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Sample records for compact blue-green lasers

  1. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Faulkner, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  2. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  3. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Ping; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    A laser for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr.sup.3+ ions and Yb.sup.3+ ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output.

  4. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, P.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1998-09-08

    A laser is disclosed for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr{sup 3+} ions and Yb{sup 3+} ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output. 11 figs.

  5. 500.5-nm blue-green laser based on sum-frequency mixing of diode pumped neodymium lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. F.; Na, Y. X.

    2011-07-01

    We report for the first time a continuous-wave (CW) coherent radiation at 500.5 nm by intracavity sum-frequency generation of 1063 nm Nd:GdVO4 laser and 946 nm Nd:YAG laser. Blue-green laser is obtained by using a doubly cavity, type-II critical phase matching KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal sum-frequency mixing. With total pump power of 27.8 W, TEM00 mode blue-green laser at 500.5 nm of 421 mW is obtained. At the output power level of 421 mW, the blue-green power stability is better than 2.8% and laser beam quality M 2 factor is 1.37.

  6. Blue-green light generation by self-sum-frequency mixing Nd:YCOB laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X. H.; Che, Y.; Li, Y. L.; Jiang, H. L.

    2011-06-01

    We report a coherent blue-green radiation at 497 nm by self-sum-frequency generation of the 936 and 1060 nm laser-lines of the Nd:YCa4O(BO3)3 (Nd:YCOB) crystal. With a diode pump power of 14.3 W, the maximum blue-green output power of 75 mW is obtained. The beam quality M2 value is 1.22 in both horizontal and vertical dimensions. The output power stability over 30 min is better than 4.1%. To the best of our knowledge, this is first work on self-sum-frequency generation of a diode pumped Nd:YCOB laser at 497 nm.

  7. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 plus or minus 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m. A 2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.

  8. Development of a UV laser-induced fluorescence lidar for monitoring blue-green algae in Lake Suwa.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasunori; Takano, Kengo; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2014-10-20

    We developed a UV (355 nm) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) lidar for monitoring the real-time status of blue-green algae. Since the fluorescence spectrum of blue-green algae excited by 355 nm showed the specific fluorescence at 650 nm, the lidar was designed to be able to detect the 650 nm fluorescence as a surveillance method for the algae. The usefulness was confirmed by observation at Lake Suwa over four years (2005-2008). The detection limit of the LIF lidar was 16.65 mg/L for the blue-green algae, which is the range of concentrations in the safe level set by the World Health Organization.

  9. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePlus

    Blue-green algae” describes a large and diverse group of simple, plant-like organisms found in salt water and some large fresh water lakes. Blue-green algae products are used for many conditions, but so ...

  10. Experimental underwater scanning imaging system using pulsed blue-green lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Qi-heng; Wang, Hua-chuang; Yu, Xue-gang; Nie, Rui-jie

    2011-06-01

    A new, simple and compact experimental laser scanning imaging system is introduced for underwater imaging, and the characteristics of the system are analyzed in this paper. The system consists of the illuminator, optical scanning system, optical receiving system, narrow band filters, high-sensitivity gated image sensor, synchronous control and data acquisition system and power supply and cooling system. The illuminator is a lump-pumped, Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser operating at 532 nm with a frequency of 50 Hz. The receiver is a self-made gated intensified charge coupled device (ICCD). As a result, gated super Gen-II image intensifier and PAL format charge-coupled device (CCD) camera are assembled to meet the requirements. The coupling gated ICCD has a sensitivity of approximated 10-5lx, and the minimum gate width can reach to 40 ns. And a set of scanning structure which only uses one mirror is used in the experimental system. In addition, the performance parameters are listed. Finally, the detection capabilities of the imaging system are theoretically analyzed in typical seawater. The analysis indicates that the detection depth of the system can reach to 16 m in the clear seawater.

  11. Tunable CW blue, green, orange and red upconversion fiber lasers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ping; Gosnell, T. R.

    The authors report tunable CW laser actions at 491-493nm, 517-540nm, 605-622nm and 635-637nm in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) doped ZBLAN optical fibers. A tunable Ti:Al2O3 laser was used as the pump source to simulate diode laser pumping. With 60 nW launched power, the excitation wavelength of the lasers was in the range of 780nm to 880nm. 300mW Output power has been achieved at 635nm with 760mW launched power at 860nm. With the pump wavelength at 860nm, the authors have also demonstrated stimulated emissions of 45mW at 615 nm with 430mW launched power, 20mW at 520 and 4mW at 493nm with 200mW launched power.

  12. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Blue-green laser emission from IF subjected to wide-band optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, N. G.; Zuev, V. S.; Mikheev, L. D.; Yalovoĭ, V. I.

    1982-05-01

    Lasing at 485-491 nm was observed from the interhalogen compound IF which was formed by excitation of an NF3-CF3I-Ar mixture with vacuum ultraviolet radiation from a high-current electric discharge. The energy of laser pulses was 42 mJ and the duration of these pulses was 4 μ sec.

  13. Blue-green laser emission from IF subjected to wide-band optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N.G.; Zuev, V.S.; Mikheev, L.D.; Yalovoi, V.I.

    1982-05-01

    Lasing at 485--491 nm was observed from the interhalogen compound IF which was formed by excitation of an NF/sub 3/--CF/sub 3/I--Ar mixture with vacuum ultraviolet radiation from a high-current electric discharge. The energy of laser pulses was 42 mJ and the duration of these pulses was 4 ..mu..sec.

  14. The energy transfer mechanism of a photoexcited and electroluminescent organic hybrid thin film of blue, green, and red laser dyes.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiling; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yanqiong; Chen, Guo; Cai, Miao; Wei, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Though optically pumped lasing has been realized for years, electrically pumped lasing has not yet been achieved in organic semiconductor devices. In order to make a better understanding of the laser mechanisms of the organic materials, we prepared organic thin films consisting of three efficient laser dyes of a blue emitter, 4″,4″'-N,N-diphenylamine-4,4'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl (BN), a green emitter, 1,4-bis[2-[4-[N,N-di(p-tolyl)amino] phenyl]vinyl]benzene (DSB), and a red emitter, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidy-l-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) with different doping concentrations for the first time to investigate the cascade energy transfer process. The energy transfer schemes in the co-doped thin films in photoluminescence and electroluminescence have been investigated. The results indicated that the DSB molecules acted as a bridge to deliver energy more effectively from the host (BN) to the guest (DCJTB). Meanwhile, the maximum current efficiency (C E) and power efficiency (P E) of the organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with the emitting layer of lower doping concentration were 13.5 cd/A and 14.1 lm/W, respectively.

  15. Super-Compact Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc. produced the portable Farfield-2 laser for field applications that require high power pulsed illumination. The compact design was conceived through research at Goddard Space Flight Center on laser instruments for space missions to carry out geoscience studies of Earth. An exclusive license to the key NASA patent for the compact laser design was assigned to Microcosm. The FarField-2 is ideal for field applications, has low power consumption, does not need water cooling or gas supplies, and produces nearly ideal beam quality. The properties of the laser also make it effective over long distances, which is one reason why NASA developed the technology for laser altimeters that can be toted aboard spacecraft. Applications for the FarField-2 include medicine, biology, and materials science and processing, as well as diamond marking, semiconductor line-cutting, chromosome surgery, and fluorescence microscopy.

  16. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  17. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  18. Photooxidative Death in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Abeliovich, A.; Shilo, M.

    1972-01-01

    When incubated in the light under 100% oxygen, wild-type blue-green algae (Anacystis nidulans, Synechococcus cedrorum) die out rapidly at temperatures of 4 to 15 C, and at 35 C (or at 26 C in the case of S. cedrorum) in the absence of CO2. Photosynthesis is impaired in these cells long before they die. Blocking of photosystem II at high temperatures in the presence of CO2 sensitizes the algae to photooxidative death. Photooxidative death and bleaching of photosynthetic pigments are separable phenomena. Photooxidative conditions were demonstrated in Israeli fish ponds using A. nidulans as the test organism during dense summer blooms, when dissolved CO2 is low, and in winter, when water temperatures generally drop below 15 C. This finding suggests that photooxidative death may be responsible for the sudden decomposition of blue-green blooms in summer, and may be a factor in the absence of blue-green blooms in winter. PMID:4626540

  19. CW room temperature operation of praseodymium-doped fluorozirconate glass fibre lasers in the blue-green, green and red spectral regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, R. G.; Carter, J. N.; Tropper, A. C.; Hanna, D. C.; Davey, S. T.; Carter, S. F.; Szebesta, D.

    1991-11-01

    We report room temperature, continuous-wave oscillation of Pr 3+-doped fluorozirconate fibre lasers at around 491 nm, 520 nm, 605 nm, 635 nm and 715 nm. An output power of 250 mW has been obtained 635 nm for 800 mW of pump power from an argon ion laser operating at 476.5 nm. Tunable operation of the red transitions has been investigated, with output powers in excess of 30 mW being obtained. Q-switched pulses of 75 ns (fwhm) and 20 W peak power at 635 nm have also been generated.

  20. Compact Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2009-04-01

    ): In this paper we present design considerations, thermal and optical modeling results, and device performance for a ruggedized, compact laser transmitter that utilizes a room temperature quantum cascade (QC) laser source. The QC laser transmitter is intended for portable mid-infrared (3-12 µm) spectroscopy applications, where the atmospheric transmission window is relatively free of water vapor interference and where the molecular rotational vibration absorption features can be used to detect and uniquely identify chemical compounds of interest. Initial QC laser-based sensor development efforts were constrained by the complications of cryogenic operation. However, improvements in both QC laser designs and fabrication processes have provided room-temperature devices that now enable significant miniaturization and integration potential for national security, environmental monitoring, atmospheric science, and industrial safety applications.

  1. Phycobilisomes in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Ruth B.; Bowen, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen species of freshwater blue-green algae, including unicellular, filamentous, and colonial forms, were subjected to a variety of fixatives, fixation conditions, and stains for comparison of the preservation of phycobilisomes. Absorption spectra of the corresponding in vivo and released photosynthetic pigments, in 10 of the species that were maintained in culture, demonstrated the presence of phycocyanin in all 10 species and phycoerythrin in only 2 of them. Spectroscope and electron microscope evidence was obtained for localization of phycobiliproteins in phycobilisomes of Nostoc muscorum. Phycobilisomes were observed in all species examined in situ, strenghening the hypothesis that phycobilisomes are common to all phycobiliprotein-containing photosynthetic blue-green algae. Images PMID:4204443

  2. Blue-green pulsed propagation through fog.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, G C; Geller, M; Stotts, L B; Stephens, D H; Krautwald, R A

    1979-02-15

    Measurements and analysis of a blue-green pulsed propagation through fog have identified three distinct regions for energy transport. Region I small number of attenuation lengths tau in the path (0 32): the direct beam and the forwardscattered beam have decayed to the point where the diffusion type multiple-scattered radiation is the dominant energy received. This component does not decay exponentially but results in large spatial, angular, and temporal spreading. This paper presents quantitative data on Region II. PMID:20208740

  3. Compact and highly efficient laser pump cavity

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Bass, Isaac L.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1999-01-01

    A new, compact, side-pumped laser pump cavity design which uses non-conventional optics for injection of laser-diode light into a laser pump chamber includes a plurality of elongated light concentration channels. In one embodiment, the light concentration channels are compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) which have very small exit apertures so that light will not escape from the pumping chamber and will be multiply reflected through the laser rod. This new design effectively traps the pump radiation inside the pump chamber that encloses the laser rod. It enables more uniform laser pumping and highly effective recycle of pump radiation, leading to significantly improved laser performance. This new design also effectively widens the acceptable radiation wavelength of the diodes, resulting in a more reliable laser performance with lower cost.

  4. Compact pulsed laser having improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A highly efficient, compact pulsed laser having high energy to weight and volume ratios is provided. The laser utilizes a cavity reflector that operates as a heat sink and is essentially characterized by having a high heat conductivity, by being a good electrical insulator and by being substantially immune to the deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation. Manual portability is accomplished by eliminating entirely any need for a conventional circulating fluid cooling system.

  5. Compact, high energy gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stapleton, Robert E.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1976-08-03

    An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

  6. [Phycobiliproteins of blue-green, red and cryptophytic algae].

    PubMed

    Stadnichuk, I N; Gusev, M V

    1979-04-01

    The present-day concepts on phycobiliproteins, the protein pigments of blue-green, red and cryptophyte algae are reviewed. The functions, distribution, localization, physico-chemical, spectral and immunochemical properties of phycobiliproteins are described. The properties of the polypeptide protein subunits and the composition and chemical structure of chromophores as well as their binding to the apoprotein molecules are discussed.

  7. Compact ultrahigh-power laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Galvanauskas, A.

    1995-11-01

    Compact sources of high energy ultrashort pulses are described. Femtosecond and picosecond optical pulses with microjoule energies are obtained using chirped-pulse fiber amplifiers. Mode-locked fiber lasers and fast-tuned laser diodes are used to generate initial pulses for amplification. Efficient frequency conversion of amplified pulses is demonstrated and microjoule second-harmonic pulses are produced. The first all-fiber chirped pulse amplification circuit is demonstrated. It uses in-fiber chirped Bragg gratings, which replaces conventional diffraction-grating compressors and stretchers.

  8. [Immunostimulating activity of the lipopolysaccharides of blue-green algae].

    PubMed

    Besednova, N N; Smolina, T P; Mikheĭskaia, L V; Ovodova, R G

    1979-12-01

    The whole cells of blue-gree algae and lipopolysaccharides isolated from these cells were shown to stimulate the production of macro-(mainly) and microglobulin antibodies in rabbits. The macro- and microphage indices in rabbits increased significantly after the injection of LPS isolated from blue-green algae 24--48 hours before infecting the animals with a virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis strain. Besides, the inhibiting action of this strain on the migration of phagocytes to the site of infection was abolished immediately after the injection. The use of the indirect hemagglutination test allowed to prove the absence of close antigenic interrelations between blue-green algae and the following organisms: Spirulina platensis, Microcystis aeruginosa, Phormidium africanum and P. uncinatum. PMID:117655

  9. Subunit structure of the phycobiliproteins of blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A N; Cohen-Bazire, G

    1971-07-01

    The phycobiliproteins of the blue-green algae Synechococcus sp. and Aphanocapsu sp. were characterized with respect to homogeneity, isoelectric point, and subunit composition. Each of the biliproteins consisted of two different noncovalently associated subunits, with molecular weights of about 20,000 and 16,000 for phycocyanin, 17,500 and 15,500 for allophycocyanin, and 22,000 and 20,000 for phycoerythrin. Covalently bound chromophore was associated with each subunit.

  10. Compact Laser Technology for Compton Scattering Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shverdin, M.; Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S. M.; Ebbers, C.; Gibson, D.; Messerly, M.; Hartemann, F. V.; Siders, C. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2009-11-01

    We describe compact laser technology for Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source at LLNL. The high energy, 120W interaction laser utilizes chirped pulse amplification (CPA) in Nd:YAG to amplify a sub-nanometer bandwidth 20 μJ pulses from a fiber system to 1J. A novel pulse stretcher provides a dispersion of over 7000ps/nm to expand a several picosecond wide seed pulse to 6ns. After amplification, the pulse is recompressed to 10ps with a hyper-dispersive pulse compressor. We also describe a technique for over an order of magnitude increase in the generated gamma-ray flux by recirculation of the interaction laser pulse. This technique, termed Recirculation Injection by Nonlinear Gating (RING), consists of frequency doubling the incident laser pulse inside a dichroic mirror cavity. The resonator mirrors transmit at 1φ and reflect at 2φ. The 2^nd harmonic of the incident pulse then becomes trapped inside the cavity. To date, we demonstrated 14 times cavity enhancement of 180mJ, 10ps, 532nm laser pulses.

  11. Theoretical study of the AlO blue-green (B2Sigma + - X2Sigma +) band system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Langhoff, S. R.; Lengsfield, B. H., III; Liu, B.

    1983-01-01

    Two independent, extensive theoretical calculations are reported for the relative band strengths of the AlO (B2Sigma + - X2Sigma +) blue-green system and for the radiative lifetimes of the lowest few vibrational levels of the B2Sigma(+) state. The theoretical lifetimes, which include a small (less than -.5 percent) contribution from bound-bound transitions into the A2Pi state, are in excellent agreement with laser fluorescence studies. The theoretical lifetimes increase monotonically and very slowly with increasing vibrational quantum number. The relative band strengths for the blue-green system derived from the two theoretical calculations are in excellent agreement, but differ systematically from the relative band strengths of Linton and Nicholls (1969). The present results suggest that their self-absorption corrections are not large enough, resulting in relative intensities that are too large, especially for the weak bands with r centroids less than 1.5 A.

  12. Temporal and angular spreading of blue-green pulses in clouds.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, G C; Geller, M

    1982-05-01

    The first blue-green laser propagation measurements through clouds that simulate the geometry of a satellite-to-ground communication link were made. The time history of large diameter (approximately 6-km) pulses illuminating cloud tops was recorded as a function of receiver field of view (FOV). The maximum pulse stretching observed for nanosecond laser pulses was 20 microsec for clouds of 1.5-km thickness. It was shown that the pulses could in general be represented by a linear combination of two modified gamma functions: One, a slowly decaying term, represents the power from the diffusion type of multiple scattering. The other, a much faster decaying term, represents the power from a direct nonscattered portion of the beam or from a lower order of multiple scattering. For very dense clouds, the only component measured was the diffusion type. Data of FOV scans are presented for various values of optical thickness.

  13. Compact Fiber Laser for 589nm Laser Guide Star Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D.; Drobshoff, D.; Mitchell, S.; Brown, A.

    Laser guide stars are crucial to the broad use of astronomical adaptive optics, because they facilitate access to a large fraction of possible locations on the sky. Lasers tuned to the 589 nm atomic sodium resonance can create an artificial beacon at altitudes of 95-105 km, thus coming close to reproducing the light path of starlight. The deployment of multiconjugate adaptive optics on large aperture telescopes world-wide will require the use of three to nine sodium laser guide stars in order to achieve uniform correction over the aperture with a high Strehl value. Current estimates place the minimum required laser power at > 10 W per laser for a continuous wave source, though a pulsed format, nominally 6?s in length at ~ 16.7 kHz, is currently preferred as it would enable tracking the laser through the Na layer to mitigate spot elongation. The lasers also need to be compact, efficient, robust and turnkey. We are developing an all-fiber laser system for generating a 589 nm source for laser-guided adaptive optics. Fiber lasers are more compact and insensitive to alignment than their bulk laser counterparts, and the heat-dissipation characteristics of fibers, coupled with the high efficiencies demonstrated and excellent spatial mode characteristics, make them a preferred candidate for many high power applications. Our design is based on sum-frequency mixing an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser operating at 1583 nm with a 938 nm Nd:silica fiber laser in a periodically poled crystal to generate 589 nm. We have demonstrated 14 W at 1583 nm with an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser, based on a Koheras single frequency fiber oscillator amplified in an IPG Photonics fiber amplifier. The Nd:silica fiber laser is a somewhat more novel device, since the Nd3+ ions must operate on the resonance transition (i.e. 4F3/2-4I9/2), while suppressing ASE losses at the more conventional 1088 nm transition. Optimization of the ratio of the fiber core and cladding permits operation of the laser at room

  14. The blue-green blood plasma of marine fish.

    PubMed

    Fang, L S; Bada, J L

    1990-01-01

    1. The blue-green coloration of the blood plasma in some marine fishes, which is attributed to a protein bound tetrapyrrol (biliverdin), is an anomaly in vertebrates. 2. Recent studies have shown that biliverdin not only occurs in many fish, but is also present in the blood of tobacco hornworm, the wings of moth and butterfly, the shell of bird eggs, the serum and egg of frog, the placenta of dog and in the blood of humans suffering from hepatic diseases. 3. In this review, we begin with a historical account of the description of the presence of blue-green blood plasma in fish, and then consider the biochemistry, metabolism, physiology, and the ecological implications of biliverdin in fish. 4. A comparative description of the occurrence of biliverdin in fish and other animals is presented. 5. The mechanism of accumulation of biliverdin in fish blood and its evolutionary significance are also considered. It is suggested that this process may serve as a useful model for further research on bile pigment metabolism in other animals.

