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Sample records for community study case

  1. Three Community College Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtysiak, Joseph; Sutton, William J., II; Wright, Tommy; Brantley, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three case studies that focus on specific projects that are underway or have been completed. In the first case study, Joseph Wojtysiak and William J. Sutton, II discuss the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, which is designed to serve as the state's preeminent source for education, training and public information about…

  2. Case study: Union of Raba River communities

    SciTech Connect

    Shewmake, T.

    1997-08-01

    This paper is a case study of the Union of Raba River Communities in Poland. The City of Cracow receives 60% of its water from the Dobczyce Reservoir, which is located in the Raba River Watershed. The water quality in this reservoir is threatened by pollution from non-point sources and untreated sewage. Because the reservoir and watershed are located outside of Cracow, protecting the water quality falls to communities that do not use the Reservoir. To meet this responsibility, communities in the watershed formed the Union of Raba River Communities (the Union). The Union hired a Cracow consulting firm to conduct a study of watershed management options, which was completed in January 1996. The Union is now evaluating the plan and looking for funding for implementation. The Union is also addressing specific problems in the watershed, including the siting of a much needed but unpopular landfill. There are numerous sources of pollution in the watershed including: sewage; runoff from urban areas, roads, agriculture, logged areas, landfills and dumps, fertilizer and pesticide storage areas, and petrol stations; and air pollution.

  3. Multicounty Community Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N.

    1974-01-01

    The study analyzes the community development programs implemented in a 14-county rural complex of the Upper Cumberland region of Tennessee. Community development is conceptualized from an interactional or field perspective with emphasis on ecological, cultural, and social analysis. Available from: Editorial and Business Offices, Piazza Cavalieri…

  4. Instructional Design: Case Studies in Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keppell, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Instructional Design: Case Studies in Communities of Practice" documents real-world experiences of instructional designers and staff developers who work in communities of practice. "Instructional Design: Case Studies in Communities of Practice" explains the strategies and heuristics used by instructional designers when working…

  5. Instructional Design: Case Studies in Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keppell, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Instructional Design: Case Studies in Communities of Practice" documents real-world experiences of instructional designers and staff developers who work in communities of practice. "Instructional Design: Case Studies in Communities of Practice" explains the strategies and heuristics used by instructional designers when working…

  6. Rural Action: A Collection of Community Work Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paul, Ed.; Francis, David, Ed.

    This book contains 10 case studies of rural community development in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and Catalonia, as seen from the perspective of community-work practitioners. Development projects encompassed such activities as promotion of tourism, establishment of community centers, vocational training for school dropouts, adult community…

  7. Issues for Community Development: Some Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Quintin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Includes "Community Development in Areas of Political and Social Conflict" (Oliver); "Women and Development in Peru" (Barrig); "Some Reflections on Community Development Experiences in Brazil" (O'Gorman); "Informal Networks for Pre-School Children in a Black Community in South Africa" (Lines); "The…

  8. Leadership and Community Participation: Four Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Alison A.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews relevant literature on systemic change and community participation. Explores leadership styles of principals in four community-minded middle schools. Administrators should be aware of their individual leadership styles and their effects on others' behavior. Principals wishing to foster empowerment in schools should move toward a…

  9. Organizing the Asian Community: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topacio, Cayan; And Others

    Community organization is a method of social intervention in which individuals, groups, and agencies plan actions which are intended to alleviate social problems. It is concerned with the education, development, and/or change of social institutions. This approach involves two processes: community planning and coordination. The general nature and…

  10. The World of Wonder Accelerated Learning Community: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Julie K.

    This report presents a case study of the World of Wonders Accelerated Learning Community School (WOW). A community school in Ohio is a new kind of public school-an independent public school that is nonsectarian and nondiscriminatory. The report presents three contexts for the study--historical, local and methodological--and highlights some of the…

  11. Extension's Part in Better Communities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Gerald F.

    1971-01-01

    Author presents a case-study showing how Delaware Extension Service launched an effort to reach the goal of better planned communities through making land-use controls become guidelines for zoning ordinances. He discusses how segments of the community were approached and the positive results of fifteen years of work. (Editor/LF)

  12. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  13. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  14. Successful Student Goal Completion: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Sara C.

    2013-01-01

    Research studies have shown that one half of all students who begin college fail to realize their goals. This case study of one community college provided a comprehensive examination of best practices developed over several years through strategic enrollment planning. Additionally, this dissertation examined the decision-making processes that…

  15. Community paramedicine model of care: an observational, ethnographic case study.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Peter; Stirling, Christine; Ruest, Michel; Martin, Angela

    2016-02-02

    Community paramedicine programs have emerged throughout North America and beyond in response to demographic changes and health system reform. Our aim was to identify and analyse how community paramedics create and maintain new role boundaries and identities in terms of flexibility and permeability and through this develop and frame a coherent community paramedicine model of care that distinguish the model from other innovations in paramedic service delivery. Using an observational ethnographic case study approach, we collected data through interviews, focus groups and field observations. We then applied a combination of thematic analysis techniques and boundary theory to develop a community paramedicine model of care. A model of care that distinguishes community paramedicine from other paramedic service innovations emerged that follows the mnemonic RESPIGHT: Response to emergencies; Engaging with communities; Situated practice; Primary health care; Integration with health, aged care and social services; Governance and leadership; Higher education; Treatment and transport options. Community engagement and situated practice distinguish community paramedicine models of care from other paramedicine and out-of-hospital health care models. Successful community paramedicine programs are integrated with health, aged care and social services and benefit from strong governance and paramedic leadership.

  16. Veterans' Transitions to Community College: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    Veterans on college campuses are not new; however, the recent influx of veterans returning home from war-time service present challenges to the colleges they attend. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the transition process experienced by veterans leaving military service and attending community college for the first time.…

  17. Veterans' Transitions to Community College: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    Veterans on college campuses are not new; however, the recent influx of veterans returning home from war-time service present challenges to the colleges they attend. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the transition process experienced by veterans leaving military service and attending community college for the first time.…

  18. Beacon communities' public health initiatives: a case study analysis.

    PubMed

    Massoudi, Barbara L; Marcial, Laura H; Haque, Saira; Bailey, Robert; Chester, Kelley; Cunningham, Shellery; Riley, Amanda; Soper, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The Beacon Communities for Public Health (BCPH) project was launched in 2011 to gain a better understanding of the range of activities currently being conducted in population- and public health by the Beacon Communities. The project highlighted the successes and challenges of these efforts with the aim of sharing this information broadly among the public health community. The Beacon Community Program, designed to showcase technology-enabled, community-based initiatives to improve outcomes, focused on: building and strengthening health information technology (IT) infrastructure and exchange capabilities; translating investments in health IT to measureable improvements in cost, quality, and population health; and, developing innovative approaches to performance measurement, technology, and care delivery. Four multimethod case studies were conducted based on a modified sociotechnical framework to learn more about public health initiative implementation and use in the Beacon Communities. Our methodological approach included using document review and semistructured key informant interviews. NACCHO Model Practice Program criteria were used to select the public health initiatives included in the case studies. Despite differences among the case studies, common barriers and facilitators were found to be present in all areas of the sociotechnical framework application including structure, people, technology, tasks, overarching considerations, and sustainability. Overall, there were many more facilitators (range = 7-14) present for each Beacon compared to barriers (range = 4-6). Four influential promising practices were identified through the work: forging strong and sustainable partnerships; ensuring a good task-technology fit and a flexible and iterative design; fostering technology acceptance; and, providing education and demonstrating value. A common weakness was the lack of a framework or model for the Beacon Communities evaluation work. Sharing a framework or approach

  19. A Case Study of School-Community Alliances that Rebuilt a Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines how the leadership of a principal in the worst elementary school in her district, located in what William J. Wilson describes as a socially dislocated African American community, worked to change the nature of an entire community by transforming how she and her faculty communicated with parents. Drawing on data gathered…

  20. Creating a Democratic Learning Community: The Case Study of Federal Hocking High School. Transforming Learning Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Susan R.; Wood, George H.

    This book is part of a series of case studies that present better ways to educate Ohio's students. The case study is part of the Transforming Learning Communities (TLC) Project, designed to support significant school-reform efforts among Ohio's elementary, middle, and high schools. The text describes the transformation of a small high school in…

  1. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  2. Developing Online Communities for Librarian Researchers: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Lili; Kennedy, Marie; Brancolini, Kristine; Stephens, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the role of online communities in connecting and supporting librarian researchers, through the analysis of member activities in the online community for academic librarians that attended the 2014 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL). The 2014 IRDL cohort members participated in the online community via Twitter…

  3. A Community of Congruence among Secondary Social Studies Teachers: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Province, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the community of one purposely selected department of secondary social studies teachers. I aimed to provide insight into the nature of one community of congruence amid the many constraints and systemic pressures in school systems today. Many have suggested that education is a microcosm of larger…

  4. School Life and Community Economic Challenge: A Newfoundland Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This study explored changes in student attitudes toward school life following the 1992 Newfoundland groundfishery closure. Using data extracted from a provincial quality of school life (QSL) survey, means associated with students from a sample of fishing communities were compared with provincial means. Although community students had poorer…

  5. Rural Community Action: A Series of Case Studies of Action Projects in Small New York State Communities. Miscellaneous Bulletin 116.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, James C.; Halton, Katherine B.

    The report presents case studies of 7 community action projects which were undertaken by New York communities with populations under 10,000 and which show how local leaders can improve the quality of life in their communities. The report describes the background, initiation, expansion, implementation, consequences, and highlights of the projects,…

  6. Demystifying Virtual Communities of Practice: A Case Study of IBM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Ayse

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this proposed research study is to empirically explore the nature of virtual communities of practice (CoP) in a global organisation within the context of its International Corporate Volunteer (ICV) Program. This study investigates whether and how the use of virtual CoP evolves and becomes embedded within this organization. Following…

  7. Ecotourism and community development: case studies from Hainan, China.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mike; Wall, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    The connections between people, parks, and tourism have received significant attention in recent years, recognizing the potential for mutually beneficial relationships. Ecotourism has been promoted and widely adopted as a strategy for funding conservation initiatives, while at the same time contributing to the socioeconomic development of host communities and providing for quality tourism experiences. Parks are among the most common ecotourism destinations. Employing interviews, observations and secondary sources, this study assesses the current status of ecotourism at two protected areas in Hainan, China, where it is being promoted as a strategy for balancing regional economic growth and conservation objectives. Through an evaluation of the existing tourism-park-community relationships, opportunities and constraints are identified. Ecotourism development was found to be at an early stage at both study sites. Socioeconomic benefits for the local communities have been limited and tourism activity has not contributed revenues towards conservation to date. Community residents, nevertheless, generally support conservation and are optimistic that tourism growth will yield benefits. In light of the study findings and the salient literature, planning direction is offered with the intention of enhancing the capacity of ecotourism to generate benefits for both communities and the parks, and thus contribute to the sustainable development of the region more generally. Lessons derived have broad applicability for ecotourism destinations elsewhere.

  8. Case Studies Involving Displaced Workers' Transition to Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lillian R.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative study is how community college transition programs and services accommodated students who experienced a major life transition event (job loss) using Schlosberg's (1984) Life Transition Model and the updated model with Anderson and Goodman (2006). Students' perceptions of transition programs and services were…

  9. Case Studies Involving Displaced Workers' Transition to Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lillian R.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative study is how community college transition programs and services accommodated students who experienced a major life transition event (job loss) using Schlosberg's (1984) Life Transition Model and the updated model with Anderson and Goodman (2006). Students' perceptions of transition programs and services were…

  10. Environmental policies, politics, and community risk perception: case study of community contamination in Casper, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Mansoureh; Gottlieb, Karen; Lowndes, Nita; Stewart, Gloria

    2007-01-01

    We identify and explain factors that affected a community's perception of risk due to extensive industrial contamination and people's distrust of government agencies regarding the environmental investigations. Intrinsic bounded case study methodology was used to conduct research about extensive environmental contaminations due to activities of an oil refinery in North Casper, Wyoming, and the citizens' response. Data were collected from multiple sources that included public testimonies, observations, public hearings and meetings minutes, newspaper articles, archived records obtained from federal and state environmental and health agencies, as well as industry records obtained through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. The overarching theme that emerged was lack of trust due to several critical events and factors such as no response or delay in response time to community concerns, lack of transparency, perceived cover up, vague and fragmented communication by government and state officials, perception of pro-industry stance, and perceived unfair treatment. People's perception of environmental risks and their willingness to accept official explanations and outcomes of environmental investigations are strongly affected by their direct experiences with government agencies and the evidence of influence the powerful industries exert over relevant investigations. The government cannot successfully address public and community concerns about environmental health impacts of contaminations and in turn the public perception of risk unless it adopts and implements policies, procedures, and protocols that are clear, timely, transparent, and free from industry influence.

  11. Case Study: Roles and Responsibilities of Counseling Faculty at Three California Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the roles and responsibilities of California Community College counselors. Three case studies were conducted at 3 community colleges within the central California region. Participants included 3 general counseling faculty members at each community college. Interviews and focus groups were the primary sources of data. Other…

  12. Child Sexual Abuse: A Case Study in Community Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faller, Kathleen Coulborn; Henry, James

    2000-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of a collaborative approach to the case management of child sexual abuse. Data from 323 criminal court files found a sex offense confession rate of 64 percent and plea rate of 70 percent. Fifteen cases went to trial and in six the offender was convicted. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  13. 44 CFR 66.3 - Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... case file and flood elevation study docket. 66.3 Section 66.3 Emergency Management and Assistance... National Flood Insurance Program CONSULTATION WITH LOCAL OFFICIALS § 66.3 Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket. (a) A file shall be established for each community at the...

  14. 44 CFR 66.3 - Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... case file and flood elevation study docket. 66.3 Section 66.3 Emergency Management and Assistance... National Flood Insurance Program CONSULTATION WITH LOCAL OFFICIALS § 66.3 Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket. (a) A file shall be established for each community at the time...

  15. 44 CFR 66.3 - Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... case file and flood elevation study docket. 66.3 Section 66.3 Emergency Management and Assistance... National Flood Insurance Program CONSULTATION WITH LOCAL OFFICIALS § 66.3 Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket. (a) A file shall be established for each community at the time...

  16. 44 CFR 66.3 - Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... case file and flood elevation study docket. 66.3 Section 66.3 Emergency Management and Assistance... National Flood Insurance Program CONSULTATION WITH LOCAL OFFICIALS § 66.3 Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket. (a) A file shall be established for each community at the time...

  17. 44 CFR 66.3 - Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... case file and flood elevation study docket. 66.3 Section 66.3 Emergency Management and Assistance... National Flood Insurance Program CONSULTATION WITH LOCAL OFFICIALS § 66.3 Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket. (a) A file shall be established for each community at the time...

  18. Measuring disaster-resilient communities: a case study of coastal communities in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Shesh Kanta

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerability reduction and resilience building of communities are central concepts in recent policy debates. Although there are fundamental linkages, and complementarities exist between the two concepts, recent policy and programming has focused more on the latter. It is assumed here that reducing underlying causes of vulnerabilities and their interactions with resilience elements is a prerequisite for obtaining resilience capabilities. An integrated approach, incorporating both the vulnerability and resilience considerations, has been taken while developing an index for measuring disaster-resilient communities. This study outlines a method for measuring community resilience capabilities using process and outcome indicators in 43 coastal communities in Indonesia. An index was developed using ten process and 25 outcome indicators, selected on the basis of the ten steps of the Integrated Community Based Risk Reduction (ICBRR) process, and key characteristics of disaster resilient communities were taken from various literatures. The overall index value of all 43 communities was 63, whereas the process and outcome indicator values were measured as 63 and 61.5 respectively. The core components of this index are process and outcome indicators. The tool has been developed with an assumption that both the process and outcome indicators are equally important in building disaster-resilient communities. The combination of both indicators is an impetus to quality change in the community. Process indicators are important for community understanding, ownership and the sustainability of the programme; whereas outcome indicators are important for the real achievements in terms of community empowerment and capacity development. The process of ICBRR approach varies by country and location as per the level of community awareness and organisational strategy. However, core elements such as the formation of community groups, mobilising those groups in risk assessment and planning

  19. A Case Study of Troika Short-Term Study Abroad Program Model in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined the phenomenon, through a basic interpretive approach, of 13 students who participated in a short-term study abroad program at a community college. Participants shared experiences from their programs that provided meaning to their lives and how that meaning has shaped their life socially, academically, professionally, and…

  20. A Case Study of Troika Short-Term Study Abroad Program Model in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined the phenomenon, through a basic interpretive approach, of 13 students who participated in a short-term study abroad program at a community college. Participants shared experiences from their programs that provided meaning to their lives and how that meaning has shaped their life socially, academically, professionally, and…

  1. Perceptions of Professionalism: A Case Study of Community College Baccalaureate Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasse, Jeffrey Peter

    2013-01-01

    This case study analyzed the perceptions of professionalism among an emerging and distinct occupational sector of community college faculty: community college faculty who teach in baccalaureate programs. The research was designed to address three questions as to the experiences of Community College Baccalaureate (CCB) faculty. First, what are the…

  2. Establishing a Learning Community to Support Research and Scholarly Training: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Jane; Birks, Melanie; Francis, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of learning communities as defined in the literature. An existing case study is described, and the issues that facilitated and constrained the development of this learning community are considered and discussed. Strategies to address threats to the ongoing viability and usefulness of a learning community to support…

  3. Community College Students' Experiences with Financial Aid Policies and Practices: A Critical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes community college students' experiences with governmental financial aid policies and institutional financial aid processes at an urban community college campus in the Northeastern United States. Drawing from theories of social justice, conceptions of social capital, and institutionalist analyses of the community college…

  4. Adult Health Learning and Transformation: A Case Study of a Canadian Community-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coady, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study of adult learning in a Canadian multisite Community Cardiovascular Hearts in Motion program. The researcher highlights the informal learning of 40 adult participants in this 12-week community-based cardiac rehabilitation/education program in five rural Nova Scotia communities. The effects of this learning and…

  5. Perceptions of Professionalism: A Case Study of Community College Baccalaureate Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasse, Jeffrey Peter

    2013-01-01

    This case study analyzed the perceptions of professionalism among an emerging and distinct occupational sector of community college faculty: community college faculty who teach in baccalaureate programs. The research was designed to address three questions as to the experiences of Community College Baccalaureate (CCB) faculty. First, what are the…

  6. Adult Health Learning and Transformation: A Case Study of a Canadian Community-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coady, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study of adult learning in a Canadian multisite Community Cardiovascular Hearts in Motion program. The researcher highlights the informal learning of 40 adult participants in this 12-week community-based cardiac rehabilitation/education program in five rural Nova Scotia communities. The effects of this learning and…

  7. Rural Governance, Community Empowerment and the New Institutionalism: A Case Study of the Isle of Wight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David; Southern, Rebekah; Beer, Julian

    2007-01-01

    This article compares two different institutional models--state-sponsored rural partnerships and community-based development trusts--for engaging and empowering local communities in area-based regeneration, using the Isle of Wight as a case study. Following a critical review of the literature on community governance, we evaluate the effectiveness…

  8. Rural Governance, Community Empowerment and the New Institutionalism: A Case Study of the Isle of Wight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David; Southern, Rebekah; Beer, Julian

    2007-01-01

    This article compares two different institutional models--state-sponsored rural partnerships and community-based development trusts--for engaging and empowering local communities in area-based regeneration, using the Isle of Wight as a case study. Following a critical review of the literature on community governance, we evaluate the effectiveness…

  9. Training in the Community-Collaborative Context: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Racquel-María

    2014-01-01

    Emerging community-based methodologies call for collaboration with speech community members. Although motivated, community members may lack the tools or training to contribute actively. In response, many linguists deliver training workshops in documentation or preservation, while others train community members to record data. Although workshops…

  10. Training in the Community-Collaborative Context: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Racquel-María

    2014-01-01

    Emerging community-based methodologies call for collaboration with speech community members. Although motivated, community members may lack the tools or training to contribute actively. In response, many linguists deliver training workshops in documentation or preservation, while others train community members to record data. Although workshops…

  11. Case Study: Philadelphia. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  12. Case Study: Nashville. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  13. Case Study: Chicago. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  14. Case Study: Parramore. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  15. A role for communities in primary prevention of chronic illness? Case studies in regional Australia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Judy; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Cargo, Margaret; Larkins, Sarah; Preston, Robyn

    2013-08-01

    In regional Australia "communities of place," defined as bounded geographic locations with a local society, undertake community-wide primary prevention programs. In helping to prevent chronic illness, communities provide valuable resources to the health system. To understand the role of community-health sector partnerships for primary prevention and the community contextual factors that affect them, we studied eight partnerships. We used an embedded multiple case study design and collected data through interviews, nonparticipant observation, and document analysis. These data were analyzed using a typology of community-health sector partnerships and community interaction theory to frame the key community contextual factors that affected partnerships. The dominant factor affecting all partnerships was the presence of a collective commitment that communities brought to making the community a better place through developing health. We call this a communitarian approach. Additional research to investigate factors influencing a communitarian approach and the role it plays in partnerships is required.

  16. Improving Community Health While Satisfying a Critical Community Need: A Case Study for Nonprofit Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kephart, Donna K.; Dillon, Judith F.; McCullough, Jody R.; Blatt, Barbara J.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background School-based student health screenings identify issues that may affect physical and intellectual development and are an important way to maintain student health. Nonprofit hospitals can provide a unique resource to school districts by assisting in the timely completion of school-based screenings and meet requirements of the Affordable Care Act. This case study describes the collaboration between an academic medical center and a local school district to conduct school-based health screenings. Community Context Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey PRO Wellness Center collaborated with Lebanon School District to facilitate student health screenings, a need identified in part by a community health needs assessment. Methods From June 2012 through February 2013, district-wide student health screenings were planned and implemented by teams of hospital nursing leadership, school district leadership, and school nurses. In fall 2013, students were screened through standardized procedures for height, weight, scoliosis, vision, and hearing. Outcomes In 2 days, 3,105 students (67% of all students in the district) were screened. Letters explaining screening results were mailed to parents of all students screened. Debriefing meetings and follow-up surveys for the participating nurses provided feedback for future screenings. Interpretation The 2-day collaborative screening event decreased the amount of time spent by school nurses in screening students throughout the year and allowed them more time in their role as school wellness champion. Additionally, parents found out early in the school year whether their child needed physician follow-up. Partnerships between school districts and hospitals to conduct student health screenings are a practical option for increasing outreach while satisfying community needs. PMID:26513441

  17. Benefits and costs of prevention: Case studies of community wellhead protection. Volume 2. Detailed case studies of seven communities. Source water protection business and economics series No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-30

    In 1994, EPA initiated the study of the benefits and costs of wellhead protection (WHP). The purpose of the study was to compare the cost of local wellhead protection to the cost of contamination which could have potentially been avoided as a wellhead protection program is caried out. Additionally, the information in these case studies is intended to assist local decisionmakers assess the value, cost and feasibility of implementing wellhead protection in their communities. While the results reported below for the seven communities are neither exhaustive nor statistically representative of all communities, they do provide an indication and present the potential extent and range of benefits for a prevention program to protect community drinking water sources. EPA also was interested in collecting observations on the study communities` experiences in responding to contamination incidents and in developing and implementing WHPPs.

  18. CMC and Ethnic Communities: A Case Study of Chinese Students' Electronic Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Kewen; Hao, Xiaoming

    This paper presents a case study exploring the impact of Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) on the formation of ethnic social groups, or communities, by examining the case of Chinese students in North America and other parts of the world. The paper (1) reviews the relationship between communication and community; (2) traces the development of…

  19. International Education at Community Colleges: Themes, Practices, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latiner Raby, Rosalind, Ed.; Valeau, Edward J., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together distinguished scholars, community college practitioners, and emerging leaders to expand upon existing theories, provide reflection on practice, and demonstrate the dynamic nature of community college internationalization. There is a special challenge for United States community colleges to move from selected international…

  20. Community Involvement: A Case Study of the Education Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephen; And Others

    The Education Resource Center (ERC) is a community-based teachers' resource center located in Chicago (Illinois). Its conceptual base is broader than that of a typical teachers center as ERC represents a community-based social movement with a wider orientation than teacher training. ERC's policy board reflects community organizations and the…

  1. Community Involvement: A Case Study of the Education Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephen; And Others

    The Education Resource Center (ERC) is a community-based teachers' resource center located in Chicago (Illinois). Its conceptual base is broader than that of a typical teachers center as ERC represents a community-based social movement with a wider orientation than teacher training. ERC's policy board reflects community organizations and the…

  2. Farmers' Markets in Rural Communities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfonso, Moya L.; Nickelson, Jen; Cohen, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the potential health benefits of farmers markets have been discussed for years, there is a dearth of literature to aid health educators in advocating for the development of local farmers markets. Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to present a case study of a rural farmers market in southeast Georgia with emphasis on…

  3. Community Involvement in Arts Education: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rademaker, Linnea L.

    2003-01-01

    Reports a case study of a non profit arts advocacy group. Explores how Arts Collaborators, Inc. (ACI) advocated arts education, how they chose and developed arts education activities, and how individual and corporate beliefs about art influenced those choices. Offers recommendations about effectively evaluating and incorporating outside influences…

  4. Farmers' Markets in Rural Communities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfonso, Moya L.; Nickelson, Jen; Cohen, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the potential health benefits of farmers markets have been discussed for years, there is a dearth of literature to aid health educators in advocating for the development of local farmers markets. Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to present a case study of a rural farmers market in southeast Georgia with emphasis on…

  5. Academic Computing at the Community College of Baltimore: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Beverly; Kearsley, Greg

    Part of a series of case studies on successful academic computing programs at minority institutions, this monograph focuses on the Community College of Baltimore (CCB). Sections I and II outline the purpose and background of the case study project, focusing on the 11 computing activities the case studies are designed to facilitate, the need for…

  6. Data management for community research projects: A JGOFS case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Roy K.

    1992-01-01

    Since the mid 1980s, much of the marine science research effort in the United Kingdom has been focused into large scale collaborative projects involving public sector laboratories and university departments, termed Community Research Projects. Two of these, the Biogeochemical Ocean Flux Study (BOFS) and the North Sea Project incorporated large scale data collection to underpin multidisciplinary modeling efforts. The challenge of providing project data sets to support the science was met by a small team within the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) operating as a topical data center. The role of the data center was to both work up the data from the ship's sensors and to combine these data with sample measurements into online databases. The working up of the data was achieved by a unique symbiosis between data center staff and project scientists. The project management, programming and data processing skills of the data center were combined with the oceanographic experience of the project communities to develop a system which has produced quality controlled, calibrated data sets from 49 research cruises in 3.5 years of operation. The data center resources required to achieve this were modest and far outweighed by the time liberated in the scientific community by the removal of the data processing burden. Two online project databases have been assembled containing a very high proportion of the data collected. As these are under the control of BODC their long term availability as part of the UK national data archive is assured. The success of the topical data center model for UK Community Research Project data management has been founded upon the strong working relationships forged between the data center and project scientists. These can only be established by frequent personal contact and hence the relatively small size of the UK has been a critical factor. However, projects covering a larger, even international scale could be successfully supported by a

  7. Vegetative community control of freshwater availability: Phoenix Islands case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, M.; Heinse, R.

    2014-12-01

    On small low islands with limited freshwater resources, terrestrial plant communities play a large role in moderating freshwater availability. Freshwater demands of vegetative communities are variable depending on the composition of the community. Hence, changes to community structure from production crop introductions, non-native species invasions, and climate change, may have significant implications for freshwater availability. Understanding how vegetative community changes impact freshwater availability will allow for better management and forecasting of limited freshwater supplies. To better understand these dynamics, we investigated three small tropical atolls in the Phoenix Island Protected Area, Kiribati. Despite their close proximity, these islands receive varying amounts of rainfall, are host to different plant communities and two of the islands have abandoned coconut plantations. Using electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar, soil samples, climate and satellite data, we present preliminary estimates of vegetative water demand for different tropical plant communities.

  8. The Journey to Meet Emerging Community Benefit Requirements in a Rural Hospital: A Case Study

    PubMed

    Sabin, Allison V; Levin, Pamela F

    2015-10-22

    The Affordable Care Act requires nonprofit hospitals to collaborate with public health agencies and community stakeholders to identify and address community health needs. As a rural organization, Wabash County (Indiana) Hospital pursued new approaches to achieve these revised requirements of the community benefit mandate. Using a case study approach, the authors provide a historical review of governmental relationships with nonprofit community hospitals, offer a case study application for implementing legislative mandates and community benefit requirements, share the insights they garnered on their journey to meet the mandates, and conclude that drawing upon the existing resources in the community and using current community assets in novel ways can help conserve time, and also financial, material, and human resources in meeting legislative mandates.

  9. Research partnerships with local communities: two case studies from Papua New Guinea and Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almany, G. R.; Hamilton, R. J.; Williamson, D. H.; Evans, R. D.; Jones, G. P.; Matawai, M.; Potuku, T.; Rhodes, K. L.; Russ, G. R.; Sawynok, B.

    2010-09-01

    Partnerships between scientists and local communities can increase research capacity and data delivery while improving management effectiveness through enhanced community participation. To encourage such collaboration, this study demonstrates how these partnerships can be formed, drawing on two case studies in coral reef ecosystems in very different social settings (Papua New Guinea and Australia). In each case, steps towards successfully engaging communities in research were similar. These included: (1) early engagement by collaborating organizations to build trust, (2) ensuring scientific questions have direct relevance to the community, (3) providing appropriate incentives for participation, and (4) clear and open communication. Community participants engaged in a variety of research activities, including locating and capturing fishes, collecting and recording data (weight, length and sex), applying external tags, and removing otoliths (ear bones) for ageing and elemental analysis. Research partnerships with communities enhanced research capacity, reduced costs and, perhaps more importantly, improved the likelihood of long-term community support for marine protected areas (MPAs).

  10. Improving Community Health While Satisfying a Critical Community Need: A Case Study for Nonprofit Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Alicia M; Kephart, Donna K; Dillon, Judith F; McCullough, Jody R; Blatt, Barbara J; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L

    2015-10-29

    School-based student health screenings identify issues that may affect physical and intellectual development and are an important way to maintain student health. Nonprofit hospitals can provide a unique resource to school districts by assisting in the timely completion of school-based screenings and meet requirements of the Affordable Care Act. This case study describes the collaboration between an academic medical center and a local school district to conduct school-based health screenings. Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey PRO Wellness Center collaborated with Lebanon School District to facilitate student health screenings, a need identified in part by a community health needs assessment. From June 2012 through February 2013, district-wide student health screenings were planned and implemented by teams of hospital nursing leadership, school district leadership, and school nurses. In fall 2013, students were screened through standardized procedures for height, weight, scoliosis, vision, and hearing. In 2 days, 3,105 students (67% of all students in the district) were screened. Letters explaining screening results were mailed to parents of all students screened. Debriefing meetings and follow-up surveys for the participating nurses provided feedback for future screenings. The 2-day collaborative screening event decreased the amount of time spent by school nurses in screening students throughout the year and allowed them more time in their role as school wellness champion. Additionally, parents found out early in the school year whether their child needed physician follow-up. Partnerships between school districts and hospitals to conduct student health screenings are a practical option for increasing outreach while satisfying community needs.

  11. Analysis of a Community Organizing Case Study: Alkali Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Bonnie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examines the success of a Shuswap Indian community in reducing its alcoholism rate from 95 percent to 5 percent. Analyzes and categorizes the community organization methods used by tribal members in relation to the methods of Rothman and Tropman, Alinsky, and Freire. Contains 13 references. (SV)

  12. A Community Case Study on Underage Drinking Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Governors' Highway Safety Representatives.

    The National Association of Governors' Highway Safety Representatives (NAGHSR), with funding from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), pilot tested a comprehensive underage drinking prevention program in a number of communities across the country. In 1995, NAGHSR launched the effort in five communities, which received…

  13. From Homeschool to the Community College: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    The number of U.S. homeschooled students has steadily risen from the 1980's to the present, and many eventually choose to attend community colleges (Cogan, 2010; Mason, 2004; Ray, 2004a; Sorey & Duggan, 2008a). Homeschoolers who make community colleges their first structured educational setting outside the home do so for various reasons: (a)…

  14. Analysis of a Community Organizing Case Study: Alkali Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Bonnie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examines the success of a Shuswap Indian community in reducing its alcoholism rate from 95 percent to 5 percent. Analyzes and categorizes the community organization methods used by tribal members in relation to the methods of Rothman and Tropman, Alinsky, and Freire. Contains 13 references. (SV)

  15. From Homeschool to the Community College: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    The number of U.S. homeschooled students has steadily risen from the 1980's to the present, and many eventually choose to attend community colleges (Cogan, 2010; Mason, 2004; Ray, 2004a; Sorey & Duggan, 2008a). Homeschoolers who make community colleges their first structured educational setting outside the home do so for various reasons: (a)…

  16. Adult Learners in Cyberspace: A Collective Case Study of Reentry Women in a Virtual Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study is to describe and explore a virtual learning community as experienced by women reentering higher education in an online graduate degree program. The grand tour question for this study was: How do reentry women in an online graduate program describe their experience in a virtual learning community? …

  17. Democratic versus Capitalistic: A Case Study Analysis of One Community College Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burruss, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the mission of a community college regarding a change from democratic to capitalistic. A case study methodology was employed by converging on one North Carolina community college. Data were gathered by conducting 4 individual interviews, 3 focus groups, and document analyses. Documents examined included…

  18. Democratic versus Capitalistic: A Case Study Analysis of One Community College Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burruss, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the mission of a community college regarding a change from democratic to capitalistic. A case study methodology was employed by converging on one North Carolina community college. Data were gathered by conducting 4 individual interviews, 3 focus groups, and document analyses. Documents examined included…

  19. Approaches for building community participation: A qualitative case study of Canadian food security programs.

    PubMed

    Hyett, Nerida; Kenny, Amanda; Dickson-Swift, Virginia

    2017-08-01

    There is increasing opportunity and support for occupational therapists to expand their scope of practice in community settings. However, evidence is needed to increase occupational therapists' knowledge, confidence, and capacity with building community participation and adopting community-centered practice roles. The purpose of this study is to improve occupational therapists' understanding of an approach to building community participation, through case study of a network of Canadian food security programs. Qualitative case study was utilized. Data were semistructured interviews, field observations, documents, and online social media. Thematic analysis was used to identify and describe four themes that relate to processes used to build community participation. The four themes were use of multiple methods, good leaders are fundamental, growing participation via social media, and leveraging outcomes. Occupational therapists can utilize an approach for building community participation that incorporates resource mobilization. Challenges of sustainability and social exclusion must be addressed.

  20. HIV/AIDS, beersellers and critical community health psychology in Cambodia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lubek, Ian; Lee, Helen; Kros, Sarath; Wong, Mee Lian; Van Merode, Tiny; Liu, James; McCreanor, Tim; Idema, Roel; Campbell, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This case study illustrates a participatory framework for confronting critical community health issues using 'grass-roots' research-guided community-defined interventions. Ongoing work in Cambodia has culturally adapted research, theory and practice for particular, local health-promotion responses to HIV/AIDS, alcohol abuse and other challenges in the community of Siem Reap. For resource-poor communities in Cambodia, we recycle such 'older' concepts as 'empowerment' and 'action research'. We re-imagine community health psychology, when confronted with 'critical', life-and-death issues, as adjusting its research and practices to local, particular ontological and epistemological urgencies of trauma, morbidity and mortality.

  1. Approaches to dog health education programs in Australian rural and remote Indigenous communities: four case studies.

    PubMed

    Constable, S E; Dixon, R M; Dixon, R J; Toribio, J-A

    2013-09-01

    Dog health in rural and remote Australian Indigenous communities is below urban averages in numerous respects. Many Indigenous communities have called for knowledge sharing in this area. However, dog health education programs are in their infancy, and lack data on effective practices. Without this core knowledge, health promotion efforts cannot progress effectively. This paper discusses a strategy that draws from successful approaches in human health and indigenous education, such as dadirri, and culturally respectful community engagement and development. Negotiating an appropriate education program is explored in its practical application through four case studies. Though each case was unique, the comparison of the four illustrated the importance of listening (community consultation), developing and maintaining relationships, community involvement and employment. The most successful case studies were those that could fully implement all four areas. Outcomes included improved local dog health capacity, local employment and engagement with the program and significantly improved dog health.

  2. Cultural Capital and Innovative Pedagogy: A Case Study among Indigenous Communities in Mexico and Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregorcic, Marta

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces case studies of innovative approaches to pedagogy among indigenous Mayan communities in Chiapas (Mexico) and Lencan communities in Intibuca (Honduras). Innovative approaches to researching alternative theories and practices of pedagogy are used by the author to develop an epistemology of critical pedagogy and its potential…

  3. The Experience of Creating Community: An Intrinsic Case Study of Four Midwestern Public School Choral Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this intrinsic case study was to explore four midwestern choral teachers' experiences of creating and sustaining community within their public school choirs. Research questions included (1) how choral teachers describe their experiences of creating choral communities, (2) how the teacher-student relationship is experienced, and (3)…

  4. Neighborhood Renewal: Case Studies & Conversations Focusing on Adult and Community Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lenford

    This document explores the themes of sustainability, rural poverty, community activism, and challenging racism in the United Kingdom. The book presents 21 case studies demonstrating ways in which 18 organizations and 3 activists in the United Kingdom have worked successfully with adult learners to empower their communities, develop capacity, and…

  5. Reviving a Community's Adult Education Past: A Case Study of the Library's Role in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Amidst calls for libraries to regain their socially progressive roots and connections to community, this study analyzes two interwoven cases of nonformal, community education in northeastern Nova Scotia, initiated by libraries that aimed to revive those links. Through a reading circle and a people's school, librarians used historical materials on…

  6. Non-Credit Community Arts Programs: A Comparative Case Study of Three Programs within Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Toro, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of "Non-credit community arts programs: A comparative case study of three programs within research universities" is to examine the perceptions of the various stakeholders of non-credit community arts programs to determine the perceived benefits received by all stakeholders from the non-credit program, the university, and its…

  7. Project-Based Learning Communities in Developmental Education: A Case Study of Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Alison; Christofili, Monica

    2014-01-01

    This case study tracks the application of project-based learning (PBL) during four separate college terms at Portland Community College in Portland, Oregon. Each term follows a different learning community of first-term college students enrolled in a program of developmental education (DE), reading, writing, math, and college survival and success…

  8. Case Study of Professional Learning Community Characteristics in an Egyptian Private School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenoyer, Faith E.

