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Sample records for communicate comparative effectiveness

  1. Effective Communication Modes in Multilingual Encounters: Comparing Alternatives in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mulken, Margot; Hendriks, Berna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study investigating alternative communication modes to English as a Lingua Franca. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of different modes of communication and to gain insight in communication strategies used by interlocutors to solve referential conflicts. Findings show that ELF may not necessarily be…

  2. Effective Communication Modes in Multilingual Encounters: Comparing Alternatives in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mulken, Margot; Hendriks, Berna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study investigating alternative communication modes to English as a Lingua Franca. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of different modes of communication and to gain insight in communication strategies used by interlocutors to solve referential conflicts. Findings show that ELF may not necessarily be…

  3. Congress should clarify the circumstances under which drug makers can communicate results on comparative effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Klasmeier, Coleen

    2012-10-01

    Hypothetical comparative effectiveness studies of two migraine drugs offer an opportunity to analyze the legal issues that manufacturers face in conveying to practicing physicians information from such research about prescription drugs. This information, derived from observational studies, supposedly cannot be communicated to clinicians because it does not constitute "substantial evidence" as required by law. In fact, however, the emerging effectiveness data can be included in manufacturers' communications to physicians about drugs' clinical utility through various existing channels defined by other law. This article argues that Congress should further clarify the circumstances under which such communications can occur to comply with First Amendment requirements that speech constraints be narrowly drawn, known in advance, and precise. Otherwise, the Food and Drug Administration risks losing First Amendment arguments in cases involving the agency's regulation of the communications-or "speech"-of drug manufacturers.

  4. What Are the Perceived Effects of Telecollaboration Compared to Other Communication-Scenarios with Peers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    What are the perceived effects of Telecollaboration (TC), compared to other types of communication-scenarios with peers (i.e. local peers in small groups and Erasmus students abroad)? This is the question this exploratory study tackles within a blended language learning course. The analysis of students' perceptions paints a rather contrastive…

  5. Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  6. Comparing three experiential learning methods and their effect on medical students' attitudes to learning communication skills.

    PubMed

    Koponen, Jonna; Pyörälä, Eeva; Isotalus, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous studies exploring medical students' attitudes to communication skills learning (CSL), there are apparently no studies comparing different experiential learning methods and their influence on students' attitudes. We compared medical students' attitudes to learning communication skills before and after a communication course in the data as a whole, by gender and when divided into three groups using different methods. Second-year medical students (n = 129) were randomly assigned to three groups. In group A (n = 42) the theatre in education method, in group B (n = 44) simulated patients and in group C (n = 43) role-play were used. The data were gathered before and after the course using Communication Skills Attitude Scale. Students' positive attitudes to learning communication skills (PAS; positive attitude scale) increased significantly and their negative attitudes (NAS; negative attitude scale) decreased significantly between the beginning and end of the course. Female students had more positive attitudes than the male students. There were no significant differences in the three groups in the mean scores for PAS or NAS measured before or after the course. The use of experiential methods and integrating communication skills training with visits to health centres may help medical students to appreciate the importance of CSL.

  7. Communication: comparing ab initio methods of obtaining effective U parameters for closed-shell materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuang; Carter, Emily A

    2014-03-28

    The density functional theory (DFT)+U method is an efficient and effective way to calculate the ground-state properties of strongly correlated transition metal compounds, with the effective U parameters typically determined empirically. Two ab initio methods have been developed to compute the U parameter based on either constrained DFT (CDFT) or unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) theory. Previous studies have demonstrated the success of both methods in typical open-shell materials such as FeO and NiO. In this Communication we report numerical instability issues that arise for the CDFT method when applied to closed-shell transition metals, by using ZnO and Cu2O as examples. By contrast, the UHF method behaves much more robustly for both closed- and open-shell materials, making it more suitable for treating closed-shell transition metals, as well as main group elements.

  8. Comparative cost-effectiveness of the components of a behavior change communication campaign on HIV/AIDS in North India.

    PubMed

    Sood, Suruchi; Nambiar, Devaki

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies show that exposure to entertainment-education-based mass media campaigns is associated with reduction in risk behaviors. Concurrently, there is a growing interest in comparing the cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions taking into account infrastructural and programmatic costs. In such analyses, though few in number, mass media campaigns have fared well. Using data from a mass media communication campaign in the low HIV prevalence states of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Delhi in Northern India, in this article we examine the following: (1) factors that mediate behavior change in different components of the campaign, comprising a TV drama, reality show for youth audiences, and TV spots; (2) the relative impact of campaign components on the behavioral outcome: condom use; and (3) the cost-effectiveness calculations arising from this analysis. Results suggest that recall of the TV spots and the TV drama influences behavior change and is strongly associated with interpersonal communication and positive gender attitudes. The TV drama, in spite of being the costliest, emerges as the most cost-effective component when considering the behavioral outcome of interest. The analysis of the comparative cost-effectiveness of individual campaign components provides insights into the planning of resources for communication interventions globally.

  9. A comparative study on the effectiveness of one-way printed communication versus videophone interactive interviews on health promotion.

    PubMed

    Homma, Satoki; Imamura, Haruhiko; Nakamura, Toru; Fujimura, Kaori; Ito, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Yuji; Kaneko, Ikuyo

    2016-01-01

    We performed a comparative study of a health education programme that was delivered either through one-way communication with printed media, or through interactive videophone interviews. We aimed to ascertain which mode of counselling, when used in combination with telemonitoring, is more effective at lifestyle modification intended to improve health status. Participants, who were residents of Kurihara city in Miyagi prefecture, Japan, were randomized into two groups: one group received individualized monthly documented reports (n = 33; 22 females; average age: 67.2 years), and the other received interactive videophone communication (n = 35; 22 females; average age: 65.1 years) for three months. Telemonitoring was conducted on both groups, using a pedometer, weighing scale and a sphygmomanometer. Pre- and post-intervention, anthropometric measurements and blood tests were performed; the participants also completed self-administered questionnaires. The two groups showed similar degrees of health status improvement and satisfaction levels. However, the participants in the videophone group were more aware of improvements in their lifestyles than were the participants in the document group. The individualized printed communication programme was less time-consuming compared to videophone communication. Further studies are needed to formulate a balanced protocol for a counselling-cum-telemonitoring programme that provides optimal health improvement and cost performance with the available human resources. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. A Comparative Study on Perceived Effects of Communication Networks in Acquiring International Orientations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haavelsrud, Magnus

    A study was designed to test the hypothesis that different communication stages between nations--primitive, traditional, modern, and neomodern--provide important variables for explaining differences in pre-adults' conception of war in different countries. Although the two samples used in the study were drawn from two cultures which fall into the…

  11. Teaching communication skills to hospice teams: comparing the effectiveness of a communication skills laboratory with in-person, second life, and phone role-playing.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Gillian; Ortega, Rosio; Hochstetler, Vicki; Pierson, Kristen; Lin, Peiyi; Lowes, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Communication skills are critical in hospice care but challenging to teach. Therefore, a hospice agency developed a communication skills laboratory for nurses and social workers. Learners role-played 3 common hospice scenarios. The role-play modalities were in-person, Second Life, and telephone. Learners were scored on 4 communication aspects. Learners in all modalities rated the laboratory as very effective. However, learners in the Second Life and phone modality showed greater improvements from scene 1 to 3 than those in the in-person modality. There were no significant differences in improvement between the Second Life and phone modalities. Results support the effectiveness of this communication skills laboratory while using different teaching modalities and show phone and Second Life role-plays were more effective than an in-person role-play. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Comparative cardiac effects of three hepatobiliary radiopharmacologicals in the dog: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Shani, J.; Rogel, S.; Weininger, J.; Lubin, E.

    1982-04-01

    Three hepatobiliary agents with an acetanilide-imidoacetic-acid moiety resembling that in lidocaine were investigated for their possible effects on contractility and conductivity in the heart and on arterial pressure and aortic blood flow. This was done in the light of lidocaine's numerous cardiac side effects. HIDA, BIDA, and DIPA, each with traces of decayed Tc-99m, were injected i.v. into anesthetized dogs with an A-V block, and their effects on the above parameters were followed until control levels were reestablished. Wheras lidocaine raises the diastolic threshold and prolongs the refractory period, the three agents tested do not prolong myocardial conductivity. Both HIDA and BIDA have an effect similar to that of lidocaine, but DIPA has no effect on the latter two parameters. Moreover, whereas lidocaine depresses myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and blood flow, HIDA has a less prominent effect on these parameters, and neither BIDA nor DIPA has any such effect. It is concluded that even though the effect of HIDA on the heart is milder than that of lidocaine, the effects of both BIDA and DIPA are even less pronounced, and they are less likely to cause cardiac side effects when similar doses are administered during nuclear medicine procedures.

  13. Comparative cardiac effects of three hepatobiliary radiopharmacologicals in the dog: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Shani, J.; Sarel, O.; Rogel, S.; Weininger, J.; Lubin, E.

    1982-04-01

    Three hepatobiliary agents with an acetanilide-imidoacetic-acid moiety resembling that in lidocaine were investigated for their possible effects on contractility and conductivity in the heart and on arterial pressure and aortic blood flow. This was done in the light of lidocaine's numerous cardiac side effects. HIDA, BIDA, and DIPA, each with traces of decayed /sup 99m/Tc, were injected i.v. into anesthetized dogs with an A-V block, and their effects on the above parameters were followed until control levels were reestablished. Whereas lidocaine raises the diastolic threshold and prolongs the refractory period, the three agents tested do not prolong myocardial conductivity. Both HIDA and BIDA have an effect similar to that of lidocaine, but DIPA has no effect on the latter two parameters. Moreover, whereas lidocaine depressed myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and blood flow, HIDA has a less prominent effect on these parameters, and neither BIDA nor DIPA has any such effect. It is concluded that even though the effect of HIDA on the heart is milder than that of lidocaine, the effects of both BIDA and DIPA are even less pronounced, and they are less likely to cause cardiac side effects when similar doses are administered during nuclear medicine procedures.

  14. Comparative Efficacy of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) versus a Speech-Generating Device: Effects on Requesting Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boesch, Miriam C.; Wendt, Oliver; Subramanian, Anu; Hsu, Ning

    2013-01-01

    An experimental, single-subject research study investigated the comparative efficacy of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) versus a speech-generating device (SGD) in developing requesting skills for three elementary-age children with severe autism and little to no functional speech. Results demonstrated increases in requesting…

  15. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  16. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  17. Communicating tobacco product harm: Compared to what?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Annette R; Suls, Jerry M; Klein, William M P

    2016-01-01

    With the expansion of tobacco product options, a better understanding is needed of how information about the known and unknown risks of products is communicated to the public. Engaging in comparative processes is an common way for people to understand novel products, but the referent of comparison matters and can influence perceptions and behavior. This paper builds awareness of research from other disciplines, including decision science, marketing, and psychology, which can help inform research and tobacco control efforts.

  18. Communicating tobacco product harm: Compared to what?

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Annette R.; Suls, Jerry M.; Klein, William M.P.

    2015-01-01

    With the expansion of tobacco product options, a better understanding is needed of how information about the known and unknown risks of products is communicated to the public. Engaging in comparative processes is an common way for people to understand novel products, but the referent of comparison matters and can influence perceptions and behavior. This paper builds awareness of research from other disciplines, including decision science, marketing, and psychology, which can help inform research and tobacco control efforts. PMID:26162963

  19. The Effect of Communication Skills Training by Video Feedback Method on Clinical Skills of Interns of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Compared to Didactic Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Managheb, S. E.; Zamani, A.; Shams, B.; Farajzadegan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective communication is essential to the practice of high-quality medicine. There are methodological challenges in communication skills training. This study was performed in order to assess the educational benefits of communication skills training by video feedback method versus traditional formats such as lectures on clinical…

  20. The Effect of Communication Skills Training by Video Feedback Method on Clinical Skills of Interns of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Compared to Didactic Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Managheb, S. E.; Zamani, A.; Shams, B.; Farajzadegan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective communication is essential to the practice of high-quality medicine. There are methodological challenges in communication skills training. This study was performed in order to assess the educational benefits of communication skills training by video feedback method versus traditional formats such as lectures on clinical…

  1. Alleviating Communication Apprehension through Rational Emotive Therapy: A Comparative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Arden K.; Dodd, Carley H.

    Albert Ellis's Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), which assumes that a person can change an emotional disturbance by discovering and disputing the irrational ideas giving rise to that emotion, has been used effectively in treating public speaking anxiety. To compare RET with other treatments for communication apprehension, 52 high communication…

  2. Peer role-play and standardised patients in communication training: a comparative study on the student perspective on acceptability, realism, and perceived effect

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess the student perspective on acceptability, realism, and perceived effect of communication training with peer role play (RP) and standardised patients (SP). Methods 69 prefinal year students from a large German medical faculty were randomly assigned to one of two groups receiving communication training with RP (N = 34) or SP (N = 35) in the course of their paediatric rotation. In both groups, training addressed major medical and communication problems encountered in the exploration and counselling of parents of sick children. Acceptability and realism of the training as well as perceived effects and applicability for future parent-physician encounters were assessed using six-point Likert scales. Results Both forms of training were highly accepted (RP 5.32 ± .41, SP 5.51 ± .44, n.s.; 6 = very good, 1 = very poor) and perceived to be highly realistic (RP 5.60 ± .38, SP 5.53 ± .36, n.s.; 6 = highly realistic, 1 = unrealistic). Regarding perceived effects, participation was seen to be significantly more worthwhile in the SP group (RP 5.17 ± .37, SP 5.50 ± .43; p < .003; 6 = totally agree, 1 = don't agree at all). Both training methods were perceived as useful for training communication skills (RP 5.01 ± .68, SP 5.34 ± .47; 6 = totally agree; 1 = don't agree at all) and were considered to be moderately applicable for future parent-physician encounters (RP 4.29 ± 1.08, SP 5.00 ± .89; 6 = well prepared, 1 = unprepared), with usefulness and applicability both being rated higher in the SP group (p < .032 and p < .009). Conclusions RP and SP represent comparably valuable tools for the training of specific communication skills from the student perspective. Both provide highly realistic training scenarios and warrant inclusion in medical curricula. Given the expense of SP, deciding which method to employ should be carefully weighed up. From the perspective of the students in our study, SP were seen as a more useful and more applicable tool than RP

  3. Communication and Affect: A Comparative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, Thomas, Ed.; And Others

    These seven original essays by noted behavioral scientists were prepared for a symposium held at Eridale College (University of Toronto), and concern the causes, functions, and dysfunctions of human affective communication. The empirical findings and theoretical statements in the essays provide a framework for development of a psychological…

  4. Communication and Affect: A Comparative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, Thomas, Ed.; And Others

    These seven original essays by noted behavioral scientists were prepared for a symposium held at Eridale College (University of Toronto), and concern the causes, functions, and dysfunctions of human affective communication. The empirical findings and theoretical statements in the essays provide a framework for development of a psychological…

  5. Effective communication with older adults.

    PubMed

    Daly, Louise

    2017-06-07

    Communication is an essential aspect of life, yet it can be taken for granted. Its centrality to being in the world and in professional practice often becomes evident when nurses and older adults encounter communication difficulties. The factors that can affect nurses' communication with older adults relate to the older adult, the nurse, sociocultural considerations and the environment, and the interactions between these factors. In adopting a person-centred approach to communicating with older adults, it is necessary to get to know the person as an individual and ensure communication meets their needs and abilities. Effective communication is essential in nursing practice and requires professional competence and engagement. This article can be used by nurses to support effective communication with older adults across the continuum of care.

  6. A Critical Reflection on Comparative Communication Research Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Myung Koo

    This paper examines the unresolved epistemological and theoretical problems in comparative communication research. The first section examines what "comparative" means by reviewing various fields in the social sciences. The second section provides an overview of epistemic assumptions of comparative communication research and suggests that in the…

  7. A Critical Reflection on Comparative Communication Research Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Myung Koo

    This paper examines the unresolved epistemological and theoretical problems in comparative communication research. The first section examines what "comparative" means by reviewing various fields in the social sciences. The second section provides an overview of epistemic assumptions of comparative communication research and suggests that in the…

  8. Strategies for communicating contraceptive effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lopez, L M; Steiner, M J; Grimes, D A; Schulz, K F

    2008-04-16

    Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness is crucial to making an informed choice. The consumer has to comprehend the pros and cons of the contraceptive methods being considered. Choice may be influenced by understanding the likelihood of pregnancy with each method and factors that influence effectiveness. To review all randomized controlled trials comparing strategies for communicating to consumers the effectiveness of contraceptives in preventing pregnancy. We searched the computerized databases MEDLINE, POPLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and EMBASE for studies of communicating contraceptive effectiveness. We also examined references lists of relevant articles, and wrote to known investigators for information about other published or unpublished trials. We included randomized controlled trials that compared methods for communicating contraceptive effectiveness to consumers. The comparison could be usual practice or an alternative to the experimental intervention. Data were abstracted by two authors and entered into RevMan. For dichotomous variables, the Peto odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was calculated. For continuous variables, the weighted mean difference (WMD) was computed. Five trials met the inclusion criteria. In one study, knowledge gain favored a slide-and-sound presentation versus a physician's oral presentation (WMD -19.00; 95% CI -27.52 to -10.48). Another trial showed a table with effectiveness categories led to more correct answers than one based on numbers [ORs were 2.42 (95% CI 1.43 to 4.12) and 2.19 (95% CI 1.21 to 3.97)] or a table with categories and numbers [ORs were 2.58 (95% CI 1.5 to 4.42) and 2.03 (95% CI 1.13 to 3.64)]. One trial examined contraceptive choice: women in the expanded program were more likely to choose sterilization (OR 4.26; 95% CI 2.46 to 7.37) or use a modern contraceptive method (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.82 to 3.03). No trial had an explicit theoretical base, but each used concepts from common theories or models. We

  9. The effects of two EFL (English as a foreign language) teaching approaches studied by the cotwin control method: a comparative study of the communicative and the grammatical approaches.

    PubMed

    Ando, J

    1992-01-01

    The present study compared two different types of English-language teaching approaches, the grammatical approach (GA) and the communicative approach (CA), by the cotwin control method. This study has two purposes: to study the effects of teaching approaches and to estimate genetic influences upon learning aptitudes. Seven pairs of identical twins (MZ) and 4 pairs of fraternal twins (DZ) participated in the experiment along with 68 other nontwin fifth graders. Each cotwin was assigned to the GA and CA respectively and received 20 hours of lessons over a 10-day period. The behavioral similarities between MZ cotwins were statistically and descriptively depicted. No major effect of either teaching approach was noted, but the genetic influence upon individual differences of learning achievement was obvious. Furthermore, an interesting interaction between the teaching approaches and intelligence was found, that is, that the GA capitalises on and CA compensates for intelligence. This interactional pattern could be interpreted as an example of genotype-environment interaction. The relationship between genetic factors and learning aptitudes is discussed.

  10. State synergies and disease surveillance: creating an electronic health data communication model for cancer reporting and comparative effectiveness research in kentucky.

    PubMed

    Reams, Christopher; Powell, Mallory; Edwards, Rob

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes the collaboration between a state public health department, a major research university, and a health extension service funded as part of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act to establish an interoperable health information system for disease surveillance through electronic reporting of systemic therapy data from numerous oncology practices in Kentucky. The experience of the Kentucky cancer surveillance system can help local and state entities achieve greater effectiveness in designing communication efforts to increase usage of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information exchanges (HIEs), help eligible clinicians meet these new standards in patient care, and conduct disease surveillance in a learning health system. We document and assess the statewide efforts of early health information technology (HIT) adopters in Kentucky to facilitate the nation's first electronic transmission of a clinical document architecture (CDA) from a physician office to a state cancer surveillance registry in November 2012. Successful transmission of the CDA not only represented a landmark for technology innovators, informaticists, and clinicians, but it also set in motion a new communication mechanism by which state and federal agencies can capture and trade vital cancer statistics in a way that is safe, secure, and timely. The corresponding impact this has on cancer surveillance and comparative effective research is immense. With guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Kentucky Cancer Registry (KCR), the Kentucky Health Information Exchange (KHIE), and the Kentucky Regional Extension Center (KREC) have moved one step further in transforming the interoperable health environment for improved disease surveillance. This case study describes the efforts of established and reputable agencies, including the KCR, the state department of health, state and federal governmental

  11. Communicating more effectively.

    PubMed

    Kline, C; Leedy, J A; Riedemann, G

    1991-01-01

    Communicating is something people take for granted. But some organizations have still not learned that information should not be a closely guarded commodity, but something to be shared freely. To be productive, employees must know the organization's goals and constraints. Managers must develop an early warning system so little problems do not grow into big ones. They must be able to assess their employees' morale and prevent personality problems from getting out of hand. In this issue, we asked some top communicators for their tips on promoting better information exchange.

  12. Promoting Effective Communications with Paraeducators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickett, Anna Lou; And Others

    This conference presentation on promoting effective communications with paraeducators working in special education consists of 13 distinct text items. The items deal with: (1) definition of paraeducators and the roles of teachers in working with paraeducators in inclusive classrooms; (2) the importance of teacher-paraeducator communication; (3)…

  13. Effective Communication. Successful Living Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This module on effective communication is one of a series of modules designed to help teach students to become more self-sufficient in their personal and professional lives. This module contains teacher and student materials that are planned to help students become more relaxed, prepared, and confident when using written and verbal communications.…

  14. Linguistic Communication: A Comparative Field Study. Esperanto Document 46A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piron, Claude

    This paper explores the various options available for dealing with the demands and costs of communication in a world of many languages. Globalization has increased the demand for language services necessary to accomplish effective communication. It is argued that the day is not far off when the complications, costs, and inequalities of language…

  15. Comparative analysis of nonverbal interpersonal communication of schizophrenics and normals.

    PubMed

    Hardin, S B

    1980-06-01

    The nonverbal communications of schizophrenics and normals in dyadic interactions were analyzed and compared. Twelve purposively selected women were videotaped in normal-normal, normal-schizophrenic, and schizophrenic-schizophrenic communication acts for 30 minutes. Using a PLATO IV computer program and a modified Kendon Kinesic Notation System, a priori sets of nonverbal behaviors were recorded at 1-second intervals. Frequency and duration scores for the sets of nonverbal behaviors with corresponding communication meanings were totaled. A nested analysis of variance showed that the three groups differed significantly (p less than .05) in engagement and defensiveness and that the normal interactors were the least imitative of the three groups. An analysis and description of the patterns of nonverbal communication also revealed differences, lending support to the theory of dysjunctive schizophrenic communication.

  16. The Language of Library Leadership: Effective Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Charles D.

    This paper examines the role of communication in library leadership. The discussion is organized into 14 sections: (1) multidimensional approaches to effective leadership communication and varying communication style to the situation; (2) the importance of conciseness; (3) streamlining library communication; (4) the vision being communicated by…

  17. Strategies for communicating contraceptive effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Laureen M; Steiner, Markus; Grimes, David A; Hilgenberg, Deborah; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2013-04-30

    Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness is crucial to making an informed choice. The consumer has to comprehend the pros and cons of the contraceptive methods being considered. Choice may be influenced by understanding the likelihood of pregnancy with each method and factors that influence effectiveness. To review all randomized controlled trials comparing strategies for communicating to consumers the effectiveness of contraceptives in preventing pregnancy. Through February 2013, we searched the computerized databases of MEDLINE, POPLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO and CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. Previous searches also included EMBASE. We also examined references lists of relevant articles. For the initial review, we wrote to known investigators for information about other published or unpublished trials. We included randomized controlled trials that compared methods for communicating contraceptive effectiveness to consumers. The comparison could be usual practice or an alternative to the experimental intervention.Outcome measures were knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness, attitude about contraception or toward any particular contraceptive, and choice or use of contraceptive method. For the initial review, two authors independently extracted the data. One author entered the data into RevMan, and a second author verified accuracy. For the update, an author and a research associate extracted, entered, and checked the data.For dichotomous variables, we calculated the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous variables, we computed the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. Seven trials met the inclusion criteria and had a total of 4526 women. Five were multi-site studies. Four trials were conducted in the USA, while Nigeria and Zambia were represented by one study each, and one trial was done in both Jamaica and India.Two trials provided multiple sessions for participants. In one study that examined contraceptive choice, women in

  18. Communication Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abkarian, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    This literature review addresses studies of speech, language, and communication skills evidenced by children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects. Concomitant physical, behavioral, intellectual, and learning patterns are reviewed, and symptoms presented by alcohol-exposed children are compared to those seen in other…

  19. Communication Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abkarian, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    This literature review addresses studies of speech, language, and communication skills evidenced by children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects. Concomitant physical, behavioral, intellectual, and learning patterns are reviewed, and symptoms presented by alcohol-exposed children are compared to those seen in other…

  20. Pair Interactions and Mode of Communication: Comparing Face-to-Face and Computer Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Lan Liana; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

    2010-01-01

    In today's second language classrooms, students are often asked to work in pairs or small groups. Such collaboration can take place face-to-face, but now more often via computer mediated communication. This paper reports on a study which investigated the effect of the medium of communication on the nature of pair interaction. The study involved…

  1. Comparing Audio and Video Data for Rating Communication

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristine; Herman, Ruth; Bontempo, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Video recording has become increasingly popular in nursing research, adding rich nonverbal, contextual, and behavioral information. However, benefits of video over audio data have not been well established. We compared communication ratings of audio versus video data using the Emotional Tone Rating Scale. Twenty raters watched video clips of nursing care and rated staff communication on 12 descriptors that reflect dimensions of person-centered and controlling communication. Another group rated audio-only versions of the same clips. Interrater consistency was high within each group with ICC (2,1) for audio = .91, and video = .94. Interrater consistency for both groups combined was also high with ICC (2,1) for audio and video = .95. Communication ratings using audio and video data were highly correlated. The value of video being superior to audio recorded data should be evaluated in designing studies evaluating nursing care. PMID:23579475

  2. Comparing audio and video data for rating communication.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristine; Herman, Ruth; Bontempo, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Video recording has become increasingly popular in nursing research, adding rich nonverbal, contextual, and behavioral information. However, benefits of video over audio data have not been well established. We compared communication ratings of audio versus video data using the Emotional Tone Rating Scale. Twenty raters watched video clips of nursing care and rated staff communication on 12 descriptors that reflect dimensions of person-centered and controlling communication. Another group rated audio-only versions of the same clips. Interrater consistency was high within each group with Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) (2,1) for audio .91, and video = .94. Interrater consistency for both groups combined was also high with ICC (2,1) for audio and video = .95. Communication ratings using audio and video data were highly correlated. The value of video being superior to audio-recorded data should be evaluated in designing studies evaluating nursing care.

  3. Effective communication during difficult conversations.

    PubMed

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2013-06-01

    A strong interest and need exist in the workplace today to master the skills of conducting difficult conversations. Theories and strategies abound, yet none seem to have found the magic formula with universal appeal and success. If it is such an uncomfortable skill to master is it better to avoid or initiate such conversations with employees? Best practices and evidence-based management guide us to the decision that quality improvement dictates effective communication, even when difficult. This brief paper will offer some suggestions for strategies to manage difficult conversations with employees. Mastering the skills of conducting difficult conversations is clearly important to keeping lines of communication open and productive. Successful communication skills may actually help to avert confrontation through employee engagement, commitment and appropriate corresponding behavior

  4. Space weather effects on communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    In the 150 years since the advent of the first electrical communication system - the electrical telegraph - the diversity of communications technologies that are embedded within space-affected environments have vastly increased. The increasing sophistication of these communications technologies, and how their installation and operations may relate to the environments in which they are embedded, requires ever more sophisticated understanding of natural physical phenomena. At the same time, the business environment for most present-day communications technologies that are affected by space phenomena is very dynamic. The commercial and national security deployment and use of these technologies do not wait for optimum knowledge of possible environmental effects to be acquired before new technological embodiments are created, implemented, and marketed. Indeed, those companies that might foolishly seek perfectionist understanding of natural effects can be left behind by the marketplace. A well-considered balance is needed between seeking ever deeper understanding of physical phenomena and implementing `engineering' solutions to current crises. The research community must try to understand, and operate in, this dynamic environment.

  5. Using Comparative Risk Surveys in Environmental Communication Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Travis

    2006-01-01

    Using student-generated comparative risk surveys in environmental communication pedagogy has been helpful in achieving specified learning objectives: to describe (1) the influence of socioeconomic, political, and scientific factors in the social construction of environmental problems; (2) the role risk perception plays in defining environmental…

  6. Delivering effective science communication: advice from a professional science communicator.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Sam

    2017-10-01

    Science communication is becoming ever more prevalent, with more and more scientists expected to not only communicate their research to a wider public, but to do so in an innovative and engaging manner. Given the other commitments that researchers and academics are required to fulfil as part of their workload models, it is unfair to be expect them to also instantly produce effective science communication events and activities. However, by thinking carefully about what it is that needs to be communicated, and why this is being done, it is possible to develop high-quality activities that are of benefit to both the audience and the communicator(s). In this paper, I present some practical advice for developing, delivering and evaluating effective science communication initiatives, based on over a decade of experience as being a professional science communicator. I provide advice regarding event logistics, suggestions on how to successfully market and advertise your science communication initiatives, and recommendations for establishing effective branding and legacy. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Photographic handbook for comparing burned and unburned sites within a dry forested and grassland mosiac: a tool for communication, calibration, and monitoring post-fire effects

    Treesearch

    Theresa Jain; Molly Juillerat; Jonathan Sandquist; Mike Ford; Brad Sauer; Robert Mitchell; Scott McAvoy; Justin Hanley; Jon David

    2007-01-01

    This photograph handbook describes characteristics and burn severity of a dry forested and grassland mosaic that burned within the last decade. We show photographs of different burned and unburned sites to help compare fire occurrence in similar stands. The handbook provides local land managers with a quick, inexpensive, and efficient way to evaluate effects of...

  8. Effectively executing a comprehensive marketing communication strategy.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Taylor, Jan; Piccirilli, Ami; Cundiff, Lee; Britt, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Marketers are under increasing scrutiny from their management to demonstrate accountability for the resources they receive. Three models are presented to help marketers execute their customer communication activities more effectively. Benefits of using the "Identification of Strategic Communication Elements," "Business Communication" and "Communications Management Process" models include (1) more effective upfront strategic and tactical planning, (2) ensuring key communication principles are addressed, (3) easier communication program communication, (4) provides a framework for program evaluation and market research and (5) increases the creative thinking marketers need when addressing the major marketing challenges. The ultimate benefit is the greater likelihood of more positive marketing results.

  9. Communicate and Motivate: The School Leader's Guide to Effective Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arneson, Shelly

    2011-01-01

    Develop the skills you need to communicate effectively and in ways that motivate your faculty towards success. Written especially for principals and other administrators, this book will empower you to communicate well as you work to promote a student-centered environment best suited to schoolwide achievement. Learn to approach one-on-one…

  10. [Doctor patient communication: which skills are effective?].

    PubMed

    Moore, Philippa; Gómez, Gricelda; Kurtz, Suzanne; Vargas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Effective Communication Skills form part of what is being a good doctor. There is a solid evidence base that defines the components of effective communication. This article offers a practical conceptual framework to improve physician patient communication to a professional level of competence. There are six goals that physicians and patients work to achieve through their communication with each other. These are to construct a relationship, structure an interview, start the interview, gather information, explain, plan and close the interview. The outcomes that can be improved with an effective communication and the "first principles" of communication are described. A brief look at the historical context that has influenced our thinking about communication in health care is carried out. Finally, the Calgary Cambridge Guide, an approach for delineating and organizing the specific skills required of an effective communication with patients is described. It is clear from the literature that better communication skills improve patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes.

  11. Multimedia Astronomy Communication: Effectively Communicate Astronomy to the Desired Audience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star Cartier, Kimberly Michelle; Wright, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of our jobs as scientists is communicating our work to others. In this, the field of astronomy holds the double-edged sword of ubiquitous fascination: the topic has been of interest to nearly the entire global population at some point in their lives, yet the learning curve is steep within any subfield and rife with difficult-to-synthesize details. Compounding this issue is the ever-expanding array of methods to reach people in today's Communications Era. Each communication medium has its own strengths and weaknesses, is appropriate in different situations, and requires its own specific skillset in order to maximize its functionality. Despite this, little attention is given to training astronomers in effective communication techniques, often relying on newcomers to simply pick up the ability by mimicking others and assuming that a firm grasp on the subject matter will make up for deficiencies in communication theory. This can restrict astronomers to a narrow set of communication methods, harming both the communicators and the audience who may struggle to access the information through those media.Whether writing a research paper to academic peers or giving an astronomy talk to a pubic audience, successfully communicating a scientific message requires more than just an expert grasp on the topic. A communicator must understand the makeup and prior knowledge of the desired audience, be able to break down the salient points of the topic into pieces that audience can digest, select and maximize upon a medium to deliver the message, and frame the message in a way that hooks the audience and compels further interest. In this work we synthesize the requirements of effective astronomy communication into a few key questions that every communicator needs to answer. We then discuss some of the most common media currently used to communicate astronomy, give both effective and poor examples of utilizing these media to communicate astronomy, and provide key

  12. The Effect of Context on Communicative Intent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lougeay-Mottinger, Janice; And Others

    This study examined the effect of various intervention contexts on the ability of young children (ages 3 and 4 years) with language impairments to effectively direct communications to a partner and to vary communicative intentions. The six children in the study were either nonverbal or in the early stages of developing verbal communication and all…

  13. Effective communication skills in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bramhall, Elaine

    2014-12-09

    This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  14. Developing Effective Interpersonal Communication and Discussion Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Karl L.; Featheringham, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Regardless of the content specialty--from accounting to information systems to finance--employers view effective communication as critical to an individual's success in today's competitive workplace. Most business degree programs require a business communication course to help students develop communication skills needed both in getting a job and…

  15. Developing Effective Interpersonal Communication and Discussion Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Karl L.; Featheringham, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Regardless of the content specialty--from accounting to information systems to finance--employers view effective communication as critical to an individual's success in today's competitive workplace. Most business degree programs require a business communication course to help students develop communication skills needed both in getting a job and…

  16. Effective communication and teamwork promotes patient safety.

    PubMed

    Gluyas, Heather

    2015-08-05

    Teamwork requires co-operation, co-ordination and communication between members of a team to achieve desired outcomes. In industries with a high degree of risk, such as health care, effective teamwork has been shown to achieve team goals successfully and efficiently, with fewer errors. This article introduces behaviours that support communication, co-operation and co-ordination in teams. The central role of communication in enabling co-operation and co-ordination is explored. A human factors perspective is used to examine tools to improve communication and identify barriers to effective team communication in health care.

  17. Counselor Effectiveness Through Radio Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This study determined the effectiveness of the use of radio as a means of providing immediate feedback on student counselors in a practicum setting. Using a non-equivalent group experimental design, 10 experimental subjects were compared to 10 control subjects with respect to counselor effectiveness. The experimental subjects were given immediate…

  18. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  19. Shared identity is key to effective communication.

    PubMed

    Greenaway, Katharine H; Wright, Ruth G; Willingham, Joanne; Reynolds, Katherine J; Haslam, S Alexander

    2015-02-01

    The ability to communicate with others is one of the most important human social functions, yet communication is not always investigated from a social perspective. This research examined the role that shared social identity plays in communication effectiveness using a minimal group paradigm. In two experiments, participants constructed a model using instructions that were said to be created by an ingroup or an outgroup member. Participants made models of objectively better quality when working from communications ostensibly created by an ingroup member (Experiments 1 and 2). However, this effect was attenuated when participants were made aware of a shared superordinate identity that included both the ingroup and the outgroup (Experiment 2). These findings point to the importance of shared social identity for effective communication and provide novel insights into the social psychology of communication. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  20. The Role of Communication in Effective Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolle, Joni R.

    Suggesting that the old saying "It's not what you say, it's how you say it" rings true for one educational leader, a Speech Pathologist, keenly aware of the necessity of effective communication and its impact on leadership. Possessing the quality of effective communication makes for a high quality leader because it enables one to express ideas…

  1. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  2. Communication skills training: effects on attitudes toward communication skills and empathic tendency.

    PubMed

    Harlak, H; Gemalmaz, A; Gurel, F S; Dereboy, C; Ertekin, K

    2008-07-01

    This study explored and compared medical students' attitudes toward communication skills and empathic tendency before and after communication skills training. Fifty-nine first-year students voluntarily completed a questionnaire consisting of the Communication Skills Attitudes Scale and the Empathic Tendency Scale before and after training. K-means cluster analysis and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis. In the pre-test, 49% of the students had positive attitudes toward communication skills learning and 59% had higher empathic tendencies. In post-test, the mean score in the positive attitude group decreased significantly, whereas there was no change in the negative attitude group. In the high empathy group, empathy scores did not change significantly after training; however, in the low empathy group, empathic tendency significantly increased. As students' low empathic tendency level became higher and positive attitudes toward communication skills learning significantly changed in a negative direction after training, we observed that our training programme seems to have an effect that makes students similar to each other in terms of their empathic tendency and attitudes toward communication skills learning. Women had more positive attitudes toward communication skills and their empathic tendencies were higher than men's. Our findings suggest that our curriculum is in need of further examination and modification. Future studies with larger samples are needed to investigate the effects of communication skills training on students' attitudes.

  3. On the Need for the Comparative Study of Communication: Some Conceptual and Methodological Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetzinger, Charles; Rummel, Lynda

    A comparative approach to the study of communication can be seen as extremely valuable for a thorough understanding of human communication. In its broadest sense, communication is a biological phenomenon, defined as the interchange of information between an organism and its environment. Communication systems of living organisms differ…

  4. Information and Language for Effective Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitoy, Sammy P.

    2012-01-01

    Information and Language for Effective Communication (ILEC) is a language teaching approach emphasizing learners' extensive exposure in different language communicative sources. In ILEC, the language learners will first receive instructions of ILEC principles and application. Afterwards, they will receive autonomous, direct, purposeful, and…

  5. Information and Language for Effective Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitoy, Sammy P.

    2012-01-01

    Information and Language for Effective Communication (ILEC) is a language teaching approach emphasizing learners' extensive exposure in different language communicative sources. In ILEC, the language learners will first receive instructions of ILEC principles and application. Afterwards, they will receive autonomous, direct, purposeful, and…

  6. An Evaluation of "Effective Communication Skills" Coursebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Shameem

    2016-01-01

    In Communicative Language Teaching situation, role of material is not only important but also inevitable. In the traditional context of English teaching textbooks are considered the main source of materials. This paper will provide an evaluation of "Effective Communication Skills" ("ECS") coursebook that has been introduced as…

  7. Cultural Effects and Uses of Communication Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Wilbur

    The communication satellite already has developed a mature technology. It carries a substantial part of the world's long range communication, and is now useable for special cultural and educational purposes. Major cultural effects come from its contribution to increasing enormously the flow of information in the world. It will increase human…

  8. Effective Advocacy and Communication with Legislators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Counseling Association, Office of Public Policy and Information, Alexandria, VA.

    This pamphlet attempts to make communicating with legislators easy. Each section includes a brief paragraph and several bullet points that present techniques or advice for simplifying communication. It begins with "Rules for Effective Advocacy," which presents a core set of basic advocacy principles, followed by "What Makes…

  9. Cultural Effects and Uses of Communication Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Wilbur

    The communication satellite already has developed a mature technology. It carries a substantial part of the world's long range communication, and is now useable for special cultural and educational purposes. Major cultural effects come from its contribution to increasing enormously the flow of information in the world. It will increase human…

  10. Comparative Effects of an Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker (ARB)/Diuretic vs. ARB/Calcium-Channel Blocker Combination on Uncontrolled Nocturnal Hypertension Evaluated by Information and Communication Technology-Based Nocturnal Home Blood Pressure Monitoring - The NOCTURNE Study.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tomitani, Naoko; Kanegae, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hajime; Uchiyama, Kazuaki; Yamagiwa, Kayo; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Kanda, Kiyomi; Hasegawa, Shinji; Hoshide, Satoshi

    2017-06-23

    Nocturnal blood pressure (BP) is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular events. The NOCTURNE study, a multicenter, randomized controlled trial (RCT) using our recently developed information and communication technology (ICT) nocturnal home BP monitoring (HBPM) device, was performed to compare the nocturnal HBP-lowering effects of differential ARB-based combination therapies in 411 Japanese patients with nocturnal hypertension (HT).Methods and Results:Patients with nocturnal BP ≥120/70 mmHg at baseline even under ARB therapy (100 mg irbesartan daily) were enrolled. The ARB/CCB combination therapy (irbesartan 100 mg+amlodipine 5 mg) achieved a significantly greater reduction in nocturnal home systolic BP (primary endpoint) than the ARB/diuretic combination (daily irbesartan 100 mg+trichlormethiazide 1 mg) (-14.4 vs. -10.5 mmHg, P<0.0001), independently of urinary sodium excretion and/or nocturnal BP dipping status. However, the change in nocturnal home systolic BP was comparable among the post-hoc subgroups with higher salt sensitivity (diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and elderly patients). This is the first RCT demonstrating the feasibility of clinical assessment of nocturnal BP by ICT-nocturnal HBPM. The ARB/CCB combination was shown to be superior to ARB/diuretic in patients with uncontrolled nocturnal HT independently of sodium intake, despite the similar impact of the 2 combinations in patients with higher salt sensitivity.

  11. Increasing pandemic vaccination rates with effective communication.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Natalie J

    2011-06-01

    Communicating effectively with the public about the importance of vaccination during a pandemic poses a challenge to health communicators. The public's concerns about the safety, effectiveness and necessity of vaccines lead many people to refuse vaccination and the current communication strategies are often unsuccessful at overcoming the public's resistance to vaccinate. Convincing the public to receive a vaccination, especially during a pandemic when there can be so much uncertainty about the vaccine and the disease, requires a revised communication approach. This revised approach should integrate into messages information that the public identifies as important, as well as presenting messages in a way that is consistent with our evolved social learning biases. These biases will impact both the content of the message and who delivers the message to different target populations. Additionally, an improved understanding between media and health communicators about the role each plays during a crisis may increase the effectiveness of messages disseminated to the public. Lastly, given that the public is increasingly seeking health information from on-line and other electronic sources, health communication needs to continue to find ways to integrate new technologies into communication strategies.

  12. Effective Perioperative Communication to Enhance Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J Hudson

    2016-08-01

    Breakdowns in health care communication are a significant cause of sentinel events and associated patient morbidity and mortality. Effective communication is a necessary component of a patient safety program, which enables all members of the interdisciplinary health care team to effectively manage their individual roles and responsibilities in the perioperative setting; set expectations for safe, high-reliability care; and measure and assess outcomes. To sustain a culture of safety, effective communication should be standardized, complete, clear, brief, and timely. Executive leadership and support helps remove institutional barriers and address challenges to support the engagement of patients in health care communication, which has been shown to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and improve the patient experience.

  13. Implicit Coordination Strategies for Effective Team Communication.

    PubMed

    Butchibabu, Abhizna; Sparano-Huiban, Christopher; Sonenberg, Liz; Shah, Julie

    2016-06-01

    We investigated implicit communication strategies for anticipatory information sharing during team performance of tasks with varying degrees of complexity. We compared the strategies used by teams with the highest level of performance to those used by the lowest-performing teams to evaluate the frequency and methods of communications used as a function of task structure. High-performing teams share information by anticipating the needs of their teammates rather than explicitly requesting the exchange of information. As the complexity of a task increases to involve more interdependence among teammates, the impact of coordination on team performance also increases. This observation motivated us to conduct a study of anticipatory information sharing as a function of task complexity. We conducted an experiment in which 13 teams of four people performed collaborative search-and-deliver tasks with varying degrees of complexity in a simulation environment. We elaborated upon prior characterizations of communication as implicit versus explicit by dividing implicit communication into two subtypes: (a) deliberative/goal information and (b) reactive status updates. We then characterized relationships between task structure, implicit communication, and team performance. We found that the five teams with the fastest task completion times and lowest idle times exhibited higher rates of deliberative communication versus reactive communication during high-complexity tasks compared with the five teams with the slowest completion times and longest idle times (p = .039). Teams in which members proactively communicated information about their next goal to teammates exhibited improved team performance. The findings from our work can inform the design of communication strategies for team training to improve performance of complex tasks. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  14. Comparing three knowledge communication strategies - Diffusion, Dissemination and Translation - through randomized controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Lane, Joseph P; Stone, Vathsala I

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a series of three randomized controlled case studies comparing the effectiveness of three strategies for communicating new research-based knowledge (Diffusion, Dissemination, Translation), to different Assistive Technology (AT) stakeholder groups. Pre and post intervention measures for level of knowledge use (unaware, aware, interested, using) via the LOKUS instrument, assessed the relative effectiveness of the three strategies. The latter two approaches were both more effective than diffusion but also equally effective. The results question the value added by tailoring research findings to specific audiences, and instead supports the critical yet neglected role for relevance in determining knowledge use by stakeholders.