  15. Blue-green and green phosphors for lighting applications

    DOEpatents

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi; Henderson, Claire Susan; Nammalwar, Pransanth Kumar; Radkov, Emil

    2012-12-11

    Embodiments of the present techniques provide a related family of phosphors that may be used in lighting systems to generate blue or blue-green light. The phosphors include systems having a general formula of: ((Sr.sub.1-zM.sub.z).sub.1-(x+w)A.sub.wCe.sub.x).sub.3(Al.sub.1-ySi.s- ub.y)O.sub.4+y+3(x-w)F.sub.1-y-3(x-w) (I), wherein 0blue/green light. Further, the phosphors may be used in blends with other phosphors, or in combined lighting systems, to produce white light suitable for illumination.

  16. Compact 10 mW all-solid-state 491 nm laser based on frequency doubling a master oscillator power amplifier laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluck, Daniel; Pliska, Tomas; Günter, Peter

    1996-02-01

    We report on continuous-wave blue-green light generation by direct frequency doubling a monolithically integrated master oscillator power amplifier laser diode in a potassium niobate (KNbO 3) crystal. 10 mW of diffraction limited ( M2 ≤ 1.1) second-harmonic light at 491 nm is generated with a fundamental power of 760 mW incident on a 17 mm long crystal. The blue-green laser radiation is 100% polarised and single-longitudinal mode with a frequency linewidth of ˜33 GHz corresponding to a coherence length of ˜6 mm. The root-mean-square fluctuations of the second-harmonic output power is as low as 0.1% and the power drift is less than 3% over six hours.

  17. Retinal oximeter for the blue-green oximetry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Sieluzycka, Katarzyna B.; Hendryx, Jennifer K.; Ririe, Tyson J.; Deluca, Lawrence; Chipman, Russell A.

    2011-10-01

    Retinal oximetry offers potential for noninvasive assessment of central venous oxyhemoglobin saturation (SO2) via the retinal vessels but requires a calibrated accuracy of +/-3% saturation in order to be clinically useful. Prior oximeter designs have been hampered by poor saturation calibration accuracy. We demonstrate that the blue-green oximetry (BGO) technique can provide accuracy within +/-3% in swine when multiply scattered light from blood within a retinal vessel is isolated. A noninvasive on-axis scanning retinal oximeter (ROx-3) is constructed that generates a multiwavelength image in the range required for BGO. A field stop in the detection pathway is used in conjunction with an anticonfocal bisecting wire to remove specular vessel reflections and isolate multiply backscattered light from the blood column within a retinal vessel. This design is tested on an enucleated swine eye vessel and a retinal vein in a human volunteer with retinal SO2 measurements of ~1 and ~65%, respectively. These saturations, calculated using the calibration line from earlier work, are internally consistent with a standard error of the mean of +/-2% SO2. The absolute measures are well within the expected saturation range for the site (-1 and 63%). This is the first demonstration of noninvasive on-axis BGO retinal oximetry.

  18. Analysis of pollutant enhanced bacterial-blue-green algal interrelationships potentiating surface water contamination by noxious blue-green algal blooms. Completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, G.W.

    1984-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfovibro can stimulate the blue-green alga (Cyanobacterium) Anabaena variabilis (Strain 6411) into increasing its dry weight biomass production by more than 200 percent over that of the control as the total phosphate in the medium approaches zero. Results suggest that methods which utilize total nitrogen to phosphorus ratios in waters as predictors of blue-green algal 'blooms' may be unreliable when the waters are very low in phosphorus yet remain high in sulfate with conditions favorable for sulfate-reducing bacterial growth in benthic sediments. Otherwise, if the phosphate levels alone in the aqueous systems are reduced below threshold levels under these conditions, the magnitude of the blue-green algal blooms may be increased substantially.

  19. A Compact Reliable Laser Surgery Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Dounan; Yu, Guiqiu; Chen, Taolue

    1989-09-01

    Now, more and more hospitals and doctors in the world are getting interested in laser medicine, more and more people are getting understanding on laser surgery operations and physical therapy. Following the cotinuous comprehensive investigation of laser medicine, the clinical applications of laser has been further expanded and per a lot of indications have been found. As is well known, CO2 laser is one of the most famous medical lasers. In recent years, we concentrate our at to it, a new minitype CO2 laser surgery instrument has been built after improving repeately, the improvement depends on the experiences of hundreds of doctors in hundreds of hospitals for curing ten thousands cases. Our new laser surgery instrument has been improved in five-main characters: 1) Expanding the range of adjustable power into 3-10 W; 2) Making the laser output flexible, dose from 0.1--105 W/cm2 for different cures; 3) Expanding its applications into about 50 indications of general surgery, dermatology, otolaryngology, and gynecology. Which have been proven effective or very effective.

  20. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  1. Compact stabilized semiconductor laser for frequency metrology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Eliyahu, Danny; Dale, Elijah; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Seidel, David; Matsko, Andrey B; Maleki, Lute

    2015-04-10

    We report on the development of a frequency modulatable 795 nm semiconductor laser based on self-injection locking to a high-quality-factor whispering-gallery-mode microresonator. The laser is characterized by residual amplitude modulation below -80  dB and frequency noise better than 300  Hz/Hz(1/2) at offset frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 10 MHz. The frequency modulation speed and span of the laser exceed 1 MHz and 4 GHz, respectively. Locking of the laser to the Doppler-free saturated absorption resonance of the (87)Rb D1 line is demonstrated and relative frequency stability better than 10(-12) is measured for integration time spanning from 1 s to 1 day. The architecture demonstrated in this study is suitable for the realization of frequency modulatable lasers at any wavelength.

  2. Compact-range coordinate system established using a laser tracker.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, Floyd H.; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

    2006-12-01

    Establishing a Cartesian coordinate reference system for an existing Compact Antenna Range using the parabolic reflector is presented. A SMX (Spatial Metrix Corporation) M/N 4000 laser-based coordinate measuring system established absolute coordinates for the facility. Electric field characteristics with positional movement correction are evaluated. Feed Horn relocation for alignment with the reflector axis is also described. Reference points are established for follow-on non-laser alignments utilizing a theodolite.

  3. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutton, Andrew

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  4. Compact laser illumination system for endoscopic interventions.

    PubMed

    Blase, Bastian

    2015-08-01

    External cold light sources as well as LEDs are commonly used for abdominal illumination in minimally invasive surgery. Still, both feature certain disadvantages. A new illumination system for endoscopes based on laser diodes is placed in the handle. No external light cables are needed. High conversion and coupling efficiencies and small package size allow for several diodes to be integrated, enabling color mixing and the adjustment of color temperatures. An optical module to collimate and combine the light is described. The heat to be dissipated is stored in a passive latent heat storage based on phase change materials surrounding the optical module. Thereby, operation time is considerably extended, as the handle's temperature is stabilized. To reduce the negative effect of coherent light on optical rough surfaces leading to patterns of spots, several devices for speckle reduction are developed and tested. By combining these components, an assembly of a powerful RGB laser light module for the integration in standard sized endoscopes is formed. PMID:26737628

  5. A new compact laser source for portable LIBS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujon, J.; Musset, O.; Giakoumaki, A.; Pinon, V.; Anglos, D.; Georgiou, E.

    2008-02-01

    We present LIBS experimental results that demonstrate the use of a newly compact, versatile pulsed laser source in material analysis in view of research aiming at the development of portable LIBS instrumentation. LIBS qualitative analyses were performed on various samples and objects, and spectra were recorded in gated and non-gated modes. The latter is important because of advantages arising from size and cost reduction when using simple, compact spectrograph-CCD detection systems over the standard ICCD-based configurations. The new Nd 3+:YAG laser source exhibited very reliable performance in terms of laser pulse repeatability, autonomy and interface. Indeed, it can deliver a 45 mJ for 4.5 ns pulse and work at 1 Hz. Having the ability to work in double-pulse mode, it provided versatility in the measurements leading to increased LIBS signal intensities, improved the signal noise ratio and stabilized spectra. The first test results are encouraging and demonstrate that this new laser is suitable for integration in compact, portable and low cost LIBS sensors with a wide spectrum of materials analysis applications.

  6. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The state-of-the-art X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam produced by an X-band RF accelerator and a high-intensity laser pulse generated by chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) has been carried out by our research team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system is called "Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source". The applications include nuclear resonance fluorescence, medical imaging and therapy, and nuclear waste imaging and assay. One of the key factors in this system is how we know the interaction happened in the vacuum chamber, which is the spectrometer of electron beams. The other key factor is the interaction after the spectrometer, which is the outgoing X-ray. In this thesis, the work in the simulation for the result of the interaction between electrons and the laser, the calibration of spectrometer, and laser focus characterization are discussed.

  7. Compact laser Doppler flowmeter for application in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Ivan V.; Mareew, Gleb O.; Finokhina, Olga A.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2005-06-01

    Lightweight handheld laser Doppler instrument is designed for blood flow assessment in soft tissues of oral cavity. Laser light source, fiber optic probe detector and amplifier circuitry are mounted inside the compact hand held probe assembly to minimize noise and to exclude optical fiber motion artifacts. Both the instrument and data processing software are optimized for the using of the standard PC sound interface as the data acquisition device that provides low cost and effective solution for clinical use. The instrument is suitable for quantitative diagnostics of gingivitis and other disorders in dentistry.

  8. Uptake and Retention of Cs137 by a Blue-Green Alga in Continuous Flow and Batch Culture Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, J.R.

    2003-02-18

    Since routine monitoring data show that blue-green algae concentrate radioactivity from water by factors as great as 10,000, this study was initiated to investigate the uptake and retention patterns of specific radionuclides by the dominant genera of blue-green algae in the reactor effluents. Plectonema purpureum was selected for this study.

  9. The rapid quantitation of the filamentous blue-green alga plectonema boryanum by the luciferase assay for ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.

    1974-01-01

    Plectonema boryanum is a filamentous blue green alga. Blue green algae have a procaryotic cellular organization similar to bacteria, but are usually obligate photoautotrophs, obtaining their carbon and energy from photosynthetic mechanism similar to higher plants. This research deals with a comparison of three methods of quantitating filamentous populations: microscopic cell counts, the luciferase assay for ATP and optical density measurements.

  10. Modeling the Role of Zebra Mussels in the Proliferation of Blue-green Algae in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under model assumptions from Saginaw Bay 1991, selective rejection of blue-green algae by zebra mussels appears to be a necessary factor in the enhancement of blue-green algae production in the presence of zebra mussels. Enhancement also appears to depend on the increased sedime...

  11. Compact frequency-quadrupled pulsed 1030nm fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian; DiLazaro, Tom; Hays, Alan D.

    2016-03-01

    A compact 1030nm fiber laser for ultraviolet generation at 257.5nm is presented. The laser employs a short length of highly-doped, large core (20μm), coiled polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber pumped by a wavelength-stabilized 975nm diode. It is passively Q-switched via a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber and generates 2.4W at 1030nm in a 110μJ pulse train. Lithium triborate (LBO) and beta-barium borate (BBO) are used to achieve 325mW average power at the fourth harmonic. The laser's small form factor, narrow linewidth and modest power consumption are suitable for use in a man-portable ultraviolet Raman explosives detection system.

  12. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  13. Phycobilisomes from a Blue-Green Alga Nostoc Species

    PubMed Central

    Gray, B. H.; Lipschultz, C. A.; Gantt, E.

    1973-01-01

    Phycobilisomes were isolated from a Nostoc sp. strain Mac in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) by treatment with 1% Brij 56 and centrifugation on discontinuous sucrose gradients (2.0, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.25 M in the proportions 6:4:4:10 ml, respectively). Absorption spectra of isolated phycobilisomes showed the presence of phycoerythrin, phycocyanin, and allophycocyanin. The phycobilisome pigments were partially resolved by electrophoresis on acrylamide gels. Stained gels demonstrated that each main protein band corresponded to a pigmented region. The phycobilisomes appeared compact with a rounded surface and flattened base (about 40-nm diameter) at the attachment site to the photosynthetic lamellae. Fixation in glutaraldehyde caused a significant reduction in total pigment absorption, as well as shifts in the absorption maxima, particularly that of phycoerythrin. Images PMID:4200843

  14. Role of Reduced Exogenous Organic Compounds in the Physiology of the Blue-Green Bacteria (Algae): Photoheterotrophic Growth of an “Autotrophic” Blue-Green Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, L. O.; Van Baalen, C.; Calder, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The unicellular blue-green bacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum strain BG-1 was found to be capable of rapid photoheterotrophic growth but unable to grow in the dark on a variety of reduced organic substrates. The generation time on glycerol was 12 h, and on CO2, 3 h. Glycerol carbon was converted into cellular carbon with a very high efficiency. This high efficiency of carbon conversion, the action spectrum for growth on glycerol, cell pigmentation, gas exchange measurements, and immediate ability of photoheterotrophically grown cells to evolve O2 (upon the addition of CO2) suggest the involvement of both photosystems I and II of photosynthesis during photoheterotrophic growth. PMID:4196253

  15. Side diode pumped ultra-compact Er:glass laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkin, Vladimir V.; Polyakov, Vadim M.; Kharitonov, Artem A.; Buchenkov, Vyacheslav A.; Rodionov, Andrey Y.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate side pumped ultra-compact Q-switched Er:glass laser for rangefinding with 1.4 mJ energy at 1.54 um. Laser diode with 75 W power and 5 ms pulse duration was used. Active medium was enveloped with diffuse reflector. Output pulse energy in free-running mode was 27 mJ with a slope efficiency of 12%. Transparent glass-ceramics containing Co2+:MgAl2O4 nanocrystals were used as a passive gate to ensure Q-switching in an operation temperature range and transverse mode selection. The Q-switch mode had steady operation at 1 Hz repetition rate with thermal effects playing no visible role.

  16. The prospect function of terrestrial nitrogen-fixing blue-green algae on the fixation of desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yusuo; Lei, Jiaqiang

    2003-07-01

    The Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae, which are possessed of both photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, are the leading organisms in the adverse circumstances. With their typical cell structures and physiological abilities, they are strongly resistant to drought, infertility etc. The growth of Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae can rich the soils in nitrogen and organic compounds, which are benefit to other microbes and plants. Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae are widely distributed in Gurbantunggut Desert. It was estimated that about 40% of the surface of the desert are covered by the "Black Crust". "Black Crust" is mainly occupied by Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae. It is Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae that construct the mechanical crust with a little other algae and fungi through biological, chemical and physical actions. So Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae play an important part in desert fixation. It was analyzed that there are three species of the blue-greens in the "Black Crust": Microcoleus vaginatus(Vauch)Gom.,Scytonema ocellatum Lynbye and Schizothrix mella Gardner. We had isolated Microcoleus vaginatus(Vauch)Gom. and Scytonema ocellatum Lynbye. Some tests had been made to prove the feasibility of the desert fixation of the Blue-greens. Under experiment conditions, the blue-greens grown on the surface of sand, covered the sand quickly after the inoculation, and formed a mechanical fixed surface layer (7 days for Microcoleus vaginatus, 15-21 days for Scytonema ocellatum).

  17. Compact stacking of diode lasers for pulsed light sources of high brightness.

    PubMed

    Alahautala, Taito; Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2004-07-20

    A compact stacking architecture for high-power diode-laser arrays is proposed and compared with traditional stacks. The objective of compact stacking is to achieve high brightness values without the use of microlenses. The calculated brightness for a compact stack is over 300 W mm(-2) sr(-1), which is approximately 40 times higher than that of a traditional stack made of similar laser emitters. Even higher brightness values of over 600 W mm(-2) sr(-1) were reached in practice. A laser head was manufactured in which the light from several compact laser stacks could be fiber coupled or the light could be transformed to a highly uniform beam.

  18. CW laser compaction of aqueous solution deposited metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, G.J.; Dennis, T.

    1997-12-01

    Zirconium dioxide films were spin cast onto silica or silicon substrates from an aqueous solution comprised of the precursor metal nitrate and an organic complexant such as glycine. The hydrated films so derived consist of an amorphous organic phase in which the metal cations and nitrate anions are homogeneously dispersed. Heating to temperatures above 200 {degrees}C leads to film dehydration followed by an auto-catalyzed oxidation reaction whereby the bound nitrate oxidizes the organic matrix leaving behind an intact stoichiometric and crystalline metal oxide film. Films are characterized using AFM, XRD, and optical methods. Transformation processes in these films have been studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and laser induced fluorescence from films doped with a suitable rare earth probe ion such as SM{sup +3}. In the latter case, the measured fluorescence emission spectra are used to identify the hydrated, dehydrated, amorphous and crystalline metal oxide phases which evolve during processing. These transformations also have been induced upon visible CW laser irradiation at fluences in excess of 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Under these conditions, the film dehydrates and compacts within the footprint of the incident laser beam rendering this region of the film water insoluble. Post irradiation washing of the film with water removes all vestiges of the film outside of the beam footprint suggesting a possible use of this technique for lithography applications. Films subjected to laser irradiation and post irradiation heating have been characterized with respect to thickness, phase composition, crystallite size and optical constants.

  19. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, D.L.; Pope, D.H.; Cherry, W.B.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1980-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Legionnaires disease bacterium) of serogroup 1 was isolated from an algal-bacterial mat community growing at 45/sup 0/C in a man-made thermal effluent. This isolate was grown in mineral salts medium at 45/sup 0/C in association with the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Fischerella sp. over a pH range of 6.9 to 7.6. L. pneumophila was apparently using algal extracellular products as its carbon and energy sources. These observations indicate that the temperature, pH, and nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila are not as stringent as those previously observed when cultured on complex media. This association between L. pneumophila and certain blue-green algae suggests an explanation for the apparent widespread distribution of the bacterium in nature.

  20. The evolution of blue-greens and the origins of chloroplasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1981-01-01

    All of the available molecular data support the theory that the chloroplasts of eukaryote cells were originally free-living blue-greens. Of great interest is what the relationships are between contemporary types of blue-greens and eukaryote chloroplasts and whether the chloroplasts of the various eukaryotes are the result of one or more than one symbiosis. By combining information from phylogenetic trees based on cytochrome c6 and 2Fe-2S ferredoxin sequences, it is shown that the chloroplasts of a number of eukaryote algae as well as the protist Euglena are polyphyletic; the chloroplasts of green algae and the higher plants may be the result of a single symbiosis.

  1. Efficient harvesting of wet blue-green microalgal biomass by two-aminoclay [AC]-mixture systems.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hye-Min; Lee, Hyun Uk; Kim, Eui Jin; Seo, Soonjoo; Kim, Bohwa; Lee, Go-Woon; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Jun Yeong; Huh, Yun Suk; Song, Hyun A; Lee, Young-Chul

    2016-07-01

    Blue-green microalgal blooms have been caused concerns about environmental problems and human-health dangers. For removal of such cyanobacteria, many mechanical and chemical treatments have been trialled. Among various technologies, the flocculation-based harvesting (precipitation) method can be an alternative if the problem of the low yield of recovered biomass at low concentrations of cyanobacteria is solved. In the present study, it was utilized mixtures of magnesium aminoclay [MgAC] and cerium aminoclay [CeAC] with different particle sizes to harvest cyanobacteria feedstocks with ∼100% efficiency within 1h by ten-fold lower loading of ACs compared with single treatments of [MgAC] or [CeAC]. This success was owed to the compact networks of the different-sized-ACs mixture for efficient bridging between microalgal cells. In order to determine the usage potential of biomass harvested with AC, the mass was heat treated under the reduction condition. This system is expected to be profitably utilizable in adsorbents and catalysts. PMID:27023387

  2. Compact laser vibrometer for industrial and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Andrew C.

    1998-06-01

    Laser interferometric vibrometers are now well known and accepted as sensitive, accurate, high bandwidth and linear measurement system. For many applications the internal complexity and resultant size of the interferometric sensor head limits the widespread use. This paper describes the performance and principle of operation of a new miniaturized interferometric sensor head which retains the important characteristics of the previously mentioned systems, but embodied in a robust compact housing no larger thana typical torchlight. Velocity resolution in the acoustic range has been found to be up to 50 nanometers/sec in a 10 Hz RBW. The size of this new sensor head allows it to be mounted on balanced microscope assemblies or within machinery, and the waterproof design allows disinfectant cleaning in clinical applications or operation in industrial environments.

  3. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.; Wang, X.; Bhowmik, A.; Bobbs, B.; Cover, R.A.; Dixon, F.P.; Rakowsky, G.; Gallardo, J.; Pellegrini, C.; Westenskow, G.

    1988-09-09

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Compact and smart laser diode systems for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirin, Viatcheslav N.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Solovieva, Tatiana I.

