay in molting, and increase in larval lethality. Compared with LqhIT2 protein, the stability and insecticidal efficacy of LMX was better. Meanwhile, biochemical analysis showed that LMX protein ingestion dramatically decreased ecdysone content in rice leaf folder larvae, and down-regulated enzymatic activities of the detoxification system (α-naphthyl acetate esterase and glutathione S-transferase), the digestive system (tryptase and chymotrypsin), and the antioxidant system (catalase). These changes were tightly correlated with the dosage of LMX protein. Transgene analysis showed that the rate of leaf damage, and the number of damaged tillers and leaves in the transgenic line were greatly reduced relative to wild type plants and empty vector plants. Based on these observations, we propose that the insect-specific scorpion neurotoxin peptide LMX is an attractive and effective alternative molecule for the protection of rice from rice leaf folder. PMID:24964088

  14. Selection Under Domestication: Evidence for a Sweep in the Rice Waxy Genomic Region

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Kenneth M.; Caicedo, Ana L.; Polato, Nicholas; McClung, Anna; McCouch, Susan; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) was cultivated by Asian Neolithic farmers >11,000 years ago, and different cultures have selected for divergent starch qualities in the rice grain during and after the domestication process. An intron 1 splice donor site mutation of the Waxy gene is responsible for the absence of amylose in glutinous rice varieties. This mutation appears to have also played an important role in the origin of low amylose, nonglutinous temperate japonica rice varieties, which form a primary component of Northeast Asian cuisines. Waxy DNA sequence analyses indicate that the splice donor mutation is prevalent in temperate japonica rice varieties, but rare or absent in tropical japonica, indica, aus, and aromatic varieties. Sequence analysis across a 500-kb genomic region centered on Waxy reveals patterns consistent with a selective sweep in the temperate japonicas associated with the mutation. The size of the selective sweep (>250 kb) indicates very strong selection in this region, with an inferred selection coefficient that is higher than similar estimates from maize domestication genes or wild species. These findings demonstrate that selection pressures associated with crop domestication regimes can exceed by one to two orders of magnitude those observed for genes under even strong selection in natural systems. PMID:16547098

  15. Sago-type palms were an important plant food prior to rice in southern subtropical China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Barton, Huw J; Wan, Zhiwei; Li, Quan; Ma, Zhikun; Li, Mingqi; Zhang, Dan; Wei, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Poor preservation of plant macroremains in the acid soils of southern subtropical China has hampered understanding of prehistoric diets in the region and of the spread of domesticated rice southwards from the Yangtze River region. According to records in ancient books and archaeological discoveries from historical sites, it is presumed that roots and tubers were the staple plant foods in this region before rice agriculture was widely practiced. But no direct evidences provided to test the hypothesis. Here we present evidence from starch and phytolith analyses of samples obtained during systematic excavations at the site of Xincun on the southern coast of China, demonstrating that during 3,350-2,470 aBC humans exploited sago palms, bananas, freshwater roots and tubers, fern roots, acorns, Job's-tears as well as wild rice. A dominance of starches and phytoliths from palms suggest that the sago-type palms were an important plant food prior to the rice in south subtropical China. We also believe that because of their reliance on a wide range of starch-rich plant foods, the transition towards labour intensive rice agriculture was a slow process.

  16. New market opportunities for rice grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding efforts for rice have been focusing on increasing yield and improving quality (milling yield and grain quality), while maintaining cooked rice sensory properties to meet consumer preferences. These breeding targets will no doubt continue as the main foci for the rice industry. However, the ...

  17. Rice aroma and flavor: a literature review.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aroma and flavor of cooked rice are major criteria for preference among consumers. Small variations in these sensory properties can make rice highly desired or unacceptable to consumers. Human sensory analyses have identified over a dozen different aromas and flavors in rice. Instrumental ana...

  18. Understanding rice heterosis using deep sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterosis is a complex biological phenomenon where the offspring show better performance compared to the inbred parents. Although rice breeders have used heterosis in hybrid rice production for nearly 40 years, the genetic and molecular mechanism underlying the heterosis in rice is still poorly und...

  19. Is ALL Rice Bran Created Equal?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of whole grain rice is increasing in the U.S. This increase is likely due to increased consumer awareness of the importance of whole grains in the diet. Whole grain rice is superior nutritionally compared to milled rice because, except for carbohyrates, it contains more phytochemicals an...

  20. Campylobacter populations in wild and domesticated Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Colles, Frances M; Ali, Jan S; Sheppard, Samuel K; McCarthy, Noel D; Maiden, Martin C J

    2011-10-01

    Identifying the Campylobacter genotypes that colonize farmed and wild ducks will help to assess the proportion of human disease that is potentially attributable to the consumption of duck meat and environmental exposure to duck faeces. Comparison of temporally and geographically matched farmed and wild ducks showed that they had different Campylobacter populations in terms of: (i) prevalence, (ii) Campylobacter species and (iii) diversity of genotypes. Furthermore, 92.4% of Campylobacter isolates from farmed ducks were sequence types (STs) commonly associated with human disease, in contrast to just one isolate from the wild ducks. Only one ST, ST-45, was shared between the two sources, accounting for 0.9% of wild duck isolates and 5% of farmed duck isolates. These results indicate that domestic 'niche' as well as host type may affect the distribution of Campylobacter, and that husbandry practises associated with intensive agriculture may be involved in generating a reservoir of human disease associated lineages.