  15. On Quantitative Comparative Research in Communication and Language Evolution.

    PubMed

    Oller, D Kimbrough; Griebel, Ulrike

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative comparison of human language and natural animal communication requires improved conceptualizations. We argue that an infrastructural approach to development and evolution incorporating an extended interpretation of the distinctions among illocution, perlocution, and meaning (Austin 1962; Oller and Griebel 2008) can help place the issues relevant to quantitative comparison in perspective. The approach can illuminate the controversy revolving around the notion of functional referentiality as applied to alarm calls, for example in the vervet monkey. We argue that referentiality offers a poor point of quantitative comparison across language and animal communication in the wild. Evidence shows that even newborn human cry could be deemed to show functional referentiality according to the criteria typically invoked by advocates of referentiality in animal communication. Exploring the essence of the idea of illocution, we illustrate an important realm of commonality among animal communication systems and human language, a commonality that opens the door to more productive, quantifiable comparisons. Finally, we delineate two examples of infrastructural communicative capabilities that should be particularly amenable to direct quantitative comparison across humans and our closest relatives.

  16. On Quantitative Comparative Research in Communication and Language Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Oller, D. Kimbrough; Griebel, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of human language and natural animal communication requires improved conceptualizations. We argue that an infrastructural approach to development and evolution incorporating an extended interpretation of the distinctions among illocution, perlocution, and meaning (Austin 1962; Oller and Griebel 2008) can help place the issues relevant to quantitative comparison in perspective. The approach can illuminate the controversy revolving around the notion of functional referentiality as applied to alarm calls, for example in the vervet monkey. We argue that referentiality offers a poor point of quantitative comparison across language and animal communication in the wild. Evidence shows that even newborn human cry could be deemed to show functional referentiality according to the criteria typically invoked by advocates of referentiality in animal communication. Exploring the essence of the idea of illocution, we illustrate an important realm of commonality among animal communication systems and human language, a commonality that opens the door to more productive, quantifiable comparisons. Finally, we delineate two examples of infrastructural communicative capabilities that should be particularly amenable to direct quantitative comparison across humans and our closest relatives. PMID:25285057

  17. Effective communication with primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication requires direct interaction between the hospitalist and the primary care provider using a standardized method of information exchange with the opportunity to ask questions and assign accountability for follow-up roles. The discharge summary is part of the process but does not provide the important aspects of handoff, such as closed loop communication and role assignments. Hospital discharge is a significant safety risk for patients, with more than half of discharged patients experiencing at least one error. Hospitalist and primary care providers need to collaborate to develop a standardized system to communicate about shared patients that meets handoff requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Can Science Effectively Communicate to Politics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardi, Peter

    Communication between science and politics is ineffective even though solutions to common and pressing problems urgently need an improved dialogue. I attempt to answer if it is possible to improve communications between science and politics, and, if so, how? I analyze the communication difficulties encountered from the perspective of both science and politics, and chart the foreseeable changes in the character of science. I examine the likely effects of these changes, particularly the consequences that can embed moral values into scientific research and make research more participatory. Finally, I suggest building a model of interdependency between science and politics to better understand the co-evolution of human and natural systems.

  19. Organizational Communication Effectiveness: The View of Corporate Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Susan R.; Eblen, Anna

    1986-01-01

    Compares previous findings regarding dimensions of organizational communication effectiveness with the results of interviews with 48 northwest corporate administrators. Lists six major dimensions of effectiveness: (1) coaching and motivating employees, (2) encouraging worker involvement and participation, (3) self-motivation, (4) problem-solving…

  20. Cognitive Complexity-Simplicity as a Determinant of Communication Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.

    1980-01-01

    Hypothesized that cognitively complex individuals would be more effective than cognitively simple individuals at accomplishing a communication-dependent task. Analysis revealed that messages (generated by an exercise with tinker toy models and a password game) of complex individuals were more effective than the messages of comparatively simple…

  1. Organizational Communication Effectiveness: The View of Corporate Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Susan R.; Eblen, Anna

    1986-01-01

    Compares previous findings regarding dimensions of organizational communication effectiveness with the results of interviews with 48 northwest corporate administrators. Lists six major dimensions of effectiveness: (1) coaching and motivating employees, (2) encouraging worker involvement and participation, (3) self-motivation, (4) problem-solving…

  2. Construction of a Communication Audit: An Examination of Communication Systems and Their Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brent D., Ed.; Greenbaum, Howard H., Ed.

    Abstracts of 12 papers concerning the effectiveness of various communication systems are printed here. Subjects of the papers are: the appraisal of organizational communication systems, and evaluation of ECCO analysis as a communication audit methodology, assessment of attitude and opinion change effects of the communication audit, organizational…

  3. Communicating more effectively with public audiences (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowsky, S.; Cook, J.

    2013-12-01

    Although nearly all domain experts agree that human greenhouse gas emissions are altering the world's climate, a segment of the public rejects the scientific evidence. How can this gap between scientific knowledge and public understanding be bridged? Improved communication requires a better understanding of the cultural factors (e.g., political worldviews) and cognitive factors (e.g., inability to appreciate the concept of accumulation) that contribute to the public's rejection of the science. We review those factors and then provide practical guidance on more effective ways of communicating to the public. We focus on (a) framing of climate change in ways that are less challenging to people's worldview; (b) the role of the perceived scientific consensus in communication; and (c) ways in which uncertainty can be communicated without creating further barriers to acceptance of the science.

  4. Direct counterfactual communication via quantum Zeno effect.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Cao, Zhu; Yin, Juan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Ma, Xiongfeng; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-05-09

    Intuition from our everyday lives gives rise to the belief that information exchanged between remote parties is carried by physical particles. Surprisingly, in a recent theoretical study [Salih H, Li ZH, Al-Amri M, Zubairy MS (2013) Phys Rev Lett 110:170502], quantum mechanics was found to allow for communication, even without the actual transmission of physical particles. From the viewpoint of communication, this mystery stems from a (nonintuitive) fundamental concept in quantum mechanics-wave-particle duality. All particles can be described fully by wave functions. To determine whether light appears in a channel, one refers to the amplitude of its wave function. However, in counterfactual communication, information is carried by the phase part of the wave function. Using a single-photon source, we experimentally demonstrate the counterfactual communication and successfully transfer a monochrome bitmap from one location to another by using a nested version of the quantum Zeno effect.

  5. Direct counterfactual communication via quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Cao, Zhu; Yin, Juan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Ma, Xiongfeng; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Intuition from our everyday lives gives rise to the belief that information exchanged between remote parties is carried by physical particles. Surprisingly, in a recent theoretical study [Salih H, Li ZH, Al-Amri M, Zubairy MS (2013) Phys Rev Lett 110:170502], quantum mechanics was found to allow for communication, even without the actual transmission of physical particles. From the viewpoint of communication, this mystery stems from a (nonintuitive) fundamental concept in quantum mechanics—wave-particle duality. All particles can be described fully by wave functions. To determine whether light appears in a channel, one refers to the amplitude of its wave function. However, in counterfactual communication, information is carried by the phase part of the wave function. Using a single-photon source, we experimentally demonstrate the counterfactual communication and successfully transfer a monochrome bitmap from one location to another by using a nested version of the quantum Zeno effect.

  6. Developing Effective Communications about Extreme Weather Risks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruine de Bruin, W.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the general public often face complex decisions about the risks that they face, including those associated with extreme weather and climate change adaptation. Scientific experts may be asked to develop communications with the goal of improving people's understanding of weather and climate risks, and informing people's decisions about how to protect against these risks. Unfortunately, scientific experts' communication efforts may fail if they lack information about what people need or want to know to make more informed decisions or what wording people prefer use to describe relevant concepts. This presentation provides general principles for developing effective risk communication materials that aim for widespread dissemination, such as brochures and websites. After a brief review of the social science evidence on how to design effective risk communication materials, examples will focus on communications about extreme weather events and climate change. Specifically, data will be presented from ongoing projects on flood risk perception, public preparedness for heat waves, and public perceptions of climate change. The presentation will end with specific recommendations about how to improve recipients' understanding about risks and inform decisions. These recommendations should be useful to scientific experts who aim to communicate about extreme weather, climate change, or other risks.

  7. Atmospheric propagation effects relevant to optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of atmospheric phenomena affect the propagation of light. The effects of clear air turbulence are reviewed as well as atmospheric turbidity on optical communications. Among the phenomena considered are astronomical and random refraction, scintillation, beam broadening, spatial coherence, angle of arrival, aperture averaging, absorption and scattering, and the effect of opaque clouds. An extensive reference list is also provided for further study. Useful information on the atmospheric propagation of light in relation to optical deep space communications to an earth based receiving station is available, however, further data must be generated before such a link can be designed with committed performance.

  8. Atmospheric Propagation Effects Relevant to Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of atmospheric phenomena affect the propagation of light. This article reviews the effects of clear-air turbulence as well as atmospheric turbidity on optical communications. Among the phenomena considered are astronomical and random refraction, scintillation, beam broadening, spatial coherence, angle of arrival, aperture averaging, absorption and scattering, and the effect of opaque clouds. An extensive reference list is also provided for further study, Useful information on the atmospheric propagation of light in resolution to optical deep-space communications to an earth-based receiving station is available, however, further data must be generated before such a link can be designed with committed performance.

  9. The Strategic Communication Plan: Effective Communication for Strategic Leaders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    PLAN? 5 WHO SHOULD HAVE A STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS PLAN? 7 SUCCESSFUL STRATEGIC PLANNING BEGINS WITH STRATEGIC THINKING . 8 HOW IS THE STRATEGIC...communicate internally and externally.9 SUCCESSFUL STRATEGIC PLANNING BEGINS WITH STRATEGIC THINKING A key objective of strategic thinking is to formulate and...vision should be captured in the strategic communication plan. Yet, in many organizations, prescribed strategic planning systems are the death knell

  10. Effective Use of Strategic Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    disseminated to social networking sites like, MySpace, Twitter and Facebook.24 Judith McHale, the Undersecretary for Public Diplomacy and Public...Obama administration use of social networking sites and the simple posting of his speech on-line made for an effective way to disseminate the

  11. Effective Communication with Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Patrick; Elliott, David

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government established the Office for Youth (the Office) in September 2008 in an effort to engage with the young people of Australia. The Office will work with other government agencies to help young people reach their full potential; make effective transitions to adulthood as they continue to learn, start work, make decisions that…

  12. Effective Communication for Academic Chairs. SUNY Series in Speech Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickson, Mark, III, Ed.; Stacks, Don W.

    This book presents 11 contributed papers which examine communication aspects of the department chair position in academia. It is noted that most academic department chairs are not trained in management skills, including communication strategies. After an introductory chapter by Christopher H. Spicer and Ann Q. Staton, the following papers are…

  13. Effect of Communicator Background on Credibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzica, Norman

    1973-01-01

    To help assess the effect of a communicator's perceived background on his credibility, students were asked to rate a speaker on drug abuse. Half the students were led to believe that the speaker had himself used psychotropic drugs regularly. The others were told he had used no such drugs. Differences in mean ratings did not show statistical…

  14. Determinants of Effective Communication among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anvari, Roya; Atiyaye, Dauda Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between effective communication and transferring information. In the present correlational study, a cross-sectional research design was employed, and data were collected using a questionnaire-based survey. 46 students were chosen based on random sampling and questionnaires were distributed among…

  15. Ocean Variability Effects on Underwater Acoustic Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Variability Effects on Underwater Acoustic...APPROACH High rate acoustic communications in the ocean is a challenging task in the presence of environmental variability . There exist two...kinds of variability : 1) rapid fluctuations of the channel over scales of seconds due to small-scale fast ocean processes, dynamic ocean surfaces, and

  16. Unlocking Doors: A Guide to Effective Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, Inc., Minneapolis, MN.

    The booklet is intended to help parents understand and acquire more assertive communication styles in matters of special education. Assertive behavior is introduced, distinguished from less productive behavior styles, and considered in terms of barriers to effectiveness. The booklet proceeds with a discussion of basic legal and human rights that…

  17. Effective communication: Principle of Nursing Practice E.

    PubMed

    Casey, Anne; Wallis, Alison

    This is the sixth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service user organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The article discusses Principle E, effective communication, and provides some examples of good practice.

  18. Effective Communication in Adolescent Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azima, Fern J.

    This paper defines a useful strategy for therapists working with adolescents which includes: (1) a general model of the group leader's responsibilities and (2) a cataloguing of some of the specific impediments for both adolescent peers and the therapist that prevent effective communication. The goal of the group therapy is to identify the specific…

  19. Comparing Person Centered Communication Education in Long Term Care Using Onsite and Online Formats

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Carissa K.; Fanning, Kim; Williams, Kristine N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Educating nursing home (NH) staff to provide person-centered care is complicated by scheduling, costs, and other feasibility issues. This study compared outcomes for an in-service program focused on person-centered communication provided in onsite and online formats. Methods The Changing Talk program was provided onsite in 7 NHs (327 staff). The online program included 8 NHs (211 staff). Outcomes were compared between groups. Results ANOVA revealed an interaction between format type and pre/post-test scores with improved recognition of person-centered communication in the onsite group only. Group program evaluations based on the modified Diffusion of Innovation in Long Term Care Battery indicated no significant differences between training formats. Conclusions Staff’s perception of the program was similar; and statistically significant gains in post-test scores indicating for awareness of person-centered communication for the onsite group have limited clinical significance. Feasibility and effectiveness are important considerations for in-service education supporting NH culture change. PMID:26046364

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Organizations' Communication Structure: Organizational Technology and Outcomes as Determinants of Internal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anita C.; DeWine, Sue

    C. Perrow's research has suggested that analyzing organizations according to technology (or process) and raw material (or outcome) can provide valuable information about organizational communication behaviors and patterns. His scheme for classifying organizations suggests a continuum that places organizations with "variable" technologies…

  1. Effective Climate Communication with Difficult Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate communication is often fraught with ideological baggage ("noise") that makes it very difficult to connect to audiences. In these cases, it is helpful to use "best practices" known from other fields of communication. Engaging audiences with authenticity, using plain language, respecting cultural and political differences, and a sprinkling of humor can go a long way toward establishing a connection. It's important to avoid common but polarizing tropes from popular media, and often quite helpful to frame climate issues in novel or unexpected ways that cut across entrenched political discourse. Emerging social science research Beyond ideology, climate change is Simple, Serious, and Solvable. Effective communication of these three key ideas can succeed when the science argument is carefully framed to avoid attack of the audience's ethical identity. Simple arguments from common sense and everyday experience are more successful than data. Serious consequences to values that resonate with the audience can be avoided by solutions that don't threaten those values.

  2. Foreground effects on troposcatter digital communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, E. E.

    1985-12-01

    Troposcatter antennas are usually pointed very close to the horizon to maximize system gain. As a result, multipath reflections from the foreground may arise. These multipath signals may have time delays that are significantly longer than direct signals, which are scattered within the common volume and thus degrade system performance. In this report, the effects of terrain-reflected multipath signals on troposcatter digital communication systems are examined. The distance that a ray travels from the transmitting antenna to a point within the common volume is calculated. The maximum differential distance that can occur for a pair of rays that intersect the common volume is than determined for a set of troposcatter geometries. The total distance that a terrain-reflected ray traverses in going from the antenna to the common volume is also calculated. It is found that, for typical troposcatter/foreground geometries, the differential distance between a direct ray and a foreground-reflected ray is small compared with the maximum differential distance that exists between direct rays within the common volume. Thus, multipath signals that would have time delays significantly longer than those scattered within the common volume must be scattered from a region outside the common volume.

  3. A comparative study of optical concentrators for visible light communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyawan, Rahmat; Gomez, Ariel; Chun, Hyunchae; Rajbhandari, Sujan; Manousiadis, Pavlos P.; Vithanage, Dimali A.; Faulkner, Grahame; Turnbull, Graham A.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.; Collins, Stephen; O'Brien, Dominic

    2017-01-01

    Given the imminent radio frequency spectrum crunch, Visible Light Communication (VLC) is being proposed as an alternative wireless technology allowing for scalable connectivity to potentially millions of mobile and Internet-of- Things (IoT) devices. A VLC system uses a photo-detector (PD) receiver that converts the optically modulated light from a light source into a modulated electrical signal. The corresponding receiver electrical bandwidth is typically inversely proportional to the PD active area. Consequently, to construct a high-speed VLC link, the PD active area is often substantially reduced and an optical concentrator is used to enhance the receiver collection area. However, to achieve high concentrating factor, the link field-of-view (FOV) needs to be narrow due to the étendue conservation in linear passive optical systems. This paper studies a Fluorescent Concentrator (FC) that breaks this étendue conservation. The FC is not only based on reflective and refractive principles but also makes use of fluorescence process. A comparison between the FC and conventional optical concentrators, namely Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) is also investigated. The trade-off between received signal strength and incoming link angle is demonstrated over 60° coverage. Experimental results show that performance degradation as the link angle increases using FC-based receivers is significantly lower than for conventional CPC.

  4. Effects of the Advanced Innovative Internet-Based Communication Education Program on Promoting Communication Between Nurses and Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hui-Chen; Kaas, Merrie; Su, Ying-Hwa; Lin, Mei-Feng; Huang, Mei-Chih; Wang, Jing-Jy

    2016-06-01

    Effective communication between nurses and patients with dementia promotes the quality of patient care by improving the identification of patient needs and by reducing the miscommunication-related frustration of patients and nurses. This study evaluates the effects of an advanced innovative Internet-based communication education (AIICE) program on nurses' communication knowledge, attitudes, frequency of assessing patient communication capacity, and communication performance in the context of care for patients with dementia. In addition, this study attempts to evaluate the indirect effects of this program on outcomes for patients with dementia, including memory and behavior-related problems and depressive symptoms. A quasi-experimental research design with a one-group repeated measure was conducted. Convenience sampling was used to recruit nurses from long-term care facilities in southern Taiwan. Data were analyzed using general estimating equations to compare changes over time across three points: baseline, fourth-week posttest, and 16th-week posttest. One hundred five nurses completed the AIICE program and the posttest surveys. The findings indicate that nurses' communication knowledge, frequency in assessing patients' communication capacity, and communication performance had improved significantly over the baseline by either the 4th- or 16th-week posttest (p < .01). However, communication attitude showed no significant improvement in the posttest survey (p = .40). Furthermore, the findings indicate that the memory and behavior-related problems and the depressive symptoms of patients had decreased significantly by the 16th-week posttest (p = .05). This study showed that the AIICE program improves nurses' communication knowledge, frequency to assess patients' communication capacity, and communication performance and alleviates the memory and behavior-related problems and depressive symptoms of patients. The continuous communication training of nurses using the

  5. Effective communication of information about chemical hazards.

    PubMed

    Lee, T R

    1986-05-01

    Given that the best available means have been used to assess the risks arising from a chemical process or product, it is a crucial aspect of management to inform the employees and the public. This task of communicating may fall to industry, government, regulating authority, professional association or an environmental protection group. It requires some understanding of the public's perceptions of the risks involved and an ethical duty to try to modify attitudes judged to be either over-anxious or complacent. There is as yet no structured knowledge on communication about chemical hazards as such. Also, circumstances vary enormously. Hence, this paper deploys the general analytic framework constructed within social psychology and reviews the extensive experimental research (and some field studies) with the aim of providing understanding and some guidance. It considers the basic modelling of attitude change as induced by printed or verbal communications. The variables influencing the effectiveness of communications are divided into: the source (e.g. his/her credibility, power or attractiveness); the message (e.g. emotional versus logical; one-sided versus both-sided arguments); and modality or media effects (e.g. spoken versus written; the mass media; campaigns).

  6. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials represent the gold standard for comparative effective research (CER), a number of additional methods are available when randomized controlled trials are lacking or inconclusive because of the limitations of such trials. In addition to more relevant, efficient, and generalizable trials, there is a need for additional approaches utilizing rigorous methodology while fully recognizing their inherent limitations. CER is an important construct for defining and summarizing evidence on effectiveness and safety and comparing the value of competing strategies so that patients, providers, and policymakers can be offered appropriate recommendations for optimal patient care. Nevertheless, methodological as well as political and social challenges for CER remain. CER requires constant and sophisticated methodological oversight of study design and analysis similar to that required for randomized trials to reduce the potential for bias. At the same time, if appropriately conducted, CER offers an opportunity to identify the most effective and safe approach to patient care. Despite rising and unsustainable increases in health care costs, an even greater challenge to the implementation of CER arises from the social and political environment questioning the very motives and goals of CER. Oncologists and oncology professional societies are uniquely positioned to provide informed clinical and methodological expertise to steer the appropriate application of CER toward critical discussions related to health care costs, cost-effectiveness, and the comparative value of the available options for appropriate care of patients with cancer. PMID:23697601

  7. Overcoming the ten most common barriers to effective team communication.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Communication is at the heart of medical practice management. Yet there are many barriers to effective communication that can interfere with the smooth running of the practice. This article describes the 10 most common barriers to effective medical practice team communication and offers six steps the practice manager can take to break them down. This article also suggests that the practice develop a team communication strategy. It suggests 10 communication principles readers can share directly with their teams and describes three hallmarks of effective team communication. Finally, this article provides a list of 25 practical questions practice managers can use to improve their team's communication.

  8. Reality Presentation and Communication: A Comparative Discussion of the Smithsonian Institution and The Washington Post as Communications Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Lisa St. Clair

    A comparative study of two types of media, a newspaper and a museum, reveals substantive differences in the ways each of these communications organizations alters the information which it presents to the public. Interviews conducted with spokespeople from the Washington Post and the Smithsonian Institution focused on three major theories of…

  9. Natural hazard communication : effectiveness and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presta, A.; Sole, A.; de Luca, G.

    2009-04-01

    Scientific, technological and methodological knowledge regarding the risks caused by natural events are in continuous evolution. A careful analysis of the communication and information, practiced by administrations and institutions involved in the decision-making processes, show a peculiar difference between the quality of the theoretical-operating level and the effectiveness of communication systems of the risk obtained. This is the level which involves directly citizens and institutions and needs, therefore, an efficacious and shared system whose aim is to inform the whole community, in a simple and clear way, during the different phases correlated to the environmental risk. The hypotesis is, in fact, to create a distinct typology of message, corresponding to each phase: • prevention of the risk > sensitization > information. If the potential risk is imminent or changes into real emergency, it is necessary to plan a communication aimed at supporting a very fast alarm to the community. • anticipation of the risk > pre-alert > information • imminence of the risk > alert > alarm • post-event /risk > information > precept and rules. The lack of a uniform and coerent planning process, both on the linguistic field (the typology of the message, iconic and verbal) and technical (the typology of supports) it is clear analysing the reference scenario in Italy. This involves the creation of deeply discordant systems which don't communicate the different typologies of risk efficaciously during distinct moments. To come to a systemic vision of the problem we proceed to collect and to obtain documentation about the "alarm" and communication systems existing in Italy nowadays. So we will have a classification of the different typologies about natural risk and communication systems related to them. The aim of this research is to propose a rationalization and a standard coding of signals. The logical conclusion of this course can be the creation of a national

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Communicative Behavior in CEDA Lincoln-Douglas Debate and CEDA Team Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Harold L.; Skaggs, Edward C.

    Keeping debate communicative is a great and recurring concern. A study investigated whether debate format may influence debaters' communicative behavior, by comparing behavior in Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) Lincoln-Douglas debate (LD) and in CEDA Team debate. Videotapes of the two first affirmative speeches of each, at the…

  11. Comparing Person-Centered Communication Education in Long-Term Care Using Onsite and Online Formats.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Carissa K; Fanning, Kim; Williams, Kristine N

    2015-11-01

    Educating nursing home (NH) staff to provide person-centered care is complicated by scheduling, costs, and other feasibility issues. The current study compared outcomes for an in-service program focused on person-centered communication provided in onsite and online formats. The Changing Talk program was provided onsite in seven NHs (n = 327 staff). The online program included eight NHs (n = 211 staff). Analysis of variance revealed an interaction between format type and pre-/post-test scores with improved recognition of person-centered communication in the onsite group only. Group program evaluations based on the modified Diffusion of Innovation in Long-Term Care Battery indicated no significant differences between training formats. Staff perception of the program was similar. Although statistically significant gains were noted in posttest scores indicating awareness of person-centered communication for the onsite group, gains were of limited clinical significance. Feasibility and effectiveness are important considerations for in-service education supporting NH culture change.

  12. Training Scientists to be Effective Communicators: AAAS Communicating Science Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendes, L.; Lohwater, T.

    2012-12-01

    "Communicating Science: Tools for Scientists and Engineers" is a workshop program developed by AAAS to provide guidance and practice for scientists and engineers in communicating about science with public audiences. The program was launched at the 2008 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston and has since provided 24 workshops for more than 1,500 scientist and engineer attendees at universities, science society meetings, and government agency labs around the United States. Each interactive workshop targets scientists and engineers specifically and has included content such as message development, defining audience, identifying opportunities for engaging the public, and practice with public presentations and cameras. The workshop format allows for collaborative learning through small-group discussion, resource sharing, and participation in critique of other participants' presentations. Continuous monitoring of the program includes on-site and online surveys and evaluation. On an assessment of workshops from 2008-2010, attendees reported that knowledge gained from the workshop helped in crafting messages about their scientific work for use in communicating with public audiences, and approximately 80 percent of respondents reported participation in communication with a public audience after attending the workshop. Through workshop content and feedback of participating scientists, this presentation will highlight some best practices and resources for scientists who want to take a proactive role in science communication.

  13. Effective communication and supervision in the biomedical engineering department.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Wald, A; Cappiello, J

    1997-01-01

    It is important for biomedical engineering supervisors to master the art of effective communication. Supervisors who have effective communication skills can successfully initiate creative programs and generate a harmonious working atmosphere. Using effective communication, they can promote good working conditions, such as high morale, worker initiative and loyalty to the department, which are almost impossible to measure but imperative for a successful department. However, effective communication tends to be neglected by supervisors who are either functional specialists or managerial generalists. This paper presents several cases of what effective communication truly is and discusses some potential factors that may lead to ineffective communication.

  14. Ocean Variability Effects On Underwater Acoustic Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    have developed a time reversal combining/decision feedback equalization (TRC/DFE) structure for underwater acoustic multiple - input / multiple - output ...T. Akal, and M. Stevenson, “ Multiple - input / multiple - output coherent time reversal communications in a shallow water acoustic channel,” IEEE J...acoustic multiple - input / multiple - output systems”, submitted, IEEE J. Oceanic Eng. (2008) [refereed]. [2] D. Rouseff, M. Badiey, and A. Song, “Effect of

  15. Shared language:Towards more effective communication.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joyce; McDonagh, Deana

    2013-01-01

    The ability to communicate to others and express ourselves is a basic human need. As we develop our understanding of the world, based on our upbringing, education and so on, our perspective and the way we communicate can differ from those around us. Engaging and interacting with others is a critical part of healthy living. It is the responsibility of the individual to ensure that they are understood in the way they intended.Shared language refers to people developing understanding amongst themselves based on language (e.g. spoken, text) to help them communicate more effectively. The key to understanding language is to first notice and be mindful of your language. Developing a shared language is an ongoing process that requires intention and time, which results in better understanding.Shared language is critical to collaboration, and collaboration is critical to business and education. With whom and how many people do you connect? Your 'shared language' makes a difference in the world. So, how do we successfully do this? This paper shares several strategies.Your sphere of influence will carry forward what and how you are communicating. Developing and nurturing a shared language is an essential element to enhance communication and collaboration whether it is simply between partners or across the larger community of business and customers. Constant awareness and education is required to maintain the shared language. We are living in an increasingly smaller global community. Business is built on relationships. If you invest in developing shared language, your relationships and your business will thrive.

  16. The Communicative Effectiveness of Different Types of Communication Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlemore, Jeanette

    2003-01-01

    Examines compensation strategies--techniques for dealing with knowledge gaps between learner and interlocutor--used by French learners of English and relates them to synoptic and ectenic learning. Suggests reasons that ectenic learners, who need conscious control of what they are learning, seem to communicate meanings of words to judges better…

  17. Comparative Effectiveness of Revascularization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, William S.; Grau-Sepulveda, Maria V.; Weiss, Jocelyn M.; O’Brien, Sean M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Kolm, Paul; Zhang, Zugui; Klein, Lloyd W.; Shaw, Richard E.; McKay, Charles; Ritzenthaler, Laura L.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Messenger, John C.; Shahian, David M.; Grover, Frederick L.; Mayer, John E.; Shewan, Cynthia M.; Garratt, Kirk N.; Moussa, Issam D.; Dangas, George D.; Edwards, Fred H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Questions persist concerning the comparative effectiveness of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG). The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) collaborated to compare the rates of long-term survival after PCI and CABG. METHODS We linked the ACCF National Cardiovascular Data Registry and the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database to claims data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for the years 2004 through 2008. Outcomes were compared with the use of propensity scores and inverse-probability-weighting adjustment to reduce treatment-selection bias. RESULTS Among patients 65 years of age or older who had two-vessel or three-vessel coronary artery disease without acute myocardial infarction, 86,244 underwent CABG and 103,549 underwent PCI. The median follow-up period was 2.67 years. At 1 year, there was no significant difference in adjusted mortality between the groups (6.24% in the CABG group as compared with 6.55% in the PCI group; risk ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 1.00). At 4 years, there was lower mortality with CABG than with PCI (16.4% vs. 20.8%; risk ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.82). Similar results were noted in multiple subgroups and with the use of several different analytic methods. Residual confounding was assessed by means of a sensitivity analysis. CONCLUSIONS In this observational study, we found that, among older patients with multivessel coronary disease that did not require emergency treatment, there was a long-term survival advantage among patients who underwent CABG as compared with patients who underwent PCI. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.) PMID:22452338

  18. Comparative Work Environment Perceptions of Operating Personnel within Experimental and Standard Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    AD/A-005 2 1 5 COMPARATIVE WORK ENVIRONMENT PERCEPTIONS OF OPERATING PERSONNEL WITHIN EXPERIMENTAL AND STANDARD COMMUNICATION SYST EMS...TM’S PKit’Wh’- Dmlm Fnf»f»rf) Rtseordi Rtport 1180 AD COMPARATIVE WORK ENVIRONMENT PERCEPTIONS OF OPERATING PERSONNEL WITHIN EXPERIMENTAL AND...variety of signals. An important segment of the research is devoted to work environment factors and communication analysis and processing. The present

  19. [Effective communication with talkative patients: 10 tips].

    PubMed

    Giroldi, Esther; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Bareman, Frits; Bueving, Herman; van der Weijden, Trudy; van der Vleuten, Cees; Muris, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Consultations with talkative patients present a challenge to doctors. It is difficult to gather all the necessary information within the available time, without damaging the doctor-patient relationship. Based on the listed existing literature and doctors' experiences, we present ten tips for gathering information from talkative patients in an effective manner whilst maintaining a good therapeutic alliance. In consultations with talkative patients, it is important to explore the cause of patients' talkativeness and to adapt one's communication approach accordingly.- Familiar communication strategies such as 'summarizing' can still be applied. When taking this route, a more directive communication approach--e.g. by means of a 'closed-ended summary'--can prevent the patient interrupting the doctor or departing from his subject. There are strategies aimed at avoiding a damaging effect to the doctor-patient relationship when applying this approach: don't be overly directive, make the patient co-responsible for efficient time management in the consultation, and make use of empathic interrupting and humour.

  20. Social-Communicative Effects of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerna, Anna; Esposito, Dalila; Conson, Massimiliano; Russo, Luigi; Massagli, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a common treatment choice for non-verbal children with autism. However, little empirical evidence is available on the usefulness of PECS in treating social-communication impairments in autism. Aims: To test the effects of PECS on social-communicative skills in children with autism,…

  1. The Effect of Communication Apprehension and Situation on Communication Strategy Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Myron W.; King, Stephen W.

    1980-01-01

    Examines students' perceptions of the probable use of certain persuasive strategies in a given situation in relation to students' level of communication apprehension. Data confirms the impact of situation on strategy selection but fails to demonstrate the effect of communication apprehension or an interaction between communication apprehension and…

  2. Social-Communicative Effects of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerna, Anna; Esposito, Dalila; Conson, Massimiliano; Russo, Luigi; Massagli, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a common treatment choice for non-verbal children with autism. However, little empirical evidence is available on the usefulness of PECS in treating social-communication impairments in autism. Aims: To test the effects of PECS on social-communicative skills in children with autism,…

  3. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Andre

    The following essays on communication are presented: communication as a condition of survival, communication for special purposes, the means of transmission of communication, communication within social and economic structures, the teaching of communication through the press, the teaching of modern languages, communication as a point of departure,…

  4. Clinician preferences for verbal communication compared to EHR documentation in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Collins, S.A.; Bakken, S.; Vawdrey, D.K.; Coiera, E.; Currie, L

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective communication is essential to safe and efficient patient care. Additionally, many health information technology (HIT) developments, innovations, and standards aim to implement processes to improve data quality and integrity of electronic health records (EHR) for the purpose of clinical information exchange and communication. Objective We aimed to understand the current patterns and perceptions of communication of common goals in the ICU using the distributed cognition and clinical communication space theoretical frameworks. Methods We conducted a focus group and 5 interviews with ICU clinicians and observed 59.5 hours of interdisciplinary ICU morning rounds. Results Clinicians used an EHR system, which included electronic documentation and computerized provider order entry (CPOE), and paper artifacts for documentation; yet, preferred the verbal communication space as a method of information exchange because they perceived that the documentation was often not updated or efficient for information retrieval. These perceptions that the EHR is a “shift behind” may lead to a further reliance on verbal information exchange, which is a valuable clinical communication activity, yet, is subject to information loss. Conclusions Electronic documentation tools that, in real time, capture information that is currently verbally communicated may increase the effectiveness of communication. PMID:23616870

  5. [Emotional climate and internal communication in a clinical management unit compared with two traditional hospital services].

    PubMed

    Alonso, E; Rubio, A; March, J C; Danet, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the emotional climate, quality of communication and performance indicators in a clinical management unit and two traditional hospital services. Quantitative study. questionnaire of 94 questions. 83 health professionals (63 responders) from the clinical management unit of breast pathology and the hospital services of medical oncology and radiation oncology. descriptive statistics, comparison of means, correlation and linear regression models. The clinical management unit reaches higher values compared with the hospital services about: performance indicators, emotional climate, internal communication and evaluation of the leadership. An important gap between existing and desired sources, channels, media and subjects of communication appear, in both clinical management unit and traditional services. The clinical management organization promotes better internal communication and interpersonal relations, leading to improved performance indicators. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender-Specific Nonverbal Communication: Impact for Speaker Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Lori

    1995-01-01

    A literature review notes how gender expectations lead to nonverbal communication differences in such behaviors as smiling, eye contact, kinesics, proximics, and decoding. The importance of the effective use of nonverbal communication in human resource development is emphasized. (SK)

  7. The effect of the communication output method on augmented interaction.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, D Jeffery; Kim, Kyung-Eun; Scally, Christine

    2007-06-01

    The experiment compared the ability of a Comprehension Model versus an Interaction Model to account for the communication performance of augmented communicators. Five dyads consisting of adults without disabilities, with one participant in each dyad randomly assigned to use an augmentative communication device, engaged in ten direction-giving tasks in which the augmented communicator used either a Word Method (i.e., spoken words only) or a Mixed Method (i.e., mix of spoken words and letters) speech output. Results indicated an overall completion time and communication rate advantage for the Mixed Method output in most communication tasks, supporting the Interaction Model of augmented communication. The role of communication co-construction in augmented interaction and the implications of the Interaction Model for future communication device design are discussed.

  8. Emotional and Interactional Prosody across Animal Communication Systems: A Comparative Approach to the Emergence of Language

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Piera

    2016-01-01

    Across a wide range of animal taxa, prosodic modulation of the voice can express emotional information and is used to coordinate vocal interactions between multiple individuals. Within a comparative approach to animal communication systems, I hypothesize that the ability for emotional and interactional prosody (EIP) paved the way for the evolution of linguistic prosody – and perhaps also of music, continuing to play a vital role in the acquisition of language. In support of this hypothesis, I review three research fields: (i) empirical studies on the adaptive value of EIP in non-human primates, mammals, songbirds, anurans, and insects; (ii) the beneficial effects of EIP in scaffolding language learning and social development in human infants; (iii) the cognitive relationship between linguistic prosody and the ability for music, which has often been identified as the evolutionary precursor of language. PMID:27733835

  9. Emotional and Interactional Prosody across Animal Communication Systems: A Comparative Approach to the Emergence of Language.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Piera

    2016-01-01

    Across a wide range of animal taxa, prosodic modulation of the voice can express emotional information and is used to coordinate vocal interactions between multiple individuals. Within a comparative approach to animal communication systems, I hypothesize that the ability for emotional and interactional prosody (EIP) paved the way for the evolution of linguistic prosody - and perhaps also of music, continuing to play a vital role in the acquisition of language. In support of this hypothesis, I review three research fields: (i) empirical studies on the adaptive value of EIP in non-human primates, mammals, songbirds, anurans, and insects; (ii) the beneficial effects of EIP in scaffolding language learning and social development in human infants; (iii) the cognitive relationship between linguistic prosody and the ability for music, which has often been identified as the evolutionary precursor of language.

  10. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 492: Effective patient-physician communication.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    Perhaps the greatest contemporary challenge in implementing the principles of effective communication lies in our current health care environment that demands increasing physician productivity and less time with each patient. Effective patient-physician communication with the use of patient-centered interviewing, caring communication skills, and shared decision making will help. The use of physician extenders and, in select situations, e-mail communication with established patients also can be beneficial.

  11. The Social Effects of Communication Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhamer, Herbert, Ed.; Westrum, Ronald

    The principal technological developments that underlie the communication revolution, especially the transistor and the computer, are reviewed in a nontechnical way. A number of devices and communication subsystems, such as cable television, ultramicrofiche, and communication satellites, that make use of these developments are then described,…

  12. The Social Effects of Communication Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhamer, Herbert, Ed.; Westrum, Ronald

    The principal technological developments that underlie the communication revolution, especially the transistor and the computer, are reviewed in a nontechnical way. A number of devices and communication subsystems, such as cable television, ultramicrofiche, and communication satellites, that make use of these developments are then described,…

  13. Revealing the Effectivenesses of Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the history of communication strategy and highlight the importance of strategic competence. It provides the histories and characterizations of communication strategy. Besides, it presents from which perspectives these definitions of communication strategies were developed. Various earlier and latter…

  14. How Effective Is Communication Training For Aircraft Crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linde, Charlotte; Goguen, Joseph; Devenish, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Report surveys communication training for aircraft crews. Intended to alleviate problems caused or worsened by poor communication and coordination among crewmembers. Focuses on two training methods: assertiveness training and grid-management training. Examines theoretical background of methods and attempts made to validate their effectiveness. Presents criteria for evaluating applicability to aviation environment. Concludes communication training appropriate for aircraft crews.

  15. How to Plan an Effective School Communications Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Walter

    1983-01-01

    Describes in sequence the key considerations involved in planning an effective program for communications among a school's staff members. Covers program goals, communications needs analysis, responsibility, credibility, communications rights of employees, necessary attitudes, planning steps, appropriate channels and network patterns,…

  16. Residents' perceived barriers to communication skills learning: comparing two medical working contexts in postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    van den Eertwegh, Valerie; van Dalen, Jan; van Dulmen, Sandra; van der Vleuten, Cees; Scherpbier, Albert

    2014-04-01

    Contextual factors are known to influence the acquisition and application of communication skills in clinical settings. Little is known about residents' perceptions of these factors. This article aims to explore residents' perceptions of contextual factors affecting the acquisition and application of communication skills in the medical workplace. We conducted an exploratory study comprising seven focus groups with residents in two different specialities: general practice (n=23) and surgery (n=18). Residents perceive the use of summative assessment checklists that reduce communication skills to behavioural components as impeding the learning of their communication skills. Residents perceive encouragement to deliberately practise in an environment in which the value of communication skills is recognised and support is institutionalised with appropriate feedback from role models as the most important enhancing factors in communication skills learning. To gradually realise a clinical working environment in which the above results are incorporated, we propose to use transformative learning theory to guide further studies. Provided it is used continuously, an approach that combines self-directed learning with observation and discussion of resident-patient consultations seems an effective method for transformative learning of communication skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Communication effectiveness training improves surgical resident teaching ability.

    PubMed

    Barth, R J; Rowland-Morin, P A; Mott, L A; Burchard, K W

    1997-12-01

    An important educational objective of academic surgical programs is to train surgical teachers. Whether formal instruction of surgery residents in general principles of teaching has a role in the achievement of this objective is unproven. We tested whether the teaching ability of surgery residents could be improved by two different interventions: (A) a lecture on communication effectiveness plus home study of their own videotaped lectures and (B) a critical review of their own videotaped lectures with a teaching consultant. Each resident taught four sessions. There was no intervention between sessions 1 and 2; intervention A occurred between sessions 2 and 3; and intervention B, between sessions 3 and 4. Each of the four videotaped sessions was graded for communication effectiveness using a standardized scoring form. There were no significant differences between scores from lectures 1 and 2 (no intervention) or lectures 2 and 3 (intervention A). Intervention B (individualized feedback) resulted in significant improvement in all scores from session 4 compared with sessions 1 and 2: content 3.40 versus 2.98 (p = 0.01), language 3.43 versus 3.22 (p = 0.03), delivery 3.25 versus 2.87 (p = 0.002), and overall 3.43 versus 2.88 (p = 0.002). Surgical resident teaching ability can be improved by communication effectiveness teaching. Individualized feedback is more effective than a lecture combined with self-study.

  18. Effectiveness of wireless communication using 100-Mbps infrared in PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Doo-Hoe; Moon, Man-Sik; Jang, Dong-Yeol; Hwang, Yeon-Soo; Ok, Min-Ah; Choi, Seung-Yong

    2002-05-01

    In our hospital, two buildings are separated by public road and was communicated each other using 2 Mbps public cable network. Recently inter-building communication with 100 Mbps infrared has been established for PACS. Gigabit network has been established in the main building. To evaluate usefulness of infrared communication, actual data transfer rate was checked. When 2 Mbps public cable was used, actual data transfer rate using 32 Mbytes text file was 193.9 Mbps. After infrared communication was established, effective network speed between two link heads of infrared was 45 Mbps. Actual data transfer rate with 32 Mbytes text file was 4.98 Mbps. Average transfer rates was also checked each 10 times using compressed medical images of each modalities from CR (4 Mbytes), ultrasound (200 Kbytes), CT (250 Kbytes), MRI (77.6 Kbytes) and fluoroscopy (1 Mbytes), and using a raw data of CR (28 Mbytes). Total average transfer rate was 4.91 Mbps. To compare data transfer rate in the separated building with them in the main building, the rate with a 14 Mbytes CR was checked 10 times at the each building. Average data transfer rate was 6.93 Mbps in the main building and 4.05 Mbps in the separated building. In conclusion, when two hospital buildings are separated, an infrared networking can be replaced for fiber-optic cable networking in PACS environment.

  19. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 587: Effective patient-physician communication.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Physicians' ability to effectively and compassionately communicate information is key to a successful patient-physician relationship. The current health care environment demands increasing clinical productivity and affords less time with each patient, which can impede effective patient-physician communication. The use of patient-centered interviewing, caring communication skills, and shared decision making improves patient-physician communication. Involving advanced practice nurses or physician assistants may improve the patient's experience and understanding of her visit. Electronic communication with established patients also can enhance the patient experience in select situations.

  20. Effective Protocols for Mobile Communications and Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, J.; Sholander, P.; Van Leeuwen, B,

    1998-12-01

    This report examines methods of mobile communications with an emphasis on mobile computing and wireless communications. Many of the advances in communications involve the use of Internet Protocol (IP), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and ad hoc network protocols. However, many of the advances in these protocols have been focused on wired communications. Recently much focus has been directed at advancing communication technology in the area of mobile wireless networks. This report discusses various protocols used in mobile communications and proposes a number of extensions to existing protocols. A detailed discussion is also included on desirable protocol characteristics and evaluation criteria. In addition, the report includes a discussion on several network simulation tools that maybe used to evaluate network protocols.

  1. The Relationship between Autism Spectrum Disorders and Anxiety: The Moderating Effect of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Thompson E., III; Moree, Brittany N.; Dempsey, Tim; Reuther, Erin T.; Fodstad, Jill C.; Hess, Julie A.; Jenkins, Whitney S.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2011-01-01

    Communication skills have been shown to have differing effects on levels of anxiety depending on whether or not a child has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or is typically developing. This article examined whether or not communication deficits differentially affect children with ASD compared to those without ASD. Ninety-nine children with…

  2. Effects of noise and task loading on a communication task loading on a communication task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrell, Dean H., II

    Previous research had shown the effect of noise on a single communication task. This research has been criticized as not being representative of a real world situation since subjects allocated all of their attention to only one task. In the present study, the effect of adding a loading task to a standard noise-communication paradigm was investigated. Subjects performed both a communication task (Modified Rhyme Test; House et al. 1965) and a short term memory task (Sternberg, 1969) in simulated levels of aircraft noise (95, 105 and 115 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL)). Task loading was varied with Sternberg's task by requiring subjects to memorize one, four, or six alphanumeric characters. Simulated aircraft noise was varied between levels of 95, 105 and 115 dB OASPL using a pink noise source. Results show that the addition of Sternberg's task and little effect on the intelligibility of the communication task while response time for the communication task increased.