    2012-01-01

    This case study of an Egyptian school sought to explore staff perceptions of which characteristics of a professional learning community, as posited by Hord (1997), were found in ABC School's culture. Educational staff (52 (100%)) completed the School Professional Staff as Learning Community Questionnaire (SPSLCQ) and 18 (35%) educational staff…

  9. Reviving a Community's Adult Education Past: A Case Study of the Library's Role in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Amidst calls for libraries to regain their socially progressive roots and connections to community, this study analyzes two interwoven cases of nonformal, community education in northeastern Nova Scotia, initiated by libraries that aimed to revive those links. Through a reading circle and a people's school, librarians used historical materials on…

  10. Auditing and Evaluating University-Community Engagement: Lessons from a UK Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The growing importance of community and public engagement activities in universities has led to an increasing emphasis on auditing and evaluating university-community partnerships. However, the development of effective audit and evaluation tools is still at a formative stage. This article presents a case study of the University of Brighton's…

  11. Auditing and Evaluating University-Community Engagement: Lessons from a UK Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The growing importance of community and public engagement activities in universities has led to an increasing emphasis on auditing and evaluating university-community partnerships. However, the development of effective audit and evaluation tools is still at a formative stage. This article presents a case study of the University of Brighton's…

  12. The Experience of Creating Community: An Intrinsic Case Study of Four Midwestern Public School Choral Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this intrinsic case study was to explore four midwestern choral teachers' experiences of creating and sustaining community within their public school choirs. Research questions included (1) how choral teachers describe their experiences of creating choral communities, (2) how the teacher-student relationship is experienced, and (3)…

  13. Bringing the Community Along: A Case Study of a School District's Information Technology Rural Development Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafft, Kai A.; Alter, Theodore R.; Bridger, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    We draw on interactional community theory to analyze the relationship between information technology and local development through a case study of a geographically isolated and economically disadvantaged rural school district. This district has used state-of-the-art information technology infrastructure in a broad-based community and economic…

  14. The Place of Community-Based Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study of Interchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on one strand of community engagement: community-based learning for students. It considers in particular Interchange as a case study. Interchange is a registered charity based in, but independent of, a department in a Higher Education Institution. It brokers between undergraduate research/work projects and Voluntary Community…

  15. How Macromedia Used Blogs to Build Its Developers' Communities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    Business organizations are using blogs as a conversational technology to help build a community of practice where knowledge exchange and sharing actively take place. This case study examines how Macromedia used blogs to build its developers' communities and become more organizationally effective. Four major types of interactions between the…

  16. Leadership to Build a Democratic Community within School: A Case Study of Two Korean High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Young Taek; Printy, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to explore how democratic community is manifest in schools in Korea. It also tries to examine how leadership, specifically transformational leadership, functions in shaping a democratic community within a school. Toward this aim, we have conducted a case study of two religious high schools in Korea. Based on the findings from the…

  17. Case Study of Professional Learning Community Characteristics in an Egyptian Private School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenoyer, Faith E.

    2012-01-01

    This case study of an Egyptian school sought to explore staff perceptions of which characteristics of a professional learning community, as posited by Hord (1997), were found in ABC School's culture. Educational staff (52 (100%)) completed the School Professional Staff as Learning Community Questionnaire (SPSLCQ) and 18 (35%) educational staff…

  18. Cultural Capital and Innovative Pedagogy: A Case Study among Indigenous Communities in Mexico and Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregorcic, Marta

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces case studies of innovative approaches to pedagogy among indigenous Mayan communities in Chiapas (Mexico) and Lencan communities in Intibuca (Honduras). Innovative approaches to researching alternative theories and practices of pedagogy are used by the author to develop an epistemology of critical pedagogy and its potential…

  19. The Place of Community-Based Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study of Interchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on one strand of community engagement: community-based learning for students. It considers in particular Interchange as a case study. Interchange is a registered charity based in, but independent of, a department in a Higher Education Institution. It brokers between undergraduate research/work projects and Voluntary Community…

  20. Community College Budgeting and Financial Planning Issues: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Soon after his election in 1995, Kentucky governor Paul E. Patton instituted a plan to restructure the commonwealth's system of postsecondary education to create a more efficient system designed to prepare Kentuckians for jobs in the new era. While Patton looked at all of postsecondary education, he focused on the 29 community and technical…

  1. University-Community Engagement: A Case Study Using Popular Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feagan, Robert; Rossiter, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of popular theatre (PT) as a pedagogical tool around which a community service learning (CSL) senior undergraduate course was oriented, specifically assessing the university student learning experience from this work relative to PT processes and CSL objectives. Design/methodology/approach:…

  2. Community College Budgeting and Financial Planning Issues: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Soon after his election in 1995, Kentucky governor Paul E. Patton instituted a plan to restructure the commonwealth's system of postsecondary education to create a more efficient system designed to prepare Kentuckians for jobs in the new era. While Patton looked at all of postsecondary education, he focused on the 29 community and technical…

  3. University-Community Engagement: A Case Study Using Popular Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feagan, Robert; Rossiter, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of popular theatre (PT) as a pedagogical tool around which a community service learning (CSL) senior undergraduate course was oriented, specifically assessing the university student learning experience from this work relative to PT processes and CSL objectives. Design/methodology/approach:…

  4. Community risk perception: a case study in a rural community hosting a waste site used by a large municipality.

    PubMed

    Ostry, A S; Hertzman, C; Teschke, K

    1993-01-01

    Using a model of risk perception which divides the community into attitudinal and behavioural subgroups based on awareness, concern and action in relation to a waste management facility, we conducted a survey in a community with an operating landfill and a ten-year history of controversy over the unsuccessful siting of a hazardous waste facility (HWF). The purpose of the survey was to study community attitudes to waste management in general, attitudes specific to landfills and HWFs, and to identify factors which shape community attitudes in both cases. Levels of concern and activism were lower for the landfill; activism and concern were more likely among younger subjects and those with children. In the case of the HWF, greater concern and activism were more likely among married people and those without a university education. Gender differences in relation to environmental "concern" were not found for either the landfill or the HWF siting attempts.

  5. Digital Technology, Diabetes and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities: A Case Study with Elderly Women from the Vietnamese Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Ben; Gill, Gurjeet K.; Babacan, Hurriyet; Donahoo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report the processes and outcomes of a case study on digital technology, diabetes and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Design: The qualitative study was based on a literature review, consultations and testing of a framework through workshops and an interactive information session. Setting: Consultations,…

  6. Digital Technology, Diabetes and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities: A Case Study with Elderly Women from the Vietnamese Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Ben; Gill, Gurjeet K.; Babacan, Hurriyet; Donahoo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report the processes and outcomes of a case study on digital technology, diabetes and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Design: The qualitative study was based on a literature review, consultations and testing of a framework through workshops and an interactive information session. Setting: Consultations,…

  7. Creating a Supportive Culture for Online Teaching: A Case Study of a Faculty Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Mei-Yan; Todd, Anne Marie; Miller, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    This case study describes the creation of a supportive culture for online teaching at a western university that was transitioning to a new learning management system. The case study highlighted the creation of a faculty learning community as one strategy to address the challenge of faculty working through a change process. The faculty learning…

  8. A Case Study of Certified Support Staff Members' Perceptions of Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Tresseler S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the perceptions of certified support staff at a Georgia middle school, focusing on their opinions of Professional Learning Communities (PLC), the roles they played in PLCs and the effect PLCs had on their professional practices. This descriptive case study utilized open-ended interviews,…

  9. Creating a Supportive Culture for Online Teaching: A Case Study of a Faculty Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Mei-Yan; Todd, Anne Marie; Miller, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    This case study describes the creation of a supportive culture for online teaching at a western university that was transitioning to a new learning management system. The case study highlighted the creation of a faculty learning community as one strategy to address the challenge of faculty working through a change process. The faculty learning…

  10. Clinical epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae in community hospitals: a case-case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Grace C; Lawson, Kenneth A; Burgess, David S

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) has been increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Despite that increase, there are limited data identifying risk factors. To evaluate risk factors associated with the acquisition of CRE among hospitalized patients. We performed a retrospective case-case-control study in 4 community hospitals from June 2007 through June 2012. Case group 1 (CG1) consisted of patients with CRE. Case group 2 (CG2) consisted of patients with carbapenem susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CSE). CG2 patients were matched to CG1 patients by site of infection and species of Enterobacteriaceae. Hospitalized controls were matched 2:1 by date of admission and hospital location to patients in CG1. Two sets of analyses were conducted comparing demographics, comorbidities, and antibiotic exposures of CG1 and CG2 to controls and then contrasted to identify unique risk factors associated with CRE. Overall, 104 patients (CG1, 25 patients; CG2, 29 patients, control, 50 patients) were evaluated. CRE and CSE consisted mostly of Klebsiella spp. (63%) from a urinary source (28%). In multivariable analyses, intensive care unit (ICU) stay (OR 12.48; 95% CI 1.14-136.62; p = 0.04) and cumulative number of antibiotic days (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.02-2.16; p = 0.04) were distinct independent predictors of CRE isolation; whereas, cumulative health care exposures (OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.20-3.41; p < 0.01) and vancomycin exposure (OR 6.70; 95% CI 1.15- 38.91; p = 0.03) were predictors for CSE. CRE should be considered in patients requiring ICU admission, particularly those who have received multiple antibiotics. Antibiotic stewardship efforts should be directed at reducing all antibiotic exposures as opposed to any specific antibiotic class to reduce the risk of CRE.

  11. Organizing Asian Pacific Islanders in an urban community to reduce HIV risk: a case study.

    PubMed

    Loue, S; Lloyd, L S; Phoombour, E

    1996-10-01

    We present a case study of community organization efforts within the Asian Pacific Islander communities of San Diego County to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. We utilized a five-phase process to implement the strategies of locality development, social planning, and social action: community analysis, program design and initiation, program implementation, program maintenance and consolidation, and program reassessment. An evaluation of the process indicates that there were increases over time in the project's activities as well as in the levels of interagency connectedness. This is one of the few reported efforts to organize Asian Pacific Islander groups to address HIV transmission. Key elements that led to the successful organization of the original project into a tax-exempt nonprofit entity (the Asian Pacific Islander Community AIDS Project) were emphasis on community ownership, reliance on group consensus, use of "gatekeepers" to access communities, simultaneous multilevel programming, and service to the community as a "coordinating" entity.

  12. Case study of capacity building for smoke-free indoor air in two rural Wisconsin communities.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Shelly; Taylor-Powell, Ellen

    2007-10-01

    Despite national declines in smoking prevalence, disparities that pose challenges to tobacco control efforts exist among rural manufacturing populations. This community case study sought to better understand the dynamics and nuances that facilitate or impede capacity-building efforts in rural communities. Two rural manufacturing communities in Wisconsin with similar demographic characteristics were chosen for study. One represented farming communities with close proximity to a metropolitan area, and the other represented more isolated communities. The qualitative case study used a collaborative approach to collect data in four areas of research: 1) community context, 2) coalition functioning, 3) partnerships, and 4) strategy implementation. Data were analyzed using standard content analysis and triangulated for clarity and consistency. Although not all the factors found to influence capacity-building efforts were unique to rural environments, the effects were impacted by rural isolation, small population sizes, local attitudes and beliefs, and lack of diversity and resources. Differences in coalition leadership and strategy implementation influenced the effectiveness of the capacity-building efforts in each community, bringing attention to the unique nature of individual contexts. Implementing capacity-building efforts in rural communities requires skilled and dedicated local leaders who have ready access to training and support (i.e., technical, emotional, and financial). Pairing of rural communities with greater use of distance technologies offers a cost-effective approach to reduce isolation and the constraints of financial and human resources.

  13. Ethical dilemmas in participatory action research: a case study from the disability community.

    PubMed

    Minkler, Meredith; Fadem, Pamela; Perry, Martha; Blum, Klaus; Moore, Leroy; Rogers, Judith

    2002-02-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) is a collaborative approach to inquiry for education and social change that is gaining increasing prominence in health education. This case study explores the use of PAR by and with a community of people with disabilities in addressing a polarizing issue in that community: death with dignity or physician-assisted suicide legislation. Following a brief review of the debate within the community about this issue and the goals, methods, and findings of this project, the authors examine four key ethical challenges. These are dilemmas in issue selection when the community is deeply divided over a problem area, inclusion and exclusion in study team makeup and sample selection, insider/outsider issues, and how best to use findings in ways that can unite and strengthen the community. The implications of these issues for health educators and others engaged in community-based PAR efforts are presented.

  14. Subject Access through Community Partnerships: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitz, Patricia A

    2003-08-12

    Innovations in scholarly communication have resulted in changing roles for authors, publishers and libraries. Traditionally roles are disappearing and players are actively seeking or reluctantly assuming new roles. Library roles are changing as they become involved in building and indexing electronic(e-)repositories and support new modes of e-research. A library-run service, the SPIRES particle physics databases, has not only weathered, but also lead, many of the transitions that have shaped the landscape of e-publishing and e-research. This has been possible through intense and in-depth partnership with its user community. The strategies used and lessons learned can help other libraries craft cost-effective roles in this new environment.

  15. The Teacher and the Community: A Case Study of Teacher-Community Relations among the Zapotec and Mixtec Indians of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Kathleen

    1998-01-01

    Studies teacher-community relations in a community where teachers are becoming more involved in indigenous community issues. Argues that formal teacher education tends to emphasize modernity and consumer culture at the expense of distinct local customs. Draws connections between the case study and low-income minority communities in the United…

  16. Community service contracting for older people in urban China: a case study in Guangdong Province.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    Contracting of community services to non-governmental service-providing organisations - mainly social work agencies - is an emerging phenomenon and a social innovation with regard to delivering community services in urban China. Contracting of community services for the older person, which is the focus of this study, is embedded in the macro context of the development of social service contracting in China. Qualitative research techniques, including document analysis, case study, participant observation and in-depth interviews, were adopted for this study. Nine government officials, three staff working in Community Residents' Committees, 15 staff working in social work agencies and 41 older people were interviewed in an effort to understand the impact and challenges of community service contracting in urban China. The findings showed that the involvement of social work agencies in the community service provision system results in integration of community resources, expansion of service coverage and enhancement of older people's access to community services. However, several problems may impede the development of community service provision in the context of contracting in China. These include purchaser-oriented rather than user-oriented service provision, older people's negative attitude towards social work services, inappropriate performance measurement, reliance of non-government organisations on government funding and ambiguous definition of community services.

  17. Leadership Style in the Deaf Community: An Exploratory Case Study of a University President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamm-Larew, Deborah; Stanford, Jevetta; Greene, Robert; Heacox, Christopher; Hodge, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative mini-case study of I. King Jordan and his leadership style explores the influence of a transformational leader on Gallaudet University and the Deaf community. The study features a template-style semistructured interview with Jordan regarding his perceptions of leadership and his personal insights. The study highlights the attributes…

  18. Leadership Style in the Deaf Community: An Exploratory Case Study of a University President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamm-Larew, Deborah; Stanford, Jevetta; Greene, Robert; Heacox, Christopher; Hodge, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative mini-case study of I. King Jordan and his leadership style explores the influence of a transformational leader on Gallaudet University and the Deaf community. The study features a template-style semistructured interview with Jordan regarding his perceptions of leadership and his personal insights. The study highlights the attributes…

  19. The Community College IR Shop and Accreditation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, George

    2011-01-01

    This article presents results of a study the author recently conducted on the role of traditional institutional research (IR) offices in support of accreditation activities and institutional effectiveness. The purpose of the study was to confirm or disconfirm the utility of a theoretical model developed by Brittingham, O'Brien, and Alig (2008) of…

  20. Emergence of Virtual Communities as Means of Communication: A Case Study on Virtual Health Care Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argan, Mehpare Tokay; Argan, Metin; Suher, Idil K.

    2011-01-01

    Like in all areas, virtual communities make their presence felt in the area of healthcare too. Virtual communities play an important role in healthcare in terms of gathering information on healthcare, sharing of personal interests and providing social support. Virtual communities provide a way for a group of peers to communicate with each other.…

  1. Probing community nurses' professional basis: a situational case study in diabetic foot ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun; Laursen, Anders Christian; Bermark, Susan; Hejlesen, Ole Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers.

  2. A Case Study of Classroom Podcast in Ohlone Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pham, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This study examined students' use of podcasting and related personal entertainment technologies for learning (the frequency of classroom podcast usage) The effectiveness of podcasting was measured by students' achievement on the course midterm and final examinations. A quasi-experimental design was used. Two intact groups (classroom instruction…

  3. Public Libraries, Communities, and Technology: Twelve Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library Resources, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Council on Library Resources, which for many years has identified library issues and developed new approaches to library operations, is interested in addressing the challenges public libraries face in an era of information revolution. Through a grant from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Council has established a program to study innovation…

  4. Analyzing Information Needs of Local Community Organizations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javelin, Muriel C.

    1976-01-01

    Nassau County (New York) library system conducted a study to ascertain the level of library service in governmental and nongovernmental departments, agencies, offices and organizations in Nassau County; to determine what additional library services were needed; and to recommend how they could best be achieved. (Author/PF)

  5. Three case studies of community occupational therapy for individuals with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Misko, Alexis N; Nelson, David L; Duggan, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    Three case studies illustrate the complexities and opportunities in providing community-based occupational therapy services to persons with HIV. An infectious disease physician recommended three clients for therapy sessions in both the home and community. The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) in conjunction with the Conceptual Framework for Therapeutic Occupation (CFTO) was used to guide the therapeutic process. Assessments measured challenges to clients and client progress in the following areas: leisure, mobility, organization, problem solving, community involvement, transitioning to independent living, fatigue, childcare/play, and home management. This paper describes the three cases with findings suggesting that community-based occupational therapy has potential to address important issues such as habits, roles, and volition in the HIV/AIDS population.

  6. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  7. Implementing Transfer and Articulation: A Case Study of Community Colleges and State Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senie, Kathryn C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the cultural aspects of a transfer articulation policy between public community colleges and state universities enacted by a newly consolidated state governing board for higher education in a northeastern state. A qualitative multisite case study design explored how key stakeholders, faculty, administrators and staff viewed the…

  8. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  9. Implementing Transfer and Articulation: A Case Study of Community Colleges and State Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senie, Kathryn C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the cultural aspects of a transfer articulation policy between public community colleges and state universities enacted by a newly consolidated state governing board for higher education in a northeastern state. A qualitative multisite case study design explored how key stakeholders, faculty, administrators and staff viewed the…

  10. Criteria for Conducting and Evaluating Workplace Literacy Programs: Two Community College Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Pamela T.; Tollefson, Terrence A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of five workplace literacy programs operated by Wake Technical Community College in North Carolina. Presents criteria for evaluating workplace literacy programs in the areas of organizations involved, curriculum, structure and class, and recruitment/retention. Offers case studies of the most effective and least effective of the…

  11. A Case Study of How Professional Learning Communities Influence Morale and Rigor in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Jessica S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how professional learning communities influence teacher morale and rigor in the classroom. Participants of the study consisted of six to eight core subject teachers from two 4-A high school campuses in southeast Texas. Two focus group interviews were conducted, one at each school, and…

  12. Lord of the Flies Community College: A Case Study of Organizational Disintegration. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Joanne; Kempner, Ken

    This case study investigated the organizational culture of a community college and how it both contributed to and prevented organizational chaos during a period of change. The study made use of themes from William G. Golding's novel, "Lord of the Flies," to analyze the setting. The period of change started with the arrival of several top…

  13. Comprehensive evaluation of a community coalition: a case study of environmental tobacco smoke reduction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Mueller, Keith J; Harrop, Dianne

    2003-01-01

    Community coalitions have become an increasingly popular means for addressing community health issues, yet evaluating their effectiveness and performance has presented formidable challenges. To meet the community's need for health program evaluation, public health nurses will need to become better prepared to deal with the complexities of evaluating coalitions and their multifaceted organizational structures. This article presents the methodology and conceptual framework, Targeting Outcomes of Programs (TOP), used to evaluate the performance and impact of a local community coalition. The case study offered here focuses on a tobacco-prevention coalition composed of 15 public and private agencies and their 121 activities. The TOP evaluation model provided the coalition with formative evaluation, needed to improve the coalition's on-going program delivery, and summative evaluation, needed for annual reviews of the coalition's effectiveness and impact in the community. The methodological approach and instrument presented here provide the public health nurse with a solid conceptual framework for approaching such a task.

  14. The Keys to Governance and Stakeholder Engagement: The Southeast Michigan Beacon Community Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Des Jardins, Terrisca R.

    2014-01-01

    Community-based health information exchanges (HIEs) and efforts to consolidate and house data are growing, given the advent of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) under the Affordable Care Act and other similar population health focused initiatives. The Southeast Michigan Beacon Community (SEMBC) can be looked to as one case study that offers lessons learned, insights on challenges faced and accompanying workarounds related to governance and stakeholder engagement. The SEMBC case study employs an established Data Warehouse Governance Framework to identify and explain the necessary governance and stakeholder engagement components, particularly as they relate to community-wide data sharing and data warehouses or repositories. Perhaps the biggest lesson learned through the SEMBC experience is that community-based work is hard. It requires a great deal of community leadership, collaboration and resources. SEMBC found that organizational structure and guiding principles needed to be continually revisited and nurtured in order to build the relationships and trust needed among stakeholder organizations. SEMBC also found that risks and risk mitigation tactics presented challenges and opportunities at the outset and through the duration of the three year pilot period. Other communities across the country embarking on similar efforts need to consider realistic expectations about community data sharing infrastructures and the accompanying and necessary governance and stakeholder engagement fundamentals. PMID:25848612

  15. The ethical community consultation model as preparation for nursing research: a case study.

    PubMed

    Freysteinson, Wyona M

    2010-11-01

    This article describes a case study in which community consultation was used to assist in the preparation of a research project on viewing self in the mirror after mastectomy. Breast cancer survivors, nurses, and other health care professionals were consulted using a variety of interactive modalities. Over a period of three months, pre-research planning information was obtained from participants. A descriptive qualitative design was used to analyze the data. The ethical goals of community consultation provided the framework for dialogue and the synthesis of information. During this project, the potential benefits of the proposed research study were explored. Possible risks to future participants were discussed, and recommendations for participant protection suggested. Community members provided insight into the legitimacy of the study. Community consultation is a tool that researchers may consider when designing studies.

  16. A Rural School/Community: A Case Study of a Dramatic Turnaround & Its Implications for School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    This paper presents a case study of a rural community exhibiting a dramatic turnaround in community support for a new school bond issue. Demographic change was partly responsible for the change in community attitudes, with two waves of immigration altering the long-term conservative orientation of this community. After a series of failed…

  17. A Rural School/Community: A Case Study of a Dramatic Turnaround & Its Implications for School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    This paper presents a case study of a rural community exhibiting a dramatic turnaround in community support for a new school bond issue. Demographic change was partly responsible for the change in community attitudes, with two waves of immigration altering the long-term conservative orientation of this community. After a series of failed…

  18. Exploratory Case Studies of the Role of the Community School Coordinator: Developing the School Social Network in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffin, Verna Dean

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory case study examines the role of the community school coordinator (CSC) in the community school model in two urban elementary schools. It seeks to understand how the role and responsibilities of a community school coordinator supports fostering relationships with parents, teachers, students and the community (i.e. building the…

  19. Exploratory Case Studies of the Role of the Community School Coordinator: Developing the School Social Network in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffin, Verna Dean

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory case study examines the role of the community school coordinator (CSC) in the community school model in two urban elementary schools. It seeks to understand how the role and responsibilities of a community school coordinator supports fostering relationships with parents, teachers, students and the community (i.e. building the…

  20. Pragmatism and Community Inquiry: A Case Study of Community-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Bertram C.; Bloch, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a philosophical basis for the concept of community inquiry. Community inquiry derives from pragmatist theory as articulated by Dewey, Peirce, Addams, and others. Following Brendel, we discuss pragmatism in terms of its emphasis on the practical dimensions of inquiry, the pluralistic nature of the tools that are used to study…

  1. Enrollment Management in the Comprehensive Community College: A Case Study of Bronx Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritze, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Faced with growing pressure to demonstrate student success and achieve financial stability, community colleges have increasingly turned to enrollment management. Using Bronx Community College as an example, this chapter examines the role institutional research can play in the enrollment management process.

  2. The value of community participation in disease surveillance: a case study from Niger.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Serigne M; Quick, Linda; Sanda, Ousmane; Niandou, Seydou

    2003-06-01

    A team of researchers, including one behavioral scientist (S.M.N.) and three epidemiologists (L.Q., O.S. and S.N.) conducted community analyses to assess the social and cultural factors that affect the detection and reporting of disease cases in a surveillance system, using acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in Niger as a case study. Over a 60-day period in the country, the research team reviewed written field reports and interviewed epidemiologists, nurses, community members and persons in governmental and non-governmental organizations. Overall, we found that the logistical difficulties of travel and communication, which are common in developing countries, constrain the conventional surveillance system that relies on epidemiologists visiting sites to discover and investigate cases, particularly in rural areas. Other challenges include: community members' lack of knowledge about the possible link between a case of paralysis and a dangerous, communicable disease; lack of access to health care, including the low number of clinics and health care workers; cultural beliefs that favor seeking a local healer before consulting a nurse or physician; and health workers' lack of training in AFP surveillance. The quality of surveillance in developing countries can improve if a community-based approach is adopted. Such a system has been used successfully in Niger during smallpox-eradication and guinea worm-control campaigns. In a community-based system, community members receive basic education or more extensive training to motivate and enable them to notify health care staff about possible cases of disease in a timely fashion. Local organizations, local projects and local leaders must be included to ensure the success of such a program. In Niger we found sufficient quantities of this type of social capital, along with enough local experience of past health campaigns, to suggest that a community-based approach can improve the level of comprehensiveness and sensitivity

  3. A Case Study of a Southeastern African American Male Mentoring Community College Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senegal, Pamela Gibson

    2011-01-01

    This research is a qualitative case study exploring the experiences of African American male mentoring community college students. Such programs have proliferated throughout higher education, over the past 20 years, in an effort to improve the retention, performance and goal attainment of African American males. The theoretical framework shaping…

  4. Relationship Depth in Community Food Security: Lessons from a Case Study of the Campus Kitchens Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelheber, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an instrumental case study of one branch of the nationally networked food recovery and redistribution program, the Campus Kitchens Project (CKP). Inquiry is focused on developing a better understanding of the relationship between this CKP branch and its community partners, as well as recognizing the potential for CKP branches…

  5. Confidence Using Best Practices to Teach Writing: A Case Study of Community College Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Sharon J.

    2012-01-01

    The issue of preparation of the nation's student body has many facets, including the preparation of faculty charged with their instruction. This article reviews findings from a single-case study of community college English faculty members' perceived self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) using best instructional practices, as identified by the…

  6. A Community Organizes for Action: A Case Study of the Mon-Yough Region in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Robert W.; Chesler, Herbert A.

    This case study examines the development and problems of the Mon-Yough Community Action Committee, Inc. (MYCAC), one of the local anti-poverty agencies in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The agency's major effort is to overcome problems created by the decline of the local steel industry by supporting existing welfare agencies, and through such…

  7. Community Participation and Policy in Educational Reform Efforts: A Case Study of Knott County, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Marion W.

    A case study of an economically distressed rural Kentucky school district examined the theory that educational policy can enable community participation and that participation can enable policy implementation by affecting school governance and expanding the services provided. Primary data were gathered via interviews with four parent participants,…

  8. The Impact of Management Decision-Making on Student Success in Community Colleges: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Albert G.

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined a multi-college community college district in northern California in a primarily rural area, to understand how their practices compared to management best practices designed to improve student success, barriers that may exist in implementing best practices, and how the institution may improve its own practices. The problem…

  9. The TRY Foundation: A Case Study in Private Community Development Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Paul T.

    This is a case study of the TRY Foundation, a privately funded non-profit corporation devoting its resources to "community and human development in disadvantaged areas." Activities sponsored by its primate unit, the Willowbrook Chapter of Watts, Los Angeles, include: thrift shop, preventive dentistry clinic, Operation Vegetable…

  10. A Case Study Examination of Best Practices of Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akopoff, Tanya M.

    2010-01-01

    A current trend in education is that small teacher groups, called professional learning communities (PLC), are being advocated as a tool to help teachers reach struggling students. Educators planning to use PLC as an intervention strategy can benefit from research-based information about PLC best practices. This multiple case study addressed the…

  11. Multiple Images, Common Threads. Case Studies of Good Practice in Adult Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Delia

    This document presents 10 case studies of adult community education programs (ACE) in the state of Victoria, Australia, in the mid 1990s, that were identified as exemplifying the following principles of good practice in ACE: expansiveness, integration, responsiveness, innovation, belonging, explicitness, autonomy, accessibility, synthesis, and…

  12. The Impact of Management Decision-Making on Student Success in Community Colleges: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Albert G.

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined a multi-college community college district in northern California in a primarily rural area, to understand how their practices compared to management best practices designed to improve student success, barriers that may exist in implementing best practices, and how the institution may improve its own practices. The problem…

  13. A Case Study Examination of Best Practices of Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akopoff, Tanya M.

    2010-01-01

    A current trend in education is that small teacher groups, called professional learning communities (PLC), are being advocated as a tool to help teachers reach struggling students. Educators planning to use PLC as an intervention strategy can benefit from research-based information about PLC best practices. This multiple case study addressed the…

  14. Transformative Learning through Education Abroad: A Case Study of a Community College Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Ashley A.

    2014-01-01

    This case study examined how participating in a short-term education abroad program fostered transformative learning for a small group of community college students. As a participant-observer, I utilized ethnographic methods, including interviews, observations, and document analysis, to understand students' perceptions of their experiences…

  15. Community Arts Programs: Cohesion and Difference Case Studies. Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiebert-Gruen, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    A comparative case study of two cultural institutions, Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio, founded almost eighty years apart, were involved in social justice causes and community arts. Although both of these institutions participated in the political activism of their time, they also demonstrated an important adaptability. They were…

  16. Community Arts Programs: Cohesion and Difference Case Studies. Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiebert-Gruen, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    A comparative case study of two cultural institutions, Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio, founded almost eighty years apart, were involved in social justice causes and community arts. Although both of these institutions participated in the political activism of their time, they also demonstrated an important adaptability. They were…

  17. Citizen Participation Handbook: Four Case Studies. Community Education Advisory Council Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druian, Greg

    Four case studies presented in this handbook demonstrate specific techniques which can be used to build citizen participation in a community education program. Based on criteria of adaptability, evidence of effectiveness, and significance, one project for each of the following four classifications of ninety-two relevant projects was selected for…

  18. Enhancing the Elementary School Curriculum through Community Arts Organizations: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Jay A.; Boris, Gregory A.; Baron, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a case study of 95 elementary schools within a 50-mile radius of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, to discern the extent to which elementary schools use local cultural/arts organizations to enhance teaching and learning. Concludes that most schools made use of available resources and that there is a need for a community "clearinghouse"…

  19. Community of Practice or Affinity Space: A Case Study of a Professional Development MOOC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kyle M. L.; Stephens, Michael; Branch-Mueller, Jennifer; de Groot, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have brought about new questions regarding the construction of virtual learning environments and course delivery systems. One such question that researchers and instructors alike are considering is the role of community in learning spaces. This paper uses a professional development (PD) MOOC as a case study to…

  20. Transformative Learning through Education Abroad: A Case Study of a Community College Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Ashley A.

    2014-01-01

    This case study examined how participating in a short-term education abroad program fostered transformative learning for a small group of community college students. As a participant-observer, I utilized ethnographic methods, including interviews, observations, and document analysis, to understand students' perceptions of their experiences…

  1. The Regional Accreditation Process at Community Colleges: A Case Study of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Alissa L.

    2013-01-01

    This companion dissertation reports the findings of applied case study research on four community college organizational units that consistently meet or exceed standard performance measures. In addition, prior ample evidence confirms that performance extended significantly beyond what might be explained by available tangible resources alone. The…

  2. Community of Practice or Affinity Space: A Case Study of a Professional Development MOOC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kyle M. L.; Stephens, Michael; Branch-Mueller, Jennifer; de Groot, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have brought about new questions regarding the construction of virtual learning environments and course delivery systems. One such question that researchers and instructors alike are considering is the role of community in learning spaces. This paper uses a professional development (PD) MOOC as a case study to…

  3. A Case Study of a Southeastern African American Male Mentoring Community College Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senegal, Pamela Gibson

    2011-01-01

    This research is a qualitative case study exploring the experiences of African American male mentoring community college students. Such programs have proliferated throughout higher education, over the past 20 years, in an effort to improve the retention, performance and goal attainment of African American males. The theoretical framework shaping…

  4. Early Childhood Funding at the Community Level: A Case Study from Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, David; Joseph, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG) distributes state funding for preschool and birth-to-three programs in Illinois. The authors conducted a case study in Evanston, a city in north Cook County, Illinois, interviewing community representatives and analyzing ECBG program data to discern how ECBG funds are used to provide early childhood services.…

  5. A Case Study of Job Satisfaction in Surgical Services at Martin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    anesthesiologists, and registered nurses. The research was qualitative in nature, primarily employing comprehensive nonprobability sampling . Primary data...Community Hospital (MACH), Fort Benning, Georgia. The case study employed the nominal group technique to garner job factors specific to the...group technique to garner job factors specific to the professionals involved in surgical services at MACH. Job satisfaction was structured under the

  6. Framing community forestry challenges with a broader lens: case studies from the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Reem; McGrath, David G; Kozak, Robert A; Innes, John L

    2011-09-01

    Community forestry initiatives have been shown to reduce rural poverty while promoting the conservation and sustainable use of forests. However, a number of challenges face communities wanting to initiate or maintain formal, community-based forest management. Through a grounded theory approach, this paper uses three case studies of community forest management models in the eastern Amazon to create a framework showing challenges faced by communities at different phases of formal management. The framework shows that, in the development phase, four root problems (land ownership, knowledge acquisition, community organization, and adequate capital) need to be addressed to obtain legal management permission. With this permission in hand, further challenges to operationalization are presented (deterring illegal loggers, maintaining infrastructure, obtaining necessary managerial skills and accessing markets). The interrelatedness of these challenges emphasizes that all challenges need to be addressed in a holistic manner for communities to maintain a profitable and self-sufficient operation. This contradicts current development approaches that only address part of this framework. The framework proposed here can be used as a starting point for community forestry initiatives in other regions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for maternal mortality in Delhi slums: a community-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Abha; Pandey, Arvind; Bhattacharya, B N

    2007-09-01

    In order to develop, implement and evaluate policy for reducing maternal mortality, it is essential to study the risk factors associated with maternal deaths. The study aims to determine the epidemiological risk factors and its related causes associated with maternal deaths in Delhi slums. A community-based case-control study was designed, wherein snowball-sampling method was used to identify the maternal deaths (cases) in the community and circular systematic random sampling procedure was used to select the controls from the same area where a maternal death was found. Data on 70 cases and 384 controls that had live births as the outcome of the pregnancy were analyzed. Logistic regression was applied to identify the risk factors. In the study population, most of the deliveries were conducted at home by untrained 'dais.' Cases were mostly illiterate, young, having high parity and no antenatal care taken during pregnancy (P CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest that women should be educated about the importance of antenatal registration and regular checkups. Untrained 'dais' should be trained to recognize the obstetric complications at an early stage and refer high-risk cases for adequate management. These preventive measures could help in reducing maternal mortality at the community level.

  8. Participatory action research in practice: a case study in addressing domestic violence in nine cultural communities.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Marianne; Bhuyan, Rupaleem; Senturia, Kirsten; Shiu-Thornton, Sharyne; Ciske, Sandy

    2005-08-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) is increasingly recognized as a viable approach to developing relationships with communities and working closely with them to address complex public health problems. In the case of domestic violence research, where ensuring the safety of women participants who are battered is paramount, participatory approaches to research that include advocates and women who are battered in research design, implementation, analysis, and dissemination are critical to successful and mutually beneficial projects. This article presents a case study of a PAR project that conducted formative qualitative research on domestic violence in nine ethnic and sexual minority communities. The article describes the specific ways in which a PAR approach was operationalized and discusses in detail how community participation shaped various stages of the research. Furthermore, specific actions that resulted from the research project are reported.

  9. Negotiating Community-Based Research: A Case Study of the "Life's Work" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Adam S.

    2003-01-01

    The case of Colgate University is used to argue that community-based research can be a vibrant and effective form of service learning, especially in rural communities. However, community-based research is difficult to execute well. There is little flexibility and high consequences for failed projects. As such, community-based research requires…

  10. Predicting the Emergence of Community Psychology and Community Development in 91 Countries with Brief Case Studies of Chile and Ghana.

    PubMed

    Hanitio, Felicia; Perkins, Douglas D

    2017-03-01

    Using a mixed-method analysis, we propose and test a framework for predicting the international development of community psychology (CP) and community development (CD) as two examples of applied community-based research (CBR) disciplines aiming to link local knowledge generation with social change. Multiple regressions on an international sample of 91 countries were used to determine the relative influences of preexisting grassroots activism, population size, social and economic development, and civil liberties on estimates of the current strength of CP and CD based on Internet search and review of training courses and programs, published articles and journals, and professional organizations and conferences in these countries. Our results provide support for the proposed model and suggest that grassroots activism positively accounts for the development of CP and CD, above and beyond the influences of the other predictors. Brief qualitative case-study analyses of Chile (high CP, low CD) and Ghana (high CD, low CP) explore the limitations of our quantitative model and the importance of considering other historical, sociopolitical, cultural, and geographic factors for explaining the development of CP, CD, and other applied community studies.

  11. Leadership style in the deaf community: an exploratory case study of a university president.

    PubMed

    Kamm-Larew, Deborah; Stanford, Jevetta; Greene, Robert; Heacox, Christopher; Hodge, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative mini-case study of I. King Jordan and his leadership style explores the influence of a transformational leader on Gallaudet University and the Deaf community. The study features a template-style semistructured interview with Jordan regarding his perceptions of leadership and his personal insights. The study highlights the attributes of transformational leadership and encourages further research into leadership as a tool for change in the Deaf community and the disability rights movement. This exploration of the leadership style of Gallaudet's first Deaf president is especially timely; the study was conducted between Jordan's retirement announcement and the Gallaudet Board of Trustees' decision to rescind an offer to his announced successor to become the university's next president. That tumultuous transition accentuated the disconnect between Jordan's transformational, charismatic leadership style, which affected generations of the Deaf community, and his followers' dissatisfaction with his management and successor planning.

  12. Dreaming Reality: Small Media in Community Development as Critical Educational Practice. A Case Study of Community Narrowcasting in the Town of Buchans, Newfoundland, Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Elayne M.

    A case study documented the 6 months of intense activity related to the community narrowcasting process in Buchans, Newfoundland, and its relationship to community development for 7 years thereafter. The town collaborated with the Extension Service of Memorial University in using narrowcasting to advance the community's economic renewal. Learning…

  13. Environmental justice research and action: a case study in political economy and community-academic collaboration.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Mansoureh; Minkler, Meredith

    Community-university partnerships increasingly are being created to study and address environmental injustices. This article describes a case study of one such effort and its contributions to a decade-long community struggle to curb the growth of industrial hog operations and their adverse health effects in the United States' rural south. Worldwide transformation of livestock production from family farms to large-scale industrial agricultural complexes has resulted in the degradation of local environments, with negative impacts on public health. In the rural south, the concentration of industrial livestock operations has been most pronounced in low income African-American communities. Using political economy and community-based participatory research (CBPR) as a conceptual framework, this article explores the partnership between a strong community-based organization, Concerned Citizens of Tillery, and researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Public Health to study and address this problem. The political, economic, and historical context of the partnership is examined, as are the challenges faced, and the partnership's contributions to maintaining grassroots community organizing and activism and affecting local policy change. Implications for other CBPR partnerships are discussed.