  1. Campylobacter populations in wild and domesticated Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Colles, Frances M; Ali, Jan S; Sheppard, Samuel K; McCarthy, Noel D; Maiden, Martin C J

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the Campylobacter genotypes that colonize farmed and wild ducks will help to assess the proportion of human disease that is potentially attributable to the consumption of duck meat and environmental exposure to duck faeces. Comparison of temporally and geographically matched farmed and wild ducks showed that they had different Campylobacter populations in terms of: (i) prevalence, (ii) Campylobacter species and (iii) diversity of genotypes. Furthermore, 92.4% of Campylobacter isolates from farmed ducks were sequence types (STs) commonly associated with human disease, in contrast to just one isolate from the wild ducks. Only one ST, ST-45, was shared between the two sources, accounting for 0.9% of wild duck isolates and 5% of farmed duck isolates. These results indicate that domestic ‘niche’ as well as host type may affect the distribution of Campylobacter, and that husbandry practises associated with intensive agriculture may be involved in generating a reservoir of human disease associated lineages. PMID:22164198

  2. Development of disease-resistant rice by optimized expression of WRKY45.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shingo; Sasakura-Shimoda, Fuyuko; Suetsugu, Mai; Selvaraj, Michael Gomez; Hayashi, Nagao; Yamazaki, Muneo; Ishitani, Manabu; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Matsushita, Akane; Tanabata, Takanari; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    The rice transcription factor WRKY45 plays a central role in the salicylic acid signalling pathway and mediates chemical-induced resistance to multiple pathogens, including Magnaporthe oryzae and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Previously, we reported that rice transformants overexpressing WRKY45 driven by the maize ubiquitin promoter were strongly resistant to both pathogens; however, their growth and yield were negatively affected because of the trade-off between the two conflicting traits. Also, some unknown environmental factor(s) exacerbated this problem. Here, we report the development of transgenic rice lines resistant to both pathogens and with agronomic traits almost comparable to those of wild-type rice. This was achieved by optimizing the promoter driving WRKY45 expression. We isolated 16 constitutive promoters from rice genomic DNA and tested their ability to drive WRKY45 expression. Comparisons among different transformant lines showed that, overall, the strength of WRKY45 expression was positively correlated with disease resistance and negatively correlated with agronomic traits. We conducted field trials to evaluate the growth of transgenic and control lines. The agronomic traits of two lines expressing WRKY45 driven by the OsUbi7 promoter (PO sUbi7 lines) were nearly comparable to those of untransformed rice, and both lines were pathogen resistant. Interestingly, excessive WRKY45 expression rendered rice plants sensitive to low temperature and salinity, and stress sensitivity was correlated with the induction of defence genes by these stresses. These negative effects were barely observed in the PO sUbi7 lines. Moreover, their patterns of defence gene expression were similar to those in plants primed by chemical defence inducers.

  3. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of the Tiller Suppression Gene ts1 in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Meng, Fen; He, Yonggang; Zhu, Menghao; Shen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Tiller number is one of the key factors that influences rice plant type and yield components. In this study, an EMS-induced rice tiller suppression mutant ts1 was characterized. Morphological and histological observations revealed that, in the ts1 plants, the tiller buds were abnormally formed and therefore cannot outgrow into tillers. With an F2 population derived from a cross between ts1 and an indica cultivar Wushansimiao, a major gene, tiller suppression 1 (ts1) was fine-mapped to a 108.5 kb genomic region between markers ID8378 and SSR6884 on the short arm of rice chromosome 2. Candidate gene analysis identified nineteen putative genes. Among them, ORF4 (LOC_Os02g01610) is a PPR gene which harbored a point mutation c.+733/C→T in ts1 mutant plants. A co-dominant SNP marker cd-733C/T was subsequently developed and the SNP assay demonstrated that the point mutation co-segregated with tiller suppression phenotype. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of ORF4 in ts1 plants was significantly lower than that in their wild plants, and the expression of rice tillering regulators MOC1 and HTD1 was also significantly decreased in ts1 plants. Our data indicated that ORF4 was a strong candidate gene for ts1 and ts1 might play a role in regulating rice tillering through MOC1 and HTD1 associated pathway. The results above provide a basis for further functional characterization of ts1 and will shed light on molecular mechanism of rice tillering. The informative SNP marker cd-733C/T will facilitate marker-assisted selection of ts1 in rice plant type breeding. PMID:28107441

  4. Effects of grain development on formation of resistant starch in rice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaoli; Sun, Jian; Wu, Dianxing

    2014-12-01

    Three rice mutants with different contents of resistant starch (RS) were selected to investigate the effects of grain filling process on the formation of resistant starch. During grain development, the content of RS was increased with grain maturation and showed negative correlations with the grain weight and the starch molecular weight (Mn, Mw) and a positive correlation with the distribution of molecular mass (polydispersity, Pd). The morphologies of starch granules in high-RS rice were almost uniform in single starch granules and exhibited different proliferation modes from common rice. The lower activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and starch branching enzyme and the higher activity of starch synthase and starch de-branching enzyme observed in high-RS rice might be responsible for the formation of small irregular starch granules with large spaces between them. In addition, the lower molecular weight and the broad distribution of molecular weights lead to differences in the physiochemical properties of starch.

  5. Systemic Suppression of the Shoot Metabolism upon Rice Root Nematode Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kyndt, Tina; Denil, Simon; Bauters, Lander; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Hirschmanniella oryzae is the most common plant-parasitic nematode in flooded rice cultivation systems. These migratory animals penetrate the plant roots and feed on the root cells, creating large cavities, extensive root necrosis and rotting. The objective of this study was to investigate the systemic response of the rice plant upon root infection by this nematode. RNA sequencing was applied on the above-ground parts of the rice plants at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. The data revealed significant modifications in the primary metabolism of the plant shoot, with a general suppression of for instance chlorophyll biosynthesis, the brassinosteroid pathway, and amino acid production. In the secondary metabolism, we detected a repression of the isoprenoid and shikimate pathways. These molecular changes can have dramatic consequences for the growth and yield of the rice plants, and could potentially change their susceptibility to above-ground pathogens and pests. PMID:25216177

  6. Systemic suppression of the shoot metabolism upon rice root nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Denil, Simon; Bauters, Lander; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Hirschmanniella oryzae is the most common plant-parasitic nematode in flooded rice cultivation systems. These migratory animals penetrate the plant roots and feed on the root cells, creating large cavities, extensive root necrosis and rotting. The objective of this study was to investigate the systemic response of the rice plant upon root infection by this nematode. RNA sequencing was applied on the above-ground parts of the rice plants at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. The data revealed significant modifications in the primary metabolism of the plant shoot, with a general suppression of for instance chlorophyll biosynthesis, the brassinosteroid pathway, and amino acid production. In the secondary metabolism, we detected a repression of the isoprenoid and shikimate pathways. These molecular changes can have dramatic consequences for the growth and yield of the rice plants, and could potentially change their susceptibility to above-ground pathogens and pests.