  3. A Comparative Study: Oral Communication Education in Norway and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizer, Elizabeth

    Acknowledging that, although a survey of educational offerings in Norway reveals courses in theater, mass media, and speech therapy, the curriculum does not contain oral communication courses per se, such as those found in the United States, this article compares how and why general education systems and speech education have developed differently…

  4. A Comparative Study of Information and Communications Technology Policy in Primary Education in Two Small Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xuereb, Kay

    2006-01-01

    Research into small island states emerged during the period of decolonisation with comparative case studies making a valuable contribution. This study was undertaken to evaluate information and communications technology (ICT) policies in primary education in Malta and Jamaica and to consider the influence of small island status on policy and its…

  5. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaiprasurt, Chantorn; Esichaikul, Vatcharaporn

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an…

  6. A Comparative Study of Information and Communications Technology Policy in Primary Education in Two Small Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xuereb, Kay

    2006-01-01

    Research into small island states emerged during the period of decolonisation with comparative case studies making a valuable contribution. This study was undertaken to evaluate information and communications technology (ICT) policies in primary education in Malta and Jamaica and to consider the influence of small island status on policy and its…

  7. A Comparative Study: Oral Communication Education in Norway and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizer, Elizabeth

    Acknowledging that, although a survey of educational offerings in Norway reveals courses in theater, mass media, and speech therapy, the curriculum does not contain oral communication courses per se, such as those found in the United States, this article compares how and why general education systems and speech education have developed differently…

  8. Spelling: A Fundamental Skill for Effective Business Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of effective written communication to the successful management of business enterprises. Examines the significance of correct spelling and the development of spelling competence. (CT)

  9. Social Interaction Between Deaf Preschoolers and Their Mothers: The Effects of Communication Method and Communication Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Mark T.

    The present study examined the effects of communication mode (oral vs. oral plus manual) and level of communicative competence (high vs. low) on profoundly deaf preschool children's play interactions with their hearing mothers. The sample consisted of 28 dyads equally divided into groups of oral and simultaneous (oral plus manual) communicators…

  10. Undergraduate Students As Effective Climate Change Communicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, H. O.; Joseph, J.; Mullendore, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), San Antonio College (SAC), and the University of North Dakota (UND) have partnered with NASA to provide underrepresented undergraduates from UTSA, SAC, and other community colleges climate-related research and education experiences through the Climate Change Communication: Engineer, Environmental science, and Education (C3E3) project. The program aims to develop a robust response to climate change by providing K-16 climate change education; enhance the effectiveness of K-16 education particularly in engineering and other STEM disciplines by use of new instructional technologies; increase the enrollment in engineering programs and the number of engineering degrees awarded by showing engineering's usefulness in relation to the much-discussed contemporary issue of climate change; increase persistence in STEM degrees by providing student research opportunities; and increase the ethnic diversity of those receiving engineering degrees and help ensure an ethnically diverse response to climate change. Students participated in the second summer internship funded by the project. The program is in its third year. More than 75 students participated in a guided research experiences aligned with NASA Science Plan objectives for climate and Earth system science and the educational objectives of the three institutions. The students went through training in modern media technology (webcasts), and in using this technology to communicate the information on climate change to others, especially high school students, culminating in production of webcasts on investigating the aspects of climate change using NASA data. Content developed is leveraged by NASA Earth observation data and NASA Earth system models and tools. Three Colleges were involved in the program: Engineering, Education, and Science.

  11. Comparative evaluation of the content and structure of communication using two handoff tools: implications for patient safety.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Joanna; Kannampallil, Thomas G; Almoosa, Khalid F; Patel, Bela; Patel, Vimla L

    2014-04-01

    Handoffs vary in their structure and content, raising concerns regarding standardization. We conducted a comparative evaluation of the nature and patterns of communication on 2 functionally similar but conceptually different handoff tools: Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan, based on a patient problem-based format, and Handoff Intervention Tool (HAND-IT), based on a body system-based format. A nonrandomized pre-post prospective intervention study supported by audio recordings and observations of 82 resident handoffs was conducted in a medical intensive care unit. Qualitative analysis was complemented with exploratory sequential pattern analysis techniques to capture the characteristics and types of communication events (CEs) and breakdowns. Use of HAND-IT led to fewer communication breakdowns (F1,80 = 45.66: P < .0001), greater number of CEs (t40 = 4.56; P < .001), with more ideal CEs than Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan (t40 = 9.27; P < .001). In addition, the use of HAND-IT was characterized by more request-response CE transitions. The HAND-IT's body system-based structure afforded physicians the ability to better organize and comprehend patient information and led to an interactive and streamlined communication, with limited external input. Our results also emphasize the importance of information organization using a medical knowledge hierarchical format for fostering effective communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Wildland fire and fuel management: principles for effective communication

    Treesearch

    Eric Toman; Bruce Shindler

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss four principles identified through recent research for effective citizen-agency communication and examine their use in accomplishing fire management objectives. Principles include the following: (1) effective communication is a product of effective planning; (2) both unidirectional (one-way) and interactive approaches are part of successful...

  13. Effective Communication between Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawley, Ji Ji; Moore, Jenifer; Smajic, Almir

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews research on communication between preservice and cooperating teachers during a teacher internship. The research reveals that poor communication between preservice teachers and cooperating teachers can cause barriers to planning lessons, feedback, and teaching experiences. Additionally, research indicates that…

  14. Effective Communication between Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawley, Ji Ji; Moore, Jenifer; Smajic, Almir

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews research on communication between preservice and cooperating teachers during a teacher internship. The research reveals that poor communication between preservice teachers and cooperating teachers can cause barriers to planning lessons, feedback, and teaching experiences. Additionally, research indicates that…

  15. Effective Managerial Communication through Employee Newsletters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltman, John L.; Golen, Steven P.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the employee newsletter as a medium of managerial communication, and details the newsletter's usual contents and functions. Illustrates how managers can use newsletters to communicate information, as well as motivate employees and unify an organization. Describes the newsletter editor's role and typical problems editors encounter. (MM)

  16. Effective communication: a powerful risk management tool.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F

    1993-01-01

    Physicians can employ communication techniques to improve patient diagnoses, outcomes, and satisfaction and ultimately to decrease their risk of malpractice suit. The skills outlined in this article form the basis of the Miles Program for Physician-Patient Communication of which the author is a participant.

  17. Effectively Communicating Science to Extension Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of "framing" within the context of relevant communication and psychological research and considers its potential applicability to Extension science communication. Examples of research-based support for the framing of scientific issues are presented, along with a literature-based discussion of the…

  18. Effectively Communicating Science to Extension Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of "framing" within the context of relevant communication and psychological research and considers its potential applicability to Extension science communication. Examples of research-based support for the framing of scientific issues are presented, along with a literature-based discussion of the…

  19. Effective Listening: Key to Intimate Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiquist, Jack

    Intended for those who teach dyadic communication, this paper argues that each partner in an intimate relationship has two primary communication needs: (1) to listen, look at, and pay attention to the "self" in order to attain clear awareness as a source of information for self-disclosure; and (2) to listen, look at, and pay attention to…

  20. Comparing Thin Slices of Verbal Communication Behavior of Varying Number and Duration

    PubMed Central

    Carcone, April Idalski; Naar-King, Sylvie; Eggly, Susan; Foster, Tanina; Albrecht, Terrance; Brogan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of thin slices to characterize the verbal communication behavior of counselors and patients engaged in Motivational Interviewing sessions relative to fully coded sessions. Methods Four thin slice samples that varied in number (four versus six slices) and duration (one- versus two-minutes) were extracted from a previously coded dataset. In the parent study, an observational code scheme was used to characterize specific counselor and patient verbal communication behaviors. For the current study, we compared the frequency of communication codes and the correlations among the full dataset and each thin slice sample. Results Both the proportion of communication codes and strength of the correlation demonstrated the highest degree of accuracy when a greater number (i.e., six versus four) and duration (i.e., two- versus one-minute) of slices were extracted. Conclusion These results suggest that thin slice sampling may be a useful and accurate strategy to reduce coding burden when coding specific verbal communication behaviors within clinical encounters. Practice Implications We suggest researchers interested in using thin slice sampling in their own work conduct preliminary research to determine the number and duration of thin slices required to accurately characterize the behaviors of interest. PMID:25441095

  1. Comparing thin slices of verbal communication behavior of varying number and duration.

    PubMed

    Carcone, April Idalski; Naar, Sylvie; Eggly, Susan; Foster, Tanina; Albrecht, Terrance L; Brogan, Kathryn E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of thin slices to characterize the verbal communication behavior of counselors and patients engaged in Motivational Interviewing sessions relative to fully coded sessions. Four thin slice samples that varied in number (four versus six slices) and duration (one- versus two-minutes) were extracted from a previously coded dataset. In the parent study, an observational code scheme was used to characterize specific counselor and patient verbal communication behaviors. For the current study, we compared the frequency of communication codes and the correlations among the full dataset and each thin slice sample. Both the proportion of communication codes and strength of the correlation demonstrated the highest degree of accuracy when a greater number (i.e., six versus four) and duration (i.e., two- versus one-minute) of slices were extracted. These results suggest that thin slice sampling may be a useful and accurate strategy to reduce coding burden when coding specific verbal communication behaviors within clinical encounters. We suggest researchers interested in using thin slice sampling in their own work conduct preliminary research to determine the number and duration of thin slices required to accurately characterize the behaviors of interest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physician communication coaching effects on patient experience.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Adrianne; Knee, Alexander; Shaaban, Reham; Bryson, Christine; Paadam, Jasmine; Harvey, Rohini; Igarashi, Satoko; LaChance, Christopher; Benjamin, Evan; Lagu, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Excellent communication is a necessary component of high-quality health care. We aimed to determine whether a training module could improve patients' perceptions of physician communication behaviors, as measured by change over time in domains of patient experience scores related to physician communication. We designed a comprehensive physician-training module focused on improving specific "etiquette-based" physician communication skills through standardized simulations and physician coaching with structured feedback. We employed a quasi-experimental pre-post design, with an intervention group consisting of internal medicine hospitalists and residents and a control group consisting of surgeons. The outcome was percent "always" scores for questions related to patients' perceptions of physician communication using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and a Non-HCAHPS Physician-Specific Patient Experience Survey (NHPPES) administered to patients cared for by hospitalists. A total of 128 physicians participated in the simulation. Responses from 5020 patients were analyzed using HCAHPS survey data and 1990 patients using NHPPES survey data. The intercept shift, or the degree of change from pre-intervention percent "always" responses, for the HCAHPS questions of doctors "treating patients with courtesy" "explaining things in a way patients could understand," and "overall teamwork" showed no significant differences between surgical control and hospitalist intervention patients. Adjusted NHPPES percent excellent survey results increased significantly post-intervention for the questions of specified individual doctors "keeping patient informed" (adjusted intercept shift 9.9% P = 0.019), "overall teamwork" (adjusted intercept shift 11%, P = 0.037), and "using words the patient could understand" (adjusted intercept shift 14.8%, p = 0.001). A simulation based physician communication coaching method focused on specific "etiquette

  3. Communication Effectiveness of Individuals with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Laura J.; Beukelman, David R.; Pattee, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among speech intelligibility and communication effectiveness as rated by speakers and their listeners. Participants completed procedures to measure (a) speech intelligibility, (b) self-perceptions of communication effectiveness, and (c) listener (spouse or family member) perceptions of…

  4. Communication Effectiveness of Individuals with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Laura J.; Beukelman, David R.; Pattee, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among speech intelligibility and communication effectiveness as rated by speakers and their listeners. Participants completed procedures to measure (a) speech intelligibility, (b) self-perceptions of communication effectiveness, and (c) listener (spouse or family member) perceptions of…

  5. Effective Patient-Provider Communication in Pediatric Obesity.

    PubMed

    Carcone, April Idalski; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Brogan Hartlieb, Kathryn E; Albrecht, Terrance; Martin, Tim

    2016-06-01

    Effective patient-provider communication is not a primary focus of medical school curricula. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centered, directive communication framework appropriate for in health care. Research on MI's causal mechanisms has established patient change talk as a mediator of behavior change. Current MI research focuses on identifying which provider communication skills are responsible for evoking change talk. MI recommends informing, asking, and listening. Research provides evidence that asking for and reflecting patient change talk are effective communication strategies, but cautions providers to inform judiciously. Supporting a patient's decision making autonomy is an important strategy to promote health behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effective Interpersonal Communication: A Practical Guide to Improve Your Life.

    PubMed

    Vertino, Kathleen A

    2014-09-30

    Use of effective interpersonal communication strategies by nurses in both personal and professional settings, may reduce stress, promote wellness, and therefore, improve overall quality of life. This article briefly explores the concept of interpersonal communication as it relates to Maslow's hierarchy of human needs; describes personal variables and the interaction of internal and external variables that can impact communication; and discusses possible causes and consequences of ineffective communication. Drawing on both the literature and experiences as a longtime provider of care in the mental health field, the author offers multiple practical strategies, with specific examples of possible responses for effective communication. Recommendations in this article are intended for nurses to consider as they seek healthy communication strategies that may be useful in both their personal and professional lives.

  7. Which alternative communication methods are effective for voiceless patients in Intensive Care Units? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Helen; Astin, Felicity; Munro, Wendy

    2017-03-29

    To assess the effectiveness of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) strategies to enable people who are temporarily voiceless due to medical intervention, to communicate. A systematic review informed by a protocol published on an international register. Ten databases were searched from January 2004 to January 2017. Included studies assessed the effect of using AAC strategies on patient related outcomes and barriers to their use. All included studies were quality appraised. Due to the heterogeneity of interventions and outcome measures findings were narratively reviewed. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review reporting outcomes from 1981 patient and 454 health professional participants. The quality of included studies were moderate to weak. AAC communication strategies increased the number of communication interactions, improved patient satisfaction with communication and reduced communication difficulties. Barriers to usage were device characteristics, the clinical condition of the patient, lack of timeliness in communication and staff constraints. There is preliminary, but inconsistent evidence that AAC strategies are effective in improving patient satisfaction with communication and reducing difficulties in communication. A lack of comparable studies precluded the identification of the most effective AAC strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparing two types of augmentative and alternative communication systems for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Son, Seung-Hyun; Sigafoos, Jeff; O'Reilly, Mark; Lancioni, Giulio E

    2006-01-01

    This study compared acquisition and preference for two types of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems in three pre-schoolers with autism. Acquisition of requesting behaviour using a picture-exchange system vs a voice-output communication aide (VOCA) was compared in an alternating treatments design. Following acquisition, both ACC systems were simultaneously available and the child could select which one of the two systems to use. There was little difference between picture-exchange and VOCA in terms of acquisition rates. Two children demonstrated a consistent preference for picture-exchange and the third showed a preference for the VOCA. Both speed of acquisition and system preference should be considered when designing AAC interventions for children with autism and related developmental disabilities.

  9. Intracardiac versus transesophageal echocardiography to guide transcatheter closure of interatrial communications: Nationwide trend and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Fahad; Bhirud, Ashwin; Aljohani, Sami; Mills, James; Kawsara, Akram; Runkana, Ashok; Alkhouli, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess current temporal trends in utilization of ICE versus TEE guided closure of interatrial communications, and to compare periprocedural complications and resource utilization between the two imaging modalities. While transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has historically been used to guide percutaneous structural heart interventions, intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) is being increasingly utilized to guide many of these procedures such as closure of interatrial communications. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, all patients aged >18 years, who underwent ASD or PFO closure with either ICE or TEE guidance between 2003 and 2014 were included. Comparative analysis of outcomes and resource utilization was performed using a propensity score-matching model. ICE guidance for interatrial communication closure increased from 9.7% in 2003 to 50.6% in 2014. In the matched model, the primary endpoint of major adverse cardiovascular events occurred less frequently in the ICE group versus the TEE group (11.1% vs 14.3%, respectively, P = 0.008), mainly driven by less vascular complications in the ICE group (0.5% vs 1.3%, P = 0.045). Length of stay was shorter in the ICE group (3 ± 4 vs 4 ± 4 days, P < 0.0001). Cost was similar in the two groups 18 454 ± 17 035$ in the TEE group vs 18 278 ± 15 780$ in the ICE group (P = 0.75). Intracardiac echocardiogram utilization to guide closure of interatrial communications has plateaued after a rapid rise throughout the 2000s. When utilized to guide interatrial communication closure procedure, ICE is as safe as TEE and does not increase cost or prolonged hospitalizations. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  11. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  12. Exploring dietitians' verbal and nonverbal communication skills for effective dietitian-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Cant, R P; Aroni, R A

    2008-10-01

    Little is known about how dietitians conduct their communication with individual patients in the process of nutrition education. To study this issue, both practitioners' and patients' perceptions of dietitians' skills were examined in the first phase of a two-phase study. The resulting narratives were used to develop a questionnaire to survey Australian dietitians involved in clinical practice. A purposive sample of dietitians in one state (n = 46; 12%), working in hospital, community or private practice, and a quota of their adult patients (n = 34), were interviewed. In the second stage, Australian dietitians (n = 258; 16%) responded to a national survey in 2006, which asked about educational strategies, communication skills, and professional attributes. Descriptive statistics were used to compare response distributions, and nonparametric statistics were used to examine between-group relationships. Criterion for item acceptance was established as >or=70% agreement. Triangulation of results revealed strong agreement between data sources. Four main communication competencies were established: interpersonal communication skill, nonverbal communication, professional values, and counselling skill. There was no significant difference in practice by work category or experience. The communication competencies, together with 26 accompanying skills, are described. An understanding of this guide to communication practice might help enhance dietitian-patient relations.

  13. The development of pointing perception in infancy: effects of communicative signals on covert shifts of attention.

    PubMed

    Daum, Moritz M; Ulber, Julia; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to investigate the interplay of verbal and nonverbal communication with respect to infants' perception of pointing gestures. Infants were presented with still images of pointing hands (cue) in combination with an acoustic stimulus. The communicative content of this acoustic stimulus was varied from being human and communicative to artificial. Saccadic reaction times (SRTs) from the cue to a peripheral target were measured as an indicator of the modulation of covert attention. A significant cueing effect (facilitated SRTs for congruent compared with incongruent trials) was only present in a condition with additional communicative and referential speech. In addition, the size of the cueing effect increased the more human and communicative the acoustic stimulus was. This indicates a beneficial effect of verbal communication on the perception of nonverbal communicative pointing gestures, emphasizing the important role of verbal communication in facilitating social understanding across domains. These findings additionally suggest that human and communicative (ostensive) signals are not qualitatively different from other less social signals but just quantitatively the most attention grabbing among a number of other signals.

  14. Are pharmaceutical marketing decisions calibrated to communications effects?

    PubMed

    Cavusgil, Erin; Calantone, Roger

    2011-10-01

    Marketing managers continually struggle with how to maximize the effects of an integrated marketing communications strategy. The growing number of available communication outlets, as well as highly varying competitive landscapes, adds further complexity to this challenge. This empirical study examines the differential impact within a pharmaceutical market therapeutic category where both "push" and "pull" communication strategies operate on consumers and gatekeepers alike, in an atmosphere of unrelenting product innovation and broad competition. Furthermore, we explore how two contingency variables-(a) the competitive landscape, and (b) the product's length of time on the market-interact with these communication efforts and affect brand and category sales.

  15. Effective improvement of doctor–patient communication: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hobma, Sjoerd; Ram, Paul; Muijtjens, Arno; van der Vleuten, Cees; Grol, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background Doctor–patient communication is an essential component of general practice. Improvement of GPs' communication patterns is an important target of training programmes. Available studies have so far failed to provide conclusive evidence of the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve doctor–patient communication. Aim To examine the effectiveness of a learner-centred approach that focuses on actual needs, to improve GPs' communication with patients. Design of study Randomised controlled trial. Setting One hundred volunteer GPs in the Netherlands. Method The intervention identified individual GPs' deficiencies in communication skills by observing authentic consultations in their own surgery. This performance assessment was followed by structured activities in small group meetings, aimed at remedying the identified shortcomings. Outcomes were measured using videotaped consultations in the GPs' own surgery before and after the intervention. Communication skills were rated using the MAAS-Global, a validated checklist. Results The scores in the intervention group demonstrated a significant improvement compared with those of the control group (95% confidence interval = 0.04 to 0.75). The effect size was moderate to large (d-value = 0.66). The level of participation significantly contributed to the effectiveness. Largest improvement was found on patient-centred communication skills. Conclusion The approach of structured individual improvement activities based on performance assessment is more effective in improving communication skills than current educational activities. PMID:16882375

  16. Family Communication: Strategies for Building Effective Partnerships and Working Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamash, Emily R.; Martin, Alyson M.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a variety of strategies for pre-service and beginning teachers to utilize in order to create positive and effective relationships with families that are built on clear communication and trust. It is crucial for new and veteran teachers to understand the importance of successful communication with parents and families of…

  17. An Activity for Teaching the Effects of Nonverbal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Whitney Botsford; King, Eden B.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a novel teaching activity that allows students in diversity, leadership, and communication courses to observe the powerful effects of nonverbal communication. The nonverbal experiences female leaders may encounter as they rise through the ranks of organizations are simulated and consequences discussed. Two student volunteers…

  18. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Developing Effective Communication in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Cresencio; Katz, Judy H.

    Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) is a method that teachers can use to increase their communication effectiveness by matching their communication patterns with those of their students. The basic premise of NLP is that people operate and make sense of their experience through information received from the world around them. This information is…

  19. Neuro-Linguistics Programming: Developing Effective Communication in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Cresencio; Katz, Judy H.

    1983-01-01

    Students and teachers experience the world primarily through visual, kinesthetic, or auditory representational systems. If teachers are aware of their own favored system and those of their students, classroom communication will improve. Neurolinguistic programing can help teachers become more effective communicators. (PP)

  20. The Significance of Congruent Communication in Effective Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dave F.

    2005-01-01

    Effective communication is the basis of developing an environment of mutual respect between students and teachers. The more congruent the communication is between students and teachers, the more likely students are to become willing participants in the learning process, and the more likely it is that the teacher can maintain a comfortable…

  1. The Significance of Congruent Communication in Effective Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dave F.

    2005-01-01

    Effective communication is the basis of developing an environment of mutual respect between students and teachers. The more congruent the communication is between students and teachers, the more likely students are to become willing participants in the learning process, and the more likely it is that the teacher can maintain a comfortable…

  2. Focal Event, Contextualization, and Effective Communication in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Per; Ryve, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to develop analytical tools for studying mathematical communication in collaborative activities. The theoretical construct of contextualization is elaborated methodologically in order to study diversity in individual thinking in relation to effective communication. The construct of contextualization highlights issues of…

  3. Creating the Conditions for Effective Communication and Learning in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Monica

    2008-01-01

    The author believes that effective communication is an essential factor in overcoming differences and creating an environment where people can come together to learn, work, or play. Communication on the surface seems a straightforward endeavour. In practice, it is fraught with a multitude of issues that are dependent on the parties involved, who…

  4. Amelia Bedelia in the Library or Effective Communication for Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Frances Ruth

    This paper discusses ways in which how both formal and informal library leaders can utilize communication principles to persuade, motivate, and build positive employee relations. Noting that effective communication takes time, it is suggested that administrators talk with, not to, individual staff members, and that they (1) use direct eye contact;…

  5. The Relationship of Cultural Similarity, Communication Effectiveness and Uncertainty Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koester, Jolene; Olebe, Margaret

    To investigate the relationship of cultural similarity/dissimilarity, communication effectiveness, and communication variables associated with uncertainty reduction theory, a study examined two groups of students--a multinational group living on an "international floor" in a dormitory at a state university and an unrelated group of U.S.…

  6. Neuro-Linguistics Programming: Developing Effective Communication in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Cresencio; Katz, Judy H.

    1983-01-01

    Students and teachers experience the world primarily through visual, kinesthetic, or auditory representational systems. If teachers are aware of their own favored system and those of their students, classroom communication will improve. Neurolinguistic programing can help teachers become more effective communicators. (PP)

  7. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Developing Effective Communication in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Cresencio; Katz, Judy H.

    Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) is a method that teachers can use to increase their communication effectiveness by matching their communication patterns with those of their students. The basic premise of NLP is that people operate and make sense of their experience through information received from the world around them. This information is…

  8. Focal Event, Contextualization, and Effective Communication in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Per; Ryve, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to develop analytical tools for studying mathematical communication in collaborative activities. The theoretical construct of contextualization is elaborated methodologically in order to study diversity in individual thinking in relation to effective communication. The construct of contextualization highlights issues of…

  9. TV Viewing Compared to Book Reading and Toy Playing Reduces Responsive Maternal Communication with Toddlers and Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Amy I.; Rasmussen, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the amount and style of maternal communication with toddlers and preschoolers while mother-child pairs watched TV, read books, and played with toys. We found that mother-child communication was less frequent and less verbally responsive when dyads viewed TV compared with when they read books, and in many cases, when they played…

  10. Effect of the patient-to-patient communication model on dysphagia caused by total laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Tian, L; An, R; Zhang, J; Sun, Y; Zhao, R; Liu, M

    2017-03-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of a patient-to-patient communication model on dysphagia in laryngeal cancer patients after total laryngectomy. Sixty-five patients who had undergone total laryngectomy were randomly divided into three groups: a routine communication group, a patient communication group (that received the patient-to-patient communication model) and a physician communication group. Questionnaires were used to compare quality of life and swallowing problems among all patient groups. The main factors causing dysphagia in total laryngectomy patients were related to fear and mental health. The patient communication group had improved visual analogue scale scores at one week after starting to eat. Quality of life in swallowing disorders questionnaire scores were significantly higher in the patient communication and physician communication groups than in the routine communication group. In addition, swallowing problems were much more severe in patients educated to high school level and above than in others. The patient-to-patient communication model can be used to resolve swallowing problems caused by psychological factors in total laryngectomy patients.

  11. The cost-effectiveness of health communication programs: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Wheeler, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    While a considerable body of evidence has emerged supporting the effectiveness of communication programs in augmenting health, only a very small subset of studies has examined also whether these programs are cost-effective, that is, whether they achieve greater health gains for available financial resources than alternative interventions. In this article, we examine the available literature on the cost-effectiveness of health behavior change communication programs, focusing on communication interventions involving mass media, and, to a lesser extent, community mobilization and interpersonal communication or counseling. Our objective is to identify the state of past and current research efforts of the cost-effectiveness of behavior change communication programs. This review makes three principal conclusions. First, the analysis of the cost-effectiveness of health communication programs commonly has not been performed. Second, the studies reviewed here have utilized a considerable diversity of methods and have reflected varying levels of quality and adherence to standard cost-effectiveness methodologies. This leads to problems of transparency, comparability, and generalizability. Third, while the available studies generally are indicative of the cost-effectiveness of communication interventions relative to alternatives, the evidence base clearly needs to be expanded by additional rigorous cost-effectiveness analyses.

  12. The Effect of Karate Techniques Training on Communication Deficit of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Fatimah; Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Marandi, Sayed Mohammad; Sorensen, Carl

    2016-03-01

    This investigation examined the long term effect of Karate techniques training on communication of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Thirty school aged children with ASD were randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 15) or a control group (n = 15). Participants in the exercise group were engaged in 14 weeks of Karate techniques training. Communication deficit at baseline, post-intervention (week 14), and at 1 month follow up were evaluated. Exercise group showed significant reduction in communication deficit compared to control group. Moreover, reduction in communication deficit in the exercise group at one month follow up remained unchanged compared to post-intervention time. We concluded that teaching Karate techniques to children with ASD leads to significant reduction in their communication deficit.

  13. Communicating Effectively About Organ Donation: A Randomized Trial of a Behavioral Communication Intervention to Improve Discussions About Donation

    PubMed Central

    Siminoff, Laura A.; Traino, Heather M.; Genderson, Maureen Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Background Families’ refusal to authorize solid organ donation contributes to the organ deficit in the United States. The importance of communication to reducing refusal to requests for solid organ donation at the bedside and thus increasing the supply of transplantable organs cannot be overstated. This research compares 2 versions of an innovative communication skills training program for organ procurement organization request staff, Communicating Effectively About Donation (CEaD), designed to improve the quantity and quality of organ donation discussions with family decision makers of deceased patients. Methods We conducted a parallel group randomized controlled trial of the CEaD intervention, comparing an online only version of the training (CEaD1) with the online version bolstered with in-person practice and feedback (CEaD2). Survey and interview data were collected from 1603 family decision makers and 273 requesters to assess the impact of both versions of the CEaD on requesters’ communication skills and behaviors; the rate of family authorization to solid organ donation was obtained from administrative data provided by 9 organ procurement organizations. Results Results revealed higher rates of authorization for requesters with less tenure (78% to 89%, P < 0.03) for both versions; however, CEaD1 also increased authorization rates for requesters with 3 or more years of experience (89% to 92%, P < 0.03). Both conditions resulted in an improvement in overall communication quality. Conclusions We conclude that the CEaD was effective in improving requesters’ communication skills, rates of family authorization to organ donation, and the overall quality of the donation experience. PMID:26146659

  14. Communicating Effectively about Organ Donation: A Randomized Trial of a Behavioral Communication Intervention to Improve Discussions about Donation.

    PubMed

    Siminoff, Laura A; Traino, Heather M; Genderson, Maureen Wilson

    2015-03-01

    Families' refusal to authorize solid organ donation contributes to the organ deficit in the United States. The importance of communication to reducing refusal to requests for solid organ donation at the bedside and thus increasing the supply of transplantable organs cannot be overstated. This research compares two versions of an innovative communication skills training program for Organ Procurement Organization (OPO) request staff, Communicating Effectively About Donation (CEaD), designed to improve the quantity and quality of organ donation discussions with family decision makers (FDM) of deceased patients. We conducted a parallel-group randomized controlled trial of the CEaD intervention, comparing an online only version of the training (CEaD1) with the online version bolstered with in-person practice and feedback (CEaD2). Survey and interview data were collected from 1,603 FDMs and 273 requesters to assess the impact of both versions of the CEaD on requesters' communication skills and behaviors; the rate of family authorization to solid organ donation were obtained from administrative data provided by 9 OPOs. Results revealed higher rates of authorization for requesters with less tenure (78% to 89%, p < .03) for both versions; however, CEaD1 also increased authorization rates for requesters with three or more years of experience (89% to 92%, p < .03). Both conditions resulted in an improvement in overall communication quality. We conclude that the CEaD was effective in improving requesters' communication skills, rates of family authorization to organ donation, and the overall quality of the donation experience.

  15. Effective Chemistry Communication in Informal Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry plays a critical role in daily life, impacting areas such as medicine and health, consumer products, energy production, the ecosystem, and many other areas. Communicating about chemistry in informal environments has the potential to raise public interest and understanding of chemistry around the world. However, the chemistry community…

  16. Exploring Effective Communication for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Eric John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore experiences and perceptions of organizational leaders regarding organizational change communication to improve change results in an organizational setting. Building on a conceptual framework of organizational theory, 25 full-time online faculty at an institution of higher learning in the southwestern…

  17. Cue Effectiveness in Communicatively Efficient Discourse Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Ting; Jaeger, T. Florian

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a surge in accounts motivated by information theory that consider language production to be partially driven by a preference for communicative efficiency. Evidence from discourse production (i.e., production beyond the sentence level) has been argued to suggest that speakers distribute information across discourse so as to…

  18. Communication and Teaching Effectiveness in Industrial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Churchill L.; Becker, Samuel L.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of communication skills in the vocational education teaching/learning process is underscored. The most important measures which differentiated good from poor teaching were: teacher dynamism, teacher delivery, time spent with students, positive reinforcement of students, and positive attitude toward the students. (RC)

  19. Effective Communication: Faculty and Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This guide offers guidance to college instructors about working with students who have communication-related disabilities including speech, language, hearing, emotional, or medical disorders. It offers some general accommodation strategies including a statement in the syllabus encouraging students to discuss any special needs with you, ask the…

  20. Cue Effectiveness in Communicatively Efficient Discourse Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Ting; Jaeger, T. Florian

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a surge in accounts motivated by information theory that consider language production to be partially driven by a preference for communicative efficiency. Evidence from discourse production (i.e., production beyond the sentence level) has been argued to suggest that speakers distribute information across discourse so as to…

  1. Effective International Communication by Word of Mouth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCarthy, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the significance of communication in the present-day world and the various factors affecting the comprehensibility of spoken English. Warns aqainst stressing fluency at the cost of correct pronunciation and against dogmatic preference for certain varieties of English. (IFS/WGA)

  2. Effective Chemistry Communication in Informal Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry plays a critical role in daily life, impacting areas such as medicine and health, consumer products, energy production, the ecosystem, and many other areas. Communicating about chemistry in informal environments has the potential to raise public interest and understanding of chemistry around the world. However, the chemistry community…

  3. A Black Perspective on Interethnic Communication Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Ribeau, Sidney

    A study investigated the issues that Blacks perceive as salient to their satisfaction and dissatisfaction with communication with Whites, and whether these issues were independent of age, biological sex, and income. Two groups of subjects, selected from economically determined working class students in a large introductory speech communication…

  4. Exploring Effective Communication for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Eric John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore experiences and perceptions of organizational leaders regarding organizational change communication to improve change results in an organizational setting. Building on a conceptual framework of organizational theory, 25 full-time online faculty at an institution of higher learning in the southwestern…

  5. The Effectiveness of a Patient Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Harue J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports data from three consecutive classes of first- year optometry students at the Southern California College of Optometry, who were tested preceding and following completion of a patient communication course. Findings indicated that students improved their ability to respond to patients and were better able to discriminate among various levels…

  6. Affirming the connection: comparative findings on communication issues from hospice patients and hematology survivors.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2004-11-01

    The following discussion presents comparative findings from hospice patients and hematology survivors on the topic of talking about dying to significant others within their network of family and friends. The insights have been gathered from an Australian research program that is exploring the notion of spirituality in relation to serious illness. The findings document the participants' awareness, acceptance, and fear of dying. It documents the difficulty associated with talking about dying, which creates voids in relationships and deprives seriously ill individuals of their sense of normality, at a time when they have a strong need to talk and share experiences. Six specific blocks to communication are explored, along with as emphasis on the importance of communicating with others who have a similar life experience.

  7. Social-communicative effects of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Lerna, Anna; Esposito, Dalila; Conson, Massimiliano; Russo, Luigi; Massagli, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a common treatment choice for non-verbal children with autism. However, little empirical evidence is available on the usefulness of PECS in treating social-communication impairments in autism. To test the effects of PECS on social-communicative skills in children with autism, concurrently taking into account standardized psychometric data, standardized functional assessment of adaptive behaviour, and information on social-communicative variables coded in an unstructured setting. Eighteen preschool children (mean age = 38.78 months) were assigned to two intervention approaches, i.e. PECS and Conventional Language Therapy (CLT). Both PECS (Phases I-IV) and CLT were delivered three times per week, in 30-min sessions, for 6 months. Outcome measures were the following: Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) domain scores for Communication and Reciprocal Social Interaction; Language and Personal-Social subscales of the Griffiths' Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS); Communication and Social Abilities domains of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS); and several social-communicative variables coded in an unstructured setting. Results demonstrated that the two groups did not differ at Time 1 (pre-treatment assessment), whereas at Time 2 (post-test) the PECS group showed a significant improvement with respect to the CLT group on the VABS social domain score and on almost all the social-communicative abilities coded in the unstructured setting (i.e. joint attention, request, initiation, cooperative play, but not eye contact). These findings showed that PECS intervention (Phases I-IV) can improve social-communicative skills in children with autism. This improvement is especially evident in standardized measures of adaptive behaviour and measures derived from the observation of children in an unstructured setting. © 2012 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  8. Exploring communication pathways to better health: Clinician communication of expectations for acupuncture effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Street, Richard L.; Cox, Vanessa; Kallen, Michael A.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study tested a pathway whereby acupuncturists’ communication of optimism for treatment effectiveness would enhance patients’ satisfaction during treatment, which in turn would contribute to better pain and function outcomes for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Secondary analysis from a 2 arm (real vs. sham acupuncture, high vs. neutral expectations) RCT. 311 patients with knee osteoarthritis received acupuncture over 10–12 sessions. Coders rated the degree to which acupuncturists communicated optimism for the treatment’s effectiveness. Satisfaction with acupuncture was assessed 4 weeks into treatment. Pain and function were assessed 6 weeks following treatment. Results Patients experiencing better outcomes were more satisfied with acupuncture during treatment, were younger, and had better baseline pain and function scores. Satisfaction during treatment was greater when patients interacted with more optimistic clinicians and had higher pretreatment expectations for acupuncture efficacy. Conclusion Acupuncturists’ communication of optimism about treatment effectiveness contributed to pain and function outcomes indirectly through its effect on satisfaction during treatment. Future research should model pathways through which clinician-patient communication affects mediating variables that in turn lead to improved health outcomes. Practical Implications While clinicians should not mislead patients, communicating hope and optimism for treatment effectiveness has therapeutic value for patients. PMID:22857778

  9. Effective Interpersonal Health Communication for Linkage to Care After HIV Diagnosis in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mabuto, Tonderai; Charalambous, Salome

    2017-01-01

    Background: Early in the global response to HIV, health communication was focused toward HIV prevention. More recently, the role of health communication along the entire HIV care continuum has been highlighted. We sought to describe how a strategy of interpersonal communication allows for precision health communication to influence behavior regarding care engagement. Methods: We analyzed 1 to 5 transcripts from clients participating in longitudinal counseling sessions from a communication strategy arm of a randomized trial to accelerate entry into care in South Africa. The counseling arm was selected because it increased verified entry into care by 40% compared with the standard of care. We used thematic analysis to identify key aspects of communication directed specifically toward a client's goals or concerns. Results: Of the participants, 18 of 28 were female and 21 entered HIV care within 90 days of diagnosis. Initiating a communication around client-perceived consequences of HIV was at times effective. However, counselors also probed around general topics of life disruption—such as potential for child bearing—as a technique to direct the conversation toward the participant's needs. Once individual concerns and needs were identified, counselors tried to introduce clinical care seeking and collaboratively discuss potential barriers and approaches to overcome to accessing that care. Conclusions: Through the use of interpersonal communication messages were focused on immediate needs and concerns of the client. When effectively delivered, it may be an important communication approach to improve care engagement. PMID:27930608

  10. Effective Interpersonal Health Communication for Linkage to Care After HIV Diagnosis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mabuto, Tonderai; Charalambous, Salome; Hoffmann, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Early in the global response to HIV, health communication was focused toward HIV prevention. More recently, the role of health communication along the entire HIV care continuum has been highlighted. We sought to describe how a strategy of interpersonal communication allows for precision health communication to influence behavior regarding care engagement. We analyzed 1 to 5 transcripts from clients participating in longitudinal counseling sessions from a communication strategy arm of a randomized trial to accelerate entry into care in South Africa. The counseling arm was selected because it increased verified entry into care by 40% compared with the standard of care. We used thematic analysis to identify key aspects of communication directed specifically toward a client's goals or concerns. Of the participants, 18 of 28 were female and 21 entered HIV care within 90 days of diagnosis. Initiating a communication around client-perceived consequences of HIV was at times effective. However, counselors also probed around general topics of life disruption-such as potential for child bearing-as a technique to direct the conversation toward the participant's needs. Once individual concerns and needs were identified, counselors tried to introduce clinical care seeking and collaboratively discuss potential barriers and approaches to overcome to accessing that care. Through the use of interpersonal communication messages were focused on immediate needs and concerns of the client. When effectively delivered, it may be an important communication approach to improve care engagement.

  11. The Second-Agent Effect: Communicative Gestures Increase the Likelihood of Perceiving a Second Agent

    PubMed Central

    Manera, Valeria; Del Giudice, Marco; Bara, Bruno G.; Verfaillie, Karl; Becchio, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Background Beyond providing cues about an agent's intention, communicative actions convey information about the presence of a second agent towards whom the action is directed (second-agent information). In two psychophysical studies we investigated whether the perceptual system makes use of this information to infer the presence of a second agent when dealing with impoverished and/or noisy sensory input. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants observed point-light displays of two agents (A and B) performing separate actions. In the Communicative condition, agent B's action was performed in response to a communicative gesture by agent A. In the Individual condition, agent A's communicative action was replaced with a non-communicative action. Participants performed a simultaneous masking yes-no task, in which they were asked to detect the presence of agent B. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether criterion c was lowered in the Communicative condition compared to the Individual condition, thus reflecting a variation in perceptual expectations. In Experiment 2, we manipulated the congruence between A's communicative gesture and B's response, to ascertain whether the lowering of c in the Communicative condition reflected a truly perceptual effect. Results demonstrate that information extracted from communicative gestures influences the concurrent processing of biological motion by prompting perception of a second agent (second-agent effect). Conclusions/Significance We propose that this finding is best explained within a Bayesian framework, which gives a powerful rationale for the pervasive role of prior expectations in visual perception. PMID:21829472

  12. Passing crisis and emergency risk communications: the effects of communication channel, information type, and repetition.

    PubMed

    Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Newbold, Lex; Titchener, Kirsteen

    2015-05-01

    Three experiments explore several factors which influence information transmission when warning messages are passed from person to person. In Experiment 1, messages were passed down chains of participants using five different modes of communication. Written communication channels resulted in more accurate message transmission than verbal. In addition, some elements of the message endured further down the chain than others. Experiment 2 largely replicated these effects and also demonstrated that simple repetition of a message eliminated differences between written and spoken communication. In a final field experiment, chains of participants passed information however they wanted to, with the proviso that half of the chains could not use telephones. Here, the lack of ability to use a telephone did not affect accuracy, but did slow down the speed of transmission from the recipient of the message to the last person in the chain. Implications of the findings for crisis and emergency risk communication are discussed.

  13. Engaging children's cooperation in the dental environment through effective communication.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A

    2006-01-01

    Establishing a trusting relationship with the child patient is a critical requisite for the pediatric dentist in gaining the child's cooperation in the provision of oral health care. Developing such a relationship is predicated on the establishment of effective communication. Many publications in the psychological literature, specifically the parenting literature, describe communication skills that are relevant to the pediatric dentist in effectively communicating with children in the dental environment. Yet, several of these approaches to communication are not generally discussed or advocated in the dental literature. Among these skills are: (1) reflective listening; (2) self-disclosing assertiveness; and (3) the use of descriptive praise. This article: (1) reviews these 3 skills; (2) describes their theoretical foundations; (3) provides examples of when they are useful in the dentist-child clinical encounter; and (4) indicates why they are important aspects of the pediatric dentist's communication repertoire in establishing a positive, empathetic, and mutually cooperative relationship with the child patient.

  14. Exploring the influence of vocal emotion expression on communicative effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Biersack, Sonja; Kempe, Vera

    2005-01-01

    This study explores whether speaker emotion influences communicative effectiveness. Two hundred participants rated their current emotional state and gave a description of a route on a simple map. The quality of the linguistic content of the descriptions was assessed using Latent Semantic Analysis. Six hundred participants provided route drawings based on the map descriptions. Median route deviation served as a measure of communicative effectiveness. Eighty additional participants rated invariant parts of the descriptions for perceived speaker happiness. Path analysis revealed that while speaker emotion did not affect the linguistic content of the descriptions, it had an effect on communicative effectiveness both through the effects of vocal cues directly as well as mediated by perceived happiness of speech. Specifically, higher first formants were associated with higher reported and perceived happiness as well as higher communicative effectiveness. Jitter, on the other hand, was negatively related to the perception of happiness and positively related to communicative effectiveness. These findings suggest that mood-related modulation of phonation and articulation can influence the effectiveness of communication in addition to message content.

  15. Hot or cold: is communicating anger or threats more effective in negotiation?

    PubMed

    Sinaceur, Marwan; Van Kleef, Gerben A; Neale, Margaret A; Adam, Hajo; Haag, Christophe

    2011-09-01

    Is communicating anger or threats more effective in eliciting concessions in negotiation? Recent research has emphasized the effectiveness of anger communication, an emotional strategy. In this article, we argue that anger communication conveys an implied threat, and we document that issuing threats is a more effective negotiation strategy than communicating anger. In 3 computer-mediated negotiation experiments, participants received either angry or threatening messages from a simulated counterpart. Experiment 1 showed that perceptions of threat mediated the effect of anger (vs. a control) on concessions. Experiment 2 showed that (a) threat communication elicited greater concessions than anger communication and (b) poise (being confident and in control of one's own feelings and decisions) ascribed to the counterpart mediated the positive effect of threat compared to anger on concessions. Experiment 3 replicated this positive effect of threat over anger when recipients had an attractive alternative to a negotiated agreement. These findings qualify previous research on anger communication in negotiation. Implications for the understanding of emotion and negotiation are discussed.