    2003-04-01

    To win the cancer is one of the most important mankind task to be decided in III Millenium. New technology of treatment is to recognize and kill cancer cells with the laser light not by surgery operation, but by soft painless therapy. Even though from the beginning of the 80s of the last century this technology, so-called photodynamic therapy (PDT) has received acceptance in America, Europe and Asia it is still considered in the medical circles to be a new method with the little-known approaches of cancer treatment. Recently the next step was done, and the unique method of PDT combined with laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was developed. Compact and smart diode laser apparatus "Modul-GF" for its realization was designed. In this report the concept of this method, experimental materials on clinical trials and ways of optimization of technical decisions and software of apparatus "Modul-GF", including the autotuning of laser power dependently on tissue temperature measured with thermosensors are discussed. The special instruments such as fiber cables and special sensors are described to permit application of "Modul-GF" for the treatment of the tumors of the different localizations, both surface and deeply located with using of the endoscopy method. The examples of the oncological and nononcological pathologies" treatment by the developed method and apparatus in urology, gynecology, gastroenterology, dermatology, cosmetology, bronchology, pulmonology are observed. The results of clinical approval the developed combination of PDT&LITT realized with "Modul-GF" leads to essentially increasing of the treatment effectiveness.

  5. Compact prisms for polarisation splitting of fibre laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L; Yagodkin, D I

    2005-11-30

    Simple compact monoprisms for spatial splitting of polarised laser beams with relatively small diameters (no more than 1 mm) are considered. Prisms can be made of optically inactive CaCO{sub 3}, {alpha}-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} ({alpha}-BBO), LiIO{sub 3}, LiNbO{sub 3}, YVO{sub 4}, and TiO{sub 2} crystals known in polarisation optics. The exact solution of the Snell equation for the extraordinary wave reflected from a surface arbitrarily tilted to its wave vector is obtained. The analysis of variants of the solution allows the fabrication of prisms with any deviation angles of the extraordinary wave by preserving the propagation direction of the ordinary wave. Three variants of prisms are considered: with minimised dimensions, with the Brewster output of the extraordinary beam, and with the deviation of the extraordinary wave by 90{sup 0}. Calcite prisms with the deviation angles for the extraordinary beam {approx}19{sup 0} and 90{sup 0} are tested experimentally. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. A highly efficient, compact Yb:KYW laser for mobile precision systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S A; Pivtsov, V S

    2014-05-30

    We have developed a promising scheme of a multimodediode-pumped ytterbium laser. The Yb:KYW laser in the cw regime demonstrates record-high differential (40%) and total optical (35%) efficiencies. Mode locking is realised, which allows the scheme to be used for the development of compact laser systems, such as mobile femtosecond precision synthesisers. The peculiarities of the laser operation and ways of further improving its efficiency are discussed. (lasers)

  7. Elastic Properties of Compacted Clay Soils by Laser Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, M.; Godínez, F. A.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of the excitation frequency on the dynamic properties of soils, the elastic modulus , shear modulus , and Poisson’s ratio for three Mexican compacted clayey soils were determined using two techniques: laser ultrasonic and resonant column (RC) tests. For the first, the parameters were determined by measurements of the P- and S-waves at ultrasonic frequencies and variations of the height of the cylindrical soil specimens and for the second one, a harmonic excitation between 5 Hz and 7 Hz was applied. Large variations in the elastic parameters through an ultrasonic axial scanning of the soil specimens were observed; this reveals the heterogeneity of these materials, while a decrease of the sample aspect ratio mainly affects the determination of Poisson’s ratio. The ultrasonic data were integrated with those from RC data to obtain a shear modulus profile covering both high and low frequencies. The interpolation on whether the data are either linear or not is an indication of the viscoelastic behavior of the compacted clayey soils. The specimens were: (a) clay from Texcoco Valley, (b) clay from Mexico Valley, and (c) granular soils from the Parota. Experimental determination of the mechanical properties of soils is very important because soil constitutive models are traditionally calibrated from global boundary measurements taken from laboratory soil specimens. The most difficult parameter to obtain is the Poisson’s ratio, as well as the shear modulus, which is a fundamental parameter for establishing the soil response under low amplitude vibrations and it is extremely important to foundation design.

  8. Innovative fiber-laser architecture-based compact wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Tracy, Allen; Vetorino, Steve; Higgins, Richard; Sibell, Russ

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes an innovative, compact and eyesafe coherent lidar system developed for use in wind and wake vortex sensing applications. This advanced lidar system is field ruggedized with reduced size, weight, and power consumption (SWaP) configured based on an all-fiber and modular architecture. The all-fiber architecture is developed using a fiber seed laser that is coupled to uniquely configured fiber amplifier modules and associated photonic elements including an integrated 3D scanner. The scanner provides user programmable continuous 360 degree azimuth and 180 degree elevation scan angles. The system architecture eliminates free-space beam alignment issues and allows plug and play operation using graphical user interface software modules. Besides its all fiber architecture, the lidar system also provides pulsewidth agility to aid in improving range resolution. Operating at 1.54 microns and with a PRF of up to 20 KHz, the wind lidar is air cooled with overall dimensions of 30" x 46" x 60" and is designed as a Class 1 system. This lidar is capable of measuring wind velocities greater than 120 +/- 0.2 m/s over ranges greater than 10 km and with a range resolution of less than 15 m. This compact and modular system is anticipated to provide mobility, reliability, and ease of field deployment for wind and wake vortex measurements. The current lidar architecture is amenable for trace gas sensing and as such it is being evolved for airborne and space based platforms. In this paper, the key features of wind lidar instrumentation and its functionality are discussed followed by results of recent wind forecast measurements on a wind farm.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the ferredoxin gene of blue-green alga Anabaena siamensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shou-Dong; Song, Li-Rong; Liu, Yong-Ding; Zhao, Jin-Dong

    1998-03-01

    The structure gene for ferredoxin, petFI, from Anabaena siamensis has been amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and cloned into cloning vector pGEM-3zf(+). The nucleotide sequence of petFI has been determined with silver staining sequencing method. There is 96.8% homology between coding region of petFI from A. siamensis and that of petFI from A. sp. 7120. Amino acid sequences of seven strains of blue-green algae are compared.

  10. Strong tolerance of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae to very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, F.; Nishihira, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Saigusa, M.; Matsushima, Y.; Yamazaki, D.; Ito, E.

    2015-09-01

    It was shown in our previous reports that a few spores of moss Venturiella could tolerate the very high pressure of 20 GPa for 30 min and germinated a protonema to the length of 30 μm. However, these spores did not grow any further, and disappeared at around 30 days of incubation after seeded. On the other hand, colonies of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae came to appear about 76 days after the moss spores were seeded. Many of these colonies appeared at the places where the moss spores had disappeared. These colonies were formed by the algae that had adhered to the spore cases of the moss and survived after exposure to the very high pressure of 20 GPa. Though the appearance of the colonies of high pressure exposed algae was delayed by about 50 days compared with that of the control group which was not exposed to high pressure, there seems no difference in their shape and color from those of the control group. The pressure tolerance of blue-green alga is found to be enormously strong, and it can survive after exposure to the high pressure which corresponds to the depth of about 550-600 km from the surface of the Earth, just above the lower mantle.

  11. Approach to compact terawatt CO{sub 2} laser system for particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Kimura, W.D.; Fisher, C.H.; Kannari, F.; Kurnit, N.A.

    1994-11-01

    A compact table-top 20-GW 50-ps CO{sub 2} laser system is in operation for strong-field physics studies at the ATF. We propose scaling up of the picosecond CO{sub 2} laser to a terawatt peak power level to meet the requirements of advanced laser accelerators. Computer modeling shows that a relatively compact single-beam picosecond CO{sub 2} laser system with a high-pressure x-ray picosecond amplifier of a 10-cm aperture is potentially scalable to the {approximately}1-TW peak power level.

  12. Beam shaping design for compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled laser-diode system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-06-20

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. A compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled system has been designed based on a significant beam shaping method. The laser-diode stack consists of eight mini-bars and is effectively coupled into a standard 100 μm core diameter and NA=0.22 fiber. The simulative result indicates that the module will have an output power over 440 W. Using this technique, compactness and high-brightness production of a fiber-coupled laser-diode module is possible.

  13. The Effects of Ultraviolet Irradiation on a Coccoid Blue-Green Alga: Survival, Photosynthesis, and Photoreactivation 1

    PubMed Central

    Van Baalen, Chase

    1968-01-01

    The effects of UV irradiation (254 mμ) on a coccoid blue-green alga Agmenellum quadruplicatum, Strain PR-6, have been examined in terms of the survival curve and measurement of short time photosynthetic rates. From study of survival evidence has been found for a strong photoreactivation centered near 430 mμ. Measurements of photosynthetic rate suggest that there is a correlation between decay of photosynthesis and survival after UV exposure. The UV induced decay in photosynthetic activity is reversed by the identical photoreactivation conditions that increase the survival level. The photosynthetic data are interpreted as demonstrating a photoreactivation of photosynthesis in blue-green algae. PMID:16656955

  14. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  15. Summary of studies on the blue-green autofluorescence and light transmission of the ocular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Best, Jaap A.; Kuppens, Esmeralda V.

    1996-07-01

    This paper reviews previous work done to demonstrate the clinical relevance of the measurement of blue-green autofluorescence and light transmission of the ocular lens. These can be determined quantitatively with fluorophotometry in a few seconds. Autofluorescence and transmission values are determined in healthy volunteers, in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and in patients with untreated glaucoma or untreated ocular hypertension. The lens autofluorescence of healthy volunteers increased linearly and transmission decreased exponentially with age. Each year of diabetes induced an increase of autofluorescence equal to one extra year of age. Untreated glaucoma or ocular hypertension had no significant effect on lens autofluorescence and transmission. Increased autofluorescence and decreased transmission values in comparison with values of a healthy population are proved to be indicative for an increased risk of developing cataract and the clinical usefulness of these measures is demonstrated. Diabetes is a risk factor for developing cataracts while untreated glaucoma or ocular hypertension is not.

  16. Spirulan from blue-green algae inhibits fibrin and blood clots: its potent antithrombotic effects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated in vitro and in vivo fibrinolytic and antithrombotic activity of spirulan and analyzed its partial biochemical properties. Spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide from the blue-green alga Arthrospira platensis, exhibits antithrombotic potency. Spirulan showed a strong fibrin zymogram lysis band corresponding to its molecular mass. It specifically cleaved Aα and Bβ, the major chains of fibrinogen. Spirulan directly decreased the activity of thrombin and factor X activated (FXa), procoagulant proteins. In vitro assays using human fibrin and mouse blood clots showed fibrinolytic and hemolytic activities of spirulan. Spirulan (2 mg/kg) showed antithrombotic effects in the ferric chloride (FeCl3 )-induced carotid arterial thrombus model and collagen and epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboembolism mouse model. These results may be attributable to the prevention of thrombus formation and partial lysis of thrombus. Therefore, we suggest that spirulan may be a potential antithrombotic agent for thrombosis-related diseases. PMID:25651404

  17. Assessment of blue-green algae in substantially reducing nitrogen fertilizer requirements for biomass fuel crops

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Molten, P.M.; Metting, B.

    1981-07-01

    Laboratory, mass culture, and field studies are being undertaken in order to assess the potential of using blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) as nitrogen biofertilizers on irrigated ground. Of seven candidate strains, two were chosen for application to replicated field plots sown to field corn and the basis of laboratory-scale soil tray experiments and ease of semi-continuous 8000 l culture. Chosen were Anabaena BM-165, isolated from a local soil and Tolypothrix tenuis, imported from India. Using the acetylene reduction method, Anabaena is estimated from laboratory soil experiments to be able to fix from 30 to 62 kg N/ha/y, and has been mass cultured to a density of 1527 mg dry wt/l. T. tenuis is estimated from laboratory experiments to be able to fix from 27 to 65 kg N/ha/y, and has been mass cultured to a density of 1630 mg dry wt/l.

  18. Blue green alga mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its antibacterial efficacy against Gram positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Suganya, K S Uma; Govindaraju, K; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Karthick, V; Singaravelu, G; Elanchezhiyan, M

    2015-02-01

    Biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) play an important role in design and development of nanomedicine. Synthesis of AuNPs from biogenic materials is environmentally benign and possesses high bacterial inhibition and bactericidal properties. In the present study, blue green alga Spirulina platensis protein mediated synthesis of AuNPs and its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria is discussed. AuNPs were characterized using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, High Resolution-Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Stable, well defined AuNPs of smaller and uniform shape with an average size of ~ 5 nm were obtained. The antibacterial efficacy of protein functionalized AuNPs were tested against Gram positive organisms Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25492207

  19. Observations on the Occurrence, Distribution, and Seasonal Incidence of Blue-green Algal Viruses.

    PubMed

    Safferman, R S; Morris, M E

    1967-09-01

    Phycovirus populations were found in 11 of the 12 waste stabilization ponds studied. These populations were comprised solely of blue-green algal (BGA) viruses. Two virus types were observed, one of which was related to the previously reported LPP-1 virus. The incidence and magnitude of the LPP group indicated that several of the ponds supported well-established BGA virus populations of this type. Counts as high as 270 plaque-forming units/ml were noted; however, marked differences in the nature and magnitude of these BGA viruses were apparent even in geographically related ponds of similar design. Of the algal strains found dominant in these ponds, none was of the type reported susceptible to the LPP viruses. PMID:16349731

  20. Compact 180-kV Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Arantchouk, L. Larour, J.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-03-10

    We developed a compact Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by a single femtosecond laser beam undergoing filamentation. Voltage pulses of 180 kV could be generated with a subnanosecond jitter. The same laser beam was also used to initiate simultaneously guided discharges up to 21 cm long at the output of the generator.

  1. Extraction of Nutraceuticals from Spirulina (Blue-Green Alga): A Bioorganic Chemistry Practice Using Thin-layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J.; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R.; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together…

  2. Extraction of nutraceuticals from Spirulina (blue-green alga): A bioorganic chemistry practice using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together current research, theory, and practice, and always in accordance with pedagogical ideas.

  3. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  4. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications. PMID:27036765

  5. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  6. Compact IR laser for calibration of space based sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kietrick, K.M.; Dezenberg, G.; Hamilton, C.; Vann, J.; LaSala, J.

    1996-04-17

    An Er:YAG laser, operating at 2.94 microns, has been developed for in-theater calibration of space based infrared sensors. The laser is used to illuminate a spaceborne sensor focal plane from a surveyed ground reference point. The known reference point is compared to the laser position reported by the sensor, and boresight corrections are made. The Er:YAG laser is side pumped by a InGaAs diode array and is tuned to an atmospheric microwindow with and intracavity etalon. This technology is being directly applied to meet Army requirements for enhanced deep strike targeting information supplied to theater weapons systems.

  7. Compact multiphoton/single photon laser scanning microscope for spectral imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Volker; Fischer, Peter; Riemann, Iris; Königt, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    An inverted fluorescence microscope was upgraded into a compact three-dimensional laser scanning microscope (LSM) of 65 x 62 x 48 cm dimensions by means of a fast kHz galvoscanner unit, a piezodriven z-stage, and a picosecond (ps) 50 MHz laser diode at 405 nm. In addition, compact turn-key near infrared femtosecond lasers have been employed to perform multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. To expand the features of the compact LSM, a time-correlated single photon counting unit as well as a Sagnac interferometer have been added to realize fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and spectral imaging. Using this unique five-dimensional microscope, TauMap, single-photon excited (SPE), and two-photon excited (TPE) cellular fluorescence as well as intratissue autofluorescence of water plant leaves have been investigated with submicron spatial resolution, <270 ps temporal resolution, and 10 nm spectral resolution. PMID:15536977

  8. Green roof and storm water management policies: monitoring experiments on the ENPC Blue Green Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Gires, Auguste; Fitton, George; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Currently widespread in new urban projects, green roofs have shown a positive impact on urban runoff at the building/parcel scale. Nevertheless, there is no specific policy promoting their implementation neither in Europe nor in France. Moreover they are not taken into account (and usually considered as an impervious area) in the sizing of a retention basin for instance. An interesting example is located in the heart of the Paris-East Cluster for Science and Technology (Champs-sur-Marne, France). Since 2013 a large (1 ha) wavy-form vegetated roof (called bleu green wave) is implemented. Green roof area and impervious areas are connected to a large retention basin, which has been oversized. The blue green wave represents a pioneering site where an initially amenity (decorative) design project has been transformed into a research oriented one. Several measurement campaigns have been conducted to investigate and better understand the hydrological behaviour of such a structure. Rainfall, humidity, wind velocity, water content and temperature have been particularly studied. The data collected are used for several purposes: (i) characterize the spatio-temporal variability of the green roof response, (ii) calibrate and validate a specific model simulating its hydrological behavior. Based on monitoring and modeling results, green roof performances will be quantified. It will be possible to estimate how they can reduce stormwater runoff and how these performances can vary in space and in time depending on green roof configuration, rainfall event characteristics and antecedent conditions. These quantified impacts will be related to regulation rules established by stormwater managers in order to connect the parcel to the sewer network. In the particular case of the building of a retention basin, the integration of green roof in the sizing of the basin will be studied. This work is funded by the European Blue Green Dream project (http://bgd.org.uk/, funded by Climate

  9. Optical signal transmission characteristics in slant path of blue-green laser communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuan-ming; Song, Lin; Liu, Qing-li; Pan, Cheng-sheng

    2013-08-01

    Most previous transmission characteristics analysis did not consider whole characteristic of the atmospheric-seawater channel and model of underwater optical power attenuation was applied only to the horizontal communication links. Optical power attenuation model in slant path is built based on seawater optical properties and idea of seawater stratification. Power attenuation of downlink is analyzed with simulation in the conditions of pure atmospheric and calm sea. The results show that, when communicating in the South China Sea and the receiver sensitivity is -55.3dBm, the communication distance can reach underwater 54.4m to 66.5 m.

  10. Strategies towards a compact XUV free electron laser adopted for the LUNEX5 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Labat, M.; Evain, C.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Hubert, N.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Briquez, F.; Chapuis, L.; Marteau, F.; Valléau, M.; Marcouillé, O.; Marchand, P.; Diop, M.; Marlats, J. L.; Tavakoli, K.; Zerbib, D.; Cassinari, L.; Bouvet, F.; Herbeaux, C.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Dennetière, D.; Polack, F.; Lestrade, A.; Khojoyan, M.; Yang, W.; Sharma, G.; Morin, P.; Loulergue, A.

    2016-02-01

    More than 50 years after the laser discovery, X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), the first powerful tuneable, short pulse lasers in the X-ray spectral range, are now blooming in the world, enabling new discoveries on the ultra-fast dynamics of excited systems and imaging. LUNEX5 demonstrator project aims at investigating paths towards advanced and compact FELs. Two strategies are adopted. The first one concerns the FEL line where seeding and echo harmonic generation are implemented together with compact cryogenic in-vacuum undulators. In the second one, the electron beam is no longer provided by a conventional linear accelerator but by a laser plasma process, while a necessary particular electron beam manipulation is required to handle the electron properties to enable FEL amplification.

  11. Blue-green color and composition of Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri) milk.

    PubMed

    Ullrey, D E; Schwartz, C C; Whetter, P A; Rajeshwar Rao, T; Euber, J R; Cheng, S G; Brunner, J R

    1984-01-01

    Two hundred ml of milk were obtained from a lactating Stejneger's beaked whale stranded at Ninilchik, Alaska on 21 Oct, 1980. Total solids (41%) were similar to values reported for sperm and belukha whales, while fat (17%) was half as great and crude protein (17%) was 2-4 times greater than in milk of these species. Lactose was not detected. Calcium (0.22%) was greater than reported for pigmy sperm whales but less than for blue whales. Phosphorus (0.07%) was less than for any of the above species. Sodium and potassium concentrations were 0.13% and 0.11%, respectively. Values (microgram/g) for other elements analyzed (magnesium, 42; iron, 35; copper, 2.6; zinc, 1.5; manganese, 0.3; selenium, 0.36) have not been reported for whale milk. Based on SDS-gel electropherograms, this whale milk did not contain a whey protein corresponding to cattle milk alpha-lactalbumin. A blue-green pigment in the milk was identified as biliverdin.