  7. Effect of post-harvest treatment on bioactive phytochemicals of Thai black rice.

    PubMed

    Norkaew, Orranuch; Boontakham, Pittayaporn; Dumri, Kanchana; Noenplab, Acharaporn Na Lampang; Sookwong, Phumon; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2017-02-15

    Because black rice is rich in antioxidants, appropriate methods of post-harvest treatment are necessary for maintaining these bioactive phytochemicals. Drying methods, storage temperatures, storage duration, and packaging methods affected the contents of some bioactive compounds in the two varieties of Thai black rice used in this research. Sun drying reduces the loss of anthocyanins and γ-oryzanols more than does hot air drying. Glutinous black rice stored as paddy at cool room temperature retains more anthocyanins, γ-oryzanols, and vitamin E than does paddy stored at room temperature. Nylon/LLDPE pouches containing N2 are the most suitable packaging for preserving the key aroma compound 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2AP), total phenolic, and anthocyanin contents of unpolished aromatic black rice. These pouches also retard the formation of some common off-flavor compounds.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a spotted leaf 32 mutant with early leaf senescence and enhanced defense response in rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liting; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Ling-long; Wang, Chunming; Gan, Ting; Zhang, Zhengyao; Wang, Yunlong; Wang, Di; Niu, Mei; Long, Wuhua; Li, Xiaohui; Zheng, Ming; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex biological process and defense responses play vital role for rice development, their molecular mechanisms, however, remain elusive in rice. We herein reported a rice mutant spotted leaf 32 (spl32) derived from a rice cultivar 9311 by radiation. The spl32 plants displayed early leaf senescence, identified by disintegration of chloroplasts as cellular evidence, dramatically decreased contents of chlorophyll, up-regulation of superoxide dismutase enzyme activity and malondialdehyde, as physiological characteristic, and both up-regulation of senescence-induced STAY GREEN gene and senescence-associated transcription factors, and down-regulation of photosynthesis-associated genes, as molecular indicators. Positional cloning revealed that SPL32 encodes a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT). Compared to wild type, enzyme activity of GOGAT was significantly decreased, and free amino acid contents, particularly for glutamate and glutamine, were altered in spl32 leaves. Moreover, the mutant was subjected to uncontrolled oxidative stress due to over-produced reactive oxygen species and damaged scavenging pathways, in accordance with decreased photorespiration rate. Besides, the mutant showed higher resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae than its wild type, coupled with up-regulation of four pathogenesis-related marker genes. Taken together, our results highlight Fd-GOGAT is associated with the regulation of leaf senescence and defense responses in rice. PMID:28139777

  9. [Liberation into the wild of wild felines--danger of the release of virus infections].

    PubMed

    Lutz, H; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Fehr, D; Leutenegger, C; Hartmann, M; Ossent, P; Grob, M; Elgizoli, M; Weilenmann, P

    1996-01-01

    There are several felidae amongst the numerous endangered species. Means of aiding survival are the reintroduction to the wild of animals bred under the auspices of man and their relocation from densely populated to thinly populated areas. It is unlikely that the dangers of such reintroduction or relocation projects have been examined sufficiently in respect to the risks of virus infections confronting individuals kept in zoos or similar situations. This report presents three examples to illustrate that accidental virus infections may be expected to occur when relocating and reintroducing wild cats. The first example is the reintroduction of captive snow leopards. Zoo bred snow leopards may be infected with FIV, a virus infection that is highly unlikely to occur in the original himalayan highlands of Tibet and China. A second example is of several cases of FIP that occurred in European wild cats bred in groups in captivity. The third example mentioned is the relocation of lions from East Africa where all the commonly known feline viruses are wide-spread to the Etosha National Park. In the latter, virus infections such as FIV, FCV and FPV do not occur. The indiscriminate relocation and reintroduction of the wild cats mentioned here harbours a potential of undesirable consequences.

  10. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes.

  11. Red Yeast Rice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu; Karl, Mitchell; Santini, Antonello

    2017-01-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR), produced by the fermentation of the Monascus purpureus mold, has been used for a long time in Asian cuisine and traditional medicine. It consists of multiple bioactive substances, including monacolins, which potentially can be used as a nutraceutical. Monacolin K, which is chemically identical to lovastatin, has been recognized as responsible for the cholesterol-reducing effect of this compound. While the European Food Safety Authority maintains that the use of monacolin K from RYR preparations of at least 10 mg can produce a normal blood cholesterol level, the United States Food and Drug Administration considers monacolin K, due to its similarity with lovastatin, an unapproved drug, and therefore marketing of products that label the monacolin content is prohibited. This mini-review summarizes the benefit of RYR in hyperlipidemia, maintains RYR use as a food, and addresses the importance of regulation regarding RYR and the need for clinical data and clear label information for consumers with reference to a toxin-free, non-augmented, standardized amount of monacolins. PMID:28257063

  12. A rice-based soluble form of a murine TNF-specific llama variable domain of heavy-chain antibody suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Abe, Michiyo; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kurokawa, Shiho; Mejima, Mio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Park, Eun Jeong; Scheller, Jürgen; Nakanishi, Ushio; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-04-10

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) plays a pivotal role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Although anti-TNF antibody therapy is now commonly used to treat patients suffering from these inflammatory conditions, the cost of treatment continues to be a concern. Here, we developed a rice transgenic system for the production of a llama variable domain of a heavy-chain antibody fragment (VHH) specific for mouse TNF in rice seeds (MucoRice-mTNF-VHH). MucoRice-mTNF-VHH was produced at high levels in the rice seeds when we used our most recent transgene-overexpression system with RNA interference technology that suppresses the production of major rice endogenous storage proteins while enhancing the expression of the transgene-derived protein. Production levels of mTNF-VHH in rice seeds reached an average of 1.45% (w/w). Further, approximately 91% of mTNF-VHH was released easily when the powder form of MucoRice-mTNF-VHH was mixed with PBS. mTNF-VHH purified by means of single-step gel filtration from rice PBS extract showed high neutralizing activity in an in vitro mTNF cytotoxicity assay using WEHI164 cells. In addition, purified mTNF-VHH suppressed progression of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. These results show that this rice-expression system is useful for the production of neutralizing VHH antibody specific for mTNF.