  16. I can see, hear, and smell your fear: comparing olfactory and audiovisual media in fear communication.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jasper H B; Semin, Gün R; Smeets, Monique A M

    2014-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that humans can become fearful after exposure to olfactory fear signals, yet these studies have reported the effects of fear chemosignals without examining emotion-relevant input from traditional communication modalities (i.e., vision, audition). The question that we pursued here was therefore: How significant is an olfactory fear signal in the broader context of audiovisual input that either confirms or contradicts olfactory information? To test this, we manipulated olfactory (fear, no fear) and audiovisual (fear, no fear) information and demonstrated that olfactory fear signals were as potent as audiovisual fear signals in eliciting a fearful facial expression. Irrespective of confirmatory or contradictory audiovisual information, olfactory fear signals produced by senders induced fear in receivers outside of conscious access. These findings run counter to traditional views that emotions are communicated exclusively via visual and linguistic channels.

  17. Netiquette: The Rules of the Road for Effective Internet Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnaly, Gene

    1997-01-01

    Presents guidelines for effective Internet communication. Discusses rules for creating e-mail messages; posting messages to online discussion groups and newsgroups; and using initialism and "emoticons." Presents a glossary of common Internet terms. (AEF)

  18. Netiquette: The Rules of the Road for Effective Internet Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnaly, Gene

    1997-01-01

    Presents guidelines for effective Internet communication. Discusses rules for creating e-mail messages; posting messages to online discussion groups and newsgroups; and using initialism and "emoticons." Presents a glossary of common Internet terms. (AEF)

  19. Impacts of Diversity on Communication Effectiveness: A Proposed Typology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Willie E.; Hopkins, Shirley A.

    1994-01-01

    Proposes a typology of impacts that greater increases in workforce diversity might have on communication effectiveness in organizations. Proposes the typology to stimulate further interest in the research domain. (SR)

  20. Adolescent Weight Control: An Intervention Targeting Parent Communication and Modeling Compared With Minimal Parental Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Wendy; Sato, Amy; Kuhl, Elizabeth; Rancourt, Diana; Oster, Danielle; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adolescent weight control interventions demonstrate variable findings, with inconsistent data regarding the appropriate role for parents. The current study examined the efficacy of a standard adolescent behavioral weight control (BWC) intervention that also targeted parent–adolescent communication and parental modeling of healthy behaviors (Standard Behavioral Treatment + Enhanced Parenting; SBT + EP) compared with a standard BWC intervention (SBT). Methods 49 obese adolescents (M age = 15.10; SD = 1.33; 76% female; 67.3% non-Hispanic White) and a caregiver were randomly assigned to SBT or SBT + EP. Adolescent and caregiver weight and height, parental modeling, and weight-related communication were obtained at baseline and end of the 16-week intervention. Results Significant decreases in adolescent weight and increases in parental self-monitoring were observed across both conditions. Analyses of covariance revealed a trend for greater reduction in weight and negative maternal commentary among SBT condition participants. Conclusions Contrary to hypotheses, targeting parent–adolescent communication and parental modeling did not lead to better outcomes in adolescent weight control. PMID:25294840

  1. Communicate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Stuart

    This ten chapter book is designed to provide high school students with an understanding of basic communication processes. The first five chapters include discussions of language development, function, and acquisition in relation to both human and non-human communication. The sixth chapter contains specimen linguistic analyses of speech and…

  2. Effects of Communication Partner Instruction on the Communication of Individuals using AAC: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kent-Walsh, Jennifer; Murza, Kimberly A; Malani, Melissa D; Binger, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) partner instruction intervention literature to determine (a) the overall effects of partner interventions on the communication of individuals using AAC, and (b) any possible moderating variables relating to participant, intervention, or outcome characteristics. Seventeen single-case experimental design studies (53 participants) met the inclusion criteria and were advanced to the full coding and analysis phase of the investigation. Descriptive analyses and effect size estimations using the Improvement Rate Difference (IRD) metric were conducted. Overall, communication partner interventions were found to be highly effective across a range of participants using AAC, intervention approaches, and outcome measure characteristics, with more evidence available for participants less than 12 years of age, most of whom had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder or intellectual/developmental disability. Aided AAC modeling, expectant delay, and open-ended question asking were the most frequently targeted communication partner interaction skills. Providing a descriptive overview, instructor modeling, guided practice, and role plays were the most frequently incorporated communication partner intervention activities within the included studies.

  3. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  4. Effects of clinical communication interventions in hospitals: a systematic review of information and communication technology adoptions for improved communication between clinicians.

    PubMed

    Wu, Robert C; Tran, Kim; Lo, Vivian; O'Leary, Kevin J; Morra, Dante; Quan, Sherman D; Perrier, Laure

    2012-11-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify, describe and assess interventions of information and communication technology on the processes of communication and associated patient outcomes within hospital settings. Studies published from the years 1996 to 2010 were considered and were selected if they described an evaluation of information and communication technology interventions to improve clinical communication within hospitals. Two authors abstracted data from full text articles, and the quality of individual articles were appraised. Results of interventions were summarized by their effect. There were 18 identified studies that evaluated the use of interventions that included alphanumeric paging, hands-free communication devices, mobile phones, smartphones, task management systems and a display based paging system. Most quantitative studies used a before and after study design and were of lower quality. Of all the studies, there was only one prospective randomized study, but this study used only simulated communication events. Quantitative studies identified improved perceptions of communication and some improvement in communication metrics. Qualitative studies described improvements in efficiency of communication but also issues of loss of control and reliability. Despite the rapid advancement in information and communications technology over the last decade, there is limited evidence suggesting improvements in the ability of health professionals to communicate effectively. Given the critical nature of communication, we advocate further evaluation of information and communication technology designed to improve communication between clinicians. Outcome measures should include measures of patient-oriented outcomes and efficiency for clinicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Developing Tools and Techniques to Increase Communication Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Linda A.; Peterson, Doug

    1997-01-01

    The Public Affairs Office (PAO) of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for communicating current JSC Space Program activities as well as goals and objectives to the American Public. As part of the 1996 Strategic Communications Plan, a review of PAO' s current communication procedures was conducted. The 1996 Summer Faculty Fellow performed research activities to support this effort by reviewing current research concerning NASA/JSC's customers' perceptions and interests, developing communications tools which enable PAO to more effectively inform JSC customers about the Space Program, and proposing a process for developing and using consistent messages throughout PAO. Note that this research does not attempt to change or influence customer perceptions or interests but, instead, incorporates current customer interests into PAO's communication process.

  6. An Effective Local Routing Strategy on the Communication Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Jian; Wang, Bing-Hong; Xi, Zheng-Dong; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Yang, Han-Xin; Sun, Duo

    In this paper, we propose an effective routing strategy on the basis of the so-called nearest neighbor search strategy by introducing a preferential cut-off exponent K. We assume that the handling capacity of one vertex is proportional to its degree when the degree is smaller than K, and is a constantC 0 otherwise. It is found that by tuning the parameter α, the scale-free network capacity measured by the order parameter is considerably enhanced compared to the normal nearest-neighbor strategy. Traffic dynamics both near and far away from the critical generating rate R c are discussed. Simulation results demonstrate that the optimal performance of the system corresponds to α= - 0.5. Due to the low cost of acquiring nearest-neighbor information and the strongly improved network capacity, our strategy may be useful and reasonable for the protocol designing of modern communication networks.

  7. Ocean Variability Effects on Underwater Acoustic Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    302) 831-6521/email: badiey@udel.edu Award Number: N00014- 10 -1-0345 http://www.ceoe.udel.edu/people/ajsong LONG-TERM GOALS This proposed...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT... 10 -32 kHz was utilized by ITC-1001 transducers. The transducers of a ship-tethered source array transmitted communication signals at four sub-bands

  8. Environmental effects of information and communications technologies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric

    2011-11-16

    The digital revolution affects the environment on several levels. Most directly, information and communications technology (ICT) has environmental impacts through the manufacturing, operation and disposal of devices and network equipment, but it also provides ways to mitigate energy use, for example through smart buildings and teleworking. At a broader system level, ICTs influence economic growth and bring about technological and societal change. Managing the direct impacts of ICTs is more complex than just producing efficient devices, owing to the energetically expensive manufacturing process, and the increasing proliferation of devices needs to be taken into account.

  9. The Use of Post-Purchase Communication to Reduce Dissonance and Improve Direct Marketing Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliman, Ronald E.; Decker, Phillip J.

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates the use and potentially positive effects of postpurchase communication on order refund requests and reorder rates. Finds that dissonance was effectively reduced through postpurchase communication. (MG)

  10. Comparing Learning Gains: Audio Versus Text-based Instructor Communication in a Blended Online Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Dominique

    Though blended course audio feedback has been associated with several measures of course satisfaction at the postsecondary and graduate levels compared to text feedback, it may take longer to prepare and positive results are largely unverified in K-12 literature. The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the time investment and learning impact of audio communications with 228 secondary students in a blended online learning biology unit at a central Florida public high school. A short, individualized audio message regarding the student's progress was given to each student in the audio group; similar text-based messages were given to each student in the text-based group on the same schedule; a control got no feedback. A pretest and posttest were employed to measure learning gains in the three groups. To compare the learning gains in two types of feedback with each other and to no feedback, a controlled, randomized, experimental design was implemented. In addition, the creation and posting of audio and text feedback communications were timed in order to assess whether audio feedback took longer to produce than text only feedback. While audio feedback communications did take longer to create and post, there was no difference between learning gains as measured by posttest scores when student received audio, text-based, or no feedback. Future studies using a similar randomized, controlled experimental design are recommended to verify these results and test whether the trend holds in a broader range of subjects, over different time frames, and using a variety of assessment types to measure student learning.

  11. Technical Communication Internship Requirements in the Academic Economy: How We Compare among Ourselves and across Other Applied Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Gerald J.; Seible, Marcea K.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a study of internship requirements in technical communication programs compared with three established professions and one emerging profession that have certification or licensing requirements for practitioners. The study addresses three questions about technical communication internship programs: 1) Are internships offered as…

  12. Technical Communication Internship Requirements in the Academic Economy: How We Compare among Ourselves and across Other Applied Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Gerald J.; Seible, Marcea K.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a study of internship requirements in technical communication programs compared with three established professions and one emerging profession that have certification or licensing requirements for practitioners. The study addresses three questions about technical communication internship programs: 1) Are internships offered as…

  13. Health communications: nursing education for increased visibility and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, M

    2000-01-01

    The media play an influential role in American society. The challenge for health professionals, including nurses, is to translate and transmit complex health information for the public through many channels. Although nurses are trained to be effective communicators in practice, a recent study demonstrates that nurses are virtually invisible in the media. This lack of visibility limits nursing's ability to communicate important health information, impedes nursing's ability to define its role and contributions in the health care delivery system, and restricts nursing's ability to advocate for health policy. One option to improve nurses' ability to communicate effectively in all media venues is to integrate health communications content into nursing programs, which would provide nurses with the opportunity to develop advanced communication skills, media expertise, and new strategies for educating the public. Health communications programs exist in several colleges and universities, but not within nursing programs. Because nursing curricula are in a period of transition as changes in the health care environment are accommodated, health communications courses could be integrated into nursing programs as elective courses, graduate certificate programs, or a field of graduate study. Without creative educational strategies, nursing will remain invisible to the public and ineffective in its ability to influence the health care environment.

  14. Effects of partitioning and scheduling sparse matrix factorization on communication and load balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venugopal, Sesh; Naik, Vijay K.

    1991-01-01

    A block based, automatic partitioning and scheduling methodology is presented for sparse matrix factorization on distributed memory systems. Using experimental results, this technique is analyzed for communication and load imbalance overhead. To study the performance effects, these overheads were compared with those obtained from a straightforward 'wrap mapped' column assignment scheme. All experimental results were obtained using test sparse matrices from the Harwell-Boeing data set. The results show that there is a communication and load balance tradeoff. The block based method results in lower communication cost whereas the wrap mapped scheme gives better load balance.

  15. Effective communication: the key to career success and great leadership.

    PubMed

    Michelman, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Good communication is the key to educating, creating, and negotiating with others, and is especially important for security professionals whose jobs involve dealing with an employee having problems, negotiating with another department to get something we need, educating our bosses about hardening our targets or trying to de-escalate a family or patient who is upset or out of control, the author points out. Developing your own communication style, based on your understanding of what is involved in effective communications, will stand you in good stead in succeeding as a leader and advancing your career, she says.

  16. [The paradoxical effect of persuasive communication in health education sessions].

    PubMed

    Piperini, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the communication dynamics leading to the adoption of new attitudes and cognitions in health education sessions. We examined the verbal interactions at work in persuasive communication in 16 health education sessions. The study found that the medical expertise of the educator and the initial level of commitment of the participants had a positive effect on adherence to recommendations. However, persuasive communication in health education sessions appears to involve a paradoxical process in which criticism of the message can go hand in hand with the expression of an intention to implement new risk-reducing behaviors.

  17. Effective communications strategies: engaging the media, policymakers, and the public.

    PubMed

    Blake, Allison; Bonk, Kathy; Heimpel, Daniel; Wright, Cathy S

    2013-01-01

    Too often, strategic communication is too little, or comes too late, when involved with a child fatality or serious injury. This article explores the challenges arising from negative publicity around child safety issues and the opportunities for communications strategies that employ a proactive public health approach to engaging media, policymakers, and the public. The authors provide a case study and review methods by which child welfare agencies across the nation are building public engagement and support for improved outcomes in child safety while protecting legitimate confidentiality requirements. Finally, the piece articulates the rationale for agency investments in the resources necessary to develop and implement an effective communications plan.

  18. Taking Your Talents to Business Communications: Analyzing Effective Communication through LeBron James's Career Moves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manisaligil, Alperen; Bilimoria, Diana

    2016-01-01

    We describe an in-class activity that helps students improve their skills in media selection and use to reinforce effective communication. The activity builds on media richness and channel expansion theories through an examination of the media selection and use of NBA athlete LeBron James and Cleveland Cavaliers majority owner Dan Gilbert during…

  19. Taking Your Talents to Business Communications: Analyzing Effective Communication through LeBron James's Career Moves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manisaligil, Alperen; Bilimoria, Diana

    2016-01-01

    We describe an in-class activity that helps students improve their skills in media selection and use to reinforce effective communication. The activity builds on media richness and channel expansion theories through an examination of the media selection and use of NBA athlete LeBron James and Cleveland Cavaliers majority owner Dan Gilbert during…

  20. Career Skills Workshop: Achieving Your Goals Through Effective Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-01-01

    Physics students graduate with a huge array of transferrable skills, which are extremely useful to employers (particularly in the private sector, which is the largest employment base of physicists at all degree levels). However, the key to successfully connecting with these opportunities lies in how well graduates are able to communicate their skills and abilities to potential employers. The ability to communicate effectively is a key professional skill that serves scientists in many contexts, including interviewing for jobs, applying for grants, or speaking with law and policy makers. In this interactive workshop, Crystal Bailey (Careers Program Manager at APS) and Gregory Mack (Government Relations Specialist at APS) will lead activities to help attendees achieve their goals through better communication. Topics will include writing an effective resume, interviewing for jobs, and communicating to different audiences including Congress, among others. Light refreshments will be served.

  1. Performance effects of irregular communications patterns on massively parallel multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel; Petiton, Serge; Berryman, Harry; Rifkin, Adam

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study of the performance effects of irregular communications patterns on the CM-2 was conducted. The communications capabilities of the CM-2 were characterized under a variety of controlled conditions. In the process of carrying out the performance evaluation, extensive use was made of a parameterized synthetic mesh. In addition, timings with unstructured meshes generated for aerodynamic codes and a set of sparse matrices with banded patterns on non-zeroes were performed. This benchmarking suite stresses the communications capabilities of the CM-2 in a range of different ways. Benchmark results demonstrate that it is possible to make effective use of much of the massive concurrency available in the communications network.

  2. Health literacy and its importance for effective communication. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Veronica; Keogh, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    This is the second of two articles exploring the concept of health literacy, an often hidden barrier to effective healthcare communication. Part 1 was published in April ( Lambert and Keogh 2014 ). This article explains how to detect low levels of health literacy among parents and children, and outlines the challenges to assessing health literacy levels, including the stigma and discrimination some people experience. Some basic healthcare communication strategies for supporting health literacy in practice are suggested.

  3. Effects of Parent Instruction on the Symbolic Communication of Children Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication during Storybook Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent-Walsh, Jennifer; Binger, Cathy; Hasham, Zishan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of a communication partner instruction strategy for parents of children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) on the communicative turn taking of their children. Instruction was provided within storybook-reading contexts. Method: Two single-subject multiple-probe-across-participants…

  4. The Effect of Communication Strategy Training on the Development of EFL Learners' Strategic Competence and Oral Communicative Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the effect of communication strategy instruction on EFL students' oral communicative ability and their strategic competence. In a 14-week English as a Foreign Language (EFL) course (English Use II) based on Communicative Language Teaching approach, 80 learners were divided into two groups. The strategy training group (n = 44)…

  5. The effects of scenario-based communication training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy and myocardial infarction knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Huang, Ya-Hsuan; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of a simulated communication training course on nurses' communication competence, self-efficacy, communication performance, myocardial infarction knowledge, and general satisfaction with their learning experience. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a pre-test and two post-tests. The experimental group underwent simulated communication training course and the control group received a case-based communication training course. The experimental group made more significant improvement in competence and self-efficacy in communication from pre-test to the second post-test than the control group. Although both groups' satisfaction with their learning experience significantly increased from the first post-test to the second post-test, the experimental group was found to be more satisfied with their learning experience than the control group. No significant differences in communication performance and myocardial infarction knowledge between the two groups were identified. Scenario-based communication training can be more fully incorporated into in-service education for nurses to boost their competence and self-efficacy in communication and enhance their communication performance in myocardial infarction patient care. Introduction of real-life communication scenarios through multimedia in communication education could make learners more motivated to practice communication, hence leading to improved communication capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The pragmatist's guide to comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amitabh; Jena, Anupam B; Skinner, Jonathan S

    2011-01-01

    Following an acrimonious health care reform debate involving charges of "death panels," in 2010, Congress explicitly forbade the use of cost-effectiveness analysis in government programs of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. In this context, comparative effectiveness research emerged as an alternative strategy to understand better what works in health care. Put simply, comparative effectiveness research compares the efficacy of two or more diagnostic tests, treatments, or health care delivery methods without any explicit consideration of costs. To economists, the omission of costs from an assessment might seem nonsensical, but we argue that comparative effectiveness research still holds promise. First, it sidesteps one problem facing cost-effectiveness analysis--the widespread political resistance to the idea of using prices in health care. Second, there is little or no evidence on comparative effectiveness for a vast array of treatments: for example, we don't know whether proton-beam therapy, a very expensive treatment for prostate cancer (which requires building a cyclotron and a facility the size of a football field) offers any advantage over conventional approaches. Most drug studies compare new drugs to placebos, rather than "head-to-head" with other drugs on the market, leaving a vacuum as to which drug works best. Finally, the comparative effectiveness research can prove a useful first step even in the absence of cost information if it provides key estimates of treatment effects. After all, such effects are typically expensive to determine and require years or even decades of data. Costs are much easier to measure, and can be appended at a later date as financial Armageddon draws closer.

  7. A comparative study of protocols for secure quantum communication under noisy environment: single-qubit-based protocols versus entangled-state-based protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vishal; Thapliyal, Kishore; Pathak, Anirban; Banerjee, Subhashish

    2016-11-01

    The effect of noise on various protocols of secure quantum communication has been studied. Specifically, we have investigated the effect of amplitude damping, phase damping, squeezed generalized amplitude damping, Pauli type as well as various collective noise models on the protocols of quantum key distribution, quantum key agreement, quantum secure direct quantum communication and quantum dialogue. From each type of protocol of secure quantum communication, we have chosen two protocols for our comparative study: one based on single-qubit states and the other one on entangled states. The comparative study reported here has revealed that single-qubit-based schemes are generally found to perform better in the presence of amplitude damping, phase damping, squeezed generalized amplitude damping noises, while entanglement-based protocols turn out to be preferable in the presence of collective noises. It is also observed that the effect of noise depends upon the number of rounds of quantum communication involved in a scheme of quantum communication. Further, it is observed that squeezing, a completely quantum mechanical resource present in the squeezed generalized amplitude channel, can be used in a beneficial way as it may yield higher fidelity compared to the corresponding zero squeezing case.

  8. Effect of Ionosphere on Geostationary Communication Satellite Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Esra; Arikan, Feza; Gulgonul, Senol

    2016-07-01

    ionosphere using IRI-Plas-G software. One of the outstanding features of IONOLAB-RAY is the opportunity of Global Ionospheric Map-Total Electron Content (GIM-TEC) assimilation. This feature enables more realistic representation of ionosphere, especially for the times when ionosphere deviates from the generalized models, such as during geomagnetic storms. This feature is critical to examine the effect of ionosphere on satellite signals under ionospheric storm conditions. In this study TURKSAT satellite data is used to compare the results of IONOLAB-RAY and evaluate the effect of ionosphere. TURKSAT is one of the world's leading companies providing all sorts of satellite communications through the satellites of TURKSAT as well as the other satellites. Providing services for voice, data, internet, TV, and radio broadcasting through the satellites across a wide area extending from Europe to Asia. The latest satellite of TURKSAT, namely Turksat 4B was launched on October 2015, before that various versions of TURKSAT satellites are launched since 1994. In the future enlargement of broadcasting area towards equatorial region is aimed, where the ionospheric anomalies and storms are highly expected. In the future this study can be applied to the satellite signals in equatorial regions and effects of ionosphere especially under storm conditions can be discussed. This study is supported by TUBITAK 114E541, 115E915 and Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  9. Parasitoid flies exploiting acoustic communication of insects-comparative aspects of independent functional adaptations.

    PubMed

    Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard; Lehmann, Gerlind U C

    2015-01-01

    Two taxa of parasitoid Diptera have independently evolved tympanal hearing organs to locate sound producing host insects. Here we review and compare functional adaptations in both groups of parasitoids, Ormiini and Emblemasomatini. Tympanal organs in both groups originate from a common precursor organ and are somewhat similar in morphology and physiology. In terms of functional adaptations, the hearing thresholds are largely adapted to the frequency spectra of the calling song of the hosts. The large host ranges of some parasitoids indicate that their neuronal filter for the temporal patterns of the calling songs are broader than those found in intraspecific communication. For host localization the night active Ormia ochracea and the day active E. auditrix are able to locate a sound source precisely in space. For phonotaxis flight and walking phases are used, whereby O. ochracea approaches hosts during flight while E. auditrix employs intermediate landings and re-orientation, apparently separating azimuthal and vertical angles. The consequences of the parasitoid pressure are discussed for signal evolution and intraspecific communication of the host species. This natural selection pressure might have led to different avoidance strategies in the hosts: silent males in crickets, shorter signals in tettigoniids and fluctuating population abundances in cicadas.

  10. Effective Health Risk Communication About Pandemic Influenza for Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of pandemic influenza for vulnerable populations will depend partly on the effectiveness of health risk communications. Strategic planning should fully consider how life circumstances, cultural values, and perspectives on risk influence behavior during a pandemic. We summarize recent scientific evidence on communication challenges and examine how sociocultural, economic, psychological, and health factors can jeopardize or facilitate public health interventions that require a cooperative public. If ignored, current communication gaps for vulnerable populations could result in unequal protection across society during an influenza pandemic. We offer insights on communication preparedness gleaned from scientific studies and the deliberations of public health experts at a meeting convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 1 and 2, 2008. PMID:19797744

  11. Effective Nurse Communication With Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Bob C; Lokhorst, Anne Marike; Rutten, Guy E H M; van Woerkum, Cees M J

    2015-08-01

    Many type 2 diabetes mellitus patients have difficulties reaching optimal blood glucose control. With patients treated in primary care by nurses, nurse communication plays a pivotal role in supporting patient health. The twofold aim of the present review is to categorize common barriers to nurse-patient communication and to review potentially effective communication methods. Important communication barriers are lack of skills and self-efficacy, possibly because nurses work in a context where they have to perform biomedical examinations and then perform patient-centered counseling from a biopsychosocial approach. Training in patient-centered counseling does not seem helpful in overcoming this paradox. Rather, patient-centeredness should be regarded as a basic condition for counseling, whereby nurses and patients seek to cooperate and share responsibility based on trust. Nurses may be more successful when incorporating behavior change counseling based on psychological principles of self-regulation, for example, goal setting, incremental performance accomplishments, and action planning.

  12. The communication triangle: elements of an effective warning message

    SciTech Connect

    Vaught, C.; Brnich, M.J. Jr.; Mallett, L.

    2007-01-15

    The lack of good communication is a very real problem in mine emergencies. To counter communication breakdowns, researchers at the NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory developed the Emergency Communication Triangle. It is a training intervention designed to help those giving a warning to provide the right sort of information and those receiving a warning to ask the right questions. The Triangle has six ordered components with the first three considered most important. The Emergency Communication is packaged as a short safety talk to be given by supervisors at the start of a shift. It was first tested in 1998 with a group of 236 workers at an underground mine in Colorado, and proved effective. It was followed up in 2003 and again in 2004. Now, more than half the miners would report who was affected by an event, 60% would report in its severity, and 70% would say what had been done so far. 3 figs.

  13. Lunar Surface Propagation Modeling and Effects on Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the lunar terrain effects on the signal propagation of the planned NASA lunar wireless communication and sensor systems. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate that the terrain geometry, antenna location, and lunar surface material are important factors determining the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless communication systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, operating frequency, and surface material. The analysis results from this paper are important for the lunar communication link margin analysis in determining the limits on the reliable communication range and radio frequency coverage performance at planned lunar base worksites. Key Words lunar, multipath, path loss, propagation, wireless.

  14. Effective health risk communication about pandemic influenza for vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Elaine; Tinker, Timothy

    2009-10-01

    The consequences of pandemic influenza for vulnerable populations will depend partly on the effectiveness of health risk communications. Strategic planning should fully consider how life circumstances, cultural values, and perspectives on risk influence behavior during a pandemic. We summarize recent scientific evidence on communication challenges and examine how sociocultural, economic, psychological, and health factors can jeopardize or facilitate public health interventions that require a cooperative public. If ignored, current communication gaps for vulnerable populations could result in unequal protection across society during an influenza pandemic. We offer insights on communication preparedness gleaned from scientific studies and the deliberations of public health experts at a meeting convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 1 and 2, 2008.

  15. Ideas for Effective Communication of Statistical Results

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-03-01

    Effective presentation of statistical results to those with less statistical training, including managers and decision-makers requires planning, anticipation and thoughtful delivery. Here are several recommendations for effectively presenting statistical results.

  16. Ideas for Effective Communication of Statistical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-03-01

    Effective presentation of statistical results to those with less statistical training, including managers and decision-makers requires planning, anticipation and thoughtful delivery. Here are several recommendations for effectively presenting statistical results.

  17. Promoting effective communication for patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Grossbach, Irene; Stranberg, Sarah; Chlan, Linda

    2011-06-01

    Communicating effectively with ventilator-dependent patients is essential so that various basic physiological and psychological needs can be conveyed and decisions, wishes, and desires about the plan of care and end-of-life decision making can be expressed. Numerous methods can be used to communicate, including gestures, head nods, mouthing of words, writing, use of letter/picture boards and common words or phrases tailored to meet individualized patients' needs. High-tech alternative communication devices are available for more complex cases. Various options for patients with a tracheostomy tube include partial or total cuff deflation and use of a speaking valve. It is important for nurses to assess communication needs; identify appropriate alternative communication strategies; create a customized care plan with the patient, the patient's family, and other team members; ensure that the care plan is visible and accessible to all staff interacting with the patient; and continue to collaborate with colleagues from all disciplines to promote effective communication with nonvocal patients.

  18. The effects of hands-free communication device systems: communication changes in hospital organizations

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joshua E; Ash, Joan S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effects that hands-free communication device (HCD) systems have on healthcare organizations from multiple user perspectives. Design This exploratory qualitative study recruited 26 subjects from multiple departments in two research sites located in Portland, Oregon: an academic medical center and a community hospital. Interview and observation data were gathered January through March, 2007. Measurements Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Because this study was exploratory, data were coded and patterns identified until overall themes ‘emerged’. Results Five themes arose: (1) Communication access—the perception that HCD systems provide fast and efficient communication that supports workflow; (2) Control—social and technical considerations associated with use of an HCD system; (3) Training—processes that should be used to improve use of the HCD system; (4) Organizational change—changes to organizational design and behavior caused by HCD system implementation; and (5) Environment and infrastructure—HCD system use within the context of physical workspaces. Conclusion HCD systems improve communication access but users experience challenges integrating the system into workflow. Effective HCD use depends on how well organizations train users, adapt to changes brought about by HCD systems, and integrate HCD systems into physical surroundings. PMID:20064808

  19. The effects of hands-free communication device systems: communication changes in hospital organizations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Joshua E; Ash, Joan S

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the effects that hands-free communication device (HCD) systems have on healthcare organizations from multiple user perspectives. This exploratory qualitative study recruited 26 subjects from multiple departments in two research sites located in Portland, Oregon: an academic medical center and a community hospital. Interview and observation data were gathered January through March, 2007. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Because this study was exploratory, data were coded and patterns identified until overall themes 'emerged'. Five themes arose: (1) Communication access-the perception that HCD systems provide fast and efficient communication that supports workflow; (2) Control-social and technical considerations associated with use of an HCD system; (3) Training-processes that should be used to improve use of the HCD system; (4) Organizational change-changes to organizational design and behavior caused by HCD system implementation; and (5) Environment and infrastructure-HCD system use within the context of physical workspaces. HCD systems improve communication access but users experience challenges integrating the system into workflow. Effective HCD use depends on how well organizations train users, adapt to changes brought about by HCD systems, and integrate HCD systems into physical surroundings.

  20. Ocean environmental effects on walrus communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, Samuel L.

    between ambient noise level and source level was identified. The Lombard effect, the increase in source level in response to an increase in noise level has not previously been identified in any pinniped species. In both datasets, an increase of approximately 5 dB in source level was found for an increase in 10 dB of noise level. A propagation experiment was conducted to measure the transmission of an impulsive acoustic signal, similar to a walrus knock, from an underwater source through ice and into air. Peak to peak pressure measured in air was approximately 2,500 times lower than pressure measured in water separated by two meters of shorefast ice. The results from this experiment were used to verify the adequacy of a wavenumber integration acoustic propagation model for determining transmission loss in this multi-media environment. Propagation model environments were generated from historical ice thickness and oceanographic data. Modeled received signals were compared with walrus audiometric data to determine what factors impact signal detectability with source level, ice thickness, and range having the greatest impact. The findings of this work suggest that the underwater vocalizations of males making breeding vocalizations are received by females hauled out on ice at audible levels when the females are within a few hundred meters of the males. As the signals exceed the levels estimated to be perceived, these signals may play a role in mate selection by the females. If climate change affects the ice conditions, water depth, and bathymetry where walrus congregate for breeding, mate selection and therefore offspring fitness may be impacted.

  1. The effect of relationship status on communicating emotions through touch.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Erin H; Hampton, James A

    2011-02-01

    Research into emotional communication to date has largely focused on facial and vocal expressions. In contrast, recent studies by Hertenstein, Keltner, App, Bulleit, and Jaskolka (2006) and Hertenstein, Holmes, McCullough, and Keltner (2009) exploring nonverbal communication of emotion discovered that people could identify anger, disgust, fear, gratitude, happiness, love, sadness and sympathy from the experience of being touched on either the arm or body by a stranger, without seeing the touch. The study showed that strangers were unable to communicate the self-focused emotions embarrassment, envy and pride, or the universal emotion surprise. Literature relating to touch indicates that the interpretation of a tactile experience is significantly influenced by the relationship between the touchers (Coan, Schaefer, & Davidson, 2006). The present study compared the ability of romantic couples and strangers to communicate emotions solely via touch. Results showed that both strangers and romantic couples were able to communicate universal and prosocial emotions, whereas only romantic couples were able to communicate the self-focused emotions envy and pride. © 2010 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa business

  2. Effective training strategies for teaching communication skills to physicians: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Berkhof, Marianne; van Rijssen, H Jolanda; Schellart, Antonius J M; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2011-08-01

    Physicians need good communication skills to communicate effectively with patients. The objective of this review was to identify effective training strategies for teaching communication skills to qualified physicians. PubMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and COCHRANE were searched in October 2008 and in March 2009. Two authors independently selected relevant reviews and assessed their methodological quality with AMSTAR. Summary tables were constructed for data-synthesis, and results were linked to outcome measures. As a result, conclusions about the effectiveness of communication skills training strategies for physicians could be drawn. Twelve systematic reviews on communication skills training programmes for physicians were identified. Some focused on specific training strategies, whereas others emphasized a more general approach with mixed strategies. Training programmes were effective if they lasted for at least one day, were learner-centred, and focused on practising skills. The best training strategies within the programmes included role-play, feedback, and small group discussions. Training programmes should include active, practice-oriented strategies. Oral presentations on communication skills, modelling, and written information should only be used as supportive strategies. To be able to compare the effectiveness of training programmes more easily in the future, general agreement on outcome measures has to be established. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparative View of Communications. An Experimental Unit, Second Edition, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gary R.

    This instructional unit offers high-school students experiences in learning about how human beings communicate and fail to communicate. It is based on the assumption that personal and cultural differences create differing "perceptual sets." Seventeen learning activities are grouped into four units: (1) Communication Processes and "Meaning-Making,"…

  4. A Comparative Study of the Present and Ideal Roles of Communication Directors in Selected Business Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shatshat, Hussein M.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the role of communication directors involved in internal communication activities in business organizations. Indicates that directors perform a variety of roles ranging from journalistic to advisory/support work. Proposes a functional role involved in determining major policies for communications systems. (JMF)

  5. A regulator's view of comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Temple, Robert

    2012-02-01

    'Comparative effectiveness' is the current enthusiasm, and for good reason. After knowing a treatment works, the most critical question is how it compares with alternatives. Comparative studies are not commonly conducted by drug companies and they represent a significant methodological challenge. Comparative data could include evidence of overall superiority to an alternative or advantages in identifiable subsets, for example, people who do not respond to or tolerate alternatives, or members of a genetic subset and could also include convincing evidence that there is little difference between two treatments. To describe regulations, guidance, and Food and Drug Administration experience related to studies of comparative effectiveness, including approaches to showing superiority and problems encountered in showing similarity. Review of Food and Drug Administration regulations and guidance and experience with showing superiority and similarity, particularly related to randomized trials and epidemiologic studies. Methods exist, and they have been successful for showing overall superiority of one drug over another, advantages in specific population subsets. Efforts to show true equivalence face problems of definition and very large sample sizes needed to rule out small differences. There is need for further discussion of what is meant by similarity or equivalence of two treatments. Comparative studies are challenging because differences between effective therapies are likely to be small and can be detected reliably only in randomized trials, often large ones. Despite the difficulties, comparative trials have been successful and we clearly would like to see more of them.

  6. Physician-patient argumentation and communication, comparing Toulmin's model, pragma-dialectics, and American sociolinguistics.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Francisco Javier Uribe; Artmann, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the application of theories of argumentation and communication to the field of medicine. Based on a literature review, the authors compare Toulmin's model, pragma-dialectics, and the work of Todd and Fisher, derived from American sociolinguistics. These approaches were selected because they belong to the pragmatic field of language. The main results were: pragma-dialectics characterizes medical reasoning more comprehensively, highlighting specific elements of the three disciplines of argumentation: dialectics, rhetoric, and logic; Toulmin's model helps substantiate the declaration of diagnostic and therapeutic hypotheses, and as part of an interpretive medicine, approximates the pragma-dialectical approach by including dialectical elements in the process of formulating arguments; Fisher and Todd's approach allows characterizing, from a pragmatic analysis of speech acts, the degree of symmetry/asymmetry in the doctor-patient relationship, while arguing the possibility of negotiating treatment alternatives.

  7. [The effect of a scenario-based simulation communication course on improving the communication skills of nurses].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Hsuan; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2014-04-01

    Limited disease knowledge is frequently the cause of disease-related anxiety in myocardial infarction patients. The ability to communicate effectively serves multiple purposes in the professional nursing practice. By communicating effectively with myocardial infarction patients, nurses may help reduce their anxiety by keeping them well informed about their disease and teaching them self-care strategies. This research evaluates the communication skills of nurses following scenario-based simulation education in the context of communication with myocardial infarction patients. This study used an experimental design and an educational intervention. The target population comprised nurses of medicine (clinical qualified level N to N2 for nursing) working at a municipal hospital in Taipei City, Taiwan. A total 122 participants were enrolled. Stratified block randomization divided participants into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received clinical scenario-based simulation education for communication. The control group received traditional class-based education for communication. Both groups received a pre-test and a Communication Skills Checklist post-test assessment. Results were analyzed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows software. A t-test showed significant increases in communication skills (p < .001) in the experimental group and ANCOVA results identified significant between-group differences (p < .001) in communication skills following the education intervention. The results indicate that clinical scenario-based simulation education for communication is significantly more effective than traditional class-based education in enhancing the ability of nurses to communicate effectively with myocardial infarction patients.

  8. The "Mozart Effect II" and Other Communication/Learning Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

    2007-01-01

    While exploring the development of Communication and Learning Aids in all venues, particularly the effect of music on learning, several different tracks were followed. The therapeutic use of music is for relaxation and stress reduction, which apparently helps the body to access and discharge deeply locked-in material. The Mozart Effect track which…

  9. The "Mozart Effect II" and Other Communication/Learning Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

    2007-01-01

    While exploring the development of Communication and Learning Aids in all venues, particularly the effect of music on learning, several different tracks were followed. The therapeutic use of music is for relaxation and stress reduction, which apparently helps the body to access and discharge deeply locked-in material. The Mozart Effect track which…

  10. Communication - An Effective Tool for Implementing ISO 14001/EMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Damewood; Bowen Huntsman

    2004-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) received ISO 14001/EMS certification in June 2002. Communication played an effective role in implementing ISO 14001/EMS at the INEEL. This paper describes communication strategies used during the implementation and certification processes. The INEEL achieved Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) and Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star status in 2001. ISMS implemented a formal process to plan and execute work. VPP facilitated worker involvement by establishing geographic units at various facilities with employee points of contact and management champions. The INEEL Environmental Management System (EMS) was developed to integrate the environmental functional area into its ISMS and VPP. Since the core functions of ISMS, VPP, and EMS are interchangeable, they were easy to integrate. Communication is essential to successfully implement an EMS. (According to ISO 14001 requirements, communication interacts with 12 other elements of the requirements.) We developed communication strategies that integrated ISMS, VPP, and EMS. For example, the ISMS, VPP, and EMS Web sites communicated messages to the work force, such as “VPP emphasizes the people side of doing business, ISMS emphasizes the system side of doing business, and EMS emphasizes the systems to protect the environment; but they all define work, identify and analyze hazards, and mitigate the hazards.” As a result of this integration, the work force supported and implemented the EMS. In addition, the INEEL established a cross-functional communication team to assist with implementing the EMS. The team included members from the Training and Communication organizations, VPP office, Pollution Prevention, Employee and Media Relations, a union representative, facility environmental support, and EMS staff. This crossfunctional team used various communication strategies to promote our EMS to all organization levels and successfully implemented EMS

  11. Longitudinal effects of medical students' communication skills on future performance.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; LaRochelle, Jeffrey S; Durning, Steven J; Saguil, Aaron; Swygert, Kimberly; Artino, Anthony R

    2015-04-01

    The Essential Elements of Communication (EEC) were developed from the Kalamazoo consensus statement on physician-patient communication. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) has adopted a longitudinal curriculum to use the EEC both as a learning tool during standardized patient encounters and as an evaluation tool culminating with the end of preclerkship objective-structured clinical examinations (OSCE). Medical educators have recently emphasized the importance of teaching communication skills, as evidenced by the United States Medical Licensing Examination testing both the integrated clinical encounter (ICE) and communication and interpersonal skills (CIS) within the Step 2 Clinical Skills exam (CS). To determine the associations between students' EEC OSCE performance at the end of the preclerkship period with later communication skills assessment and evaluation outcomes in the context of a longitudinal curriculum spanning both undergraduate medical education and graduate medical education. Retrospective data from preclerkship (overall OSCE scores and EEC OSCE scores) and clerkship outcomes (internal medicine [IM] clinical points and average clerkship National Board of Medical Examiners [NBME] scores) were collected from 167 USU medical students from the class of 2011 and compared to individual scores on the CIS and ICE components of Step 2 CS, as well as to the communication skills component of the program directors' evaluation of trainees during their postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) residency. In addition to bivariate Pearson correlation analysis, we conducted multiple linear regression analysis to examine the predictive power of the EEC score beyond the IM clerkship clinical points and the average NBME Subject Exams score on the outcome measures. The EEC score was a significant predictor of the CIS score and the PGY-1 communication skills score. Beyond the average NBME Subject Exams score and the IM clerkship clinical points, the EEC score

  12. Educating to Tolerance: Effects of Communicating Social Psychology Research Findings.

    PubMed

    La Barbera, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    The effect of communicating social psychology research findings on ingroup bias in a classroom setting has been investigated. Two hundred and twenty one high school students either read or did not read a brief report about three classical social psychological studies, then completed evaluation scales for the ingroup and the outgroup. Participants' motivation was manipulated, and the messages were different as regards the congruency between the content and participants' actual intergroup experience. Results showed that communication exerted a significant effect in reducing ingroup bias for participants in the high motivation/high congruency condition, that is, the communication effect was moderated by the individual's level of motivation and the content of the arguments proposed in the report. Practical implications of results for education work and stereotype change, limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Educating to Tolerance: Effects of Communicating Social Psychology Research Findings

    PubMed Central

    La Barbera, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The effect of communicating social psychology research findings on ingroup bias in a classroom setting has been investigated. Two hundred and twenty one high school students either read or did not read a brief report about three classical social psychological studies, then completed evaluation scales for the ingroup and the outgroup. Participants’ motivation was manipulated, and the messages were different as regards the congruency between the content and participants’ actual intergroup experience. Results showed that communication exerted a significant effect in reducing ingroup bias for participants in the high motivation/high congruency condition, that is, the communication effect was moderated by the individual’s level of motivation and the content of the arguments proposed in the report. Practical implications of results for education work and stereotype change, limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed. PMID:27247671

  14. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  15. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  16. Comparative Study of Optical and Radio-Frequency Communication Systems for a Deep-Space Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Wilson, K.; Sue, M. K.; Harcke, L. J.; Wilhelm, M.; Chen, C.-C.; Lesh, J.; Feria, Y.; Rascoe, D.; Lansing, F.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed a study on telecommunication systems for a hypothetical mission to Mars. The objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the benefits that microwave-X-band (8.4 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) - and optical communications technologies a afford to future missions. The telecommunication systems were required to return data after launch and in orbit at 2.7 AU with daily data volumes of 0.1, 1.0, or 10.0 Gbits (Gb). Spacecraft terminals capable of delivering each of the three data volumes were proposed and characterized in terms of mass, power consumption, size, and cost. The estimated parameters for X-band, Ka-band, and optical frequencies are compared and presented here. For all cases, the optical light terminal exhibits about 60 percent of the mass of the corresponding radio frequency (RF) subsystem. Power consumption is comparable for all three technologies at a 0.1 Gb/day data volume, but the power required at either Ka-band or optical is less than half of the X-band requirement at 10 Gb/day. These benefits can be obtained only with a suitable investment in reception facilities for Ka-band or optical frequencies.

  17. Teamwork and communication: an effective approach to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mujumdar, Sandhya; Santos, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork and communication failures are leading causes of patient safety incidents in health care. Though health care providers must work in teams, they are not well-trained in teamwork and communication skills. Health care faces the problems of differences in communication styles, communication failures and poor teamwork. There is enough evidence in the literature to show that communication failure is detrimental to patient safety. It is estimated that 80% of serious medical errors worldwide take place because of miscommunication between medical providers. NUH recognizes that effective communication and teamwork are essential in the delivery of high quality safe patient care, especially in a complex organization. NUH is a good example, where there is a rich mix of nationalities and races, in staff and in patients, and there is a rapidly expanding care environment. NUH had to overcome these challenges by adopting a multi-pronged approach. The trials and tribulations of NUH in this journey were worthwhile as the patient safety climate survey scores improved over the years.

  18. Determining the effectiveness of illustrated communication material for communication with intubated patients at an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Otuzoğlu, Münevver; Karahan, Azize

    2014-10-01

    Communication with non-speaking patients in intensive care unit is stress for both nurse and patients. Semi-experimental study that took place at a University Hospital was to develop illustrated material for patient communication and determine its effectiveness. The study sample consisted of 90 intubated patients at the Adult Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit who had undergone open heart surgery. The patients were divided into the intervention and control groups. Data analysis was with descriptive statistics and the χ(2) test. The illustrated communication material was stated to be helpful by 77.8% and partially helpful by 22.2% of the intervention group patients regarding the communication between the health-care staff and the patients. Control group patients had more difficulties communicating with the health-care staff. Illustrated communication material was an effective method in communicating with intubated patients. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Effective laboratory communication...it's a two-way street.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Martin R

    2006-07-01

    Working as part of your team, your dental laboratory can increase your predictable success and decrease the stress of daily practice. This partnership should begin during the treatment planning phase and continue through to the insertion appointment. Many dentists are beginning to view their laboratory technician as a bonafide member of their patient care team. Thorough communication on both sides is crucial to reaching this predictable success. A trusting relationship will enable the dentist and the laboratory technician to communicate effectively. The laboratory must take the responsibility to communicate its concerns to the dentist, just as the dentist must take the responsibility to communicate effectively with the laboratory his or her needs and desires for each case. When effective communication techniques are followed, everyone is a winner. The dentist is more productive per hour and has reduced stress. The dental laboratory does not have to bear the burden of remakes, and spends less time on the phone or sending e-mail for routine cases. And most importantly, the patient receives an exceptional restoration that meets his or her expectations. In the end, the true measure of a great relationship between the dentist and the laboratory is happy patients who refer friends and family to your practice for years to come.