  14. Strengthening community mental health competence-A realist informed case study from Dehradun, North India.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Kaaren; Mathias, Jeph; Goicolea, Isabel; Kermode, Michelle

    2017-09-11

    Few accounts exist of programmes in low- and middle-income countries seeking to strengthen community knowledge and skills in mental health. This case study uses a realist lens to explore how a mental health project in a context with few mental health services, strengthened community mental health competence by increasing community knowledge, creating safer social spaces and engaging partnerships for action. We used predominantly qualitative methods to explore relationships between context, interventions, mechanisms and outcomes in the "natural setting" of a community-based mental health project in Dehradun district, Uttarakhand, North India. Qualitative data came from focus group discussions, participant observation and document reviews of community teams' monthly reports on changes in behaviour, attitudes and relationships among stakeholder groups. Data analysis initially involved thematic analysis of three domains: knowledge, safe social spaces and partnerships for action. By exploring patterns within the identified themes for each domain, we were able to infer the mechanisms and contextual elements contributing to observed outcomes. Community knowledge was effectively increased by allowing communities to absorb new understanding into pre-existing social and cultural constructs. Non-hierarchical informal community conversations allowed "organic" integration of unfamiliar biomedical knowledge into local explanatory frameworks. People with psycho-social disability and caregivers found increased social support and inclusion by participating in groups. Building skills in respectful communication through role plays and reflexive discussion increased the receptivity of social environments to people with psycho-social disabilities participation, thereby creating safe social spaces. Facilitating social networks through groups increases women's capacity for collective action to promote mental health. In summary, locally appropriate methods contribute most to learning

  15. Primary care physicians' perspectives on facilitating older patients' access to community support services: Qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Lam, Annie

    2017-01-01

    To understand how family physicians facilitate older patients' access to community support services (CSSs) and to identify similarities and differences across primary health care (PHC) models. Qualitative, multiple-case study design using semistructured interviews. Four models of PHC delivery, specifically 2 family health teams (FHTs), 4 non-FHTs family health organizations, 4 fee-for-service practices, and 2 community health centres in urban Ontario. Purposeful sampling of 23 family physicians in solo and small and large group practices within the 4 models of PHC. A multiple-case study approach was used. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using within- and cross-case analysis. Case study tactics to ensure study rigour included memos and an audit trail, investigator triangulation, and the use of multiple, rather than single, case studies. Three main themes were identified: consulting and communicating with the health care team to create linkages; linking patients and families to CSSs; and relying on out-of-date resources and ineffective search strategies for information on CSSs. All participants worked with their team members; however, those in FHTs and community health centres generally had a broader range of health care providers available to assist them. Physicians relied on home-care case managers to help make linkages to CSSs. Physicians recommended the development of an easily searchable, online database containing available CSSs. This study shows the importance of interprofessional teamwork in primary care settings to facilitate linkages of older patients to CSSs. The study also provides insight into the strategies physicians use to link older persons to CSSs and their recommendations for change. This understanding can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support physicians in making appropriate linkages to CSSs. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  16. Mining Data from Weibo to WeChat: A Comparative Case Study of MOOC Communities on Social Media in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    This article starts with an overview on China's MOOC phenomenon and social media, and then reports a comparative, multiple case study on three selected MOOC communities that have emerged on social media in China. These representative MOOC communities included: (a) MOOC Academy, the largest MOOC community in China, (b) Zhejiang University of…

  17. Mining Data from Weibo to WeChat: A Comparative Case Study of MOOC Communities on Social Media in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    This article starts with an overview on China's MOOC phenomenon and social media, and then reports a comparative, multiple case study on three selected MOOC communities that have emerged on social media in China. These representative MOOC communities included: (a) MOOC Academy, the largest MOOC community in China, (b) Zhejiang University of…

  18. A Case Study of a Community-Based Participatory Evaluation Research (CBPER) Project: Reflections on Promising Practices and Shortcomings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Jini; Bennett, Laurie; Cutforth, Nick; Tombari, Chris; Stein, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This instrumental case study documents a community-based participatory evaluation research (CBPER) project that involved a community partner, two graduate students, a faculty member, and an external funder. It highlights the fact that a participatory evaluation model is a viable way to conduct community-based research (CBR) when a community…

  19. The Business of Creating Small Businesses: A Case Study of the Springfield Business Incubator at Springfield Technical Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauber, James Shuler, Sr.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to understand and explain the characteristics of a small business incubator located on the campus of a community college. Business incubation and entrepreneurship programs are increasing in number on community college campuses across the country (Montoya, 2009). As community colleges have traditionally played a…

  20. The Business of Creating Small Businesses: A Case Study of the Springfield Business Incubator at Springfield Technical Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauber, James Shuler, Sr.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to understand and explain the characteristics of a small business incubator located on the campus of a community college. Business incubation and entrepreneurship programs are increasing in number on community college campuses across the country (Montoya, 2009). As community colleges have traditionally played a…

  1. Case study of attempts to enact self service tobacco display ordinances: a tale of three communities

    PubMed Central

    Bidell, M.; Furlong, M.; Dunn, D.; Koegler, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine self service tobacco displays (SSTDs) and youth retail tobacco access by comparing longitudinal illegal tobacco sales rates in three communities in Santa Barbara County, California, that considered or implemented ordinances banning SSTDs. A confirmatory survey was also conducted to substantiate the longitudinal data.
DESIGN—A longitudinal case study design was utilised. Five undercover tobacco buys were conducted between 1994 and 1997 (n = 332). In addition, one confirmatory survey was conducted in a geographically separated area, which had no ordinances banning SSTDs (n = 57).
RESULTS—Decreases in youth buy rates were reported in all three communities. Most notably, the first city to enact a SSTD ban, Carpinteria, achieved a 0% sales rate, which was maintained throughout the study period. In contrast, Santa Barbara and Goleta experienced considerable drops in their illegal sales rates, but neither community obtained results as dramatic as those found in Carpinteria. The confirmatory survey showed that 32.1% of stores with SSTDs sold cigarettes to minors; this compares to a sales rate of 3.4% in stores without SSTDs (χ2 (1) = 8.11, p = 0.004).
CONCLUSIONS—Efforts to enact self service bans are likely to meet with retail and tobacco industry opposition, as was the case in this study's three communities. The process of community debate, resultant publicity surrounding the issue, and enactment of SSTD ordinances may serve to not only increase merchant awareness of youth tobacco laws and their penalties but also may contribute to reduced youth cigarette sales rates. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.


Keywords: self service tobacco displays; youth tobacco access; community tobacco control efforts PMID:10691760

  2. What do you see? A case study of community college science pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Chantae M.

    Community colleges educate almost half of all American undergraduates. These students include but are not limited to under-prepared high school graduates, and individuals who are working full-time while attending school, as well as students of diverse cultural, socioeconomic, and ethnic backgrounds. With such a diverse student population, science educators may find it difficult to teach science, especially since the language of science is exceptional and contains some inner hierarchy that most other disciplines do not (Osborne, 2002). This qualitative case study examined a community college science faculty member notion's learning to use visual illustrations in science instruction through a collaborative professional development approach. Through this study, insights were gained on how to implement relevant science pedagogy at this community college. Narratives are used to tell the story of a community college science instructor's experience using visual illustrations through science concepts (e.g. cell structure, cellular transport, and metabolism) taught. Narratives reflect the science instructor's story leading to further studies in multiliteracies, professional development, and student perception of visual images in community college setting.

  3. Evaluation of community participation in the implementation of community-based sanitation systems: a case study from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Roma, Elisa; Jeffrey, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Acceptance and adequate use of water and sanitation technologies in least developed countries is still a chimera, with one billion people using unimproved water supply sources and 2.5 billion not benefitting from adequate sanitation. Public participation in water and sanitation planning and pre-implementation phases has become increasingly important for technology providers seeking solutions to implementation challenges towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Based on the principle that successful implementation of WATSAN technologies ultimately depends on recipients' ability to absorb a technology and adapt it to their own needs, this study analyses the impacts of participatory methods adopted by community-based sanitation (CBS) providers on communities' receptivity of the transferred systems. A fieldwork activity was undertaken in Indonesia and a multiple case study approach adopted to analyse indicators of receptivity of the transferred technologies. Conclusions show that community involvement through participatory methods in the implementation of CBS systems can enhance the process of acceptance and management of the technologies, thereby increasing the progress towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

  4. Public health accreditation and metrics for ethics: a case study on environmental health and community engagement.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, Ruth Gaare; Stefanak, Matthew; Brandenburg, Terry; Pannone, Aaron; Melnick, Alan

    2013-01-01

    As public health departments around the country undergo accreditation using the Public Health Accreditation Board standards, the process provides a new opportunity to integrate ethics metrics into day-to-day public health practice. While the accreditation standards do not explicitly address ethics, ethical tools and considerations can enrich the accreditation process by helping health departments and their communities understand what ethical principles underlie the accreditation standards and how to use metrics based on these ethical principles to support decision making in public health practice. We provide a crosswalk between a public health essential service, Public Health Accreditation Board community engagement domain standards, and the relevant ethical principles in the Public Health Code of Ethics (Code). A case study illustrates how the accreditation standards and the ethical principles in the Code together can enhance the practice of engaging the community in decision making in the local health department.

  5. A comprehensive HIV stigma-reduction and wellness-enhancement community intervention: a case study.

    PubMed

    French, Heleen; Greeff, Minrie; Watson, Martha J; Doak, Coleen M

    2015-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a comprehensive HIV stigma-reduction and wellness-enhancement community intervention that focused on people living with HIV (PLWH), as well as people living close to them (PLC) from six designated groups. A holistic multiple case study design was used in urban and rural settings in the North West Province, South Africa. Purposive voluntary sampling was used to recruit the PLWH group; snowball sampling was used for the PLCs. Data were analyzed by means of open coding and text document analysis. The comprehensive nature of the intervention ensured enhancement in relationships in all groups. The increase in knowledge about stigma, coping with it, and improved relationships led to PLWH feeling less stigmatized and more willing to disclose. PLCs became aware of their stigmatizing behaviors and were empowered to lead stigma reduction in their communities. Many community members were reached through these initiatives.

  6. Cohorts and community: a case study of community engagement in the establishment of a health and demographic surveillance site in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Allotey, Pascale; Reidpath, Daniel D.; Devarajan, Nirmala; Rajagobal, Kanason; Yasin, Shajahan; Arunachalam, Dharmalingam; Imelda, Johanna Debora; Soyiri, Ireneous; Davey, Tamzyn; Jahan, Nowrozy

    2014-01-01

    Background Community engagement is an increasingly important requirement of public health research and plays an important role in the informed consent and recruitment process. However, there is very little guidance about how it should be done, the indicators for assessing effectiveness of the community engagement process and the impact it has on recruitment, retention, and ultimately on the quality of the data collected as part of longitudinal cohort studies. Methods An instrumental case study approach, with data from field notes, policy documents, unstructured interviews, and focus group discussions with key community stakeholders and informants, was used to explore systematically the implementation and outcomes of the community engagement strategy for recruitment of an entire community into a demographic and health surveillance site in Malaysia. Results For a dynamic cohort, community engagement needs to be an ongoing process. The community engagement process has likely helped to facilitate the current response rate of 85% in the research communities. The case study highlights the importance of systematic documentation of the community engagement process to ensure an understanding of the effects of the research on recruitment and the community. Conclusions A critical lesson from the case study data is the importance of relationships in the recruitment process for large population-based studies, and the need for ongoing documentation and analysis of the impact of cumulative interactions between research and community engagement. PMID:24804983

  7. Micro grants as a stimulus for community action in residential health programmes: a case study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Plochg, T; Harting, J; Klazinga, N S; Stronks, K

    2009-09-01

    This paper aimed to explore the contribution of a micro grant financing scheme to community action in terms of residential health-promoting initiatives, interorganizational collaboration and public participation. The scheme was two-fold, consisting of (i) micro grants of 500-3500 Euros, which were easily obtainable by local organizations and (ii) neighbourhood health panels of community and health workers, functioning as a distributing mechanism. Data were collected using three methods: (i) observations of the neighbourhood-based health panels, (ii) in-depth interviews with policy-makers and professionals and (iii) analyses of documents and reports. This study demonstrated the three-fold role of micro grants as a vehicle to enable community action at an organizational level in terms of increased network activities between the local organizations, to set an agenda for the 'health topic' in non-traditional health agencies and to enable a number of health-promoting initiatives. Although these initiatives were attended by small groups of residents normally considered hard to reach, the actual public participation was limited. In their role as a distributing mechanism, the health panels were vital with regard to the achieved impact on the community action. However, certain limitations were also seen, which were related to the governance of the panels. This case study provides evidence to suggest that micro grants have the potential to stimulate community action at an organizational and a residential level, but with the prerequisite that grants be accompanied by increased investments in infrastructure.

  8. Assertive community treatment (ACT) case managers' professional identities: A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Lerbaek, Birgitte; Aagaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Mette Braendstrup; Buus, Niels

    2016-12-01

    Assertive community treatment (ACT) case managers provide healthcare services to people with severe and persistent mental illness. These case managers take on generic roles in multidisciplinary teams and provide all-around services in the clients' private homes. This focus group study aimed to gain insight into Danish ACT case managers' professional identity work by examining their discussions of ethical dilemmas and collaboration in their everyday practice. Data were collected during five focus groups at three ACT teams in the North Denmark Region and subjected to discourse analysis emphasizing how identity work was accomplished through talk. The findings indicated that the case managers constructed professional identities by actively positioning themselves and the particular ACT approach in relation to other mental healthcare professionals and clients. They represented themselves as achieving better client-related outcomes by being more assertive and persistent, and as responsible caregivers who provided the help that their clients needed when other services had failed to do so. They depicted their services as being focused on the clients' well-being, and their persistent efforts to establish and sustain interpersonal relationships with clients were an important part of their service. Basic nursing tasks were described as an important part of their everyday work, and even though such tasks were not distinctive for ACT case managers, the representations of their work seemed to give them a sense of worth as professionals and legitimized a unique role in the community mental healthcare services.

  9. Perceptions of Community: A Case Study of a Partnership between a Small Suburban College and an Inner-City Neighborhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Sharon A.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed method, single case study describes a university-community partnership between a small, suburban liberal arts college and an inner-city neighborhood located over eight miles away. The ultimate goal of the study was to improve the partnership for community and campus partners. The study does this by focusing on partnership members'…

  10. Environmental Collaborations Between Indigenous Communities and Western Science: Case Studies and Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    The study of coupled natural and human systems in a changing world can benefit greatly from indigenous perspectives, which have the potential to bring deep, placed-based understanding to complex environmental issues while promoting sustainable solutions to pressing socio-environmental problems. In recent years, scientists have begun to embrace indigenous knowledge and perspectives, but indigenous voices in the sciences remain relatively few. At the same time, indigenous communities face wide ranging and unique vulnerabilities to global environmental change on a variety of fronts, particularly where water resources are concerned. Given this situation, indigenous scientists often find themselves bridging both western scientific and indigenous communities, sometimes embodying the nexus in a literal sense. Here I reflect on this nexus from the perspective of an indigenous hydrologist collaborating with American Indian communities in North Carolina, which has the largest American Indian population of any state in the eastern US. Intertwining case studies of coupled natural and human systems illustrate some of the the challenges, complexities, and successes of ongoing collaborations with tribal communities and Native-serving organizations on water resource issues, environmental impacts of food and energy production, and broadening participation of American Indians in the sciences.

  11. A Study of Selected Developing Colleges and Universities. Case Study V: Valencia Community College, Orlando, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Edward P.

    As part of a study of selected developing colleges and universities funded under the Advanced Institutional Development Program, this report reviews Valencia Community College (VCC) in Orlando, Florida, according to its state-of-development, structural history, administrative structure, and management system and effectiveness. Within this…

  12. An Integrative Psychotherapy Approach to Foster Community Engagement and Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: A Case Study Illustration.

    PubMed

    Kukla, Marina; Whitesel, Frankie; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    This case study illustrates the use of a long-term integrative psychotherapy approach with a middle- aged man with chronic schizophrenia and a mood disorder. The case of "Holst" describes a man with a history of insecure attachment and trauma who later went on to contract a serious chronic illness, precipitating the onset of psychotic symptoms, depression, and chronic suicidal ideation, resulting in multiple hospitalizations. Combining metacognition-oriented therapy with elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychiatric rehabilitation, this approach fostered significantly improved community functioning and attainment of personal goals over time. Through the journey of therapy, the patient also developed a more coherent narrative about his life, established a stable sense of self, and became an active agent in the world. This case illustration demonstrates that these three different approaches can be used in a sequential and complementary fashion to foster recovery in the midst of serious physical and mental illness.

  13. Soil microbial communities of postpyrogenic pine forests (case study in Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Ekaterina

    2015-04-01

    Soil microbial communities of postpyrogenic pine forests (case study in Russia) Ekaterina Maksimova Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Applied Ecology, Saint-Petersburg, Russian Federation Institute of Ecology of Volga basin, Togljatty city, Russian Federation Soils, affected by catastrophic wildfires in 2010, were investigated in pine woods of Togljatty city, Samara region with the special reference to soil biological parameters. The analysis of microbial community of pine wood soils was carried out. It was revealed that wildfires have a negative impact on structure and functional activity of the microbial community postpyrogenic soils. In particular, they influence on values of eukaryotes-prokaryotes ratios, on CO2 emission intensity and on microorganisms functional state (as it was determined by microbial metabolic quotient) after wildfires. It has been revealed that microbial biomass values and basal respiration rate shows the trend to decrease in case of postfire sites compared with control (in 6.5 and 3.4 times respectively). The microbial biomass and basal respiration values have annual natural variability that testifies to a correlation of this process with soil hydrothermal conditions. However, it was also noted that wildfires don't affect on measured microbiological parameters in layers situated deeper than top 10 cm of soil. An increasing of the values, mentioned above, was observed 2-3 years after wildfires. Zone of microorganisms' activity has been moved to the lowermost soil layers. A disturbance of soil microbial communities' ecophysiological status after the fire is diagnosed by an increase of microbial metabolic quotient value. The metabolic activity of the microbial community decreases in a row: control→crown fire→ground fire. That testifies to certain intensive changes in the microbial community. High-temperature influence on microbial community has a significant effect on a total amount of bacteria, on a length of actinomycetes

  14. Case study of the integration of a local health department and a community health center.

    PubMed

    Lambrew, J M; Ricketts, T C; Morrissey, J P

    1993-01-01

    As rural communities struggle to sustain health services locally, innovative alternatives to traditional programs are being developed. A significant adaptation is the rural health network or alliance that links local health departments and community health centers. The authors describe how a rural local health department and community health center, the core organizations in publicly sponsored primary care, came to share a building and administrative and service activities. Both the details of this alliance and its development are examined. The case history reveals that circumstance and State involvement were the catalysts for service integration, more so than the need for or the benefits of the arrangement. The closure of a county-owned hospital created a situation in which State officials were able to broker a cooperative agreement between the two agencies. This case study suggests two hypotheses: that need for integrated services alone may not be sufficient to catalyze the development of primary care alliances and that strong policy support may override any local and internal resistance to integration.

  15. Fitting the CHIN (community health information network) to the customer: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Rabunski, J S; Weil, J P

    1995-01-01

    Each of the case studies described above is typical of many health care organizations in the northeastern United States. The reasons each of these three organizations seeks to form or participate in a CHIN varies-from establishing the loyalty of practicing physicians in a community hospital's struggle to survive, through sharing of real-time patient care data in a successful community-wide effort to avoid expensive duplication of services, to driving the transition from a multihospital integrated delivery system to a full-risk accountable health plan. While the need to reduce costs, by taking advantage of economies of scale and prospectively monitoring utilization, is common to all three organizations, selecting the type of CHIN that best fits each scenario, with particular emphasis on aspects of control, is the key success factor.

  16. Individual and community factors for railway suicide: a matched case-control study in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Too, Lay San; Spittal, Matthew J; Bugeja, Lyndal; McClure, Roderick; Milner, Allison

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to simultaneously examine individual- and community-level factors associated with railway suicide. We performed a case-control study in Victoria, Australia between 2001 and 2012. Data on cases of railway suicide were obtained from the National Coronial Information System (a database of coronial investigations). Controls were living individuals randomly selected from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia study, matching to cases on age groups, sex and year of exposures. A conditional logistic regression model was used to assess the individual-level and community-level influences on individual odds of railway suicide, controlling for socioeconomic status. Individual-level diagnosed mental illness increased railway suicide odds by six times [95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.5, 9.2]. Community-level factors such as living in an area with a presence of railway tracks [odds ratio (OR) 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2, 2.8], within a city (OR 3.2, 95 % CI 1.9, 5.4), and with a higher overall suicide rate (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.01, 1.04) were independently associated with greater individual odds of railway suicide compared to living in an area without a presence of railway tracks, outside a city, and with a relatively lower overall suicide rate. The effects of mental illness and high incidence of overall suicides are prominent, but not specific on railway suicide. The effects of presence of railway tracks and city residence suggest the importance of accessibility to the railways for individual risk of railway suicide. Prevention efforts should focus on vulnerable people live in areas with easy access to the railways.

  17. How does community context influence coalitions in the formation stage? a multiple case study based on the Community Coalition Action Theory

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Community coalitions are rooted in complex and dynamic community systems. Despite recognition that environmental factors affect coalition behavior, few studies have examined how community context impacts coalition formation. Using the Community Coalition Action theory as an organizing framework, the current study employs multiple case study methodology to examine how five domains of community context affect coalitions in the formation stage of coalition development. Domains are history of collaboration, geography, community demographics and economic conditions, community politics and history, and community norms and values. Methods Data were from 8 sites that participated in an evaluation of a healthy cities and communities initiative in California. Twenty-three focus groups were conducted with coalition members, and 76 semi-structured interviews were conducted with local coordinators and coalition leaders. Cross-site analyses were conducted to identify the ways contextual domains influenced selection of the lead agency, coalition membership, staffing and leadership, and coalition processes and structures. Results History of collaboration influenced all four coalition factors examined, from lead agency selection to coalition structure. Geography influenced coalition formation largely through membership and staffing, whereas the demographic and economic makeup of the community had an impact on coalition membership, staffing, and infrastructure for coalition processes. The influence of community politics, history, norms and values was most noticeable on coalition membership. Conclusions Findings contribute to an ecologic and theory-based understanding of the range of ways community context influences coalitions in their formative stage. PMID:20178633

  18. Patients’ experiences of a multidisciplinary team-led community case management programme: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Gowing, Alice; Dickinson, Claire; Gorman, Tom; Robinson, Louise; Duncan, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the views and experiences of patients on the care they have received while enrolled on the Northumberland High Risk Patient Programme (NHRPP). This programme involved case finding of frail patients using a multidisciplinary team (MDT)-led community case management programme, and support of patients through care planning and regular reviews using primary, community, secondary and social care professionals. Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were digitally recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Setting Community patients receiving primary care in the county of Northumberland, England. Participants 23 participants took part, of which 16 were patients enrolled on the NHRPP, and 7 carers. GP practices were selected purposively by size, deprivation and location, and patients identified and invited by General Practitioners to participate. Results 4 main themes emerged from the data: awareness and understanding of the NHRPP, confidence in the primary healthcare team, limitations of home care and the active role of being a patient. Despite having a low level of awareness of the details of the NHRPP, participants did think that its broad aim made sense. Participants discussed their high level of satisfaction with their care and access to team members. However, some limitations of alternatives to hospital care were identified, including the need to consider psychological as well as medical needs, the importance of overnight care and the needs of those without informal carers. Finally, participants discussed the active nature of being a patient under the NHRPP if they were to contribute fully to planning and managing their own care. Conclusions This study has identified that a programme of MDT-led case management was generally very well received by patients and their families. However, a number of factors were identified that could improve the implementation of the programme and further research needs to be

  19. Understanding the community perspectives of trachoma: The Gambia as a case study.

    PubMed

    Ajewole, J F; Faal, H B; Johnson, G; Hart, A

    2001-07-01

    Trachoma has justifiably attracted an incredibly large amount of research interest and literature over the last several decades. Perhaps, the area which is least explored is the social aspect of the disease. Most of the major constraints to trachoma control on the global scale appear to be concerned with this aspect of the disease. Recently, a study was conducted in The Gambia with the aim of highlighting the socio-cultural determinants of trachoma. We applied qualitative methods of Focus Group Discussion and Semi-structured interview to explore the local people's concepts of the disease among two traditional ethnic groups, the Jolas and the Manjagos, in five rural communities. Our results show that there appears to be a poor understanding of the chronic nature of the active inflammatory phase of trachoma among the local people. But more importantly, there is a lack of mental connection between this childhood infection and blindness resulting from trichiasis in adults. This probably explains why it is difficult for the people in these communities to see the need for prolonged use of antibiotic eye ointment as required in the treatment of active inflammatory trachoma. Moreover, the local concepts about the cause(s) of the disease tend to compel the people to seek the traditional herbal remedies first, though there is adequate knowledge and experience among them that modern methods of treatment may produce cure, as in the case of corrective lid surgery for trichiasis. This ambivalent attitude of the people to health services appear to be a universal phenomenon in many local communities in Africa, and perhaps hinges on the local people's perspective of the disease, which varies from place to place. We conclude that for any intervention strategy to achieve the set goals of eliminating trachoma in spite of these constraints, community support and participation is essential, and in order to achieve this, the health care provider needs to have a better understanding of

  20. Local government alcohol policy development: case studies in three New Zealand communities.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, Brett; Kypri, Kypros; Room, Robin; Langley, John

    2013-05-01

    Local alcohol policies can be effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. The aim of this study was to examine local government responses to alcohol-related problems and identify factors influencing their development and adoption of alcohol policy. DESIGNSETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: Case studies were used to examine local government responses to alcohol problems in three New Zealand communities: a rural town, a provincial city and a metropolitan city. Newspaper reports, local government documents and key informant interviews were used to collect data which were analysed using two conceptual frameworks: Kingdon's Streams model and the Stakeholder model of policy development. Key informant narratives were categorized according to the concepts of the Streams and Stakeholder models. Kingdon's theoretical concepts associated with increased likelihood of policy change seemed to apply in the rural and metropolitan communities. The political environment in the provincial city, however, was not favourable to the adoption of alcohol restrictions. The Stakeholder model highlighted differences between the communities in terms of power over agenda-setting and conflict between politicians and bureaucrats over policy solutions to alcohol-related harm. These differences were reflected in the ratio of policies considered versus adopted in each location. Decisions on local alcohol policies lie ultimately with local politicians, although the policies that can be adopted by local government are restricted by central government legislation. The adoption of policies and strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm may be better facilitated by an agenda-setting process where no 'gate-keepers' determine what is included into the agenda, and community mobilization efforts to create competitive local government elections around alcohol issues. Policy adoption would also be facilitated by more enabling central government legislation. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of

  1. Implementing a Virtual Community of Practice for Family Physician Training: A Mixed-Methods Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sandra C; Caton, Tim; Iverson, Don; Bennett, Sue; Robinson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background GP training in Australia can be professionally isolating, with trainees spread across large geographic areas, leading to problems with rural workforce retention. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) may provide a way of improving knowledge sharing and thus reducing professional isolation. Objective The goal of our study was to review the usefulness of a 7-step framework for implementing a VCoP for general practitioner (GP) training and then evaluated the usefulness of the resulting VCoP in facilitating knowledge sharing and reducing professional isolation. Methods The case was set in an Australian general practice training region involving 55 first-term trainees (GPT1s), from January to July 2012. ConnectGPR was a secure, online community site that included standard community options such as discussion forums, blogs, newsletter broadcasts, webchats, and photo sharing. A mixed-methods case study methodology was used. Results are presented and interpreted for each step of the VCoP 7-step framework and then in terms of the outcomes of knowledge sharing and overcoming isolation. Results Step 1, Facilitation: Regular, personal facilitation by a group of GP trainers with a co-ordinating facilitator was an important factor in the success of ConnectGPR. Step 2, Champion and Support: Leadership and stakeholder engagement were vital. Further benefits are possible if the site is recognized as contributing to training time. Step 3, Clear Goals: Clear goals of facilitating knowledge sharing and improving connectedness helped to keep the site discussions focused. Step 4, A Broad Church: The ConnectGPR community was too narrow, focusing only on first-term trainees (GPT1s). Ideally there should be more involvement of senior trainees, trainers, and specialists. Step 5, A Supportive Environment: Facilitators maintained community standards and encouraged participation. Step 6, Measurement Benchmarking and Feedback: Site activity was primarily driven by centrally

  2. A Case Study of Using an Online Community of Practice for Teachers' Professional Development at a Secondary School in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qiyun; Lu, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    In this case study, an online community was designed at a secondary school in China for the teachers to prepare their lessons collectively, reflect on their teaching practices, collect comments from peers, and share resources. A survey was administered to the teachers to investigate their perceptions on the online community for their professional…

  3. Working Together and Making a Difference: Virginia Western Community College and Goodwill Industries of the Valleys Partnership Case Study Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Bill

    2015-01-01

    "Working Together and Making A Difference: Virginia Western Community College and Goodwill Industries of the Valleys Partnership Case Study Report" is a report aimed at informing community college and workforce leaders of best practices for launching and expanding partnerships to serve students more effectively. Co-published by AspenWSI…

  4. Case-control and qualitative study of attrition in a community epilepsy programme in rural India.

    PubMed

    Pal, D K; Das, T; Sengupta, S

    2000-03-01

    Dropout from epilepsy programmes is a serious problem in developing countries and has not been systematically studied before. We set up a community-based programme for children with epilepsy in rural India. The aim of this study was to assess reasons for dropout. We assessed medical and sociodemographic variables for their effect on dropout at 12 months using an unmatched case-control design on 32 cases and 62 controls. We also interviewed the parents of 32 children who dropped out of treatment, using a topic schedule. Two-thirds of the dropouts occurred within the first 6 months of treatment. Severely impaired children were more likely to drop out (odds ratio 4.60, 95% CI: 1.0-21.0) and families who had tried AEDs before were less likely to do so (odds ratio 0.12, 95% CI: 0.015-0.88). Denial of diagnosis, access problems and symptom resolution were the other main reasons underlying attrition. Active ascertainment methods should be reconsidered in community programmes. Very poor families without a male head or with long journey times are at high risk of dropout. People with severe impairments need appropriate integrated rehabilitation.

  5. Health issues in the Arab American community. Male infertility in Lebanon: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kobeissi, Loulou; Inhorn, Marcia C

    2007-01-01

    The impact of risk factors, such as consanguinity and familial clustering, reproductive infections, traumas, and diseases, lifestyle factors and occupational and war exposures on male infertility, was investigated in a case-controlled study conducted in Lebanon. One-hundred-twenty males and 100 controls of Lebanese, Syrian or Lebanese-Palestinian descents were selected from two in-vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics located in Beirut, Lebanon. All cases suffered from impaired sperm count and function, according to World Health Organization guidelines for semen analysis. Controls were the fertile husbands of infertile women. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview, laboratory blood testing and the results of the most recent semen analysis. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used for data analysis, along with checks for effect modification and control of confounders. Consanguinity and the familial clustering of male infertility cases, as well as reproductive illnesses and war exposures were independently significant risk factors for male infertility. The odds of having infertility problems in the immediate family were 2.6 times higher in cases than controls. The odds of reproductive illness were 2 times higher in cases than controls. The odds of war exposures were 1.57 times higher in cases than controls. Occupational exposures, such as smoking and caffeine intake, were not shown to be important risk factors. This case-controlled study highlights the importance of investigating the etiology of male infertility in Middle Eastern communities. It suggests the need to expand research on male reproductive health in the Middle East in order to improve the prevention and management of male infertility and other male reproductive health problems.

  6. Preparing Learning Communities to Thrive beyond Blended Classrooms: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier-Psomas, Wallace Neal

    2011-01-01

    We don't have a lot of evidence of what people see and think about communities after the fact. What are their worldviews when they look at experiences in blended learning communities in retrospect? Which elements do they find most meaningful? This study explores the character, meaning, and impact of community using the lived experiences of…

  7. Assessing Opinions in Community Leadership Networks to Address Health Inequalities: A Case Study from Project IMPACT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, M. P.; Ramanadhan, S.; Viswanath, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in "Milltown", the New…

  8. Preparing Learning Communities to Thrive beyond Blended Classrooms: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier-Psomas, Wallace Neal

    2011-01-01

    We don't have a lot of evidence of what people see and think about communities after the fact. What are their worldviews when they look at experiences in blended learning communities in retrospect? Which elements do they find most meaningful? This study explores the character, meaning, and impact of community using the lived experiences of…

  9. Assessing Opinions in Community Leadership Networks to Address Health Inequalities: A Case Study from Project IMPACT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, M. P.; Ramanadhan, S.; Viswanath, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in "Milltown", the New…

  10. An applied collaborative training program for graduate students in community psychology: a case study of a community project working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jeanne L

    2003-06-01

    The following case study offers a detailed description of a university-organization partnership, the basis for a collaborative outreach training program between community psychology graduate students and a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth center. Students and youth collaborated over 2 semesters on the creation of a social meeting venue within an urban LGBTQ youth-operated center as part of a community outreach project in the students' course in community psychology. Semistructured interviews with the youth and the students provide first-person accounts and perspectives of the project as an effective learning tool for training students in community psychology and in working with LGBTQ youth.

  11. Local government alcohol policy development: case studies in three New Zealand communities

    PubMed Central

    Maclennan, Brett; Kypri, Kypros; Room, Robin; Langley, John

    2013-01-01

    Aims Local alcohol policies can be effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. The aim of this study was to examine local government responses to alcohol-related problems and identify factors influencing their development and adoption of alcohol policy. Designsettings and participants Case studies were used to examine local government responses to alcohol problems in three New Zealand communities: a rural town, a provincial city and a metropolitan city. Newspaper reports, local government documents and key informant interviews were used to collect data which were analysed using two conceptual frameworks: Kingdon's Streams model and the Stakeholder model of policy development. Measurements Key informant narratives were categorized according to the concepts of the Streams and Stakeholder models. Findings Kingdon's theoretical concepts associated with increased likelihood of policy change seemed to apply in the rural and metropolitan communities. The political environment in the provincial city, however, was not favourable to the adoption of alcohol restrictions. The Stakeholder model highlighted differences between the communities in terms of power over agenda-setting and conflict between politicians and bureaucrats over policy solutions to alcohol-related harm. These differences were reflected in the ratio of policies considered versus adopted in each location. Decisions on local alcohol policies lie ultimately with local politicians, although the policies that can be adopted by local government are restricted by central government legislation. Conclusions The adoption of policies and strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm may be better facilitated by an agenda-setting process where no ‘gate-keepers’ determine what is included into the agenda, and community mobilization efforts to create competitive local government elections around alcohol issues. Policy adoption would also be facilitated by more enabling central government legislation. PMID:23130762

  12. Member Perceptions of Informal Science Institution Graduate Certificate Program: Case Study of a Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Lois A.

    This research attempted to understand the experiences of a cohort of informal and formal science educators and informal science institution (ISI) community representatives during and after completion of a pilot graduate certificate program. Informal science educators (ISEs) find limited opportunities for professional development and support which influence their contributions to America's science literacy and school science education. This emergent design nested case study described how an innovative program provided professional development and enabled growth in participants' abilities to contribute to science literacy. Data were collected through interviews, participant observations, and class artifacts. The program by design and constituency was the overarching entity that accounted for members' experiences. Three principal aspects of the ISI certificate program and cohort which influenced perceptions and reported positive outcomes were (1) the cohort's composition and their collaborative activities which established a vigorous community of practice and fostered community building, mentoring, and networking, (2) long term program design and implementation which promoted experiential learning in a generative classroom, and (3) ability of some members who were able to be independent or autonomous learners to embrace science education reform strategies for greater self-efficacy and career advancement. This research extends the limited literature base for professional development of informal science educators and may benefit informal science institutions, informal and formal science educators, science education reform efforts, and public education and science-technology-society understanding. The study may raise awareness of the need to establish more professional development opportunities for ISEs and to fund professional development. Further, recognizing and appreciating informal science educators as a diverse committed community of professionals who positively

  13. Evaluating cumulative risk assessment for environmental justice: a community case study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary A

    2002-01-01

    A key feature of cumulative risk assessment (CRA) is the ability to estimate differential health risks from environmental exposures within populations. Identifying populations at increased risk from environmental exposures is the first step toward mitigating such risks as required by the fair treatment mandate of environmental justice. CRA methods remain under development except for a limited application in pesticide regulations. The goals of this research were to advance CRA methods and to test their application in a community case study. We compared cumulative risk and health assessments for South and Southwest Philadelphia communities. The analysis found positive correlations between cumulative risk and mortality measurements for total mortality in Whites and non-Whites when we conducted the risk assessment using a multi-end point toxicological database developed for this project. Cumulative risk scores correlated positively with cause-specific mortality in non-Whites. Statistically significant increases in total and respiratory mortality rates were associated with incremental increases in the hazard ratio cumulative risk scores, with ranges of 2-6% for total and 8-23% for respiratory. Regression analyses controlled for percent non-White population and per capita income, indicating that risk scores represent an environmental effect on health independent of race and income. This case study demonstrated the successful application of CRA at the community level. CRA adds a health dimension to pollutant concentrations to produce a more comprehensive understanding of environmental inequities that can inform decision making. CRA is a viable tool to identify high-risk areas and to guide surveillance, research, or interventions. PMID:11929729

  14. Campus Leadership's Influence in Implementing a Community College's Sustainability Goals: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    The case study documented one large, multicampus community college's progress in implementing sustainability goals outlined in the American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). The case study examined the role of branch-campus presidents and the college president in institutionalizing sustainability. Responses…

  15. Campus Leadership's Influence in Implementing a Community College's Sustainability Goals: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    The case study documented one large, multicampus community college's progress in implementing sustainability goals outlined in the American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). The case study examined the role of branch-campus presidents and the college president in institutionalizing sustainability. Responses…

  16. Mapping School Change in an Accelerated School: The Case Study of Miami East North Elementary School. Transforming Learning Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poetter, Thomas S.

    This book is part of a series of case studies that demonstrate better ways to educate Ohio's students. The case study is part of the Transforming Learning Communities (TLC) Project, designed to support significant school-reform efforts among Ohio's elementary, middle, and high schools. The text describes an elementary school serving a homogeneous…

  17. Any qualified provider: a qualitative case study of one community NHS Trust's response

    PubMed Central

    Walumbe, Jackie; Swinglehurst, Deborah; Shaw, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine how those managing and providing community-based musculoskeletal (MSK) services have experienced recent policy allowing patients to choose any provider that meets certain quality standards from the National Health Service (NHS), private or voluntary sector. Design Intrinsic case study combining qualitative analysis of interviews and field notes. Setting An NHS Community Trust (the main providers of community health services in the NHS) in England, 2013–2014. Participants NHS Community Trust employees involved in delivering MSK services, including clinical staff and managerial staff in senior and mid-range positions. Findings Managers (n=4) and clinicians (n=4) working within MSK services understood and experienced the Any Qualified Provider (AQP) policy as involving: (1) a perceived trade-off between quality and cost in its implementation; (2) deskilling of MSK clinicians and erosion of professional values; and (3) a shift away from interprofessional collaboration and dialogue. These ways of making sense of AQP policy were associated with dissatisfaction with market-based health reforms. Conclusions AQP policy is poorly understood. Clinicians and managers perceive AQP as synonymous with competition and privatisation. From the perspective of clinicians providing MSK services, AQP, and related health policy reforms, tend, paradoxically, to drive down quality standards, supporting reconfiguration of services in which the complex, holistic nature of specialised MSK care may become marginalised by policy concerns about efficiency and cost. Our analysis indicates that the potential of AQP policy to increase quality of care is, at best, equivocal, and that any consideration of how AQP impacts on practice can only be understood by reference to a wider range of health policy reforms. PMID:26908521

  18. Using Analysis of Governance to Unpack Community-Based Conservation: A Case Study from Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Lance W.; Makupa, Enock

    2015-11-01

    Community-based conservation policies and programs are often hollow with little real devolution. But to pass a judgment of community-based or not community-based on such initiatives and programs obscures what is actually a suite of attributes. In this paper, we analyze governance around a specific case of what is nominally community-based conservation—Ikona Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Tanzania—using two complementary sets of criteria. The first relates to governance "powers": planning powers, regulatory powers, spending powers, revenue-generating powers, and the power to enter into agreements. The second set of criteria derive from the understanding of governance as a set of social functions: social coordination, shaping power, setting direction, and building community. The analysis helps to detail ways in which the Tanzanian state through policy and regulations has constrained the potential for Ikona WMA to empower communities and community actors. Although it has some features of community-based conservation, community input into how the governance social functions would be carried out in the WMA was constrained from the start and is now largely out of community hands. The two governance powers that have any significant community-based flavor—spending powers and revenue-generating powers—relate to the WMA's tourism activities, but even here the picture is equivocal at best. The unpacking of governance that we have done, however, reveals that community empowerment through the processes associated with creating and recognizing indigenous and community-conserved areas is something that can be pursued through multiple channels, some of which might be more strategic than others.