  13. Molecular mapping of a novel gene, Grh5, conferring resistance to green rice leafhopper (Nephotettix cincticeps Uhler) in rice, Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Daisuke; Doi, Kazuyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Yasui, Hideshi

    2006-08-01

    The green rice leafhopper (GRH), Nephotettix cincticeps Uhler, is one of the most serious insect pests affecting cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) in temperate regions of East Asia. An accession of the wild rice species, Oryza rufipogon Griff. (W1962), was found to be highly resistant to GRH by an antibiosis test. To understand the genetic basis of the GRH resistance, a BC1F1 population derived from a cross between a susceptible Japonica variety, Taichung 65 (T65), and a highly resistant accession W1962 was analyzed by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. A single major QTL for GRH resistance was detected on rice chromosome 8. A nearly isogenic population containing segments of the targeted QTL region derived from W1962 was then developed through advanced backcrossing with marker-assisted selection. Further molecular mapping using a BC4F2 population revealed that a new resistance gene, designated as Green rice leafhopper resistance 5 (Grh5), was located on the distal region of the long arm of chromosome 8 and tightly linked to the simple sequence repeat markers RM3754 and RM3761. A nearly isogenic line (NIL) carrying Grh5 was subsequently developed in the progeny of the mapping population. The resistance level of Grh5-NIL was compared with those of developed NILs for GRH resistance and was found to have the highest resistance. The DNA markers found to be closely linked to Grh5 would be useful for marker-assisted selection for the improvement of resistance to GRH in rice.

  14. Proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The modern cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has evolved from wild common beans distributed in Central America, Mexico and the Andean region of South America. It has been reported that wild common bean accessions have higher levels of protein content than the domesticated dry bean cultiva...

  15. Pen-reared fulvous tree ducks used in movement studies of wild populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flickinger, Edward L.; King, K.A.; Heyland, O.

    1973-01-01

    To obtain movement data on wild fulvous tree ducks (Dendrocygna bicolor) 165 immature pen-reared fulvous tree ducks were color-marked and released in three southeast Texas counties in July October 1969/70. Nine (5 percent) of the marked birds were recovered from 3 days to 9 months after release, and an additional 15 birds provided sight records. Many released birds apparently became integrated into the wild population; all of those observed were with wild flocks. Six birds were recovered over 50 miles from the release sites. Four released in late July to mid-September had moved eastward and two went southward in September or later. Five were still in the Texas-Louisiana rice belt (three in late November). The sixth bird was recovered in October in Veracruz, which supports the assumption that U.S. Gulf Coast nesting populations winter in southern Mexico.

  16. Rice, indica (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Indica varieties, which are generally recalcitrant to tissue culture and transformation, occupy 80 % of rice cultivation area in the world. Therefore, transformation method for indica rice must be improved greatly so that global rice production would take full advantage of cutting-edge biotechnology. An efficient protocol for indica transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens is hereby described. Immature embryos collected from plants in a greenhouse are cocultivated with A. tumefaciens after pretreatment with heat and centrifuging. The protocol was successfully tested in many elite indica cultivars such as IR8, IR24, IR58025B, IR64, IR72, Suweon 258, and Nanjing 11, yielding between 5 and 15 of independent transgenic plants per immature embryo. The use of immature embryos is recommended because gene transfer to them could be much more efficient and much less genotype dependent than gene transfer to callus.

  17. Rice epigenomics and epigenetics: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangsong; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2013-05-01

    During recent years rice genome-wide epigenomic information such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, which are important for genome activity has been accumulated. The function of a number of rice epigenetic regulators has been studied, many of which are found to be involved in a diverse range of developmental and stress-responsive pathways. Analysis of epigenetic variations among different rice varieties indicates that epigenetic modification may lead to inheritable phenotypic variation. Characterizing phenotypic consequences of rice epigenomic variations and the underlining chromatin mechanism and identifying epialleles related to important agronomic traits may provide novel strategies to enhance agronomically favorable traits and grain productivity in rice.

  18. Tillering and panicle branching genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-hong; Shang, Fei; Lin, Qun-ting; Lou, Chen; Zhang, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important staple food crops in the world, and rice tillering and panicle branching are important traits determining grain yield. Since the gene MONOCULM 1 (MOC 1) was first characterized as a key regulator in controlling rice tillering and branching, great progress has been achieved in identifying important genes associated with grain yield, elucidating the genetic basis of yield-related traits. Some of these important genes were shown to be applicable for molecular breeding of high-yielding rice. This review focuses on recent advances, with emphasis on rice tillering and panicle branching genes, and their regulatory networks.

  19. Constitutive expression of CaPLA1 conferred enhanced growth and grain yield in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Youl; Kim, Eun Yu; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipids are not only important components of cell membranes, but participate in diverse processes in higher plants. In this study, we generated Capsicum annuum phospholipiase A1 (CaPLA1) overexpressing transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants under the control of the maize ubiquitin promoter. The T4 CaPLA1-overexpressing rice plants (Ubi:CaPLA1) had a higher root:shoot mass ratio than the wild-type plants in the vegetative stage. Leaf epidermal cells from transgenic plants had more cells than wild-type plants. Genes that code for cyclin and lipid metabolic enzymes were up-regulated in the transgenic lines. When grown under typical paddy field conditions, the transgenic plants produced more tillers, longer panicles and more branches per panicle than the wild-type plants, all of which resulted in greater grain yield. Microarray analysis suggests that gene expressions that are related with cell proliferation, lipid metabolism, and redox state were widely altered in CaPLA1-overexpressing transgenic rice plants. Ubi:CaPLA1 plants had a reduced membrane peroxidation state, as determined by malondialdehyde and conjugated diene levels and higher peroxidase activity than wild-type rice plants. Furthermore, three isoprenoid synthetic genes encoding terpenoid synthase, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase were up-regulated in CaPLA1-overexpressing plants. We suggest that constitutive expression of CaPLA1 conferred increased grain yield with enhanced growth in transgenic rice plants by alteration of gene activities related with cell proliferation, lipid metabolism, membrane peroxidation state and isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  20. Iron biofortification of myanmar rice.