  20. Improving outpatient safety through effective electronic communication: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Sawhney, Mona K; Wilson, Lindsey; Sittig, Dean F; Esquivel, Adol; Watford, Monica; Davis, Traber; Espadas, Donna; Singh, Hardeep

    2009-09-25

    Health information technology and electronic medical records (EMRs) are potentially powerful systems-based interventions to facilitate diagnosis and treatment because they ensure the delivery of key new findings and other health related information to the practitioner. However, effective communication involves more than just information transfer; despite a state of the art EMR system, communication breakdowns can still occur. [1-3] In this project, we will adapt a model developed by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) to understand and improve the relationship between work systems and processes of care involved with electronic communication in EMRs. We plan to study three communication activities in the Veterans Health Administration's (VA) EMR: electronic communication of abnormal imaging and laboratory test results via automated notifications (i.e., alerts); electronic referral requests; and provider-to-pharmacy communication via computerized provider order entry (CPOE). Our specific aim is to propose a protocol to evaluate the systems and processes affecting outcomes of electronic communication in the computerized patient record system (related to diagnostic test results, electronic referral requests, and CPOE prescriptions) using a human factors engineering approach, and hence guide the development of interventions for work system redesign. This research will consist of multiple qualitative methods of task analysis to identify potential sources of error related to diagnostic test result alerts, electronic referral requests, and CPOE; this will be followed by a series of focus groups to identify barriers, facilitators, and suggestions for improving the electronic communication system. Transcripts from all task analyses and focus groups will be analyzed using methods adapted from grounded theory and content analysis.

  1. Improving outpatient safety through effective electronic communication: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Sawhney, Mona K; Wilson, Lindsey; Sittig, Dean F; Esquivel, Adol; Watford, Monica; Davis, Traber; Espadas, Donna; Singh, Hardeep

    2009-01-01

    Background Health information technology and electronic medical records (EMRs) are potentially powerful systems-based interventions to facilitate diagnosis and treatment because they ensure the delivery of key new findings and other health related information to the practitioner. However, effective communication involves more than just information transfer; despite a state of the art EMR system, communication breakdowns can still occur. [1-3] In this project, we will adapt a model developed by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) to understand and improve the relationship between work systems and processes of care involved with electronic communication in EMRs. We plan to study three communication activities in the Veterans Health Administration's (VA) EMR: electronic communication of abnormal imaging and laboratory test results via automated notifications (i.e., alerts); electronic referral requests; and provider-to-pharmacy communication via computerized provider order entry (CPOE). Aim Our specific aim is to propose a protocol to evaluate the systems and processes affecting outcomes of electronic communication in the computerized patient record system (related to diagnostic test results, electronic referral requests, and CPOE prescriptions) using a human factors engineering approach, and hence guide the development of interventions for work system redesign. Design This research will consist of multiple qualitative methods of task analysis to identify potential sources of error related to diagnostic test result alerts, electronic referral requests, and CPOE; this will be followed by a series of focus groups to identify barriers, facilitators, and suggestions for improving the electronic communication system. Transcripts from all task analyses and focus groups will be analyzed using methods adapted from grounded theory and content analysis. PMID:19781075

  2. Comparative tissue transcriptomics reveal prompt inter-organ communication in response to local bacterial kidney infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucosal infections elicit inflammatory responses via regulated signaling pathways. Infection outcome depends strongly on early events occurring immediately when bacteria start interacting with cells in the mucosal membrane. Hitherto reported transcription profiles on host-pathogen interactions are strongly biased towards in vitro studies. To detail the local in vivo genetic response to infection, we here profiled host gene expression in a recent experimental model that assures high spatial and temporal control of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection within the kidney of a live rat. Results Transcriptional profiling of tissue biopsies from UPEC-infected kidney tissue revealed 59 differentially expressed genes 8 h post-infection. Their relevance for the infection process was supported by a Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Early differential expression at 3 h and 5 h post-infection was of low statistical significance, which correlated to the low degree of infection. Comparative transcriptomics analysis of the 8 h data set and online available studies of early local infection and inflammation defined a core of 80 genes constituting a "General tissue response to early local bacterial infections". Among these, 25% were annotated as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulated. Subsequent experimental analyses confirmed a systemic increase of IFN-γ in rats with an ongoing local kidney infection, correlating to splenic, rather than renal Ifng induction and suggested this inter-organ communication to be mediated by interleukin (IL)-23. The use of comparative transcriptomics allowed expansion of the statistical data handling, whereby relevant data could also be extracted from the 5 h data set. Out of the 31 differentially expressed core genes, some represented specific 5 h responses, illustrating the value of comparative transcriptomics when studying the dynamic nature of gene regulation in response to infections. Conclusion Our hypothesis-free approach identified

  3. Comparative Effectiveness Research Using Observational Data: Active Comparators to Emulate Target Trials with Inactive Comparators

    PubMed Central

    Huitfeldt, Anders; Hernan, Miguel A.; Kalager, Mette; Robins, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Because a comparison of noninitiators and initiators of treatment may be hopelessly confounded, guidelines for the conduct of observational research often recommend using an “active” comparator group consisting of people who initiate a treatment other than the medication of interest. In this paper, we discuss the conditions under which this approach is valid if the goal is to emulate a trial with an inactive comparator. Identification of Effects: We provide conditions under which a target trial in a subpopulation can be validly emulated from observational data, using an active comparator that is known or believed to be inactive for the outcome of interest. The average treatment effect in the population as a whole is not identified, but under certain conditions this approach can be used to emulate a trial in the subset of individuals who were treated with the treatment of interest, in the subset of individuals who were treated with the treatment of interest but not with the comparator, or in the subset of individuals who were treated with both the treatment of interest and the active comparator. The Plausibility of the Comparability Conditions: We discuss whether the required conditions can be expected to hold in pharmacoepidemiologic research, with a particular focus on whether the conditions are plausible in situations where the standard analysis fails due to unmeasured confounding by access to health care or health seeking behaviors. Discussion: The conditions discussed in this paper may at best be approximately true. Investigators using active comparator designs to emulate trials with inactive comparators should exercise caution. PMID:27891526

  4. 76 FR 23812 - Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... COMMISSION Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects on Broadband Communications Networks of Damage or Failure of Network Equipment or Severe Overload; Independent Panel Reviewing the Impact of Hurricane Katrina on Communications Networks AGENCY: Federal...

  5. Radio Gaga? Intra-team communication of Australian Rules Football umpires - effect of radio communication on content, structure and frequency.

    PubMed

    Neville, Timothy J; Salmon, Paul M; Read, Gemma J M

    2017-07-31

    Intra-team communication plays an important role in team effectiveness in various domains including sport. As such, it is a key consideration when introducing new tools within systems that utilise teams. The difference in intra-team communication of Australian Rules Football (AFL) umpiring teams was studied when umpiring with or without radio communications technology. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted to analyse the verbal communication of seven umpiring teams (20 participants) grouped according to their experience with radio communication. The results identified that radio communication technology increased the frequency and altered the structure of intra-team communication. Examination of the content of the intra-team communication identified impacts on the 'Big Five' teamwork behaviours and associated coordinating mechanisms. Analysis revealed that the communications utilised did not align with the closed-loop form of communication described in the Big Five model. Implications for teamwork models, coaching and training of AFL umpires are discussed. Practitioner Summary: Assessing the impact of technology on performance is of interest to ergonomics practitioners. The impact of radio communications on teamwork is explored in the highly dynamic domain of AFL umpiring. When given radio technology, intra-team communication increased which supported teamwork behaviours, such as backup behaviour and mutual performance monitoring.

  6. Effect of language immersion on communication with Latino patients.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Shari; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Manuel, Janeen; Hall, Mark A

    2003-01-01

    In the US, the fastest growing segment of the general pediatric population is Latino children. Language barriers may impede optimal care for these patients. Programs are needed to enhance communication effectiveness with Latino patients. We examined the effect of language immersion training for pediatric faculty on their communication with Latino patients. Five general pediatric faculty physicians were sent to Guatemala for a two-week language immersion course and then had monthly one-hour Spanish language meetings for one year. Before and after immersion, six, and twelve months later, their Spanish skills were assessed. Before and after faculty training, Latino parents of pediatric patients were surveyed to assess their trust in and communication with the attending pediatricians. Spanish survey instruments were pilot tested and revised (trust scale alpha = 0.79; communication scale alpha = 0.80). Language proficiency increased for all the faculty participants, from a baseline score of 28% to a post-intervention score of 55%, p < 0.001. This increase in proficiency was sustained six and twelve months after the intervention. General linear modeling with repeated measures was used to examine associations between physician, parent, and clinic variables and the doctor-patient communication and patient trust scores. Even though baseline communication and trust scores were high, both improved after the intervention, p < 0.01. A two-week faculty language-training program can improve physician' language skills, communication, and trust between non-Latino doctor and Latino patient. Other measures of cultural competence should be measured and cost-benefit analyses conducted to assess the impact of immersion versus classroom experience.

  7. Comparative effectiveness research: challenges for medical journals.

    PubMed

    Sox, Harold C; Helfand, Mark; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Dickersin, Kay; Tovey, David; Knottnerus, J André; Tugwell, Peter

    2010-04-28

    Editors from a number of medical journals lay out principles for journals considering publication of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). In order to encourage dissemination of this editorial, this article is freely available in PLoS Medicine and will be also published in Medical Decision Making, Croatian Medical Journal, The Cochrane Library, Trials, The American Journal of Managed Care, and Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.

  8. Intercultural communication between patients and health care providers: an exploration of intercultural communication effectiveness, cultural sensitivity, stress, and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ulrey, K L; Amason, P

    2001-01-01

    Cultural diversity is becoming increasingly more important in the workplace. This is particularly true in health care organizations facing demographic shifts in the patients served and their families. This study serves to aid the development of intercultural communication training programs for health care providers by examining how cultural sensitivity and effective intercultural communication, besides helping patients, personally benefit health care providers by reducing their stress. Effective intercultural communication and cultural sensitivity were found to be related. Health care providers' levels of intercultural anxiety also were found to correlate with effective intercultural communication.

  9. The Effect of Family Communication Patterns on Adopted Adolescent Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Rueter, Martha A.

    2008-01-01

    Adoption and family communication both affect adolescent adjustment. We proposed that adoption status and family communication interact such that adopted adolescents in families with certain communication patterns are at greater risk for adjustment problems. We tested this hypothesis using a community-based sample of 384 adoptive and 208 nonadoptive families. Adolescents in these families were, on average, 16 years of age. The results supported our hypothesis. Adopted adolescents were at significantly greater risk for adjustment problems compared to nonadopted adolescents in families that emphasized conformity orientation without conversation orientation and in families that emphasized neither conformity nor conversation orientation. Adolescents in families emphasizing conversation orientation were at lower risk for adjustment problems, regardless of adoption status. PMID:19649145

  10. Effects of the Mass Media of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Walter

    The mass media are considered to be television, radio, movies, and newspapers. They may generate changes in cognition and comprehension. They do effect emotional arousal, sex and behavior identification, and changes in allocation of time, consumer purchase, and voting behavior. The only data which show a clear relationship between the mass media…

  11. Some Communication Effects of Charity Advertising Campaigns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Roy L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to examine the relationship of advertising exposure to a variety of cognitive and affective variables in a nonprofit charity campaign. The study also tested the transactional model of advertising effects, which combines exposure, motivations, and gratifications for viewing. A sample of 350 adults was randomly selected and…

  12. Effects of the Mass Media of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Walter

    The mass media are considered to be television, radio, movies, and newspapers. They may generate changes in cognition and comprehension. They do effect emotional arousal, sex and behavior identification, and changes in allocation of time, consumer purchase, and voting behavior. The only data which show a clear relationship between the mass media…

  13. Effects of communication skills training on parents and young adolescents from extreme family types.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Susan K; Henriques, Jeffrey; Chanchong, Weena

    2003-01-01

    What were the effects of a communication skills training intervention among a sample of young adolescents and parents who scored in the "extreme" range of the Circumplex Model of Family Systems? Thirty-seven young adolescents and a parent (intervention group) participated in communication skills training 2 hours/week for 6 weeks. Their responses on measures of satisfaction with the family system and perceptions of communication were compared with those of 47 young adolescents and a parent who scored in the extreme range but did not participate in the training (control group). Fathers and young adolescents demonstrated no change as a result of the program. Mothers who participated in skills training perceived communication with their young adolescent as more open than control mothers, but became increasingly dissatisfied with the family system. This universal, community-based, family-focused intervention may not be indicated for extreme families.

  14. Effective Patient-Provider Communication in Pediatric Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Hartlieb, Kathryn E. Brogan; Albrecht, Terrance; Martin, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Summary Effective patient-provider communication, although acknowledged as a key clinical skill and linked to better outcomes for patients, providers, and society as a whole, is not a primary focus of many medical schools’ curricula. Motivational Interviewing, or MI, is a patient-centered, directive communication framework appropriate for the health care setting with an ever growing empirical evidence base. Research on MI’s causal mechanisms has previously established patient change talk (motivational statements about behavior change) to be a mediator of behavior change. Current MI research is focused on identifying which provider communication skills are responsible for evoking change talk. MI recommends three core communication skills – informing, asking, and listening. A consistent evidence base is emerging for providers’ use of reflections (an active listening strategy). Our research provides evidence that asking for and reflecting patient change talk are effective communication strategies, but cautions providers to inform judiciously. In addition, our research indicates that supporting a patient's decision making autonomy is an important strategy to promote health behaviors. PMID:27261548

  15. The Effects of Communication Training on Teachers' and Students' Verbal Behaviours during Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study sought to compare the effects of training teachers in specific communication skills designed to promote thinking and scaffold learning on teachers' and students' verbal behaviours during cooperative group work. Thirty teachers and 826 children from years 5 to 7 participated in the study. The results show that when teachers are…

  16. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  17. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  18. The Communicative Effectiveness Survey: Preliminary Evidence of Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Neila J.; Kendall, Diane L.; Young, Mary Ellen; Rosenbek, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To provide preliminary evidence of the construct validity of the Communicative Effectiveness Survey (CES) for individuals with dysarthria and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: In a prospective, quasi-experimental design, 25 participants each were assigned to 3 groups (N = 75): PD and dysarthria, non-PD and no dysarthria, and PD…

  19. Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

  20. Effective Communication in Legal and Public Policy Hearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Jim; Sonsteng, John; Thorstad, Linda

    2014-04-01

    Scientists play a special role in legal debates and public policy decisions. The challenge for scientists who serve as expert witnesses is to communicate effectively in various legal forums, including litigation and legislative hearings. Expert witnesses must not advocate for one side or the other but must be able to convey the meaning as well as the quality and accuracy of their work.

  1. Chaos-based wireless communication resisting multipath effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun-Liang; Li, Chen; Ren, Hai-Peng; Grebogi, Celso

    2017-09-01

    In additive white Gaussian noise channel, chaos has been shown to be the optimal coherent communication waveform in the sense of using a very simple matched filter to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. Recently, Lyapunov exponent spectrum of the chaotic signals after being transmitted through a wireless channel has been shown to be unaltered, paving the way for wireless communication using chaos. In wireless communication systems, inter-symbol interference caused by multipath propagation is one of the main obstacles to achieve high bit transmission rate and low bit-error rate (BER). How to resist the multipath effect is a fundamental problem in a chaos-based wireless communication system (CWCS). In this paper, a CWCS is built to transmit chaotic signals generated by a hybrid dynamical system and then to filter the received signals by using the corresponding matched filter to decrease the noise effect and to detect the binary information. We find that the multipath effect can be effectively resisted by regrouping the return map of the received signal and by setting the corresponding threshold based on the available information. We show that the optimal threshold is a function of the channel parameters and of the information symbols. Practically, the channel parameters are time-variant, and the future information symbols are unavailable. In this case, a suboptimal threshold is proposed, and the BER using the suboptimal threshold is derived analytically. Simulation results show that the CWCS achieves a remarkable competitive performance even under inaccurate channel parameters.

  2. Communicating Effectively with All Colleagues, Even "Difficult" Ones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Heidi H.

    2011-01-01

    To help create a supportive learning environment for students, school psychologists must collaborate daily with parents, teachers, and other professionals. Effective communication is an indispensable tool for helping to ensure that all parties understand how they play an essential role in a student's development. The ability to communicate…

  3. Learning the Intricacies of Effective Communication through Game Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednar, Lucy

    2008-01-01

    As many teachers of communication come to realize, students often operate under the misconception that the effective use of language consists primarily of memorizing and applying the rules and regulations of grammar. Even worse, some students believe that they must inherit a talent for language and that without a genetic predisposition, they can…

  4. Effective Communication with Cultural Heritage Using Virtual Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffat, R. M.; Nofal, E. M.

    2013-07-01

    Cultural heritage is neither static nor stable. There is a need to explore ways for effectively communicating with cultural heritage to tourists and society at large, in an age of immediacy, a time of multiple realities and to multi-cultural tourists. It is vital to consider cultural heritage as a creative and relational process where places and communities are constantly remade through creative performance. The paper introduces virtual technologies as an approach to attain effective communication with cultural heritage. This approach emphasizes the importance of "user, content and context" in guiding the production of virtual heritage, as opposed to technology being the sole motivator. It addresses how these three issues in virtual heritage need to be transformed from merely representing quantitative data towards cultural information using the proposed effective communication triangle through representing meaningful relationships between cultural heritage elements, users and context. The paper offers a focused articulation of a proposed computational platform of "interactive, personalized and contextual-based navigation" with Egyptian heritage monuments as a one step forward towards achieving effective communication with Egyptian cultural heritage.

  5. Toward a Standard of Communication Training Effectiveness Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Matthew D.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    Communication training efforts in American business have increased steadily for the past several years. While this increase may be viewed as positive from several vantage points, it has not been matched by an increase in any systematic application of evaluation measures. Effective evaluation should take place at various levels. D. L. Kirkpatrick…

  6. Evidence of Halo Effects in Student Evaluations of Communication Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2002-01-01

    Notes that the halo effect is a construct reserved to explain individual rater's failure to discriminate among conceptually distinct aspects of a stimulus person's behavior. Examines instructor evaluations completed by 128 students from three communication courses. Finds significant inter-correlations among five measures indicating the presence of…

  7. Toward a Standard of Communication Training Effectiveness Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Matthew D.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    Communication training efforts in American business have increased steadily for the past several years. While this increase may be viewed as positive from several vantage points, it has not been matched by an increase in any systematic application of evaluation measures. Effective evaluation should take place at various levels. D. L. Kirkpatrick…

  8. Evidence of Halo Effects in Student Evaluations of Communication Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2002-01-01

    Notes that the halo effect is a construct reserved to explain individual rater's failure to discriminate among conceptually distinct aspects of a stimulus person's behavior. Examines instructor evaluations completed by 128 students from three communication courses. Finds significant inter-correlations among five measures indicating the presence of…

  9. Effectiveness of Social Media for Communicating Health Messages in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannor, Richard; Asare, Anthony Kwame; Bawole, Justice Nyigmah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop an in-depth understanding of the effectiveness, evolution and dynamism of the current health communication media used in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach: This paper uses a multi-method approach which utilizes a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches. In-depth interviews are…

  10. Terminology Revisited: Effective Communications for the Agricultural Community

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture-based finishing systems for meat goats, sheep and cattle are growing rapidly in the eastern USA, particularly on small farms. Increasing demand for pasture-raised meat and dairy products requires renewed efforts to communicate the best practical information as effectively as possible. Many...

  11. Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

  12. Effects of Systematic Desensitization in the Alleviation of Communication Apprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Arden K.

    A study examined stages and objectives of a systematic desensitization (SD) program and its effects on subject reported apprehension levels and perceived benefits and behavior changes toward public speaking. Subjects, 19 freshmen and sophomore university students, were administered the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension-24 (PRCA-24).…

  13. The Communicative Effectiveness Survey: Preliminary Evidence of Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Neila J.; Kendall, Diane L.; Young, Mary Ellen; Rosenbek, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To provide preliminary evidence of the construct validity of the Communicative Effectiveness Survey (CES) for individuals with dysarthria and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: In a prospective, quasi-experimental design, 25 participants each were assigned to 3 groups (N = 75): PD and dysarthria, non-PD and no dysarthria, and PD…

  14. Social and Cognitive Effects of Professional Communication on Software Usability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirel, Barbara; Olsen, Leslie A.

    1998-01-01

    Designs a technical-communication course for software-engineering majors to take concurrently with their capstone project course in software design. Studies effects of writing on students' user-centered beliefs and design practices and on usability of their product. Suggests the synergy of this interdisciplinary approach sensitized students to…

  15. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Pulak K.; Li, Yunyun; Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-12-07

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer’s diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer’s propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer’s axis. The corresponding swimmer’s diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  16. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak K.; Li, Yunyun; Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer's diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer's propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer's axis. The corresponding swimmer's diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  17. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-12-07

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer's diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer's propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer's axis. The corresponding swimmer's diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  18. The Effect of Communication Skills Training on Quality of Care, Self-Efficacy, Job Satisfaction and Communication Skills Rate of Nurses in Hospitals of Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, Esmail; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Moghaddasian, Sima; Babapour, Jalil

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Having an effective relationship with the patient in the process of treatment is essential. Nurses must have communication skills in order to establish effective relationships with the patients. This study evaluated the impact of communication skills training on quality of care, self-efficacy, job satisfaction and communication skills of nurses. Methods: This is an experimental study with a control group that has been done in 2012. The study sample consisted of 73 nurses who work in hospitals of Tabriz; they were selected by proportional randomizing method. The intervention was only conducted on the experimental group. In order to measure the quality of care 160 patients, who had received care by nurses, participated in this study. The Data were analyzed by SPSS (ver.13). Results: Comparing the mean scores of communication skills showed a statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups after intervention. The paired t-test showed a statistically significant difference in the experimental group before and after the intervention. Independent t-test showed a statistically significant difference between the rate of quality of care in patients of control and experimental groups after the intervention. Conclusion: The results showed that the training of communication skills can increase the nurse's rate of communication skills and cause elevation in quality of nursing care. Therefore, in order to improve the quality of nursing care it is recommended that communication skills be established and taught as a separate course in nursing education. PMID:25276707

  19. Assessing risk communication effectiveness: perspectives of agency practitioners.

    PubMed

    Tinker, T L; Collins, C M; King, H S; Hoover, M D

    2000-04-03

    A study conducted by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), a US public health agency, evaluated ATSDR's risk communication process, specifically the roles and responsibilities, planning, implementation, and coordination of activities in response to illegal indoor spraying of methyl parathion, a hazardous pesticide, in Pascagoula, MS. Interviews of staff members involved in the intervention were conducted and an analysis revealed strengths and areas in need of improvement in the design and implementation of risk communication strategies. Key recommendations included developing a clear strategy for planning and conducting communication activities; determining staff roles and responsibilities for coordination; and developing clear and consistent health messages, a dissemination strategy, and training in the delivery and evaluation of messages, effects, and outcomes.

  20. Cross-Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith; Davison, Jeannie; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Recent research on communication and performance in airline flight crews has led to a concept of shared mental models that is associated with effective, efficient team coordination in problem solving and decision making situations. Elements that characterize efficient communication have been identified. This research, however, was based strictly on US crews. More recent studies supported by NASA have identified cultural factors that influence communication among team members who vary in their status and roles. Research is just beginning to identify commonalities and culturally distinct strategies for accomplishing joint tasks. ASRS incident reports have been analyzed to identify language barriers in flight that have safety consequences. Implications of these concepts and findings for multi-cultural command and control will be explored.

  1. Improving Communication Skills of Pharmacy Students Through Effective Precepting

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Randy P.; Bennett, Marialice S.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacy students should be given opportunities to learn and practice interpersonal communication skills during their community advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Preceptors have the responsibility of setting the stage for the pharmacy students during their initial encounter. During this orientation to the site, students should become familiar with the history of the practice, the types of services provided, and the staff members. Once the orientation is completed, preceptors can develop strategies for incorporating the students into the practice's patient care activities. Students should participate in patient counseling, interviewing, and educational sessions. Also, students should participate in collaborative work with other health care providers. To ensure the development of communication skills in pharmacy students, preceptors can incorporate the teaching process “see one, do one, teach one” into their teaching activities. By following these strategies, preceptors can effectively and positively impact the communication skills of their students. PMID:17136179

  2. Conceptualizing and communicating management effects on forest water quality.

    PubMed

    Futter, Martyn N; Högbom, Lars; Valinia, Salar; Sponseller, Ryan A; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2016-02-01

    We present a framework for evaluating and communicating effects of human activity on water quality in managed forests. The framework is based on the following processes: atmospheric deposition, weathering, accumulation, recirculation and flux. Impairments to water quality are characterized in terms of their extent, longevity and frequency. Impacts are communicated using a "traffic lights" metaphor for characterizing severity of water quality impairments arising from forestry and other anthropogenic pressures. The most serious impairments to water quality in managed boreal forests include (i) forestry activities causing excessive sediment mobilization and extirpation of aquatic species and (ii) other anthropogenic pressures caused by long-range transport of mercury and acidifying pollutants. The framework and tool presented here can help evaluate, summarize and communicate the most important issues in circumstances where land management and other anthropogenic pressures combine to impair water quality and may also assist in implementing the "polluter pays" principle.

  3. Children's attitudes toward interaction with an unfamiliar peer with complex communication needs: comparing high- and low-technology devices.

    PubMed

    Dada, Shakila; Horn, Tenille; Samuels, Alecia; Schlosser, Ralf W

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the attitudes of children with typical development towards an unfamiliar peer with complex communication needs using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Specifically, the study aimed to compare attitudes when the peer used mobile technology (i.e., iPad(©)(1) ) with an AAC-specific application (Proloquo2Go™ (2) ) versus a low-technology communication board. A within-group crossover design was utilized involving 78 children. Half of the participants (i.e., Group 1) viewed Video 1 of an unfamiliar peer with complex communication needs in a scripted communication interaction using an iPad with Proloquo2Go followed by Video 2 of the same interaction using a communication board. The other half of the participants (Group 2) viewed these videos in the reverse sequence. The Communication Aid/Device Attitudinal Questionnaire (CADAQ) was completed after watching each video. Results indicated that both groups were more positive towards Video 1 (iPad with Prologuo2Go) on certain dimensions of the CADAQ. The results are discussed and recommendations for future research provided.

  4. Essays in Comparative Popular Culture: Coffee, Comics, and Communication. Paper No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Hidetoshi

    Based on papers presented at the East-West Communication Institute conferences and seminars in Hawaii between 1973 and 1975, these five essays focus on intercultural communication, emphasizing that popular culture existed with great diversity for centuries before modern media and that popular cultures have importance and impact on the everyday…

  5. Comparing Discussion and Lecture Pedagogy When Teaching Oral Communication in Business Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dai, Yao

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century, oral communication skills are increasingly important for business graduates who will start their careers. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to discover the best method to help business students enhance their oral communication skills during their college years. This research also helps professors to make their…

  6. Elements of effective communication--rediscoveries from homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane S

    2009-11-01

    Patients are increasingly attracted to homeopathy despite the unproven effectiveness of homeopathic remedies. Clinical benefit of homeopathy may be due to communication. This review aims to identify and assess effective communication patterns in homeopathy. Narrative review and synthesis of published communication patterns, patient narratives and the author's professional experience as a homeopathic practitioner. In the biomedical model, where the focus is on disease, communication is physician-centered with early redirection of patients' concerns, and associated with reduced compliance, increasing risk of malpractice claims and low professional fulfillment. The biopsychosocial and the developing integrative medicine models are based on biomedicine but aim to include the whole person. Patient-centeredness is a behavior that elicits, respects and incorporates patients' wishes, allows active patient participation and is related to improved outcomes. The homeopathic model is based on holism and comprehension of the totality of the patient and uses patient-centered communication with a high degree of physician co-operation, empathy, hopefulness, enablement and narrative competence, all of which can improve outcomes. Both biopsychosocial and homeopathic models rely on patient-centered communication. Regardless of conceptual differences, they overlap in their common respect for the totality and individuality of the patient. The study of the homeopathic model shows that respect for the whole person is a basic requirement to entrench patient-centeredness more firmly in medicine. Medical education should include values such as individual coping strategies, the benefits of a sound and healthy life-style and the necessity of hope and enablement. Health care should be redesigned to honor physicians who practice these values.

  7. Effective Strategies to Communicate Modeling with Project Regulators and Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arola, C.; Moser, K.; Bratton, W.

    2008-12-01

    Modeling is commonly used to support environmental project decision making. A notable example of the role of groundwater flow, fate, and transport modeling is to support the CERCLA remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) process. Modeling within an RI/FS is often used to evaluate new sampling locations, or to support evaluation of potential groundwater remedial technologies. Modeling used in these efforts ranges from simple to complex, and often must fit within a variety of state and federal regulations. Project stakeholder understanding and familiarity with model tools and application ranges broadly. Effective communication of the purpose, expected outcomes, strengths, limitations, and uncertainties of modeling efforts with regulators and project stakeholders is critical to successfully support project needs. Effective communication begins prior to the implementation of modeling efforts and should continue throughout the lifecycle of the modeling project. Communication efforts should include regular project workshops to keep stakeholders apprised of modeling progress. Regular communication throughout the modeling lifecycle provides a more technically and cost effective final product due to consideration of stakeholder concerns throughout the modeling effort through information exchange and negotiation, rather than at the end of the project, when it is often too late in the process or too expensive to change course and meet project milestones.

  8. Cross-Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.; Orasanu, J.; Davison, J.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Communication is essential to safe flight, as evidenced by several accidents in which crew communicates was found to have contributed to the accidents. This chapter documents the essential role of explicit efficient communication to flight safety with a global context. It addresses communication between flight crews and air traffic controllers in regions a the world where pilots and controllers speak different native languages, as well as cases in which crew members within the flight deck represent different native languages and cultures. It also addresses problems associated with "exporting" crew resource management training programs to parts of the world which values and norms differ from those of the United States, where these programs were initially developed. This chapter is organized around several central questions: (1) What are various kinds of communication failures and what are their consequences; (2) What are the causes of communication failure; (3) What are features of effective crew communication; (4) What can be done to enhance communication success? To explore a wider range of communication failures than available from accident reports, we examined a set of incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System. These could be classified into three major categories: those in which language actually interfered with transmission of a message; those in which transmission was adequate but the context was not expressed unambiguously and thus the message received was not the same as the message intended; and those in which the message was received as intended, but was not adequately understood or acted upon, mainly because of cultural factors. The consequences of failed communication can be flight errors (such as when a clearance is not received correctly), loss of situation awareness, or failure of crew members (or ATC and pilots) to build a shared understanding of a situation. Causes of misunderstanding can be traced to a number of sources, often

  9. Cross-Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.; Orasanu, J.; Davison, J.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Communication is essential to safe flight, as evidenced by several accidents in which crew communicates was found to have contributed to the accidents. This chapter documents the essential role of explicit efficient communication to flight safety with a global context. It addresses communication between flight crews and air traffic controllers in regions a the world where pilots and controllers speak different native languages, as well as cases in which crew members within the flight deck represent different native languages and cultures. It also addresses problems associated with "exporting" crew resource management training programs to parts of the world which values and norms differ from those of the United States, where these programs were initially developed. This chapter is organized around several central questions: (1) What are various kinds of communication failures and what are their consequences; (2) What are the causes of communication failure; (3) What are features of effective crew communication; (4) What can be done to enhance communication success? To explore a wider range of communication failures than available from accident reports, we examined a set of incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System. These could be classified into three major categories: those in which language actually interfered with transmission of a message; those in which transmission was adequate but the context was not expressed unambiguously and thus the message received was not the same as the message intended; and those in which the message was received as intended, but was not adequately understood or acted upon, mainly because of cultural factors. The consequences of failed communication can be flight errors (such as when a clearance is not received correctly), loss of situation awareness, or failure of crew members (or ATC and pilots) to build a shared understanding of a situation. Causes of misunderstanding can be traced to a number of sources, often

  10. Focus on Communicating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Ways of teaching students to communicate effectively using descriptive words and comparative statements are described. Two task cards involving descriptions of experiments investigating air pressure are included. (MT)

  11. Mode Use in Deaf Children: The Effects of Communication Method and Communication Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Mark T.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the differential mode usage (speech, vocalize, gesture and sign) of profoundly deaf preschoolers and their hearing mothers as a function of their level of communicative competence and method of communication. Relates simultaneous use of modes to higher communicative competence and specific pragmatic types of communication. (Author/MES)

  12. Communication Skills in Dental Students: New Data Regarding Retention and Generalization of Training Effects.

    PubMed

    Broder, Hillary L; Janal, Malvin; Mitnick, Danielle M; Rodriguez, Jasmine Y; Sischo, Lacey

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that a communications program using patient instructors (PIs) facilitates data-gathering and interpersonal skills of third-year dental students. The aim of this study was to address the question of whether those skills are retained into the students' fourth year and generalized from the classroom to the clinic. In the formative training phase, three cohorts of D3 students (N=1,038) at one dental school received instruction regarding effective patient-doctor communication; interviewed three PIs and received PI feedback; and participated in a reflective seminar with a behavioral science instructor. In the follow-up competency phase, fourth-year students performed two new patient interviews in the clinic that were observed and evaluated by clinical dental faculty members trained in communications. Mean scores on a standardized communications rating scale and data-gathering assessment were compared over training and follow-up sessions and between cohorts with a linear mixed model. The analysis showed that the third-year students' mean communication and data-gathering scores increased with each additional encounter with a PI (p<0.05) and that communication scores were not only maintained but increased during the fourth-year follow-up competency evaluations (p<0.05). Based on changes in the communications curriculum, prior instruction facilitated the students' clinical communication performance at baseline (p<0.05). This study suggests that the current Clinical Communications program improved students' data-gathering and interpersonal skills. Those skills were maintained and generalized through completion of the D4 students' summative competency performance in a clinical setting.

  13. Matched and mismatched appraisals of the effectiveness of communication strategies by family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Orange, J B

    2014-01-01

    Communication problems stemming from Alzheimer's disease (AD) often result in misunderstandings that can be linked with problem behaviours and increased caregiver stress. Moreover, these communication breakdowns also can result either from caregivers' use of ineffective communication strategies, which paradoxically are perceived as helpful, or can occur as a result of not using effective communication strategies that are perceived as unhelpful. The two primary aims were to determine the effectiveness of strategies used to resolve communication breakdowns and to examine whether caregivers' ratings of strategy effectiveness were consistent with evidence from video-recorded conversations and with effective communication strategies documented in the literature. Twenty-eight mealtime conversations were recorded using a sample of 15 dyads consisting of individuals with early, middle and late clinical-stage AD and their family caregivers. Conversations were analysed using the trouble-source repair paradigm to identify the communication strategies used by caregivers to resolve breakdowns. Family caregivers also rated the helpfulness of communication strategies used to resolve breakdowns. Analyses were conducted to assess the overlap or match between the use and appraisals of the helpfulness of communication strategies. Matched and mismatched appraisals of communication strategies varied across stages of AD. Matched appraisals by caregivers of persons with early-stage AD were observed for 68% of 22 communication strategies, whereas caregivers of persons with middle- and late-stage AD had matched appraisals for 45% and 55% of the strategies, respectively. Moreover, caregivers of persons with early-stage AD had matched appraisals over and above making matched appraisals by chance alone, compared with caregivers of persons in middle- and late-stage AD. Mismatches illustrate the need for communication education and training, particularly to establish empirically derived

  14. Phylogenetic comparative analysis of electric communication signals in ghost knifefishes (Gymnotiformes: Apteronotidae).

    PubMed

    Turner, Cameron R; Derylo, Maksymilian; de Santana, C David; Alves-Gomes, José A; Smith, G Troy

    2007-12-01

    Electrocommunication signals in electric fish are diverse, easily recorded and have well-characterized neural control. Two signal features, the frequency and waveform of the electric organ discharge (EOD), vary widely across species. Modulations of the EOD (i.e. chirps and gradual frequency rises) also function as active communication signals during social interactions, but they have been studied in relatively few species. We compared the electrocommunication signals of 13 species in the largest gymnotiform family, Apteronotidae. Playback stimuli were used to elicit chirps and rises. We analyzed EOD frequency and waveform and the production and structure of chirps and rises. Species diversity in these signals was characterized with discriminant function analyses, and correlations between signal parameters were tested with phylogenetic comparative methods. Signals varied markedly across species and even between congeners and populations of the same species. Chirps and EODs were particularly evolutionarily labile, whereas rises differed little across species. Although all chirp parameters contributed to species differences in these signals, chirp amplitude modulation, frequency modulation (FM) and duration were particularly diverse. Within this diversity, however, interspecific correlations between chirp parameters suggest that mechanistic trade-offs may shape some aspects of signal evolution. In particular, a consistent trade-off between FM and EOD amplitude during chirps is likely to have influenced the evolution of chirp structure. These patterns suggest that functional or mechanistic linkages between signal parameters (e.g. the inability of electromotor neurons increase their firing rates without a loss of synchrony or amplitude of action potentials) constrain the evolution of signal structure.

  15. Comparing narrative and multiple-choice formats in online communication skill assessment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sara; Spielberg, Freya; Mauksch, Larry; Farber, Stu; Duong, Cuong; Fitch, Wes; Greer, Tom

    2009-06-01

    We compared multiple-choice and open-ended responses collected from a web-based tool designated 'Case for Change', which had been developed for assessing and teaching medical students in the skills involved in integrating sexual risk assessment and behaviour change discussions into patient-centred primary care visits. A total of 111 Year 3 students completed the web-based tool. A series of videos from one patient encounter illustrated how a clinician uses patient-centred communication and health behaviour change skills while caring for a patient presenting with a urinary tract infection. Each video clip was followed by a request for students to respond in two ways to the question: 'What would you do next?' Firstly, students typed their statements of what they would say to the patient. Secondly, students selected from a multiple-choice list the statements that most closely resembled their free text entries. These two modes of students' answers were analysed and compared. When articulating what they would say to the patient in a narrative format, students frequently used doctor-centred approaches that focused on premature diagnostic questioning or neglected to elicit patient perspectives. Despite the instruction to select a matching statement from the multiple-choice list, students tended to choose the most exemplary patient-centred statement, which was contrary to the doctor-centred approaches reflected in their narrative responses. Open-ended questions facilitate in-depth understanding of students' educational needs, although the scoring of narrative responses is time-consuming. Multiple-choice questions allow efficient scoring and individualised feedback associated with question items but do not fully elicit students' thought processes.

  16. Lithium-ion battery models: a comparative study and a model-based powerline communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidani, Fida; Hutter, Franz X.; Scurtu, Rares-George; Braunwarth, Wolfgang; Burghartz, Joachim N.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, various Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery models are evaluated according to their accuracy, complexity and physical interpretability. An initial classification into physical, empirical and abstract models is introduced. Also known as white, black and grey boxes, respectively, the nature and characteristics of these model types are compared. Since the Li-ion battery cell is a thermo-electro-chemical system, the models are either in the thermal or in the electrochemical state-space. Physical models attempt to capture key features of the physical process inside the cell. Empirical models describe the system with empirical parameters offering poor analytical, whereas abstract models provide an alternative representation. In addition, a model selection guideline is proposed based on applications and design requirements. A complex model with a detailed analytical insight is of use for battery designers but impractical for real-time applications and in situ diagnosis. In automotive applications, an abstract model reproducing the battery behavior in an equivalent but more practical form, mainly as an equivalent circuit diagram, is recommended for the purpose of battery management. As a general rule, a trade-off should be reached between the high fidelity and the computational feasibility. Especially if the model is embedded in a real-time monitoring unit such as a microprocessor or a FPGA, the calculation time and memory requirements rise dramatically with a higher number of parameters. Moreover, examples of equivalent circuit models of Lithium-ion batteries are covered. Equivalent circuit topologies are introduced and compared according to the previously introduced criteria. An experimental sequence to model a 20 Ah cell is presented and the results are used for the purposes of powerline communication.

  17. Comparative Effectiveness of STEMI Regionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Concannon, Thomas W.; Kent, David M.; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Griffith, John L.; Cohen, Joshua; Beshansky, Joni R.; Wong, John B.; Aversano, Thomas; Selker, Harry P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is more effective on average than fibrinolytic therapy (FT) in the treatment of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Yet most U.S. hospitals are not equipped for PCI and FT is still widely used. This study evaluated the comparative effectiveness of STEMI regionalization strategies to increase the use of PCI against standard emergency transport and care. METHODS AND RESULTS We estimated incremental treatment costs and quality-adjusted life expectancies of 2,000 patients with STEMI who received PCI or FT in simulations of emergency care in a regional hospital system. To increase access to PCI across the system, we compared a base case strategy to 12 hospital-based strategies of building new PCI labs or extending the hours of existing labs, and one emergency medical services (EMS)-based strategy of transporting all patients with STEMI to existing PCI-capable hospitals. The base case resulted in 609 (569, 647) patients getting PCI. Hospital-based strategies increased the number of patients receiving PCI, the costs of care, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) saved, and were cost effective under a variety of conditions. An EMS-based strategy of transporting every patient to an existing PCI facility was less costly and more effective than all hospital expansion options. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that new construction and staffing of PCI labs may not be warranted if an EMS strategy is both available and feasible. PMID:20664025

  18. Can We Help Care Providers Communicate More Effectively With Persons Having Dementia Living in Long-Term Care Homes?

    PubMed

    McGilton, Katherine S; Rochon, Elizabeth; Sidani, Souraya; Shaw, Alexander; Ben-David, Boaz M; Saragosa, Marianne; Boscart, Veronique M; Wilson, Rozanne; Galimidi-Epstein, Karmit K; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2017-02-01

    Effective communication between residents with dementia and care providers in long-term care homes (LTCHs) is essential to resident-centered care. To determine the effects of a communication intervention on residents' quality of life (QOL) and care, as well as care providers' perceived knowledge, mood, and burden. The intervention included (1) individualized communication plans, (2) a dementia care workshop, and (3) a care provider support system. Pre- and postintervention scores were compared to evaluate the effects of the intervention. A total of 12 residents and 20 care providers in an LTCH participated in the feasibility study. The rate of care providers' adherence to the communication plans was 91%. Postintervention, residents experienced a significant increase in overall QOL. Care providers had significant improvement in mood and perceived reduced burden. The results suggest that the communication intervention demonstrates preliminary evidence of positive effects on residents' QOL and care providers' mood and burden.

  19. Can We Help Care Providers Communicate More Effectively With Persons Having Dementia Living in Long-Term Care Homes?

    PubMed Central

    Rochon, Elizabeth; Sidani, Souraya; Shaw, Alexander; Ben-David, Boaz M.; Saragosa, Marianne; Boscart, Veronique M.; Wilson, Rozanne; Galimidi-Epstein, Karmit K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective communication between residents with dementia and care providers in long-term care homes (LTCHs) is essential to resident-centered care. Purpose: To determine the effects of a communication intervention on residents’ quality of life (QOL) and care, as well as care providers’ perceived knowledge, mood, and burden. Method: The intervention included (1) individualized communication plans, (2) a dementia care workshop, and (3) a care provider support system. Pre- and postintervention scores were compared to evaluate the effects of the intervention. A total of 12 residents and 20 care providers in an LTCH participated in the feasibility study. Results: The rate of care providers’ adherence to the communication plans was 91%. Postintervention, residents experienced a significant increase in overall QOL. Care providers had significant improvement in mood and perceived reduced burden. Conclusion: The results suggest that the communication intervention demonstrates preliminary evidence of positive effects on residents’ QOL and care providers’ mood and burden. PMID:27899433

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis for health communication programs.

    PubMed

    Guilkey, David K; Hutchinson, Paul; Lance, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article describes methods for analyzing the cost-effectiveness of health communication programs, focusing in particular on estimating program effectiveness with econometric methods that address experimental and quasi-experimental designs (and their absence), national or subnational program coverage, and endogenously targeting of programs. Experimental designs provide a gold standard for assessing effectiveness but are seldom feasible for large-scale health communication programs. Even in the absence of such designs, however, fairly simple methods can be used to examine intermediate objectives, such as program reach, which in turn can be linked to program costs to estimate cost effectiveness. When moving beyond program reach to behavioral or other outcome measures, such as contraceptive use or fertility, or when faced with full-coverage national programs, more elaborate data and methods are required. We discuss data requirements and assumptions necessary in each case, focusing on single-equation multiple regression models, structural equations models, and fixed effects estimators for use with longitudinal data, and then describing how cost information can be incorporated into econometric models so as to get measures of the cost-effectiveness of communication interventions.