  19. Using Analysis of Governance to Unpack Community-Based Conservation: A Case Study from Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lance W; Makupa, Enock

    2015-11-01

    Community-based conservation policies and programs are often hollow with little real devolution. But to pass a judgment of community-based or not community-based on such initiatives and programs obscures what is actually a suite of attributes. In this paper, we analyze governance around a specific case of what is nominally community-based conservation-Ikona Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Tanzania-using two complementary sets of criteria. The first relates to governance "powers": planning powers, regulatory powers, spending powers, revenue-generating powers, and the power to enter into agreements. The second set of criteria derive from the understanding of governance as a set of social functions: social coordination, shaping power, setting direction, and building community. The analysis helps to detail ways in which the Tanzanian state through policy and regulations has constrained the potential for Ikona WMA to empower communities and community actors. Although it has some features of community-based conservation, community input into how the governance social functions would be carried out in the WMA was constrained from the start and is now largely out of community hands. The two governance powers that have any significant community-based flavor-spending powers and revenue-generating powers-relate to the WMA's tourism activities, but even here the picture is equivocal at best. The unpacking of governance that we have done, however, reveals that community empowerment through the processes associated with creating and recognizing indigenous and community-conserved areas is something that can be pursued through multiple channels, some of which might be more strategic than others.

  20. A case study in the use of community-based participatory research in public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Savage, Christine L; Xu, Yin; Lee, Rebecca; Rose, Barbara L; Kappesser, Mary; Anthony, Jean Spann

    2006-01-01

    There is growing demand for research using a community-based participatory (CBPR) approach. CBPR requires that the academic research team actively partner with community members and stakeholders in the entire research process. The community members are full partners with the researchers in relation to the development and implementation of the study, analysis of the data, and dissemination of the findings. The purpose of this article is to review four basic principles of CBPR and provide an example of how these CBPR principles were used in an ethnographic study related to the culture of African American infant health. In the pilot study, CBPR provided the framework for recruitment and retention of participants, ongoing data analysis, and dissemination of findings. Using CBPR provided the researchers an introduction into the selected community. Community members served as key informants about the culture of the community and provided access to potential participants. The community partners contributed to analysis of emerging themes and in the dissemination of findings to the community, stakeholders, and the scientific community. CBPR provides opportunities for community health nurse researchers to conduct research with vulnerable populations and sets the stage for implementing evidenced-based nursing interventions in the community.

  1. Building a Mien-American house: A case study in school-community relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Lorie A.

    2000-10-01

    Researchers and policymakers agree that schools and parents must work together if they are to provide the sustenance, services, and support which children need to be successful in our increasingly complex society. (Clark, 1983; Comer, 1980, 1996; Clinton, 1995; Epstein, 1995, 1996). Unfortunately, the social and academic success of language minority students is often adversely affected by the alienation of parents from school culture and by the "deficit" view which teachers hold of language minority parents' academic and parenting skills (Boggs, 1985; Delgado-Gaitan, 1990; Heath, 1983; Lareau, 1987, 1989; Philips, 1983). This case study describes the attempts of one school site to build academic and social bridges between immigrant families from a Southeast Asian Hill Tribe, the Iu Mien, and a mainstream elementary school. This effort is facilitated by a constructivist approach to curriculum in which parents, teachers, and children create an intercultural space---a school community garden---as a context in which academic dialogue can occur. Various strategies which enable inter-cultural learning are described, including the use of students as ethnographers, of parents as expert teachers, and of teachers as cultural brokers. The study also considers the cultural conflicts and understandings which occurred when American teachers and Mien parents built a Mien field-house together: a structure which became symbolic of their blended lives. Through both a descriptive narration and interviews with various participants, the study analyzes (a) community-based curriculum development, led by practitioner reformers, as a way to enable language minority students to be academically successful within their own life worlds, as well as (b) the political and bureaucratic forces which make community-based reforms difficult to sustain. This study employs qualitative research strategies within an action-research context in which the author plays the dual role of practitioner reformer

  2. What Attracts People to Visit Community Open Spaces? A Case Study of the Overseas Chinese Town Community in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyong; Liu, Tao; Xie, Xiaohuan; Marušić, Barbara Goličnik

    2016-01-01

    A well-designed open space that encourages outdoor activity and social communication is a community asset that could potentially contribute to the health of local residents and social harmony of the community. Numerous factors may influence the use of each single space and may result in a variety of visitors. Compared with previous studies that focused on accessibility, this study highlights the relationship between the utilization and characteristics of community open spaces in China. The Overseas Chinese Town community in Shenzhen is regarded as an example. The association between the number of visitors and space characteristics is examined with multivariate regression models. Results show that large areas with accessible lawns, well-maintained footpaths, seats, commercial facilities, and water landscapes are important characteristics that could increase the use of community open spaces. However, adding green vegetation, sculptures, and landscape accessories in open spaces has limited effects on increasing the outdoor activities of residents. Thus, to increase the use of community open spaces, landscape designers should focus more on creating user-oriented spaces with facilities that encourage active use than on improving ornamental vegetation and accessories. PMID:27367713

  3. What Attracts People to Visit Community Open Spaces? A Case Study of the Overseas Chinese Town Community in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiyong; Liu, Tao; Xie, Xiaohuan; Marušić, Barbara Goličnik

    2016-06-28

    A well-designed open space that encourages outdoor activity and social communication is a community asset that could potentially contribute to the health of local residents and social harmony of the community. Numerous factors may influence the use of each single space and may result in a variety of visitors. Compared with previous studies that focused on accessibility, this study highlights the relationship between the utilization and characteristics of community open spaces in China. The Overseas Chinese Town community in Shenzhen is regarded as an example. The association between the number of visitors and space characteristics is examined with multivariate regression models. Results show that large areas with accessible lawns, well-maintained footpaths, seats, commercial facilities, and water landscapes are important characteristics that could increase the use of community open spaces. However, adding green vegetation, sculptures, and landscape accessories in open spaces has limited effects on increasing the outdoor activities of residents. Thus, to increase the use of community open spaces, landscape designers should focus more on creating user-oriented spaces with facilities that encourage active use than on improving ornamental vegetation and accessories.

  4. What influences referrals within community palliative care services? A qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Catherine; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Todd, Chris; Caress, Ann

    2008-07-01

    Evidence suggests that the utilisation of community palliative care services varies considerably according to different patient characteristics. Most literature describes this variability, but does not address why such differences exist. Exploring the processes underpinning referral making rather than simply describing the outcomes of referrals may further our understanding of this variability. The aim of this article was to investigate the influences on referral decisions made within community palliative care services. A qualitative case study strategy was adopted, studying three Primary Care Trusts in England, UK. Data collection used multiple methods (interviews, observation and documentary analysis) from multiple perspectives (including general and specialist palliative care professionals, patients, managers and commissioners). Two core influences on the way health care professionals made referral decisions are identified. First, their perception of their own role in providing palliative care; autonomous professionals make independent judgements about referrals, influenced by their expertise, workload, the special nature of palliative care and the relationship they develop with patients. Second, their perception about those to whom they may refer; professionals report needing to know about services to refer to, and then make a complex judgement about the professionals involved and what they could offer the referrer as well as the patient. These findings indicate that many more factors than an assessment of patients' clinical need affect referrals within community palliative care services. It appears that personal, inter-personal and interprofessional factors have the potential to shape referral practices. Practitioners could be more explicit about influences on decision making, and policy makers take account of these complex influences on referrals rather than just mandating change.

  5. Building Local Community Commitment to Wetlands Restoration: A Case Study of the Cache River Wetlands in Southern Illinois, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Mae A.; Bridges, Christopher A.; Mangun, Jean C.; Carver, Andrew D.; Williard, Karl W. J.; Jones, Elizabeth O.

    2010-04-01

    Natural resource professionals are increasingly faced with the challenges of cultivating community-based support for wetland ecosystem restoration. While extensive research efforts have been directed toward understanding the biophysical dimensions of wetland conservation, the literature provides less guidance on how to successfully integrate community stakeholders into restoration planning. Therefore, this study explores the social construction of wetlands locally, and community members’ perceptions of the wetland restoration project in the Cache River Watershed of southern Illinois, where public and private agencies have partnered together to implement a large-scale wetlands restoration project. Findings illustrate that the wetlands hold diverse and significant meanings to community members and that community members’ criteria for project success may vary from those identified by project managers. The case study provides managers with strategies for building community commitment such as engaging local citizens in project planning, minimizing local burdens, maximizing local benefits, and reducing uncertainty.

  6. Power and public participation in a hazardous waste dispute: a community case study.

    PubMed

    Culley, Marci R; Hughey, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    Qualitative case study findings are presented. We examined whether public participation in a hazardous waste dispute manifested in ways consistent with theories of social power; particularly whether participatory processes or participants' experiences of them were consistent with the three-dimensional view of power (Gaventa, Power and powerlessness: quiescence and rebellion in an appalacian valley, 1980; Lukes, Power: A radical view, 1974; Parenti, Power and the powerless, 1978). Findings from four data sources collected over 3 years revealed that participatory processes manifested in ways consistent with theories of power, and participants' experiences reflected this. Results illustrated how participation was limited and how citizen influence could be manipulated via control of resources, barriers to participation, agenda setting, and shaping conceptions about what participation was possible. Implications for community research and policy related to participation in hazardous waste disputes are discussed.

  7. Exploring the Hidden Barriers in Knowledge Translation: A Case Study Within an Academic Community.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Gill; Marshall, Rhianon J; Jordan, Zoe; Kitson, Alison L

    2015-11-01

    Debates about knowledge translation (KT) typically focus on the research-practice gap, which appears to be premised on the assumption that academics are a homogeneous collective, sharing a common view. We argue that a number of hidden barriers need to be addressed related to the understanding, interpretation, ability, and commitment to translate knowledge within academic communities. We explore this by presenting a qualitative case study in a health sciences faculty. Applying organizational and management theory, we discuss different types of boundaries and the resultant barriers generated, ranging from diversity in understanding and perceptions of KT to varying motivations and incentives to engage in translational activity. We illustrate how we are using the empirical findings to inform the development of a KT strategy that targets the identified barriers. Investing in this internal KT-focused activity is an important step to maximize the potential of future collaborations between producers and users of research in health care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Community Attitudes about Economic Impacts of Colleges: A Case Study. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Robert J.

    This study examined attitudes of people about benefits of the economic impacts of two local colleges (Palmer College of Chiropractic and Scott Community College) in the metropolitan Quad Cities area of Rock Island County (Illinois) and Scott County (Iowa). The study compared impacts considered important by the community with those estimated by the…

  9. Bringing Parent and Community Engagement Back into the Education Reform Spotlight: A Comparative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Molly F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study I argue that educational practitioners and policy makers cannot solve the problem of increasing student learning and growth by organizationally isolating the work of schools from communities. The purpose of this study was to explore which organizational conditions have enabled and which have hindered schools and communities from…

  10. Pulmonary function in aluminium smelter and surrounding community--a case study.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, B P; Saiyed, H N; Roychowdhury, A; Alam, J

    2007-10-01

    The increase of industrial activities in the Angul-Talcher area, Orissa resulted in indiscriminate disposal of waste into the environment leading to the deterioration of the quality of the environment, which affects the health of the workers as well as the community people. Considering the magnitude of the problem, the pulmonary function study had been carried out in one of the largest aluminium producing plant of the country as well as surrounding community people. Aluminium is produced from oxides of alumina by Hall-Heroult smelting process. The electrolysis called as aluminium smelting is carried out in an electrolytic cell (pot) having anode, cathode and electrolyte. The aluminium is deposited in the cathode and the oxygen moves towards anode is released. The workers working at the captive power plant (CPP), which is necessary to meet the power demand of the smelter plant were also investigated. 180 smelter plants workers (non-smoker 129, smoker-51) of different sections and 37 captive power plant workers (non-smoker 29, smoker-8) had undergone pulmonary function tests. Besides these, 85 persons from the surrounding community (non-smoker-66, smoker-19) were also investigated. The workers were all male. Spirometric assessments of Vital Capacity (VC), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were done by Spirovit-sp-10 (Schiller Health Care Ltd, Switzerland) and Wrights Peak flow meter (Clement and Clarke, UK). Different lung volumes like FEV1, FEV1%, and flow rates like FEF200-1200ml, FEF25-75% and FEF75-85% were calculated from the same tracings pulmonary function test (PFT) results of the workers according to different age groups, duration of exposures and smoking habits. The mean values of SVC, FVC and FEV1 of smelter plant workers were found higher compared to the community people but the values of captive power plant workers were very much close to the values of the community people. A gradual decrement of the PFT values was found

  11. Feasibility Study of Case-Finding for Breast Cancer by Community Health Workers in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Touhidul Imran; Love, Richard Reed; Chowdhury, Mohammad Touhidul Imran; Artif, Abu Saeem; Ahsan, Hasib; Mamun, Anwarul; Khanam, Tahmina; Woods, James; Salim, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Mortality from breast cancer is high in low- and middle-income countries, in part because most patients have advanced stage disease when first diagnosed. Case-finding may be one approach to changing this situation. We conducted a pilot study to explore the feasibility of population-based case finding for breast cancer by community health workers (CHWs) using different data collection methods and approaches to management of women found to have breast abnormalities. After training 8 CHWs in breast problem recognition, manual paper data collection and operation of a cell-phone software platform for reporting demographic, history and physical finding information, these CHWs visited 3150 women >age 18 and over they could find--from 2356 households in 8 villages in rural Bangladesh. By 4 random assignments of villages, data were collected manually (Group 1), or with the cell-phone program alone (Group 2) or with management algorithms (Groups 3 and 4), and women adjudged to have a serious breast problem were shown a motivational video (Group 3), or navigated/accompanied to a breast problem center for evaluation (Group 4). Only three visited women refused evaluation. The manual data acquisition group (1) had missing data in 80% of cases, and took an average of 5 minutes longer to acquire, versus no missing data in the cell phone-reporting groups (2,3 and 4). One woman was identified with stage III breast cancer, and was appropriately treated. Among very poor rural Bangladeshi women, there was very limited reluctance to undergo breast evaluation. The estimated rarity of clinical breast cancer is supported by these population-based findings. The feasibility and efficient use of mobile technology in this setting is supported. Successor studies may most appropriately be trials focusing on improving the suggested benefits of motivation and navigation, on increasing the numbers of cases found, and on stage of disease at diagnosis as the primary endpoint.

  12. Assessing community readiness for overweight and obesity prevention in pre-adolescent girls: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kesten, Joanna May; Cameron, Noel; Griffiths, Paula Louise

    2013-12-20

    Childhood overweight and obesity is a global public health concern. For girls in particular, being overweight or obese during pre-adolescence (aged 7-11 years) has intergenerational implications for both the mother and her future offspring. In the United Kingdom (UK) there is increasing interest in community targeted interventions but less is known about how to tailor these approaches to the needs of the community. This study applied the Community Readiness Model (CRM), for the first time in the UK, to demonstrate its applicability in designing tailored interventions. Community readiness assessment was conducted using semi-structured key informant interviews. The community's key informants were identified through focus groups with pre-adolescent girls. The interviews addressed the community's efforts; community knowledge of the efforts; leadership; community climate; community knowledge of the issue and resources available to support the issue. Interviews were conducted until the point of theoretical saturation and questions were asked separately regarding physical activity (PA) and healthy eating and drinking (HED) behaviours. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and were firstly analysed thematically and then scored using the assessment guidelines produced by the CRM authors. Readiness in this community was higher for PA than for HED behaviours. The lowest scores related to the community's 'resources' and the 'community knowledge of the issue'; affirming these two issues as the most appropriate initial targets for intervention. In terms of resources, there is also a need for resources to support the development of HED efforts beyond the school. Investment in greater physical education training for primary school teachers was also identified as an intervention priority. To address the community's knowledge of the issue, raising the awareness of the prevalence of pre-adolescent girls' health behaviours is a priority at the local community level. Inconsistent

  13. The role of community conversations in facilitating local HIV competence: case study from rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper examines the potential for community conversations to strengthen positive responses to HIV in resource-poor environments. Community conversations are an intervention method through which local people work with a facilitator to collectively identify local strengths and challenges and brainstorm potential strategies for solving local problems. Methods We conducted 18 community conversations (with six groups at three points in time) with a total of 77 participants in rural Zimbabwe (20% HIV positive). Participants were invited to reflect on how they were responding to the challenges of HIV, both as individuals and in community groups, and to think of ways to better support openness about HIV, kindness towards people living with HIV and greater community uptake of HIV prevention and treatment. Results Community conversations contributed to local HIV competence through (1) enabling participants to brainstorm concrete action plans for responding to HIV, (2) providing a forum to develop a sense of common purpose in relation to implementing these, (3) encouraging and challenging participants to overcome fear, denial and passivity, (4) providing an opportunity for participants to move from seeing themselves as passive recipients of information to active problem solvers, and (5) reducing silence and stigma surrounding HIV. Conclusions Our discussion cautions that community conversations, while holding great potential to help communities recognize their potential strengths and capacities for responding more effectively to HIV, are not a magic bullet. Poverty, poor harvests and political instability frustrated and limited many participants’ efforts to put their plans into action. On the other hand, support from outside the community, in this case the increasing availability of antiretroviral treatment, played a vital role in enabling communities to challenge stigma and envision new, more positive, ways of responding to the epidemic. PMID:23590640

  14. The role of community conversations in facilitating local HIV competence: case study from rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catherine; Nhamo, Mercy; Scott, Kerry; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Skovdal, Morten; Gregson, Simon

    2013-04-17

    This paper examines the potential for community conversations to strengthen positive responses to HIV in resource-poor environments. Community conversations are an intervention method through which local people work with a facilitator to collectively identify local strengths and challenges and brainstorm potential strategies for solving local problems. We conducted 18 community conversations (with six groups at three points in time) with a total of 77 participants in rural Zimbabwe (20% HIV positive). Participants were invited to reflect on how they were responding to the challenges of HIV, both as individuals and in community groups, and to think of ways to better support openness about HIV, kindness towards people living with HIV and greater community uptake of HIV prevention and treatment. Community conversations contributed to local HIV competence through (1) enabling participants to brainstorm concrete action plans for responding to HIV, (2) providing a forum to develop a sense of common purpose in relation to implementing these, (3) encouraging and challenging participants to overcome fear, denial and passivity, (4) providing an opportunity for participants to move from seeing themselves as passive recipients of information to active problem solvers, and (5) reducing silence and stigma surrounding HIV. Our discussion cautions that community conversations, while holding great potential to help communities recognize their potential strengths and capacities for responding more effectively to HIV, are not a magic bullet. Poverty, poor harvests and political instability frustrated and limited many participants' efforts to put their plans into action. On the other hand, support from outside the community, in this case the increasing availability of antiretroviral treatment, played a vital role in enabling communities to challenge stigma and envision new, more positive, ways of responding to the epidemic.

  15. Leadership Development Institute: A California Community College Multi-College District Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Bianca R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine a community college district Grow Your Own (GYO) leadership program in the Western United States, the Multi College Leadership Development Institute (MCLDI). The MCLDI was developed in-house for a multi-campus community college district and offered to interested employees at all position levels with the…

  16. Leadership Development Institute: A California Community College Multi-College District Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Bianca R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine a community college district Grow Your Own (GYO) leadership program in the Western United States, the Multi College Leadership Development Institute (MCLDI). The MCLDI was developed in-house for a multi-campus community college district and offered to interested employees at all position levels with the…

  17. School Leadership and Professional Learning Community: Case Study of Two Senior High Schools in Northeast China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings of a qualitative study on school leadership and professional learning community in two high achieving senior high schools in Northeast China. The findings show that teachers participated in school-based communities of professional learning, such as Teaching and Research Groups, Lesson Preparation Groups, and Grade…

  18. Creating Community-University Partnerships in a Teacher Education Program: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woloshyn, Vera; Chalmers, Heather; Bosacki, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    In this study we explored a triad partnership among preservice department instructors and teacher candidates, community practitioners, and partners in a community-university research alliance (CURA). All partners were interviewed about their perceptions of their role in the partnership, the effectiveness of the collaboration, and the key lessons…

  19. Creating Community-University Partnerships in a Teacher Education Program: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woloshyn, Vera; Chalmers, Heather; Bosacki, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    In this study we explored a triad partnership among preservice department instructors and teacher candidates, community practitioners, and partners in a community-university research alliance (CURA). All partners were interviewed about their perceptions of their role in the partnership, the effectiveness of the collaboration, and the key lessons…

  20. Strengthening Parent-Community Member Relations on Agency Boards: Comparative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Meg A.; Keys, Christopher B.

    2000-01-01

    In this comparative study of the boards of three community agencies, the forces that influence the quality of parent-community member relations are examined. Results indicate that an organization's ability to manage intergroup tension is influenced by organizational history of intergroup relations, group identification, and organizational…

  1. A Case Study of Select Illinois Community College Board Chair Perspectives on Their Leadership Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, John

    Three Illinois community college chairs were selected to participate in this study, which examined the challenges faced by community college board chairs. In Illinois, the chair is an elected official, who has been selected by her or his fellow trustees to fulfill a statutory obligation and to serve the college in a leadership position. The author…

  2. Service-Learning and Emergent Communities of Practice: A Teacher Education Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaschak, Jennifer Cutsforth; Letwinsky, Karim Medico

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the unexpected emergence of a community of practice in a middle level mathematics and science methods course. The authors describe how preservice teacher participation in a collaborative, project-based service-learning experience resulted in the formation of a community of practice characterized by teamwork, meaningful…

  3. School Leadership and Professional Learning Community: Case Study of Two Senior High Schools in Northeast China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings of a qualitative study on school leadership and professional learning community in two high achieving senior high schools in Northeast China. The findings show that teachers participated in school-based communities of professional learning, such as Teaching and Research Groups, Lesson Preparation Groups, and Grade…

  4. Determinants of Raised Blood Pressure in Urban Uganda: A Community-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jerome H; Twinobuhungiro, Aska; Sandhu, Alexander; Hootsmans, Norbert; Kayima, James; Kalyesubula, Robert

    2017-01-19

    Rapid urbanization is changing the epidemiology of non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to identify the determinants of raised blood pressure in urban Uganda to highlight targets for preventive interventions. Case-control. Three community-based sites in Kampala, the capital of Uganda. Participants were eligible to enroll if they were aged ≥18 years and not pregnant. 450 cases with raised blood pressure were frequency matched by sex and age to 412 controls. Unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of socio-demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and laboratory variables with the outcome of raised blood pressure. Cases currently treated with antihypertensive medication and cases not treated with antihypertensive medication were analyzed separately. Significantly increased odds of raised blood pressure were associated with overweight body mass index (BMI) (25 kg/m(2) ≤ BMI < 30 kg/m(2)), obese BMI (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 6.5%. Significantly decreased odds of raised blood pressure were associated with moderate-to-vigorous work-related physical activity of >4 hours/week. No significant associations were found between raised blood pressure and marital status, education level, car or flush toilet ownership, dietary habits, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, moderate-to-vigorous leisure-related physical activity > 4 hours/week, waist-to-hip ratio, or total cholesterol levels. Targeted interventions are needed to address the key modifiable risk factors for raised blood pressure identified in this study, namely elevated BMI and regular physical activity, in order to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in urban Uganda.

  5. A Model for Semi-Informal Online Learning Communities: A Case Study of the NASA INSPIRE Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesee, Amanda Glasgow

    2011-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to develop a model of informal online learning communities based on theory, research and practice. Case study methodology was used to examine the NASA Interdisciplinary National Science Project Incorporating Research and Education Experience (INSPIRE) Project as an example of a successful…

  6. A Model for Semi-Informal Online Learning Communities: A Case Study of the NASA INSPIRE Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesee, Amanda Glasgow

    2011-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to develop a model of informal online learning communities based on theory, research and practice. Case study methodology was used to examine the NASA Interdisciplinary National Science Project Incorporating Research and Education Experience (INSPIRE) Project as an example of a successful…

  7. Sustaining a Community Computing Infrastructure for Online Teacher Professional Development: A Case Study of Designing Tapped In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umer; Schank, Patricia; Harris, Alexandra; Fusco, Judith; Schlager, Mark

    Community computing has recently grown to become a major research area in human-computer interaction. One of the objectives of community computing is to support computer-supported cooperative work among distributed collaborators working toward shared professional goals in online communities of practice. A core issue in designing and developing community computing infrastructures — the underlying sociotechnical layer that supports communitarian activities — is sustainability. Many community computing initiatives fail because the underlying infrastructure does not meet end user requirements; the community is unable to maintain a critical mass of users consistently over time; it generates insufficient social capital to support significant contributions by members of the community; or, as typically happens with funded initiatives, financial and human capital resource become unavailable to further maintain the infrastructure. On the basis of more than 9 years of design experience with Tapped In-an online community of practice for education professionals — we present a case study that discusses four design interventions that have sustained the Tapped In infrastructure and its community to date. These interventions represent broader design strategies for developing online environments for professional communities of practice.

  8. An empirical case study of the effects of training and technical assistance on community coalition functioning and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Keene Woods, Nikki; Watson-Thompson, Jomella; Schober, Daniel J; Markt, Becky; Fawcett, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    The case study analyzes the effects of training and technical assistance on the amount of community changes facilitated by members of a community coalition to prevent adolescent substance use. The study examines the sustainability of these changes in the community over time. The coalition implemented a Community Change Intervention that focused on building coalition capacity to support implementation of community changes-program, policy, and practice changes. Over the 2-year intervention period, there were 36 community changes facilitated by the coalition to reduce risk for adolescent substance use. Results showed that the coalition facilitated an average of at least 3 times as many community changes (i.e., program, policy and practice changes) per month following the intervention. Action planning was found to have accelerated the rate of community changes implemented by the coalition. After the intervention there was increased implementation of three key prioritized coalition processes: Documenting Progress/Using Feedback, Making Outcomes Matter, and Sustaining the Work. A 1-year probe following the study showed that the majority of the community changes were sustained. Factors associated with the sustainability of changes included the continued development of collaborative partnerships and securing multiyear funding. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Factors contributing to participation of a rural community in health education: a case study from ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Abebaw Yirga

    This study investigated factors that contributed to the participation of a rural community in health education. It was conducted in the Awi zone of the Amhara region in Ethiopia. The participants were rural community members and health extension workers. Purposive and snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit rural community members, whereas convenient sampling was used to recruit health extension workers. Data was collected through in-depth individual interviews, and focus group discussions. The study revealed various factors contributing to the participation of a rural community in health education, including attainability of the objectives of health education, profiles of the health extension workers, peer influence, organization of the health education program in terms of place and time, and meaningfulness of the health education in terms of rural community lives. Although the ultimate goal of participation in health education is similar for all rural community members, they were attracted to the program by one or more than one different factor. Efforts aimed at enhancing participation of a rural community in health education program should address each factor that contributes to the participation of community members.

  10. A Case Study of Teacher Reflection: Examining Teacher Participation in a Video-Based Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeg, Susanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Professional learning communities (PLCs) constitute worthwhile spaces in which to study teacher participation in the reflective practices that have potential to shift their teaching. This qualitative case study details the interactions between dual-language and ELL teachers in a grade-level PLC as they met together to confer over video-clips of…

  11. A Case Study of Institutional Divorce: The Separation of a Community College From a University. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Joanne

    This case study examined the separation of a community college from a local university where both had functioned as one for 20 years. The study used Robert Yin's model of investigating a "real-life" situation and several sources of data including: informal interviews, field notes, and archival data. In addition, the metaphor of…

  12. Assessing community readiness for overweight and obesity prevention in pre-adolescent girls: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood overweight and obesity is a global public health concern. For girls in particular, being overweight or obese during pre-adolescence (aged 7–11 years) has intergenerational implications for both the mother and her future offspring. In the United Kingdom (UK) there is increasing interest in community targeted interventions but less is known about how to tailor these approaches to the needs of the community. This study applied the Community Readiness Model (CRM), for the first time in the UK, to demonstrate its applicability in designing tailored interventions. Methods Community readiness assessment was conducted using semi-structured key informant interviews. The community’s key informants were identified through focus groups with pre-adolescent girls. The interviews addressed the community’s efforts; community knowledge of the efforts; leadership; community climate; community knowledge of the issue and resources available to support the issue. Interviews were conducted until the point of theoretical saturation and questions were asked separately regarding physical activity (PA) and healthy eating and drinking (HED) behaviours. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and were firstly analysed thematically and then scored using the assessment guidelines produced by the CRM authors. Results Readiness in this community was higher for PA than for HED behaviours. The lowest scores related to the community’s ’resources’ and the ’community knowledge of the issue’; affirming these two issues as the most appropriate initial targets for intervention. In terms of resources, there is also a need for resources to support the development of HED efforts beyond the school. Investment in greater physical education training for primary school teachers was also identified as an intervention priority. To address the community’s knowledge of the issue, raising the awareness of the prevalence of pre-adolescent girls’ health behaviours is a

  13. Do online communities change power processes in healthcare? Using case studies to examine the use of online health communities by patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Benschop, Yvonne W M; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Communication technologies, such as personal online health communities, are increasingly considered as a tool to realise patient empowerment. However, little is known about the actual use of online health communities. Here, we investigated if and how patients' use of online communities supports patient empowerment. Setting A network of primary and secondary care providers around individual patients with Parkinson's disease. Participants We conducted case studies to examine our research question. We interviewed 18 patients with Parkinson's disease and observed the use of online health communities of 14 of them for an average of 1 year. Primary outcome measures We analysed the interviews and the online conversations between patients and healthcare providers, using Foucault's framework for studying power processes. Results We observed that patient empowerment is inhibited by implicit norms that exist within these communities around the number and content of postings. First, patients refrained from asking too many questions of their healthcare providers, but felt obliged to offer them regular updates. Second, patients scrutinised the content of their postings, being afraid to come across as complainers. Third, patients were cautious in making knowledge claims about their disease. Conclusions Changing implicit norms within online communities and the societal context they exist in seems necessary to achieve greater patient empowerment. Possibilities for changing these norms might lie in open dialogue between patient and healthcare providers about expectations, revising the curriculum of medical education and redesigning personal online health communities to support two-way knowledge exchange. PMID:27821596

  14. Systems thinking tools as applied to community-based participatory research: a case study.

    PubMed

    BeLue, Rhonda; Carmack, Chakema; Myers, Kyle R; Weinreb-Welch, Laurie; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2012-12-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is being used increasingly to address health disparities and complex health issues. The authors propose that CBPR can benefit from a systems science framework to represent the complex and dynamic characteristics of a community and identify intervention points and potential "tipping points." Systems science refers to a field of study that posits a holistic framework that is focused on component parts of a system in the context of relationships with each other and with other systems. Systems thinking tools can assist in intervention planning by allowing all CBPR stakeholders to visualize how community factors are interrelated and by potentially identifying the most salient intervention points. To demonstrate the potential utility of systems science tools in CBPR, the authors show the use of causal loop diagrams by a community coalition engaged in CBPR activities regarding youth drinking reduction and prevention.

  15. Community owned solutions for fire management in tropical ecosystems: case studies from Indigenous communities of South America.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Bilbao, Bibiana A; Berardi, Andrea

    2016-06-05

    Fire plays an increasingly significant role in tropical forest and savanna ecosystems, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and impacting on biodiversity. Emerging research shows the potential role of Indigenous land-use practices for controlling deforestation and reducing CO2 emissions. Analysis of satellite imagery suggests that Indigenous lands have the lowest incidence of wildfires, significantly contributing to maintaining carbon stocks and enhancing biodiversity. Yet acknowledgement of Indigenous peoples' role in fire management and control is limited, and in many cases dismissed, especially in policy-making circles. In this paper, we review existing data on Indigenous fire management and impact, focusing on examples from tropical forest and savanna ecosystems in Venezuela, Brazil and Guyana. We highlight how the complexities of community owned solutions for fire management are being lost as well as undermined by continued efforts on fire suppression and firefighting, and emerging approaches to incorporate Indigenous fire management into market- and incentive-based mechanisms for climate change mitigation. Our aim is to build a case for supporting Indigenous fire practices within all scales of decision-making by strengthening Indigenous knowledge systems to ensure more effective and sustainable fire management.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

  16. Community owned solutions for fire management in tropical ecosystems: case studies from Indigenous communities of South America

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fire plays an increasingly significant role in tropical forest and savanna ecosystems, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and impacting on biodiversity. Emerging research shows the potential role of Indigenous land-use practices for controlling deforestation and reducing CO2 emissions. Analysis of satellite imagery suggests that Indigenous lands have the lowest incidence of wildfires, significantly contributing to maintaining carbon stocks and enhancing biodiversity. Yet acknowledgement of Indigenous peoples' role in fire management and control is limited, and in many cases dismissed, especially in policy-making circles. In this paper, we review existing data on Indigenous fire management and impact, focusing on examples from tropical forest and savanna ecosystems in Venezuela, Brazil and Guyana. We highlight how the complexities of community owned solutions for fire management are being lost as well as undermined by continued efforts on fire suppression and firefighting, and emerging approaches to incorporate Indigenous fire management into market- and incentive-based mechanisms for climate change mitigation. Our aim is to build a case for supporting Indigenous fire practices within all scales of decision-making by strengthening Indigenous knowledge systems to ensure more effective and sustainable fire management. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The interaction of fire and mankind’. PMID:27216507

  17. Case study in designing a research fundamentals curriculum for community health workers: a university-community clinic collaboration.

    PubMed

    Dumbauld, Jill; Kalichman, Michael; Bell, Yvonne; Dagnino, Cynthia; Taras, Howard L

    2014-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly incorporated into research teams. Training them in research methodology and ethics, while relating these themes to a community's characteristics, may help to better integrate these health promotion personnel into research teams. An interactive training course on research fundamentals for CHWs was designed and implemented jointly by a community agency serving a primarily Latino, rural population and an academic health center. A focus group of community members and input from community leaders comprised a community-based participatory research model to create three 3-hour interactive training sessions. The resulting curriculum was interactive and successfully stimulated dialogue between trainees and academic researchers. By choosing course activities that elicited community-specific responses into each session's discussion, researchers learned about the community as much as the training course educated CHWs about research. The approach is readily adaptable, making it useful to other communities where CHWs are part of the health system.

  18. Exploring the Why of Volunteer and Philanthropic Commitment at One Community College: Case Study of a Capital Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    The case study engaged selected stakeholders who explored their perceptions and understanding of why they made significant commitments of volunteerism and philanthropy to a capital campaign at one public community college, and the particular factors that influenced their decisions. A paucity of inquiries examines this topic from the volunteer or…

  19. Using Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory to Understand Community Partnerships: A Historical Case Study of One Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Although the value of school-community partnerships is unquestioned, the reasons for success and failure are not sufficiently understood. This mixed-methods case study examines 60 years of partnering at one urban high school, using Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory to better understand the effect on student development as measured by…

  20. Leading Change: A Case Study of Leadership Practices from the Development of the Niagara County Community College Culinary Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caton, Jazmin; Mistriner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the lessons learned from the development of a project that set out to revitalize an economically depressed area with an innovative approach to workforce development through partnerships. The focus was to utilize the development of the Niagara County Community College Culinary Institute as an example…

  1. Diversifying California's Community College Leadership: What's Race Got to Do with It? A Qualitative Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chochezi, Victoire S.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative multiple case study examined diversity perceptions of California community college senior leaders and sought to provide insights into how a senior leader's view of diversity concepts influences their actions in succession planning and selection of leaders and faculty. An in-depth qualitative analysis of participant interviews and…

  2. Teaching Community Networks: A Case Study of Informal Social Support and Information Sharing among Sociology Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Andrea N.; Mair, Christine A.; Atkinson, Maxine P.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prominence of teaching in academia, we know little about how graduate students learn to teach. We propose the concept of a teaching community network (TCN), an informal social network that facilitates the exchange of teaching-specific resources. We explore the role of TCNs through a case study of a sociology doctoral program at a large…

  3. A "Tale of Two Cities:" A Comparative Case Study of Community Engagement and Costs in Two Levy Campaigns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingle, W. Kyle; Johnson, Paul A.; Petroff, Ruth Ann

    2011-01-01

    Using Anderson's (1998) framework for authentic community engagement and Levin and McEwan's (2001) "ingredients method," this comparative case study analyzed contrasting approaches to levy campaigns undertaken by two suburban school districts and the associated costs of the campaigns. We found that District A ran a campaign that…

  4. Community Treatment of Extremely Troublesome Youth with Dual Mental Health/Mental Retardation Diagnoses: A Data Based Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabry, Bernie D.; Reitz, Andrew L.; Luster, W. Clark

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a data-based case study of a linked array of community-based treatment services for troublesome, dual-diagnosed children and adolescents. Factors in the program's successes are described, followed by long-term data supporting treatment effectiveness. Results support applied research at this level and present a simple…

  5. Leading Change: A Case Study of Leadership Practices from the Development of the Niagara County Community College Culinary Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caton, Jazmin; Mistriner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the lessons learned from the development of a project that set out to revitalize an economically depressed area with an innovative approach to workforce development through partnerships. The focus was to utilize the development of the Niagara County Community College Culinary Institute as an example…

  6. Exploring the Why of Volunteer and Philanthropic Commitment at One Community College: Case Study of a Capital Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    The case study engaged selected stakeholders who explored their perceptions and understanding of why they made significant commitments of volunteerism and philanthropy to a capital campaign at one public community college, and the particular factors that influenced their decisions. A paucity of inquiries examines this topic from the volunteer or…

  7. The Perceptions of Administrators in the Implementation of Professional Learning Communities: A Case Study in an Oklahoma School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaques, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    In January of 2002, President George Bush implemented the No Child left behind act that required all students to be proficient on state standards by the year 2014. One way a school district in Oklahoma met these new requirements was through the implementation of the principles of a Professional Learning Community. This case study was designed…

  8. Using Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory to Understand Community Partnerships: A Historical Case Study of One Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Although the value of school-community partnerships is unquestioned, the reasons for success and failure are not sufficiently understood. This mixed-methods case study examines 60 years of partnering at one urban high school, using Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory to better understand the effect on student development as measured by…

  9. The Muddy-Booted Boys: A Case Study of Working-Class Youth in a Rural Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiderlein, Marie

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes the high school experiences of White working-class boys in a rural community in the northeast United States. It examines the identity formation of these youth, key characteristics of those identities, as well as a prominent and significant group identity among them. These youth are typically kinesthetic learners and…

  10. The Perceptions of Administrators in the Implementation of Professional Learning Communities: A Case Study in an Oklahoma School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaques, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    In January of 2002, President George Bush implemented the No Child left behind act that required all students to be proficient on state standards by the year 2014. One way a school district in Oklahoma met these new requirements was through the implementation of the principles of a Professional Learning Community. This case study was designed…

  11. Fostering Supportive Environments: A Case Study of Public Pedagogy in a Community-Based AIDS Service Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of the significance of public pedagogy for how community-based organizations that provide prevention, support, and educational services to people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS operate. The article reports on a case study analysis of a local AIDS service organization (ASO) in a small town in Ontario, Canada. The…

  12. An Investigation of Leadership in a Professional Learning Community: A Case Study of a Large, Suburban, Public Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebman, Howard; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.; Thompson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated a large, suburban, public middle school focusing on educators' perceptions of leadership within their professional learning community. Participants included the principal, administrative team, and key faculty members. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and were analyzed by hand coding and…

  13. Public health and health services development in postconflict communities: a case study of a safe motherhood project in East Timor.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Penny; Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal

    2009-10-01

    Armed conflict causes suffering in many countries; it contributes to poor health and hinders health services development. The effects of conflict are evidenced by weakened community structures and can make reconstruction efforts challenging. East Timor has a history of prolonged conflict and saw a resurgence of internal violence in 2006. This participant observation study discusses considerations for implementing public health and health systems development projects in postconflict settings using a case study of a maternal and child health project. It illustrates the importance of appreciating the historical context and community dynamics when implementing development projects. The sequelae of conflict are often characterized by reduced human resource development capacity, distrust of hierarchy, and limited capacity for resource mobilization. Working in such postconflict communities requires flexibility in program design, stronger efforts for community capacity building, and rebuilding trust between various stakeholders.