  12. Effect of Nanohexaconazole on Nitrogen Fixing Blue Green Algae and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gopal, Madhuban; Pabbi, Sunil; Paul, Sangeeta; Alam, Md Imteyaz; Yadav, Saurabh; Nair, Kishore Kumar; Chauhan, Neetu; Srivastava, Chitra; Gogoi, Robin; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Goswami, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    Nanohexaconazole is a highly efficient fungicide against Rhizoctonia solani. Nanoparticles are alleged to adversely affect the non-target organisms. In order to evaluate such concern, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of nanohexaconazole and its commercial formulation on sensitive nitrogen fixing blue green algae (BGA) and bacteria. Various activities of algae and bacteria namely growth, N-fixation, N-assimilation, Indole acetic acid (IAA) production and phosphate solubilization were differently affected in the presence of hexaconazole. Although, there was stimulatory to slightly inhibitory effect on the growth measurable parameters of the organisms studied at the recommended dose of nanohexaconazole, but its higher dose was inhibitory to all these microorganisms. On the other hand, the recommended as well as higher dose of commercial hexaconazole showed much severe inhibition of growth and metabolic activity of these organisms as compared to the nano preparation. The uses of nanohexazconazole instead of hexaconazole as a fungicide will not only help to control various fungal pathogens but also sustain the growth and activity of these beneficial microorganisms for sustaining soil fertility and productivity. PMID:27398501

  13. Oxygen-dependent proton efflux in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). [Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Stuerzl, E.; Boeger, P.

    1984-05-01

    The oxygen-dependent proton efflux (in the dark) of intact cells of Anabaena variabilis and four other cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was investigated. In contrast to bacteria and isolated mitochondria, an H/sup +//e ratio (= protons translocated per electron transported) of only 0.23 to 0.35 and a P/e ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 were observed, indicative of respiratory electron transport being localized essentially on the thylakoids, not on the cytoplasmic membrane. Oxygen-induced acidification of the medium was sensitive to cyanide and the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Inhibitors such as 2,6-dinitrophenol and vanadate exhibited a significant decrease in the H/sup +//e ratio. After the oxygen pulse, electron transport started immediately, but proton efflux lagged 40 to 60 s behind, a period also needed before maximum ATP pool levels were attained. The authors suggest that proton efflux in A. variabilis is due to a proton-translocating ATP hydrolase (ATP-consuming ATPase) rather than to respiratory electron transport located on the cytoplasmic membrane.

  14. The influence of nitrogen on heterocyst production in blue-green algae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogawa, Roann E.; Carr, John F.

    1969-01-01

    A series of experiments on heterocyst production in Anabaena variabilis provides some strong indirect evidence for the role of heterocysts in nitrogen fixation. Of the algae tested (Anabaena variabilis, A. inaequalis, A. cylindrica, A. flos-aquae, Tolypothrix distorta, Gloeotrichia echinulata, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Oscillatoria sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa), only those with heterocysts grew in a nitrate-free medium. Growth in the nitrate-free medium was accompanied by an increase in heterocysts. Heterocyst formation in A. variabilis was evident 24 hr after transfer from a nitrate-containing to a nitrate-free medium. The number of heterocysts was altered by changes in the nitrogen source. Numbers were lowest when NH4-N was used as a nitrogen source and highest when nitrogen (N2-N) was derived from the atmosphere. Heterocyst numbers could also be regulated by controlling the concentration of NO3-N in the medium. Heterocyst production depended on the absence of combined nitrogen and the presence of phosphate. Data are presented on the occurrence of blue-green algae (with heterocysts) in Lake Erie and the environmental conditions apparently necessary for them to become dominant.

  15. Nitrogen Fixation by Thermophilic Blue-Green Algae (Cyanobacteria): Temperature Characteristics and Potential Use in Biophotolysis

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.; Benemann, John R.

    1979-01-01

    Thermophilic, nitrogen-fixing, blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) were investigated for use in biophotolysis. Three strains of Mastigocladus laminosus were tested and were found to be equally effective in biophotolysis as judged by nitrogenase activity. The alga, M. laminosus NZ-86-m, which was chosen for further study, grew well in the temperature range from 35 to 50°C, with optimum growth at 45°C, at which temperature acetylene reduction activity was also greatest. The maximum tolerable temperature was 55°C. Acetylene reduction activity was saturated at a light intensity of 1 × 104 ergs cm−2 s−1. Atmospheric oxygen tension was found to be slightly inhibitory to acetylene reduction of both slowly growing and exponentially growing cultures. Nonsterile continuous cultures, which were conducted to test problems of culture maintenance, could be operated for 2 months without any significant decrease in nitrogenase activity or contamination by other algae. Nitrogen-starved cultures of M. laminosus NZ-86-m produced hydrogen at comparable rates to Anabaena cylindrica. The conversion efficiency of light to hydrogen energy at maximum rates of hydrogen production was 2.7%. PMID:16345353

  16. Toxic effects of organic solvents on the growth of blue-green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.

    1987-06-01

    Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms, and these deal primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. Information for microbial systems are more limited with some data available for algae and slightly more for fungi. Aside from direct toxic effects of their own, solvents can interact synergistically and antagonistically with the toxicant in solution. This problem has been well documented with pesticides, and a procedure has been developed to identify and eliminate these effects from bioassays. The first step in choosing a solvent for use in microbial bioassays should be a detailed screening to identify solvents with inherently low toxicity to the test organism, followed by an interaction study to choose the best concentration to use. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards five species of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), in order to identify solvents with low toxicity for use in bioassays.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide containing L-acofriose in the filamentous blue-green alga Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, J; Katz, A; Drews, G; Mayer, H; Fromme, I

    1974-11-01

    For the first time, an O-antigenic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been isolated from a filamentous blue-green alga (Anabaena variabilis). It was extractable with phenol-water, resulting in extraction of the bulk of the LPS into the phenol phase. The polysaccharide moiety of this LPS consists of l-rhamnose, its 3-O-methyl ether l-acofriose, d-mannose, d-glucose, and d-galactose. l-Glycero-d-mannoheptose and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, the two characteristic sugar components of enteric LPS, and phosphate groups are absent from the A. variabilis O antigen. The only amino sugar present is d-glucosamine. Three hydroxy fatty acids were identified, namely, beta-hydroxymyristic, beta-hydroxypalmitic and beta-hydroxystearic acids, in addition to palmitic and unidentified fatty acid. The LPS of A. variabilis is localized in the outermost cell wall layer and behaves like a bacterial O antigen in serological tests. The passive hemagglutination yielded high titers with isolated LPS (pretreated by heat or by alkali) and rabbit antisera prepared against living or heat-killed cells. The position of the precipitation arcs after immunoelectrophoresis of the O antigen indicates the lack of charged groups. The water phase of the phenol-water extract contains, in high yield, a glucose polymer. It is serologically inactive as shown by the passive hemagglutination test and by agar-gel precipitation.

  18. Photosynthetic regeneration of ATP using a strain of thermophilic blue-green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Y.; Kanayama, K.; Ochiai, H.

    1982-02-01

    Photosynthetic ATP accumulation was shown in the presence of exogenous ADP plus ortho-phosphate on illumination to the intact cells of a strain of thermophilic blue-green algae isolated from Matsue hot springs, Mastigocladus sp. Kinetic studies of various effectors on the ATP accumulation proved that the ATP synthesis depends mainly on the cyclic photophosphorylation system around photosystem I (PS-I) in the algal cells. The temperature and pH optima for the accumulation were found at 45 degrees C and pH 7.5. Maximum yield was obtained with light intensity higher than 15 mW/squared cm. Borate ion exerted pronounced enhancement on the ATP synthesis. With a continuous reactor at a flow rate of 1 ml/hour at 45 degrees C and pH 7.5, efficient photoconversion of ADP (2mM, at substrate reservoir) to ATP (1mM, at product outlet) has been maintained for a period of 2.5 days, though the efficiency has decreased in a further 2-day period to the level of 0.5 mM ATP/9.5 h of residence time. (Refs. 24).

  19. Method and system for compact efficient laser architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Erlandson, Alvin Charles; Manes, Kenneth Rene; Spaeth, Mary Louis; Caird, John Allyn; Deri, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    A laser amplifier module having an enclosure includes an input window, a mirror optically coupled to the input window and disposed in a first plane, and a first amplifier head disposed along an optical amplification path adjacent a first end of the enclosure. The laser amplifier module also includes a second amplifier head disposed along the optical amplification path adjacent a second end of the enclosure and a cavity mirror disposed along the optical amplification path.

  20. High (1 GHz) repetition rate compact femtosecond laser: A powerful multiphoton tool for nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, A.; Riemann, I.; Martin, S.; Le Harzic, R.; Bartels, A.; Janke, C.; König, K.

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton tomography of human skin and nanosurgery of human chromosomes have been performed with a 1GHz repetition rate laser by the use of the commercially available femtosecond multiphoton laser tomograph DermaInspect as well as a compact galvoscanning microscope. We performed the autofluorescence tomography up to 100μm in the depth of human skin. Submicron cutting lines and hole drillings have been conducted on labeled human chromosomes.

  1. Compact dual-frequency fiber laser accelerometer with sub-μg resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Jin, Long; Liang, Yizhi; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a compact and high-resolution dual-polarization fiber laser accelerometer. A spring-mass like scheme is constructed by fixing a 10-gram proof mass on the laser cavity to transduce applied vibration into beat-frequency change. The loading is located at the intensity maximum of intracavity light to maximize the optical response. The detection limit reaches 107 ng/Hz1/2 at 200 Hz. The working bandwidth ranges from 60 Hz to 600 Hz.

  2. Extraction of nutraceuticals from Spirulina (blue-green alga): A bioorganic chemistry practice using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together current research, theory, and practice, and always in accordance with pedagogical ideas. PMID:26331489

  3. Evidence from action and fluorescence spectra that UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence enhances leaf photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mantha, S V; Johnson, G A; Day, T A

    2001-03-01

    We assessed the contribution of UV-induced violet-blue-green leaf fluorescence to photosynthesis in Poa annua, Sorghum halepense and Nerium oleander by measuring UV-induced fluorescence spectra (280-380 nm excitation, 400-550 nm emission) from leaf surfaces and determining the monochromatic UV action spectra for leaf photosynthetic O2-evolution. Peak fluorescence emission wavelengths from leaf surfaces ranged from violet (408 nm) to blue (448 nm), while excitation peaks for these maxima ranged from 333 to 344 nm. Action spectra were developed by supplementing monochromatic radiation from 280 to 440 nm, in 20 nm increments, to a visible nonsaturating background of 500 mumol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically active radiation and measuring photosynthetic O2-evolution rates. Photosynthetic rates tended to be higher with the 340 nm supplement than with higher or lower wavelength UV supplements. Comparing photosynthetic rates with the 340 nm supplement to those with the 400 nm supplement, the percentage enhancement in photosynthetic rates at 340 nm ranged from 7.8 to 9.8%. We suspect that 340 nm UV improves photosynthetic rates via fluorescence that provides violet-blue-green photons for photosynthetic energy conversion because (1) the peak excitation wavelength (340 nm) for violet-blue-green fluorescence from leaves was also the most effective UV wavelength at enhancing photosynthetic rates, and (2) the magnitude of photosynthetic enhancements attributable to supplemental 340 nm UV was well correlated (R2 = 0.90) with the apparent intensity of 340 nm UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence emission from leaves.

  4. Compact cryogenic source of periodic hydrogen and argon droplet beams for relativistic laser-plasma generation.

    PubMed

    Costa Fraga, R A; Kalinin, A; Kühnel, M; Hochhaus, D C; Schottelius, A; Polz, J; Kaluza, M C; Neumayer, P; Grisenti, R E

    2012-02-01

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen and argon droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art high-power lasers in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We show this by irradiating argon droplets with multi-terawatt pulses.

  5. Compact and portable multiline UV and visible Raman lasers in hydrogen-filled HC-PCF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Couny, F; Light, P S; Mangan, B J; Benabid, F

    2010-04-15

    We report on the realization of compact UV visible multiline Raman lasers based on two types of hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The first, with a large pitch Kagome lattice structure, offers a broad spectral coverage from near IR through to the much sought after yellow, deep-blue and UV, whereas the other, based on photonic bandgap guidance, presents a pump conversion concentrated in the visible region. The high Raman efficiency achieved through these fibers allows for compact, portable diode-pumped solid-state lasers to be used as pumps. Each discrete component of this laser system exhibits a spectral density several orders of magnitude larger than what is achieved with supercontinuum sources and a narrow linewidth, making it an ideal candidate for forensics and biomedical applications.

  6. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; d'Humières, E; Lancia, L; Dervieux, V; Antici, P; Böcker, J; Bonlie, J; Breil, J; Cauble, B; Chen, S N; Feugeas, J L; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Romagnani, L; Shepherd, R; Sentoku, Y; Swantusch, M; Tikhonchuk, V T; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  7. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; d'Humières, E; Lancia, L; Dervieux, V; Antici, P; Böcker, J; Bonlie, J; Breil, J; Cauble, B; Chen, S N; Feugeas, J L; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Romagnani, L; Shepherd, R; Sentoku, Y; Swantusch, M; Tikhonchuk, V T; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle. PMID:25933857

  8. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertazzi, B.; d'Humières, E.; Lancia, L.; Dervieux, V.; Antici, P.; Böcker, J.; Bonlie, J.; Breil, J.; Cauble, B.; Chen, S. N.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Nicolaï, P.; Romagnani, L.; Shepherd, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Swantusch, M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Borghesi, M.; Willi, O.; Pépin, H.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  9. Anaerobic and Aerobic Hydrogen Gas Formation by the Blue-Green Alga Anabaena cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Daday, Arlene; Platz, Rosalea A.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made of certain factors involved in the formation of hydrogen gas, both in an anaerobic environment (argon) and in air, by the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica. The alga had not been previously adapted under hydrogen gas and hence the hydrogen evolution occurred entirely within the nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells; organisms grown in a fixed nitrogen source, and which were therefore devoid of heterocysts, did not produce hydrogen under these conditions. Use of the inhibitor dichlorophenyl-dimethyl urea showed that hydrogen formation was directly dependent on photosystem I and only indirectly dependent on photosystem II, consistent with heterocysts being the site of hydrogen formation. The uncouplers carbonyl cyanide chlorophenyl hydrazone and dinitrophenol almost completely inhibited hydrogen formation, indicating that the process occurs almost entirely via the adenosine 5′-triphosphate-dependent nitrogenase. Salicylaldoxime also inhibited hydrogen formation, again illustrating the necessity of photophosphorylation. Whereas hydrogen formation could usually only be observed in anaerobic, dinitrogen-free environments, incubation in the presence of the dinitrogen-fixing inhibitor carbon monoxide plus the hydrogenase inhibitor acetylene resulted in significant formation of hydrogen even in air. Hydrogen formation was studied in batch cultures as a function of age of the cultures and also as a function of culture concentration, in both cases the cultures being harvested in logarithmic growth. Hydrogen evolution (and acetylene-reducing activity) exhibited a distinct maximum with respect to the age of the cultures. Finally, the levels of the protective enzyme, superoxide dismutase, were measured in heterocyst and vegetative cell fractions of the organism; the level was twice as high in heterocyst cells (2.3 units/mg of protein) as in vegetative cells (1.1 units/mg of protein). A simple procedure for isolating heterocyst cells is described. PMID

  10. A blue/green water-based accounting framework for assessment of water security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Dulce B. B.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Mendiondo, Eduardo M.

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive assessment of water security can incorporate several water-related concepts, while accounting for Blue and Green Water (BW and GW) types defined in accordance with the hydrological processes involved. Here we demonstrate how a quantitative analysis of provision probability and use of BW and GW can be conducted, so as to provide indicators of water scarcity and vulnerability at the basin level. To illustrate the approach, we use the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to model the hydrology of an agricultural basin (291 km2) within the Cantareira Water Supply System in Brazil. To provide a more comprehensive basis for decision making, we analyze the BW and GW-Footprint components against probabilistic levels (50th and 30th percentile) of freshwater availability for human activities, during a 23 year period. Several contrasting situations of BW provision are distinguished, using different hydrological-based methodologies for specifying monthly Environmental Flow Requirements (EFRs), and the risk of natural EFR violation is evaluated by use of a freshwater provision index. Our results reveal clear spatial and temporal patterns of water scarcity and vulnerability levels within the basin. Taking into account conservation targets for the basin, it appears that the more restrictive EFR methods are more appropriate than the method currently employed at the study basin. The blue/green water-based accounting framework developed here provides a useful integration of hydrologic, ecosystem and human needs information on a monthly basis, thereby improving our understanding of how and where water-related threats to human and aquatic ecosystem security can arise.

  11. ROx3: Retinal oximetry utilizing the blue-green oximetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Jennifer Kathleen Hendryx

    The ROx is a retinal oximeter under development with the purpose of non-invasively and accurately measuring oxygen saturation (SO2) in vivo. It is novel in that it utilizes the blue-green oximetry technique with on-axis illumination. ROx calibration tests were performed by inducing hypoxia in live anesthetized swine and comparing ROx measurements to SO 2 values measured by a CO-Oximeter. Calibration was not achieved to the precision required for clinical use, but limiting factors were identified and improved. The ROx was used in a set of sepsis experiments on live pigs with the intention of tracking retinal SO2 during the development of sepsis. Though conclusions are qualitative due to insufficient calibration of the device, retinal venous SO2 is shown to trend generally with central venous SO2 as sepsis develops. The novel sepsis model developed in these experiments is also described. The method of cecal ligation and perforation with additional soiling of the abdomen consistently produced controllable severe sepsis/septic shock in a matter of hours. In addition, the ROx was used to collect retinal images from a healthy human volunteer. These experiments served as a bench test for several of the additions/modifications made to the ROx. This set of experiments specifically served to illuminate problems with various light paths and image acquisition. The analysis procedure for the ROx is under development, particularly automating the process for consistency, accuracy, and time efficiency. The current stage of automation is explained, including data acquisition processes and the automated vessel fit routine. Suggestions for the next generation of device minimization are also described.

  12. Blue-Green Algae Inhibit the Development of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chai Siah; Kim, Bohkyung; Pham, Tho X; Yang, Yue; Wegner, Casey J; Park, Young-Ki; Balunas, Marcy; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia and inflammation contribute to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective was to determine antiatherogenic effect of edible blue-green algae (BGA) species, that is, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP), in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice, a well-established mouse model of atherosclerosis. Male ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol (HF/HC, 15% fat and 0.2% cholesterol by wt) control diet or a HF/HC diet supplemented with 5% (w/w) of NO or SP powder for 12 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured, and livers were analyzed for histology and gene expression. Morphometric analysis for lesions and immunohistochemical analysis for CD68 were conducted in the aorta and the aortic root. NO supplementation significantly decreased plasma TC and TG, and liver TC, compared to control and SP groups. In the livers of NO-fed mice, less lipid droplets were present with a concomitant decrease in fatty acid synthase protein levels than the other groups. There was a significant increase in hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein levels in SP-supplemented mice than in control and NO groups. Quantification of aortic lesions by en face analysis demonstrated that both NO and SP decreased aortic lesion development to a similar degree compared with control. While lesions in the aortic root were not significantly different between groups, the CD68-stained area in the aortic root was significantly lowered in BGA-fed mice than controls. In conclusion, both NO and SP supplementation decreased the development of atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that they may be used as a natural product for atheroprotection. PMID:26566121

  13. A Blue/Green Water-based Accounting Framework for Assessment of Water Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D. B.; Gupta, H. V.; Mendiondo, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    A comprehensive assessment of water security can incorporate several water-related concepts, including provisioning and support for freshwater ecosystem services, water footprint, water scarcity, and water vulnerability, while accounting for Blue and Green Water (BW and GW) flows defined in accordance with the hydrological processes involved. Here, we demonstrate how a quantitative analysis of provisioning and demand (in terms of water footprint) for BW and GW ecosystem services can be conducted, so as to provide indicators of water scarcity and vulnerability at the basin level. To illustrate the approach, we use the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to model the hydrology of an agricultural basin (291 sq.km) within the Cantareira water supply system in Brazil. To provide a more comprehensive basis for decision-making, we compute the BW provision using three different hydrological-based methods for specifying monthly Environmental Flow Requirements (EFRs) for 23 year-period. The current BW-Footprint was defined using surface water rights for reference year 2012. Then we analyzed the BW- and GW-Footprints against long-term series of monthly values of freshwater availability. Our results reveal clear spatial and temporal patterns of water scarcity and vulnerability levels within the basin, and help to distinguish between human and natural reasons (drought) for conditions of insecurity. The Blue/Green water-based accounting framework developed here can be benchmarked at a range of spatial scales, thereby improving our understanding of how and where water-related threats to human and aquatic ecosystem security can arise. Future investigation will be necessary to better understand the intra-annual variability of blue water demand and to evaluate the impacts of uncertainties associated with a) the water rights database, b) the effects of climate change projections on blue and green freshwater provision.