  1. How Physicians, Patients, and Observers Compare on the Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Measures of Physician-Patient Communication.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Howard S; Street, Richard L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare several different measures of physician-patient communication. We compared data derived from different measures of three communication behaviors, patient participation, physician information giving, and physician participatory decision-making (PDM) style, from 83 outpatient visits to oncology or thoracic surgery clinics for pulmonary nodules or lung cancer. Communication was measured with rating scales completed by patients and physicians after the consultation and by two different groups of external observers who used rating scales or coded the frequency of communication behaviors, respectively, after listening to an audio recording of the consultation. Measures were compared using Pearson's correlations. Correlations of patients' and physicians' ratings of patient participation (r = .04) and physician PDM style (r = .03) were low and not significant (p > .0083, Bonferroni-adjusted). Correlations of observers' ratings with patients' or physicians' ratings for patient participation and physician PDM style were moderate or low (r = .15, .27, .07, and .01, respectively) but were not statistically significant (p > .0083, Bonferroni-adjusted). Correlations between observers' ratings and frequency measures were .31, .52, and .63 and were statistically significant with p values .005, <.0001, and <.0001, respectively, for PDM style, information giving, and patient participation. Our findings highlight the potential for using observers' ratings as an alternate measure of communication to more labor intensive frequency measures.

  2. Improving interprofessional collaboration: The effect of training in nonviolent communication.

    PubMed

    Museux, Anne-Claire; Dumont, Serge; Careau, Emmanuelle; Milot, Élise

    2016-07-01

    This article examines the effects of nonviolent communication (NVC) training on the interprofessional collaboration (IPC) of two health and social services sector care teams. The study was conducted in 2013 with two interprofessional teams (N = 9) using a mixed method research design to measure the effects of the training. Individual IPC competency was measured using the Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter tool, and group competency using the Observed Interprofessional Collaboration tool. A focus group was held to collect participant perceptions of what they learned in the training. Results revealed improvements in individual competency in client/family-centered collaboration and role clarification. Improvements in group competency were also found with respect to teams' ability to develop a shared plan of action. Data suggests that participants accepted and adopted training content. After the training, they appeared better able to identify the effects of spontaneous communication, more understanding of the mechanisms of empathy, and in a better position to foster collective leadership.

  3. Adult Mortality Attributable to Preventable Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases and Injuries in Japan: A Comparative Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Nayu; Inoue, Manami; Iso, Hiroyasu; Ikeda, Shunya; Satoh, Toshihiko; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Saito, Eiko; Katanoda, Kota; Sobue, Tomotaka; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Naghavi, Mohsen; Ezzati, Majid; Shibuya, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Background The population of Japan has achieved the longest life expectancy in the world. To further improve population health, consistent and comparative evidence on mortality attributable to preventable risk factors is necessary for setting priorities for health policies and programs. Although several past studies have quantified the impact of individual risk factors in Japan, to our knowledge no study has assessed and compared the effects of multiple modifiable risk factors for non-communicable diseases and injuries using a standard framework. We estimated the effects of 16 risk factors on cause-specific deaths and life expectancy in Japan. Methods and Findings We obtained data on risk factor exposures from the National Health and Nutrition Survey and epidemiological studies, data on the number of cause-specific deaths from vital records adjusted for ill-defined codes, and data on relative risks from epidemiological studies and meta-analyses. We applied a comparative risk assessment framework to estimate effects of excess risks on deaths and life expectancy at age 40 y. In 2007, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure accounted for 129,000 deaths (95% CI: 115,000–154,000) and 104,000 deaths (95% CI: 86,000–119,000), respectively, followed by physical inactivity (52,000 deaths, 95% CI: 47,000–58,000), high blood glucose (34,000 deaths, 95% CI: 26,000–43,000), high dietary salt intake (34,000 deaths, 95% CI: 27,000–39,000), and alcohol use (31,000 deaths, 95% CI: 28,000–35,000). In recent decades, cancer mortality attributable to tobacco smoking has increased in the elderly, while stroke mortality attributable to high blood pressure has declined. Life expectancy at age 40 y in 2007 would have been extended by 1.4 y for both sexes (men, 95% CI: 1.3–1.6; women, 95% CI: 1.2–1.7) if exposures to multiple cardiovascular risk factors had been reduced to their optimal levels as determined by a theoretical-minimum-risk exposure distribution. Conclusions

  4. Barriers to effective communication in skilled nursing facilities: differences in perception between nurses and physicians.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, M P; Franzi, C; Osterweil, D; Hill, T

    1999-01-01

    Effective communication between nurses and physicians is central to the clinical care of nursing home residents. Anecdotal evidence suggests that communication between the groups is unsatisfactory, but no empirical data exist with which to validate assumptions. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare perceptions of potential communication barriers among nurses and physicians in four California nursing homes. Registered nurses (n = 59), and physicians (n = 47) involved in the direct clinical care of nursing home residents completed a 12-item questionnaire designed to elicit perceptions about potential communication barriers. Five specific categories of barriers were identified. These included nurse competence, time burden of calls, necessity of calls, professional respect, and language comprehension. Responses were compared using t test analysis. Significant differences in perceived communication barriers were identified. Physicians, but not nurses, perceive nursing competence to be a significant barrier. Nurses perceive physicians to be unpleasant. Both physicians and nurses perceive that physicians do not value nurses' opinions. Neither group perceived language expression, language comprehension, or time burden of phone calls to be barriers to communication. Issues related to the perceived competency of nurses by physicians is consistent with existing data from other clinical settings. Differences in awareness about scope of practice and regulatory requirements between the groups may offer a partial explanation for the discordant perceptions. Perceptions by nurses (but not physicians) of unpleasantness and/or disrespect during telephone encounters may reflect the broader ongoing differences in professional culture, social status, and gender inequality between the two groups. Further clarification of the causes of barriers to effective communication is essential in order to plan appropriate interventions.

  5. Analysis of variance of communication latencies in anesthesia: comparing means of multiple log-normal distributions.

    PubMed

    Ledolter, Johannes; Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2011-10-01

    Anesthesiologists rely on communication over periods of minutes. The analysis of latencies between when messages are sent and responses obtained is an essential component of practical and regulatory assessment of clinical and managerial decision-support systems. Latency data including times for anesthesia providers to respond to messages have moderate (> n = 20) sample sizes, large coefficients of variation (e.g., 0.60 to 2.50), and heterogeneous coefficients of variation among groups. Highly inaccurate results are obtained both by performing analysis of variance (ANOVA) in the time scale or by performing it in the log scale and then taking the exponential of the result. To overcome these difficulties, one can perform calculation of P values and confidence intervals for mean latencies based on log-normal distributions using generalized pivotal methods. In addition, fixed-effects 2-way ANOVAs can be extended to the comparison of means of log-normal distributions. Pivotal inference does not assume that the coefficients of variation of the studied log-normal distributions are the same, and can be used to assess the proportional effects of 2 factors and their interaction. Latency data can also include a human behavioral component (e.g., complete other activity first), resulting in a bimodal distribution in the log-domain (i.e., a mixture of distributions). An ANOVA can be performed on a homogeneous segment of the data, followed by a single group analysis applied to all or portions of the data using a robust method, insensitive to the probability distribution.

  6. The effect of a nurse team leader on communication and leadership in major trauma resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Clements, Alana; Curtis, Kate; Horvat, Leanne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and resuscitation of trauma patients requires an organised, multidisciplinary team. Literature evaluating leadership roles of nurses in trauma resuscitation and their effect on team performance is scarce. To assess the effect of allocating the most senior nurse as team leader of trauma patient assessment and resuscitation on communication, documentation and perceptions of leadership within an Australian emergency department. The study design was a pre-post-test survey of emergency nursing staff (working at resuscitation room level) perceptions of leadership, communication, and documentation before and after the implementation of a nurse leader role. Patient records were audited focussing on initial resuscitation assessment, treatment, and nursing clinical entry. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Communication trended towards improvement. All (100%) respondents post-test stated they had a good to excellent understanding of their role, compared to 93.2% pre-study. A decrease (58.1-12.5%) in 'intimidating personality' as a negative aspect of communication. Nursing leadership had a 6.7% increase in the proportion of those who reported nursing leadership to be good to excellent. Accuracy of clinical documentation improved (P = 0.025). Trauma nurse team leaders improve some aspects of communication and leadership. Development of trauma nurse leaders should be encouraged within trauma team training programmes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effective Communication and File-I/O Bandwidth Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A E; Rabenseifner, R

    2001-05-02

    We describe the design and MPI implementation of two benchmarks created to characterize the balanced system performance of high-performance clusters and supercomputers: b{_}eff, the communication-specific benchmark examines the parallel message passing performance of a system, and b{_}eff{_}io, which characterizes the effective 1/0 bandwidth. Both benchmarks have two goals: (a) to get a detailed insight into the Performance strengths and weaknesses of different parallel communication and I/O patterns, and based on this, (b) to obtain a single bandwidth number that characterizes the average performance of the system namely communication and 1/0 bandwidth. Both benchmarks use a time driven approach and loop over a variety of communication and access patterns to characterize a system in an automated fashion. Results of the two benchmarks are given for several systems including IBM SPs, Cray T3E, NEC SX-5, and Hitachi SR 8000. After a redesign of b{_}eff{_}io, I/O bandwidth results for several compute partition sizes are achieved in an appropriate time for rapid benchmarking.

  8. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  9. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  10. The Economics of Comparative Effectiveness Studies

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, David; Basu, Anirban; Conti, Rena

    2013-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) can provide valuable information for patients, providers and payers. These stakeholders differ in their incentives to invest in CER. To maximize benefits from public investments in CER, it is important to understand the value of CER from the perspectives of these stakeholders and how that affects their incentives to invest in CER. This article provides a conceptual framework for valuing CER, and illustrates the potential benefits of such studies from a number of perspectives using several case studies. We examine cases in which CER provides value by identifying when one treatment is consistently better than others, when different treatments are preferred for different subgroups, and when differences are small enough that decisions can be made based on price. We illustrate these findings using value-of-information techniques to assess the value of research, and by examining changes in pharmaceutical prices following publication of a comparative effectiveness study. Our results suggest that CER may have high societal value but limited private return to providers or payers. This suggests the importance of public efforts to promote the production of CER. We also conclude that value-of-information tools may help inform policy decisions about how much public funds to invest in CER and how to prioritize the use of available public funds for CER, in particular targeting public CER spending to areas where private incentives are low relative to social benefits. PMID:20831292

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of case method instruction in technical communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    The effectiveness of the case method as an instructional technique in improving technical writing was evaluated. The development of a self-report instrument that attempts to measure changes in attitude toward technical communication and the presentation results change are the purpose of this paper. Standards for developing a case set forth by Goldstein and Couture, were used to design an evaluation instrument to measure the effect instruction on student attitude toward technical communication. This self-report instrument is based on model developed and tested by Daly and Miller who studied writer attitude and apprehension toward writing. It was the most important objective of any evaluation is to provide information for improving the program.

  12. [Neurogenic communication disorders: how effective are relaxation therapy and acupuncture?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M

    2008-12-01

    Not only neurologists but also ENT-physicians and phoniatricians have to prescribe speech and language therapy for patients with communication disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained increasing popularity among patients. Many studies have investigated these procedures and positive effects on certain physical e. g., chronic pain and anxiety disorders could be validated. Unfortunately only few empirical investigations have targeted the use of CAM to treat neurogenic disorders of communication or cognition. In this review we provide an overview over general therapeutical principals of two widely used approaches, relaxation therapy and acupuncture. Then we survey the literature and summarize existent research literature regarding the effects of the treatment of neurogenic disorders including dementia.

  13. Improved interval estimation of comparative treatment effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Krevelen, Ryne Christian

    Comparative experiments, in which subjects are randomized to one of two treatments, are performed often. There is no shortage of papers testing whether a treatment effect exists and providing confidence intervals for the magnitude of this effect. While it is well understood that the object and scope of inference for an experiment will depend on what assumptions are made, these entities are not always clearly presented. We have proposed one possible method, which is based on the ideas of Jerzy Neyman, that can be used for constructing confidence intervals in a comparative experiment. The resulting intervals, referred to as Neyman-type confidence intervals, can be applied in a wide range of cases. Special care is taken to note which assumptions are made and what object and scope of inference are being investigated. We have presented a notation that highlights which parts of a problem are being treated as random. This helps ensure the focus on the appropriate scope of inference. The Neyman-type confidence intervals are compared to possible alternatives in two different inference settings: one in which inference is made about the units in the sample and one in which inference is made about units in a fixed population. A third inference setting, one in which inference is made about a process distribution, is also discussed. It is stressed that certain assumptions underlying this third type of inference are unverifiable. When these assumptions are not met, the resulting confidence intervals may cover their intended target well below the desired rate. Through simulation, we demonstrate that the Neyman-type intervals have good coverage properties when inference is being made about a sample or a population. In some cases the alternative intervals are much wider than necessary on average. Therefore, we recommend that researchers consider using our Neyman-type confidence intervals when carrying out inference about a sample or a population as it may provide them with more

  14. Health literacy and its importance for effective communication. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Veronica; Keogh, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    This is the first of two articles exploring the concept of health literacy, an often hidden barrier to effective healthcare communication. The authors define the components of health literacy, as well as describing the extent and implications of limited health literacy for parents/caregivers and their children. The article also identifies the link between poor health literacy and health outcomes and outlines a framework for adolescent health literacy. Part two will be published in May.

  15. Comparative Study of Optical and RF Communication Systems for a Mars Mission - Part II. Unified Value Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Layland, J.; Lesh, J.; Wilson, K.; Sue, M.; Rascoe, D.; Lansing, F.; Wilhelm, M.; Harcke, L.; Chen, C.; Feria, Y.

    1997-01-01

    In this Par-II report of the Advanced Communications Benefits study, two critical metrics for comparing the benefits of utilizing X-band, Ka-band and Optical frequencies for supporting generic classes of Martian exploration missions have been evaluated.

  16. Effect of cyto/chemokine degradation in effective intercellular communication distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.

    2017-02-01

    Many complex biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and cell motility are governed by cell signaling. This mode of intercellular communication is of paramount importance for tissue function and ultimately for entire organism. In intercellular communication cells secrete signaling molecules such as cyto/chemokines which diffuse through the surrounding medium and eventually bind to receptors on other cells whereby the signal transduction is completed. An accurate estimation of the effective communication distances and the time scale on which signaling takes place are important for the interpretation of cell and organ physiology and ultimately in the effective and efficient chemotactically driven tissue engineering. The present study uses a solitary cell model incorporating degradation of secreted molecules to estimate the effective communication distances and the time scale on which signaling takes place. We demonstrate through our model that in presence of degradation the effective communication distances are significantly reduced.

  17. Effect of cyto/chemokine degradation in effective intercellular communication distances.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K

    2017-02-15

    Many complex biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and cell motility are governed by cell signaling. This mode of intercellular communication is of paramount importance for tissue function and ultimately for entire organism. In intercellular communication cells secrete signaling molecules such as cyto/chemokines which diffuse through the surrounding medium and eventually bind to receptors on other cells whereby the signal transduction is completed. An accurate estimation of the effective communication distances and the time scale on which signaling takes place are important for the interpretation of cell and organ physiology and ultimately in the effective and efficient chemotactically driven tissue engineering. The present study uses a solitary cell model incorporating degradation of secreted molecules to estimate the effective communication distances and the time scale on which signaling takes place. We demonstrate through our model that in presence of degradation the effective communication distances are significantly reduced.

  18. Methods of alleviation of ionospheric scintillation effects on digital communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The degradation of the performance of digital communication systems because of ionospheric scintillation effects can be reduced either by diversity techniques or by coding. The effectiveness of traditional space-diversity, frequency-diversity and time-diversity techniques is reviewed and design considerations isolated. Time-diversity signaling is then treated as an extremely simple form of coding. More advanced coding methods, such as diffuse threshold decoding and burst-trapping decoding, which appear attractive in combatting scintillation effects are discussed and design considerations noted. Finally, adaptive coding techniques appropriate when the general state of the channel is known are discussed.

  19. Methods of alleviation of ionospheric scintillation effects on digital communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The degradation of the performance of digital communication systems because of ionospheric scintillation effects can be reduced either by diversity techniques or by coding. The effectiveness of traditional space-diversity, frequency-diversity and time-diversity techniques is reviewed and design considerations isolated. Time-diversity signaling is then treated as an extremely simple form of coding. More advanced coding methods, such as diffuse threshold decoding and burst-trapping decoding, which appear attractive in combatting scintillation effects are discussed and design considerations noted. Finally, adaptive coding techniques appropriate when the general state of the channel is known are discussed.

  20. Methods for teaching effective patient communication techniques to radiography students.

    PubMed

    Makely, S

    1990-07-01

    Teaching students to communicate effectively with patients has always been part of the radiography curriculum in the USA. However, developing these skills has become even more important in recent times due to several factors. Patients who have been well versed in what to expect from the examination being conducted are in a better position to co-operate with the radiographer. This increases the chances of producing optimal results from an examination at the first attempt, thus reducing radiation exposure, patient discomfort and the overall cost of conducting the procedure. Also, increased competition among health care providers has resulted in more emphasis being placed on patient, or customer, satisfaction. Radiographers are in the 'front line' of patient care. Patients often have more interaction with radiographers than with physicians or other medical specialists. Radiographers who practise effective communication techniques with their patients can alleviate anxiety and make an important contribution to the overall satisfaction of the patient with respect to the quality of service and care they receive. This article describes instructional methods being used in the USA to help develop effective patient communication techniques, and reports the findings of a study among radiography educators as to which of these methods are thought to be most successful.

  1. Comparative antibacterial effectiveness of seven hand antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Myklebust, S

    1985-12-01

    Seven hand antiseptics (alcohol-, iodophor- and chlorhexidine preparations) were compared for antibacterial effectiveness using finger-print contact sampling on blood agar in duplicate series with 18 students as test persons. Bacterial samples were obtained before and after handwashing (with unmedicated liquid soap) as well as after hand disinfection. Hibiscrub was tested without prewashing. The antiseptics were rubbed into the skin and the hands left uncontaminated for 2 min before sampling. Due to results showing unexpectedly low antibacterial effectiveness of 70% (v/v) ethanol, a series of supplementary experiments with ethanol (70% (v/v) and 80% (v/v] and isopropanol (60% (v/v] were performed with 10 laboratory staff-members. These experiments confirmed the previously demonstrated weak antibacterial effect of 70% (v/v) ethanol on the normal hand flora. Alcoholic chlorhexidine solutions and Hibiscrub were the only preparations that gave significant, mean reductions (97.9-99.9% and 80.3-93.4%, respectively) in the number of colony forming units. According to the present study, these are the only test preparations that can be recommended for presurgical hand disinfection, and when hand disinfection is needed in general dental practice.

  2. The Effects of Communication Apprehension and Opportunity to Communicate on Human Bargaining Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustainis, J. Justin; Albone, Kenneth

    A study examined three aspects of the collective bargaining situation that involves, either directly or indirectly, communication behavior: (1) the number of opportunities to communicate, (2) the degree of cooperation/competitiveness shown by an opponent, and (3) the degree of communication apprehension possessed by parties to the process.…

  3. Effectiveness of Training Clinicians' Communication Skills on Patients' Clinical Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vinicius C; Ferreira, Manuela L; Pinto, Rafael Z; Filho, Ruben F; Refshauge, Kathryn; Ferreira, Paulo H

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the literature on the effectiveness of communication skills training for clinicians on patients' clinical outcomes in primary care and rehabilitation settings. We systematically reviewed the literature for randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of communication skills training for clinicians on patients' satisfaction with care and on pain and disability in primary care and rehabilitation settings. The search strategy was conducted using AMED, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials through June 2015. Methodological quality of included trials was assessed by 2 independent investigators using the PEDro scale, and consensus was used to resolve disagreements. Data were extracted, and meta-analyses were performed. Nineteen randomized controlled trials were included. Of these, 16 investigated communication training for clinicians that emphasized patient participation (eg, shared decision-making approaches). Communication training had small effects on patients' satisfaction with care when compared to control (4.1 points on a 100-point scale, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-7.0). Communication training also had small effects on pain and disability with pooled results showing weighted mean differences of -3.8 points (95% CI, -6.5 to -1.1) and -3.6 (95% CI, -5.4 to -1.7), respectively. Studies show that communication training for clinicians produces small effects in improving patients' satisfaction with care or reducing pain and disability in primary care and rehabilitation settings. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rehabilitation professionals still do not communicate effectively about cognition.

    PubMed

    Lande, Erik S; Wanlass, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    To examine current use of descriptive labels for levels of cognitive impairment and types of memory to explore whether rehabilitation disciplines are now communicating more effectively. Survey of rehabilitation professionals. Hospital rehabilitation programs. Respondents (N=130) representing 8 facilities in 5 states completed surveys. Not applicable. Responses to survey questions about severity and types of memory impairment were examined with the Kruskal-Wallis test to determine the impact of profession on ratings. Post hoc Mann-Whitney U test comparisons of the 2 professions with the most cognitive assessment experience, psychologists/neuropsychologists and speech-language pathologists, were conducted. Ratings of various deficit levels differed significantly by profession (mild: H=39.780, P<.000; moderate: H=43.309, P<.000; severe: H=38.354, P<.000), but not by program location. In comparing psychologists/neuropsychologists and speech-language pathologists specifically, we found a significant discrepancy in ratings for percentile ranges associated with the terms mild (U=103.000, P<.001), moderate (U=78.000, P<.000), and severe (U=109.000, P<.001). Disagreement on the meaning of descriptive memory terms was noted among rehabilitation professionals in general, with large percentages of respondents not agreeing on the meanings of terms. A significant lack of consensus persists regarding the understanding of common cognitive terminology. This miscommunication affects cognitive impairment descriptors (eg, mild, moderate, severe) and categorization of types of memory. Only half of rehabilitation professionals appear aware of this discrepancy, suggesting that education is necessary to bring greater awareness of the potential for miscommunication. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation methodology for comparing memory and communication of analytic processes in visual analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Eric D; Goodall, John R

    2014-01-01

    Provenance tools can help capture and represent the history of analytic processes. In addition to supporting analytic performance, provenance tools can be used to support memory of the process and communication of the steps to others. Objective evaluation methods are needed to evaluate how well provenance tools support analyst s memory and communication of analytic processes. In this paper, we present several methods for the evaluation of process memory, and we discuss the advantages and limitations of each. We discuss methods for determining a baseline process for comparison, and we describe various methods that can be used to elicit process recall, step ordering, and time estimations. Additionally, we discuss methods for conducting quantitative and qualitative analyses of process memory. By organizing possible memory evaluation methods and providing a meta-analysis of the potential benefits and drawbacks of different approaches, this paper can inform study design and encourage objective evaluation of process memory and communication.

  6. Comparative effectiveness research: policy and politics.

    PubMed

    Zusman, Edie E

    2012-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is the basis for some of the fiercest rhetoric of the current political era. While it is a relatively old and previously academic pursuit, CER may well become the foundation upon which the future of health care in the US is based. The actual impact of CER on-and uptake among-doctors, patients, hospitals, and health insurers, however, remains to be seen. Political considerations and compromises have led to the removal of key aspects of CER implementation from policy legislation to prevent alienating stakeholders critical to the success of health care reform. Health care providers, including specialists such as neurosurgeons, will need to understand both the policies and political implications of CER as its practices becomes an indelible part of the future health care landscape.

  7. Clinical handover as an interactive event: informational and interactional communication strategies in effective shift-change handovers.

    PubMed

    Eggins, Suzanne; Slade, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Clinical handover -- the transfer between clinicians of responsibility and accountability for patients and their care (AMA 2006) -- is a pivotal and high-risk communicative event in hospital practice. Studies focusing on critical incidents, mortality, risk and patient harm in hospitals have highlighted ineffective communication -- including incomplete and unstructured clinical handovers -- as a major contributing factor (NSW Health 2005; ACSQHC 2010). In Australia, as internationally, Health Departments and hospital management have responded by introducing standardised handover communication protocols. This paper problematises one such protocol - the ISBAR tool - and argues that the narrow understanding of communication on which such protocols are based may seriously constrain their ability to shape effective handovers. Based on analysis of audio-recorded shift-change clinical handovers between medical staff we argue that handover communication must be conceptualised as inherently interactive and that attempts to describe, model and teach handover practice must recognise both informational and interactive communication strategies. By comparing the communicative performance of participants in authentic handover events we identify communication strategies that are more and less likely to lead to an effective handover and demonstrate the importance of focusing close up on communication to improve the quality and safety of healthcare interactions.

  8. Montreal Communication Evaluation Battery--Portuguese version: age and education effects.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Mônica de Souza; Pagliarin, Karina Carlesso; Mineiro, Ana; Ferré, Perrine; Joanette, Yves; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2015-01-01

    To verify age and education effects on communication performance of healthy adults in the Montreal Communication Evaluation Battery, Portuguese version (MAC-PT). The sample comprised 90 healthy adults from Portugal, European Portuguese speakers, divided into nine groups according to educational level (4-9, 10-13, and > 13 years of formal schooling) and age (19-40, 41-64, and 65-80 years). The influence of age and education was assessed by comparing mean scores between groups, using a two-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni post hoc tests (p ≤ 0.05). The results showed that participants' performance was influenced by age in pragmatic-inferential, discursive, and prosodic tasks. Education had the greatest influence on the performance in all processes evaluated by the MAC-PT. Age and education seem to influence the communicative performance and should be considered in the assessment of neurological patients.

  9. Facing the greenhouse effect: Communication about energy in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Henschel, C.; Wiedemann, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Energy policy in Germany has been characterized by an irreconcilable debate about nuclear power and the potentials of renewable energy sources and energy-saving activities for more than 15 years. The question is whether the emerging greenhouse effect has changed or at least influenced this conflict. In this study the authors screened the publications of various stakeholders in the energy debate and investigated their standpoints, values, and attitudes towards energy policy after the emergence of the greenhouse effect. The study reveals that the focus of the communication is no longer nuclear power. Moreover, communication with the public tries to hide the still virulent conflict among the agents. Every agent argues for the protection of the global climate and environment. But despite this superficial consensus and the [open quotes]green[close quotes] arguments, the various agents draw different conclusions. Thus communication not only minimizes clarity, but also fails to produce any consensus on how to realize the ambitious goals of global environmental protection. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Effective Vaccine Communication during the Disneyland Measles Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Broniatowski, David Andre; Hilyard, Karen M.; Dredze, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine refusal rates have increased in recent years, highlighting the need for effective risk communication, especially over social media. Fuzzy-trace theory predicts that individuals encode bottom-line meaning ("gist") and statistical information ("verbatim") in parallel and that articles expressing a clear gist will be most compelling. We coded news articles (n=4,686) collected during the 2014–2015 Disneyland measles for content including statistics, stories, or opinions containing bottom-line gists regarding vaccines and vaccine-preventable illnesses. We measured the extent to which articles were compelling by how frequently they were shared on Facebook. The most widely shared articles expressed bottom-line opinions, although articles containing statistics were also more likely to be shared than articles lacking statistics. Stories had limited impact on Facebook shares. Results support Fuzzy Trace Theory's predictions regarding the distinct yet parallel impact of categorical gist and statistical verbatim information on public health communication. PMID:27179915

  11. Investigating effects of communications modulation technique on targeting performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Eusebio, Gerald; Huling, Edward

    2006-05-01

    One of the key challenges facing the global war on terrorism (GWOT) and urban operations is the increased need for rapid and diverse information from distributed sources. For users to get adequate information on target types and movements, they would need reliable data. In order to facilitate reliable computational intelligence, we seek to explore the communication modulation tradeoffs affecting information distribution and accumulation. In this analysis, we explore the modulation techniques of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS), and statistical time-division multiple access (TDMA) as a function of the bit error rate and jitter that affect targeting performance. In the analysis, we simulate a Link 16 with a simple bandpass frequency shift keying (PSK) technique using different Signal-to-Noise ratios. The communications transfer delay and accuracy tradeoffs are assessed as to the effects incurred in targeting performance.

  12. Effective vaccine communication during the disneyland measles outbreak.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, David A; Hilyard, Karen M; Dredze, Mark

    2016-06-14

    Vaccine refusal rates have increased in recent years, highlighting the need for effective risk communication, especially over social media. Fuzzy-trace theory predicts that individuals encode bottom-line meaning ("gist") and statistical information ("verbatim") in parallel and those articles expressing a clear gist will be most compelling. We coded news articles (n=4581) collected during the 2014-2015 Disneyland measles for content including statistics, stories, or bottom-line gists regarding vaccines and vaccine-preventable illnesses. We measured the extent to which articles were compelling by how frequently they were shared on Facebook. The most widely shared articles expressed bottom-line gists, although articles containing statistics were also more likely to be shared than articles lacking statistics. Stories had limited impact on Facebook shares. Results support Fuzzy Trace Theory's predictions regarding the distinct yet parallel impact of categorical gist and statistical verbatim information on public health communication.

  13. The effect of social marketing communication on safe driving.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Jenn; Lin, Wan-Chen; Lo, Jyue-Yu

    2011-12-01

    Processing of cognition, affect, and intention was investigated in viewers of advertisements to prevent speeding while driving. Results indicated that anchoring-point messages had greater effects on viewers' cognition, attitude, and behavioral intention than did messages without anchoring points. Further, the changes in message anchoring points altered participants' perceptions of acceptable and unacceptable judgments: a higher anchoring point in the form of speeding mortality was more persuasive in promoting the idea of reducing driving speed. Implications for creation of effective safe driving communications are discussed.

  14. Comparing the NRC and the Faculty Hiring Network Methods of Ranking Doctoral Programs in Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, George A.; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The current analysis examines the relationship between measures (R-scores, S-scores, faculty productivity) utilized in the recently published National Research Council NRC report and communication doctoral programs' centrality in the faculty-hiring network. Correlations among the network indicators and the NRC ratings were generally moderate and…

  15. A comparative study of two communication models in HIV/AIDS coverage in selected Nigerian newspapers.

    PubMed

    Okidu, Onjefu

    2013-01-30

    The current overriding thought in HIV/AIDS communication in developing countries is the need for a shift from the cognitive model, which emphasises the decision-making of the individual, to the activity model, which emphasises the context of the individual. In spite of the acknowledged media shift from the cognitive to the activity model in some developing countries, some HIV/AIDS communication scholars have felt otherwise. It was against this background that this study examined the content of some selected Nigerian newspapers to ascertain the attention paid to HIV/AIDS cognitive and activity information. Generally, the study found that Nigerian newspapers had shifted from the cognitive to the activity model of communication in their coverage of HIV/AIDS issues. The findings of the study seem inconsistent with the theoretical argument of some scholars that insufficient attention has been paid by mass media in developing countries to the activity model of HIV/AIDS communication. It is suggested that future research replicate the study for Nigerian and other developing countries' mass media.

  16. A comparative study of two communication models in HIV/AIDS coverage in selected Nigerian newspapers.

    PubMed

    Okidu, Onjefu

    2013-01-01

    The current overriding thought in HIV/AIDS communication in developing countries is the need for a shift from the cognitive model, which emphasises the decision-making of the individual, to the activity model, which emphasises the context of the individual. In spite of the acknowledged media shift from the cognitive to the activity model in some developing countries, some HIV/AIDS communication scholars have felt otherwise. It was against this background that this study examined the content of some selected Nigerian newspapers to ascertain the attention paid to HIV/AIDS cognitive and activity information. Generally, the study found that Nigerian newspapers had shifted from the cognitive to the activity model of communication in their coverage of HIV/AIDS issues. The findings of the study seem inconsistent with the theoretical argument of some scholars that insufficient attention has been paid by mass media in developing countries to the activity model of HIV/AIDS communication. It is suggested that future research replicate the study for Nigerian and other developing countries' mass media.

  17. A Comparative Analysis: The Structure and Function of Task-Oriented Communication within Complex Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElreath, Mark P.

    The research presented in this paper demonstrates that Katz and Kahn's (1966) distinction between people-processing and object-processing organizations is a useful classification scheme that can help explain differences in organizational communication systems. To assess the usefulness of Katz and Kahn's scheme, data derived from a sample of more…

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Internal Communication and Public Relations Audits. State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, David M.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    A review of current literature regarding the state of the art in the conduct of internal communication and public relations audits by public relations practitioners reveals that these two related measurement activities are of considerable importance to the practice of public relations. Public relations audits are concerned with exploratory…

  19. Comparing Sensorimotor Performance with Multiple Measures of Communicative Ability in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dores, Paul A.

    The relationship between sensorimotor performance and communicative ability in 18 autistic children (40 to 108 months old) was studied. The children were administered the Means-End and Operational Causality scales from the Ordinal Scales of Psychological Development. In addition, the Ss were assessed on four measures of verbal and nonverbal…

  20. Information and Communication Technology in the International Business Classroom: Comparing Faculty and Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Deusen, Cheryl A.; Jones, Gordon; Mueller, Carolyn B.; Ricks, David A.; Schlegelmilch, Bodo B.

    2004-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) is revolutionizing traditional educational methods in university contexts and changing the process of how educators do their jobs. However, research offers conflicting views regarding the benefits of ICT in the classroom. To better understand the various advantages and disadvantages of…

  1. A comparative study of two communication models in HIV/AIDS coverage in selected Nigerian newspapers

    PubMed Central

    Okidu, Onjefu

    2013-01-01

    The current overriding thought in HIV/AIDS communication in developing countries is the need for a shift from the cognitive model, which emphasises the decision-making of the individual, to the activity model, which emphasises the context of the individual. In spite of the acknowledged media shift from the cognitive to the activity model in some developing countries, some HIV/AIDS communication scholars have felt otherwise. It was against this background that this study examined the content of some selected Nigerian newspapers to ascertain the attention paid to HIV/AIDS cognitive and activity information. Generally, the study found that Nigerian newspapers had shifted from the cognitive to the activity model of communication in their coverage of HIV/AIDS issues. The findings of the study seem inconsistent with the theoretical argument of some scholars that insufficient attention has been paid by mass media in developing countries to the activity model of HIV/AIDS communication. It is suggested that future research replicate the study for Nigerian and other developing countries’ mass media. PMID:23394854

  2. Comparing the NRC and the Faculty Hiring Network Methods of Ranking Doctoral Programs in Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, George A.; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The current analysis examines the relationship between measures (R-scores, S-scores, faculty productivity) utilized in the recently published National Research Council NRC report and communication doctoral programs' centrality in the faculty-hiring network. Correlations among the network indicators and the NRC ratings were generally moderate and…

  3. Performance Evaluation and Analysis of Effective Range and Data Throughput for Unmodified Bluetooth Communication Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Performance Evaluation and Analysis of Effective Range and Data Throughput for Unmodified Bluetooth Communication Devices THESIS...Government. AFIT/GCS/ENG/03-08 Performance Evaluation and Analysis of Effective Range and Data Throughput for Unmodified Bluetooth Communication...AFIT/GCS/ENG/03-08 Performance Evaluation and Analysis of Effective Range and Data Throughput for Unmodified Bluetooth Communication Devices

  4. Cost-effectiveness of peer role play and standardized patients in undergraduate communication training.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Hans Martin; Nickel, Martin; Huwendiek, Sören; Schultz, Jobst Hendrik; Nikendei, Christoph

    2015-10-24

    The few studies directly comparing the methodological approach of peer role play (RP) and standardized patients (SP) for the delivery of communication skills all suggest that both methods are effective. In this study we calculated the costs of both methods (given comparable outcomes) and are the first to generate a differential cost-effectiveness analysis of both methods. Medical students in their prefinal year were randomly assigned to one of two groups receiving communication training in Pediatrics either with RP (N = 34) or 19 individually trained SP (N = 35). In an OSCE with standardized patients using the Calgary-Cambridge Referenced Observation Guide both groups achieved comparable high scores (results published). In this study, corresponding costs were assessed as man-hours resulting from hours of work of SP and tutors. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. Cost-effectiveness analysis revealed a major advantage for RP as compared to SP (112 vs. 172 man hours; cost effectiveness ratio .74 vs. .45) at comparable performance levels after training with both methods. While both peer role play and training with standardized patients have their value in medical curricula, RP has a major advantage in terms of cost-effectiveness. This could be taken into account in future decisions.

  5. Determinants of Effective Caregiver Communication After Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hobart-Porter, Laura; Wade, Shari; Minich, Nori; Kirkwood, Michael; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, Hudson Gerry

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the effects of caregiver mental health and coping strategies on interactions with an injured adolescent acutely after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Multi-site, cross-sectional study. Outpatient setting of 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals and 2 tertiary general medical centers. Adolescents (N = 125) aged 12-17 years, 1-6 months after being hospitalized with complicated mild to severe TBI. Data were collected as part of a multi-site clinical trial of family problem-solving therapy after TBI. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of caregiver and environmental characteristics to the dimensions of effective communication, warmth, and negativity during caregiver-adolescent problem-solving discussions. Adolescent and caregiver interactions, as measured by the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales. Caregivers who utilized problem-focused coping strategies were rated as having higher levels of effective communication (P < .01), as were those with higher socioeconomic status (P < .01). Problem-focused coping style and higher socioeconomic status were also associated lower levels of negative interactions (P < .01 and P < .05, respectively). Female gender of the adolescent and fewer children in the home were associated with increased parental warmth during the interaction (P < .01 and P < .05, respectively). Neither adolescent TBI severity nor caregiver depression significantly influenced caregiver-teen interactions. Problem-focused coping strategies are associated with higher levels of effective communication and lower levels of caregiver negativity during the initial months after adolescent TBI, suggesting that effective caregiver coping may facilitate better caregiver-adolescent interactions after TBI. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Determinants of Effective Caregiver Communication After Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hobart-Porter, Laura; Wade, Shari; Minich, Nori; Kirkwood, Michael; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, Hudson Gerry

    2017-01-01

    Objective To characterize the effects of caregiver mental health and coping strategies on interactions with an injured adolescent acutely after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Multi-site, cross-sectional study. Setting Outpatient setting of 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals and 2 tertiary general medical centers. Participants Adolescents (N = 125) aged 12–17 years, 1–6 months after being hospitalized with complicated mild to severe TBI. Methods Data were collected as part of a multi-site clinical trial of family problem-solving therapy after TBI. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of caregiver and environmental characteristics to the dimensions of effective communication, warmth, and negativity during caregiver-adolescent problem-solving discussions. Main Outcomes Measures Adolescent and caregiver interactions, as measured by the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales. Results Caregivers who utilized problem-focused coping strategies were rated as having higher levels of effective communication (P <.01), as were those with higher socioeconomic status (P <.01). Problem-focused coping style and higher socioeconomic status were also associated lower levels of negative interactions (P < .01 and P < .05, respectively). Female gender of the adolescent and fewer children in the home were associated with increased parental warmth during the interaction (P < .01 and P < .05, respectively). Neither adolescent TBI severity nor caregiver depression significantly influenced caregiver-teen interactions. Conclusions Problem-focused coping strategies are associated with higher levels of effective communication and lower levels of caregiver negativity during the initial months after adolescent TBI, suggesting that effective caregiver coping may facilitate better caregiver-adolescent interactions after TBI. PMID:25687111

  7. PROACT: Iterative Design of a Patient-Centered Visualization for Effective Prostate Cancer Health Risk Communication.

    PubMed

    Hakone, Anzu; Harrison, Lane; Ottley, Alvitta; Winters, Nathan; Gutheil, Caitlin; Han, Paul K J; Chang, Remco

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the US, and yet most cases represent localized cancer for which the optimal treatment is unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests that the available treatment options, including surgery and conservative treatment, result in a similar prognosis for most men with localized prostate cancer. However, approximately 90% of patients choose surgery over conservative treatment, despite the risk of severe side effects like erectile dysfunction and incontinence. Recent medical research suggests that a key reason is the lack of patient-centered tools that can effectively communicate personalized risk information and enable them to make better health decisions. In this paper, we report the iterative design process and results of developing the PROgnosis Assessment for Conservative Treatment (PROACT) tool, a personalized health risk communication tool for localized prostate cancer patients. PROACT utilizes two published clinical prediction models to communicate the patients' personalized risk estimates and compare treatment options. In collaboration with the Maine Medical Center, we conducted two rounds of evaluations with prostate cancer survivors and urologists to identify the design elements and narrative structure that effectively facilitate patient comprehension under emotional distress. Our results indicate that visualization can be an effective means to communicate complex risk information to patients with low numeracy and visual literacy. However, the visualizations need to be carefully chosen to balance readability with ease of comprehension. In addition, due to patients' charged emotional state, an intuitive narrative structure that considers the patients' information need is critical to aid the patients' comprehension of their risk information.

  8. The Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication: A Mixed-Method Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Harrod, Molly; Sales, Anne; Hofer, Timothy P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Background Communication failures between physicians and nurses are one of the most common causes of adverse events for hospitalized patients, as well as a major root cause of all sentinel events. Communication technology (ie, the electronic medical record, computerized provider order entry, email, and pagers), which is a component of health information technology (HIT), may help reduce some communication failures but increase others because of an inadequate understanding of how communication technology is used. Increasing use of health information and communication technologies is likely to affect communication between nurses and physicians. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe, in detail, how health information and communication technologies facilitate or hinder communication between nurses and physicians with the ultimate goal of identifying how we can optimize the use of these technologies to support effective communication. Effective communication is the process of developing shared understanding between communicators by establishing, testing, and maintaining relationships. Our theoretical model, based in communication and sociology theories, describes how health information and communication technologies affect communication through communication practices (ie, use of rich media; the location and availability of computers) and work relationships (ie, hierarchies and team stability). Therefore we seek to (1) identify the range of health information and communication technologies used in a national sample of medical-surgical acute care units, (2) describe communication practices and work relationships that may be influenced by health information and communication technologies in these same settings, and (3) explore how differences in health information and communication technologies, communication practices, and work relationships between physicians and nurses influence communication. Methods This 4-year study uses a sequential mixed

  9. The Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication: A Mixed-Method Protocol.

    PubMed

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Harrod, Molly; Sales, Anne; Hofer, Timothy P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2015-06-11

    Communication failures between physicians and nurses are one of the most common causes of adverse events for hospitalized patients, as well as a major root cause of all sentinel events. Communication technology (ie, the electronic medical record, computerized provider order entry, email, and pagers), which is a component of health information technology (HIT), may help reduce some communication failures but increase others because of an inadequate understanding of how communication technology is used. Increasing use of health information and communication technologies is likely to affect communication between nurses and physicians. The purpose of this study is to describe, in detail, how health information and communication technologies facilitate or hinder communication between nurses and physicians with the ultimate goal of identifying how we can optimize the use of these technologies to support effective communication. Effective communication is the process of developing shared understanding between communicators by establishing, testing, and maintaining relationships. Our theoretical model, based in communication and sociology theories, describes how health information and communication technologies affect communication through communication practices (ie, use of rich media; the location and availability of computers) and work relationships (ie, hierarchies and team stability). Therefore we seek to (1) identify the range of health information and communication technologies used in a national sample of medical-surgical acute care units, (2) describe communication practices and work relationships that may be influenced by health information and communication technologies in these same settings, and (3) explore how differences in health information and communication technologies, communication practices, and work relationships between physicians and nurses influence communication. This 4-year study uses a sequential mixed-methods design, beginning with a

  10. Dember effect photodetectors and the effects of turbulence on free-space optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmelik, Yamac

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems have recently utilized components that have been developed for fiber-optic communication systems. The received laser beam in such a system must be coupled into a single-mode fiber at the input of a commercially available receiver module or a wavelength division demultiplexer. However, one effect of propagation through atmospheric turbulence is that the spatial coherence of a laser beam is degraded and the percentage of the available power that can be coupled into the single-mode fiber is limited. This dissertation presents a numerical evaluation of fiber coupling efficiency for laser light distorted by atmospheric turbulence. The results for weak fluctuation conditions provide the level of coupling efficiency that can be expected for a given turbulence strength. In addition, the results show that the link distance must be limited to 400 m under moderate turbulence conditions if the link budget requires a coupling efficiency of 0.1. We also investigate the use of a coherent fiber array as a receiver structure to improve the fiber coupling efficiency of a free-space optical communication system. Our numerical results show that a coherent fiber array that consists of seven subapertures would increase fiber coupling efficiency by a significant amount for representative turbulence conditions and link distances. The use of photo-emf detectors as elements of a wavefront sensor for an adaptive optics system is also considered as an alternative method of reducing the effects of turbulence on a free-space optical communication system. Dember and photo-emf currents are investigated in silicon photoconductive detectors both theoretically and experimentally. Our results show that Dember photocurrents dominate the response of high-purity silicon samples with top surface electrodes to a moving interference pattern. The use of surface electrodes leads to shadowed regions beneath the electrodes and Dember photocurrents appear

  11. A comparative analysis of communication about sex, health and sexual health in India and South Africa: Implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Helen; Wood, Kate

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of modes of dialogue, non-verbal communication and embodied action relating to sex and health in two contrasting countries-India and South Africa-which have the world's two most heavily HIV-affected populations (in terms of numbers of people living with HIV). Drawing on material derived from multiple studies, including ethnographic and other forms of qualitative and multi-disciplinary research, the paper identifies commonalities as well as differences in communication relating to sex and sexual health in these diverse settings. The paper considers: first, how and by whom sex is and is not talked about, in public discourse and private conversation; second, how sexual intention and desire are communicated through indirect, non-verbal means in everyday life; and third, how references to sexuality and the sexual body re-enter within a more explicit set of indigenous discourses about health (rather than 'sexual health' per se), such as semen loss in India and womb 'dirtiness' in South Africa. The concluding section reflects on the implications of a comparative analysis such as this for current policy emphases on the importance of promoting verbal communication skills as part of 'life skills' for HIV prevention.