  14. Promoting universal financial protection: a case study of new management of community health insurance in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Josephine; Maluka, Stephen; Kuwawenaruwa, August; Makawia, Suzan; Tantau, Juma; Mtei, Gemini; Ally, Mariam; Macha, Jane

    2013-06-13

    The National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF), a compulsory formal sector scheme took over the management of the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary informal sector scheme, in 2009. This study assesses the origins of the reform, its effect on management and reporting structures, financial flow adequacy, reform communication and acceptability to key stakeholders, and initial progress towards universal coverage. The study relied on national data sources and an in-depth collective case study of a rural and an urban district to assess awareness and acceptability of the reform, and fund availability and use relative to need in a sample of facilities. The reform was driven by a national desire to expand coverage and increase access to services. Despite initial delays, the CHF has been embedded within the NHIF organisational structure, bringing more intensive and qualified supervision closer to the district. National CHF membership has more than doubled. However, awareness of the reform was limited below the district level due to the reform's top-down nature. The reform was generally acceptable to key stakeholders, who expected that benefits between schemes would be harmonised.The reform was unable to institute changes to the CHF design or district management structures because it has so far been unable to change CHF legislation which also limits facility capacity to use CHF revenue. Further, revenue generated is currently insufficient to offset treatment and administration costs, and the reform did not improve the revenue to cost ratio. Administrative costs are also likely to have increased as a result of the reform. Informal sector schemes can benefit from merger with formal sector schemes through improved data systems, supervision, and management support. However, effects will be maximised if legal frameworks can be harmonised early on and a reduction in administrative costs is not guaranteed.

  15. Promoting universal financial protection: a case study of new management of community health insurance in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF), a compulsory formal sector scheme took over the management of the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary informal sector scheme, in 2009. This study assesses the origins of the reform, its effect on management and reporting structures, financial flow adequacy, reform communication and acceptability to key stakeholders, and initial progress towards universal coverage. Methods The study relied on national data sources and an in-depth collective case study of a rural and an urban district to assess awareness and acceptability of the reform, and fund availability and use relative to need in a sample of facilities. Results The reform was driven by a national desire to expand coverage and increase access to services. Despite initial delays, the CHF has been embedded within the NHIF organisational structure, bringing more intensive and qualified supervision closer to the district. National CHF membership has more than doubled. However, awareness of the reform was limited below the district level due to the reform’s top-down nature. The reform was generally acceptable to key stakeholders, who expected that benefits between schemes would be harmonised. The reform was unable to institute changes to the CHF design or district management structures because it has so far been unable to change CHF legislation which also limits facility capacity to use CHF revenue. Further, revenue generated is currently insufficient to offset treatment and administration costs, and the reform did not improve the revenue to cost ratio. Administrative costs are also likely to have increased as a result of the reform. Conclusion Informal sector schemes can benefit from merger with formal sector schemes through improved data systems, supervision, and management support. However, effects will be maximised if legal frameworks can be harmonised early on and a reduction in administrative costs is not guaranteed. PMID:23763711

  16. Developing Occupational Programs: A Case Study of Four Arkansas Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Duane Edward

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how differences in the environmental conditions and organizational factors facing each community college contribute to the development of occupational and technical education programs. This study was driven by one primary research question: What environmental conditions and organizational factors influence the nature of the…

  17. Knowledge Construction in Online Learning Communities: A Case Study of a Doctoral Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Kwok-Wing

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents a study investigating co-construction of knowledge by doctoral students in an online learning community. In this study 12 students participated in the coursework and thesis proposal development stages of a doctoral program offered by a research-intensive university in New Zealand. Socio-cultural and social constructivist…

  18. Learning Approach and Learning Strengths: A Case Study in an Ultraorthodox Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aflalo, Ester

    2012-01-01

    This study furthers the understanding of the connections between learning approaches and learning strengths. The research population embraced 65 males from the Jewish ultraorthodox community, who abide by distinct methods of study. One group follows the very didactic, linear and structured approach with performance orientation, while the second…

  19. Knowledge Construction in Online Learning Communities: A Case Study of a Doctoral Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Kwok-Wing

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents a study investigating co-construction of knowledge by doctoral students in an online learning community. In this study 12 students participated in the coursework and thesis proposal development stages of a doctoral program offered by a research-intensive university in New Zealand. Socio-cultural and social constructivist…

  20. Developing Occupational Programs: A Case Study of Four Arkansas Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Duane Edward

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how differences in the environmental conditions and organizational factors facing each community college contribute to the development of occupational and technical education programs. This study was driven by one primary research question: What environmental conditions and organizational factors influence the nature of the…

  1. Learning Approach and Learning Strengths: A Case Study in an Ultraorthodox Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aflalo, Ester

    2012-01-01

    This study furthers the understanding of the connections between learning approaches and learning strengths. The research population embraced 65 males from the Jewish ultraorthodox community, who abide by distinct methods of study. One group follows the very didactic, linear and structured approach with performance orientation, while the second…

  2. Assessment of community contribution to the ICDS scheme in district Agra: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nayar, D; Kapil, U; Nandan, D

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess community contribution to the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) program, which promotes mother and child health in the Agra district, Uttar Pradesh, India. Three rural ICDS projects in the district were selected, out of which a total of 74 Anganwadi centers (AWCs) were chosen for the study. The Anganwadi workers (AWWs) were interviewed through a semi-structured questionnaire to assess the community¿s contribution during the previous 6 months. Results revealed that about 68% of AWWs had been able to receive assistance in bringing the children to the AWC. 53.3% had received free accommodation for AWC, and 42.6% had obtained assistance in implementation of health activities. Only 4% and 12% of the AWWs reported community assistance in the preparation and distribution of nutritional supplements, respectively. There had been no contribution received in terms of raw food for supplementary nutrition and fuel for cooking. The study concludes that rural area free accommodation for the AWC and community assistance in bringing children to the AWC were the most common forms of community contribution to the ICDS program.

  3. What is the role of a case manager in community aged care? A qualitative study in Australia.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to explore the perceptions of case managers about their roles in providing community aged care in Australia. Purposeful sampling was used and 33 qualitative semi-structured interviews with 47 participants were conducted. Participants were drawn from a list of all case managers working in aged care organisations that provided publicly funded case-managed community aged care programmes in the State of Victoria, Australia. Participant selection criteria included age, gender, job titles, professional backgrounds, practice locations, organisational attributes and organisational size. Data collection was implemented between September 2012 and March 2013. Thematic analysis was performed. Participants believed that case managers performed diverse roles based on clients' needs. They also articulated 16 important roles of case managers, including advisors, advocates, carers, communicators, co-ordinators, educators, empowering clients, engaging clients and families, liaising with people, managing budgets, navigators, negotiators, networking with people, facilitators, problem solvers and supporters. However, they were concerned about brokers, mediators and counsellors in terms of the terminology or case managers' willingness to perform these roles. Moreover, they perceived that neither gatekeepers nor direct service provision was case managers' role. The findings of this study suggest that case managers working in community aged care sectors may be more effective if they practised the 16 roles aforementioned. With the value of helping rather than obstructing clients to access services, they may not act as gatekeepers. In addition, they may not provide services directly as opposed to their peers working in medical care settings. The findings will also assist organisations to design job descriptions specifying case managers' roles and associated job responsibilities. Clear job descriptions will further benefit the organisations in staff recruitment, orientation

  4. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as highlighting

  5. A case report: ethics of a proposed qualitative study of hospital closure in an Australian rural community.

    PubMed

    Fraser, John

    2004-02-01

    The GP and qualitative researcher use similar patient-centred approaches, but their roles are different. Guidelines for conducting GP research in small communities are limited. I planned a qualitative study about hospital closure in a small rural Australian town where I worked. Few studies have researched community reaction to hospital closure and this process of change. I used historical analysis to improve external reliability, and purposeful sampling to develop and pre-test a qualitative semi-structured research instrument. Newspaper articles, minutes and tape recordings of public meetings, annual reports from 1991 to 1997, quality assurance data and interviews with two health professionals were analysed in this process. These sources were coded using content and thematic analysis. Ethical issues arose during early stages of planning. Ethical guidelines and bioethics principles were discussed with colleagues and a member of an ethics committee. I validated my findings with three other community members involved in the hospital closure. Themes of a transition, from resistance to change and divisions between key stake holders, to a need to appreciate the benefits of change emerged in coding material from 1991 to 1997. The principle of non-maleficence outweighed the principle of beneficence in this study. Existing health services could be harmed by examining the process of change after spending time and resources to reconcile community differences. Individuals could be harmed as confidentiality in a small community was difficult to maintain, and discussions about sensitive issues could produce adverse public criticism. The autonomy of participants to give informed consent was complicated by the author providing clinical services in the community, raising concerns about patients feeling an obligation to participate. A justified case for discontinuing this study was made by the researcher on ethical grounds. Use of bioethical principles and community representatives

  6. Assessing opinions in community leadership networks to address health inequalities: a case study from Project IMPACT

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, M. P.; Ramanadhan, S.; Viswanath, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in ‘Milltown’, the New England city where the study was conducted. We used UCINET network analysis software to assess the structure of local leadership and NVivo qualitative software to analyze leaders’ views on public health and health inequalities. Our main analyses showed that community power is distributed unequally in Milltown, with our network of 33 divided into an older, largely male and more powerful group, and a younger, largely female group with many ‘grassroots’ sector leaders who focus on reducing health inequalities. Ancillary network analyses showed that grassroots leaders comprise a self-referential cluster that could benefit from greater affiliation with leaders from other sectors and identified leaders who may serve as leverage points in our overall program of public agenda change to address health inequalities. Our innovative approach provides public health practitioners with a method for assessing community leaders’ views, understanding subgroup divides and mobilizing leaders who may be helpful in reducing health inequalities. PMID:26471919

  7. Assessing opinions in community leadership networks to address health inequalities: a case study from Project IMPACT.

    PubMed

    McCauley, M P; Ramanadhan, S; Viswanath, K

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in 'Milltown', the New England city where the study was conducted. We used UCINET network analysis software to assess the structure of local leadership and NVivo qualitative software to analyze leaders' views on public health and health inequalities. Our main analyses showed that community power is distributed unequally in Milltown, with our network of 33 divided into an older, largely male and more powerful group, and a younger, largely female group with many 'grassroots' sector leaders who focus on reducing health inequalities. Ancillary network analyses showed that grassroots leaders comprise a self-referential cluster that could benefit from greater affiliation with leaders from other sectors and identified leaders who may serve as leverage points in our overall program of public agenda change to address health inequalities. Our innovative approach provides public health practitioners with a method for assessing community leaders' views, understanding subgroup divides and mobilizing leaders who may be helpful in reducing health inequalities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A Case Study of Community Involvement Influence on Policy Decisions: Victories of a Community-Based Participatory Research Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Edith M.; Terrell, Julien; Anderson, Judith; Tumiel-Berhalter, Laurene

    2016-01-01

    The Buffalo Lupus Project was a community-university partnership that investigated associations between exposure to a local waste site and high rates of lupus and other autoimmune diseases. The partnership’s major accomplishment was successful advocacy for containment and clean-up of the site. As a result of community education, the remediation plan suggested by the community was adopted. Additionally, when a local childhood lead poisoning testing program was canceled, community members signed a letter to legislators urging them to replace the funding, which was restored within one week. This demonstrated how coordinated community-based capacity-building efforts can influence health policy. PMID:27213418

  9. A Case Study of Community Involvement Influence on Policy Decisions: Victories of a Community-Based Participatory Research Partnership.

    PubMed

    Williams, Edith M; Terrell, Julien; Anderson, Judith; Tumiel-Berhalter, Laurene

    2016-05-20

    The Buffalo Lupus Project was a community-university partnership that investigated associations between exposure to a local waste site and high rates of lupus and other autoimmune diseases. The partnership's major accomplishment was successful advocacy for containment and clean-up of the site. As a result of community education, the remediation plan suggested by the community was adopted. Additionally, when a local childhood lead poisoning testing program was canceled, community members signed a letter to legislators urging them to replace the funding, which was restored within one week. This demonstrated how coordinated community-based capacity-building efforts can influence health policy.

  10. Acute respiratory infection case definitions for young children: a systematic review of community-based epidemiologic studies in South Asia.

    PubMed

    Roth, Daniel E; Gaffey, Michelle F; Smith-Romero, Evelyn; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Morris, Shaun K

    2015-12-01

    To explore the variability in childhood acute respiratory infection case definitions for research in low-income settings where there is limited access to laboratory or radiologic investigations. We conducted a systematic review of community-based, longitudinal studies in South Asia published from January 1990 to August 2013, in which childhood acute respiratory infection outcomes were reported. Case definitions were classified by their label (e.g. pneumonia, acute lower respiratory infection) and clinical content 'signatures' (array of clinical features that would be always present, conditionally present or always absent among cases). Case definition heterogeneity was primarily assessed by the number of unique case definitions overall and by label. We also compared case definition-specific acute respiratory infection incidence rates for studies reporting incidence rates for multiple case definitions. In 56 eligible studies, we found 124 acute respiratory infection case definitions. Of 90 case definitions for which clinical content was explicitly defined, 66 (73%) were unique. There was a high degree of content heterogeneity among case definitions with the same label, and some content signatures were assigned multiple labels. Within studies for which incidence rates were reported for multiple case definitions, variation in content was always associated with a change in incidence rate, even when the content differed by a single clinical feature. There has been a wide variability in case definition label and content combinations to define acute upper and lower respiratory infections in children in community-based studies in South Asia over the past two decades. These inconsistencies have important implications for the synthesis and translation of knowledge regarding the prevention and treatment of childhood acute respiratory infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Designing Program Roadmaps to Catalyze Community Formation: A Case Study of the Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmapword

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Brent; Hanson, Duane; Matthern, Gretchen

    2003-02-27

    A number of broad perspective technology roadmaps have been developed in the last few years as tools for coordinating nation-wide research in targeted areas. These roadmaps share a common characteristic of coalescing the associated stakeholder groups into a special-interest community that is willing to work cooperatively in achieving the roadmap goals. These communities are key to roadmap implementation as they provide the collaborative energy necessary to obtain the political support and funding required for identified science and technology development efforts. This paper discusses the relationship between roadmaps and special-interest communities, using the recently drafted Department of Energy's Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmap as a case study. Specific aspects this roadmap's design facilitated the development of a long-term stewardship community while specific realities during roadmap development impacted the realization of the design.

  12. Predicting treatment failure in patients with community acquired pneumonia: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Treatment failure in community-acquired-pneumonia (CAP) patients is associated with a high mortality rate, and therefore are a matter of great concern in clinical management. Those patients have increased mortality and are a target population for randomized clinical trials. Methods A case–control study was performed in patients with CAP (non-failure cases vs. failure cases, discriminating by late and early failure). CRP, PCT, interleukin 1, 6, 8 and 10 and TNF were determined at days 1 and 3 of hospitalization. Results A total of 253 patients were included in this study where 83 patients presented treatment failure. Of these, 40 (48.2%) had early failure. A discriminative effect was found for a higher CURB-65 score among late failure patients (p = 0.004). A significant increase on day 1 of hospitalization in CRP (p < 0.001), PCT (p = 0.004), IL-6 (p < 0.001) and IL-8 (p = 0.02), and a decrease in IL-1 (p = 0.06) in patients with failure was observed compared with patients without failure. On day 3, only the increase in CRP (p < 0.001), PCT (p = 0.007) and IL-6 (p < 0.001) remained significant. Independent predictors for early failure were higher IL-6 levels on day 1 (OR = 1.78, IC = 1.2-2.6) and pleural effusion (OR = 2.25, IC = 1.0-5.3), and for late failure, higher PCT levels on day 3 (OR = 1.60, IC = 1.0-2.5), CURB-65 score ≥ 3 (OR = 1.43, IC = 1.0-2.0), and multilobar involvement (OR = 4.50, IC = 2.1-9.9). Conclusions There was a good correlation of IL-6 levels and CAP failure and IL-6 & PCT with late CAP failure. Pleural effusion and multilobar involvement were simple clinical predictors of early and late failure, respectively. Trial registration IRB Register: http://2009/5451. PMID:24996572

  13. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-01-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged. PMID:24334331

  14. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-02-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged.

  15. Measuring the Cost of a College Degree: A Case Study of a SUNY Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Richard M.; Losinger, Regina; Millard, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by a white paper produced by the Delta Project on Postsecondary Education Costs, Productivity, and Accountability, this study uses different measures of calculating the cost of a college degree at an upstate community college in New York. Departmental cost per credit hour, direct instructional costs, and full costs are all explained. A…

  16. Community College Student Participation in Undergraduate Research: An Explanatory Case Study for Faculty and Research Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Dana L.

    2009-01-01

    This study adapted the current model of science undergraduate research experiences (URE's) and applied this novel modification to include community college students. Numerous researchers have examined the efficacy of URE's in improving undergraduate retention and graduation rates, as well as matriculation rates for graduate programs. However, none…

  17. Examining an Evolution: A Case Study of Organizational Change Accompanying the Community College Baccalaureate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Lyle; Morris, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the nature and degree of organizational change that occurs when community colleges offer their own baccalaureate degree programs. Utilizing qualitative research methodology, we investigated how executive administrators at two Florida colleges managed this momentous change process and how this transformation has affected their…

  18. Fostering Teacher Learning Communities: A Case Study of a School-Based Leadership Team's Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Kenneth Brian

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how a school-based leadership team identifies and alters school conditions to foster the development of TLCs. Many educators, school leaders, and politicians have embraced teacher learning communities (TLCs) as a vehicle for school reform. Despite the considerable documentation of the capability for TLCs to…

  19. A Case Study Exploring Research Communication and Engagement in a Rural Community Experiencing an Environmental Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Charlene A.; Kuntz, Sandra W.; Weinert, Clarann; Black, Brad

    2014-01-01

    As a means to involve the public in research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) established the Partners in Research Program and solicited research grant applications from academic/scientific institutions and community organizations that proposed to forge partnerships: (a) to study methods and strategies to engage and inform the public…

  20. Learning Community Transitions in the First Year: A Case Study of Academic and Social Network Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel A.

    2011-01-01

    Residential learning communities often focus on easing first-year students' transitions to college by emphasizing the creation of peer social and academic relationships. However, this relational process is most often examined through analyzing individual student characteristics, behaviors, and attitudes. This study used network analysis to…

  1. Fostering Teacher Learning Communities: A Case Study of a School-Based Leadership Team's Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Kenneth Brian

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how a school-based leadership team identifies and alters school conditions to foster the development of TLCs. Many educators, school leaders, and politicians have embraced teacher learning communities (TLCs) as a vehicle for school reform. Despite the considerable documentation of the capability for TLCs to…

  2. Learning Community Transitions in the First Year: A Case Study of Academic and Social Network Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel A.

    2011-01-01

    Residential learning communities often focus on easing first-year students' transitions to college by emphasizing the creation of peer social and academic relationships. However, this relational process is most often examined through analyzing individual student characteristics, behaviors, and attitudes. This study used network analysis to…

  3. A Group Approach in a Community Empowerment: A Case Study of Waste Recycling Group in Jakarta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadiyanti, Puji

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews a group approach in empowering the community through waste recycling activities related to the development of human resources in Jakarta. The specific objectives to be achieved are the wish to understand and find: (1) Conditions of waste recycling empowerment in Jakarta, (2) Mechanisms of a group approach in empowering…

  4. Faculty and Administrator Beliefs Regarding Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strollo, Toni Marie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined higher education faculty and academic administrator (AO) beliefs regarding the value of assessment of student learning outcomes (ASLO) as a means for improving teaching and learning at a Southeastern community college known for its commitment as a learning college and as an exemplar for such efforts. Faculty and AOs at this…

  5. Global Educational Ecosystem: Case Study of a Partnership with K-12 Schools, Community Organizations, and Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Donna S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a collaborative partnership model known as the Global Educational Ecosystem, which involves three K-12 schools in Northern California, community organizations (representing science, technology, health, and arts), and Xilinx, Inc. from the perspectives of the leaders of the involved partner organizations in…

  6. A Case Study Exploring Research Communication and Engagement in a Rural Community Experiencing an Environmental Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Charlene A.; Kuntz, Sandra W.; Weinert, Clarann; Black, Brad

    2014-01-01

    As a means to involve the public in research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) established the Partners in Research Program and solicited research grant applications from academic/scientific institutions and community organizations that proposed to forge partnerships: (a) to study methods and strategies to engage and inform the public…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in a Knowledge-Building Community: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chai, Ching Sing; Merry, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This study explores three teachers' perceptions and developments as a result of experiencing learning and teaching in a knowledge-building community (KBC). To understand the teachers' views, in-depth interviews were conducted. The transcripts were coded using a grounded theory approach. The findings indicate that KBC is reportedly viewed by the…

  8. Effects of Student Participation in an Online Learning Community on Environmental Education: A Greek Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastergiou, Marina; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Apostolou, Marianna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was: (a) the creation of an Online Learning Community (OLC) for the implementation of an environmental education (EE) project in secondary education, and (b) the investigation of the potential impact of student participation in the OLC on students' knowledge and attitudes regarding the natural environment, on students'…

  9. Ethnic Identity and Assimilation: The Polish-American Community. Case Study of Metropolitan Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Neil C.

    This study investigated the relationship between different generational and social class groups within the Polish-American community and the salience of ethnicity in each group. One of the largest immigrations to America was that from Poland. By the turn of the century a dispersed and highly mobile Polish-American population was evident in the Los…

  10. Community-Engaged Courses in a Conflict Zone: A Case Study of the Israeli Academic Corpus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Daphna; Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Nadera

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on an action-oriented study of 13 community-engaged courses at 11 institutions of higher education in Israel. These courses were not part of peace education programs but rather accredited academic courses in various disciplines, all of which included practice and theory. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how these…

  11. The New England Farm Workers' Council: Case Study of a Community Service Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bruce

    The study described the development of the New England Farm Workers' Council, Inc., and documented significant interactions among selected elements of the Puerto Rican migrant farm labor system in the Connecticut Valley. These elements were the migrant farmworker community, the farm labor employers, and agencies of the federal government and of…

  12. Examining an Evolution: A Case Study of Organizational Change Accompanying the Community College Baccalaureate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Lyle; Morris, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the nature and degree of organizational change that occurs when community colleges offer their own baccalaureate degree programs. Utilizing qualitative research methodology, we investigated how executive administrators at two Florida colleges managed this momentous change process and how this transformation has affected their…

  13. The Politics of School Desegregation: Comparative Case Studies of Community Structure and Policy-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Robert L.

    An analysis of the political process by which school systems can be desegregated rests on thepremise that school desegregation is a community decision. The process is documented in Part I by studies of eight non-Southern, big city school systems. Part II presents an analysis of school policy-making. Part III is devoted to desegregation in New…

  14. Global Educational Ecosystem: Case Study of a Partnership with K-12 Schools, Community Organizations, and Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Donna S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a collaborative partnership model known as the Global Educational Ecosystem, which involves three K-12 schools in Northern California, community organizations (representing science, technology, health, and arts), and Xilinx, Inc. from the perspectives of the leaders of the involved partner organizations in…

  15. Case Study IV: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching's Networked Improvement Communities (NICs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Cynthia E.; Penuel, William R.; Geil, Kimberly E.

    2015-01-01

    The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is a nonprofit, operating foundation with a long tradition of developing and studying ways to improve teaching practice. For the past three years, the Carnegie Foundation has initiated three different Networked Improvement Communities (NICs). The first, Quantway, is addressing the high…

  16. Enhancing engagement with community sector organisations working in sustainable waste management: A case study.

    PubMed

    Dururu, John; Anderson, Craig; Bates, Margaret; Montasser, Waleed; Tudor, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Voluntary and community sector organisations are increasingly being viewed as key agents of change in the shifts towards the concepts of resource efficiency and circular economy, at the community level. Using a meta-analysis and questionnaire surveys across three towns in the East Midlands of England, namely Northampton, Milton Keynes and Luton, this study aimed to understand public engagement with these organisations. The findings suggest that these organisations play a significant and wide-spread role, not only with regard to sustainable environmental management, but also a social role in community development and regeneration. The surveys indicated that there were generally high levels of awareness of the organisations and strong engagement with them. Clothes were the items most donated. Key reasons for engagement included the financial value offered and the perception that it helped the environment. However, potential limitations in future public engagement were also determined and recommendations for addressing these suggested.

  17. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Peter A.; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. Methods From 2008–2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Results Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of “community”; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. Conclusions This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the

  18. Case Study in Designing a Research Fundamentals Curriculum for Community Health Workers: A University - Community Clinic Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, Jill; Kalichman, Michael; Bell, Yvonne; Dagnino, Cynthia; Taras, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Community health workers are increasingly incorporated into research teams. Training them in research methodology and ethics, while relating these themes to a community’s characteristics, may help to better integrate these health promotion personnel into research teams. Approach and Strategies This pilot project involved the design and implementation of an interactive training course on research fundamentals for community health workers from clinics in a rural, predominately Latino setting. Curriculum development was guided by collaborative activities arising from a university - clinic partnership, a community member focus group, and the advice of community-based researchers. The resulting curriculum was interactive and stimulated dialogue between trainees and academic researchers. Discussion and Conclusions Collaboration between researchers and health agency professionals proved to be a practical method to develop curriculum for clinic staff. An interactive curriculum allowed trainees to incorporate community-specific themes into the discussion. This interaction educated course instructors from academia about the community as much as it educated course participants about research. The bidirectional engagement that occurs during the development and teaching of this course can potentially lead to research partnerships between community agencies and academia, better-informed members of the public, and research protocols that accommodate community characteristics. PMID:24121537

  19. Raising Graduation and College Going Rates: Community High School Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelroth, Rita

    2009-01-01

    A community school is a place and a set of partnerships between the school and community resources. The community school strategy integrates academics, health and social services, youth and community development, and civic engagement to improve student learning and to develop stronger families and healthier communities. This report presents a…

  20. A case study of physical and social barriers to hygiene and child growth in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Bailie, Ross; Grace, Jocelyn; Brewster, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite Australia's wealth, poor growth is common among Aboriginal children living in remote communities. An important underlying factor for poor growth is the unhygienic state of the living environment in these communities. This study explores the physical and social barriers to achieving safe levels of hygiene for these children. Methods A mixed qualitative and quantitative approach included a community level cross-sectional housing infrastructure survey, focus groups, case studies and key informant interviews in one community. Results We found that a combination of crowding, non-functioning essential housing infrastructure and poor standards of personal and domestic hygiene underlie the high burden of infection experienced by children in this remote community. Conclusion There is a need to address policy and the management of infrastructure, as well as key parenting and childcare practices that allow the high burden of infection among children to persist. The common characteristics of many remote Aboriginal communities in Australia suggest that these findings may be more widely applicable. PMID:19761623

  1. Case study of a solid-waste-scavenger community with respect to health and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kungskulniti, Nipapun.

    1991-01-01

    This study was an investigation of a solid waste scavenger community at the On-Nooch Dump Site in Bangkok, Thailand. The purpose was to identify the dimensions of the public health conditions of solid waste scavengers and their community. Cross-sectional field surveys and measurements were undertaken to characterize the distribution and magnitude of health-related problems and environmental conditions. Scavengers were found to be exposed to hazardous conditions due to the waste materials at the dump site. Cuts and punctures from sharp materials were the most common complaints among scavengers. Health symptoms like headache, diarrhea, respiratory illness, skin diseases and back pain were also reported. There was a high prevalence of childhood respiratory illness especially among those children of households where cigarette smoking was present. Children had poor nutritional status and were commonly infected by intestinal protozoa and helminths. An appreciable proportion of adult respondents was below the normal range for lung function performance. Seroprevalence of HBV infection was found to be high among male respondents in addition to six respondents that had possible HIV infections. The quality of the community water supply was low. Air pollution measurements showed acceptable ambient air levels except for particulate levels (TSP and RSP). Levels of indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure NO{sub 2} were found to be similar. Data for an inner-city project apartment community named Din-Dang were also collected for comparison. A priority rating index and recommendations for public health condition improvements were presented.

  2. Risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-I; Song, J-H; Kim, S H; Chung, D R; Peck, K R; So, T M; Hsueh, P-R

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical features of community-onset levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia and to identify risk factors for levofloxacin resistance. Using the database of a surveillance study of community-acquired pneumococcal infections in Asian countries, we conducted a nested case-control study to identify risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Of 981 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 (4.7 %) had levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, of whom 39 evaluable cases were included in the analysis. All cases were from Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Among patients with levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae, 490 controls were selected based on patient country. Of the 39 cases of levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia, 23 (59.0 %) were classified as healthcare-associated, while 164 (33.5 %) of the 490 controls of levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (P = 0.001) were classified as healthcare-associated. Multivariate analysis showed that previous treatment with fluoroquinolones, cerebrovascular disease, and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia (all P < 0.05). Levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococci pose an important new public health threat in our region, and more information on the emergence and spread of these resistant strains will be necessary to prevent spread throughout the population.

  3. Epistemic communities in global health and the development of child survival policy: a case study of iCCM.

    PubMed

    Dalglish, Sarah L; George, Asha; Shearer, Jessica C; Bennett, Sara

    2015-12-01

    Nearly all African countries have recently implemented some form of integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM), a strategy aimed at reducing child mortality by providing curative care for common yet fatal childhood illnesses. This case study describes the evolution of iCCM at the global level using the theory of epistemic communities first outlined by Haas, which explains how international policy coordination on technical issues takes place via transnational expert networks. We draw from in-depth interviews with global policy-makers (n = 25), a document review (n = 72) and co-authorship network analysis of scientific articles on iCCM. We find that members of the iCCM epistemic community were mainly mid- to upper-level technical officers working in the headquarters of large norm-setting bodies, implementing partners, funders and academic/research groups in global health. Already linked by pre-existing relationships, the epistemic community was consolidated as conflicts were overcome through structural changes in the network (including or excluding some members), changes in the state of technology or scientific evidence, shifting funding considerations, and the development of consensus through argument, legitimation and other means. Next, the epistemic community positioned iCCM as a preferred solution via three causal dynamics outlined by Haas: (1) responding to decision-makers' uncertainty about how to reduce child mortality after previous policies proved insufficient, (2) using sophisticated analytic tools to link the problem of child mortality to iCCM as a solution and (3) gaining buy-in from major norm-setting bodies and financial and institutional support from large implementing agencies. Applying the epistemic communities framework to the iCCM case study reveals the strengths and weaknesses of a focused policy enterprise with highly specialized and homogenous disciplinary origins, allowing for efficient sharing of complex, high

  4. Modeling the population dynamics and community impacts of Ambystoma tigrinum: A case study of phenotype plasticity.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Maeve L; Wallace, Dorothy; Whiteman, Howard H; Rheingold, Evan T; Dunham, Ann M; Prosper, Olivia; Chen, Michelle; Hu-Wang, Eileen

    2017-02-24

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of an organism to change its phenotype in response to changes in the environment. General mathematical descriptions of the phenomenon rely on an abstract measure of "viability" that, in this study, is instantiated in the case of the Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum. This organism has a point in its development when, upon maturing, it may take two very different forms. One is a terrestrial salamander (metamorph)that visits ponds to reproduce and eat, while the other is an aquatic form (paedomorph) that remains in the pond to breed and which consumes a variety of prey including its own offspring. A seven dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations is developed, incorporating small (Z) and large (B) invertebrates, Ambystoma young of the year (Y), juveniles (J), terrestrial metamorphs (A) and aquatic paedomorphs (P). One parameter in the model controls the proportion of juveniles maturing into A versus P. Solutions are shown to remain non-negative. Every effort was made to justify parameters biologically through studies reported in the literature. A sensitivity analysis and equilibrium analysis of model parameters demonstrate that morphological choice is critical to the overall composition of the Ambystoma population. Various population viability measures were used to select optimal percentages of juveniles maturing into metamorphs, with optimal choices differing considerably depending on the viability measure. The model suggests that the criteria for viability for this organism vary, both from location to location and also in time. Thus, optimal responses change with spatiotemporal variation, which is consistent with other phenotypically plastic systems. Two competing hypotheses for the conditions under which metamorphosis occurs are examined in light of the model and data from an Ambystoma tigrinum population at Mexican Cut, Colorado. The model clearly supports one of these over the other for this data set

  5. Sporadic community-acquired Legionnaires' disease in France: a 2-year national matched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    CHE, D.; CAMPESE, C.; SANTA-OLALLA, P.; JACQUIER, G.; BITAR, D.; BERNILLON, P.; DESENCLOS, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Legionnaires' disease (LD) is an aetiology of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults, with a high case-fatality ratio (CFR). We conducted a matched case-control study to identify risk factors for sporadic, community-acquired LD. Cases of sporadic, community-acquired and biologically confirmed LD, in metropolitan France from 1 September 2002 to 31 September 2004, were matched with a control subject according to age, sex, underlying illness and location of residence within 5 km. We performed a conditional logistic regression on various host-related factors and exposures. Analysis was done on 546 matched pairs. The CFR was 3·5%. Age ranged from 18–93 years (mean 57 years), with a 3·6 male:female sex ratio. Cases were more likely to have smoked with the documentation of a dose-effect relation, to have travelled with a stay in a hotel (OR 6·1, 95% CI 2·6–14·2), or to have used a wash-hand basin for personal hygiene (OR 3·5, 95% CI 1·6–7·7) than controls. Tobacco and travel have been previously described as risk factors for LD, but this is the first time that such a dose-effect for tobacco has been documented among sporadic cases. These findings will provide helpful knowledge about LD and help practitioners in identifying patients at high risk. PMID:18211725

  6. Do online communities change power processes in healthcare? Using case studies to examine the use of online health communities by patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Visser, Laura M; Bleijenbergh, Inge L; Benschop, Yvonne W M; Van Riel, Allard C R; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-11-07

    Communication technologies, such as personal online health communities, are increasingly considered as a tool to realise patient empowerment. However, little is known about the actual use of online health communities. Here, we investigated if and how patients' use of online communities supports patient empowerment. A network of primary and secondary care providers around individual patients with Parkinson's disease. We conducted case studies to examine our research question. We interviewed 18 patients with Parkinson's disease and observed the use of online health communities of 14 of them for an average of 1 year. We analysed the interviews and the online conversations between patients and healthcare providers, using Foucault's framework for studying power processes. We observed that patient empowerment is inhibited by implicit norms that exist within these communities around the number and content of postings. First, patients refrained from asking too many questions of their healthcare providers, but felt obliged to offer them regular updates. Second, patients scrutinised the content of their postings, being afraid to come across as complainers. Third, patients were cautious in making knowledge claims about their disease. Changing implicit norms within online communities and the societal context they exist in seems necessary to achieve greater patient empowerment. Possibilities for changing these norms might lie in open dialogue between patient and healthcare providers about expectations, revising the curriculum of medical education and redesigning personal online health communities to support two-way knowledge exchange. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Performance of community health workers managing malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea under the community case management programme in central Uganda: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bagonza, James; Kibira, Simon P S; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2014-09-18

    Lay community health workers (CHWs) have been widely used to provide curative interventions in communities that have traditionally lacked access to health care. Optimal performance of CHWs managing children with malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea in communities is desired if a reduction in childhood morbidity and mortality is to be achieved. This study assessed factors influencing performance of CHWs managing malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea under the Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) programme in Wakiso district, central Uganda. A cross sectional study was conducted among 336 CHWs. Data was collected using interviews and record reviews. Performance was measured using composite scores based on the core activities of CHWs under the iCCM programme. These core activities included: treating children under five years, referring severely sick children including newborns, home visits, counseling caregivers on home care, record keeping and community sensitization. Descriptive and inferential statistics using odds ratios were done to determine factors influencing performance of CHWs. Of the 336 respondents, 242 (72%) were females and the overall level of good performance was 21.7% (95% CI, 17.3-26.1%). Factors significantly associated with performance were: sex (females) (AOR 2.65; 95% CI, 1.29 -5.43), community support (AOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.27-4.14), receiving feedback from health facilities (AOR 4.90; 95% CI, 2.52-9.51) and having drugs in the previous three months (AOR 2.99; 95% CI, 1.64-5.42). Only one in every five CHWs performed optimally under the iCCM programme. Strategies to improve drug supply, community support and feedback provision from the formal health system are necessary to improve the performance of CHWs.

  8. Collaborative drug therapy management: case studies of three community-based models of care.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Margie E; Earl, Tara R; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Greenberg, Michael; Heisler, Holly; Revels, Michelle; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2015-03-26

    Collaborative drug therapy management agreements are a strategy for expanding the role of pharmacists in team-based care with other providers. However, these agreements have not been widely implemented. This study describes the features of existing provider-pharmacist collaborative drug therapy management practices and identifies the facilitators and barriers to implementing such services in community settings. We conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in 2012 in a federally qualified health center, an independent pharmacy, and a retail pharmacy chain. Facilitators included 1) ensuring pharmacists were adequately trained; 2) obtaining stakeholder (eg, physician) buy-in; and 3) leveraging academic partners. Barriers included 1) lack of pharmacist compensation; 2) hesitation among providers to trust pharmacists; 3) lack of time and resources; and 4) existing informal collaborations that resulted in reduced interest in formal agreements. The models described in this study could be used to strengthen clinical-community linkages through team-based care, particularly for chronic disease prevention and management.