    PubMed

    Aung, May Sann; Masuda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Yamakawa, Takashi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency elevates human mortality rates, especially in developing countries. In Myanmar, the prevalence of Fe-deficient anemia in children and pregnant women are 75 and 71%, respectively. Myanmar people have one of the highest per capita rice consumption rates globally. Consequently, production of Fe-biofortified rice would likely contribute to solving the Fe-deficiency problem in this human population. To produce Fe-biofortified Myanmar rice by transgenic methods, we first analyzed callus induction and regeneration efficiencies in 15 varieties that are presently popular because of their high-yields or high-qualities. Callus formation and regeneration efficiency in each variety was strongly influenced by types of culture media containing a range of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid concentrations. The Paw San Yin variety, which has a high-Fe content in polished seeds, performed well in callus induction and regeneration trials. Thus, we transformed this variety using a gene expression cassette that enhanced Fe transport within rice plants through overexpression of the nicotianamine synthase gene HvNAS1, Fe flow to the endosperm through the Fe(II)-nicotianamine transporter gene OsYSL2, and Fe accumulation in endosperm by the Fe storage protein gene SoyferH2. A line with a transgene insertion was successfully obtained. Enhanced expressions of the introduced genes OsYSL2, HvNAS1, and SoyferH2 occurred in immature T2 seeds. The transformants accumulated 3.4-fold higher Fe concentrations, and also 1.3-fold higher zinc concentrations in T2 polished seeds compared to levels in non-transgenic rice. This Fe-biofortified rice has the potential to reduce Fe-deficiency anemia in millions of Myanmar people without changing food habits and without introducing additional costs.

  1. Common Mechanism Underlies Repeated Evolution of Extreme Pollution Tolerance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human alterations to the environment can exert strong evolutionary pressures, yet contemporary adaptation to human-mediated stressors is rarely documented in wild populations. A common-garden experimental design was coupled with comparative transcriptomics to discover evolved me...

  2. Objective evaluation of whiteness of cooked rice and rice cakes using a portable spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Asanome, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Keitaro; Sano, Tomoyoshi; Saito, Hiroshi; Abe, Yohei; Chuba, Masaru; Nishio, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    The whiteness of cooked rice and rice cakes was evaluated using a portable spectrophotometer with a whiteness index (WI). Also, by using boiled rice for measurement of Mido values by Mido Meter, it was possible to infer the whiteness of cooked rice without rice cooking. In the analysis of varietal differences of cooked rice, 'Tsuyahime', 'Koshihikari' and 'Koshinokaori' showed high whiteness, while 'Satonoyuki' had inferior whiteness. The whiteness of rice cakes made from 'Koyukimochi' and 'Dewanomochi' was higher than the whiteness of those made from 'Himenomochi' and 'Koganemochi'. While there was a significant correlation (r = 0.84) between WI values and whiteness scores of cooked rice by the sensory test, no correlation was detected between the whiteness scores and Mido values, indicating that the values obtained by a spectrophotometer differ from those obtained by a Mido Meter. Thus, a spectrophotometer may be a novel device for measurement of rice eating quality.

  3. The Glycemic Index of Rice and Rice Products: A Review, and Table of GI Values.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Ranawana, Viren; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the principle staple and energy source for nearly half the world's population and therefore has significant nutrition and health implications. Rice is generally considered a high glycemic index (GI) food, however, this depends on varietal, compositional, processing, and accompaniment factors. Being a major contributor to the glycemic load in rice eating populations, there is increasing concern that the rising prevalence of insulin resistance is as a result of the consumption of large amounts of rice. Devising ways and means of reducing the glycemic impact of rice is therefore imperative. This review gathers studies examining the GI of rice and rice products and provides a critical overview of the current state of the art. A table collating published GI values for rice and rice products is also included.

  4. Incorporating rice residues into paddy soils affects methylmercury accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huike; Zhong, Huan; Wu, Jialu

    2016-06-01

    Paddy fields are characterized by frequent organic input (e.g., fertilization and rice residue amendment), which may affect mercury biogeochemistry and bioaccumulation. To explore potential effects of rice residue amendment on methylmercury (MMHg) accumulation in rice, a mercury-contaminated paddy soil was amended with rice root (RR), rice straw (RS) or composted rice straw (CS), and planted with rice. Incorporating RS or CS increased grain MMHg concentration by 14% or 11%. The observed increases could be attributed to the elevated porewater MMHg levels and thus enhanced MMHg uptake by plants, as well as increased MMHg translocation to grain within plants. Our results indicated for the first time that rice residue amendment could significantly affect MMHg accumulation in rice grain, which should be considered in risk assessment of MMHg in contaminated areas.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF BIO-ETHANOL MADE FROM RICE STRAW CONSIDERING LAND OCCUPATION EFFECTS ON ECOSYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoshita, Masaharu; Yang, Cuifen; Genchi, Yutaka; Tahara, Kiyotaka; Inaba, Atsushi

    Most of rice straw produced as a byproduct is not or low utilized in Japan. However, it may be available for the production of bio-ethanol without threatening food supply because of its characteristics as one of the lignocellulosic materials. Though it has already been revealed in previous studies that bio-ethanol made from rice straw can contribute to reducing energy consumption and repressing greenhouse gas emissions, effects on ecosystem due to land occupation for rice straw production and ethanol refinery plant have not been evaluated. Thus, environmental impacts of bio-ethanol made from rice straw including effects on ecosystem caused by land occupation were evaluated in this study. Some differences among three representative assessment methods could be found in results of the effect on ecosystem due to land occupation for rice straw production and ethanol refinery plant. However, it is common among all assessment methods that the effect on ecosystem caused by land occupation dominates large part of total environmental impact of ethanol made from rice straw (72-83% of total impact). Bio-ethanol made from rice straw showed larger environmental impact compared to that of gasoline due to land occupation. The improvement of the operating rate and the productivity of ethanol refinery plants is especially necessary for repressing the environm ental impacts related to bio-ethanol production made from rice straw.