  12. Effectively Responding to Public Scrutiny When Communicating Climate Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas, A.; Halpern, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate researchers face regular scrutiny of their work from groups outside academia. In recent years, interest groups that oppose climate policy have targeted scientists with hate-mail campaigns, invasive document requests, hostile questioning and legal threats. In their day-to-day work, scientists struggle to respond to heated discussions about their research, whether from online commentators, opinion columnists, or special interest groups. Based on decades of experience and interviews with scientists, the Union of Concerned Scientists has developed a guide for communicating science amid heightened scrutiny. Building on the information contained in the UCS guide, this presentation will discuss best practices for climate researchers, including suggestions for when scrutiny can be ignored or when it deserves a response and methods for responding that can uphold scientific integrity while also protecting an individual researcher's reputation and ability to publicly communicate. Examples include scientists who have responded to bloggers criticizing their research, advocacy groups demanding their personal emails and policymakers targeting them with personal attacks. In understanding how to respond to scrutiny, scientists can bolster their own ability to communicate and curtail the chilling effect that scrutiny can have on other scientists conducting public enegagement.

  13. Wound Dressings and Comparative Effectiveness Data

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Aditya; Granick, Mark S.; Tomaselli, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Injury to the skin provides a unique challenge, as wound healing is a complex and intricate process. Acute wounds have the potential to move from the acute wound to chronic wounds, requiring the physician to have a thorough understanding of outside interventions to bring these wounds back into the healing cascade. Recent Advances: The development of new and effective interventions in wound care remains an area of intense research. Negative pressure wound therapy has undoubtedly changed wound care from this point forward and has proven beneficial for a variety of wounds. Hydroconductive dressings are another category that is emerging with studies underway. Other modalities such as hyperbaric oxygen, growth factors, biologic dressings, skin substitutes, and regenerative materials have also proven efficacious in advancing the wound-healing process through a variety of mechanisms. Critical Issues: There is an overwhelming amount of wound dressings available in the market. This implies the lack of full understanding of wound care and management. The point of using advanced dressings is to improve upon specific wound characteristics to bring it as close to “ideal” as possible. It is only after properly assessing the wound characteristics and obtaining knowledge about available products that the “ideal” dressing may be chosen. Future Directions: The future of wound healing at this point remains unknown. Few high-quality, randomized controlled trials evaluating wound dressings exist and do not clearly demonstrate superiority of many materials or categories. Comparative effectiveness research can be used as a tool to evaluate topical therapy for wound care moving into the future. Until further data emerge, education on the available products and logical clinical thought must prevail. PMID:25126472

  14. Comparing the effectiveness of software testing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Selby, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    This study compares the results of code reading, functional testing, and structural testing in three aspects of software testing: fault detection effectiveness, fault detection cost, and classes of faults detected. Thirty two professional programmers and 42 advanced students applied the three techniques to four unit-sized programs in a fractional experimental design. The major results of this study are the following: (1) With the professional programmers, code reading detected more software faults and had a higher detection rate than did functional or structural testing, while functional testing detected more faults than did structural testing, but functional and structural testing were not different in fault detection rate. (2) In one advanced student subject group, code reading and functional testing were not different in faults found, but were superior to structural testing, while in the other advanced student subject group there was no difference among the techniques. (3) With the advanced student subjects, the three techniques were not different in fault deteciton rate. (4) Number of faults observed, fault detection rate, and total effort in detection depended on the type of software tested. (5) Code reading detected more interface faults than did the other methods. (6) Functional testing detected more control faults than did the other methods. (7) When asked to estimate the percentage of faults detected, code readers gave the most accurate estimates while functional testers gave the least accurate estimates. Appendix B includes the source code for the word.

  15. Comparative sporicidal effects of liquid chemical agents.

    PubMed Central

    Sagripanti, J L; Bonifacino, A

    1996-01-01

    We compared the effectiveness of glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, cupric ascorbate (plus a sublethal amount of hydrogen peroxide), sodium hypochlorite, and phenol to inactivate Bacillus subtilis spores under various conditions. Each chemical agent was distinctly affected by pH, storage time after activation, dilution, and temperature. Only three of the preparations (hypochlorite, peracetic acid, and cupric ascorbate) studied here inactivated more than 99.9% of the spore load after a 30-min incubation at 20 degrees C at concentrations generally used to decontaminate medical devices. Under similar conditions, glutaraldehyde inactivated approximately 90%, and hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, and phenol produced little killing of spores in suspension. By kinetic analysis at different temperatures, we calculated the rate of spore inactivation (k) and the activation energy of spore killing (delta E) for each chemical agent. Rates of spore inactivation had a similar delta E value of approximately 20 kcal/mol (ca.83.68 kJ/mol) for every substance tested. The variation among k values allowed a quantitative comparison of liquid germicidal agents. PMID:8593054

  16. Low income parents' reports of communication problems with health care providers: effects of language and insurance.

    PubMed

    Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Kenney, Genevieve

    2007-01-01

    This study examines how parental reports of communication problems with health providers vary over a wider range of characteristics of low income children than considered in previous studies. Data were drawn from the 1999 and 2002 National Survey of America's Families. Communication problems, insurance type, socioeconomic characteristics, health factors, and provider type were examined. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate techniques. Bivariate analysis identified that the parents of 24.4% of low income children and 36.4% of publicly covered low income children with a Spanish interview reported poor communication with health providers. Coefficients from regression analysis suggest that, controlling for covariates, foreign-born parents with a Spanish interview were 11.8 percentage points (p<0.01) more likely to report communication problems than U.S.-born parents with an English interview. Among low income publicly covered children with a Spanish interview, regression analysis suggests that parents of children who used clinics or hospital outpatient departments as their usual source of care were 9.5 percentage points (p<0.05) more likely to report communication problems compared with those whose usual source of care was a doctor's or HMO office. Implementing policies to improve communication barriers for low income children, particularly those with foreign-born parents whose native language is not English, may be necessary to reduce health disparities relative to higher income children across a variety of health domains including utilization, satisfaction, and outcomes. Focusing attention on the availability of professional translation services in clinics or hospital outpatient departments may be a cost-effective strategy for reducing communication problems for publicly insured children.

  17. Combined effects of waggle dance communication and landscape heterogeneity on nectar and pollen uptake in honey bee colonies

    PubMed Central

    Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Härtel, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    The instructive component of waggle dance communication has been shown to increase resource uptake of Apis mellifera colonies in highly heterogeneous resource environments, but an assessment of its relevance in temperate landscapes with different levels of resource heterogeneity is currently lacking. We hypothesized that the advertisement of resource locations via dance communication would be most relevant in highly heterogeneous landscapes with large spatial variation of floral resources. To test our hypothesis, we placed 24 Apis mellifera colonies with either disrupted or unimpaired instructive component of dance communication in eight Central European agricultural landscapes that differed in heterogeneity and resource availability. We monitored colony weight change and pollen harvest as measure of foraging success. Dance disruption did not significantly alter colony weight change, but decreased pollen harvest compared to the communicating colonies by 40%. There was no general effect of resource availability on nectar or pollen foraging success, but the effect of landscape heterogeneity on nectar uptake was stronger when resource availability was high. In contrast to our hypothesis, the effects of disrupted bee communication on nectar and pollen foraging success were not stronger in landscapes with heterogeneous compared to homogenous resource environments. Our results indicate that in temperate regions intra-colonial communication of resource locations benefits pollen foraging more than nectar foraging, irrespective of landscape heterogeneity. We conclude that the so far largely unexplored role of dance communication in pollen foraging requires further consideration as pollen is a crucial resource for colony development and health. PMID:28603677

  18. Comparing young adults to older adults in e-cigarette perceptions and motivations for use: implications for health communication

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Maria; Harrell, Melissa B.; Perry, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Use of electronic cigarettes (‘e-cigarettes’ is rapidly rising, and is especially prevalent among young adults. A better understanding of e-cigarette perceptions and motivations for use is needed to inform health communication and educational efforts. This study aims to explore these aspects of use with a focus on comparing young adults to older adults. Methods: In this qualitative study, the investigator conducted semi-structured interviews among a purposive sample of e-cigarette users. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data and document themes. Results: e-cigarettes were most commonly used for smoking cessation among both age groups. Young adults described other motivations for use including doing smoke tricks, being able to consume a wide variety of flavors, and helping them study. Some interviewees (11%) believed e-cigarettes were a healthy alternative to conventional cigarettes, while many other users (30%) expressed concerns about the unknown risks of e-cigarettes. Conclusion: Findings were generally consistent across both age groups in their perceptions of harm from e-cigarettes and in subjective effects such as perceived addictiveness. However, individuals under 30 described unique motivations for e-cigarette use. Health messaging targeted to young adults should emphasize the potential health risks of e-cigarette use and recognize their distinct motivational aspects. PMID:27325619

  19. The effect of pause time upon the communicative interactions of young people who use augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Hilary; Sutherland, Dean; McAuliffe, Megan

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of variation in partner-initiated pause time on the expressive communication of young people who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). Eight participants aged 8;11-20;08 years (mean 16;02 years) participated in the study. Three pause time conditions (2, 10, and 45 seconds) were trialled during a scripted shared storybook reading task. A total of 27 turn opportunities were provided for participants during the task. Participant interactions were analysed for the percentage of responses made to a turn opportunity, mean length of utterance in words (MLU), percentage of assertive conversational acts made, and the modes of communication used. Findings indicated that participants were more likely to respond to a turn opportunity when their communication partner provided a longer pause time. Additionally, a longer pause time resulted in longer MLUs. Participants did not use more assertive conversational acts and continued to use a variety of communication modes when provided with a longer pause time. Results indicate that increasing pause time is an effective strategy to support the development of expressive communication for young people who use AAC. This suggests the need for professionals providing AAC services to encourage communication partners to provide extended pauses during interactions.

  20. Effect of the vegetarian diet on non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo

    2014-01-30

    A vegetarian diet generally includes plenty of vegetables and fruits, which are rich in phytochemicals, antioxidants, fiber, magnesium, vitamins C and E, Fe³⁺, folic acid and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and is low in cholesterol, total fat and saturated fatty acid, sodium, Fe²⁺, zinc, vitamin A, B₁₂ and D, and especially n-3 PUFA. Mortality from all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and circulatory and cerebrovascular diseases was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivorous populations. Compared with omnivores, the incidence of cancer and type 2 diabetes was also significantly lower in vegetarians. However, vegetarians have a number of increased risk factors for non-communicable diseases such as increased plasma homocysteine, mean platelet volume and platelet aggregability compared with omnivores, which are associated with low intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA. Based on the present data, it would seem appropriate for vegetarians to carefully design their diet, specifically focusing on increasing their intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA to further reduce already low mortality and morbidity from non-communicable diseases. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. The effect of communication and implicit associations on consuming insects: An experiment in Denmark and Italy.

    PubMed

    Verneau, Fabio; La Barbera, Francesco; Kolle, Susanne; Amato, Mario; Del Giudice, Teresa; Grunert, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    It has been widely noted that the introduction of insects in Westerns' diet might be a promising path towards a more sustainable food consumption. However, Westerns' are almost disgusted and sceptical about the eating of insects. In the current paper we report the results of an experiment conducted in two European countries-Denmark and Italy-different for food culture and familiarity with the topic of eating insects. We investigated the possibility to foster people's willingness to eat insect-based food through communication, also comparing messages based on individual vs. societal benefits of the eating of insects. Communication proved to be effective on intention and behaviour, and the societal message appeared to be more robust over time. The communication effect is significant across nation, gender, and previous knowledge about the topic. In addition, we investigated the impact of non-conscious negative associations with insects on the choice to eat vs. not eat insect-based food. Implicit attitudes proved to be a powerful factor in relation to behaviour, yet they did not impede the effectiveness of communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of context priming and task type on augmentative communication performance.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, D Jeffery; Bisantz, Ann M; Sunm, Michelle; Adams, Kim; Yik, Fen

    2009-03-01

    Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices include special purpose electronic devices that generate speech output and are used by individuals to augment or replace vocal communication. Word prediction, including context specific prediction, has been proposed to help overcome barriers to the use of these devices (e.g., slow communication rates and limited access to situation-related vocabulary), but has not been tested in terms of effects during actual task performance. In this study, we compared AAC device use, task performance, and user perceptions across three tasks, in conditions where the AAC device used either was, or was not, primed with task specific vocabularies. The participants in this study were adults with normal physical, cognitive, and communication abilities. Context priming had a marginally significant effect on AAC device use as measured by keystroke savings; however, these advantages did not translate into higher level measures of rate, task performance, or user perceptions. In contrast, there were various statistically significant process and performance differences across task type. Additionally, results for two different emulations of human performance showed significant keystroke savings across context conditions. However, these effects were mitigated in actual performance and did not translate into keystroke savings. This indicates to AAC device designers and users that keystroke-based measures of device use may not be predictive of high level performance.

  3. The effects of scenario-based simulation course training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Chang, Wen-Hui; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that an underappreciation of the importance of person-centered communication and inappropriate communication training could result in unsatisfactory communication performance from nurses. There are a large number of studies about communication training for nurses, but not so many about communication training in early stages of nursing career. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of a traditional course versus scenario-based simulation training on nurses' communication competency, communication self-efficacy, and communication performance in discharge planning Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). A randomized controlled trial was used with a pretest and two posttests. The experimental group underwent the scenario-based simulation course, whereas the control group received the traditional course. A convenience sample of 116 nurses with qualifications ranging from N0 level (novice nurses) to N2 level (competent nurses) in Taiwan's clinical nursing ladder system was recruited from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Analysis of covariance was used to determine between-subjects effects on communication competency and self-efficacy, whereas independent t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine between-subjects effects on learner satisfaction and discharge planning communication performance. Paired t test was used to determine communication self-efficacy. In this study, the nurses and independent raters found scenario-based simulation training more effective than traditional communication course. However, standardized patients reported no significant difference in communication performance between the two groups of nurses. Despite that traditional classroom lectures and simulation-based communication training could both produce enhanced communication competency and self-efficacy among nurses, this study has established that the latter may be better than the former in terms of learner satisfaction and communication

  4. Quasi-Experiment Study on Effectiveness Evaluation of Health Communication Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This experimental study examined differences in doctor-patient relationships according to the health communication strategies during cases of medical malpractices occurred at primary medical institution. A total of 116 subjects aged in their 20s-50s was sampled. The first medical malpractice scenario chosen was the medical malpractice case most frequently registered at the Korean Medical Association Mutual Aid and the second scenario was associated with materials and devices as the cause of malpractice. Four types of crisis communication strategy messages were utilized, consisting of denial, denial + ingratiation, apology, and apology + ingratiation. Subjects were classified into four research groups by crisis communication strategy to measure levels of trust, control mutuality, commitment, and satisfaction, before and after the occurrence of medical malpractice and application of communication strategies. The findings of this study revealed that the apology strategy, compared with the denial strategy, showed a smaller difference before and after the application of communication strategies in all variables of trust (F = 8.080, F = 5.768), control mutuality (F = 8.824, F = 9.081), commitment (F = 9.815, F = 8.301), and satisfaction (F = 8.723, F = 5.638). Further, a significant interaction effect was shown between variables. The apology strategy, compared with the denial strategy, was effective in the improvement of doctor-patient relationships in both Scenarios I and II. For Scenario I, the apology strategy without ingratiation boosted commitment and satisfaction, but for Scenario II, utilizing the apology strategy with ingratiation boosted the effectiveness of trust and commitment. PMID:27365998

  5. Quasi-Experiment Study on Effectiveness Evaluation of Health Communication Strategies.

    PubMed

    Song, Dae Jong; Choi, Jae Wook; Kim, Kyunghee; Kim, Min Soo; Moon, Jiwon Monica

    2016-07-01

    This experimental study examined differences in doctor-patient relationships according to the health communication strategies during cases of medical malpractices occurred at primary medical institution. A total of 116 subjects aged in their 20s-50s was sampled. The first medical malpractice scenario chosen was the medical malpractice case most frequently registered at the Korean Medical Association Mutual Aid and the second scenario was associated with materials and devices as the cause of malpractice. Four types of crisis communication strategy messages were utilized, consisting of denial, denial + ingratiation, apology, and apology + ingratiation. Subjects were classified into four research groups by crisis communication strategy to measure levels of trust, control mutuality, commitment, and satisfaction, before and after the occurrence of medical malpractice and application of communication strategies. The findings of this study revealed that the apology strategy, compared with the denial strategy, showed a smaller difference before and after the application of communication strategies in all variables of trust (F = 8.080, F = 5.768), control mutuality (F = 8.824, F = 9.081), commitment (F = 9.815, F = 8.301), and satisfaction (F = 8.723, F = 5.638). Further, a significant interaction effect was shown between variables. The apology strategy, compared with the denial strategy, was effective in the improvement of doctor-patient relationships in both Scenarios I and II. For Scenario I, the apology strategy without ingratiation boosted commitment and satisfaction, but for Scenario II, utilizing the apology strategy with ingratiation boosted the effectiveness of trust and commitment.

  6. Effective communication and delivery of culturally competent health care.

    PubMed

    Markova, Tsveti; Broome, Barbara

    2007-06-01

    Effective communication between patients and health care providers is a critical element to quality health care. Becoming aware of patients' attitudes, beliefs, biases, and behaviors that may influence patient care can help clinicians improve access to and quality of care. Health care providers should develop a strategic plan for improvement, then implement and evaluate the plan to include structured, continuously improving progress toward achieving cultural competency goals. In this challenging health care environment, health care providers need the skills to explore the meaning of illness, to determine patient's social and family context, and provide patient-centered and culturally competent care.

  7. Effect of digital scrambling on satellite communication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessouky, K.

    1985-01-01

    Digital data scrambling has been considered for communication systems using NRZ symbol formats. The purpose is to increase the number of transitions in the data to improve the performance of the symbol synchronizer. This is accomplished without expanding the bandwidth but at the expense of increasing the data bit error rate (BER). Models for the scramblers/descramblers of practical interest are presented together with the appropriate link model. The effects of scrambling on the performance of coded and uncoded links are studied. The results are illustrated by application to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) links. Conclusions regarding the usefulness of scrambling are also given.

  8. Effect of attenuation models on communication system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimabukuro, Fred I.

    1995-01-01

    The atmosphere has a significant impact on the design of a global communication system operating at 20 GHz. The system under consideration has a total atmospheric link attenuation budget that is less than 6 dB. For this relatively small link margin, rain, cloud, and molecular attenuation have to be taken into account. For an assessment of system performance on a global basis, attenuation models are utilized. There is concern whether current models can adequately describe the atmospheric effects such that a system planner can properly allocate his resources for superior overall system performance. The atmospheric attenuation as predicted by models will be examined.

  9. Comparative review of family-professional communication: what mental health care can learn from oncology and nursing home care.

    PubMed

    van de Bovenkamp, Hester M; Trappenburg, Margo J

    2012-08-01

    Because family members take on caring tasks and also suffer as a consequence of the illness of the patient, communication between health-care professionals and family members of the patient is important. This review compares communication practices between these two parties in three different parts of health care: oncology, nursing home care, and mental health care. It shows that there are important differences between sectors. Mental health stands out because contacts between family members and professionals are considered problematic due to the autonomy and confidentiality of the patient. The article explores several explanations for this, and, by comparing the three health sectors, distils lessons to improve the relationship between family members and health-care professionals.

  10. Ethical pitfalls in neonatal comparative effectiveness trials.

    PubMed

    Modi, Neena

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine has been embraced wholeheartedly, and rightly so, as the best approach for reducing clinical uncertainty and ensuring that patients receive treatment and care that are efficacious (i.e. they work) and effective (i.e. they work in real life). High-quality evidence comes from high-quality clinical research. It would hence be reasonable to assume that these two would form a closely integrated partnership. Alas, this is not yet the case. So many uncertainties in medical care relate to treatments and practices already widely in use. In neonatal medicine, for example, some of us use protein-carbohydrate fortification of human milk and some of us do not, some of us stop enteral feeds during blood transfusions whereas some of us do not, some of us reach for dopamine when blood pressure falls while some of us use dobutamine. For our patients, these uncertainties represent a lottery, the throw of the dice that determines whether they receive the treatment advocated by Dr. A or Dr. B. They deserve better than this. Randomization is considered the gold standard approach to eliminating the clinician bias that very often dominates the choice of treatments. Randomization reduces the influence on outcomes of confounding by unknown factors, and ensures that every patient has a fair and equal chance of receiving the best possible treatment when this is, in fact, not known. In an ideal world, every medical uncertainty would be addressed in this way. The evaluation of treatments that are in accepted use has been termed 'comparative effectiveness research', i.e. the comparison of existing healthcare interventions to determine which works best, for whom and under which circumstances. Recently a long-standing uncertainty, the optimum saturation target for preterm babies receiving oxygen was put to the test of randomization. The accepted standard-of-care saturation range of 85-95% has been used for a considerable time and its use is intended to avoid both levels of

  11. The BigCAT: A Normative and Comparative Investigation of the Communication Attitude of Nonstuttering and Stuttering Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanryckeghem, Martine; Brutten, Gene J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to provide normative and comparative data for the BigCAT, the adult form of the Communication Attitude Test, a sub-test of the Behavior Assessment Battery. The BigCAT, a 35-item self-report test of speech-associated attitude was administered to 96 adults who stutter (PWS) and 216 adults who do not (PWNS). The…

  12. The BigCAT: A Normative and Comparative Investigation of the Communication Attitude of Nonstuttering and Stuttering Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanryckeghem, Martine; Brutten, Gene J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to provide normative and comparative data for the BigCAT, the adult form of the Communication Attitude Test, a sub-test of the Behavior Assessment Battery. The BigCAT, a 35-item self-report test of speech-associated attitude was administered to 96 adults who stutter (PWS) and 216 adults who do not (PWNS). The…

  13. Communicating Effectively About Clinical Trials With African American Communities: A Comparison of African American and White Information Sources and Needs.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Andrea; Bergeron, Caroline D; Zheng, Yue; Friedman, Daniela B; Kim, Sei-Hill; Foster, Caroline B

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trial (CT) participation is low among African Americans (AAs). To better communicate with AAs about the importance of CTs, the purpose of this study was to explore the communication sources and perceived effective communication channels and strategies through which the general public, AAs, and White individuals receive CT information. A quantitative telephone survey was conducted with AAs and Whites in one Southern state (N = 511). The measures assessed CT sources of information, perceived effectiveness of communication channels and strategies, CT understanding, and CT participation. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were used to compare responses overall and by race. AAs reported being exposed to more CT information than Whites. AAs received CT information most often through television, social media, and doctors compared to Whites. Perceived effectiveness of communication strategies and channels varied by race. AAs preferred simple and easy-to-understand CT information distributed through faith-based organizations. Whites preferred to receive CT information through a trustworthy source (e.g., doctor). There were no significant differences between AAs and Whites in their perceived effectiveness of media sources (e.g., Internet). Recommendations are provided to help health promotion practitioners and CT recruiters tailor information and communicate it effectively to potential AA and White CT participants. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Effective physician-nurse communication: a patient safety essential for labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyndon, Audrey; Zlatnik, Marya G; Wachter, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    Effective communication is a hallmark of safe patient care. Challenges to effective interprofessional communication in maternity care include differing professional perspectives on clinical management, steep hierarchies, and lack of administrative support for change. We review principles of high reliability as they apply to communication in clinical care and discuss principles of effective communication and conflict management in maternity care. Effective clinical communication is respectful, clear, direct, and explicit. We use a clinical scenario to illustrate an historic style of nurse-physician communication and demonstrate how communication can be improved to promote trust and patient safety. Consistent execution of successful communication requires excellent listening skills, superb administrative support, and collective commitment to move past traditional hierarchy and professional stereotyping. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of sung speech on socio-communicative responsiveness in children with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arkoprovo; Sharda, Megha; Menon, Soumini; Arora, Iti; Kansal, Nayantara; Arora, Kavita; Singh, Nandini C.

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence to demonstrate the efficacy of music-based interventions for improving social functioning in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). While this evidence lends some support in favor of using song over spoken directives in facilitating engagement and receptive intervention in ASD, there has been little research that has investigated the efficacy of such stimuli on socio-communicative responsiveness measures. Here, we present preliminary results from a pilot study which tested whether sung instruction, as compared to spoken directives, could elicit greater number of socio-communicative behaviors in young children with ASD. Using an adapted single-subject design, three children between the ages of 3 and 4 years, participated in a programme consisting of 18 sessions, of which 9 were delivered with spoken directives and 9 with sung. Sessions were counterbalanced and randomized for three play activities—block matching, picture matching and clay play. All sessions were video-recorded for post-hoc observational coding of three behavioral metrics which included performance, frequency of social gesture and eye contact. Analysis of the videos by two independent raters indicated increased socio-communicative responsiveness in terms of frequency of social gesture as well as eye contact during sung compared to spoken conditions, across all participants. Our findings suggest that sung directives may play a useful role in engaging children with ASD and also serve as an effective interventional medium to enhance socio-communicative responsiveness. PMID:26578923

  16. Effect of action-oriented communication training on nurses' communication self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Raica, Dagmar A

    2009-01-01

    Miscommunication poses a significant threat to the safety of hospitalized patients, but nurses often lack the communication confidence (self-efficacy) needed to represent their views regarding patient situations. Findings of this study suggest training programs are needed to help nurses develop confident, assertive communication skills.

  17. Effects of Therapist's Nonverbal Communication on Rated Skill and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Mark; Rogers, Ronald W.

    1980-01-01

    Nonverbal cues of immediacy significantly improved ratings of the therapist's interpersonal skills and effectiveness. A therapist's nonverbal behavior is a basis for interpretations of empathy, warmth, genuineness, and effectiveness. (Author)

  18. Deep space communications, weather effects, and error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, Edward C.

    1989-01-01

    Deep space telemetry is and will remain signal-to-noise limited and vulnerable to interference. A need exists to increase received signal power and decrease noise. This includes going to Ka-band in the mid-1990's to increase directivity. The effects of a wet atmosphere can increase the noise temperature by a factor of 5 or more, even at X-band, but the order of magnitude increase in average data rate obtainable at Ka-band relative to X-band makes the increased uncertainty a good trade. Lowbit error probabilities required by data compression are available both theoretically and practically with coding, at an infinitesimal power penalty rather than the 10 to 15 dB more power required to reduce error probabilities without coding. Advances are coming rapidly in coding, as with the new constraint-length 15 rate 1/4 convolutional code concatenated with the already existing Reed-Solomon code to be demonstrated on Galileo. In addition, high density spacecraft data storage will allow selective retransmissions, even from the edge of the Solar System, to overcome weather effects. In general, deep space communication was able to operate, and will continue to operate, closer to theoretical limits than any other form of communication. These include limits in antenna area and directivity, system noise temperature, coding efficiency, and everything else. The deep space communication links of the mid-90's and beyond will be compatible with new instruments and compression algorithms and represent a sensible investment in an overall end-to-end information system design.

  19. Comparing Sexuality Communication Among Offspring of Teen Parents and Adult Parents: a Different Role for Extended Family.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Jennifer M; Tracy, Allison J; Richer, Amanda M; Erkut, Sumru

    2015-06-01

    This brief report examined teenagers' sexuality communication with their parents and extended families. It compared who teens of early parents (those who had children when they were adolescents) and teens of later parents (those who were adults when they had children) talk to about sex. Eighth grade students (N=1281) in 24 schools completed survey items about their communication about sex. Structural equation modeling was used to predict communication profiles, while adjusting for the nesting of students within schools. After controlling for teens' age, gender, race/ethnicity, grades, parent/guardian closeness, and social desirability of survey responses, as well as family status and median family income, results showed that teens of early (teen) parents were more likely than teens of later (adult) parents to talk with both parents and extended family about sex and less likely than later parents to talk only with parents. These findings indicate that realities of teen sexuality communication for teens of early parents may extend beyond a parent-teen model to include extended family. Extended family involvement in educational outreach is a potential untapped resource to support sexual health for teens of early parents.

  20. Comparing Sexuality Communication Among Offspring of Teen Parents and Adult Parents: a Different Role for Extended Family

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Allison J.; Richer, Amanda M.; Erkut, Sumru

    2016-01-01

    This brief report examined teenagers’ sexuality communication with their parents and extended families. It compared who teens of early parents (those who had children when they were adolescents) and teens of later parents (those who were adults when they had children) talk to about sex. Eighth grade students (N=1281) in 24 schools completed survey items about their communication about sex. Structural equation modeling was used to predict communication profiles, while adjusting for the nesting of students within schools. After controlling for teens’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, grades, parent/guardian closeness, and social desirability of survey responses, as well as family status and median family income, results showed that teens of early (teen) parents were more likely than teens of later (adult) parents to talk with both parents and extended family about sex and less likely than later parents to talk only with parents. These findings indicate that realities of teen sexuality communication for teens of early parents may extend beyond a parent-teen model to include extended family. Extended family involvement in educational outreach is a potential untapped resource to support sexual health for teens of early parents. PMID:27499816

  1. Designing Effective Persuasive Systems Utilizing the Power of Entanglement: Communication Channel, Strategy and Affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiqing; Chatterjee, Samir

    With rapid advances in information and communication technology, computer-mediated communication (CMC) technologies are utilizing multiple IT platforms such as email, websites, cell-phones/PDAs, social networking sites, and gaming environments. However, no studies have compared the effectiveness of a persuasive system using such alternative channels and various persuasive techniques. Moreover, how affective computing impacts the effectiveness of persuasive systems is not clear. This study proposes (1) persuasive technology channels in combination with persuasive strategies will have different persuasive effectiveness; (2) Adding positive emotion to a message that leads to a better overall user experience could increase persuasive effectiveness. The affective computing or emotion information was added to the experiment using emoticons. The initial results of a pilot study show that computer-mediated communication channels along with various persuasive strategies can affect the persuasive effectiveness to varying degrees. These results also shows that adding a positive emoticon to a message leads to a better user experience which increases the overall persuasive effectiveness of a system.

  2. Academic detailing can play a key role in assessing and implementing comparative effectiveness research findings.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael A; Avorn, Jerry

    2012-10-01

    Comparative effectiveness research evaluates the relative effectiveness, safety, and value of competing treatment options in clinically realistic settings. Such evaluations can be methodologically complex and difficult to interpret. There will be a growing need for critical evaluation of comparative effectiveness studies to assess the adequacy of their design and to put new information into a broader context. Equally important, this knowledge will have to be communicated to clinicians in a way that will actually change practice. We identify three challenges to effective dissemination of comparative effectiveness research findings: the difficulty of interpreting comparative effectiveness research data, the need for trusted sources of information, and the challenge of turning research results into clinical action. We suggest that academic detailing-direct outreach education that gives clinicians an accurate and unbiased synthesis of the best evidence for practice in a given clinical area-can translate comparative effectiveness research findings into actions that improve health care decision making and patient outcomes.

  3. Volcanic hazard communication using maps: an evaluation of their effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Katharine; Barclay, Jenni; Pidgeon, Nick

    2007-11-01

    Hazard maps are considered essential tools in the communication of volcanic risk between scientists, the local authorities and the public. This study investigates the efficacy of such maps for the volcanic island of Montserrat in the West Indies using both quantitative and qualitative research techniques. Normal plan view maps, which have been used on the island over the last 10 years of the crisis, are evaluated against specially produced three-dimensional (3D) maps and perspective photographs. Thirty-two demographically representative respondents of mixed backgrounds, sex, education and location were interviewed and asked to complete a range of tasks and identification on the maps and photographs. The overall results show that ordinary people have problems interpreting their environment as a mapped representation. We found respondents’ ability to locate and orientate themselves as well as convey information relating to volcanic hazards was improved when using aerial photographs rather than traditional plan view contour maps. There was a slight improvement in the use of the 3D maps, especially in terms of topographic recognition. However, the most striking increase in effectiveness was found with the perspective photographs, which enabled people to identify features and their orientation much more readily. For Montserrat it appears that well labelled aerial and perspective photographs are the most effective geo-spatial method of communicating volcanic risks.

  4. Using the Psychology of Language to Effectively Communicate Actionable Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The words used to articulate science can have as significant a psychological impact on public perception as the data itself. It is therefore essential to utilize language that not only accurately relates the scientific information, but also effectively conveys a message that is congruent with the presenter's motivation for expressing the data. This is especially relevant for environmental subjects that are surrounded by emotionally charged, political discourses. For example are terms like catastrophe and disaster; while these words may accurately illustrate impartial scientific data, they will likely trigger psychological responses in audiences such as fear or denial that have a detrimental impact on the human decision making process. I propose a set of 5 key principles to assist in communicating data to the general public that both support the transfer of ideas and the presenter's intended psychological impact. 1) Articulate the underlying intentions that motivate the communication of data in a transparent manner 2) Use language congruent with the presenter's stated intentions 3) Maintain a neutral, non-judgmental attitude towards the complex human psychological and emotional dynamics present in a target audience 4) Demonstrate acceptance and compassion when analyzing past and present human actions that adversely affect the environment 5) Develop a perspective of non-attachment when proposing future actions and/or consequences of current human behaviors. The application of these 5 principles provides a framework to move from our current understanding of problems and solutions to effective physical action that allows us to gracefully adapt with our ever changing planet.

  5. The comparative effectiveness of persuasion, commitment and leader block strategies in motivating sorting.

    PubMed

    Mickaël, Dupré

    2014-04-01

    Household waste management has become essential in industrialized countries. For the recycling programs to be a success, all citizens must comply with the developed residential procedures. Governmental bodies are thus dependent on as many people as possible adhering to the sorting systems they develop. Since the 1970s oil crisis, governments have called upon social psychologists to help develop effective communication strategies. These studies have been based on persuasion and behavioral commitment (Kiesler, 1971). Less common are studies based on developing participative communication (Horsley, 1977), a form of communication that relies on individuals to pass on information. After going through the main communication perspectives as they relate to the sorting of household waste, a comparative field study will be presented on the effectiveness of persuasive, committing and participative communication. Participative communication relied on users to pass along information to their neighbors. The results show that the participants who spread information in this way, along with those who made a commitment, changed their behavior to a greater degree than the other participants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancing risk communication for more effective epidemic control in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shih-Ming; Liu, Li-Ling; Chin, Ko-Chien

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates how to more effectively conduct risk communication to increase the probability of successful control of an epidemic in Taiwan. The epidemic control of H1N1 in Taiwan in 2010 was studied. We used factor analysis and Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) to obtain the total influence for each factor and to determine the critical factors among them. After being processed using proposed operational procedures, we obtained the critical factors and found that the government plays the key role in successful epidemic control. To reduce the resistance to efforts that seek to prevent pandemic crises, some necessary intervention activities, such as fairly and honorably exploring the complete relevant information and revealing the side effects of vaccines in a manner that is easily understood, were recommended. These could lead to an increase in immunizations among Taiwanese people by gaining their trust and commitment, thus achieving control of this epidemic.

  7. The effects of age on using prosody to convey meaning and on judging communicative effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Sarah K; James, Lori E; Noble, Paula M

    2010-09-01

    We tested the effects of aging on the use of prosody to convey meaning and the ability to monitor communicative effectiveness. Participants read aloud ambiguous sentences with the goal of clearly communicating one designated meaning. Young and older adults produced intonational boundaries consistent with the designated meaning equally often, but listener judgments indicated that older adults disambiguated the sentences more often than chance and young adults did so only marginally more often than chance. Young adults believed they communicated their message clearly, and older adults evaluated their own communication even more favorably. Participants were more confident for structurally ambiguous sentences than for lexically ambiguous sentences (which cannot be differentiated through prosody), and older adults demonstrated more overconfidence than young adults for both types of ambiguous sentences. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Communicative Effectiveness of Pantomime Gesture in People with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Miranda L.; Mok, Zaneta; Sekine, Kazuki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Human communication occurs through both verbal and visual/motoric modalities. Simultaneous conversational speech and gesture occurs across all cultures and age groups. When verbal communication is compromised, more of the communicative load can be transferred to the gesture modality. Although people with aphasia produce meaning-laden…

  9. The Effect of Family Communication Patterns on Adopted Adolescent Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueter, Martha A.; Koerner, Ascan F.

    2008-01-01

    Adoption and family communication both affect adolescent adjustment. We proposed that adoption status and family communication interact such that adopted adolescents in families with certain communication patterns are at greater risk for adjustment problems. We tested this hypothesis using a community-based sample of 384 adoptive and 208…

  10. Shaping effective communication skills and therapeutic relationships at work: the foundation of collaboration.

    PubMed

    Grover, Susan M

    2005-04-01

    Effective communication is essential to practice and can result in improved interpersonal relationships at the workplace. Effective communication is shaped by basic techniques such as open-ended questions, listening, empathy, and assertiveness. However, the relationship between effective communication and successful interpersonal relationships is affected by intervening variables. The variables of gender, generation, context, collegiality, cooperation, self-disclosure, and reciprocity can impede or enhance the outcome of quality communication. It is essential for occupational health nurses to qualitatively assess the degree to which each of these concepts affects communication and, in turn, relationships at work.

  11. Assessing conflict communication in couples: comparing the validity of self-report, partner-report, and observer ratings.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Keith

    2010-04-01

    This study of married couples investigated the short-term predictive validity of the partner-report and self-report scales of the Conflict Communication Inventory and compared the validity of these scales with the validity of observer ratings. A sample of 83 married couples completed two problem-solving conversations. Self-report, partner-report, and observer ratings from Conversation 1 were used to predict behavior in Conversation 2, as rated by a separate panel of observers. The short-term predictive validity of partner-report ratings was extremely high and indistinguishable from the validity of observer ratings. Self-report ratings also demonstrated good validity, albeit slightly lower than other methods. Both partner-report and self-report scores explained a substantial amount of variance in concurrent observer ratings of communication after controlling for relationship satisfaction. 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  12. Comparing Open and Guided Inquiry Activities in an Informal Physics Program To Promote Agency, Communication, and Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Rosemary Philomena

    In this thesis, we investigate an informal after-school science program. We examine two inquiry curricula used in this program; one more guided and the other more open. We have developed new methods to analyze middle school children's scientific notebooks, and we measure how the children exhibit agency, how the children communicate, and the mechanistic reasoning children use. We compare the two curricula and find that the children exhibit more agency in the open curriculum, write and draw more in the open curriculum, demonstrate a wide variety of scientific communication, and use more varied types of mechanistic reasoning in the open curriculum. These aspects can be linked to science identity, and we conclude that the more open curriculum supports the development of positive science identity.

  13. Cutting-edge technology for public health workforce training in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A; Nash, Michelle C; Salemi, Jason L; Mbah, Alfred K; Salihu, Hamisu M

    2013-06-01

    A critical mass of public health practitioners with expertise in analytic techniques and best practices in comparative effectiveness research is needed to fuel informed decisions and improve the quality of health care. The purpose of this case study is to describe the development and formative evaluation of a technology-enhanced comparative effectiveness research learning curriculum and to assess its potential utility to improve core comparative effectiveness research competencies among the public health workforce. Selected public health experts formed a multidisciplinary research collaborative and participated in the development and evaluation of a blended 15-week comprehensive e-comparative effectiveness research training program, which incorporated an array of health informatics technologies. Results indicate that research-based organizations can use a systematic, flexible, and rapid means of instructing their workforce using technology-enhanced authoring tools, learning management systems, survey research software, online communities of practice, and mobile communication for effective and creative comparative effectiveness research training of the public health workforce.

  14. Mass Communication and Journalism Faculty's Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Email Communication with College Students: A Nationwide Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Bradford L.; Adams, Jennifer Wood; Brunner, Brigitta R.

    2009-01-01

    Nearly 700 US journalism and mass communication faculty (all teaching personnel) reported their perceptions of student email use via a web-based survey. This nationwide study focused on the content of email sent by faculty to students, email's effectiveness, and email's effect on student learning. Comparisons were made based on faculty gender,…

  15. Effect Size Measures for Mediation Models: Quantitative Strategies for Communicating Indirect Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Kelley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The statistical analysis of mediation effects has become an indispensable tool for helping scientists investigate processes thought to be causal. Yet, in spite of many recent advances in the estimation and testing of mediation effects, little attention has been given to methods for communicating effect size and the practical importance of those…

  16. Effective media communication of disasters: Pressing problems and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, Wilson; Evans, William; Gower, Karla K; Robinson, Jennifer A; Ginter, Peter M; McCormick, Lisa C; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2007-01-01

    terrorism and other disasters. The findings from this formative research suggest that perspectives and organizational processes often limit effective communication between these groups; though practical solutions such as participation of journalists in drills, scenario exercises, sharing of informational resources, and raising awareness at professional trade meetings may enhance the timely dissemination of accurate and appropriate information. PMID:17553153

  17. Effective media communication of disasters: pressing problems and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Wilson; Evans, William; Gower, Karla K; Robinson, Jennifer A; Ginter, Peter M; McCormick, Lisa C; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2007-06-06

    findings from this formative research suggest that perspectives and organizational processes often limit effective communication between these groups; though practical solutions such as participation of journalists in drills, scenario exercises, sharing of informational resources, and raising awareness at professional trade meetings may enhance the timely dissemination of accurate and appropriate information.

  18. Size and scale effects as constraints in insect sound communication

    PubMed Central

    Bennet-Clark, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    For optimal transfer of power to the surrounding medium, a sound source should have a radius of 1/6 to 1/4 of the sound wavelength. Sound-waves propagate from the source as compressions and rarefactions of the fluid medium, which decay by spreading and viscous losses. Higher frequencies are more easily refracted and reflected by objects in the environment, causing degradation of signal structure. In open air or water, the sound spreads spherically and decays by the inverse square law. If the sound is restricted to two dimensions rather than three, it decays as the inverse of range, whereas waves within a rod decay largely due to viscous losses; such calls are usually rather simple pulses and rely on the initial time of arrival because of multiple pathlengths or different propagation velocities in the environment. Because of the relationship between calling success and reproductive success, singing insects are under selective pressure to optimize the range, and to maintain the specificity, of their calls. Smaller insects have less muscle power; because of their small sound sources, higher frequencies will be radiated more efficiently than lower frequencies, but in order to produce brief loud pulses from a long-duration muscle contraction they may use both a frequency multiplier mechanism and a mechanical power amplifier. Airborne insect sounds in the range from 1 to 5 kHz tend to have sustained puretone components and a specific pattern of pulses which propagate accurately. Where the song frequency is higher, the pulses tend to become briefer, with a rapid initial build-up that gives a reliable time of onset through obstructed transmission pathways. These scale effects may be related both to the sound-producing mechanism and the auditory system of the receiver. Tiny insects have the special acoustic problem of communicating with only a small amount of available power. Some, such as fruit flies, communicate at low frequencies, at close range, by generating air

  19. Teaching medical students about communication in speech-language disorders: Effects of a lecture and a workshop.

    PubMed

    Saldert, Charlotta; Forsgren, Emma; Hartelius, Lena

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of an interactive workshop involving speech-language pathology students on medical students' knowledge about communication in relation to speech-language disorders. Fifty-nine medical students received a lecture about speech-language disorders. Twenty-six of them also participated in a workshop on communication with patients with speech-language disorders. All students completed a 12-item questionnaire exploring knowledge and attitudes towards communication before and after the lecture or the workshop. The results from the two groups' self-ratings of confidence in knowledge were compared with expert-ratings of their ability to choose suitable communicative strategies. Both the lecture and the workshop increased the students' confidence in knowledge about speech-language disorders and how to support communication. Only the workshop group also displayed a statistically significant increase in expert-rated ability and changed their attitude regarding responsibility for the communication in cases of speech-language disorders. There were no statistically significant correlations between the student's own confidence ratings and the experts' ratings of ability. Increased confidence in knowledge from learning is not always reflected in actual knowledge in how to communicate. However, an interactive workshop proved to increase medical students' expert-rated ability and attitudes related to communication in cases of speech-language disorders.