  14. Saturnus: the UCLA compact infrared free-electron laser project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, James W.; Aghamir, F.; Barletta, W. A.; Cline, David B.; Hartman, Steven C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Kolonko, J.; Park, Sanghyun; Pellegrini, Claudio; Terrien, J. C.; Davis, J. G.; Joshi, Chand J.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; McDermott, David B.; Ivanchenkov, S. N.; Lachin, Yu Y.; Varfolomeev, A. A.

    1991-04-01

    1407_51Saturnus is an infrared FEL operating in the 10 micrometers wavelength region, driven by a compact 20 MeV linac with a photoinjector, under construction at UCLA. The 1.5 cm period, 0.6 (Tau) peak field undulator is being built at the Kurchatov IAE. The FEL is designed to operate primarily in the self-amplified spontaneous emission mode. This paper covers the start-up from noise, optical guiding, saturation, sidebands and superradiance, with emphasis on the effects important for future short wavelength operation of FELs. The photoinjector follows closely the Brookhaven design. Electrons are injected into an accelerating section based on the plane-wave transformer design developed by Swenson at SAIC. Simulation of the linac and FEL show a gain length of 10 cm, and a saturation power of 50 MW.

  15. Underwater wireless transmission of high-speed QAM-OFDM signals using a compact red-light laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Song, Yuhang; Yu, Xiangyu; Lin, Aobo; Kong, Meiwei; Han, Jun; Deng, Ning

    2016-04-18

    We first study the transmission property of red light in water in terms of extinction coefficient and channel bandwidth via Monte Carlo simulation, with an interesting finding that red light outperforms blue-green light in highly turbid water. We further propose and experimentally demonstrate a broadband underwater wireless optical communication system based on a simple and cost-effective TO56 red-light laser diode. We demonstrate a 1.324-Gb/s transmission at a bit error rate (BER) of 2.02 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel, by using 128-QAM OFDM signals and a low-cost 150-MHz positive-intrinsic-negative photodetector, with a record spectral efficiency higher than 7.32 bits/Hz. By using an avalanche photodetector and 32-QAM OFDM signals, we have achieved a record bit rate of 4.883 Gb/s at a BER of 3.20 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel. PMID:27137249

  16. Underwater wireless transmission of high-speed QAM-OFDM signals using a compact red-light laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Song, Yuhang; Yu, Xiangyu; Lin, Aobo; Kong, Meiwei; Han, Jun; Deng, Ning

    2016-04-18

    We first study the transmission property of red light in water in terms of extinction coefficient and channel bandwidth via Monte Carlo simulation, with an interesting finding that red light outperforms blue-green light in highly turbid water. We further propose and experimentally demonstrate a broadband underwater wireless optical communication system based on a simple and cost-effective TO56 red-light laser diode. We demonstrate a 1.324-Gb/s transmission at a bit error rate (BER) of 2.02 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel, by using 128-QAM OFDM signals and a low-cost 150-MHz positive-intrinsic-negative photodetector, with a record spectral efficiency higher than 7.32 bits/Hz. By using an avalanche photodetector and 32-QAM OFDM signals, we have achieved a record bit rate of 4.883 Gb/s at a BER of 3.20 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel.

  17. Compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for the MESSENGER mission to Mercury.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Danny J; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Li, Steven X; Lindauer, Steven J; Afzal, Robert S; Yu, Anthony W

    2005-03-20

    A compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for the Mercury Laser Altimeter, an instrument on the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging mission to the planet Mercury. The laser achieves 5.4% efficiency with a near-diffraction-limited beam. It passed all space-flight environmental tests at subsystem, instrument, and satellite integration testing and successfully completes a postlaunch aliveness check en route to Mercury. The laser design draws on a heritage of previous laser altimetry missions, specifically the Ice Cloud and Elevation Satellite and the Mars Global Surveyor, but incorporates thermal management features unique to the requirements of an orbit of the planet Mercury. PMID:15813276

  18. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  19. A compact and portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for single and double pulse applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujon, J.; Giakoumaki, A.; Piñon, V.; Musset, O.; Anglos, D.; Georgiou, E.; Boquillon, J. P.

    2008-10-01

    We present LIBS experimental results that demonstrate the use of a newly developed, compact, versatile pulsed laser source in material analysis related to art and archaeological applications in view of research aiming at the development of portable LIBS instrumentation. LIBS qualitative analysis measurements were performed on various samples and objects, and the spectra were recorded in gated and non-gated modes. The latter is important because of advantages arising from size and cost reduction when using simple, compact spectrograph-CCD detection systems over the standard ICCD-based configurations. The new laser source exhibited a very reliable performance in terms of laser pulse repeatability, autonomy and interface. Having the ability to work in double pulse mode it provided versatility in the measurements leading to increased LIBS signal intensities, improved the signal-to-noise ratio and the RSD of the spectra. The first test results are encouraging and demonstrate that this new laser is suitable for integration in compact, portable LIBS sensors with a wide spectrum of materials analysis applications.

  20. Compact optical system for pulse-to-pulse laser beam quality measurement and applications in laser machining.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Robert W; Cortés-Martínez, Rodolpho; Waddle, Andrew J; Shephard, Jonathan D; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R; Greenaway, Alan H; Hand, Duncan P

    2004-09-10

    Fluctuations in beam quality (M2) have been observed on a pulse-to-pulse basis from an industrial Nd:YAG laser. This was achieved with a compact multiplane imaging method incorporating quadratically distorted diffraction gratings, which enabled simultaneous imaging of nine planes on a single CCD array. With this system, we measured across a range of beam qualities with an associated error (in M2 variation) of the order of 0.7%. Application of the system to fiber-optic beam delivery and laser drilling is demonstrated.

  1. Compact Optical System for Pulse-to-Pulse Laser Beam Quality Measurement and Applications in Laser Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Robert W.; Cortés-Martínez, Rodolpho; Waddie, Andrew J.; Shephard, Jonathan D.; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.; Greenaway, Alan H.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2004-09-01

    Fluctuations in beam quality (M^2) have been observed on a pulse-to-pulse basis from an industrial Nd:YAG laser. This was achieved with a compact multiplane imaging method incorporating quadratically distorted diffraction gratings, which enabled simultaneous imaging of nine planes on a single CCD array. With this system, we measured across a range of beam qualities with an associated error (in M^2 variation) of the order of 0.7%. Application of the system to fiber-optic beam delivery and laser drilling is demonstrated.

  2. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; Schroeder, Carl B.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-09-13

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent FEL radiation generation. In this paper, we discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for SASE and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  3. High-stability compact atomic clock based on isotropic laser cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esnault, Francois-Xavier; Holleville, David; Rossetto, Nicolas; Guerandel, Stephane; Dimarcq, Noel

    2010-09-15

    We present a compact cold-atom clock configuration where isotropic laser cooling, microwave interrogation, and clock signal detection are successively performed inside a spherical microwave cavity. For ground operation, a typical Ramsey fringe width of 20 Hz has been demonstrated, limited by the atom cloud's free fall in the cavity. The isotropic cooling light's disordered properties provide a large and stable number of cold atoms, leading to a high signal-to-noise ratio limited by atomic shot noise. A relative frequency stability of 2.2x10{sup -13{tau}-1/2} has been achieved, averaged down to 4x10{sup -15} after 5x10{sup 3} s of integration. Development of such a high-performance compact clock is of major relevance for on-board applications, such as satellite-positioning systems. As a cesium clock, it opens the door to a new generation of compact primary standards and timekeeping devices.

  4. Compact ultrafast semiconductor disk laser for nonlinear imaging in living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Filippidis, G.; Hamilton, Craig; Malcolm, Graeme; Weingarten, Kurt J.; Südmeyer, Thomas; Barbarin, Yohan; Keller, Ursula; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    Ultrashort pulsed laser systems (such as Ti:sapphire) have been used in nonlinear microscopy during the last years. However, its implementation is not straight forward as they are maintenance-intensive, bulky and expensive. These limitations have prevented their wide-spread use for nonlinear imaging, especially in "real-life" biomedical applications. In this work we present the suitability of a compact ultrafast semiconductor disk laser source, with a footprint of 140x240x70 mm, to be used for nonlinear microscopy. The modelocking mechanism of the laser is based on a quantumdot semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). The laser delivers an average output power of 287 mW with 1.5 ps pulses at 500 MHz, corresponding to a peak power of 0.4 kW. Its center wavelength is 965 nm which is ideally suited for two-photon excitation of the widely used Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) marker as it virtually matches its twophoton action cross section. We reveal that it is possible to obtain two photon excited fluorescence images of GFP labeled neurons and secondharmonic generation images of pharynx and body wall muscles in living C. elegans nematodes. Our results demonstrate that this compact laser is well suited for long-term time-lapse imaging of living samples as very low powers provide a bright signal. Importantly this non expensive, turn-key, compact laser system could be used as a platform to develop portable nonlinear bio-imaging devices, facilitating its wide-spread adoption in "real-life" applications.

  5. Novel, ultra-compact, high-performance, eye-safe laser rangefinder for demanding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, M.; Lee, S. T.; Borthwick, A.; Morton, G.; McNeill, C.; McSporran, D.; McRae, I.; McKinlay, G.; Jackson, D.; Alexander, W.

    2016-05-01

    Compact eye-safe laser rangefinders (LRFs) are a key technology for future sensors. In addition to reduced size, weight and power (SWaP), compact LRFs are increasingly being required to deliver a higher repetition rate, burst mode capability. Burst mode allows acquisition of telemetry data from fast moving targets or while sensing-on-the-move. We will describe a new, ultra-compact, long-range, eye-safe laser rangefinder that incorporates a novel transmitter that can deliver a burst capability. The transmitter is a diode-pumped, erbium:glass, passively Q-switched, solid-state laser which uses design and packaging techniques adopted from the telecom components sector. The key advantage of this approach is that the transmitter can be engineered to match the physical dimensions of the active laser components and the submillimetre sized laser spot. This makes the transmitter significantly smaller than existing designs, leading to big improvements in thermal management, and allowing higher repetition rates. In addition, the design approach leads to devices that have higher reliability, lower cost, and smaller form-factor, than previously possible. We present results from the laser rangefinder that incorporates the new transmitter. The LRF has dimensions (L x W x H) of 100 x 55 x 34 mm and achieves ranges of up to 15km from a single shot, and over a temperature range of -32°C to +60°C. Due to the transmitter's superior thermal performance, the unit is capable of repetition rates of 1Hz continuous operation and short bursts of up to 4Hz. Short bursts of 10Hz have also been demonstrated from the transmitter in the laboratory.

  6. Solderjet bumping technique used to manufacture a compact and robust green solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribes, P.; Burkhardt, T.; Hornaff, M.; Kousar, S.; Burkhardt, D.; Beckert, E.; Gilaberte, M.; Guilhot, D.; Montes, D.; Galan, M.; Ferrando, S.; Laudisio, M.; Belenguer, T.; Ibarmia, S.; Gallego, P.; Rodríguez, J. A.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.

    2015-06-01

    Solder-joining using metallic solder alloys is an alternative to adhesive bonding. Laser-based soldering processes are especially well suited for the joining of optical components made of fragile and brittle materials such as glasses, ceramics and optical crystals due to a localized and minimized input of thermal energy. The Solderjet Bumping technique is used to assemble a miniaturized laser resonator in order to obtain higher robustness, wider thermal conductivity performance, higher vacuum and radiation compatibility, and better heat and long term stability compared with identical glued devices. The resulting assembled compact and robust green diode-pumped solid-state laser is part of the future Raman Laser Spectrometer designed for the Exomars European Space Agency (ESA) space mission 2018.

  7. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic {sup 173}Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  8. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic 173Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  9. Analysis of the possibility of fabricating compact combustion-driven DF lasers due to fuel preheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaoting; Yuan, Shengfu; Hua, Weihong

    2016-09-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the processes proceeding in the combustor of combustion-driven cw DF/HF chemical lasers with different mixtures of fuels preheated to high temperatures. Calculation results demonstrate a great effect of the preheating temperature on the yield of F atoms and strongest deactivator, on the primary dilution ratio ψp and on the estimated specific power. When fuels are preheated to about 1300 K, the specific power is improved by about 74.2%, and the total mass of the fuel is reduced by about 43%, which makes it possible to realise a more compact and efficient design of combustion-driven cw DF/HF chemical lasers at elevated combustor pressures. Fuel preheating can facilitate the development of chemical lasers and high-power lasers based not only on airborne and space-borne platforms, but also on mobile ground-based platforms.

  10. Multiphoton microscopy system with a compact fiber-based femtosecond-pulse laser and handheld probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Kieu, Khanh; Wise, Frank W; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system that integrates a compact and robust fiber laser with a miniature probe. The all normal dispersion fiber femtosecond laser has a central wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse width of 125 fs and average power of more than 1 W. A double cladding photonic crystal fiber was used to deliver the excitation beam and to collect the two-photon signal. The hand-held probe included galvanometer-based mirror scanners, relay lenses and a focusing lens. The packaged probe had a diameter of 16 mm. Second harmonic generation (SHG) images and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) images of biological tissues were demonstrated using the system. PMID:20635426

  11. A phase-modulated laser system of ultra-low phase noise for compact atom interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Se; Kim, Jaewan; Lee, Sang-Bum; Park, Sang Eon; Kwon, Taek Yong

    2015-07-01

    A compact and robust laser system is essential for mobile atom interferometers. Phase modulation can provide the two necessary phase-coherent frequencies without sophisticated phase-locking between two different lasers. However, the additional laser frequencies generated can perturb the atom interferometer. In this article, we report on a novel method to produce a single high-power laser beam composed of two phase-coherent sidebands without the perturbing carrier mode. Light from a diode laser is phase-modulated by using a fiber-coupled electro-optic modulator driven at 3.4 GHz and passes through a Fabry-Perot cavity with a 6.8 GHz free spectral range. The cavity filters the carrier mode to leave the two first-order sidebands for the two-photon Raman transition between the two hyperfine ground states of 87Rb. The laser beam is then fed to a single tapered amplifier, and the two sidebands are both amplified without mode competition. The phase noise is lower than that of a state-of-the-art optically phase-locked external-cavity diode laser (-135 dBrad2/Hz at 10 kHz) at frequencies above 10 Hz. This technique can be used in all-fiber-based laser systems for future mobile atom interferometers.

  12. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  13. Compact dual-wavelength thulium-doped fiber laser employing a double-ring filter.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuliang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Siming; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Yong; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we report on stable dual-wavelength operation of a thulium-doped compact all-fiber laser using a double-ring filter as the wavelength selective element. Simultaneously lasing at 2014.4 and 2018.4 nm has been obtained via tuning the polarization controllers to adjust the relative gain and loss of the laser cavity. The side mode suppression ratios are greater than 52 dB and the output power difference between the two lasing lines is less than 0.08 dB under 2.6 W of incident pump power. PMID:27140105

  14. A compact chaotic laser device with a two-dimensional external cavity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sunada, Satoshi Adachi, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takehiro; Shinohara, Susumu; Arai, Kenichi; Harayama, Takahisa

    2014-06-16

    We propose a compact chaotic laser device, which consists of a semiconductor laser and a two-dimensional (2D) external cavity for delayed optical feedback. The overall size of the device is within 230 μm × 1 mm. A long time delay sufficient for chaos generation can be achieved with the small area by the multiple reflections at the 2D cavity boundary, and the feedback strength is controlled by the injection current to the external cavity. We experimentally demonstrate that a variety of output properties, including chaotic output, can be selectively generated by controlling the injection current to the external cavity.

  15. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  16. Tuning emission in violet, blue, green and red in cubic GaN/InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Hinostroza, I. E.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Compeán García, V. D.; Zamora, C. Cuellar; Rodríguez, A. G.; López Luna, E.; Vidal, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Light emission in the three primary colors was achieved in cubic GaN/InGaN/GaN heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on MgO substrates in a single growth process. A heterostructure with four quantum wells with a width of 10 nm was grown; this quantum wells width decrease the segregation effect of In. Photoluminescence emission produced four different emission signals: violet, blue, green-yellow and red. Thus, we were able to tune energy transitions in the visible spectrum modifying the In concentration in cubic InxGa1-xN ternary alloy.

  17. Combined effect of oil, oil products and dispersants on the blue-green algae Synechocystis aquatilis and Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Gapochka, L.D.; Brodskii, L.I.; Kravchenko, M.E.; Fedorov, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    The study of the combined effect of oil, oil products and dispersants on the growth of the blue-green algae Synechocystis aquatilis and Anabaena variabilis has shown that out of 12 studied oil-dispersant pairs 6 revealed a positive relationship, which provides evidence for a decrease in oil and oil products toxic effect in the presence of a dispersant. The positive interaction between oil and oil products was found. The negative oil and oil products effect on all studied indices of A. variabilis culture increases with time.

  18. Blue-green algae (Arthrospira platensis) as an ingredient in pasta: free radical scavenging activity, sensory and cooking characteristics evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zouari, Nacim; Abid, Mouna; Fakhfakh, Nahed; Ayadi, M A; Zorgui, Lazhar; Ayadi, Moez; Attia, Hamadi

    2011-12-01

    The effects of semolina enrichment with blue-green algae (Arthrospira platensis) at three different levels (1, 2 and 3 g/100 g of semolina) on the colour, cooking properties, firmness, free radical scavenging activity and sensory characteristics of pasta are reported. Microalgae addition resulted in higher swelling index and lower cooking loss than the control sample. A significant increase in pasta firmness was evidenced with an increase of added microalgae due to structural reinforcement. In addition to colouring, the use of A. platensis (2 g/100 g of semolina) can enhance the sensory quality and nutraceutical potential as evaluated by free radical scavenging activity of pasta. PMID:21568819

  19. New class of compact diode pumped sub 10-fs lasers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T.; Müller, A.; Sumpf, B.; Jensen, O. B.; Hansen, A. K.; Andersen, P. E.

    2016-03-01

    Diode-pumping Ti:sapphire lasers promises a new approach to low-cost femtosecond light sources. Thus in recent years much effort has been taken just to overcome the quite low power and low beam qualities of available green diodes to obtain output powers of several hundred milliwatts from a fs-laser. In this work we present an alternative method by deploying frequency-doubled IR diodes with good beam qualities to pump fs-lasers. The revolutionary approach allows choosing any pump wavelengths in the green region and avoids complicated relay optics for the diodes. For the first time we show results of a diode-pumped 10 fs-laser and how a single diode setup can be integrated into a 30 x 30 cm2 fs-laser system generating sub 20 fs laser pulses with output power towards half a Watt. This technology paves the way for a new class of very compact and cost-efficient fs-lasers for life science and industrial applications.

  20. A compact, efficient, and lightweight laser head for CARLO®: integration, performance, and benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Waldemar; Schneider, Adrian; Augello, Marcello; Bruno, Alfredo E.; Juergens, Philipp; Cattin, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Ever since the first functional lasers were built about 50 years ago, researchers and doctors dream of a medical use for such systems. Today's technology is finally advanced enough to realize these ambitions in a variety of medical fields. There are well-established laser based systems in ophthalmology, dental applications, treatment of kidney stones, and many more. Using lasers presents more than just an alternative to conventional methods for osteotomies. It offers less tissue damage, faster healing times, comparable intervention duration and in consequence improves postoperative treatment of patients. However, there are a few factors that limit routine applications. These technical drawbacks include missing depth control and safe guiding of the laser beam. This paper presents the engineering and integration of a miniaturized laser head for a computer assisted and robot-guided laser osteotome (CARLO®), which can overcome the mentioned drawbacks. The CARLO® device ensures a safe and precise guidance of the laser beam. Such guidance also enables new opportunities and methods, e.g. free geometrical functional cuts, which have the potential to revolutionize bone surgery. The laser head is optimized for beam shaping, target conditioning, working distance, compactness and the integration of all other parts needed, e.g. CCD-cameras for monitoring and referencing, a visible laser for cut simulation, etc. The beam coming out of the laser system is conditioned in shape, energy properties and working distance with an optical arrangement to achieve the desired cutting performance. Here also parameters like optical losses, operating mode, optics materials and long-term stability have are taken into account.