  6. Differential Gene Expression Reflects Morphological Characteristics and Physiological Processes in Rice Immunity against Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Maziah; Abdullah, Siti N. A.; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Nejat, Naghmeh; Latif, Muhammad A.

    2015-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious pathogen that jeopardises the world’s most important food-security crop. Ten common Malaysian rice varieties were examined for their morphological, physiological and genomic responses to this rice blast pathogen. qPCR quantification was used to assess the growth of the pathogen population in resistant and susceptible rice varieties. The chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were also measured to further understand the disruptive effects that M. oryzae has on infected plants of these varieties. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of eight blast resistance genes among the ten local varieties. Blast disease has destructive effects on the growth of rice, and the findings of our study provide evidence that the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes are involved in defence responses in the leaves of Malaysian rice at 31 h after inoculation with M. oryzae pathotype P7.2. Both the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were reduced, but the levels of Pikh gene expression remained constant in susceptible varieties, with a developed pathogen population and mild or severe symptoms. The Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes, however, were simultaneously upregulated in infected rice plants. Therefore, the presence of the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes in the germplasm is useful for improving the resistance of rice varieties. PMID:26001124

  7. Differential Gene Expression Reflects Morphological Characteristics and Physiological Processes in Rice Immunity against Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Mahmood, Maziah; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Nejat, Naghmeh; Latif, Muhammad A; Sahebi, Mahbod

    2015-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious pathogen that jeopardises the world's most important food-security crop. Ten common Malaysian rice varieties were examined for their morphological, physiological and genomic responses to this rice blast pathogen. qPCR quantification was used to assess the growth of the pathogen population in resistant and susceptible rice varieties. The chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were also measured to further understand the disruptive effects that M. oryzae has on infected plants of these varieties. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of eight blast resistance genes among the ten local varieties. Blast disease has destructive effects on the growth of rice, and the findings of our study provide evidence that the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes are involved in defence responses in the leaves of Malaysian rice at 31 h after inoculation with M. oryzae pathotype P7.2. Both the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were reduced, but the levels of Pikh gene expression remained constant in susceptible varieties, with a developed pathogen population and mild or severe symptoms. The Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes, however, were simultaneously upregulated in infected rice plants. Therefore, the presence of the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes in the germplasm is useful for improving the resistance of rice varieties.

  8. Impacts of seeding rate on interactions between rice and rice water weevils.

    PubMed

    Stout, M J; Harrell, D; Tindall, K V; Bond, J

    2009-10-01

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, is the most widely distributed and destructive early season insect pest of rice, Oryza sativa L., in the United States. Economic losses result primarily from feeding by the larval stage of this insect on the roots of flooded rice plants. Prior studies suggest that infestations of rice water weevil larvae are more severe at low plant densities. Moreover, because feeding by the rice water weevil reduces rice plant tillering, a process particularly important to yield at low seeding rates, infestations by weevil larvae may have a greater impact on rice yields when rice is seeded at low rates. In total, six experiments were conducted over a 3-yr period in Louisiana and Missouri to investigate the impacts of rice seeding rate on levels of infestations by, and yield losses from, the rice water weevil. An inverse relationship between seeding rate and densities of rice water weevil larvae and pupae on a per area basis was found in two of the six experiments. Furthermore, in two of the three experiments conducted with 'Bengal' (a susceptible cultivar) in Louisiana, percentages of yield loss were significantly higher at lower seeding rates than at higher seeding rates. Overall, these results indicate that rice sown at low rates is more vulnerable to infestation by rice water weevils and more susceptible to yield losses from weevil injury. The significance of these findings in light of recent trends toward the use of lower seeding rates in drill-seeded rice is discussed.

  9. OryzaGenome: Genome Diversity Database of Wild Oryza Species.

    PubMed

    Ohyanagi, Hajime; Ebata, Toshinobu; Huang, Xuehui; Gong, Hao; Fujita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Takako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Feng, Qi; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    The species in the genus Oryza, encompassing nine genome types and 23 species, are a rich genetic resource and may have applications in deeper genomic analyses aiming to understand the evolution of plant genomes. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, a flood of Oryza species reference genomes and genomic variation information has become available in recent years. This genomic information, combined with the comprehensive phenotypic information that we are accumulating in our Oryzabase, can serve as an excellent genotype-phenotype association resource for analyzing rice functional and structural evolution, and the associated diversity of the Oryza genus. Here we integrate our previous and future phenotypic/habitat information and newly determined genotype information into a united repository, named OryzaGenome, providing the variant information with hyperlinks to Oryzabase. The current version of OryzaGenome includes genotype information of 446 O. rufipogon accessions derived by imputation and of 17 accessions derived by imputation-free deep sequencing. Two variant viewers are implemented: SNP Viewer as a conventional genome browser interface and Variant Table as a text-based browser for precise inspection of each variant one by one. Portable VCF (variant call format) file or tab-delimited file download is also available. Following these SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data, reference pseudomolecules/scaffolds/contigs and genome-wide variation information for almost all of the closely and distantly related wild Oryza species from the NIG Wild Rice Collection will be available in future releases. All of the resources can be accessed through http://viewer.shigen.info/oryzagenome/.