  9. A Comparative Study of Classroom Teaching in Korea and Japan: A Case Study on Reforming Schools into Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Kyunghee; Shin, Jiwon; Son, Woojung

    2010-01-01

    Some schools and teachers in Korea and Japan have begun practicing classroom-based reform according to similar visions of a learning community. The purpose of this study was to investigate reform efforts made by teachers in Korea and Japan toward turning classrooms into learning communities. Two elementary schools, School K in Korea and School T…

  10. Building Trust in Natural Resource Management Within Local Communities: A Case Study of the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Mae A.; Leahy, Jessica E.; Anderson, Dorothy H.; Jakes, Pamela J.

    2007-03-01

    Communities neighboring federally protected natural areas regularly weigh the costs and benefits of the administering agency’s programs and policies. While most agencies integrate public opinion into decision making, efforts to standardize and formalize public involvement have left many local communities feeling marginalized, spurring acrimony and opposition. A significant body of research has examined barriers to effective public participation as well as strategies for relationship building in planning processes; many of which point to trust as a key factor. Trust is especially tenuous in local communities. This paper explores perceptions of trust, expectations for management, as well as constraints to building trust. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 community members and USDA Forest Service personnel at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie in northeastern Illinois. The interviews revealed that trust is perceived as important to effective management. Distinct expectations for management outcomes and processes emerged, including the values, knowledge, and capacity demonstrated in management decisions and actions and opportunities provided for communication, collaboration, and cooperation within the agency-community relationship. The case study identified several constraints to building trust, including competing values, knowledge gaps, limited community engagement, and staff turnover.

  11. Merging and scoring molecular interactions utilising existing community standards: tools, use-cases and a case study

    PubMed Central

    Villaveces, J. M.; Jiménez, R. C.; Porras, P.; del-Toro, N.; Duesbury, M.; Dumousseau, M.; Orchard, S.; Choi, H.; Ping, P.; Zong, N. C.; Askenazi, M.; Habermann, B. H.; Hermjakob, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The evidence that two molecules interact in a living cell is often inferred from multiple different experiments. Experimental data is captured in multiple repositories, but there is no simple way to assess the evidence of an interaction occurring in a cellular environment. Merging and scoring of data are commonly required operations after querying for the details of specific molecular interactions, to remove redundancy and assess the strength of accompanying experimental evidence. We have developed both a merging algorithm and a scoring system for molecular interactions based on the proteomics standard initiative–molecular interaction standards. In this manuscript, we introduce these two algorithms and provide community access to the tool suite, describe examples of how these tools are useful to selectively present molecular interaction data and demonstrate a case where the algorithms were successfully used to identify a systematic error in an existing dataset. PMID:25652942

  12. Regenerative Studies: College Community and Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltz, Mary G.

    This case study applies principles derived from the Center for Regenerative Studies (CRS) to a community college in North Carolina. CRS, on the campus of California State Polytechnic Institute (California), is dedicated to the education, demonstration, and research of degenerative systems in the areas of shelter, food production, energy, water and…

  13. Collaborative leadership and the implementation of community-based fall prevention initiatives: a multiple case study of public health practice within community groups.

    PubMed

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Dykeman, Cathy; Ploeg, Jenny; Kelly Stradiotto, Caralyn; Andrews, Angela; Bonomo, Susan; Orr-Shaw, Sarah; Salker, Niyati

    2017-02-16

    Falls among community-dwelling older adults are a serious public health concern. While evidence-based fall prevention strategies are available, their effective implementation requires broad cross-sector coordination that is beyond the capacity of any single institution or organization. Community groups comprised of diverse stakeholders that include public health, care providers from the public and private sectors and citizen volunteers are working to deliver locally-based fall prevention. These groups are examples of collective impact and are important venues for public health professionals (PHPs) to deliver their mandate to work collaboratively towards achieving improved health outcomes. This study explores the process of community-based group work directed towards fall prevention, and it focuses particular attention on the collaborative leadership practices of PHPs, in order to advance understanding of the competencies required for collective impact. Four community groups, located in Ontario, Canada, were studied using an exploratory, retrospective, multiple case study design. The criteria for inclusion were presence of a PHP, a diverse membership and the completion of an initiative that fit within the scope of the World Health Organization Fall Prevention Model. Data were collected using interviews (n = 26), focus groups (n = 4), and documents. Cross-case synthesis was conducted by a collaborative team of researchers. The community groups differed by membership, the role of the PHP and the type of fall prevention initiatives. Seven practice themes emerged: (1) tailoring to address context; (2) making connections; (3) enabling communication; (4) shaping a vision; (5) skill-building to mobilize and take action; (6) orchestrating people and projects; and (7) contributing information and experience. The value of recognized leadership competencies was underscored and the vital role of institutional supports was highlighted. To align stakeholders working

  14. Communities of Resistance: A Case Study of Two Feminist English Classes in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahill, Cheiron

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a case study of two feminist English classes in Japan. The two classes described are grass-roots examples of Japanese women combining their study of English with the study of feminism, consciousness-raising, and action in the world. (JL)

  15. Sea lice treatments on salmon farms have no adverse effects on zooplankton communities: a case study.

    PubMed

    Willis, K J; Gillibrand, P A; Cromey, C J; Black, K D

    2005-08-01

    The long-term effects of the sea lice treatment products Excis and Slice on zooplankton communities in a Scottish sea loch were investigated at a commercially operating salmon farm over 31 months. Cypermethrin and emamectin benzoate are the active ingredients in Excis and Slice respectively, which are widely used to control ectoparasitic sea lice on farmed salmon. Excis and Slice treatments did not cause basin-wide effects on the zooplankton community. For both formulations, no adverse affects on zooplankton were detected, instead observed changes in zooplankton abundance and community composition displayed natural seasonal cycles of abundance. Water column concentrations of cypermethrin and emamectin benzoate following sea lice treatments at the fish farm were predicted using models. Cypermethrin concentrations of 3000 ng/l were predicted for short periods immediately after each cage treatment assuming no particle adhesion. The 3-h and 24-h Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) were exceeded for 10 h and 32 h respectively on the second day when five cages were treated. However, cypermethrin concentrations higher than 0.5 ng/l (24-h EQS) were predicted to occur over <2% of the total basin area on each treatment day. The 3-h EQS (16 ng/l) was exceeded in <0.3% of the basin on each treatment day. The concentration of soluble emamectin benzoate present in the water column was predicted from modelled deposition footprints and sediment concentrations to be of order 10(-3) ng/l. Predicted concentrations of both chemicals were generally lower than those causing toxicity to copepods in previous laboratory studies and further support the results of this field study that environmental concentrations of Excis and Slice do not adversely impact zooplankton communities.

  16. Income and nutritional status of the fishing community residing in coastal bay of Bengal: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pal, Baidyanath; Chattopadhyay, Manabendu; Maity, Moumita; Mukhopadhyay, Barun; Gupta, Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    This is part of a project on the disadvantaged, marginalized, vulnerable/weaker section of the population and their survival strategy. The paper presents the results of a survey carried out during 2006-07 with the objective of throwing light on the life and living conditions of an economically weaker community such as 'fishing community' residing in the coastal area of Bay of Bengal in West Bengal and Orissa, India, in the context of global scenario. Various scientists have conducted quite a large number of studies to ascertain the income and nutritional status of people in rural India. Very few attempts, however, have been made to investigate in detail regarding the living standards of some specific communities, which are very often referred to, as the 'weaker section' of the people. The people belonging to fishing community are, by and large, not only economically weak in terms of earning and availability of work, the majority of them are not able to procure the minimum nourishment. The present study shows that some notable elements of living conditions such as food, shelter, health etc. matters much more than the conventional income or calorie deficiency. Commonly, the social scientists equate poverty with income or calorie deficiency which may not be the case as is evident from this study. We have hinted some measures to be undertaken to ameliorate the sufferings of the fishing community.

  17. Military Intervention in Intrastate Conflicts in West Africa: Economic Community of West African States Monitoring Group as a Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Economic Community of West African States Monitoring Group as a Case Study Approved by: , Thesis Committee Chair Bruce W. Menning...also goes to my committee chairman, Dr. Bruce W. Menning, who gave me the needed encouragement from the very start and continued to the end. Despite...Mutual Assistance on Defence MODEL Movement for Democracy in Liberia MPCI Patriotic Movement of Côte d’ Iviore NATO North Atlantic Treaty

  18. Case Study: Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  19. Applying community-oriented primary care methods in British general practice: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, Steve; Lenihan, Penny; Wallace, Paul; Drennan, Vari; Blanchard, Martin; Harris, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The '75 and over' assessments built into the 1990 contract for general practice have failed to enthuse primary care teams or make a significant impact on the health of older people. Alternative methods for improving the health of older people living at home are being sought. AIM: To test the feasibility of applying community-oriented primary care methodology to a relatively deprived sub-population of older people in a relatively deprived area. DESIGN OF STUDY: A combination of developmental and triangulation approaches to data analysis. SETTING: Four general practices in an inner London borough. METHOD: A community-oriented primary care approach was used to initiate innovative care for older people, supported financially by the health authority and practically by primary care academics. RESULTS: All four practices identified problems needing attention in the older population, developed different projects focused on particular needs among older people, and tested them in practice. Patient and public involvement were central to the design and implementation processes in only one practice. Innovations were sustained in only one practice, but some were adopted by a primary care group and others extended to a wider group of practices by the health authority. CONCLUSION: A modified community-oriented primary care approach can be used in British general practice, and changes can be promoted that are perceived as valuable by planning bodies. However, this methodology may have more impact at primary care trust level than at practice level. PMID:12171223

  20. Investigation of acute effects of graphene oxide on wastewater microbial community: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2013-07-15

    The market for graphene-based products, such as graphene oxide (GO), is projected to reach nearly $675 million by 2020, hence it is expected that large quantities of graphene-based wastes will be generated by then. Wastewater treatment plants will be one of the ultimate repositories for these wastes. Efficient waste treatment relies heavily on the functions of diverse microbial communities. Therefore, systematic investigation of any potential toxic effects of GO in wastewater microbial communities is essential to determine the potential adverse effects and the fate of these nanomaterials in the environment. In the present study, we investigate the acute toxicity, i.e. short-term and high load, effect of GO on the microbial functions related to the biological wastewater treatment process. The results showed that toxic effects of GO on microbial communities were dose dependent, especially in concentrations between 50 and 300mg/L. Bacterial metabolic activity, bacterial viability, and biological removal of nutrients, such as organics, nitrogen and phosphorus, were significantly impacted by the presence of GO in the activated sludge. Furthermore, the presence of GO deteriorated the final effluent quality by increasing the water turbidity and reducing the sludge dewaterability. Microscopic techniques confirmed penetration and accumulation of GO inside the activated sludge floc matrix. Results demonstrated that the interaction of GO with wastewater produced significant amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could be one of the responsible mechanisms for the toxic effect of GO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Traditional climate knowledge: a case study in a peasant community of Tlaxcala, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Romero, Alexis D; Moreno-Calles, Ana I; Casas, Alejandro; Castillo, Alicia; Camou-Guerrero, Andrés

    2016-08-18

    Traditional climate knowledge is a comprehensive system of insights, experiences and practices used by peasant communities to deal with the uncertainties of climate conditions affecting their livelihood. This knowledge is today as relevant in the Mesoamerican and Andean regions as it is in Europe and Asia. Our research sought to analyze the traditional knowledge about the weather and climate in a rural village of the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico, and its importance in decision-making in agriculture. Through 30 interviews and participant observation in the community during 2013, information was gathered about traditional climate and weather indicators and prediction tools, as well as rituals and agronomic and agroforestry strategies. This information allowed for the reconstruction of the community's agro-festive calendar. Data analysis was carried out with the help of the qualitative analysis software Atlas.ti (version 7). The socio-ecological importance of traditional knowledge about the climate lies in its ability to forecast local weather conditions and recognize climate variations, so vital to the food security of rural families. Knowledge about climate predictors is exchanged and passed on from generation to generation, contributing to the preservation and promotion of biodiversity. By observing the behavior of 16 animals and 12 plant species (both domestic and wild) as well as seven astronomical indicators, villagers are able to predict rain, dry weather and frosts. However, the continuity of this traditional knowledge in the community under study is now compromised by the little interest in agriculture characteristic of the younger generations, the ensuing abandonment of the countryside, the widespread economic crisis and the disappearance of animal and plant species. Traditional climate knowledge includes the understanding of weather events and weather changes at different time scales (hours, days, weeks, and seasons). The ability to interpret weather events

  2. Community relations and child-led microfinance: a case study of caregiving children in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Skovdal, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Rampant levels of AIDS and poverty have made many children in sub-Saharan Africa the primary caregivers of their ageing or ailing guardians. This paper reports on a social action fund initiative that brought caregiving children together to set-up and run income generating activities as a group with the aim of strengthening their coping capabilities. To further our understanding of child-led microfinance activities, this paper explores how intra-community relations can both facilitate and undermine child-led activities, and how these activities in turn can further strengthen some intra-community relations. Twenty-one children (aged 12-17) and six guardians participated in this study. Data included draw-and-write compositions (n=21), essays (n=16), workshop notes and proposals (n=8) and in-depth interviews (n=16). A thematic analysis revealed that the children actively drew on the expertise and involvement of some guardians in the project as well as on each other, developing supportive peer relations that helped strengthen their coping capabilities. However, the children's disenfranchised position in the community meant that some adults took advantage of the child-led activities for their own personal gain. Some children also showed a lack of commitment to collective work, undermining the morale of their more active peers. Nevertheless, both guardians and the children themselves began to look at caregiving children differently as their engagement in the project began to earn them respect from the community - changing guardian/child relations. The paper concludes that microfinance interventions targeting children and young people must consider children's relationships with each other and with adults as key determinants of Project success.

  3. Schistosoma mansoni and HIV acquisition in fishing communities of Lake Victoria, Uganda: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ssetaala, Ali; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Asiki, Gershim; Kyakuwa, Nassim; Mpendo, Juliet; Van Dam, Govert J; Corstjens, Paul L; Pala, Pietro; Nielsen, Leslie; Bont, Jan De; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Kiwanuka, Noah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kamali, Anatoli; Elliott, Alison M

    2015-09-01

    It has been suggested that Schistosoma mansoni, which is endemic in African fishing communities, might increase susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. If confirmed, this would be of great public health importance in these high HIV-risk communities. This study was undertaken to determine whether S. mansoni infection is a risk factor for HIV infection among the fishing communities of Lake Victoria, Uganda. We conducted a matched case-control study, nested within a prospective HIV incidence cohort, including 50 HIV seroconverters (cases) and 150 controls during 2009-2011. S. mansoni infection prior to HIV seroconversion was determined by measuring serum circulating anodic antigen (CAA) in stored serum. HIV testing was carried out using the Determine rapid test and infection confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. About 49% of cases and 52% of controls had S. mansoni infection prior to HIV seroconversion (or at the time of a similar study visit, for controls): odds ratio, adjusting for ethnicity, religion, marital status, education, occupation, frequency of alcohol consumption in previous 3 months, number of sexual partners while drunk, duration of stay in the community, and history of schistosomiasis treatment in the past 2 years was 1.23 (95% CI 0.3-5.7) P = 0.79. S. mansoni infections were chronic (with little change in status between enrolment and HIV seroconversion), and there was no difference in median CAA concentration between cases and controls. These results do not support the hypothesis that S. mansoni infection promotes HIV acquisition. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Transformation of Palm Beach Community College to Palm Beach State College: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basiratmand, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to examine the organization and leadership change process of Palm Beach State College, a publicly funded institution in Florida, as it embarked on offering bachelor's degree programs. The study examined the organizational change process and the extent to which Palm Beach State College's organization…

  5. Making School Work in a Changing World: Tatitlek Community School. Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Sarah

    As part of a larger study of systemic educational reform in rural Alaska, this case study examines the implementation of the Alaska Onward to Excellence (AOTE) improvement process in the village of Tatitlek in south-central Alaska. The village has about 100 residents, mostly of Alutiiq heritage (Native peoples of Prince William Sound). A…

  6. Transformation of Palm Beach Community College to Palm Beach State College: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basiratmand, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to examine the organization and leadership change process of Palm Beach State College, a publicly funded institution in Florida, as it embarked on offering bachelor's degree programs. The study examined the organizational change process and the extent to which Palm Beach State College's organization…

  7. The "Boom" and "Bust" Patterns of Communities within the Energy Rich Region of West Virginia: A Case Study of Moundsville

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiger, Brandon S.

    The increasing worldwide demand for energy will provide Energy Rich Regions (ERRs) the opportunity to increase their wealth and quality of living. However, a reoccurring pattern of boom and bust cycles in ERRs suggests the need for more sustainable development strategies. A mixed methods approach (case study) is employed to explore the "wicked human problems" occurring in one community, Moundsville, WV and to discover development patterns that might inform sustainable development strategies for the future. This study explores briefly the distant past development patterns, and in greater detail the pre-boom and most current boom in natural gas. First, data will be derived from a conceptual "Energy Rich Region Template" that explores the sustainability of development from the inclusive wealth forms of natural, human, and physical capital. The qualitative data analysis software (MAXQDA) is used to systematically collect and organize data and information into a community-wide knowledge base (specifically the seven years of city council minutes). This framework can assist future research dedicated to similar cases. Furthermore, this case may support communities and or policymakers in the development of a programming guide for converting the natural capital into other reproducible capital forms, thus avoiding the development cycle of boom and bust.

  8. Neighborhood Characteristics, Community Development Corporations and the Community Development Industry System: A Case Study of the American Deep South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Robert Mark

    2001-01-01

    Relationship between neighborhood characteristics and community development corporations (CDCs) was examined in Jackson, Mississippi. CDCs were more likely to be in neighborhoods with significant numbers of disenfranchised groups and disinvestment in the built environment. They act as subcontractors, which limits their power and mirrors structural…

  9. Using the Women's Community Education Approach to Deliver Community Employment Training: A Case Study from Longford Women's Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lorne; Dowd, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The recent economic downturn and surge in unemployment has focused attention on education and training as a strategic response to Ireland's socio-economic crisis. However, that attention has been concentrated on training through statutory institutions, particularly FAS and the VECs. Longford Women's Link, a Women's Community Education centre in Co…

  10. Disaster Governance for Community Resilience in Coastal Towns: Chilean Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Paula; Quintana, Carolina

    2017-09-14

    This study aimed to further our understanding of a characteristic of Community Resilience known as Disaster Governance. Three attributes of Disaster Governance-redundancy, diversity, and overlap-were studied in four coastal towns in southern Chile that are at risk of tsunamis. Overall, we explored how different spatial structures of human settlements influence Disaster Governance. Using the Projective Mapping Technique, the distribution of emergency institutions (N = 32) and uses given to specific sites (e.g., for refuge, sanitary purposes and medical attention) were mapped. Content and GIS analyses (Directional Distribution and Kernel Density Index) were used to explore the dispersion and concentration of institutions and uses in each town. Disaster Governance was found to be highly influenced by decisions taken during regional, urban, and emergency planning. Governance is better in towns of higher order in the communal hierarchical structure. Most of the emergency institutions were found to be located in central and urban areas, which, in turn, assures more redundancy, overlap, and diversity in governance in the event of a tsunami. Lack of flexibility of emergency plans also limits governance in rural and indigenous areas. While the spatial relationships found in this study indicate that urban sectors have better Disaster Governance than rural and indigenous sectors, the influence of resource availability after tsunamis, the role and responsibility of different levels of governments, and the politics of disaster also play an important role in Disaster Governance for determining Community Resilience. These findings shed light on emergency planning and aspects of the Disaster Management cycle.

  11. A case study of community-based distribution and use of Misoprostol and Chlorhexidine in Sokoto State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Molly; Charyeva, Zulfiya; Oguntunde, Olugbenga; Sambisa, William; Shoretire, Kamil; Orobaton, Nosa

    2016-04-21

    The United States Agency for International Development/Targeted States High Impact Project supported Sokoto State, Nigeria government in the development of a community-based intervention aimed at preventing post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) and cord infection among women and children, respectively. This paper describes the innovative intervention within the Nigeria health delivery system. It then explains the case study approach to assessing this intervention and summarises findings. Ultimately, the intervention was received well in communities and both drugs were added to the procurement list of all health facilities providing maternity services in the State. Key factors leading to such success include early advocacy efforts at the state-level, broad stakeholder engagement in designing the distribution system, early community engagement about the value of the drugs and concerted efforts to monitor and ensure availability of the drugs. Implementation challenges occurred in some areas, including shortage of community-based health volunteers (CBHVs) and drug keepers, and socio-cultural barriers. To maximise and sustain the effectiveness of such interventions, state government needs to ensure constant drug supply and adequate human resources at the community level, enhance counselling and mobilisation efforts, establish effective quality improvement strategies and implement a strong M&E system.

  12. Community pharmacy-based point-of-care testing: A case study of pharmacist-physician collaborative working relationships.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Jennifer L; Klepser, Donald; Tilley, Heather; Smith, Jaclyn K; Klepser, Michael E

    2017-01-03

    Building collaborative working relationships (CWRs) with physicians or other prescribers is an important step for community pharmacists in establishing a collaborative practice agreement (CPA). This case study describes the individual, context, and exchange factors that drive pharmacist-physician CWR development for community pharmacy-based point-of-care (POC) testing. Two physicians who had entered in a CPA with community pharmacists to provide POC testing were surveyed and interviewed. High scores on the pharmacist-physician collaborative index indicated a high level of collaboration between the physicians and the pharmacist who initiated the relationship. Trust was established through the physicians' personal relationships with the pharmacist or due to the community pharmacy organization's strong reputation. The physicians' individual perceptions of community pharmacy-based POC testing affected their CWRs and willingness to establish a CPA. These findings suggest that exchange characteristics remain significant factors in CWR development. Individual factors may also contribute to physicians' willingness to advance their CWR to include a CPA for POC testing.

  13. Is Meaningful Community Involvement Radical? A Case Study of the Duwamish River

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation looks closely at the community involvement and communication strategy used in Seattle during the public comment period for the Duwamish River Superfund site, a strategy that resulted in community awareness, action, and stewardship.

  14. The Avalon Gardens Men's Association: A Community Health Psychology Case Study.

    PubMed

    Borg, Mark B

    2002-05-01

    This article follows the development and progress of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development's 'Healthy and Safe Communities' initiative as it was implemented by a community empowerment organization during a four-year community revitalization project in the aftermath of the Los Angeles riots. The author explores practical aspects of Community Health Psychology through assessing the ways in which its organizing principles were manifest in community-wide processes of individual and community change in one low-income housing project in South Central Los Angeles called Avalon Gardens. Specifically highlighted is how a group of African American and Latino men in the community created a group forum that helped foster, support and sustain an empowerment process that supported health promotion, health consciousness and significant health improvement in the community.

  15. Factors Associated With Weight Change in Online Weight Management Communities: A Case Study in the LoseIt Reddit Community

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Antonio; Couto Silva, Ana Paula; Meira Jr, Wagner

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown that of the 72% of American Internet users who have looked for health information online, 22% have searched for help to lose or control weight. This demand for information has given rise to many online weight management communities, where users support one another throughout their weight loss process. Whether and how user engagement in online communities relates to weight change is not totally understood. Objective We investigated the activity behavior and analyze the semantic content of the messages of active users in LoseIt (r/loseit), a weight management community of the online social network Reddit. We then explored whether these features are associated with weight loss in this online social network. Methods A data collection tool was used to collect English posts, comments, and other public metadata of active users (ie, users with at least one post or comment) on LoseIt from August 2010 to November 2014. Analyses of frequency and intensity of user interaction in the community were performed together with a semantic analysis of the messages, done by a latent Dirichlet allocation method. The association between weight loss and online user activity patterns, the semantics of the messages, and real-world variables was found by a linear regression model using 30-day weight change as the dependent variable. Results We collected posts and comments of 107,886 unique users. Among these, 101,003 (93.62%) wrote at least one comment and 38,981 (36.13%) wrote at least one post. Median percentage of days online was 3.81 (IQR 9.51). The 10 most-discussed semantic topics on posts were related to healthy food, clothing, calorie counting, workouts, looks, habits, support, and unhealthy food. In the subset of 754 users who had gender, age, and 30-day weight change data available, women were predominant and 92.9% (701/754) lost weight. Female gender, body mass index (BMI) at baseline, high levels of online activity, the number of upvotes

  16. Factors Associated With Weight Change in Online Weight Management Communities: A Case Study in the LoseIt Reddit Community.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Gisele Lobo; Cunha, Tiago Oliveira; Bicalho, Paulo Viana; Ribeiro, Antonio; Couto Silva, Ana Paula; Meira, Wagner; Beleigoli, Alline Maria Rezende

    2017-01-16

    Recent research has shown that of the 72% of American Internet users who have looked for health information online, 22% have searched for help to lose or control weight. This demand for information has given rise to many online weight management communities, where users support one another throughout their weight loss process. Whether and how user engagement in online communities relates to weight change is not totally understood. We investigated the activity behavior and analyze the semantic content of the messages of active users in LoseIt (r/loseit), a weight management community of the online social network Reddit. We then explored whether these features are associated with weight loss in this online social network. A data collection tool was used to collect English posts, comments, and other public metadata of active users (ie, users with at least one post or comment) on LoseIt from August 2010 to November 2014. Analyses of frequency and intensity of user interaction in the community were performed together with a semantic analysis of the messages, done by a latent Dirichlet allocation method. The association between weight loss and online user activity patterns, the semantics of the messages, and real-world variables was found by a linear regression model using 30-day weight change as the dependent variable. We collected posts and comments of 107,886 unique users. Among these, 101,003 (93.62%) wrote at least one comment and 38,981 (36.13%) wrote at least one post. Median percentage of days online was 3.81 (IQR 9.51). The 10 most-discussed semantic topics on posts were related to healthy food, clothing, calorie counting, workouts, looks, habits, support, and unhealthy food. In the subset of 754 users who had gender, age, and 30-day weight change data available, women were predominant and 92.9% (701/754) lost weight. Female gender, body mass index (BMI) at baseline, high levels of online activity, the number of upvotes received per post, and topics discussed

  17. Opportunities and Pitfalls of Community-Based Research: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanyi, Michael; Cockburn, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Based on a recent community-based research project with injured workers, identifies challenges faced when academics engage in community-based research based at a university, including dealing with the constraints and requirements of academic research funding, bridging the goals of academics and community members, and functioning within the…

  18. Building Vibrant School-Community Music Collaborations: Three Case Studies from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between school music and community music in Australia. While many Australian schools and community music activities tend to exist in relative isolation from one another, a range of unique school-community collaborations can be found throughout the country. Drawing on insights from "Sound Links," one…

  19. Enhancing Economic Stability Utilizing the High Technologies in Community Colleges: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehnert, Barbara H.; Kurki, Allan W.

    Strategies to enhance the economic stability of community colleges through high technology approaches are discussed in this paper. First, general economic problems facing higher education are identified, and the ways in which they influence community colleges are described. Next, 10 strategies to aid in the economic recovery of community colleges…

  20. Learning to Be Drier: A Case Study of Adult and Community Learning in the Australian Riverland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mike; Schulz, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the adult and community learning associated with "learning to be drier" in the Riverland region of South Australia. Communities in the Riverland are currently adjusting and making changes to their understandings and practices as part of learning to live with less water. The analysis of adult and community learning…

  1. Community Development in Rural Texas: A Case Study of Balmorhea Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Sarah; Velazquez, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    In a West Texas community that is 70% Hispanic, school-based community services build solidarity and contribute to well-being. The school provides social services, a community clinic, and service learning opportunities for students. This model is successful because it is self-initiated and self-organized. (Contains 43 references.) (SK)

  2. "It Really Comes Down to the Community": A Case Study of a Rural School Music Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDeusen, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Communities, schools, their music programs, and the individuals who participate in these groups are tied to the social, cultural, and political contexts in which they reside. Schools are often connected to their communities, and are often deeply cherished in rural communities. School music programs hold the potential to influence a small…

  3. Implementing the Boston Healthy Start Initiative: A Case Study of Community Empowerment and Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plough, Alonzo; Olafson, Freya

    1994-01-01

    As implemented in Boston, the federal Healthy Start Initiative aimed at reducing infant mortality revealed the following: (1) conflict is inherent in a federal program that also calls for community participation and control; (2) trust among community-based partners is essential; and (3) meaningful input from community members is necessary if…

  4. Dominant Coalitions and Dominant General Management Logic: A Case Study of Community College Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Lucian Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States are faced with several challenges, one of which is increasing the percentage of students that earn an associate degree. Research (American Association of Community Colleges, 2012; Amey, 2005; Eddy, 2010; Roueche, 2008) suggests that community college administrators need to think, act, manage, and lead in…

  5. The Silent North: A Case Study on Deafness in a Dene Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleden, Heather

    2002-01-01

    In an isolated, northern Canadian, Indigenous community, interviews were conducted with family and community members connected to a young deaf boy, who finally was sent away to a residential school. Findings highlight the lack of culturally relevant services in northern communities, prevalence of otitis media and hearing loss in Native children,…

  6. Creative Curriculum for an Inner City: A Case Study of Alex Taylor Community School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsankar, Steve; Hart, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Describes the transformation of an inner-city school in Edmonton, Alberta, from a rigidly traditional facility to a center of community activity. In framing their cocreative curriculum, staff at the Alex Taylor Community School continually look at their students and community and attempt to serve the total child through creating an environment of…

  7. Community Development in Rural Texas: A Case Study of Balmorhea Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Sarah; Velazquez, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    In a West Texas community that is 70% Hispanic, school-based community services build solidarity and contribute to well-being. The school provides social services, a community clinic, and service learning opportunities for students. This model is successful because it is self-initiated and self-organized. (Contains 43 references.) (SK)

  8. "It Really Comes Down to the Community": A Case Study of a Rural School Music Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDeusen, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Communities, schools, their music programs, and the individuals who participate in these groups are tied to the social, cultural, and political contexts in which they reside. Schools are often connected to their communities, and are often deeply cherished in rural communities. School music programs hold the potential to influence a small…

  9. The Silent North: A Case Study on Deafness in a Dene Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleden, Heather

    2002-01-01

    In an isolated, northern Canadian, Indigenous community, interviews were conducted with family and community members connected to a young deaf boy, who finally was sent away to a residential school. Findings highlight the lack of culturally relevant services in northern communities, prevalence of otitis media and hearing loss in Native children,…

  10. Opportunities and Pitfalls of Community-Based Research: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanyi, Michael; Cockburn, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Based on a recent community-based research project with injured workers, identifies challenges faced when academics engage in community-based research based at a university, including dealing with the constraints and requirements of academic research funding, bridging the goals of academics and community members, and functioning within the…

  11. Dominant Coalitions and Dominant General Management Logic: A Case Study of Community College Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Lucian Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States are faced with several challenges, one of which is increasing the percentage of students that earn an associate degree. Research (American Association of Community Colleges, 2012; Amey, 2005; Eddy, 2010; Roueche, 2008) suggests that community college administrators need to think, act, manage, and lead in…

  12. In Search of Meaningful Daytimes: Case Studies of Community-Based Nonwork Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulewski, Jennifer Sullivan

    2010-01-01

    As of 2004, more than 114,000 individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities in the United States were identified as receiving supports for community-based nonwork (CBNW), that is, activities that do not involve paid employment but do take place in the community rather than that in a facility (Institute for Community Inclusion, 2007).…

  13. Enhancing Economic Stability Utilizing the High Technologies in Community Colleges: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehnert, Barbara H.; Kurki, Allan W.

    Strategies to enhance the economic stability of community colleges through high technology approaches are discussed in this paper. First, general economic problems facing higher education are identified, and the ways in which they influence community colleges are described. Next, 10 strategies to aid in the economic recovery of community colleges…

  14. Donor Retention in Online Crowdfunding Communities: A Case Study of DonorsChoose.org

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Tim; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Online crowdfunding platforms like DonorsChoose.org and Kick-starter allow specific projects to get funded by targeted contributions from a large number of people. Critical for the success of crowdfunding communities is recruitment and continued engagement of donors. With donor attrition rates above 70%, a significant challenge for online crowdfunding platforms as well as traditional offline non-profit organizations is the problem of donor retention. We present a large-scale study of millions of donors and donations on DonorsChoose.org, a crowdfunding platform for education projects. Studying an online crowdfunding platform allows for an unprecedented detailed view of how people direct their donations. We explore various factors impacting donor retention which allows us to identify different groups of donors and quantify their propensity to return for subsequent donations. We find that donors are more likely to return if they had a positive interaction with the receiver of the donation. We also show that this includes appropriate and timely recognition of their support as well as detailed communication of their impact. Finally, we discuss how our findings could inform steps to improve donor retention in crowdfunding communities and non-profit organizations. PMID:27077139

  15. Donor Retention in Online Crowdfunding Communities: A Case Study of DonorsChoose.org.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Tim; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-05-01

    Online crowdfunding platforms like DonorsChoose.org and Kick-starter allow specific projects to get funded by targeted contributions from a large number of people. Critical for the success of crowdfunding communities is recruitment and continued engagement of donors. With donor attrition rates above 70%, a significant challenge for online crowdfunding platforms as well as traditional offline non-profit organizations is the problem of donor retention. We present a large-scale study of millions of donors and donations on DonorsChoose.org, a crowdfunding platform for education projects. Studying an online crowdfunding platform allows for an unprecedented detailed view of how people direct their donations. We explore various factors impacting donor retention which allows us to identify different groups of donors and quantify their propensity to return for subsequent donations. We find that donors are more likely to return if they had a positive interaction with the receiver of the donation. We also show that this includes appropriate and timely recognition of their support as well as detailed communication of their impact. Finally, we discuss how our findings could inform steps to improve donor retention in crowdfunding communities and non-profit organizations.

  16. Collaborative Drug Therapy Management: Case Studies of Three Community-Based Models of Care

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Margie E.; Earl, Tara R.; Greenberg, Michael; Heisler, Holly; Revels, Michelle; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative drug therapy management agreements are a strategy for expanding the role of pharmacists in team-based care with other providers. However, these agreements have not been widely implemented. This study describes the features of existing provider–pharmacist collaborative drug therapy management practices and identifies the facilitators and barriers to implementing such services in community settings. We conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in 2012 in a federally qualified health center, an independent pharmacy, and a retail pharmacy chain. Facilitators included 1) ensuring pharmacists were adequately trained; 2) obtaining stakeholder (eg, physician) buy-in; and 3) leveraging academic partners. Barriers included 1) lack of pharmacist compensation; 2) hesitation among providers to trust pharmacists; 3) lack of time and resources; and 4) existing informal collaborations that resulted in reduced interest in formal agreements. The models described in this study could be used to strengthen clinical–community linkages through team-based care, particularly for chronic disease prevention and management. PMID:25811494

  17. Lifelong Education and Community Learning: Three Case Studies in India. UIE Monographs, 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, V; Shukla, N. N.

    Three case studies of educational practices in India illustrate that lifelong learning (1) is not confined to childhood; (2) encompasses a large number of sources outside formal education; and (3) can lead to improvement of everday life. These three educational activities, all at semi-rural institutions, and directed toward improving aborigines'…

  18. Integrating Community Engagement with Management Education: A Case Study of ENT300014 Social Innovation Internship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngui, Kwang-Sing; Voon, Mung-Ling; Lee, Miin-Huui

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an academic service learning course in a foreign university branch campus in Malaysia, and its outcomes in terms of student learning. Drawing on the transformative learning theory and case study research, it discusses three forms of learning that characterise the students'…

  19. Successful Mathematics Lessons in Remote Communities: A Case Study of Balargo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the lesson practices at one very remote school that has been highly successful in numeracy. Drawing on a significant body of diverse research that promotes quality teaching and learning, this case study describes the features of the practice that have been implemented across the school. Teachers' voices provide both…

  20. Encounters with Wisdom: A Case Study of Community Worker Reflection Circles in San Antonio, TX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arispe, Don D.

    2013-01-01

    This case study focuses upon the transformational experiences of 28 social service and pastoral workers engaged in a Reflection Circle Process (RCP) in San Antonio, TX. The RCP involves the writing of a holistic journal entry, known as a process note, coupled with an in-depth exploration of the note with the help of a group of trusted peers, known…

  1. Lifelong Education and Community Learning: Three Case Studies in India. UIE Monographs, 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, V; Shukla, N. N.

    Three case studies of educational practices in India illustrate that lifelong learning (1) is not confined to childhood; (2) encompasses a large number of sources outside formal education; and (3) can lead to improvement of everday life. These three educational activities, all at semi-rural institutions, and directed toward improving aborigines'…

  2. Encounters with Wisdom: A Case Study of Community Worker Reflection Circles in San Antonio, TX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arispe, Don D.

    2013-01-01

    This case study focuses upon the transformational experiences of 28 social service and pastoral workers engaged in a Reflection Circle Process (RCP) in San Antonio, TX. The RCP involves the writing of a holistic journal entry, known as a process note, coupled with an in-depth exploration of the note with the help of a group of trusted peers, known…

  3. Multiculturalism and the Community College: A Case Study of an Immigrant Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    To gather data on the goals and effectiveness of a postsecondary program organized from the perspective of multiculturalism, a case study was conducted of Nuevos Horizontes (NH), an immigrant education program at Triton College, in Illinois. NH is designed to facilitate access to higher education for Hispanics and other minority students; provide…

  4. Seeding Writing Project Principles and Practices in a School Community: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Terry; Kato, Helen

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a small-scale case study involving all English teachers of junior classes in a rural high school in New Zealand. The Head of English had been involved in Writing Project professional learning, designed in accordance with principles and practices that can be found in a number of countries, especially the United States. The…

  5. Learning in Collaboration: A Case Study of a Community Based Partnership Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Devarati S.

    2010-01-01

    This ethnographic case study investigated a multi-agency partnership project in a Midwestern city, the goal of which was to holistically address the health, safety and wellness issues of teen girls in an alternative school. The researcher was one of the eleven partners representing five different organizations that came together to create a…

  6. A Community Organizing Case Study: An Analysis of Cap-It's Strategy to Prevent the Location of a Toxic Waste Incinerator in Their Community.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J

    1992-01-01

    With the great proliferation of chemical manufacturing in the past half-century, the dilemma of dealing with the waste produced has become an increasing problem facing communities. One method that is gaining increased acceptance by both government and industry is incineration. Many citizens have formed groups to protest these facilities because of their concerns about health risks, especially exposure to carcinogens. This case study profiles one such group, CAP-IT, a collection of middle-class residents living in a small working-class town and their successful battle to prevent the siting of a hazardous waste incinerator. CAP-IT's strategy will be critiqued using methods advanced by Lee Staples, Nicholas Freudenburg and Kurt Lewin to demonstrate the power of community organizing activities.

  7. Colorectal cancer screening: a community case-control study of proctosigmoidoscopy, barium enema radiography, and fecal occult blood test efficacy.