  1. Compact MEMS mirror based Q-switch module for pulse-on-demand laser range finders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanović, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Atwood, Bryan; Su, Yu; Limkrailassiri, Kevin; Nettleton, John E.; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian J.; Hough, Nathaniel

    2015-02-01

    A highly compact and low power consuming Q-switch module was developed based on a fast single-axis MEMS mirror, for use in eye-safe battery-powered laser range finders The module's 1.6mm x 1.6mm mirror has <99% reflectance at 1535nm wavelength and can achieve mechanical angle slew rates of over 500 rad/sec when switching the Er/Yb:Glass lasing cavity from pumping to lasing state. The design targeted higher efficiency, smaller size, and lower cost than the traditional Electro-Optical Q-Switch. Because pulse-on-demand capability is required, resonant mirrors cannot be used to achieve the needed performance. Instead, a fast point-to-point analog single-axis tilt actuator was designed with a custom-coated high reflectance (HR) mirror to withstand the high intra-cavity laser fluence levels. The mirror is bonded on top of the MEMS actuator in final assembly. A compact MEMS controller was further implemented with the capability of autonomous on-demand operation based on user-provided digital trigger. The controller is designed to receive an external 3V power supply and a digital trigger and it consumes ~90mW during the short switching cycle and ~10mW in standby mode. Module prototypes were tested in a laser cavity and demonstrated high quality laser pulses with duration of ~20ns and energy of over 3mJ.

  2. Compact quasi-monoenergetic photon sources from laser-plasma accelerators for nuclear detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Rykovanov, Sergey; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Steinke, Sven; Vay, Jean-Luc; Esarey, Eric H.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Nakamura, Kei; Quiter, Brian J.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-05-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources at MeV energies offer improved sensitivity at greatly reduced dose for active interrogation, and new capabilities in treaty verification, nondestructive assay of spent nuclear fuel and emergency response. Thomson (also referred to as Compton) scattering sources are an established method to produce appropriate photon beams. Applications are however restricted by the size of the required high-energy electron linac, scattering (photon production) system, and shielding for disposal of the high energy electron beam. Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) produce GeV electron beams in centimeters, using the plasma wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser. Recent LPA experiments are presented which have greatly improved beam quality and efficiency, rendering them appropriate for compact high-quality photon sources based on Thomson scattering. Designs for MeV photon sources utilizing the unique properties of LPAs are presented. It is shown that control of the scattering laser, including plasma guiding, can increase photon production efficiency. This reduces scattering laser size and/or electron beam current requirements to scale compatible with the LPA. Lastly, the plasma structure can decelerate the electron beam after photon production, reducing the size of shielding required for beam disposal. Together, these techniques provide a path to a compact photon source system.

  3. Initial Tests and Accuracy Assesment of a Compact Mobile Laser Scanning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julge, K.; Ellmann, A.; Vajakas, T.; Kolka, R.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is a faster and cost-effective alternative to static laser scanning, even though there is a slight trade-off in accuracy. This contribution describes a compact mobile laser scanning system mounted on a vehicle. The technical parameters of the used system components, i.e. a small LIDAR sensor Velodyne VLP-16 and a dual antenna GNSS/INS system Advanced Navigation Spatial Dual, are reviewed, along with the integration of these components for spatial data acquisition. Calculation principles of 3D coordinates from the real-time data of all the involved sensors are discussed. The field tests were carried out in a controlled environment of a parking lot and at different velocities. Experiments were carried out to test the ability of the GNSS/INS system to cope with difficult conditions, e.g. sudden movements due to cornering or swerving. The accuracy of the resulting MLS point cloud is evaluated with respect to high-accuracy static terrestrial laser scanning data. Problems regarding combining LIDAR, GNSS and INS sensors are outlined, as well as the initial accuracy assessments. Initial tests revealed errors related to insufficient quality of inertial data and a need for the trajectory post-processing calculations. Although this study was carried out while the system was mounted on a car, there is potential for operating the system on an unmanned aerial vehicle, all-terrain vehicle or in a backpack mode due to its relatively compact size.

  4. Photophysics of flavin derivatives absorbing in the blue-green region: thioflavins as potential cofactors of photoswitches.

    PubMed

    Marian, Christel M; Nakagawa, Setsuko; Rai-Constapel, Vidisha; Karasulu, Bora; Thiel, Walter

    2014-02-20

    The purpose of this study was to find flavin derivatives with absorption maxima in the blue-green region of the visible spectrum that might be used as alternative cofactors in blue-light photoreceptors. To this end, the vertical absorption spectra of eight lumiflavin-related compounds were calculated by means of quantum chemical methods. The compounds differ from lumiflavin by the subsitution of an S atom for an O atom at the 2- and/or 4-positions of the isoalloxazine core, the substitution of an N atom for a CH group in the 6- and/or 9-positions, or an extension of the π system at the 7- and 8-positions. For the three most promising compounds, 2-thio-lumiflavin, 4-thio-lumiflavin, and 2,4-dithio-lumiflavin, the quantum chemical investigations were extended to include geometry relaxations in the excited states, rates for spin-forbidden transitions and an estimate of spectral shifts brought about by polar protic environments. We find these thiocarbonyl compounds to have very promising excited-state properties. They absorb in the blue-green wavelength regime around 500 nm, i.e., substantially red-shifted with respect to lumiflavin that is the cofactor of natural blue-light photoreceptors. Their triplet quantum yields are predicted to be close to unity while their triplet lifetimes are long enough to enable bimolecular photochemical reactions. The combination of these properties makes the thioflavins potentially suitable candidates as cofactors in biomimetic photoswitches.

  5. [Effect of blue-green alga (Cyanobacteria) and their exometabolites on formation of resting forms and variability of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Solokhina, L V; Pushkareva, V I; Litvin, V Iu

    2001-01-01

    Research, carried out with the use of bacteriological methods and polymerase chain reaction, revealed that the transformation of Y. pseudotuberculosis, associated with blue-green algae Anabaena variabilis, into resting (noncultivable) forms took shorter time than in soil extract containing no algae. The exometabolites of "old" cultures of these algae sharply accelerated the formation of resting Y. pseudotuberculosis forms. The influence of the algae and the products of their metabolism was manifested far more intensively at 22 degrees C than at 4 degrees C. After passage through infusoria resting Y. pseudotuberculosis forms, preserved in the mucous covering of cyanobacteria, partially reverted into vegetative forms, capable of growing on solid culture media. The revertants essentially differed from the initial vegetative forms by having lower enzymatic activity, agglutinability and cytopathogenicity, as well as by the loss of plasmid p45. The probable role of blue-green algae, widely spread in soils and water reservoirs, in the processes of reversible transformation of Y. pseudotuberculosis vegetative and resting forms, closely connected with seasonal changes of temperature conditions. PMID:11550552

  6. Guidance values for microcystins in water and cyanobacterial supplement products (blue-green algal supplements): a reasonable or misguided approach?

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Daniel; Hoeger, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.hoeger@uni-konstanz.de

    2005-03-15

    This article reviews current scientific knowledge on the toxicity and carcinogenicity of microcystins and compares this to the guidance values proposed for microcystins in water by the World Health Organization, and for blue-green algal food supplements by the Oregon State Department of Health. The basis of the risk assessment underlying these guidance values is viewed as being critical due to overt deficiencies in the data used for its generation: (i) use of one microcystin congener only (microcystin-LR), while the other presently known nearly 80 congeners are largely disregarded, (ii) new knowledge regarding potential neuro and renal toxicity of microcystins in humans and (iii) the inadequacies of assessing realistic microcystin exposures in humans and especially in children via blue-green algal food supplements. In reiterating the state-of-the-art toxicology database on microcystins and in the light of new data on the high degree of toxin contamination of algal food supplements, this review clearly demonstrates the need for improved kinetic data of microcystins in humans and for discussion concerning uncertainty factors, which may result in a lowering of the present guidance values and an increased routine control of water bodies and food supplements for toxin contamination. Similar to the approach taken previously by authorities for dioxin or PCB risk assessment, the use of a toxin equivalent approach to the risk assessment of microcystins is proposed.

  7. Clinical results of a new high-phototherapeutic-efficiency blue-green lamp for the management of hyperbilirubinemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, Gian Paolo; Pratesi, Simone; Agati, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Pratesi, Riccardo

    1996-01-01

    We report a preliminary study on the introduction of a new, blue-green fluorescent lamp with high phototherapeutic efficiency in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The lamp (New Lamp) has an emission spectrum, peaked at 490 nm and about 40 nm wide, that was not previously investigated in clinical trials. Our study demonstrates the significantly greater efficacy of the New Lamp in decreasing the bilirubin serum level, in comparison with the most commonly used blue fluorescent lamp. The rate of decline of bilirubin concentration with the New Lamp was twice that with Philips/BB light. The success of the blue-green PT is mainly due to the combined effects of the (1) increase from blue to green of the quantum yield for lumirubin, that is the bilirubin photoproduct rapidly excreted from the organism; (2) corresponding decrease of the configurational photoisomer, formed with high concentration but not excreted from the organism; (3) filtering effect of the skin, which attenuates more blue than green light. Our results represent the first significant improvement of phototherapy efficiency following the development and introduction of the special-blue lamp by Sisson in 1970. The phototherapy exposure time has now been reduced to less than 1-day in preterm infants, ensuring less stress to the infant and less interference with nursing care.

  8. Compact gas sensor using a pulsed difference-frequency laser spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Seiter, M; Sigrist, M W

    1999-01-15

    We present a novel compact pulsed laser spectrometer based on difference-frequency mixing of a cw tunable external-cavity diode laser (795-825 nm) and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) in bulk LiNbO(3) . The pulsed mid-IR source is continuously tunable from 3.16 to 3.67microm and exhibits a linewidth of only 154 MHz, a peak power of approximately 50microW , and a pulse duration of 6 ns at a 6.5-kHz repetition rate. Spectra of methane in room air and formaldehyde have been recorded at room-temperature operation in a multipass cell with deduced detection limits of 10 and 40 parts in 10(9) , respectively. PMID:18071424

  9. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.; Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S.; Riquier, R.

    2014-04-15

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  10. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Gauthier, M; Higginson, D P; Dorard, S; Mangia, F; Riquier, R; Atzeni, S; Marquès, J-R; Fuchs, J

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams. PMID:24784604

  11. Er/Yb glass laser with compact mechanical Q-switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Brian; Hough, Nathaniel; Hays, Alan; Nettleton, John; Goldberg, Lew

    2016-03-01

    We describe a compact, side-pumped, Er/Yb glass laser with a low cost mechanical Q-switch. The Q-switch uses a mirror or reflecting prism mounted on a cantilever resonant spring that is driven by a small electromagnetic coil. The demonstrated laser used a 5 mm long Er/Yb glass gain element, and was side-pumped by a 940 nm, 5 mm wide diode bar generating up to 100 W peak power. Target energies of 3mJ have been realized in a near-diffraction limited mode, with pulse widths of 15-25ns, and an optical-to-optical efficiency of greater than 2%. The mechanical Q-switch assembly was fully athermalized via mounting a displacing porro reflector to the cantilever spring, where a 2.5mJ laser was observed to operate with less than 5% variance over -35°C to+60°C.

  12. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Mangia, F.; Riquier, R.; Atzeni, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  13. A compact picosecond pulsed laser source using a fully integrated CMOS driver circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuting; Li, Yuhua; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2016-03-01

    Picosecond pulsed laser source have applications in areas such as optical communications, biomedical imaging and supercontinuum generation. Direct modulation of a laser diode with ultrashort current pulses offers a compact and efficient approach to generate picosecond laser pulses. A fully integrated complementary metaloxide- semiconductor (CMOS) driver circuit is designed and applied to operate a 4 GHz distributed feedback laser (DFB). The CMOS driver circuit combines sub-circuits including a voltage-controlled ring oscillator, a voltagecontrolled delay line, an exclusive-or (XOR) circuit and a current source circuit. Ultrashort current pulses are generated by the XOR circuit when the delayed square wave is XOR'ed with the original square wave from the on-chip oscillator. Circuit post-layout simulation shows that output current pulses injected into an equivalent circuit load of the laser have a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 200 ps, a peak current of 80 mA and a repetition rate of 5.8 MHz. This driver circuit is designed in a 0.13 μm CMOS process and taped out on a 0.3 mm2 chip area. This CMOS chip is packaged and interconnected with the laser diode on a printed circuit board (PCB). The optical output waveform from the laser source is captured by a 5 GHz bandwidth photodiode and an 8 GHz bandwidth oscilloscope. Measured results show that the proposed laser source can output light pulses with a pulse FWHM of 151 ps, a peak power of 6.4 mW (55 mA laser peak forward current) and a repetition rate of 5.3 MHz.

  14. Compact, diode-pumped, solid-state lasers for next generation defence and security sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, M.; Lee, S. T.; Borthwick, A.; McRae, I.; Jackson, D.; Alexander, W.

    2015-06-01

    Low-cost semiconductor laser diode pump sources have made a dramatic impact in sectors such as advanced manufacturing. They are now disrupting other sectors, such as defence and security (D&S), where Thales UK is a manufacturer of sensor systems for application on land, sea, air and man portable. In this talk, we will first give an overview of the market trends and challenges in the D&S sector. Then we will illustrate how low cost pump diodes are enabling new directions in D&S sensors, by describing two diode pumped, solid- state laser products currently under development at Thales UK. The first is a new generation of Laser Target Designators (LTD) that are used to identify targets for the secure guiding of munitions. Current systems are bulky, expensive and require large battery packs to operate. The advent of low cost diode technology, merged with our novel solid-state laser design, has created a designator that will be the smallest, lowest cost, STANAG compatible laser designator on the market. The LTD delivers greater that 50mJ per pulse up to 20Hz, and has compact dimensions of 125×70×55mm. Secondly, we describe an ultra-compact, eye-safe, solid-state laser rangefinder (LRF) with reduced size, weight and power consumption compared to existing products. The LRF measures 100×55×34mm, weighs 200g, and can range to greater than 10km with a single laser shot and at a reprate of 1Hz. This also leverages off advances in laser pump diodes, but also utilises low cost, high reliability, packaging technology commonly found in the telecoms sector. As is common in the D&S sector, the products are designed to work in extreme environments, such as wide temperature range (-40 to +71°C) and high levels of shock and vibration. These disruptive products enable next- generation laser sensors such as rangefinders, target designators and active illuminated imagers.

  15. Biological imaging with nonlinear photothermal microscopy using a compact supercontinuum fiber laser source.

    PubMed

    He, Jinping; Miyazaki, Jun; Wang, Nan; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear photothermal microscopy is applied in the imaging of biological tissues stained with chlorophyll and hematoxylin. Experimental results show that this type of organic molecules, which absorb light but transform dominant part of the absorbed energy into heat, may be ideal probes for photothermal imaging without photochemical toxicity. Picosecond pump and probe pulses, with central wavelengths of 488 and 632 nm, respectively, are spectrally filtered from a compact supercontinuum fiber laser source. Based on the light source, a compact and sensitive super-resolution imaging system is constructed. Further more, the imaging system is much less affected by thermal blurring than photothermal microscopes with continuous-wave light sources. The spatial resolution of nonlinear photothermal microscopy is ~ 188 nm. It is ~ 23% higher than commonly utilized linear photothermal microscopy experimentally and ~43% than conventional optical microscopy theoretically. The nonlinear photothermal imaging technology can be used in the evaluation of biological tissues with high-resolution and contrast. PMID:25969015

  16. Materials Modification with Intense Extreme Ultraviolet Pulses from a Compact Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisham, M. E.; Vaschenko, G.; Menoni, C. S.; Juha, L.; Bittner, M.; Pershyn, Yu. P.; Kondratenko, V. V.; Zubarev, E. N.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Artioukov, I. A.; Rocca, J. J.

    In summary, we have realized a series of experiments with a compact 46.9 nm wavelength laser that produces intense pulses of nanosecond duration to study the ablation behavior of metals, common polymers, and Sc/Si multilayers. The key ablation process in polymers is likely to be a radiolysis of the polymer chains by EUV photons, resulting in the formation of numerous small molecular fragments that are subsequently removed from the surface of the samples. The EUV ablation rates for different polymers were found to be almost material independent, ˜ 50 - 400 nm/pulse. In each material EUV irradiation was observed to leave smooth craters with well defined edges and without signs of thermal damage. No threshold behavior was detected in the EUV ablation of the polymers in the range of fluences used in the experiment. In contrast to polymers the irradiation damage in metals and in Sc/Si multilayers is thermal in nature. A damage threshold of 0.08 J/cm2 was measured in the multilayer mirror coatings deposited on Si or borosilicate glass substrates, compared with a measured value of 0.7 J/cm2 for bare Si substrates. These results are relevant to the use of these mirrors with newly developed high-power EUV laser sources and provide a benchmark for their further improvement. In combination, the experiments demonstrate that compact extreme ultraviolet lasers are new tools available for surface modification studies and patterning.

  17. Compact deep UV laser system at 222.5 nm by single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnke, Norman; Müller, André; Eppich, Bernd; Güther, Reiner; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) lasers emitting below 300 nm are of great interest for many applications, for instance in medical diagnostics or for detecting biological agents. Established DUV lasers, e.g. gas lasers or frequency quadrupled solid-state lasers, are relatively bulky and have high power consumptions. A compact and reliable laser diode based system emitting in the DUV could help to address applications in environments where a portable and robust light source with low power consumption is needed. In this work, a compact DUV laser system based on single-pass frequency doubling of highpower GaN diode laser emission is presented. A commercially available high-power GaN laser diode from OSRAM Opto Semiconductors serves as a pump source. The laser diode is spectrally stabilized in an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) setup in Littrow configuration. The ECDL system reaches a maximum optical output power of 700 mW, maintaining narrowband emission below 60 pm (FWHM) at 445 nm over the entire operating range. By direct single pass frequency doubling in a BBO crystal with a length of 7.5 mm a maximum DUV output power of 16 μW at a wavelength of 222.5 nm is generated. The presented concept enables compact and efficient diode laser based light sources emitting in the DUV spectral range that are potentially suitable for in situ applications where a small footprint and low power consumption is essential.

  18. Compact linearly polarized ceramic laser made with anisotropic nanostructured thin films.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Alexandre; Beydaghyan, Gisia; Ashrit, Pandurang V; Bisson, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    A novel method is proposed for the fabrication of polarizing laser mirrors for compact solid-state lasers using glancing angle deposition. Changing the inclination angle and the azimuthal orientation of the substrate during deposition allows one to create and control in-plane birefringence of a deposited thin film by changing its nanostructure. Principal refractive indices of tungsten trioxide films were determined for various deposition angles using transmission and reflection ellipsometry. High-reflectance contrast between orthogonal linear polarization directions was obtained using a single material without any additional processing steps. These birefringent films were the building blocks of a Bragg mirror that was tested as an output coupler of a (Yb0.1Y0.9)3Al5O12 ceramic laser in a laser-diode end-pumped configuration. Continuous-wave, linearly polarized, transverse single-mode laser emission was obtained at a wavelength of 1030 nm with a polarization extinction ratio higher than 973 (30 dB). PMID:26479604

  19. A compact tunable polarized X-ray source based on laser-plasma helical undulators.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Chen, M; Zeng, M; Vieira, J; Yu, L L; Weng, S M; Silva, L O; Jaroszynski, D A; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators have great potential as the basis for next generation compact radiation sources because of their extremely high accelerating gradients. However, X-ray radiation from such devices still lacks tunability, especially of the intensity and polarization distributions. Here we propose a tunable polarized radiation source based on a helical plasma undulator in a plasma channel guided wakefield accelerator. When a laser pulse is initially incident with a skew angle relative to the channel axis, the laser and accelerated electrons experience collective spiral motions, which leads to elliptically polarized synchrotron-like radiation with flexible tunability on radiation intensity, spectra and polarization. We demonstrate that a radiation source with millimeter size and peak brilliance of 2 × 10(19) photons/s/mm(2)/mrad(2)/0.1% bandwidth can be made with moderate laser and electron beam parameters. This brilliance is comparable with third generation synchrotron radiation facilities running at similar photon energies, suggesting that laser plasma based radiation sources are promising for advanced applications. PMID:27377126

  20. A compact tunable polarized X-ray source based on laser-plasma helical undulators

    PubMed Central

    Luo, J.; Chen, M.; Zeng, M.; Vieira, J.; Yu, L. L.; Weng, S. M.; Silva, L. O.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators have great potential as the basis for next generation compact radiation sources because of their extremely high accelerating gradients. However, X-ray radiation from such devices still lacks tunability, especially of the intensity and polarization distributions. Here we propose a tunable polarized radiation source based on a helical plasma undulator in a plasma channel guided wakefield accelerator. When a laser pulse is initially incident with a skew angle relative to the channel axis, the laser and accelerated electrons experience collective spiral motions, which leads to elliptically polarized synchrotron-like radiation with flexible tunability on radiation intensity, spectra and polarization. We demonstrate that a radiation source with millimeter size and peak brilliance of 2 × 1019 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1% bandwidth can be made with moderate laser and electron beam parameters. This brilliance is comparable with third generation synchrotron radiation facilities running at similar photon energies, suggesting that laser plasma based radiation sources are promising for advanced applications. PMID:27377126

  1. Compact spectrometer for precision studies of multimode behavior in an extended-cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Timothy; Golemi, Josian; Krueger, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We have built a compact, inexpensive, high-precision spectrometer and used it to investigate the tuning behavior of a grating stabilized extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL). A common ECDL design uses a laser chip with an uncoated (partially reflecting) front facet, and the laser output exhibits a complicated pattern of mode hops as the frequency is tuned, in some cases even showing chaotic dynamics. Our grating spectrometer (based on a design by White & Scholten) monitors a span of 4000 GHz (8 nm at 780 nm) with a linewidth of 3 GHz, which with line-splitting gives a precision of 0.02 GHz in determining the frequency of a laser mode. We have studied multimode operation of the ECDL, tracking two or three simultaneous chip cavity modes (spacing ~ 30 GHz) during tuning via current or piezo control of the external cavity. Simultaneous output on adjacent external cavity modes (spacing ~ 5 GHz) is monitored by measuring an increase in the spectral linewidth. Computer-control of the spectrometer (for line-fitting and averaging) and of the ECDL (electronic tuning) allows rapid collection of spectral data sets, which we will use to test mathematical simulation models of the non-linear laser cavity interactions.