  10. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of foodborne bacteria in wild boars (Sus scrofa) and wild deer (Cervus nippon) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Goshima, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Murakami, Mariko; Haruna, Mika; Ito, Kazuo; Yamada, Yukiko

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of wild boars and deer as reservoirs of foodborne bacteria. We investigated the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and O26, and Listeria monocytogenes isolated from wild boars and deer in Japan, from July through December 2010. Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. were isolated from 43.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 35.0-52.6) and 7.4% (95% CI: 2.8-12.1) of rectal content samples of wild boars, respectively, but not from wild deer. The most common Campylobacter species was C. lanienae and C. hyointestinalis. The nine Salmonella serovars isolated were S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Agona (three isolates), S. Narashino (two), S. Enteritidis (one), S. Havana (one), S. Infantis (one), and S. Thompson (one). Five (16%) and 6 (29%) isolates of C. lanienae and C. hyointestinalis, respectively, were resistant to enrofloxacin. STEC O157 and O26 and L. monocytogenes were isolated from 2.3% (95% CI: 0-5.0), 0.8% (95% CI: 0-2.3), and 6.1% (95% CI: 1.7-10.5) of the rectal content samples of wild deer, respectively, but not from wild boars. This first nationwide survey of the prevalence of foodborne bacteria in wild boars and wild deer in Japan suggests that consumption of meat from these animals is associated with the risk of causing infection with these bacteria in humans. Moreover, these animals are potential vehicles for distribution of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria into their habitat. The prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of such foodborne bacteria in these wild animals should be monitored periodically.

  11. Enhanced resistance to blast fungus in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by expressing the ribosome-inactivating protein α-momorcharin.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qian; Huang, Lin; Yi, Rong; Wang, Shuzhen; Ding, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea is one of the three major diseases that seriously affect the rice production. Alpha-momorcharin (α-MC), a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated from Momordica charantia seeds, has antifungal effects in vitro. In this study, the α-MC gene was constitutively expressed under the control of the 2×35S promoter in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated method. The nine transgenic plants were obtained and confirmed by PCR and RT-PCR, and the four (B2, B4, B7 and B9) of them whose copy numbers were 1, 2, 3 and 3, respectively, were shown to express the α-MC protein by Western blot. The molecular weight of α-MC in transgenic plants was approximately 38 kDa larger than the purified α-MC protein (28 kDa) in vitro. When the confirmed T1 generations were inoculated with a suspension of M. grisea spores for ten days, the lesions on leaves of transgenic plants were much lesser than those found on wild type (WT). According to the criteria of International Rice Research Institute standard, the mean values for morbidity and disease index numbers were 29.8% and 14.9%, respectively, which were lower than for WT. It is unclear whether RIPs could impact plant fitness and however our results suggest that the α-MC protein is an effective antifungal protein preventing rice blast in transgenic rice.

  12. Identification of WA-type three-line hybrid rice with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Gao, B D; Chen, H Y; Mao, J J; Cao, A X; Zhu, J G; Zhu, S F

    2012-02-01

    A real-time fluorescent PCR (RTF-PCR) was developed to detect and quantify wild abortive (WA)-type three-line hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.). The mitochondrial R₂₋₆₃₀ WA gene was reported to be closely related to male sterility in plants, and developed as a molecular maker to identify the cytoplasmic male sterility system of hybrid rice. First, we got the DNA sequence of R₂₋₆₃₀ WA gene in 17 rice species with traditional PCR. Then, a pair of specific primers (P₃, P₄) and TaqMan fluorescence probe (P₃₋₁₄) were designed based on the R₂₋₆₃₀ DNA sequence. The following RTF-PCR was performed on the 17 rice species finally. The results indicate that the probes used here are specific for three-line hybrid rice F₁ and male sterile lines. We can even identify a single hybrid seed using the probes, which confirmed that the probes can be applied to the identification and quantification of the WA-type three-line hybrid rice. In addition, the RFT-PCR system can be optimized when the annealing temperature is 60 °C and the Mg²⁺ concentration is 3.5 mmol/L.

  13. The SUI-homologous translation initiation factor eIF-1 is involved in regulation of ion homeostasis in rice.

    PubMed

    Diédhiou, C J; Popova, O V; Dietz, K-J; Golldack, D

    2008-05-01

    Halophytes survive high salinity by using complex adaptive mechanisms. In a search for novel molecular mechanisms involved in salt acclimation, transcript analyses revealed increased expression of a SUI-homologous translation initiation factor eIF-1 in the salt-tolerant grass species Festuca rubra ssp. littoralis but not in rice. Upon analysis of the cell specificity of eIF-1 transcription by in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR), predominant signals were detected in rice leaf mesophyll. To further examine the role of eIF-1 in salt tolerance, transgenic rice plants were generated that over-express this factor under the control of the CaMV-35S promoter. The eIF-1 over-expressing lines showed improved growth under salt stress that was correlated with maintenance of photosynthetic activity and reduced Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulation in leaves. The transgenic rice lines also activated expression of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. In addition, an oxidoreductase that belongs to the aldo/keto reductase family was identified as a gene with modified expression in the eIF-1 over-expressing lines, compared with wild-type rice. Our data suggest that eIF-1 has a central function in salt-stress adaptation in rice by regulating ion accumulation and the intracellular redox status.

  14. The rice (E)-beta-caryophyllene synthase (OsTPS3) accounts for the major inducible volatile sesquiterpenes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ai-Xia; Xiang, Cai-Yu; Li, Jian-Xu; Yang, Chang-Qing; Hu, Wen-Li; Wang, Ling-Jian; Lou, Yong-Gen; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2007-06-01

    Terpenoids serve as both constitutive and inducible defense chemicals in many plant species, and volatile terpenes participate in plant a indirect defense by attracting natural enemies of the herbivores. The rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome contains about 50 genes encoding putative terpene synthases (TPSs). Here we report that two of the rice sesquiterpene synthase genes, OsTPS3 and OsTPS13, encode (E)-beta-caryophyllene synthase and (E,E)-farnesol synthase, respectively. In vitro, the recombinant protein of OsTPS3 catalyzed formation of (E)-beta-caryophyllene and several other sesquiterpenes, including beta-elemene and alpha-humulene, all being components of inducible volatiles of rice plants. The transcript levels of OsTPS3 exhibit a circadian rhythm of fluctuation, and its expression was also greatly induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA). In addition, expression of OsTPS3 in transgenic plants of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in emitting high quantities of OsTPS3 products. We also overexpressed OsTPS3 in rice plants which then produced more (E)-beta-caryophyllene after MeJA treatment. Finally, we found that the MeJA-treated transgenic rice plants attracted more parasitoid wasps of Anagrus nilaparvatae than the wild-type. These results demonstrate that OsTPS3, an enzyme catalyzing the formation of volatile sesquiterpenes, plays a role in indirect defense of rice plants.