    PubMed

    Scheitel, S M; Ahlquist, D A; Wollan, P C; Hagen, P T; Silverstein, M D

    1999-12-01

    To examine the effectiveness of screening proctosigmoidoscopy, barium enema radiography, and the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in decreasing colorectal cancer mortality in a community setting. In this population-based case-control study, cases comprised 218 Rochester, Minn, residents who died of colorectal cancer between 1970 and 1993. Controls were 435 age- and sex-matched residents who did not have a diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Screening proctosigmoidoscopy, barium enema radiography, and FOBT results were documented for the 10 years prior to and including the date of diagnosis of fatal colorectal cancer in cases and for the same period in matched controls. History of general medical examinations and hospitalizations was also recorded. Within the 10 years prior to diagnosis, the percentages of cases vs controls with at least 1 screening proctosigmoidoscopy were 23 (10.6%) of 218 cases vs 43 (9.9%) of 435 controls; at least 1 screening barium enema radiographic study was done in 12 (5.5%) of 218 vs 25 (5.7%) of 435. Within 3 years prior to diagnosis, the percentages of cases vs controls with at least 1 screening FOBT were 27 (12.4%) of 218 vs 44 (10.1%) of 435. Adjusted odds ratios were 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-5.13) for proctosigmoidoscopy (distal rectosigmoid cancers only), 0.67 (95% CI, 0.31-1.48) for barium enema radiography, and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.45-1.52) for FOBT over the above time periods. In this case-control study within a community setting, a colorectal cancer-specific mortality benefit could not be demonstrated for screening by FOBT, proctosigmoidoscopy, or barium enema radiography. Screening frequency was low, which may have contributed to the lack of measurable effects.

  8. Management of children’s acute diarrhea by community pharmacies in five towns of Ethiopia: simulated client case study

    PubMed Central

    Abegaz, Tadesse Melaku; Belachew, Sewunet Admasu; Abebe, Tamrat Befekadu; Gebresilassie, Begashaw Melaku; Teni, Fitsum Sebsibe; Woldie, Habtamu Gebremeskel

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute diarrhea is the major cause of child morbidity and mortality in low-income nations. It is the second most common cause of death among children <5 years of age globally. The indispensable role of community pharmacists is clearly observed in the prevention and treatment of diarrhea. However, there is a paucity of data on how community pharmacies manage acute childhood diarrhea cases in Ethiopia. This study aimed to evaluate the experience of community pharmacies in the management of acute diarrhea in northern Ethiopia. Methods A simulated case-based cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies from five towns of northern Ethiopia between April 2015 and September 2015. Convenience sampling technique was used to select sample towns. A structured questionnaire was organized to collect the information. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared test, one-way analysis of variance, and binary logistic regression were performed to describe, infer, and test for association between the variables. SPSS for Windows Version 21 was used to enter and analyze the data. A 95% confidence interval and P-value of 0.05 were set to test the level of significance. Results Approximately 113 community pharmacies were visited to collect the required data from five towns. Majority (78, 69%) of them were located away from hospitals and health care areas. Nine components of history taking were presented for dispensers. Regarding the patient history, “age” was frequently taken, (90.3%), whereas “chief complaint” was the least to be taken (23%), for patients presenting with diarrhea. Approximately 96 (85.0%) cases were provided with one or more medications. The remaining 17 (15%) cases did not receive any medication. A total of six pharmacologic groups of medications were given to alleviate acute diarrheal symptoms. Majority (66, 29.6%) of the medications were oral rehydration salts with zinc. The mean number of medications was 1.99 per visit. Components of advice

  9. Nurses’ and community support workers’ experience of telehealth: a longitudinal case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Introduction of telehealth into the healthcare setting has been recognised as a service that might be experienced as disruptive. This paper explores how this disruption is experienced. Methods In a longitudinal qualitative study, we conducted focus group discussions prior to and semi structured interviews post introduction of a telehealth service in Nottingham, U.K. with the community matrons, congestive heart failure nurses, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease nurses and community support workers that would be involved in order to elicit their preconceptions and reactions to the implementation. Results Users experienced disruption due to the implementation of telehealth as threatening. Three main factors add to the experience of threat and affect the decision to use the technology: change in clinical routines and increased workload; change in interactions with patients and fundamentals of face-to-face nursing work; and change in skills required with marginalisation of clinical expertise. Conclusion Since the introduction of telehealth can be experienced as threatening, managers and service providers should aim at minimising the disruption caused by taking the above factors on board. This can be achieved by employing simple yet effective measures such as: providing timely, appropriate and context specific training; provision of adequate technical support; and procedures that allow a balance between the use of telehealth and personal visit by nurses delivering care to their patients. PMID:24721599

  10. Child pedestrian and bicyclist injuries: results of community surveillance and a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, J. F.; Hooten, E. G.; Brown, K. A.; Peek-Asa, C.; Heye, C.; McArthur, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the dimensions of childhood pedestrian and bicyclist injuries in Long Beach, California, and to identify risk factors for these injuries. POPULATION: Long Beach residents aged 0-14 years who were involved in an auto versus pedestrian or bicyclist incident that resulted in a hospital visit and/or police response, between 1 September 1988 and 31 August 1990. METHODS: Cases were identified retrospectively using hospital charts, police records, and coroner's reports; demographic, clinical, and situational information were abstracted from the same. A nested case-control study was conducted to examine the street environments where children were injured, and to identify environmental risk factors at these case sites. RESULTS: 288 children comprised the sample population. Midblock dart-outs emerged as the single most common type of incident. Most incidents happened on residential streets, but the risk of injury was greatest on larger boulevards, and tended to cluster by region within the city. Adjusted odds ratios show that case sites had a larger proportion of traffic exceeding posted speed limits, and were also four times more likely to be near a convenience store, gas station, or fast food store than control sites. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest three possible routes for the prevention of childhood pedestrian and bicyclist injuries: education, law enforcement, and environmental modification. PMID:9346093

  11. Disaster Governance for Community Resilience in Coastal Towns: Chilean Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to further our understanding of a characteristic of Community Resilience known as Disaster Governance. Three attributes of Disaster Governance—redundancy, diversity, and overlap—were studied in four coastal towns in southern Chile that are at risk of tsunamis. Overall, we explored how different spatial structures of human settlements influence Disaster Governance. Using the Projective Mapping Technique, the distribution of emergency institutions (N = 32) and uses given to specific sites (e.g., for refuge, sanitary purposes and medical attention) were mapped. Content and GIS analyses (Directional Distribution and Kernel Density Index) were used to explore the dispersion and concentration of institutions and uses in each town. Disaster Governance was found to be highly influenced by decisions taken during regional, urban, and emergency planning. Governance is better in towns of higher order in the communal hierarchical structure. Most of the emergency institutions were found to be located in central and urban areas, which, in turn, assures more redundancy, overlap, and diversity in governance in the event of a tsunami. Lack of flexibility of emergency plans also limits governance in rural and indigenous areas. While the spatial relationships found in this study indicate that urban sectors have better Disaster Governance than rural and indigenous sectors, the influence of resource availability after tsunamis, the role and responsibility of different levels of governments, and the politics of disaster also play an important role in Disaster Governance for determining Community Resilience. These findings shed light on emergency planning and aspects of the Disaster Management cycle. PMID:28906480

  12. Appraisal of cooperation with a palliative care case manager by general practitioners and community nurses: a cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Annicka G M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Vissers, Kris C; Deliens, Luc; Jansen, Wim J J; Francke, Anneke L

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how general practitioners and community nurses value the support that they receive from a nurse case manager with expertise in palliative care, whether they think the case manager is helpful in realizing appropriate care and what characteristics of the patient and case management are associated with this view. For sustainable palliative care in an ageing society, basic palliative care is provided by generalists and specialist palliative care is reserved for complex situations. Acceptance of and cooperation with specialist palliative care providers by the general practitioner and community nurse is pivotal. Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Questionnaire data from 168 general practitioners and 125 community nurses were analysed using chi-square tests, univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Data were gathered between March 2011-December 2013. Of general practitioners, 46% rated the case manager as helpful in realizing care that is appropriate for the patient; for community nurses this was 49%. The case manager did not hinder the process of care and had added value for patients, according to the general practitioners and community nurses. The tasks of the case manager were associated with whether or not the case manager was helpful in realizing appropriate care, whereas patient characteristics and the number of contacts with the case manager were not. General practitioners and community nurses are moderately positive about the support from the case manager. To improve cooperation further, case managers should invest in contact with general practitioners and community nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Social Dynamics Analysis of the Problems Raised in the Development of a Community Network: A Case Study of A-Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Dong Hee

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigates the processes involved in the development of a broadband community network in the Northeast USA. A community network project was studied by tracing the developmental processes from network design to the stabilisation of information infrastructure. Method: A case study was conducted on the broadband community…

  14. Imagined Communities and Language Socialization Practices in Transnational Space: A Case Study of Two Korean "Study Abroad" Families in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Juyoung

    2012-01-01

    This is a yearlong ethnographic case study of 2 study abroad South Korean families' language socialization practices in their home. It explored how these parents', particularly the mothers', future visions of their returning community in South Korea influenced their home language socialization practices. As their future vision, it employed the…

  15. Human resource development for a community-based health extension program: a case study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ethiopia is one of the sub-Saharan countries most affected by high disease burden, aggravated by a shortage and imbalance of human resources, geographical distance, and socioeconomic factors. In 2004, the government introduced the Health Extension Program (HEP), a primary care delivery strategy, to address the challenges and achieve the World Health Organization Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) within a context of limited resources. Case description The health system was reformed to create a platform for integration and institutionalization of the HEP with appropriate human capacity, infrastructure, and management structures. Human resources were developed through training of female health workers recruited from their prospective villages, designed to limit the high staff turnover and address gender, social and cultural factors in order to provide services acceptable to each community. The service delivery modalities include household, community and health facility care. Thus, the most basic health post infrastructure, designed to rapidly and cost-effectively scale up HEP, was built in each village. In line with the country’s decentralized management system, the HEP service delivery is under the jurisdiction of the district authorities. Discussion and evaluation The nationwide implementation of HEP progressed in line with its target goals. In all, 40 training institutions were established, and over 30,000 Health Extension Workers have been trained and deployed to approximately 15,000 villages. The potential health service coverage reached 92.1% in 2011, up from 64% in 2004. While most health indicators have improved, performance in skilled delivery and postnatal care has not been satisfactory. While HEP is considered the most important institutional framework for achieving the health MDGs in Ethiopia, quality of service, utilization rate, access and referral linkage to emergency obstetric care, management, and evaluation of the program are the key

  16. Addressing the social determinants of health: a case study from the Mitanin (community health worker) programme in India

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Mitanin Programme, a government community health worker (CHW) programme, was started in Chhattisgarh State of India in 2002. The CHWs (Mitanins) have consistently adopted roles that go beyond health programme-specific interventions to embrace community mobilization and action on local priorities. The aim of this research was to document how and why the Mitanins have been able to act on the social determinants of health, describing the catalysts and processes involved and the enabling programmatic and organizational factors. A qualitative comparative case study of successful action by Mitanin was conducted in two ‘blocks’, purposefully selected as positive exemplars in two districts of Chhattisgarh. One case focused on malnutrition and the other on gender-based violence. Data collection involved 17 in-depth interviews and 10 group interviews with the full range of stakeholders in both blocks, including community members and programme team. Thematic analysis was done using a broad conceptual framework that was further refined. Action on social determinants involved raising awareness on rights, mobilizing women’s collectives, revitalizing local political structures and social action targeting both the community and government service providers. Through these processes, the Mitanins developed identities as agents of change and advocates for the community, both with respect to local cultural and gender norms and in ensuring accountability of service providers. The factors underpinning successful action on social determinants were identified as the significance of the original intent and vision of the programme, and how this was carried through into all aspects of programme design, the role of the Mitanins and their identification with village women, ongoing training and support, and the relative autonomy of the programme. Although the results are not narrowly generalizable and do not necessarily represent the situation of the Mitanin Programme as a whole, the

  17. Addressing the social determinants of health: a case study from the Mitanin (community health worker) programme in India.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sulakshana; Schneider, Helen

    2014-09-01

    The Mitanin Programme, a government community health worker (CHW) programme, was started in Chhattisgarh State of India in 2002. The CHWs (Mitanins) have consistently adopted roles that go beyond health programme-specific interventions to embrace community mobilization and action on local priorities. The aim of this research was to document how and why the Mitanins have been able to act on the social determinants of health, describing the catalysts and processes involved and the enabling programmatic and organizational factors. A qualitative comparative case study of successful action by Mitanin was conducted in two 'blocks', purposefully selected as positive exemplars in two districts of Chhattisgarh. One case focused on malnutrition and the other on gender-based violence. Data collection involved 17 in-depth interviews and 10 group interviews with the full range of stakeholders in both blocks, including community members and programme team. Thematic analysis was done using a broad conceptual framework that was further refined. Action on social determinants involved raising awareness on rights, mobilizing women's collectives, revitalizing local political structures and social action targeting both the community and government service providers. Through these processes, the Mitanins developed identities as agents of change and advocates for the community, both with respect to local cultural and gender norms and in ensuring accountability of service providers. The factors underpinning successful action on social determinants were identified as the significance of the original intent and vision of the programme, and how this was carried through into all aspects of programme design, the role of the Mitanins and their identification with village women, ongoing training and support, and the relative autonomy of the programme. Although the results are not narrowly generalizable and do not necessarily represent the situation of the Mitanin Programme as a whole, the

  18. Sporadic cases of community acquired legionnaires' disease: an ecological study to identify new sources of contamination

    PubMed Central

    Che, D; Decludt, B; Campese, C; Desenclos, J

    2003-01-01

    Study objective: To explore the relation between incidence of sporadic and community acquired legionnaires' disease and exposure to potentially contaminated industrial aerosols. Design: Geographical ecological approach using the postcode as the statistical unit. A multivariate Poisson regression model was used to model the relation between exposure to industrial aerosols and legionnaires' disease. Setting: Metropolitan France. Main results: More than 1000 sources of industrial exposure (aerosol and plume of smoke) were identified in 42 French departments. After adjusting for confounding factors, there was a statistically increased incidence of legionnaires' disease in postcodes with plume of smoke in comparison with postcodes without (RR=1.45, 95% CI=1.12 to 1.87), and in postcodes with more than one aerosol in comparison with postcodes without (RR=1.37, 95% CI=1.04 to 1.79). Conclusion: These findings highlight that any industrial systems generating water aerosols should be regarded as potential sources of contamination for legionnaires' disease. PMID:12775798

  19. Quantifying Competitive Exclusion and Competitive Release in Ecological Communities: A Conceptual Framework and a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Zalmen; Kadmon, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental notion in community ecology is that local species diversity reflects some balance between the contrasting forces of competitive exclusion and competitive release. Quantifying this balance is not trivial, and requires data on the magnitude of both processes in the same system, as well as appropriate methodology to integrate and interpret such data. Here we present a novel framework for empirical studies of the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release and demonstrate its applicability using data from a Mediterranean annual grassland where grazing is a major mechanism of competitive release. Empirical data on the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release are crucial for understanding observed patterns of variation in local species diversity and the proposed approach provides a simple framework for the collection, interpretation, and synthesis of such data. PMID:27536943

  20. Quantifying Competitive Exclusion and Competitive Release in Ecological Communities: A Conceptual Framework and a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Segre, Hila; DeMalach, Niv; Henkin, Zalmen; Kadmon, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental notion in community ecology is that local species diversity reflects some balance between the contrasting forces of competitive exclusion and competitive release. Quantifying this balance is not trivial, and requires data on the magnitude of both processes in the same system, as well as appropriate methodology to integrate and interpret such data. Here we present a novel framework for empirical studies of the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release and demonstrate its applicability using data from a Mediterranean annual grassland where grazing is a major mechanism of competitive release. Empirical data on the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release are crucial for understanding observed patterns of variation in local species diversity and the proposed approach provides a simple framework for the collection, interpretation, and synthesis of such data.

  1. The GeoCitizen-approach: community-based spatial planning – an Ecuadorian case study

    PubMed Central

    Atzmanstorfer, Karl; Resl, Richard; Eitzinger, Anton; Izurieta, Xiomara

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, geospatial web platforms, social media, and volunteered geographic information (VGI) have opened a window of opportunity for traditional Public Participatory GIS (PPGIS) to usher in a new era. Taking advantage of these technological achievements, this paper presents a new approach for a citizen-orientated framework of spatial planning that aims at integrating participatory community work into existing decision-making structures. One major cornerstone of the presented approach is the application of a social geoweb platform (the GeoCitizen platform) that combines geo-web technologies and social media in one single tool allowing citizens to collaboratively report observations, discuss ideas, solve, and monitor problems in their living environment at a local level. This paper gives an account of an ongoing participatory land-zoning process in the Capital District of Quito, Ecuador, where the GeoCitizen platform is applied in a long-term study. PMID:27019644

  2. Resource heterogeneity and community structure: A case study inHeliconia imbricata Phytotelmata.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Shahid

    1990-08-01

    Complex or non-additive differences in the distribution and abundance of arthropod species inhabiting the water-filled bracts ofHeliconia imbricata can be created by simple manipulations of resource levels. The primary resources for these assemblages are the corollas of the flowers that accumulate in the bracts. Removing or adding corollas to individual bracts changes the pattern in the abundance of arthropod species within each bract such that bracts with different treatments ultimately differ in composition and numerical associations among species. These results suggest that direct and indirect resource-mediated factors can structure or significantly affect the distribution and abundance of species in these and perhaps other assemblages. Thus, in natural communities, if resources are heterogeneous among patches (such as among the bracts in this study) structure in a given patch may be a function of the resource level of that patch and can differ significantly from neighboring patches that provide different resource levels.

  3. Assessing the Educational and Support Needs of Nursing Staff Serving Older Adults: A Case Study of a Community Coalition/ University Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Tam E.; Ziemba, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Given expected changes in demography and dependent care ratios, communities are preparing for the needs of older populations. Sometimes communities form coalitions to address health care needs. This case study evaluates a coalition/university partnership formed to assess the educational and support needs of nursing staff who are taking care of older adults across all service settings in one geographically defined community. A community-based coalition of 17 service providers contracted with researchers from an external university to determine the perceptions of three key stakeholder groups: older adults and their families; all levels of nursing staff; and agency administrators. By applying principles of Participatory Action Research (PAR) this case study presents the challenges faced in the community-based coalition/university research team partnership. This community/research partnership is unique, differing from most academic examples of PAR because nursing professionals as community members initiated the partnership. PMID:24652930

  4. Best Practices Case Study: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas Division

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    Case study of Pulte Homes Las Vegas Division, who certified nearly 1,200 homes to the DOE Builders Challenge between 2008 and 2012. All of the homes by Las Vegas’ biggest builder achieved HERS scores of lower than 70, and many floor plans got down to the mid 50s, with ducts located in sealed attics insulated along the roof line, advanced framing, and extra attention to air sealing.

  5. Questionnaires for collecting detailed occupational information for community-based case control studies.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P A; Stewart, W F; Siemiatycki, J; Heineman, E F; Dosemeci, M

    1998-01-01

    In case control studies, collection of information on the workplace environment has generally been limited to self-reports of exposures or to job title, type of employer, and the dates the jobs were held, supplemented sometimes by work activities. This information, however, may be insufficient to assess the potential and level of exposure accurately due to recall difficulties and the variability of exposures within a job. A solution to this problem is to use job-specific questionnaires. The organization of a series of such questionnaires developed for a case control study of brain tumors is described. Three types of questionnaires, or modules, were developed, task-based, industry-based, and modules based on jobs with nonspecific types of tasks (e.g., laborer). The format of these modules starts with questions on the general work environment (type of employer) and proceeds to questions on tasks. More detailed information is then gathered on materials and equipment used, sensory descriptions, dermal exposure, work practices, engineering controls, and personal protective equipment use. The questionnaires cover a wide variety of exposures including solvents, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, machining fluids, electromagnetic frequency fields, and many other exposures and, therefore, can be used in other case control studies.

  6. Environmental attitudes of stakeholders and their perceptions regarding protected area-community conflicts: a case study in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Miao, Hong

    2010-11-01

    Large numbers of people living in and around protected areas are highly dependent on the natural resources. However, simply excluding them from the area management has always inevitably resulted in conflicts. We conducted a case study of the Protected Area of Jinyun Mountain (PJM) in China to evaluate social context variables, environmental attitudes, and perceptions regarding protected area-community conflicts. Data were collected through questionnaire surveys administered to four stakeholder groups (i.e. local farmers, government staff, business persons, and tourists). A total of 112 questionnaires were completed in December 2008, after the Sichuan Earthquake. The questionnaire consisted of three parts, social context (gender, race, age, income, and education level), protected area-community conflicts, and environmental attitudes. The New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) scores, which were employed to evaluate environmental attitudes, differed significantly among the stakeholder groups (P<0.01). Specifically, government staff reported the highest and business persons did the lowest. Among the five items evaluated, anti-exemptionalism received the lowest score, while nature's balance did the highest. Evaluation of the protected area-community relationship indicated that harmony and conflict both exist in the PJM, but have different forms among different stakeholders, and seem to be opposite between government staff and local farmers. Among the indexes, tourism primarily contributed to the harmonious aspect, while collection of NTFPs did to the conflicting one. Conflict scores were positively related to age and negatively related to education level. Respondents with higher NEP scores were more partial to the park management. Besides, the respondents with higher annual incomes tended to support the policy of harmonizing the relationship and lessening the harm of local communities to the area. To promote proenvironmental attitudes and alleviate the protected area-community

  7. Factors related to the development of health-promoting community activities in Spanish primary healthcare: two case-control studies.

    PubMed

    March, Sebastià; Ripoll, Joana; Jordan Martin, Matilde; Zabaleta-Del-Olmo, Edurne; Benedé Azagra, Carmen Belén; Elizalde Soto, Lázaro; Vidal, Mª Clara; Bauzà Amengual, María de Lluc; Planas Juan, Trinidad; Pérez Mariano, Damiana Maria; Llull Sarralde, Micaela; Ruiz-Giménez, Juan Luís; Bajo Viñas, Rosa; Solano Villarubia, Carmen; Rodriguez Bajo, Maria; Cordoba Victoria, Manuela; Badia Capdevila, Marta; Serrano Ferrandez, Elena; Bosom Diumenjo, Maria; Montaner-Gomis, Isabel; Bolibar-Ribas, Buenaventura; Antoñanzas Lombarte, Angel; Bregel Cotaina, Samantha; Calvo Tocado, Ana; Olivan Blázquez, Barbara; Magallon Botaya, Rosa; Marín Palacios, Pilar; Echauri Ozcoidi, Margarita; Perez-Arauta, María Jose; Llobera, Joan; Ramos, Maria

    2017-10-08

    Spanish primary healthcare teams have the responsibility of performing health-promoting community activities (CAs), although such activities are not widespread. Our aim was to identify the factors related to participation in those activities. Two case-control studies. Performed in primary care of five Spanish regions. In the first study, cases were teams that performed health-promoting CAs and controls were those that did not. In the second study (on case teams from the first study), cases were professionals who developed these activities and controls were those who did not. Team, professional and community characteristics collected through questionnaires (team managers/professionals) and from secondary sources. The first study examined 203 teams (103 cases, 100 controls). Adjusted factors associated with performing CAs were percentage of nurses (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.14), community socioeconomic status (higher vs lower OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.18 to 3.95) and performing undergraduate training (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.93). In the second study, 597 professionals responded (254 cases, 343 controls). Adjusted factors were professional classification (physicians do fewer activities than nurses and social workers do more), training in CAs (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.1), team support (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.5 to 5.7), seniority (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.09), nursing tutor (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.5), motivation (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.8 to 7.5), collaboration with non-governmental organisations (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.1) and participation in neighbourhood activities (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.9 to 5.1). Professional personal characteristics, such as social sensitivity, profession, to feel team support or motivation, have influence in performing health-promoting CAs. In contrast to the opinion expressed by many professionals, workload is not related to performance of health-promoting CAs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All

  8. Enabling Innovation and Collaboration Across Geography and Culture: A Case Study of NASA's Systems Engineering Community of Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topousis, Daria E.; Murphy, Keri; Robinson, Greg

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, NASA faced major knowledge sharing challenges due to geographically isolated field centers that inhibited personnel from sharing experiences and ideas. Mission failures and new directions for the agency demanded better collaborative tools. In addition, with the push to send astronauts back to the moon and to Mars, NASA recognized that systems engineering would have to improve across the agency. Of the ten field centers, seven had not built a spacecraft in over 30 years, and had lost systems engineering expertise. The Systems Engineering Community of Practice came together to capture the knowledge of its members using the suite of collaborative tools provided by the NASA Engineering Network (NEN.) The NEN provided a secure collaboration space for over 60 practitioners across the agency to assemble and review a NASA systems engineering handbook. Once the handbook was complete, they used the open community area to disseminate it. This case study explores both the technology and the social networking that made the community possible, describes technological approaches that facilitated rapid setup and low maintenance, provides best practices that other organizations could adopt, and discusses the vision for how this community will continue to collaborate across the field centers to benefit the agency as it continues exploring the solar system.

  9. Enabling Innovation and Collaboration Across Geography and Culture: A Case Study of NASA's Systems Engineering Community of Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topousis, Daria E.; Murphy, Keri; Robinson, Greg

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, NASA faced major knowledge sharing challenges due to geographically isolated field centers that inhibited personnel from sharing experiences and ideas. Mission failures and new directions for the agency demanded better collaborative tools. In addition, with the push to send astronauts back to the moon and to Mars, NASA recognized that systems engineering would have to improve across the agency. Of the ten field centers, seven had not built a spacecraft in over 30 years, and had lost systems engineering expertise. The Systems Engineering Community of Practice came together to capture the knowledge of its members using the suite of collaborative tools provided by the NASA Engineering Network (NEN.) The NEN provided a secure collaboration space for over 60 practitioners across the agency to assemble and review a NASA systems engineering handbook. Once the handbook was complete, they used the open community area to disseminate it. This case study explores both the technology and the social networking that made the community possible, describes technological approaches that facilitated rapid setup and low maintenance, provides best practices that other organizations could adopt, and discusses the vision for how this community will continue to collaborate across the field centers to benefit the agency as it continues exploring the solar system.

  10. A Community College Partnership with a For-Profit Education Corporation: A Case Study in Entrepreneurism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    In a first-of-its-kind partnership, Higher Education Partners, LLC (formerly The Princeton Review), a for-profit education corporation, invested millions of dollars to create a facility and underwrite expenses to address a shortage of educational programs at Bristol Community College, a Massachusetts community college, with revenue to be divided…

  11. Regional Governance in Education: A Case Study of the Metro Area Learning Community in Omaha, Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison; Diem, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the first regional governance reform in public education, created in the Omaha, Nebraska metropolitan area in 2007. The legislation creating this regional reform, which is called the Learning Community, established a regional governing body, the Learning Community Coordinating Council, consisting of an elected 21-member…

  12. Supporting Conditionally-Admitted Students: A Case Study of Assessing Persistence in a Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, April; Fisher, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Using Astin's I-E-O model as a framework, this article explores the effects of a variety of factors on first-year persistence for conditionally-admitted students participating in a learning community at a public land-grant university. Since the learning community began in 2002, program administrators have collected survey, interview, and academic…

  13. Regional Governance in Education: A Case Study of the Metro Area Learning Community in Omaha, Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison; Diem, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the first regional governance reform in public education, created in the Omaha, Nebraska metropolitan area in 2007. The legislation creating this regional reform, which is called the Learning Community, established a regional governing body, the Learning Community Coordinating Council, consisting of an elected 21-member…

  14. Developing a Culture of Assessment through a Faculty Learning Community: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitz, Stephanie A.; O'Connor, Margaret; Pang, Yanhui; Stryker, Deborah; Markell, Stephen; Krupp, Ethan; Byers, Celina; Jones, Sheila Dove; Redfern, Alicia King

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how a diverse, interdisciplinary team of faculty formed a topic-based faculty learning community. Following an introduction to faculty learning communities and a brief discussion of their benefit to faculty engaged in the process of adopting new technology, we explain how our team, through a competitive mini-grant…

  15. Working from the Inside Out: A Case Study of Mackay Safe Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze…

  16. Immortality of Prejudice in Striving Ubuntu: Case Studies of Community Managed Schools in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh; Rajbhandari, Smriti

    2016-01-01

    The immortality of prejudice after the school management transfer has not been judged. This makes communities to take responsibility for schools further by compelling the government to mandate amendments of Community Managed Schools (CMS) Directives. The purpose was to explore the CMS enduring Ubuntu against immorality of prejudice, through…

  17. Organizing for Change: A Case Study of Grassroots Leadership at a Kentucky Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borregard, Andrea Rae

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges constitute a special type of higher education organization: their complex mission, dynamics, personnel structures, and values require a distinct set of understandings and skills to lead and manage them well. Most of the research on leadership in community colleges focuses on leaders in positions of power (presidents, provosts,…

  18. Alternative Spring Break Service Exchange: A Case Study at the Community College Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohon, Amanda Ellis

    2007-01-01

    The phrase spring break usually brings to mind scenes from MTV involving scandalous bathing suits and underage drinking. In general, college students are stereotyped as self-centered party animals. Over the last two years, Mountain Empire Community College (MECC), Southwest Virginia Community College (SwVCC), and Virginia Highlands Community…

  19. Finding the SurPriSe: A Case Study of a Faculty Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Roberta M.

    2014-01-01

    This article details a faculty learning community (FLC) that started in 2009 on the campus of a Midwestern University and has evolved into an interdisciplinary research, teaching and social community of practice and learning called SurPriSe. SurPriSe is an acronym that reflects the interest area of the FLC; Sur for surveillance, Pri for privacy,…

  20. Systems Thinking Tools as Applied to Community-Based Participatory Research: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BeLue, Rhonda; Carmack, Chakema; Myers, Kyle R.; Weinreb-Welch, Laurie; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is being used increasingly to address health disparities and complex health issues. The authors propose that CBPR can benefit from a systems science framework to represent the complex and dynamic characteristics of a community and identify intervention points and potential "tipping points."…

  1. Organizing for Change: A Case Study of Grassroots Leadership at a Kentucky Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borregard, Andrea Rae

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges constitute a special type of higher education organization: their complex mission, dynamics, personnel structures, and values require a distinct set of understandings and skills to lead and manage them well. Most of the research on leadership in community colleges focuses on leaders in positions of power (presidents, provosts,…

  2. Community College Healthcare Students' Conceptions of Empathy: A Program-Wide Mixed Methods Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Kellee M.

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges play a vital role in the education of our Nations healthcare professions. In order to respond to the rising economic and social needs of the healthcare sector, community colleges are meeting the challenge by providing health professions skills and training programs to meet these shortages. These crucial programs are charged with…

  3. The Caring Business: Lynch Community Homes, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Robert

    This paper, one of a series of reports describing innovative practices in integrating people with disabilities into community life, describes the Lynch Community Homes in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Lynch Homes is a for-profit organization that provides homes and supportive services for approximately 75 people with severe and profound…

  4. Community College Student Affairs Leadership and Institutional Effectiveness: A Multiple-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrent, Jonathan Vince

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges are the initial introduction to postsecondary education and training for thousands of students. As pressure for institutional accountability increases from external stakeholders, the performance of two-year colleges is becoming more critical. Within these institutions, student affairs departments in community colleges provide…

  5. The Experiences of Remedial Instructors at One Urban Community College: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liburd-Shaddai, Jean L.

    2012-01-01

    The number of incoming community college students, including recent high school graduates as well as nontraditional students, requiring remediation has increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, community colleges are mandated by the state to implement developmental programs to address the diverse academic needs of their students.…

  6. Working from the Inside Out: A Case Study of Mackay Safe Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze…

  7. A Case Study Analysis of a Constructionist Knowledge Building Community with Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Chee S.; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Wilson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates how activity theory can help research a constructionist community. We present a constructionist activity model called CONstructionism Through ACtivity Theory (CONTACT) model and explain how it can be used to analyse the constructionist activity in knowledge building communities. We then illustrate the model through its…

  8. Multiculturalism and the Community College: A Case Study of an Immigrant Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.; Solorzano, Sylvia

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes the goals and effectiveness of the Nuevos Horizontes program at Chicago's Triton College, an outreach effort to provide educational opportunities to Triton's diverse communities. Cites the general success of the program, suggesting that the two-way exchange between the college and communities served provides a model for multiculturalism…

  9. A Community College Partnership with a For-Profit Education Corporation: A Case Study in Entrepreneurism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    In a first-of-its-kind partnership, Higher Education Partners, LLC (formerly The Princeton Review), a for-profit education corporation, invested millions of dollars to create a facility and underwrite expenses to address a shortage of educational programs at Bristol Community College, a Massachusetts community college, with revenue to be divided…

  10. Community College Healthcare Students' Conceptions of Empathy: A Program-Wide Mixed Methods Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Kellee M.

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges play a vital role in the education of our Nations healthcare professions. In order to respond to the rising economic and social needs of the healthcare sector, community colleges are meeting the challenge by providing health professions skills and training programs to meet these shortages. These crucial programs are charged with…

  11. Exploring Online Community among Rural Medical Education Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Ryan Tyler

    2013-01-01

    There is a severe shortage of rural physicians in America. One reason physicians choose not to practice, or persist in practice, in rural areas is due to a lack of professional community, i.e., community of practice (CoP). Online, "virtual" CoPs, enabled by now common Internet communication technology can help give rural physicians the…

  12. A Case Study Analysis of a Constructionist Knowledge Building Community with Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Chee S.; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Wilson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates how activity theory can help research a constructionist community. We present a constructionist activity model called CONstructionism Through ACtivity Theory (CONTACT) model and explain how it can be used to analyse the constructionist activity in knowledge building communities. We then illustrate the model through its…

  13. Latino Immigrants, Meatpacking, and Rural Communities: A Case Study of Lexington, Nebraska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouveia, Lourdes; Stull, Donald D.

    In 1988, IBP, the world's largest meat processing firm, announced it would open a beefpacking plant in Lexington, Nebraska. This was part of the latest wave of meatpacking restructuring which moved plants away from urban centers and union strongholds to rural communities. This paper examines community changes accompanying the opening of a large…

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility: Case Study of Community Expectations and the Administrative Systems, Niger Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogula, David

    2012-01-01

    Poor community-company relations in the Niger Delta have drawn attention to the practice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the region. Since the 1960s, transnational oil corporations operating in the Niger Delta have adopted various CSR strategies, yet community-company relations remain adversarial. This article examines community…

  15. The Principal's Role in Implementing Professional Learning Communities within a School: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohabir, Anjani Devi

    2009-01-01

    Reform, diversity of society, and an array of standards and guidelines challenge leaders to provide successful learning for teachers and students. The Professional Learning Community (PLC) concept offers a viable approach to address those challenges. Research indicates that schools need to function as learning communities where teachers and…

  16. Student-Created Musical as a Community of Practice: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Research on the improvement of learning shifted from a focus on the learner as individual to the concept of sociocultural learning in communities of learning, communities of practice or learning cultures during the 1990s. A similar shift in the focus of the development of a single construct of individual musical creativity to socially situated…

  17. Exploring Online Community among Rural Medical Education Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Ryan Tyler

    2013-01-01

    There is a severe shortage of rural physicians in America. One reason physicians choose not to practice, or persist in practice, in rural areas is due to a lack of professional community, i.e., community of practice (CoP). Online, "virtual" CoPs, enabled by now common Internet communication technology can help give rural physicians the…

  18. Niche-based mechanisms operating within extreme habitats: a case study of subterranean amphipod communities

    PubMed Central

    Fišer, Cene; Blejec, Andrej; Trontelj, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that both niche-based and neutral mechanisms are important for biological communities to evolve and persist. For communities in extreme and isolated environments such as caves, theoretical and empirical considerations (low species turnover, high stress, strong convergence owing to strong directional selection) predict neutral mechanisms and functional equivalence of species. We tested this prediction using subterranean amphipod communities from caves and interstitial groundwater. Contrary to expectations, functional morphological diversity within communities in both habitats turned out to be significantly higher than the null model of randomly assembled communities. This suggests that even the most extreme, energy-poor environments still maintain the potential for diversification via differentiation of niches. PMID:22513281

  19. Niche-based mechanisms operating within extreme habitats: a case study of subterranean amphipod communities.

    PubMed

    Fiser, Cene; Blejec, Andrej; Trontelj, Peter

    2012-08-23

    It has been suggested that both niche-based and neutral mechanisms are important for biological communities to evolve and persist. For communities in extreme and isolated environments such as caves, theoretical and empirical considerations (low species turnover, high stress, strong convergence owing to strong directional selection) predict neutral mechanisms and functional equivalence of species. We tested this prediction using subterranean amphipod communities from caves and interstitial groundwater. Contrary to expectations, functional morphological diversity within communities in both habitats turned out to be significantly higher than the null model of randomly assembled communities. This suggests that even the most extreme, energy-poor environments still maintain the potential for diversification via differentiation of niches.

  20. Information system needs in health promotion: a case study of the Safe Community programme using requirements engineering methods.

    PubMed

    Timpka, Toomas; Olvander, Christina; Hallberg, Niklas

    2008-09-01

    The international Safe Community programme was used as the setting for a case study to explore the need for information system support in health promotion programmes. The 14 Safe Communities active in Sweden during 2002 were invited to participate and 13 accepted. A questionnaire on computer usage and a critical incident technique instrument were distributed. Sharing of management information, creating social capital for safety promotion, and injury data recording were found to be key areas that need to be further supported by computer-based information systems. Most respondents reported having access to a personal computer workstation with standard office software. Interest in using more advanced computer applications was low, and there was considerable need for technical user support. Areas where information systems can be used to make health promotion practice more efficient were identified, and patterns of computers usage were described.

  1. Engaging homeless youth in community-based participatory research: a case study from Skid Row, Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Analilia P; Minkler, Meredith; Cardenas, Zelenne; Grills, Cheryl; Porter, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence highlights the benefits to youth of involvement in community-based participatory research. Less attention has been paid, however, to the contributions youth can make to helping change health-promoting policy through such work. We describe a multi-method case study of a policy-focused community-based participatory research project in the Skid Row area of downtown Los Angeles, California, where a small group of homeless youth worked with adult mentors to develop and conduct a survey of 96 homeless youth and used the findings to help secure health-promoting policy change. We review the partnership's work at each stage of the policy-making process; its successes in changing policy regarding recreation, juvenile justice, and education; and the challenges encountered, especially with policy enforcement. We share lessons learned, including the importance of strong adult mentors and of policy environments conducive to sustainable, health-promoting change for marginalized youth.