  2. Compact diffraction grating laser wavemeter with sub-picometer accuracy and picowatt sensitivity using a webcam imaging sensor.

    PubMed

    White, James D; Scholten, Robert E

    2012-11-01

    We describe a compact laser wavelength measuring instrument based on a small diffraction grating and a consumer-grade webcam. With just 1 pW of optical power, the instrument achieves absolute accuracy of 0.7 pm, sufficient to resolve individual hyperfine transitions of the rubidium absorption spectrum. Unlike interferometric wavemeters, the instrument clearly reveals multimode laser operation, making it particularly suitable for use with external cavity diode lasers and atom cooling and trapping experiments. PMID:23206048

  3. Compact diffraction grating laser wavemeter with sub-picometer accuracy and picowatt sensitivity using a webcam imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, James D.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2012-11-01

    We describe a compact laser wavelength measuring instrument based on a small diffraction grating and a consumer-grade webcam. With just 1 pW of optical power, the instrument achieves absolute accuracy of 0.7 pm, sufficient to resolve individual hyperfine transitions of the rubidium absorption spectrum. Unlike interferometric wavemeters, the instrument clearly reveals multimode laser operation, making it particularly suitable for use with external cavity diode lasers and atom cooling and trapping experiments.

  4. Compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser at 1083 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Feng, Zhouming; Xu, Shanhui; Mo, Shupei; Yang, Changsheng; Li, Can; Gan, Jiulin; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2015-12-01

    A compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser is demonstrated at 1083 nm. The short linear resonant cavity consists of a 12 mm long homemade Yb3+-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in which the Q-switching and the frequency excursion is achieved by a tensile-induced period modulation. Over 375 MHz frequency-tuning range is achieved with a modulation frequency varying from tens to hundreds of kilohertz. The highest peak power of the output pulse reaching 6.93 W at the repetition rate of 10 kHz is obtained.

  5. Compact, low-noise, all-solid-state laser system for stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Steinle, Tobias; Kumar, Vikas; Steinmann, Andy; Marangoni, Marco; Cerullo, Giulio; Giessen, Harald

    2015-02-15

    We present a highly stable and compact laser source for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. cw-seeding of an optical parametric amplifier pumped by a bulk femtosecond Yb-oscillator and self-phase modulation in a tapered fiber allow for broad tunability without any optical or electronic synchronization. The source features noise levels of the Stokes beam close to the shot-noise limit at MHz modulation frequencies. We demonstrate the superior performance of our system by SRS imaging of micrometer-sized polymer beads. PMID:25680158

  6. Compact, Passively Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser for the MESSENGER Mission to the Planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Danny J.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Li, Steven X.; Lindauer, Steven J.; Afzal, Robert S.; Yu, Antony

    2004-01-01

    A compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) instrument which is an instrument on the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury. The laser achieves 5.4 percent efficiency with a near diffraction limited beam. It has passed all space flight environmental tests at system, instrument, and satellite integration. The laser design draws on a heritage of previous laser altimetry missions, specifically ISESAT and Mars Global Surveyor; but incorporates thermal management features unique to the requirements of an orbit of the planet Mercury.

  7. Widely ultra-narrow linewidth 104 nm tunable all-fiber compact erbium-doped ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, F. F.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Ju, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A widely tunable narrow linewidth compact erbium-doped all-fiber ring laser with 104 nm tuning range was reported. An all-fiber Fabry-Perot filter (FFP-TF) was used to realize the laser tuning output, and the wavelength at constant voltage had high time stability. With the 8 m length erbium-doped fiber as gain medium, we realized widely tunable laser from 1513 to 1617 nm with the linewidth less than 40 pm at any wavelength. Pumped by the 976 nm laser diode, the fiber laser worked with slope efficiency of above 10% and threshold of less than 21 mW.

  8. Compact, temperature-stable multi-gigahertz passively modelocked semiconductor disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yan-Rong; Guoyu, He-Yang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Jin-Rong

    2015-08-01

    We present a compact passively mode-locked semiconductor disk laser at 1045 nm. The gain chip without any post processing consists of 16 compressively strained InGaAs symmetrical step quantum wells in the active region. 3-GHz repetition rate, 4.9-ps pulse duration, and 30-mW average output power are obtained with 1.4 W of 808-nm incident pump power. The temperature stability of the laser is demonstrated to have an ideal shift rate of 0.035 nm/K of the lasing wavelength. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61177047) and the Key Project of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61235010).

  9. Low cost and compact nonlinear (SHG/TPE) laser scanning endoscope for bio-medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiayun; Lim, Ken Choong; Li, Hao; Seck, Hon Luen; Yu, Xia; Kok, Shaw Wei; Zhang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPE) and second harmonic generation (SHG) can been used to extract biological information from tissues at the molecular level, which is blind to traditional microscopes. Through these two image contrast mechanisms, a nonlinear laser scanning endoscope (NLSE) is able to image tissue cells and the extra cellular matrix (ECM) through a special fiber and miniaturized scanner without the requirement of poisonous chemical staining. Therefore, NLSE reserves high potential for in-vivo pathological study and disease diagnosis. However, the high cost and bulky size of a NLSE system has become one of the major issues preventing this technology from practical clinical operation. In this paper, we report a fiber laser based multi-modality NLSE system with compact size and low cost, ideal for in-vivo applications in clinical environments. The demonstration of the developed NLSE nonlinear imaging capability on different bio-structures in liver, retina and skin are also presented.

  10. Fresh water blue green algae from three agro-climatic zones of Uttar Pradesh, India: distribution pattern with seasonal variation.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Misra, P K; Rai, U N; Tripathi, R D; Suseela, M R; Sinha, S; Baghel, V S; Pal, Amit; Dwivedi, C P

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with 45 species of 21 genera of fresh water blue green algae (BGA) from three different agro-climatic zones of Uttar Pradesh. Samples were collected from different habitats varying in physico-chemical properties. Out of 45 species, 13 species belonged to order Chroococcales, 31 to order Nostocales, while only 1 species belonged to order Stigonimatales i.e. Fischerella mucicola. The physico-chemical parameters like pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, nitrate, nitrite and rainfall play an important role in the periodicity of BGA. A positive correlation was found between dissolved oxygen (DO) of different ponds and species diversity, except in the case of western region of Uttar Pradesh (Farukhabad and Mahoba districts) where a positive correlation was found in electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids.

  11. Toxicity of volcanic-ash leachate to a blue-green alga. Results of a preliminary bioassay experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Feder, G.L.; Stiles, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the possible effects of volcanic ash from the May 18,1980, eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington, on aquatic ecosystems, we conducted a bioassay experiment with a blue-green alga, Anabaena flos-aquae. Results showed that leachate (obtained by leaching 151 g of ash with 130 mL of simulated freshwater) was lethal to Anabaena flos-aquae cultures when diluted as much as 1:100 with culture medium. Cultures exposed to a 1:500 dilution grew, but a toxic effect was indicated by abnormalities in the Anabaena filaments. This study indicates that ash from the Mt. St. Helens volcano could have an effect on aquatic ecosystems in the areas of significant ashfall. Further study is needed to determine the toxic chemical constituents in the ash and also its possible effects on other aquatic organisms.

  12. The characterization of C-phycocyanin from an extremely halo-tolerant blue-green alga, Coccochloris elabens.

    PubMed

    Kao, O H; Berns, D S; Town, W R

    1973-01-01

    C-Phycocyanin was isolated and purified from a uni-algal culture of an extremely halo-tolerant blue-green alga, Coccochloris elabens. This alga can be grown under laboratory conditions in 25% (w/v) NaCl. Purified halophile phycocyanin was characterized by amino acid analysis and the measurement of sedimentation velocity, fluorescence polarization and immunodiffusion as a function of protein concentration, pH and ionic strength. The results were compared with those of studies of phycocyanin isolated from Plectonema calothricoides and from several other sources. The states of aggregation previously characterized as being present in other C-phycocyanins, monomer, trimer and hexamer, were present in halophile phycocyanin and were characterized as antigenically related to all C-phycocyanins tested. The equilibrium between 3S monomer and 11S hexamer at low concentrations in halophile phycocyanin was quantitatively similar to that for other phycocyanins. The effect of pH and ionic strength on the 6S (trimer) and 11S (hexamer) aggregation of halophile phycocyanin was markedly salt-dependent and the relative amount of each aggregate in the presence of 2m-NaCl was like that of C-phycocyanin from mesophiles, in the absence of additional salt. In antigenic relationship and aggregation properties, the phycocyanin from C. elabens appeared to be most closely related to that isolated from the thermophilic blue-green alga, Synechococcus lividus. Amino acid content of the halophile phycocyanin indicated the presence of a significantly larger number of acidic residues than that found in mesophiles. Explanations of the properties of the halophile protein require consideration of a strong contribution of hydrophobic forces and utilize both charge-shielding and salting-out effects. PMID:4198583

  13. UV-induced blue-green and far-red fluorescence along wheat leaves: a potential signature of leaf ageing.

    PubMed

    Meyer, S; Cartelat, A; Moya, I; Cerovic, Z G

    2003-02-01

    Under UV-excitation, leaves emit red (RF) and far-red (FRF) fluorescence from chlorophyll and blue-green fluorescence (BGF) from hydroxycinnamic acids. In this study, the aim was to develop a fluorescence signature of wheat leaf ageing after the emergence of the lamina. FRF and BGF were examined in the first three leaves of 2-week-old wheat plants. It was investigated how FRF and BGF vary as leaf and tissue aged by spectroscopic measurements, time-resolved BGF analysis and microscopic imaging of the leaf surface. It was found that FRF decreased with leaf and tissue ageing because of an accumulation of UV-absorbers in the epidermis. BGF also decreased, but without changes either in the shape of excitation and emission spectra or in the fluorescence lifetime. So, BGF emanated from the leaf surface, without changes in fluorophore composition during leaf ageing. The shape of the BGF spectrum indicates that ferulic acid bound to the cell wall is the main blue-green fluorophore. The effects of pH and solvents on BGF from intact leaves and ferulic acid in solution were similar, confirming the hydroxycinnamic acid origin of BGF. UV-fluorescence microscopic imaging of the surface of intact leaves showed that different epidermis cell types and sclerenchyma bands emitted BGF. The decreasing gradient of BGF from the base to the apex of the lamina could be related to the decrease in the surface of the fluorescent sclerenchyma bands. The significance of FRF and BGF as potential signatures of wheat lamina growth are discussed.

  14. cw laser compaction of aqueous-solution-deposited metal oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Dennis, Tasshi

    1997-05-01

    Zirconium dioxide films were spin cast onto silica or silicon substrates from an aqueous solution comprised of the precursor metal nitrate and an organic complexant such as glycine. The hydrated films so derived consist of an amorphous organic phase in which the metal cations and nitrate anions are homogeneously dispersed. Heating to temperatures above 200 degrees C leads to film dehydration followed by an auto-catalyzed oxidation reaction whereby the bound nitrate oxidizes the organic matrix leaving behind an intact stoichiometric and crystalline metal oxide film. Films are characterized using AFM, XRD, and optical methods. Transformation processes in these films have been studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and laser induced fluorescence from films doped with a suitable rare earth probe ion such as Sm+3. In the latter case, the measured fluorescence emission spectra are used to identify the hydrated, dehydrated, amorphous and crystalline metal oxide phases which evolve during processing. These transformations also have been induced upon visible CW laser irradiation at fluences in excess of 1 MW/cm2. Under these conditions, the film dehydrates and compacts within the footprint of the incident laser beam rendering this region of the film water insoluble. Post irradiation washing of the film with water removes all vestiges of the film outside of the beam footprint suggesting a possible use of this technique for lithography applications. Films subjected to laser irradiation and post irradiation heating have been characterized with respect to thickness, phase composition, crystallite size and optical constants.

  15. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  16. A compact all-fiber displacement interferometer for measuring the foil velocity driven by laser.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jidong; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Yun; Tan, Hua; Cai, Lingcang; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Cangli

    2008-11-01

    A compact all-fiber displacement interferometer (AFDI) system, working at 1550 nm, has been developed and tested, and its working fundamentals will be introduced in this letter. In contrast with other models of fiber-optic velocity interferometer system, AFDI adopts a single-mode optic fiber pigtail as the detect head, diameter of which is only 1 mm, to collect directly the reflect laser beam from the moving surface, which makes this instrument have some unique advantages in observing the point movements of a small flyer. Preliminary experiments using this instrument to measure the velocity history of a small aluminum thin foil driven by a nanosecond pulse laser were conducted successfully, the precise velocity history profile deduced from the sharp interference fringes and the nanometer resolution in displacement gives an eloquent proof of its eminent abilities. The field depth (approximately 2 mm) of our AFDI is a little smaller than the DISAR [Weng et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 111101 (2006)] system, but its compact structure makes it much convenient to operate. Further applications for multipoints velocity history measurements of small targets are under consideration.

  17. Fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements for an Integrated Compact Optical-MEMS Laser Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    WENDT,JOEL R.; KRYGOWSKI,T.W.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; REYES,DAVID NMN

    2000-07-13

    The authors describe the microfabrication of a multi-level diffractive optical element (DOE) onto a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) as a key element in an integrated compact optical-MEMS laser scanner. The DOE is a four-level off-axis microlens fabricated onto a movable polysilicon shuttle. The microlens is patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion beam etching. The DOE was fabricated on two generations of MEMS components. The first generation design uses a shuttle suspended on springs and displaced by a linear rack. The second generation design uses a shuttle guided by roller bearings and driven by a single reciprocating gear. Both the linear rack and the reciprocating gear are driven by a microengine assembly. The compact design is based on mounting the MEMS module and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) onto a fused silica substrate that contains the rest of the optical system. The estimated scan range of the system is {+-}4{degree} with a spot size of 0.5 mm.

  18. Design and experimental results for a compact laser printer optical system with MEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takatoshi; Seki, Daisuke; Fujii, Shuichi; Mukai, Yukihiro

    2010-02-01

    There are many features expected by printer users, which include high resolution, low price, compact size, color, high speed printing and so on. Laser printers generally utilize a polygon mirror as a reflector in their optical configurations, but the usual size of the polygon mirror prevents laser scanning unit from being made much smaller. We have been conducting research on techniques which can contribute to reducing the optical unit size. Although oscillating mirror made with MEMS technology enables the system to be compact, it requires a sophisticated optical design having an increased number of constraints due to the change in angular velocity which varies depending on the orientation of the mirror, while the polygon mirror allows the scanning with constant speed. Using a small MEMS mirror is one of the critical issues concerning the reduction of cost. We have successfully resolved all the challenges listed above by using high-precision free-form optical surfaces and an optical layout making efficient use of 3D space. Our techniques can make the unit size much smaller and reduce the price. The optical path is designed to have a ray passing through a lens twice. We report both theoretical and experimental results for this system.

  19. Interferometric studies of laser-created plasmas using compact soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Moon, S; Keenan, R; Jankowska, E; Maconi, M C; Hammarsten, E C; Filevich, J; Hunter, J R; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V; Rocca, J J

    2003-12-04

    We summarize results of several successful dense plasma diagnostics experiments realized by combining two different kinds of table-top soft x-ray lasers with an amplitude division interferometer based on diffraction grating beam splitters. In the first set of experiments this robust high throughput diffraction grating interferometer (DGI) was used with a 46.9 nm portable capillary discharge laser to study the dynamics of line focus and point focus laser-created plasmas. The measured electron density profiles, which differ significantly from those expected from a classical expansion, unveil important two-dimensional effects of the dynamics of these plasmas. A second DGI customized to operate in combination with a 14.7 nm Ni-like Pd transient gain laser was used to perform interferometry of line focus laser-created plasmas with picosecond time resolution. These measurements provide valuable new benchmarks for complex hydrodynamic codes and help bring new understanding of the dynamics of dense plasmas. The instrumentation and methodology we describe is scalable to significantly shorter wavelengths, and constitutes a promising scheme for extending interferometry to the study of very dense plasmas such as those investigated for inertial confinement fusion.

  20. A compact, short-pulse laser for near-field, range-gated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M.; Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 10 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight. System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  1. Compact short-pulse laser for near-field range-gated imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Yates, George J.; Gallegos, Robert A.; McDonald, Thomas E., Jr.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 100 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight, System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  2. A four kHz repetition rate compact TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yijun; Tan, Rongqing

    2013-09-01

    A compact transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser with high repetition-rate was reported. The size of the laser is 380 mm×300 mm×200 mm, and the discharge volume is 12×103 mm3. The laser cavity has a length of 320mm and consists of a totally reflective concave mirror with a radius of curvature of 4 m (Cu metal substrate coated with Au) and a partially reflecting mirror. The ultraviolet preionization makes the discharge even and stable,the output energy can be as high as 28 mJ under the circumstance of free oscillation, and the width of the light pulse is 60ns.To acquire the high wind velocity, a turbocharger is used in the system of the fast-gas flow cycle. When the wind speed is 100m/s, the repetition rate of the transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser is up to 2 kHz. On this basis, a dual modular structure with two sets of the gas discharge unit is adopted to obtain a higher pulse repetition frequency output. The dual discharge unit composed two sets of electrodes and two sets of turbo fan. Alternate trigger technology is used to make the two sets of discharge module work in turn with repetition frequency of 2 kHz, the discharge interval of two sets of the gas discharge unit can be adjusted continuously from 20 microseconds to 250 microseconds. Under the conditions of maintaining the other parameters constant, the repetition frequency of the laser pulse is up to 4 kHz. The total size of laser with dual modular structure is 380mm×520mm×200mm, and the discharge volume is 24×103 mm3 with the cavity length of 520mm.

  3. Compact multisensor laser scanning head for processing and monitoring microspot welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Moustapha; Julliard, Karin; Grossmann, Sylvain; Olivetta, Lino; Sidler, Thomas C.; Salathe, Rene-Paul; Schwob, Hans-Peter; Blom, Toon; Hoving, Willem

    2000-11-01

    In order to improve the reliability of micro-spot welding of metal parts in production such as e.g. in electron guns for TV picture tubes, real-time information about the evolution of the welding process should be available to allow on-line modification of the laser parameters. Such information can be derived from a set of sensors that are mounted on a laser-scanning head. Different sensors are used to monitor the optical fiber output power to determine the evolution of temperature during the spot welding process, to measure plasma emission and back-reflected laser light. A vision channel and a CCD camera are used to control the position of the laser spot on the parts to be processed. The compact scanning head is composed of a tip/tilt laser scanner, a collimating lens and a focusing lens. The scanner is fast steering, with a bandwidth of 700Hz, and can tilt by +/- 3.5 degree(s) with a repeatability better than 50(mu) rad. The settling time for maximum deflection is less that 10ms. The scanning lens is a newly developed focusing lens designed to replace commercial cumbersome scanning lenses such as F-(theta) lenses, which have large volume, weight and price. This lens is based on the well-known Cooke triplet design and guarantees a constant shape of the spot all over the scan surface and is specially well suited for high power beam delivery. The scan field achieved by the system is limited to 25mm x 25mm. The laser used for this application is a pulsed Nd:YAG laser delivered by an optical fiber to the optical head. However, the system can be adapted to different types of lasers. Laser micro-spot welding on copper substrate has been performed in the frame of the Brite-Euram project MAIL. Smaller tolerances (a factor of 2 less) on the spot diameters were obtained in the case of a sensor controlled operation compared to the case where sensor control is not used.