  15. Weedy (red) rice: An emerging constraint to global rice production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ongoing increases in the human population necessitate that rice will continue to be an essential aspect of food security for the 21st century. While production must increase in the coming decades to meet demand, such increases will be accompanied by diminished natural resources and rising productio...

  16. Insights into molecular mechanism of blast resistance in weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice is a serious pest in direct-seeded rice fields in the U.S. and worldwide. Under suitable conditions, weedy rice can reduce crop yields up to 70%. However, weedy rice may carry novel disease resistance genes. Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major disease wo...

  17. Detection and impact of BVDV in wild ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While BVDV is most commonly associated with cattle there is evidence, based on virus isolation and/or serology, that BVDV replicates in a wide variety of domesticated and wild ruminants including cervidae such as white tail deer, mule deer, fallow deer, elk, red deer, roe deer, and mousedeer and cap...

  18. Breeding for blast-disease-resistant and high-yield Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) mutants using low-energy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Phanchaisri, B.; Yu, L. D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam was applied on mutation induction for plant breeding of blast-disease-resistant Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105). Seeds of the wild-type rice were bombarded in vacuum by nitrogen ion beam at energy of 60-80 keV to a beam fluence range of 2 × 1016-2 × 1017 ions/cm2. The ion-bombarded rice seeds were grown in soil for 2 weeks as transplanted rice in plastic pots at 1 seedling/pot. The seedlings were then screened for blast resistance by Pyricularia grisea inoculation with 106 spores/ml concentrations. The blast-resistant rice mutant was planted up to F6 generation with the consistent phenotypic variation. The high percentage of the blast-disease-resistant rice was analyzed with DNA fingerprint. The HAT-RAPD (high annealing temperature-random amplified polymorphic DNA) marker revealed the modified polymorphism fragment presenting in the mutant compared with wild type (KDML 105). The cDNA fingerprints were investigated and the polymorphism fragment was subcloned into pGEM-T easy vector and then sequenced. The sequence of this fragment was compared with those already contained in the database, and the fragment was found to be related to the Spotted leaf protein 11 (Spl11).

  19. Ambient insect pressure and recipient genotypes determine fecundity of transgenic crop-weed rice hybrid progeny: Implications for environmental biosafety assessment.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Zhang, Hongbin; Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Xia, Hanbing; Xu, Kai; Cai, Xingxing; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Transgene introgression into crop weedy/wild relatives can provide natural selective advantages, probably causing undesirable environmental impact. The advantages are likely associated with factors such as transgenes, selective pressure, and genetic background of transgene recipients. To explore the role of the environment and background of transgene recipients in affecting the advantages, we estimated the fitness of crop-weed hybrid lineages derived from crosses between marker-free insect-resistant transgenic (Bt/CpTI) rice with five weedy rice populations under varied insect pressure. Multiway anova indicated the significant effect of both transgenes and weedy rice genotypes on the performance of crop-weed hybrid lineages in the high-insect environment. Increased fecundity was detected in most transgene-present F1 and F2 hybrid lineages under high-insect pressure, but varied among crop-weed hybrid lineages with different weedy rice parents. Increased fecundity of transgenic crop-weed hybrid lineages was associated with the environmental insect pressure and genotypes of their weedy rice parents. The findings suggest that the fitness effects of an insect-resistant transgene introgressed into weedy populations are not uniform across different environments and genotypes of the recipient plants that have acquired the transgene. Therefore, these factors should be considered when assessing the environmental impact of transgene flow to weedy or wild rice relatives.

  20. Increased α-tocotrienol content in seeds of transgenic rice overexpressing Arabidopsis γ-tocopherol methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Yun; Liu, Ru-Ru; Xu, Geng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yin; Tang, Ke-Xuan; Liang, Guo-Hua; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin E comprises a group of eight lipid soluble antioxidant compounds that are an essential part of the human diet. The α-isomers of both tocopherol and tocotrienol are generally considered to have the highest antioxidant activities. γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ-TMT) catalyzes the final step in vitamin E biosynthesis, the methylation of γ- and δ-isomers to α- and β-isomers. In present study, the Arabidopsis γ-TMT (AtTMT) cDNA was overexpressed constitutively or in the endosperm of the elite japonica rice cultivar Wuyujing 3 (WY3) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. HPLC analysis showed that, in brown rice of the wild type or transgenic controls with empty vector, the α-/γ-tocotrienol ratio was only 0.7, much lower than that for tocopherol (~19.0). In transgenic rice overexpressing AtTMT driven by the constitutive Ubi promoter, most of the γ-isomers were converted to α-isomers, especially the γ- and δ-tocotrienol levels were dramatically decreased. As a result, the α-tocotrienol content was greatly increased in the transgenic seeds. Similarly, over-expression of AtTMT in the endosperm also resulted in an increase in the α-tocotrienol content. The results showed that the α-/γ-tocopherol ratio also increased in the transgenic seeds, but there was no significant effect on α-tocopherol level, which may reflect the fact that γ-tocopherol is present in very small amounts in wild type rice seeds. AtTMT overexpression had no effect on the absolute total content of either tocopherols or tocotrienols. Taken together, these results are the first demonstration that the overexpression of a foreign γ-TMT significantly shift the tocotrienol synthesis in rice, which is one of the world's most important food crops.