  2. Achieving Research Impact Through Co-creation in Community-Based Health Services: Literature Review and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Jackson, Claire; Shaw, Sara; Janamian, Tina

    2016-06-01

    Co-creation-collaborative knowledge generation by academics working alongside other stakeholders-is an increasingly popular approach to aligning research and service development. It has potential for "moving beyond the ivory towers" to deliver significant societal impact via dynamic, locally adaptive community-academic partnerships. Principles of successful co-creation include a systems perspective, a creative approach to research focused on improving human experience, and careful attention to governance and process. If these principles are not followed, co-creation efforts may fail. Co-creation-collaborative knowledge generation by academics working alongside other stakeholders-reflects a "Mode 2" relationship (knowledge production rather than knowledge translation) between universities and society. Co-creation is widely believed to increase research impact. We undertook a narrative review of different models of co-creation relevant to community-based health services. We contrasted their diverse disciplinary roots and highlighted their common philosophical assumptions, principles of success, and explanations for failures. We applied these to an empirical case study of a community-based research-service partnership led by the Centre of Research Excellence in Quality and Safety in Integrated Primary-Secondary Care at the University of Queensland, Australia. Co-creation emerged independently in several fields, including business studies ("value co-creation"), design science ("experience-based co-design"), computer science ("technology co-design"), and community development ("participatory research"). These diverse models share some common features, which were also evident in the case study. Key success principles included (1) a systems perspective (assuming emergence, local adaptation, and nonlinearity); (2) the framing of research as a creative enterprise with human experience at its core; and (3) an emphasis on process (the framing of the program, the nature of

  3. Professional Learning Communities as a Leadership Strategy to Drive Math Success in an Urban High School Serving Diverse, Low-Income Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Kristin Shawn; Scheurich, James Joseph; Morgan, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing a qualitative case-study design, this study explored how a mid-sized urban high school professional learning community was used as a reform effort to increase student achievement in mathematics on standards-based assessments. From a year-long interaction with the math professional learning community, which consisted of 3 school leaders…

  4. Rocky-shore communities as indicators of water quality: a case study in the Northwestern Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Susana; García, María; Satta, Maria Paola; de Torres, Mariona; Ballesteros, Enric

    2007-01-01

    The collection of 152 samples from the upper sublittoral zone along the rocky coasts of Catalonia (Northwestern Mediterranean) was carried out in 1999 in order to test the suitability of littoral communities to be used as indicators of water quality in the frame of the European Water Framework Directive. Detrended correspondence analysis were performed to distinguish between different communities and to relate communities composition to water quality. Samples collected in reference sites were included in the analysis. Mediterranean rocky shore communities situated in the upper sublittoral zone can be used as indicators of the water quality: there is a gradient from high to bad status that comprises from dense Cystoseira mediterranea forests to green algae dominated communities. The geographical patterns in the distribution of these communities show that the best areas are situated in the Northern coast, where tourism is the main economic resource of the area, and the worst area is situated close to the metropolitan zone of Barcelona with high population and industrial development. Thus, Mediterranean sublittoral rocky shore communities are useful indicators of water quality and multivariate analysis are a suitable statistical tool for the assessment of the ecological status.

  5. Winter air quality in a wood-burning community: A case study in Waterbury, Vermont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Ken; Spengler, John D.; Treitman, Robert D.; Turner, William A.

    The recent upsurge in residential wood combustion has raised questions about potential adverse effects on ambient air quality and public health. Before policymakers can make informed and rational decisions about the need for government intervention, more information is needed concerning the nature and extent of the problem. This paper presents findings from the 1982 Harvard Wood-Burning Study in Waterbury, Vermont. Waterbury, a rural community of about 2000 people, was an ideal location for this investigation because: (1) half of the private residences are heated with wood fuel; (2) frequent winter temperature inversions promote pollution buildup in the valley; (3) there are no major industrial sources and (4) the Vermont Agency of Environmental Conservation has compiled a detailed wood-burning inventory. The ambient air monitoring study, from January to March 1982, emphasized measurements of total, inhalable and respirable particulate matter. Results indicate that 60-70% of the Waterbury aerosol was composed of particles less than 2.5 μm. A combination of indirect evidence suggests that wood burning was the major source of airborne particles in residential sections of the town. Dramatic diurnal variations in particulate concentrations were observed, with peak values at night exceeding afternoon levels by 5- to 10-fold. Both meteorology and emission patterns contributed to observed fluctuations.

  6. Community Health Workers as Social Marketers of Injectable Contraceptives: A Case Study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Weidert, Karen; Gessessew, Amanuel; Bell, Suzanne; Godefay, Hagos; Prata, Ndola

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ethiopia has made notable progress in increasing awareness and knowledge of family planning and is considered a success story among funders and program planners. Yet unmet need among rural women (28.6%) is almost double that of urban women (15.5%), with a wide gap in total fertility rate depending on urban (2.6) or rural (5.5) residence. This study investigates the impact of a service delivery model that combines community-based distribution (CBD) of contraception with social marketing in Tigray, Ethiopia, to create a more sustainable approach to CBD. Between September 2011 and October 2013, 626 volunteer CHWs were recruited and trained to administer depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) injections and provide counseling and referrals to the health post for other methods; the project implementation period ended in June 2014. The CHWs received a supply of DMPA injections in the form of a microloan from a drug revolving fund; the CHWs charged women a minimal fee (5 birr, or US$0.29), determined based on willingness-to-pay data, for each DMPA injection; and the CHWs returned part of the fee (3 birr) to the drug revolving fund while keeping the remaining portion (2 birr). The CHWs also promoted demand for family planning through door-to-door outreach and community meetings. Existing health extension workers (HEWs) provided regular supervision of the CHWs, supplemented by in-depth supervision visits from study coordinators. Baseline and endline representative surveys of women of reproductive age, as well as of participating CHWs, were conducted. In addition, DMPA provision data from the CHWs were collected. Between October 2011 and June 2014, the CHWs served in total 8,604 women and administered an estimated 15,410 DMPA injections, equivalent to providing 3,853 couple-years of protection. There was a 25% significant increase in contraceptive use among surveyed women, from 30.1% at baseline to 37.7% at endline, with DMPA use largely responsible for this

  7. Community Health Workers as Social Marketers of Injectable Contraceptives: A Case Study from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Weidert, Karen; Gessessew, Amanuel; Bell, Suzanne; Godefay, Hagos; Prata, Ndola

    2017-03-24

    Ethiopia has made notable progress in increasing awareness and knowledge of family planning and is considered a success story among funders and program planners. Yet unmet need among rural women (28.6%) is almost double that of urban women (15.5%), with a wide gap in total fertility rate depending on urban (2.6) or rural (5.5) residence. This study investigates the impact of a service delivery model that combines community-based distribution (CBD) of contraception with social marketing in Tigray, Ethiopia, to create a more sustainable approach to CBD. Between September 2011 and October 2013, 626 volunteer CHWs were recruited and trained to administer depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) injections and provide counseling and referrals to the health post for other methods; the project implementation period ended in June 2014. The CHWs received a supply of DMPA injections in the form of a microloan from a drug revolving fund; the CHWs charged women a minimal fee (5 birr, or US$0.29), determined based on willingness-to-pay data, for each DMPA injection; and the CHWs returned part of the fee (3 birr) to the drug revolving fund while keeping the remaining portion (2 birr). The CHWs also promoted demand for family planning through door-to-door outreach and community meetings. Existing health extension workers (HEWs) provided regular supervision of the CHWs, supplemented by in-depth supervision visits from study coordinators. Baseline and endline representative surveys of women of reproductive age, as well as of participating CHWs, were conducted. In addition, DMPA provision data from the CHWs were collected. Between October 2011 and June 2014, the CHWs served in total 8,604 women and administered an estimated 15,410 DMPA injections, equivalent to providing 3,853 couple-years of protection. There was a 25% significant increase in contraceptive use among surveyed women, from 30.1% at baseline to 37.7% at endline, with DMPA use largely responsible for this increase

  8. A comprehensive grid to evaluate case management's expected effectiveness for community-dwelling frail older people: results from a multiple, embedded case study.

    PubMed

    Van Durme, Thérèse; Schmitz, Olivier; Cès, Sophie; Anthierens, Sibyl; Maggi, Patrick; Delye, Sam; De Almeida Mello, Johanna; Declercq, Anja; Macq, Jean; Remmen, Roy; Aujoulat, Isabelle

    2015-06-18

    Case management is a type of intervention expected to improve the quality of care and therefore the quality of life of frail, community-dwelling older people while delaying institutionalisation in nursing homes. However, the heterogeneity, multidimensionality and complexity of these interventions make their evaluation by the means of classical approaches inadequate. Our objective was twofold: (i) to propose a tool allowing for the identification of the key components that explain the success of case management for this population and (ii) to propose a typology based on the results of this tool. The process started with a multiple embedded case study design in order to identify the key components of case management. Based on the results of this first step, data were collected among 22 case management interventions, in order to evaluate their expected effectiveness. Finally, multiple correspondence analyses was conducted to propose a typology of case management. The overall approach was informed by Wagner's Chronic Care Model and the theory of complexity. The study identified a total of 23 interacting key components. Based on the clustering of response patterns of the 22 case management projects included in our study, three types of case management programmes were evidenced, situated on a continuum from a more "socially-oriented" type towards a more "clinically-oriented" type of case management. The type of feedback provided to the general practitioner about both the global geriatric assessment and the result of the intervention turned out to be the most discriminant component between the types. The study design allowed to produce a tool that can be used to distinguish between different types of case management interventions and further evaluate their effect on frail older people in terms of the delaying institutionalisation, functional and cognitive status, quality of life and societal costs.

  9. Marine protected communities against biological invasions: A case study from an offshore island.

    PubMed

    Gestoso, I; Ramalhosa, P; Oliveira, P; Canning-Clode, J

    2017-03-21

    Biological invasions are a major threat to the world's biota and are considered a major cause of biodiversity loss. Therefore, world marine policy has recognized the need for more marine protected areas (MPAs) as a major tool for biodiversity conservation. The present work experimentally evaluated how protected communities from an offshore island can face the settlement and/or expansion of nonindigenous species (NIS). First, NIS colonization success in marine protected and marina communities was compared by deploying PVC settling plates at the Garajau MPA and Funchal marina (SW Madeira Island). Then, the settling plates from the MPA were transferred to Funchal marina to test their resistance to NIS invasion under high levels of NIS pressure. Results indicated that the structure and composition of fouling communities from the MPA differed from those collected in the marina. Interestingly, communities from the protected area showed lower NIS colonization success, suggesting some degree of biotic resistance against NIS invasion.

  10. Creating Community; A Case Study of a Montreal Street Kid Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabanow, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    Explores the implementation and development of an emergency street-kid shelter in Montreal. Concludes that, by merging locality development with a commitment to social action, the program has fostered an empowered community. (Author/JOW)

  11. Implication of graphene oxide in Cd-contaminated soil: A case study of bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ting; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wang, Hou; Leng, Lijian; Li, Hui; Wu, Zhibin; Jiang, Longbo; Xu, Rui; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-09-29

    The application of graphene oxide (GO) has attracted increasing concerns in the past decade regarding its environmental impacts, except for the impact of GO on a metal-contaminated soil system, due to its special properties. In the present work, the effects of GO on the migration and transformation of heavy metals and soil bacterial communities in Cd-contaminant soil were systematically evaluated. Soil samples were exposed to different doses of GO (0, 1, and 2 g kg(-1)) over 60 days. The Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction procedure was used to reflect the interaction between GO and Cd. Several microbial parameters, including enzyme activities and bacterial community structure, were measured to determine the impacts of GO on polluted soil microbial communities. It was shown that Cd was immobilized by GO throughout the entire exposure period. Interestingly, the structure of the bacterial community changed. The relative abundance of the major bacterial phyla (e.g., Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) increased, which was possibly attributed to the reduced toxicity of Cd in the presence of GO. However, GO exerted an adverse influence on the relative abundance of some phyla (e.g., WD272 and TM6). The diversity of bacterial communities was slightly restricted. The functional bacteria related to carbon and the nitrogen cycling were also affected, which, consequently, may influence the nutrient cycling in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The readiness of farmer communities in biogas development (A case study: Wiyurejo Village, Malang Regency Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinanti, D.; Erlina, D. F.; Meidiana, C.

    2017-06-01

    Wiyurejo Village has the potential for biogas development with ±75% of breeders wanting to build biogas but do not have enough vacant land. Biogas is a renewable energy source which requires the involvement of the community and public awareness in its implementation. The purpose of this research is to know the readiness of breeders for the development of biogas with limited land availability for the development of biodigester in Wiyurejo Village, Malang Regency, Indonesia. Based on the analysis, the value of the stage of readiness of farmers community in Wiyurejo Village is 2.20, which means that from nine stages of community readiness, the stage of community readiness of Wiyurejo Village is in stage three, namely vague awareness. Vague awareness means most people feel that there is a local concern, but there is no motivation to do anything about it (Plested, Edwards, & Jumper-Thurman, 2006). The value of the dimension that gives the lowest contribution and is below the average value of the community readiness is community knowledge on the issue.

  13. Environmental Equity through Negotiation: A Case Study on Urban Landfills and the Roma Community

    PubMed Central

    Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Mălina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Oroian, Ioan Gheorghe; Safirescu, Ovidiu Călin; Bican-Brișan, Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the necessity to bring environmental equity within the Pata Rât Roma community in Northwest Romania, relying on the answers to three questions: “Does environmental equity exist in Pata Rât?”, “How can it be attained?”, and “To what extent can it be brought to the targeted people?” It was shown how a trio of factors tailors the destiny of Roma inhabitants: being a minority, their ethnicity, and the fact they are living on and off what society rejects and dumps—a landfill. The framing of the environmental equity concerns within a vision considering negotiation as the most adequate means to attain it is a novel approach. Further on, the results of the study can fuel win-win solutions in environmental equity. The information abstracted from a set of indicators, assessed through an evaluation matrix, represents a beneficial platform for future bottom-up decisions concerning landfill residents. Three action options were analyzed: on-site living opportunities—that resulted to be preferred, off-site living opportunities, and “Do nothing”. The analysis provides qualitative evidence that the evaluation of environmental equity is largely subjective, because of its complexity and specificity related to geographical, historical, cultural characteristics, and political interests. PMID:27314371

  14. Cysticercosis and epilepsy in rural Tanzania: a community-based case-control and imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Kathryn; Iqbal, Ahmed; Birchall, Daniel; Jackson, Margaret; Rogathe, Jane; Jusabani, Ahmed; Gray, William; Aris, Eric; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Wilkins, Patricia P; Newton, Charles R; Walker, Richard

    2015-09-01

    To assess the contribution of neurocysticercosis (NCC) to the burden of epilepsy in a rural Tanzanian population. We identified adult people with epilepsy (PWE) in a door-to-door study in an established demographic surveillance site. PWE and community controls were tested for antibodies to Taenia solium, the causative agent of NCC, and all PWE were offered a computed tomography (CT) head scan. Data on household occupancy and sanitation, pig-keeping and pork consumption were collected from PWE and controls and associations with epilepsy were assessed using chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Six of 218 PWE had antibodies to T. solium (2.8%; 95% CI 0.6-4.9), compared to none of 174 controls (Fisher's exact test, P = 0.04). Lesions compatible with NCC were seen in eight of 200 CT scans (4.0%; 95% CI 1.3-6.7). A total of 176 PWE had both investigations of whom two had positive serology along with NCC-compatible lesions on CT (1.1%; 95% 0.3-4.0). No associations between epilepsy and any risk factors for NCC were identified. Neurocysticercosis is present in this population but at a lower prevalence than elsewhere in Tanzania and sub-Saharan Africa. Insights from low-prevalence areas may inform public health interventions designed to reduce the burden of preventable epilepsy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Environmental Equity through Negotiation: A Case Study on Urban Landfills and the Roma Community.

    PubMed

    Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Mălina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Oroian, Ioan Gheorghe; Safirescu, Ovidiu Călin; Bican-Brișan, Nicoleta

    2016-06-14

    The paper discusses the necessity to bring environmental equity within the Pata Rât Roma community in Northwest Romania, relying on the answers to three questions: "Does environmental equity exist in Pata Rât?", "How can it be attained?", and "To what extent can it be brought to the targeted people?" It was shown how a trio of factors tailors the destiny of Roma inhabitants: being a minority, their ethnicity, and the fact they are living on and off what society rejects and dumps-a landfill. The framing of the environmental equity concerns within a vision considering negotiation as the most adequate means to attain it is a novel approach. Further on, the results of the study can fuel win-win solutions in environmental equity. The information abstracted from a set of indicators, assessed through an evaluation matrix, represents a beneficial platform for future bottom-up decisions concerning landfill residents. Three action options were analyzed: on-site living opportunities-that resulted to be preferred, off-site living opportunities, and "Do nothing". The analysis provides qualitative evidence that the evaluation of environmental equity is largely subjective, because of its complexity and specificity related to geographical, historical, cultural characteristics, and political interests.

  16. A Community-Based, Case-Control Study Evaluating Mortality Reduction from Gastric Cancer by Endoscopic Screening in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato; Ogoshi, Kazuei; Okamoto, Mikizo; Shabana, Michiko; Kishimoto, Takuji; Fukao, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Aims Although the incidence of gastric cancer has decreased in the last 3 decades, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. In Asian countries, the burden of gastric cancer has remained, and cancer screening is normally expected to reduce gastric cancer death. We conducted a community-based, case-control study to evaluate the reduction of mortality from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. Methods Case subjects were defined as individuals who had died of gastric cancer between 2003 and 2006 in 4 cities in Tottori Prefecture, and between 2006 and 2010 in Niigata City, Japan. Up to 6 control subjects were matched by sex, birth year (±3 years), and the residence of each corresponding case subject from the population lists in the study areas. Control subjects were required to be disease-free at the time when the corresponding case subjects were diagnosed as having gastric cancer. The odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for those who had participated in endoscopic or radiographic screening before the reference date when the case subjects were diagnosed as having gastric cancer, compared with subjects who had never participated in any screening. Conditional logistic-regression models for matched sets were used to estimate the ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The case subjects consisted of 288 men and 122 women for case subjects, with 2,292 matched control subjects. Compared with those who had never been screened before the date of diagnosis of gastric cancer in the case subjects, the ORs within 36 months from the date of diagnosis were 0.695 (95% CI: 0.489–0.986) for endoscopic screening and 0.865 (95% CI : 0.631–1.185) for radiographic screening. Conclusions The results suggest a 30% reduction in gastric cancer mortality by endoscopic screening compared with no screening within 36 months before the date of diagnosis of gastric cancer. PMID:24236091

  17. The Potential of GIS as a Management Tool for Avenue Trees Population in Small Communities; a Case Study of Idi-Shin Community, Ibadan, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olokeogun, O. S.; Akintola, O. O.; Abodunrin, E. K.

    2016-06-01

    This study demonstrates the potentials of Geographic Information System (GIS) as a management tool for avenue trees (Street trees) populations in small communities (using Idi-Ishin community, Ibadan, Nigeria as a case study). GIS is a decision support system which integrate data or set of data from different sources, bringing them under the same referencing system in a computer system. An Ikonos Imagery (1m Spatial Resolution) of the study area was digitized to produce a digital map using ArcGIS 10.1 version. The avenue trees species ≥ 5cm diameter at breast height (DBH) was selected for enumeration. These trees were then measured and tagged. The Height, Girth and Geographic location (X &Y coordinate) of the trees were measured with Haga altimeter, Girthing tape and Hand held Global Positioning System (GPS) respectively. The species and families of the trees enumerated were also identified. Data were analysed for basal area (BA) and volume (V). A total number of 43 avenue trees were assessed in Idi-Ishin Community. Roystonea regia accounted for the majority of the avenue trees (25.58%), followed by Polyanthia longiflora (23.26%), Gliricida seprium (20.93%), Eucalyptus toreliana (13.95%), Delunix regea (6.98%). However Terminalia catapa, Terminalia radii, Azadrachita indica and Newbodia levis had the same abundance of 2.33%. It was also observed that the benefits derived from these avenue trees includes; Carbon sequestration, Beautification, Wind break and shade. A spatial relational database was created for the assessed avenue trees using ArcCatalog of ArcGIS 10.1 version. Based on the findings from the study (which serves as baseline information for the management of the avenue trees in the study area), it was therefore recommended that subsequent assessment should be carried out at 3-5 year interval in other to ensure proper and continuous monitoring and updating of the data.

  18. Public Policy in Financing Basic Education for Adults: An Investigation of the Cost-Benefit Relationships in Adult Basic Education in Public Schools and Community Colleges. Volume 3. Community Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, William S.; And Others

    Volume three presents community case studies of cities selected for the study. Cities chosen were those in which: a public school district or community college was doing an outstanding job in adult education; and the sponsorship of all or a part of the adult education program had been transferred from one district to another; and any district…

  19. Understanding community receptivity to water re-use: Ku-ring-gai Council case study.

    PubMed

    Brown, R R; Davies, P

    2007-01-01

    This social research project investigated community receptivity to using rainwater and greywater as alternative domestic water sources. It was focused in the Ku-ring-gai local government area in northern Sydney, and involved a household questionnaire followed by community leader interviews and resident focus groups. Trends, such as a prolonged drought and increasing population, compound the current crisis and concern facing Sydney's available water supply. Substitution of domestic potable water has been promoted as part of the solution. The research results revealed that community receptivity was highest for external uses, such as watering gardens and flushing toilets, and progressively decreased with increasing personal contact. Receptivity to greywater reuse fell more rapidly with the community believing there was a higher health risk associated with its use. Gender and cultural background were revealed as significant variables and give insight into the design of strategies to target these demographic groups. This evidence provides a reliable stocktake of current receptivity revealing that the community has good awareness and positive association with water reuse for many household activities. This now needs to be harnessed through programs targeted at developing skills, resources and motivation for new water reuse practices and technologies across diverse social groupings.

  20. Adaptive capacity of fishing communities at marine protected areas: a case study from the Colombian Pacific.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rocío del Pilar; Maldonado, Jorge Higinio

    2013-12-01

    Departing from a theoretical methodology, we estimate empirically an index of adaptive capacity (IAC) of a fishing community to the establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs). We carried out household surveys, designed to obtain information for indicators and sub-indicators, and calculated the IAC. Moreover, we performed a sensitivity analysis to check for robustness of the results. Our findings show that, despite being located between two MPAs, the fishing community of Bazán in the Colombian Pacific is highly vulnerable and that the socioeconomic dimension of the IAC constitutes the most binding dimension for building adaptive capacity. Bazán is characterized by extreme poverty, high dependence on resources, and lack of basic public infrastructure. Notwithstanding, social capital and local awareness about ecological conditions may act as enhancers of adaptive capacity. The establishment of MPAs should consider the development of strategies to confer adaptive capacity to local communities highly dependent on resource extraction.

  1. Redefining "Community" through Collaboration and Co-Teaching: A Case Study of an ESOL Specialist, a Literacy Specialist, and a Fifth-Grade Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed Hersi, Afra; Horan, Deborah A.; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the development of a professional learning community through a case study of three teachers--an ESOL specialist, a literacy specialist, and a fifth-grade teacher--who engaged in co-teaching and collaboration. The emerging community of practice offered these teachers a space to learn and problem-solve by utilizing their…

  2. Fuelwood production and use in rural Swaziland: a case-study of two communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.A.; Pimentel, D.P.; Lasoie, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Information of fuelwood consumption and the local production of wood was collected in two small rural communities in Swaziland. Fuelwood consumption was estimated to be 0.77 t persona??1 yeara??1 in one community (Sigombeni), and 0.63 t persona??1 in the other (Bhekinkhosi). Bhekinkhosi was found to be experiencing a significant fuelwood production/consumption deficit and it expected that Sigombeni will also experience fuelwood deficits by 1990. Individual farm woodlots provided the largest proportion of annual woody biomass production in both areas, accounting for 45% of all profuction in Sigombeni and 73% in Bhekinkhosi. Thirty-seven percent of all farms in Sigombeni and 23% in Bhekinkhosi had woodlots. Virtually all these woodlots consisted primarily of black or green wattle and were established by direct seeding. Two types of community woodlots were identified a?? those established when the area was a private farm and those established with government assistance. The first type of community woodlots was found only in Sigombeni, where it accounted for at least 20% of annual fuelwood production. Community wooslots established with government assistance were an insignificant source of fuelwood in both areas. At an estimated cost of nearly US $500 haa??1, community woodlots planted with government assistance are far more expensive to establish than individual farm woodlots which require no monetary expenditure, assuming local collection of seed. The results indicate a need to increase the local production of fuelwood in rural Swaziland and that encouraging the establishment of onfarm woodlots may be the most effective means of increasing production.

  3. Case study on effect of household task participation on home, community, and work opportunities for a youth with multiple disabilities.

    PubMed

    Harr, Natalie; Dunn, Louise; Price, Pollie

    2011-01-01

    This case study explored how household task engagement influenced participation in the home, community and work for a youth with multiple disabilities. Participants were the first author's single father and her brother, who has spina bifida and intellectual disability. Researchers used a case study design with mixed methods. Quantitative repeated measures included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), the Children Helping Out: Responsibilities, Expectations, and Supports (CHORES), and the Arc's Self-determination Scale (SDS). Qualitative data was collected from interviews and observations and was analyzed using a constant comparison method. Visual analysis revealed gains in self-determination and in performance and satisfaction on the COPM. At follow-up, the father reported his son did more self-care household tasks and was more independent with these tasks. Family-care household task performance declined and father reported relatively no change in assistance. Qualitative findings illuminated the strategies and the processes that evolved through collaboration amongst the youth, the therapist, and the father. The son's competence with a daily household task increased positive perceptions of his capabilities that led to increased participation and independence in home, community, and work activities. Interventions addressing adaptations, development of self-determination skills, and parental education promoted these changes.

  4. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Community-Scale Energy Modeling - Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Community-scale energy modeling and testing are useful for determining energy conservation measures that will effectively reduce energy use. To that end, IBACOS analyzed pre-retrofit daily utility data to sort homes by energy consumption, allowing for better targeting of homes for physical audits. Following ASHRAE Guideline 14 normalization procedures, electricity consumption of 1,166 all-electric, production-built homes was modeled. The homes were in two communities: one built in the 1970s and the other in the mid-2000s.

  5. Incorporating Ecosystem Services into Community-level Decision-Making: A San Juan, Puerto Rico Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Office of Research and Development’s Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program is developing tools and approaches to incorporate ecosystem goods and services concepts into community-level decision-making. The San Juan Community Study is one of a serie...

  6. Incorporating Ecosystem Services into Community-level Decision-Making: A San Juan, Puerto Rico Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Office of Research and Development’s Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program is developing tools and approaches to incorporate ecosystem goods and services concepts into community-level decision-making. The San Juan Community Study is one of a serie...

  7. Empowering communities in combating river blindness and the role of NGOs: case studies from Cameroon, Mali, Nigeria, and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The control of onchocerciasis is not only a major success story in global health, but also one of the best examples of the power of public-private partnership at the international level as well as at the national level. The onchocerciasis story is also a leading example of the contribution of a group of called Non-Governmental Development Organizations (NGDO) to operational research which resulted in important changes in treatment strategies and policies. The four case studies presented here illustrate some key contributions the NGDOs made to the development of “community directed treatment with ivermectin” –CDTI, in Africa, which became the approved methodology within the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC). The partnership between the international, multilateral, government institutions and the NGDO Coordination Group was the backbone of the APOC programme’s structure and facilitated progress and scale-up of treatment programmes. Contributions included piloting community–based methodology in Mali and Nigeria; research, collaboration and coordination on treatment strategies and policies, coalition building, capacity building of national health workforce and advocacy at the national and international level. While the Onchocerciasis Control Programme (OCP) and APOC provided leadership, the NGDOs working with the national health authorities played a major role in advocacy evolving the community methodology which led to achieving and maintaining- treatments with ivermectin for at least 20 years and strengthening community health systems. PMID:22574885

  8. "From me to HIV": a case study of the community experience of donor transition of health programs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Daniela C; Tripathi, Vandana; Bohren, Meghan; Paul, Amy; Singh, Kriti; Chhabra, Vibha; Singh, Suneeta; Bennett, Sara

    2015-08-19

    Avahan, a large-scale HIV prevention program in India, transitioned over 130 intervention sites from donor funding and management to government ownership in three rounds. This paper examines the transition experience from the perspective of the communities targeted by these interventions. Fifteen qualitative longitudinal case studies were conducted across all three rounds of transition, including 83 in-depth interviews and 45 focus group discussions. Data collection took place between 2010 and 2013 in four states: Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu. We find that communication about transition was difficult at first but improved over time, while issues related to employment of peer educators were challenging throughout the transition. Clinical services were shifted to government providers resulting in mixed experiences depending on the population being targeted. Lastly, the loss of activities aimed at community ownership and mobilization negatively affected the beneficiaries' view of transition. While some programmatic changes resulted in improvements, additional opportunity costs for beneficiaries may pose barriers to accessing HIV prevention services. Communicating and engaging community stakeholders early on in future such transitions may mitigate negative feelings and lead to more constructive relationships and dialogue.

  9. Disability and quality of life in community-dwelling elderly cancer survivors: Case-control study in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Kyung

    2016-10-01

    Advanced age is a significant risk factor for cancer and functional disabilities increase with age. The purpose of this case-control study of Korean individuals was to determine the effect of cancer and cancer treatment on functional disability and quality of life (QOL). Thus, we compared community-dwelling elderly cancer patients (ECPs) with individuals from the general elderly population (GEP) who never had diagnoses of cancer. We selected 1776 ECP who were at least 65 years-old from the 2008 Korean Community Health Survey data and used propensity score matching to randomly select 1766 individuals from the GEP who closely resembled the ECPs. Functional disability was measured using the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, and QOL was measured by the EuroQol Group EQ-5D. ECPs were more dependent in preparation of food, doing laundry, and shopping (IADL scale), and in mobility and usual activities (EQ-5D). Although ECP had more problems with pain, discomfort, anxiety, and depression, they were more independent in self-care and handling of financial responsibilities. ECPs had multiple physical and psychological symptoms that adversely affected functional disability and QOL, but higher functional ability, such as self-care and handling of financial responsibilities. Promotion of self-care by ECPs is pivotal for effective management in community practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Community Science Workshop Network Story: Case Studies of the CSW Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Community Science Workshops (CSWs)--with funding from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation--created a network among the CSW sites in California. The goals of the CSW Network project have been to improve programs, build capacity throughout the Network, and establish new sites. Inverness Research has been…

  11. Spaces of the Hilltop: A Case Study of Community/Academic Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knochel, Aaron; Selfe, Dickie

    2012-01-01

    The mapping imagery of the web interface is an attempt to illustrate the surprising element of the Hilltop project. The map is not "accurate." It shows real streets and highways in, around, and in-between the Ohio State University and the Hilltop community, but it is not intended to provide directions.

  12. Strategies for Change: A Case Study of Innovative Practices at the Coast Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightman, Richard W.

    This paper examines current professional literature and assesses: (1) the degree to which community colleges have (or are developing) administrative programs that actively foster instructional innovation; and (2) how education programs in general, and innovative programs in particular are evaluated in terms of relative effectiveness and costs…

  13. A Case Study Examination of a Successful Community College to University Transition Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Karla

    2014-01-01

    A low rate of successful transition and degree completion for community college (CC) students who intend to complete a baccalaureate through transfer to a four-year university has been an unresolved problem in higher education. With more students entering higher education through CCs, successful CC to university transitions have become a critical…

  14. Virtual Learning Communities as a Vehicle for Workforce Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Barbara; Lewis, Dina

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits and challenges of using a virtual learning community (VLC) as a vehicle for workforce development. This paper argues that VLCs provide a flexible vehicle for workforce development. However, workplace realities may lead to unexpected challenges for participants wanting exploit the…

  15. Using Community Development Theory to Improve Student Engagement in Online Discussion: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Online discussion can be designed to develop the skills and confidence of students as well as providing an opportunity for constructing knowledge. If students decide not to participate or join too late, they put their own development and the quality of the learning community at risk. This article reflects on a first term undergraduate experience…

  16. A Case Study Examination of a Successful Community College to University Transition Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Karla

    2014-01-01

    A low rate of successful transition and degree completion for community college (CC) students who intend to complete a baccalaureate through transfer to a four-year university has been an unresolved problem in higher education. With more students entering higher education through CCs, successful CC to university transitions have become a critical…

  17. A Case Study of the Base-Closure Community Initial Redevelopment Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    15 III. Literature Review ...redevelopment efforts was accomplished in several ways. Initially, the review of existing literature provided insight into numerous factors that were deemed to...have influenced local communities’ efforts to deal with closure of a military installation and the subsequent redevelopment. The literature review

  18. Call It Trash, Garbage or Refuse: Four Case Studies Illustrate Community Waste Management Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazzi, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Describes four successful community programs dealing with waste management issues, developed with assistance from Keep America Beautiful System: litter prevention (Beatrice, Nebraska); composting yard waste (Centralia, Illinois); recycling (Lake Jackson, Texas); and waste-to-energy incineration (Gastonia, North Carolina). Notes related education…

  19. Increasing Academic Standards and Their Impact upon Minority Transfer Students from Community Colleges: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Ambrose A.; And Others

    In 1989, Ohio's Kent State University (KSU) Office of Admissions and Records developed a list of 1,404 students who had transferred from Ohio's Cuyahoga Community College (CCC) to KSU between 1979 and 1989. Demographic, enrollment, academic performance, and graduation data were analyzed to determine the impact on transfer students of a proposed…

  20. Analysing a Web-Based E-Commerce Learning Community: A Case Study in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joia, Luiz Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of a Web-based participative virtual learning environment for graduate students in Brazil enrolled in an electronic commerce course in a Masters in Business Administration program. Discusses learning communities; computer-supported collaborative work and collaborative learning; influences on student participation; the role of…

  1. Building Community Capacity and Social Infrastructure through Landcare: A Case Study of Land Grant Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Courtney E.; Hull, R. Bruce; Stephenson, Max O.; Robertson, David P.; Cowgill, Kimberly H.

    2012-01-01

    In the struggle to remain true to their technical assistance and civic engagement missions in an era of shrinking budgets and increasingly complex accountability claims, land grant universities have developed different engagement strategies to contribute to the development of surrounding communities. Drawing on Flora and Flora's (in "Ann Am…

  2. The Community Science Workshop Network Story: Case Studies of the CSW Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Community Science Workshops (CSWs)--with funding from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation--created a network among the CSW sites in California. The goals of the CSW Network project have been to improve programs, build capacity throughout the Network, and establish new sites. Inverness Research has been…

  3. Social Dynamics in Adult and Community Education Networks: Insights from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollhausen, Karin; Alke, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Implementing network type structures has become a widely appreciated strategy to promote actor-relationships in the field of adult and community education and to coordinate them purposefully. However, there is still a lack of knowledge on how a "successful" coordination of actor-relationships can actually be achieved. This paper offers…

  4. Community Arts as Environmental Education and Activism: A Labour and Environment Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2000-01-01

    Community arts are useful tools for environmental adult education. In Toronto, a union and an environmental group sought to raise awareness of waste management through painting on garbage trucks. Controversy over a government body's decision to censor a painting made both knowledge and the democratic process visible. (SK)

  5. Community Arts as Environmental Education and Activism: A Labour and Environment Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2000-01-01

    Community arts are useful tools for environmental adult education. In Toronto, a union and an environmental group sought to raise awareness of waste management through painting on garbage trucks. Controversy over a government body's decision to censor a painting made both knowledge and the democratic process visible. (SK)

  6. Districtwide Implementation of Small Learning Communities: A Case Study on Improving School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Robert, Ed.; Shaw, Danielle, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 10 to 15 years, a variety of efforts to transform American high schools have gained both public and private support. Significant among these are initiatives to implement Small Learning Communities (SLCs), part of a larger school reform and restructuring effort designed to address a variety of goals, including "downsizing large…

  7. What Do You See? A Case Study of Community College Science Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Chantae M.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges educate almost half of all American undergraduates. These students include but are not limited to under-prepared high school graduates, and individuals who are working full-time while attending school, as well as students of diverse cultural, socioeconomic, and ethnic backgrounds. With such a diverse student population, science…

  8. The Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis: A Case Study of Academic Library Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Scott; Morris, Cele; Sutherland, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper details community engagement activity of an academic library coordinated within a broader university strategic plan. The Anderson Library at Indiana University Northwest (IU-Northwest) supports a service called the Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis. Created in 1996 with funding made available from the Indiana University…

  9. Role-Playing Simulation as a Communication Tool in Community Dialogue: Karkonosze Mountains Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krolikowska, Karolina; Kronenberg, Jakub; Maliszewska, Karolina; Sendzimir, Jan; Magnuszewski, Piotr; Dunajski, Andrzej; Slodka, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a process of role-playing simulation (RPS) as it was used during an educational exercise in community dialogue in the Karkonosze Mountains region of southwest Poland. Over the past decade Karkonosze National Park, a regional tourist magnet, has provided an excellent example of environmental conflict emerging from the…

  10. Call It Trash, Garbage or Refuse: Four Case Studies Illustrate Community Waste Management Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazzi, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Describes four successful community programs dealing with waste management issues, developed with assistance from Keep America Beautiful System: litter prevention (Beatrice, Nebraska); composting yard waste (Centralia, Illinois); recycling (Lake Jackson, Texas); and waste-to-energy incineration (Gastonia, North Carolina). Notes related education…

  11. Access, Quality, and Opportunity: A Case Study of Zambia Open Community Schools (ZOCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwalimu, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Community schools and other approaches to Alternative Primary Education or APE have increased access to primary education for underserved populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America as a major goal of the Education for All (EFA) movement. In Zambia, a country where an estimated 20 percent of the basic education enrollment now attends community…

  12. What Do You See? A Case Study of Community College Science Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Chantae M.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges educate almost half of all American undergraduates. These students include but are not limited to under-prepared high school graduates, and individuals who are working full-time while attending school, as well as students of diverse cultural, socioeconomic, and ethnic backgrounds. With such a diverse student population, science…

  13. Building America Case Study: Community-Scale Energy Modeling (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS analyzed pre-retrofit daily utility data to sort homes by energy consumption, allowing for better targeting of homes for physical audits. Following ASHRAE Guideline 14 normalization procedures, electricity consumption of 1,166 all electric production-built homes' was modeled. The homes were in two communities--one built in the 1970s and the other in the mid-2000s.

  14. Social Science Research in the U.S. Mexican Community: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuellar, Jose B.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses Chicano social scientists' needs identified by Mario Barrera: to use methodological strategies and theoretical models emphasizing researcher's close contact with the people; to research the nature of social and political control systems as applicable to the Chicano community; to define the relations between social scientists and the…

  15. Part-Time and Full-Time Faculty Conceptualizations of Academic Community: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sam, Cecile H.

    2012-01-01

    The poor work environment for part-time faculty in higher education is a topic that has been receiving more attention as the professoriate moves away from full-time tenure-track positions. In community colleges, the use of part-time faculty is even more prevalent. However, there are institutions that have been trying to create better work…

  16. Building Community Capacity and Social Infrastructure through Landcare: A Case Study of Land Grant Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Courtney E.; Hull, R. Bruce; Stephenson, Max O.; Robertson, David P.; Cowgill, Kimberly H.

    2012-01-01

    In the struggle to remain true to their technical assistance and civic engagement missions in an era of shrinking budgets and increasingly complex accountability claims, land grant universities have developed different engagement strategies to contribute to the development of surrounding communities. Drawing on Flora and Flora's (in "Ann Am…

  17. Online Learning Community: A Case Study of Teacher Professional Development in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Eunice Ratna

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the concept of online learning community (OLC) to address the issues of teacher professional development practice in twenty-first-century Indonesia. Teachers in Indonesia are trained in a "conventional way", hence, not ready to prepare the younger generations for entrance into the twenty-first-century complex life…

  18. Case Studies of Student Mentoring in Three New York City Community-Based Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truitt, Brett J.

    2012-01-01

    This researcher examined three selected New York City community-based organizations' roles in student mentoring and the building of social capital. The methodology included focus group interviews, individual interviews, shadowing, and the collection of archival materials. The data were analyzed through pattern, theme and discrepancy analysis to…

  19. Analysing a Web-Based E-Commerce Learning Community: A Case Study in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joia, Luiz Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of a Web-based participative virtual learning environment for graduate students in Brazil enrolled in an electronic commerce course in a Masters in Business Administration program. Discusses learning communities; computer-supported collaborative work and collaborative learning; influences on student participation; the role of…

  20. Spiraling Reference: A Case Study of Apprenticeship into an Academic Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent South African meditations on the complex nature of post graduate supervision and teaching by Fataar (2005) and Waghid (2005; 2007) provide excellent accounts of the dialogic space between lecturer/supervisor and student. However, these accounts need to be supplemented by an explicit discussion of the broader academic communities of practice…