  20. The Effect of a Therapy Dog on the Communication Skills of an Adult with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFrance, Caroline; Garcia, Linda J.; Labreche, Julianne

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence-based research has been published within the field of communication disorders on the role of dogs as catalysts for human communication. This single participant study, a point of entry into this realm of research, explores the effects of a therapy dog on the communication skills of a patient with aphasia receiving intensive speech…

  1. Effects of Gender on Computer-Mediated Communication: A Survey of University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenziano, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The influence of gender on computer-mediated communication is a research area with tremendous growth. This study sought to determine what gender effects exist in email communication between professors and students. The study also explored the amount of lying and misinterpretation that occurs through online communication. The study results indicate…

  2. EPEC-O for African Americans - Module 7 AA - Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  3. Attribution of Arousal as a Mediator of the Effectiveness of Fear-Arousing Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Norbert; And Others

    Characteristics of the situation in which a fear-arousing communication is received affect the effectiveness of the communication. The influence of situational factors affecting a recipient's interpretation of the arousal induced by communication were investigated with smokers (N=37) who were exposed to a fear-arousing anti-smoking movie. Prior to…

  4. The Effect of a Therapy Dog on the Communication Skills of an Adult with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFrance, Caroline; Garcia, Linda J.; Labreche, Julianne

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence-based research has been published within the field of communication disorders on the role of dogs as catalysts for human communication. This single participant study, a point of entry into this realm of research, explores the effects of a therapy dog on the communication skills of a patient with aphasia receiving intensive speech…

  5. Point prevalence study of pediatric inpatients who are unable to communicate effectively about pain.

    PubMed

    Hill, Douglas L; Carroll, Karen W; Dougherty, Susan; Vega, Cassandra; Feudtner, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric inpatients may be at risk for inadequate pain management if they are unable to communicate effectively because of age, physical or cognitive impairment, or medical procedures. We conducted a point prevalence study to estimate the proportion of inpatients at a children's hospital who have difficulty communicating to hospital staff. We obtained nurse reports of ability to communicate for all inpatients aged ≥12 months in a pediatric hospital. Demographic information was obtained from the medical record. Questionnaires were completed for 254 inpatients. Forty percent of inpatients had some difficulty communicating, and 69% had experienced pain during the hospitalization. Patient ability to communicate was not related to experiencing pain (χ(2) test, P = .30) or effectiveness of pain management (χ(2) test, P = .80) but was associated with difficulty communicating about pain and nurses needing help from the caretaker to communicate with the patient (χ(2) tests, Ps < .001). A substantial proportion of inpatients aged ≥12 months at a large children's hospital had difficulties communicating effectively and experienced pain during hospitalization. These communication difficulties were not associated with nurse reports of the effectiveness of pain management. However, patients who had difficulties communicating in general were also more likely to have difficulty communicating about pain specifically, and nurses were more likely to need help from the caregiver to understand these patients. Future directions include identifying which conditions, procedures, and medications are associated with inability to communicate. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Developing Effective Messages and Materials for Hispanic/Latino Audiences. Communications Technical Assistance Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Baraona, Miguel

    This guide provides information to help program planners meet the challenges of communicating effectively with Hispanic/Latino audiences. It is important that any communication programs and materials designed for Hispanic and Latino audiences with substance abuse problem prevention messages be based on proven health communication principles,…

  7. The Relative Effects of Explicit Correction and Recasts on Two Target Structures via Two Communication Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of negative feedback type (i.e., explicit correction vs. recasts), communication mode (i.e., face-to-face communication vs. synchronous computer-mediated communication), and target structure salience (i.e., salient vs. nonsalient) on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. Forty-eight native speakers of…

  8. Effective Communication Training Interventions for Paid Carers Supporting Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Seonaid; Melville, Craig A.; Jones, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Carer communication skills contribute to the well being of individuals with learning disabilities. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of communication training interventions, and there is a lack of robust measures of outcome. A communication self-efficacy measure relevant to carers supporting adults with learning disabilities was…

  9. Effective Communication Training Interventions for Paid Carers Supporting Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Seonaid; Melville, Craig A.; Jones, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Carer communication skills contribute to the well being of individuals with learning disabilities. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of communication training interventions, and there is a lack of robust measures of outcome. A communication self-efficacy measure relevant to carers supporting adults with learning disabilities was…

  10. The Relative Effects of Explicit Correction and Recasts on Two Target Structures via Two Communication Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of negative feedback type (i.e., explicit correction vs. recasts), communication mode (i.e., face-to-face communication vs. synchronous computer-mediated communication), and target structure salience (i.e., salient vs. nonsalient) on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. Forty-eight native speakers of…

  11. Protective Effects of Parent-College Student Communication during the First Semester of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Meg L.; Morgan, Nicole; Abar, Caitlin; Maggs, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies suggest that parents maintain influence as their adolescents transition into college. Advances in communication technology make frequent communication between parents and college students easy and affordable. This study examines the protective effect of parent-college student communication on student drinking behaviors,…

  12. Willingness to Communicate in Iranian EFL Learners: The Effect of Class Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khazaei, Zeinab Moradi; Zadeh, Ahmad Moin; Ketabi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Willingness to communicate can be considered as one of the important factors in modern language pedagogy which put emphasis on meaningful communication. The present study investigated the effect of class size on the Iranian EFL students' willingness to communicate among three different class sizes. The researcher collected the data through…

  13. Review and Synthesis: Criteria for the Evaluation of Organizational Communication Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farace, Richard V.; And Others

    Twenty-one criteria for assessing communication effectiveness in organizations provide the basis for discussion in this document. Grouped under the general heading of communication rules, the criteria are described according to five categories: structure, messages, media, communicator, and potpourri (factors that affect the decision making of…

  14. Protective Effects of Parent-College Student Communication during the First Semester of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Meg L.; Morgan, Nicole; Abar, Caitlin; Maggs, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies suggest that parents maintain influence as their adolescents transition into college. Advances in communication technology make frequent communication between parents and college students easy and affordable. This study examines the protective effect of parent-college student communication on student drinking behaviors,…

  15. Effect of Communication Style on Perceptions of Medication Side Effect Risk among Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ruta V.; Beatty, Collin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effect of communication style, and frequency and severity of medication side-effects, on pharmacy students’ perception of risk of experiencing side effects. Methods. One hundred responses from pharmacy students were obtained using an online survey. Participants were presented with a drug information box containing drug name, drug usage, and one side-effect associated with the drug. Information on side-effect for each drug was presented in one of eight experimental conditions, in a 2 (side-effect frequency: low, high), X2 (side-effect severity: mild, severe) X2 (communication style: verbal, verbal + natural frequency) factorial design. Risk perception of experiencing side effects was measured. Results. Communication style was found to have a significant impact on risk perception depending on the context of frequency and severity associated with the side effect. Conclusion. Communication style plays a significant role in formulating risk perceptions of medication side effects. Training in pharmaceutical counseling should include special emphasis on effective language use. PMID:27899827

  16. Known unknowns: indirect energy effects of information and communication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Nathaniel C.; Shehabi, Arman; Azevedo, Inês L.

    2016-10-01

    Background. There has been sustained and growing interest in characterizing the net energy impact of information and communication technology (ICT), which results from indirect effects offsetting (or amplifying) the energy directly consumed by ICT equipment. These indirect effects may be either positive or negative, and there is considerable disagreement as to the direction of this sign as well as the effect magnitude. Literature in this area ranges from studies focused on a single service (such as e-commerce versus traditional retail) to macroeconomic studies attempting to characterize the overall impact of ICT. Methods. We review the literature on the indirect energy effect of ICT found via Google Scholar, our own research, and input from other researchers in the field. The various studies are linked to an effect taxonomy, which is synthesized from several different hierarchies present in the literature. References are further grouped according to ICT service (e.g., e-commerce, telework) and summarized by scope, method, and quantitative and qualitative findings. Review results. Uncertainty persists in understanding the net energy effects of ICT. Results of indirect energy effect studies are highly sensitive to scoping decisions and assumptions made by the analyst. Uncertainty increases as the impact scope broadens, due to complex and interconnected effects. However, there is general agreement that ICT has large energy savings potential, but that the realization of this potential is highly dependent on deployment details and user behavior. Discussion. While the overall net effect of ICT is likely to remain unknown, this review suggests several guidelines for improving research quality in this area, including increased data collection, enhancing traditional modeling studies with sensitivity analysis, greater care in scoping, less confidence in characterizing aggregate impacts, more effort on understanding user behavior, and more contextual integration across the

  17. Known unknowns: indirect energy effects of information and communication technology

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Nathaniel C.; Shehabi, Arman; Azevedo, Ines L.

    2016-10-05

    There has been sustained and growing interest in characterizing the net energy impact of information and communication technology (ICT), which results from indirect effects offsetting (or amplifying) the energy directly consumed by ICT equipment. These indirect effects may be either positive or negative, and there is considerable disagreement as to the direction of this sign as well as the effect magnitude. Literature in this area ranges from studies focused on a single service (such as e-commerce versus traditional retail) to macroeconomic studies attempting to characterize the overall impact of ICT. Methods. We review the literature on the indirect energy effect of ICT found via Google Scholar, our own research, and input from other researchers in the field. The various studies are linked to an effect taxonomy, which is synthesized from several different hierarchies present in the literature. References are further grouped according to ICT service (e.g., e-commerce, telework) and summarized by scope, method, and quantitative and qualitative findings. Review results. Uncertainty persists in understanding the net energy effects of ICT. Results of indirect energy effect studies are highly sensitive to scoping decisions and assumptions made by the analyst. Uncertainty increases as the impact scope broadens, due to complex and interconnected effects. However, there is general agreement that ICT has large energy savings potential, but that the realization of this potential is highly dependent on deployment details and user behavior. Discussion. While the overall net effect of ICT is likely to remain unknown, this review suggests several guidelines for improving research quality in this area, including increased data collection, enhancing traditional modeling studies with sensitivity analysis, greater care in scoping, less confidence in characterizing aggregate impacts, more effort on understanding user behavior, and more contextual integration across the different

  18. The Effect of Communication Strategy Training on the Development of EFL Learners' Strategic Competence and Oral Communicative Ability.

    PubMed

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the effect of communication strategy instruction on EFL students' oral communicative ability and their strategic competence. In a 14-week English as a Foreign Language (EFL) course (English Use II) based on Communicative Language Teaching approach, 80 learners were divided into two groups. The strategy training group ([Formula: see text]) received CS training based on a training program designed for the purpose of the present research, whereas the control group ([Formula: see text]) received only the normal communicative course using Click On 3, with no explicit focus on CSs. The communication strategies targeted in the training program included circumlocution (paraphrase), appeal for help, asking for repetition, clarification request, confirmation request, self-repair, and guessing. Pre- and post-test procedures were used to find out the effect of strategy training on language proficiency and CS use. The effect of the training was assessed by three types of data collection: the participants' pre- and post-IELTS speaking test scores, transcription data from the speaking IELTS test, and 'Click On' Exit Test scores. The findings revealed that participants in the strategy training group significantly outperformed the control group in their IELTS speaking test scores. The results of the post-test transcription data also confirmed that the participants in the strategy training group used more CSs, which could be attributed to the CS training program. The findings of the present research have implications for language teachers, and syllabus designers.

  19. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Alcântara, Pauline Lima; Wogel, Ariane Zonho; Rossi, Maria Isabela Lobo; Neves, Isabela Rodrigues; Sabates, Ana Llonch; Puggina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Methods: Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20min. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of 1min immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which non-verbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. Results: The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7-11 years (n=23; 56%) and were males (n=26; 63.4%). There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. Conclusions: The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain. PMID:27080219

  20. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Alcântara, Pauline Lima; Wogel, Ariane Zonho; Rossi, Maria Isabela Lobo; Neves, Isabela Rodrigues; Sabates, Ana Llonch; Puggina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-12-01

    Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20minutes. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of one minute immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which nonverbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7 to 11 years (n=23; 56%) and were males (n=26; 63.4%). There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. The politics of comparative effectiveness research: lessons from recent history.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Corinna; Gusmano, Michael K; Oliver, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Efforts to support and use comparative effectiveness research (CER), some more successful than others, have been promulgated at various times over the last forty years. Following a resurgence of interest in CER, recent health care reforms provided substantial support to strengthen its role in US health care. While CER has generally captured bipartisan support, detractors have raised concerns that it will be used to ration services and heighten government control over health care. Such concerns almost derailed the initiative during passage of the health care reform legislation and are still present today. Given recent investments in CER and the debates surrounding its development, the time is ripe to reflect on past efforts to introduce CER in the United States. This article examines previous initiatives, highlighting their prescribed role in US health care, the reasons for their success or failure, and the political lessons learned. Current CER initiatives have corrected for many of the pitfalls experienced by previous efforts. However, past experiences point to a number of issues that must still be addressed to ensure the long-term success and sustainability of CER, including adopting realistic aims about its impact, demonstrating the impact of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) and communicating the benefits of CER, and maintaining strong political and stakeholder support.

  2. Communicating Comparative Findings from Meta-Analysis in Educational Research: Some Examples and Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Steve; Katsipataki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews some of the strengths and limitations of the comparative use of meta-analysis findings, using examples from the Sutton Trust-Education Endowment Foundation Teaching and Learning "Toolkit" which summarizes a range of educational approaches to improve pupil attainment in schools. This comparative use of quantitative…

  3. A Randomized Comparison of the Effect of Two Prelinguistic Communication Interventions on the Acquisition of Spoken Communication in Preschoolers with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Paul; Stone, Wendy L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized group experiment compared the efficacy of 2 communication interventions (Responsive Education and Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching [RPMT] and the Picture Exchange Communication System [PECS]) on spoken communication in 36 preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Method: Each treatment was delivered to children for a…

  4. Known unknowns: indirect energy effects of information and communication technology

    DOE PAGES

    Horner, Nathaniel C.; Shehabi, Arman; Azevedo, Ines L.

    2016-10-05

    There has been sustained and growing interest in characterizing the net energy impact of information and communication technology (ICT), which results from indirect effects offsetting (or amplifying) the energy directly consumed by ICT equipment. These indirect effects may be either positive or negative, and there is considerable disagreement as to the direction of this sign as well as the effect magnitude. Literature in this area ranges from studies focused on a single service (such as e-commerce versus traditional retail) to macroeconomic studies attempting to characterize the overall impact of ICT. Methods. We review the literature on the indirect energy effectmore » of ICT found via Google Scholar, our own research, and input from other researchers in the field. The various studies are linked to an effect taxonomy, which is synthesized from several different hierarchies present in the literature. References are further grouped according to ICT service (e.g., e-commerce, telework) and summarized by scope, method, and quantitative and qualitative findings. Review results. Uncertainty persists in understanding the net energy effects of ICT. Results of indirect energy effect studies are highly sensitive to scoping decisions and assumptions made by the analyst. Uncertainty increases as the impact scope broadens, due to complex and interconnected effects. However, there is general agreement that ICT has large energy savings potential, but that the realization of this potential is highly dependent on deployment details and user behavior. Discussion. While the overall net effect of ICT is likely to remain unknown, this review suggests several guidelines for improving research quality in this area, including increased data collection, enhancing traditional modeling studies with sensitivity analysis, greater care in scoping, less confidence in characterizing aggregate impacts, more effort on understanding user behavior, and more contextual integration across the

  5. Metrics and the effective computational scientist: process, quality and communication.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Eric T

    2012-09-01

    Recent treatments of computational knowledge worker productivity have focused upon the value the discipline brings to drug discovery using positive anecdotes. While this big picture approach provides important validation of the contributions of these knowledge workers, the impact accounts do not provide the granular detail that can help individuals and teams perform better. I suggest balancing the impact-focus with quantitative measures that can inform the development of scientists. Measuring the quality of work, analyzing and improving processes, and the critical evaluation of communication can provide immediate performance feedback. The introduction of quantitative measures can complement the longer term reporting of impacts on drug discovery. These metric data can document effectiveness trends and can provide a stronger foundation for the impact dialogue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Science of Effectively Communicating about Drought in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gann, T. M.; Conklin, M. H.; Gonzales, J. P.; Matlock, T.

    2014-12-01

    The ongoing drought in California is having a tremendous impact on the state economy and the daily lives of its citizens. The impact of the drought is also exacerbated by the complexity of water issues in California, and the lack of understanding in the general public about this complexity. Our project has two goals, both focused on the broader issue of increasing the public's understanding of water issues by helping scientists engage more effectively with the public. The first is to use a survey to assess the perceptions of California residents regarding the ongoing drought affecting the state. The first portion of our survey allows our participants to share, in a free response format, their understanding of the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to the problems caused by drought. This allowed us to get some insight into how people view the drought prior to being lead by our questions, and allows us to conduct a detailed linguistic analysis of the text they provide. Next we asked a battery of questions meant to assess our participants' views on issues such as their views of water rights, the commoditization of water, and what role the government (both state and local) should play in managing California's water. The second goal is to use this data to create profiles that can then be used to more effectively communicate with and educate the public. Together, the results will provide new and valuable insights into how views of drought vary across stakeholders, and could inform policies related to water use. The presentation will include discussion of these results, their implications for best practices by science communicators, and potential impact on policy.

  7. Education in patient-physician communication: how to improve effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Wouda, Jan C; van de Wiel, Harry B M

    2013-01-01

    Despite educational efforts expertise in communication as required by the CanMEDS competency framework is not achieved by medical students and residents. Several factors complicate the learning of professional communication. We adapted the reflective-impulsive model of social behaviour to explain the complexities of learning professional communication behaviour. We formulated recommendations for the learning objectives and teaching methods of communication education. Our recommendations are based on the reflective-impulsive model and on the model of deliberate practice which complements the reflective-impulsive model. Our recommendations are substantiated by those we found in the literature. The reflective-impulsive model explains why the results of communication education fall below expectations and how expertise in communication can be attained by deliberate practice. The model of deliberate practice specifies learning conditions which are insufficiently fulfilled in current communication programmes. The implementation of our recommendations would require a great deal of effort. Therefore we doubt whether expertise in professional communication can be fully attained during medical training. We propose that the CanMEDS communication competencies not be regarded as endpoints in medical education but as guidelines to improve communication competency through deliberate practice throughout a professional career. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effective Two-way Communication of Environmental Hazards: Understanding Public Perception in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorono-Leturiondo, Maria; O'Hare, Paul; Cook, Simon; Hoon, Stephen R.; Illingworth, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Climate change intensified hazards, such as floods and landslides, require exploring renewed ways of protecting at-risk communities (World Economic Forum 2016). Scientists are being encouraged to explore new pathways to work closely with affected communities in search of experiential knowledge that is able to complement and extend scientific knowledge (see for instance Whatmore and Landström 2011 and Höpner et al. 2010). Effective two-way communication of environmental hazards is, however, a challenge. Besides considering factors such as the purpose of communication, or the characteristics of the different formats; effective communication has to carefully acknowledge the personal framework of the individuals involved. Existing experiences, values, beliefs, and needs are critical determinants of the way they perceive and relate to these hazards, and in turn, of the communication process in which they are involved (Longnecker 2016 and Gibson et al. 2016). Our study builds on the need to analyze how the public perceives environmental hazards in order to establish forms of communication that work. Here we present early findings of a survey analysing the UK public's perception and outline how survey results can guide more effective two-way communication practices between scientists and affected communities. We explore the perception of environmental hazards in terms of how informed and concerned the public is, as well as how much ownership they claim over these phenomena. In order to gain a more accurate image, we study environmental hazards in relation to other risks threatening the UK, such as large-scale involuntary migration or unemployment (World Economic Forum 2016, Bord et al. 1998). We also explore information consumption in relation to environmental hazards and the public's involvement in advancing knowledge. All these questions are accompanied by an extensive demographics section that allows us to ascertain how the context or environment in which an

  9. Assessing communications effectiveness in meeting corporate goals of public health organizations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gordon D; Bopp, Kenneth D; Boren, Suzanne Austin

    2005-01-01

    Much evaluation of health communications in public health is considered from a program perspective of smoking cessation, weight reduction, education on sexually transmitted diseases, etc. These studies have advanced the knowledge base of communications theory and evaluation and have contributed to program effectiveness. In program-based evaluation the communications process is structured as part of the program itself. This article extends program-based communications evaluation to view communications from the perspective of the consumer and how effectively public health departments respond to consumer expectations. It develops a conceptual model for evaluating elements of communications such as its importance in defining mission and goals within the community, managing strategic constituencies, and enlisting individuals and groups as customers and co-producers of health. It gives a broader perspective on how communications in public heath organizations are managed and a basis for assessing whether they are being managed effectively.

  10. Effective teaching of communication to health professional undergraduate and postgraduate students: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to identify and assess the effectiveness of tools and methods of teaching communication skills to health professional students in undergraduate and postgraduate programs, to facilitate communication in hospitals, nursing homes and mental health institutions.For this review, effective communication will be defined as that which enhances patient satisfaction, safety, symptom resolution, psychological status, or reduces the impact/burden of disease and/or improved communication skills within undergraduate or postgraduate studentsThe review question is: What is the best available evidence on strategies to effectively teach communication skills to undergraduate and postgraduate medical, nursing and allied health students (nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology etc)? Communication is a two-way interaction where information, meanings and feelings are shared both verbally and non-verbally. Effective communication is when the message being conveyed is understood as intended. Effective communication between the health professional and patient is increasingly being recognised as a core clinical skill. Research has identified the far reaching benefits of effective communication skills including enhanced patient satisfaction, patient safety, symptom resolution and improvements in functional and psychological status. Poor communication can result in omitted or misinterpretation of information resulting in declining health of the patient. Despite the importance of effective communication in ensuring positive outcomes for both the patient and health professional, there is concern that contemporary teaching and learning approaches do not always facilitate the development of a requisite level of communication skills, both verbal and written and a difficulty for the current generation of communication skills teachers is that many have not had the experience of being taught communication skills themselves.Studies have shown that

  11. Communication, Reasoning, and Planned Behaviors: Unveiling the Effect of Interactive Communication in an Anti-Smoking Social Media Campaign.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Kang; Nah, Seungahn; Record, Rachael A; Van Stee, Stephanie K

    2017-01-01

    This study examines direct and indirect effects of interactive communication in an antismoking social media campaign. To that end, we pose a multitheoretical framework that integrates communication mediation models and the Theory of Planned Behavior. To test the theorized model, we conducted an experiment using a two-group pretest-posttest design. Participants (N = 201) were randomly assigned into two experimental conditions: "campaign message reception only" as a control group and "message reception and social interaction" as a treatment group, in which the participants contributed to the antismoking campaign by posting their own campaign ideas and information they found through mediated and interpersonal communication. The findings show that interactive communication catalyzes the participants' information searching behaviors through diverse communication channels. In turn, increased media use plays a crucial role in changing their attitudes and perceived social norms about smoking behaviors, and eventually reducing smoking intention. This study affirms that the theory of planned behavior is effective in predicting behavioral intention and demonstrates the usefulness of a multitheoretical approach in interactive campaign research on social media.

  12. Native Tissue Prolapse Repairs: Comparative Effectiveness Trials.

    PubMed

    Siff, Lauren N; Barber, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    This report reviews the success rates and complications of native tissue (nonmesh) vaginal reconstruction of pelvic organ prolapse by compartment. For apical prolapse, both uterosacral ligament suspensions and sacrospinous ligament fixations are effective and provided similar outcomes in anatomy and function with few adverse events. In the anterior compartment, traditional colporrhaphy technique is no different than ultralateral suturing. In the posterior compartment, transvaginal rectocele repair is superior to transanal repair. For uterine preservation, sacrospinous hysteropexy is not inferior to vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension for treatment of apical uterovaginal prolapse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mainstreaming hearing-impaired students: the effect of effort in communicating on cooperation and interpersonal attraction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D W; Johnson, R T

    1985-01-01

    Cooperative and individualistic learning experiences were compared in terms of their effects on interaction and relationships between hearing and hearing-impaired students. Two contradictory hypotheses were tested--one stating that the effort required for hearing and hearing-impaired students to communicate would lead to frustration, withdrawal, exclusion, and rejection; the other stating that cooperative learning experiences would lead to cross-handicap interpersonal attraction regardless of communication difficulties. Thirty 3rd-grade students (20 hearing and 10 hearing impaired) were assigned to conditions on a stratified, random basis controlling for handicap, sex, and ability level. They participated in the study for 55 min a day for 15 instructional days. The results indicate that subjects involved in cooperative learning experiences performed higher on measures of interaction and interpersonal attraction between hearing and hearing-impaired students than did subjects involved in individualistic learning experiences.

  14. The ACTS Flight System - Cost-Effective Advanced Communications Technology. [Advanced Communication Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, W. M., Jr.; Beck, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The multibeam communications package (MCP) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be STS-launched by NASA in 1988 for experimental demonstration of satellite-switched TDMA (at 220 Mbit/sec) and baseband-processor signal routing (at 110 or 27.5 Mbit/sec) is characterized. The developmental history of the ACTS, the program definition, and the spacecraft-bus and MCP parameters are reviewed and illustrated with drawings, block diagrams, and maps of the coverage plan. Advanced features of the MPC include 4.5-dB-noise-figure 30-GHz FET amplifiers and 20-GHz TWTA transmitters which provide either 40-W or 8-W RF output, depending on rain conditions. The technologies being tested in ACTS can give frequency-reuse factors as high as 20, thus greatly expanding the orbit/spectrum resources available for U.S. communications use.

  15. Effects of communication skills on stress responses while speaking Japanese and English.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Yagi, Akihiro; Miyata, Yo

    2008-08-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the effects of communication skills on stress responses, such as physiological (blink and heart rate), emotional (state of anxiety and mood), and behavioral responses (smiling and expressing an opinion) in stressful communication situations, specifically answering questions and giving a speech in Japanese and English. Participants were 32 students (16 men and 16 women; Mage = 19.5 yr., SD = 1.3) attending a Japanese university. A high communication skills group was selected from the upper tertile scores of the Social Skills Inventory, and a low communication skills group was selected from the lower tertile scores. Analysis indicated that individuals who had high communication skills performed without heart-rate increase and with more positive attitude during stressful communication tasks. Individuals who had low communication skills displayed higher anxiety prior to the experiment than those who had high communication skills.

  16. Non-verbal communication of compassion: measuring psychophysiologic effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Calm, compassionate clinicians comfort others. To evaluate the direct psychophysiologic benefits of non-verbal communication of compassion (NVCC), it is important to minimize the effect of subjects' expectation. This preliminary study was designed to a) test the feasibility of two strategies for maintaining subject blinding to non-verbal communication of compassion (NVCC), and b) determine whether blinded subjects would experience psychophysiologic effects from NVCC. Methods Subjects were healthy volunteers who were told the study was evaluating the effect of time and touch on the autonomic nervous system. The practitioner had more than 10 years' experience with loving-kindness meditation (LKM), a form of NVCC. Subjects completed 10-point visual analog scales (VAS) for stress, relaxation, and peacefulness before and after LKM. To assess physiologic effects, practitioners and subjects wore cardiorespiratory monitors to assess respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) throughout the 4 10-minute study periods: Baseline (both practitioner and subjects read neutral material); non-tactile-LKM (subjects read while the practitioner practiced LKM while pretending to read); tactile-LKM (subjects rested while the practitioner practiced LKM while lightly touching the subject on arms, shoulders, hands, feet, and legs); Post-Intervention Rest (subjects rested; the practitioner read). To assess blinding, subjects were asked after the interventions what the practitioner was doing during each period (reading, touch, or something else). Results Subjects' mean age was 43.6 years; all were women. Blinding was maintained and the practitioner was able to maintain meditation for both tactile and non-tactile LKM interventions as reflected in significantly reduced RR. Despite blinding, subjects' VAS scores improved from baseline to post-intervention for stress (5.5 vs. 2.2), relaxation (3.8 vs. 8.8) and peacefulness (3.8 vs. 9.0, P < 0.05 for all

  17. Non-verbal communication of compassion: measuring psychophysiologic effects.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Kathi J; Shaltout, Hossam A

    2011-12-20

    Calm, compassionate clinicians comfort others. To evaluate the direct psychophysiologic benefits of non-verbal communication of compassion (NVCC), it is important to minimize the effect of subjects' expectation. This preliminary study was designed to a) test the feasibility of two strategies for maintaining subject blinding to non-verbal communication of compassion (NVCC), and b) determine whether blinded subjects would experience psychophysiologic effects from NVCC. Subjects were healthy volunteers who were told the study was evaluating the effect of time and touch on the autonomic nervous system. The practitioner had more than 10 years' experience with loving-kindness meditation (LKM), a form of NVCC. Subjects completed 10-point visual analog scales (VAS) for stress, relaxation, and peacefulness before and after LKM. To assess physiologic effects, practitioners and subjects wore cardiorespiratory monitors to assess respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) throughout the 4 10-minute study periods: Baseline (both practitioner and subjects read neutral material); non-tactile-LKM (subjects read while the practitioner practiced LKM while pretending to read); tactile-LKM (subjects rested while the practitioner practiced LKM while lightly touching the subject on arms, shoulders, hands, feet, and legs); Post-Intervention Rest (subjects rested; the practitioner read). To assess blinding, subjects were asked after the interventions what the practitioner was doing during each period (reading, touch, or something else). Subjects' mean age was 43.6 years; all were women. Blinding was maintained and the practitioner was able to maintain meditation for both tactile and non-tactile LKM interventions as reflected in significantly reduced RR. Despite blinding, subjects' VAS scores improved from baseline to post-intervention for stress (5.5 vs. 2.2), relaxation (3.8 vs. 8.8) and peacefulness (3.8 vs. 9.0, P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Subjects also

  18. Comparing communicative competence in child and chimp: the pragmatics of repetition.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, P M; Savage-Rumbaugh, E S

    1993-02-01

    Through an analysis of chimpanzee-human discourse, we show that two Pan troglodytes chimpanzees and two Pan paniscus chimpanzees (bonobos) exposed to a humanly devised symbol system use partial or complete repetition of others' symbols, as children do: they do not produce rote imitations, but instead use repetition to fulfil a variety of pragmatic functions in discourse. These functions include agreement, request, promise, excitement, and selection from alternatives. In so doing, the chimpanzees demonstrate contingent turn-taking and the use of simple devices for lexical cohesion. In short, they demonstrate conversational competence. Because of the presence of this conversational competence in three sibling species, chimpanzees, bonobos, and humans, it is concluded that the potential to express pragmatic functions through repetition was part of the evolutionary history of human language, present in our common ancestor before the phylogenetic divergence of hominids and chimpanzees. In the context of these similarities, two interesting differences appeared: (I) Human children sometimes used repetition to stimulate more talk in their conversational partner; the chimpanzees, in contrast, use repetition exclusively to forward the non-verbal action. This difference may illuminate a unique feature of human linguistic communication, or it may simply reflect a modality difference (visual symbols used by the chimpanzees, speech used by the children) in the symbol systems considered in this research. A second difference seems likely to reflect a true species difference: utterance length. The one- and two-symbol repetitions used by the chimpanzees to fulfil a variety of pragmatic functions were less than half the maximum length found in either the visual symbol combinations addressed to them by their adult human caregivers or the oral repetitions of two-year-old children. This species difference probably reflects the evolution of increased brain size and consequent increased

  19. The Effects of Computer-Mediated Communication by a Course Management System (Moodle) on EFL Taiwanese Student's English Reading Achievement and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Pei-Chin

    2009-01-01

    This research study compared the effects of three instructional methods--collaborative synchronous online communication, asynchronous online communication, and independent study as traditional in grammar translation method--in English reading comprehension. A quasi-experimental research design included pre and post reading comprehension tests for…

  20. The Effects of Computer-Mediated Communication by a Course Management System (Moodle) on EFL Taiwanese Student's English Reading Achievement and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Pei-Chin

    2009-01-01

    This research study compared the effects of three instructional methods--collaborative synchronous online communication, asynchronous online communication, and independent study as traditional in grammar translation method--in English reading comprehension. A quasi-experimental research design included pre and post reading comprehension tests for…

  1. Influence of sound immersion and communicative interaction on the Lombard effect.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Maëva; Henrich, Nathalie; Dubois, Danièle

    2010-06-01

    To examine the influence of sound immersion techniques and speech production tasks on speech adaptation in noise. In Experiment 1, we compared the modification of speakers' perception and speech production in noise when noise is played into headphones (with and without additional self-monitoring feedback) or over loudspeakers. We also examined how this sound immersion effect depends on noise type (broadband or cocktail party) and level (from 62 to 86dB SPL). In Experiment 2, we compared the modification of acoustic and lip articulatory parameters in noise when speakers interact or not with a speech partner. Speech modifications in noise were greater when cocktail party noise was played in headphones than over loudspeakers. Such an effect was less noticeable in broadband noise. Adding a self-monitoring feedback into headphones reduced this effect but did not completely compensate for it. Speech modifications in noise were greater in interactive situation and concerned parameters that may not be related to voice intensity. The results support the idea that the Lombard effect is both a communicative adaptation and an automatic regulation of vocal intensity. The influence of auditory and communicative factors has some methodological implications on the choice of appropriate paradigms to study the Lombard effect.

  2. Effects of a Support Program on Nurses' Communication with Hospitalized Children's Families.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hiroko

    2017-09-01

    More than a few pediatric nurses experience difficulty in communicating with children's family members. However, effective means of providing communication support for pediatric nurses have not been examined sufficiently. This study aimed to develop and implement a communication support program for nurses to facilitate improved communication with families of hospitalized children, and to clarify changes in nurses' recognition and behavior toward communication with families in clinical settings. The program lasted 6 months and consisted of lectures, role-play, 4 communication models in which nurses experienced difficulty communicating with family members, and continued individual support. The effects of the program were evaluated qualitatively and descriptively using semi-structured interviews. A total of 7 nurses with less than 5 years of pediatric nursing experience completed the program. Subsequent to program completion, nurses' awareness of careful communication with families increased, and they began to approach families actively using thoughtful words. Furthermore, as nurses received favorable reactions from families, they realized that communication was interactive and recognized that their perception of their communication skills as poor had changed. This program could contribute in reducing nurses' difficulty in communicating with families and encourage them to improve their communication.

  3. Telling our own story: Effective communication for ANS professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom-Kulieke, B.

    1995-12-31

    Nuclear professionals often shy away from communicating as much or as well as we could, especially outside of our own work groups. Public speaking or media interviews may be especially uncomfortable or difficult. But as classic communication theory states, {open_quotes}It is impossible not to communicate.{close_quotes} Our silence speaks volumes. And if we do not tell our own story, someone else will. This paper outlines how nuclear professionals may develop themselves as excellent communicators to the benefit of our own work groups and the public.

  4. Effective nurse parent communication: a study of parents' perceptions in the NICU environment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Liz; Woodhouse, Darlene; Rowe, Jennifer

    2007-12-01

    This study examined mothers' and fathers' perceptions of effective and ineffective communication by nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment, using communication accommodation theory (CAT) as the framework. Twenty mothers and 13 fathers participated in a semi-structured interview about their perceptions of effective and ineffective communication with nurses when their infant was in the NICU. The interviews were coded for using the CAT strategies. Descriptions of effective and ineffective communication differed in terms of the strategies mentioned with effective communication about shared management of the interaction and appropriate support and reassurance by nurses. Ineffective communication was more about the interpretability strategy, particularly for fathers, and these interactions were seen as more intergroup. Mothers emphasised more being encouraged as equal partners in the care of their infant. Effective communication by nurses was accommodative and more interpersonal while ineffective communication was generally under-accommodative and more intergroup. The findings provide a framework for communication skills training for nurses that identifies both effective and ineffective communication strategies to use with mothers and fathers.

  5. Communication constraints, indexical countermeasures, and crew configuration effects in simulated space-dwelling groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienz, Robert D.; Brady, Joseph V.; Hursh, Steven R.; Banner, Michele J.; Gasior, Eric D.; Spence, Kevin R.

    2007-02-01

    Previous research with groups of individually isolated crews communicating and problem-solving in a distributed interactive simulation environment has shown that the functional interchangeability of available communication channels can serve as an effective countermeasure to communication constraints. The present report extends these findings by investigating crew performance effects and psychosocial adaptation following: (1) the loss of all communication channels, and (2) changes in crew configuration. Three-person crews participated in a simulated planetary exploration mission that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic samples. Results showed that crews developed and employed discrete navigation system operations that served as functionally effective communication signals (i.e., “indexical” or “deictic” cues) in generating appropriate crewmember responses and maintaining performance effectiveness in the absence of normal communication channels. Additionally, changes in crew configuration impacted both performance effectiveness and psychosocial adaptation.

  6. Improving medical stores management through automation and effective communication

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Cariappa, M.P.; Marwaha, Vishal; Sharma, Mukti; Arora, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical stores management in hospitals is a tedious and time consuming chore with limited resources tasked for the purpose and poor penetration of Information Technology. The process of automation is slow paced due to various inherent factors and is being challenged by the increasing inventory loads and escalating budgets for procurement of drugs. Methods We carried out an indepth case study at the Medical Stores of a tertiary care health care facility. An iterative six step Quality Improvement (QI) process was implemented based on the Plan–Do–Study–Act (PDSA) cycle. The QI process was modified as per requirement to fit the medical stores management model. The results were evaluated after six months. Results After the implementation of QI process, 55 drugs of the medical store inventory which had expired since 2009 onwards were replaced with fresh stock by the suppliers as a result of effective communication through upgraded database management. Various pending audit objections were dropped due to the streamlined documentation and processes. Inventory management improved drastically due to automation, with disposal orders being initiated four months prior to the expiry of drugs and correct demands being generated two months prior to depletion of stocks. The monthly expense summary of drugs was now being done within ten days of the closing month. Conclusion Improving communication systems within the hospital with vendor database management and reaching out to clinicians is important. Automation of inventory management requires to be simple and user-friendly, utilizing existing hardware. Physical stores monitoring is indispensable, especially due to the scattered nature of stores. Staff training and standardized documentation protocols are the other keystones for optimal medical store management. PMID:26900225

  7. Effects of Parent Instruction on Communicative Turns of Latino Children Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication during Storybook Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosa-Lugo, Linda Iris; Kent-Walsh, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Current research indicates that children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) often are not given opportunities to participate in supportive early storybook-reading experiences in home environments. This investigation employed a single-subject, multiple-baseline-across-subjects design to investigate the effects of a parent…

  8. Affirming the Connection: Comparative Findings on Communication Issues from Hospice Patients and Hematology Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Pam

    2004-01-01

    The following discussion presents comparative findings from hospice patients and hematology survivors on the topic of talking about dying to significant others within their network of family and friends. The insights have been gathered from an Australian research program that is exploring the notion of spirituality in relation to serious illness.…

  9. Affirming the Connection: Comparative Findings on Communication Issues from Hospice Patients and Hematology Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Pam

    2004-01-01

    The following discussion presents comparative findings from hospice patients and hematology survivors on the topic of talking about dying to significant others within their network of family and friends. The insights have been gathered from an Australian research program that is exploring the notion of spirituality in relation to serious illness.…

  10. Integrating Information and Communication Technology in the Classroom: A Comparative Discourse Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasseville, Bastien

    2004-01-01

    The discourse about information technology is often overlooked by researchers and scholars as a means of understanding the recent process of computerization in education. The research explores this phenomenon through a comparative discourse analysis of primary and secondary school teachers and promoters of ICT integration. The results show that…

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Trained and Untrained Helpers' Communication Behaviors in Response to Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWine, Sue; Miller, Larry D.

    A study was designed to compare the verbal responses of trained and untrained helpers confronted with the same crisis situation. The subjects were 24 trained graduate helpers, 24 untrained graduate helpers, and 24 untrained undergraduate helpers. Each subject was paired with an actor in one of the following conditions: male actor with male…

  12. The Communicative Computer Compares: A CALL Design Project for Elementary French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Patricia J.

    A computer lesson entitled "Aux Jeux Olympiques" (To the Olympic Games) simulates an ongoing situational dialog between the French student and the PLATO computer system. It offers an international setting for functional learning exercises focusing on students' understanding and use of comparative constructions, selected verbs, and other linguistic…

  13. Effective communication during an influenza pandemic: the value of using a crisis and emergency risk communication framework.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Barbara; Quinn Crouse, Sandra

    2008-10-01

    During a crisis, an open and empathetic style of communication that engenders the public's trust is the most effective when officials are attempting to galvanize the population to take a positive action or refrain from a harmful act. Although trust is imperative in a crisis, public suspicions of scientific experts and government are increasing for a variety of reasons, including access to more sources of conflicting information, a reduction in the use of scientific reasoning in decision making, and political infighting. Trust and credibility--which are demonstrated through empathy and caring, competence and expertise, honesty and openness, and dedication and commitment--are essential elements of persuasive communication.

  14. The Geography of Political Communication: Effects of Regional Variations in Campaign Advertising on Citizen Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Jaeho

    2011-01-01

    This study explores whether and how campaign-induced changes in local information environments influence citizens' everyday communication activities. The empirical analysis in this study centers on a comparison of two New Jersey media markets that showed idiosyncratic differences in the amount of political advertising during the 2000 presidential…

  15. The Geography of Political Communication: Effects of Regional Variations in Campaign Advertising on Citizen Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Jaeho

    2011-01-01

    This study explores whether and how campaign-induced changes in local information environments influence citizens' everyday communication activities. The empirical analysis in this study centers on a comparison of two New Jersey media markets that showed idiosyncratic differences in the amount of political advertising during the 2000 presidential…

  16. Evaluating public relations effectiveness in a health care setting. The identification of communication assets and liabilities via a communication audit.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie K

    2005-01-01

    The practice of public relations has experienced tremendous growth and evolution over the past 25 years, especially in the area of medical public relations. The constant changes in health care delivery have often led to increased need for communication with important publics. At the same time, practitioners in all fields of public relations have explored methods of accurately measuring the effectiveness of public relations programs. One such method of evaluation is the communication audit. This paper includes a brief overview of the communication audit concept followed by a case study based on an audit conducted for a small, multicultural non-profit health-care agency. Steps taken to conduct the audit and the methodology used are discussed. An analysis of the data is used to address two research questions regarding the efficacy of the Center's mission and vision. Suggestions for future audits are provided.

  17. Radiation effects on communication performance of radio frequency identification tags.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuyuki; Meng, Zhaowu; Kikuchi, Hirosumi; Kataoka, Yasuhide; Nakazato, Kazuhisa; Deji, Shizuhiko; Ito, Shigeki; Saze, Takuya; Hirota, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2010-11-01

    Radioactive materials (sources) are managed by bookkeeping and stocktaking. The radiation protection section staffs should check the sources manually. Annual effective dose concerning stocktaking of them are estimated at some mSv concerning fingers. A radio frequency identification (RFID) tag's absorbed dose is estimated at some dozen Gy. RFID for stocktaking automatically was devised. Radiation effects on the communication performance of RFID tags were investigated by using response times and read ranges as indices. The RFID system was composed of a computer, a detector, and transponders (tag) consisting of an integrated circuit chip and an antenna. The tag is joined to the source for identification. The tags were irradiated at doses between 5 and 5,000 Gy by an x-ray irradiator. The response times and the read ranges were tracked from 40 to 23,200 min after irradiation. Relative read ranges fluctuated between 0.9 and 1.1 in the dose region less than 2,000 Gy, but fluctuated greatly in the dose region beyond 2,000 Gy. Malfunctioning tags appeared from 3,000 Gy, and all tags malfunctioned in the dose region over 4,500 Gy. The threshold dose leading to malfunction was determined to be 2,100 Gy. Time variation of relative read ranges was classified into four patterns. The pattern shifted from pattern 1 to 4 when the dose was increased. The relative read ranges lengthened in pattern 1. The relative read rages were approximately 1.0 in pattern 2. The read ranges tentatively shortened, then recovered in pattern 3. The tags malfunctioned in pattern 4. Once the tags malfunctioned, they never recovered their performance. Radiation enhances or deteriorates communication performance depending on dosage. Tags can spontaneously recover from radiation deterioration. The time variation of the read ranges can be illustrated by enhancement, deterioration, and recovery. The mechanism of four patterns is explained based on the variation of the frequency harmonization strength and

  18. Effectively using communication to enhance the provision of pediatric palliative care in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Rosemary; Trowbridge, Kelly; Hubbard, Claudia; Ahsens, Leslie; Ward-Smith, Peggy

    2008-08-01

    The capability of effectively communicating is crucial when providing palliative care, especially when the patient is a child. Communication among healthcare professionals with the child and family members must be clear, concise, and consistent. Use of a communication tool provides documentation for conversations, treatment plans, and specific desires related to care. This paper describes communication theory, portrays the use of this theory to develop a communication tool, and illustrates the use of this tool by multidisciplinary members of a healthcare team to provide pediatric palliative care.

  19. Establishing Effective Communication with External Stakeholders: The Impact of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Kelly Christine Lockhart

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if communication skills training had an impact on public schools administrators' knowledge and application of communication skills, and their attitude toward school public relations. School administrators from three Tennessee school systems participated in this pretest/posttest quasi-experimental…

  20. The Relationship between Top Management Communication and Organizational Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincus, J. David; Rayfield, Robert E.

    A study examined the notion that employees' perceptions of communication between an organization's top managers and its employees influences certain key organizational variables in differing and predictable ways. Specifically, the study investigated whether employees' perceptions of top management communication were related to their job…