  4. Realization of an advanced nozzle concept for compact chemical oxygen iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Gaurav; Subbarao, P. M. V.; Rajesh, R.; Mainuddin; Tyagi, R. K.; Dawar, A. L.

    2007-04-01

    Conventional supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (SCOIL) are not only low-pressure systems, with cavity pressure of 2-3 Torr and Mach number of approximately 1.5, but also are high-throughput systems with a typical laser power per unit evacuation capacity of nearly 1 J/l, thus demanding high capacity vacuum systems which mainly determine the compactness of the system. These conventional nozzle-based systems usually require a minimum of a two-stage ejector system for realization of atmospheric pressure recovery in a SCOIL. Typically for a 500 W class SCOIL, a first stage requires a motive gas flow (air) of 120 gm/s to entrain a laser gas flow of 3 g/s and is capable of achieving the pressure recovery in the range of 60-80 Torr. On the other hand, the second stage ejector requires 4.5 kg/s of motive gas (air) to achieve atmospheric pressure recovery. An advanced nozzle, also known as ejector nozzle, suitable for a 500 W-class SCOIL employing an active medium flow of nearly 12 g/s, has been developed and used instead of a conventional slit nozzle. The nozzle has been tested in both cold as well as hot run conditions of SCOIL, achieving a typical cavity pressure of nearly 10 Torr, stagnation pressure of approximately 85 Torr and a cavity Mach number of 2.5. The present study details the gas dynamic aspects of this ejector nozzle and highlights its potential as a SCOIL pressure recovery device. This nozzle in conjunction with a diffuser is capable of achieving pressure recovery equivalent to a more cumbersome first stage of the pressure recovery system used in the case of a conventional slit nozzle-based system. Thus, use of this nozzle in place of a conventional slit nozzle can achieve atmospheric discharge using a single stage ejector system, thereby making the pressure recovery system quite compact.

  5. Al-free active region laser diodes at 894 nm for compact Cesium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Bandel, N.; Bébé Manga Lobé, J.; Garcia, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Lecomte, M.; Drisse, O.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Time-frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks optically pumped is a promising area that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of laser diodes that are used for atomic pumping. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for earth applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. We are in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852nm (D2 line). The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and larger spectral separation between lines in the 894nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "dark states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (<1MHz), very good reliability in time and, crucially, be insensitive to optical feedback. The development of the 894nm wavelength is grounded on our previous results for 852nm DFB. Thus, we show our first results from Al-free active region with InGaAsP quantum well broad-area lasers (100μm width, with lengths ranging from 2mm to 4mm), for further DFB operation at 894nm. We obtained low internal losses below 2cm-1, the external differential efficiency is 0.49W/A with uncoated facets and a low threshold current density of 190A/cm², for 2mm lasers at 20°C.

  6. Toward the realization of a compact chemical sensor platform using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Marcus, Logan S.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    The Army is investigating several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., infrared spectroscopy) that could allow for an adaptable sensor platform. Traditionally, chemical sensing platforms have been hampered by the opposing concerns of increasing sensor capability while maintaining a minimal package size. Current sensors, although reasonably sized, are geared to more classical chemical threats, and the ability to expand their capabilities to a broader range of emerging threats is uncertain. Recently, photoacoustic spectroscopy, employed in a sensor format, has shown enormous potential to address these ever-changing threats, while maintaining a compact sensor design. In order to realize the advantage of photoacoustic sensor miniaturization, light sources of comparable size are required. Recent research has employed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell designs. The continuous tuning capability of QCLs over a broad wavelength range in the mid-infrared spectral region greatly expands the number of compounds that can be identified. Results have demonstrated that utilizing a tunable QCL with a MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell produces favorable detection limits (ppb levels) for chemical targets (e.g., dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), vinyl acetate, 1,4-dioxane). Although our chemical sensing research has benefitted from the broad tuning capabilities of QCLs, the limitations of these sources must be considered. Current commercially available tunable systems are still expensive and obviously geared more toward laboratory operation, not fielding. Although the laser element itself is quite small, the packaging, power supply, and controller remain logistical burdens. Additionally, operational features such as continuous wave (CW) modulation and laser output powers while maintaining wide tunability are not yet ideal for a variety of sensing applications. In this paper, we will discuss our continuing evaluation of QCL technology as it matures

  7. Compact VCSEL-based laser array communications systems for improved data performance in satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Richard F.; Warren, Mial E.; Joseph, John R.; Wilcox, Thomas; Abell, David J.; Otis, Kirk J.

    2014-09-01

    Compact, radiation-hardened free-space optical data links are enabled by two-dimensional VCSEL arrays that can be modulated at high data rates while being scaled to produce high power levels. The combination of high modulation speed and scalability of power is enabled by the use of arrays which are flip-chip mounted onto sub-mounts that contain electrical strip line waveguides to provide an impedance match for the VCSELs. For laser wavelengths in the 910 nm to 1020 nm range, the lasers can be back-emitting through the GaAs substrate, which enables the use of etched microlenses to manipulate the beams from the individual elements. This approach of using VCSELs in arrays is inherently reliable and radiation-hard. The resulting free space optical data links are particularly advantageous for space-borne applications where size, weight, and power are important factors. Performance characterization of links constructed with these lasers demonstrates their suitability for short distance to medium distance data transfer at up to 10 Gb/s.

  8. Wafer-level vacuum packaged resonant micro-scanning mirrors for compact laser projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ulrich; Oldsen, Marten; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim; Janes, Joachim; Heller, Martin; Weiss, Manfred; Fakas, Georgios; Ratzmann, Lars; Marchetti, Eleonora; D'Ascoli, Francesco; Melani, Massimiliano; Bacciarelli, Luca; Volpi, Emilio; Battini, Francesco; Mostardini, Luca; Sechi, Francesco; De Marinis, Marco; Wagner, Bernd

    2008-02-01

    Scanning laser projection using resonant actuated MEMS scanning mirrors is expected to overcome the current limitation of small display size of mobile devices like cell phones, digital cameras and PDAs. Recent progress in the development of compact modulated RGB laser sources enables to set up very small laser projection systems that become attractive not only for consumer products but also for automotive applications like head-up and dash-board displays. Within the last years continuous progress was made in increasing MEMS scanner performance. However, only little is reported on how mass-produceability of these devices and stable functionality even under harsh environmental conditions can be guaranteed. Automotive application requires stable MEMS scanner operation over a wide temperature range from -40° to +85°Celsius. Therefore, hermetic packaging of electrostatically actuated MEMS scanning mirrors becomes essential to protect the sensitive device against particle contamination and condensing moisture. This paper reports on design, fabrication and test of a resonant actuated two-dimensional micro scanning mirror that is hermetically sealed on wafer level. With resonant frequencies of 30kHz and 1kHz, an achievable Theta-D-product of 13mm.deg and low dynamic deformation <20nm RMS it targets Lissajous projection with SVGA-resolution. Inevitable reflexes at the vacuum package surface can be seperated from the projection field by permanent inclination of the micromirror.

  9. Monochromatic computed tomography with a compact laser-driven X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Achterhold, K; Bech, M; Schleede, S; Potdevin, G; Ruth, R; Loewen, R; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-01-01

    A laser-driven electron-storage ring can produce nearly monochromatic, tunable X-rays in the keV energy regime by inverse Compton scattering. The small footprint, relative low cost and excellent beam quality provide the prospect for valuable preclinical use in radiography and tomography. The monochromaticity of the beam prevents beam hardening effects that are a serious problem in quantitative determination of absorption coefficients. These values are important e.g. for osteoporosis risk assessment. Here, we report quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements using a laser-driven compact electron-storage ring X-ray source. The experimental results obtained for quantitative CT measurements on mass absorption coefficients in a phantom sample are compared to results from a rotating anode X-ray tube generator at various peak voltages. The findings confirm that a laser-driven electron-storage ring X-ray source can indeed yield much higher CT image quality, particularly if quantitative aspects of computed tomographic imaging are considered.

  10. Compact And Robust Laser Impulse Measurement Device, With Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kremeyer, Kevin; Lapeyre, John; Hamann, Steven

    2008-04-28

    An impulse measurement device and analysis package was conceived, designed, constructed, tested, and demonstrated to be capable of: measuring nanoNewton-seconds to milliNewton-seconds of impulse due to laser-ablation; being transported as carry-on baggage; set-up and tear-down times of less than an hour; target exchange times of less than two minutes (targets can be ablated at multiple positions for thousands of shots); measurements in air and in vacuum; error of just a few percent; repeatability over a wide range of potential systematic error sources; and time between measurements, including ring-down and analysis, of less than 30 seconds. The instrument consists of a cantilever (i.e. leaf spring), whose time-dependent displacement/oscillation is measured and analyzed to determine the impulse imparted by a laser pulse to a target. These shapes are readily/commercially available, and any target material can be used, provided it can be fashioned in the form of a cantilever, or as a coating/film/tape, suitable for mounting on a cantilever of known geometry. The instrument was calibrated both statically and dynamically, and measurements were performed on brass, steel, and Aluminum, using laser pulses of {approx}7 ns, {approx}500 ps, and {approx}500 fs. The results agree well with those published in the literature, with surface effects, atmosphere, and pre-/post-pulses demonstrating interesting effects and indicating areas for further study. These parameters should be carefully controlled and held constant during a series of measurements. The impulse imparted by ablation due to laser filaments in air was also explored.

  11. Status of the Northrop Grumman Compact Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, I.S.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Hartley, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Compact Infrared Free Electron Laser (CIRFEL) was built as part of a joint collaboration between the Northrop Grumman Corporation and Princeton University to develop FEL`s for use by researchers in the materials, medical and physical sciences. The CIRFEL was designed to lase in the Mid-IR and Far-IR regimes with picosecond pulses, megawatt level peak powers and an average power of a few watts. The micropulse separation is 7 nsec which allows a number of relaxation phenomenon to be observed. The CIRFEL utilizes an RF photocathode gun to produce high-brightness time synchronized electron bunches. The operational status and experimental results of the CERFEL will be presented.

  12. Variable-energy microtron-injector for a compact wide-band FIR free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakevitch, Grigori M.; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Byung Cheol; Gavrilov, Nikolay G.; Kondaurov, Mikhail N.

    2003-07-01

    A microtron-injector (Proceedings of the 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, USA, 2001, 2739) for the KAERI compact far infrared free electron laser (FIR FEL) facility has been upgraded to provide tuning of the FEL wavelength from 100 μm to more than 300 μm. The wide-band tunability of the radiation has been achieved by changing the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons from 6.5 to 4.9 MeV. To do so, the position of an RF cavity inside the microtron is movable within the range of ˜170 mm, and it changes the maximum orbit number of the electrons from 12 to 8. Dependence of the electron beam parameters on the orbit number has been investigated to choose acceptable operating conditions of the microtron for stable operation of the wide-band FIR FEL. Measured parameters of the electron beam and corresponding lasing results of the FIR FEL are presented and discussed.

  13. Single-Mode, High Repetition Rate, Compact Ho:YLF Laser for Space-Borne Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Wong, Teh-Hwa; Chen, Songsheng; Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    A single transverse/longitudinal mode, compact Q-switched Ho:YLF laser has been designed and demonstrated for space-borne lidar applications. The pulse energy is between 34-40 mJ for 100-200 Hz operation. The corresponding peak power is >1 MW.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide photoproduction by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga Anabaena variabilis: A way to solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, I.; La Rosa, F.F. de )

    1992-07-01

    A photosystem for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction formed by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga, Anabaena variabilis and the redox mediator methyl viologen is described. Hydrogen peroxide is produced in a redox catalyst cycle in which methyl viologen is reduced by electrons from water obtained by the photosynthetic apparatus of the algae using solar energy, and reoxidized by the introduction of oxygen into the solution. Hydrogen peroxide is produced during methyl viologen re-oxidation in two steps by means of the formation of superoxide. Experimental conditions for maximum photoproduction (catalyst charge, chlorophyll, and agar final concentration for cell immobilization) have been investigated using a continuous photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis as photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis is photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem produces hydrogen peroxide at a rate of 100 {mu}moles/mg Chl{center dot}h, maintaining the production for several hours, and with an energy conversion efficiency of about 2%. Taking into account the use of hydrogen peroxide as fuel, this photosystem can be a useful tool in the storage of solar energy.

  15. Computer simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum Quadruplicatum

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, Andrey A.; Borisov, Alexander Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods for simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin fragments of PBS were developed. Both methods are based on the statistical analysis of an excitation behavior in modeling complexes with a limited number (up to hundreds) of chromophores using the Monte-Carlo approach and calculation of migration rates for the system of linear balance equations. Energy migration rates were calculated in the case of C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum quadruplicatum. The main channels of energy migration were determined in a monomer, trimer, hexamer, and in the rods consisting of 2-4 hexamers. The influence of the “screw” angle between two adjoining trimers of hexamer on the rates of energy migration and on its efficiencies in 1-4 hexamers was also estimated. The analysis was made for the average (random) and real orientation of chromophores in the C-phycocyanin. For both cases the optimal angle values were determined and the one for real C-phycocyanin structure was found to be very close (Δø ≤ 5°) to the optimal angle calculated. PMID:19431892

  16. A Novel Compact Electron Spectrometer for Hot Electron Measurement in Pulsed Laser Solid Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Patel, P; Price, D F; Young, B K; Springer, P T; Berry, R; Booth, R; Bruns, C; Nelson, D

    2002-07-05

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interactions provide a unique source of temporally short, broad spectrum electrons, which may be utilized in many varied applications. One such, which we are pursuing, is as part of a novel diagnostic to trace magnetic field lines in a magnetically-confined fusion device. An essential aspect of this scheme is to have a detailed characterization of the electron angular and energy distribution. To this effect we designed and constructed a compact electron spectrometer that uses permanent magnets for electron energy dispersion and over 100 scintillating fibers coupled to a 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD as the detection system. This spectrometer has electron energy coverage from 10 keV to 2 MeV. We tested the spectrometer on a high intensity (10{sup 17} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (< 100 fs) laser, JanUSP, at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory using various solid targets. The details of the spectrometer and the experimental results will be reported.

  17. Robust and compact entanglement generation from diode-laser-pumped four-wave mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrie, B. J.; Yang, Y.; Eaton, M.; Black, A. N.; Pooser, R. C.

    2016-04-11

    Four-wave-mixing processes are now routinely used to demonstrate multi-spatial-mode Einstein- Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and intensity difference squeezing. Recently, diode-laser-pumped four-wave mixing processes have been shown to provide an affordable, compact, and stable source for intensity difference squeezing, but it was unknown if excess phase noise present in power amplifier pump configurations would be an impediment to achieving quadrature entanglement. Here, we demonstrate the operating regimes under which these systems are capable of producing entanglement and under which excess phase noise produced by the amplifier contaminates the output state. We show that Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement in two mode squeezed states can be generatedmore » by a four-wave-mixing source deriving both the pump field and the local oscillators from a tapered-amplifier diode-laser. In conclusion, this robust continuous variable entanglement source is highly scalable and amenable to miniaturization, making it a critical step toward the development of integrated quantum sensors and scalable quantum information processors, such as spatial comb cluster states.« less

  18. Robust and compact entanglement generation from diode-laser-pumped four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, B. J.; Yang, Y.; Eaton, M.; Black, A. N.; Pooser, R. C.

    2016-04-01

    Four-wave-mixing processes are now routinely used to demonstrate multi-spatial-mode Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and intensity difference squeezing. Diode-laser-pumped four-wave mixing processes have recently been shown to provide an affordable, compact, and stable source for intensity difference squeezing, but it was unknown if excess phase noise present in power amplifier pump configurations would be an impediment to achieving quadrature entanglement. Here, we demonstrate the operating regimes under which these systems are capable of producing entanglement and under which excess phase noise produced by the amplifier contaminates the output state. We show that Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement in two mode squeezed states can be generated by a four-wave-mixing source deriving both the pump field and the local oscillators from a tapered-amplifier diode-laser. This robust continuous variable entanglement source is highly scalable and amenable to miniaturization, making it a critical step toward the development of integrated quantum sensors and scalable quantum information processors, such as spatial comb cluster states.

  19. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  20. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-03-15

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  1. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  2. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-03-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  3. Compact noise-like pulse fiber laser and its application for supercontinuum generation in highly nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Xia, Handing; Li, Heping; Deng, Guanglei; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-10

    We report on supercontinuum generation in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) pumped by noise-like pulses (NLPs) emitted from a compact fiber ring laser. The compact erbium-doped fiber ring laser is constructed by using an optical integrated component and mode-locked by the nonlinear polarization rotation technique. The laser produces NLPs with a 3-dB spectral bandwidth of 60.2 nm, repetition rate of 9.36 MHz, and pulse energy of 2.8 nJ. Numerical simulations reproduce the generation of NLPs in the experiment. The NLPs are then launched into a 110-m-long HNLF and a supercontinuum with a 20-dB spectral width over 500 nm is obtained. Such a simple and inexpensive supercontinuum-generation system is a potential alternative for various practical applications. PMID:26560761

  4. Use of freshly prepared rat hepatocytes to study toxicity of blooms of the blue-green algae Microcystis aeruginosa and Oscillatoria agardhii.

    PubMed

    Aune, T; Berg, K

    1986-01-01

    Extracts from blue-green algal blooms (Microcystis aeruginosa and Oscillatoria agardhii) from different lakes in southeastern Norway were tested for toxicity toward freshly prepared rat hepatocytes. The toxicity effects were scored by means of morphological studies of the cells and by measuring leakage of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the cells. The results with the hepatocytes correspond well with results from the traditional mouse bioassay, concerning both ability to distinguish between toxic and nontoxic samples and estimation of relative toxicity. Morphological changes due to toxic effects on the plasma membrane appeared earlier than leakage of enzyme from damaged cells. The results indicate that the hepatocyte-toxicity assay system might be well suited for screening purposes concerning water contamination by blue-green algae. PMID:3095554

  5. A compact high power Er:Yb:glass eyesafe laser for infrared remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, Marco; Pizzarulli, Andrea; Ruffini, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    The key features and performances of a compact, lightweight, high power Er3+:Yb3+ glass laser transmitter are reported on. The theory employed to get an optimal design of the device is also described. In free running regime high energies of about 15mJ in 3ms long pulses were obtained, with an optical efficiency close to 85%. When q-switched by a Co: MALO crystal of carefully selected initial transmittivity, a high peak power in excess of 500 kW was obtained in about 9ns pulse duration, with an optical efficiency of 60%. The laser was successfully run with no significant power losses at repetition rates up to 5Hz due to a carefully designed heat sink which allowed an efficient conduction cooling of both the diode bars and the phosphate glass. The transmitter emits at a wavelength of 1535nm in the so-called "eyesafe" region of the light spectrum thus being highly attractive for any application involving the risk of human injury as is typically the case in remote sensing activities. Moreover, the spectral band around 1,5mm corresponds to a peak in the athmospheric transmittance thus being more effective in adverse weather conditions with respect to other wavelengths. Actually, the device has been successfully integrated into a rangefinder system allowing a reliable and precise detection of small targets at distances up to 20Km. Moreover, the transmitter capabilities were used into a state of the art infrared laser illuminator for night vision allowing even the recognition of a human being at distances in excess of 5Km.

  6. Compact multichannel receiver using InGaAs APDs for single-pulse eye-safe laser radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Hoyt N.; Yun, Steven T.; Dinndorf, Kenneth M.; Hayden, David R.

    1997-08-01

    Active imaging laser radars form 3D images which can be processed to provide target identification and precision aimpoint definition in real time. Earlier raster-scanned and pushbroom-scanned 3D imaging laser radar receivers required multiple laser pulses to assemble a complete 3D image frame. Platform/target motion and atmospheric effects caused tearing and jitter in the assembled 3D images, which complicated the subsequent image processing and necessitated the use of stabilized scanning systems. This paper describes the current status of the parallel/multichannel imaging laser radar receiver (PMR) which is being developed under an SBIR Phaser II program by the USAF Wright Laboratories Armament Directorate. The PMR uses an array of multichannel laser radar receivers to form single-pulse, 3D laser radar images, thus eliminating the complex and costly scanning system, and enabling much higher frame rates than were ever before possible. The heart of the PMR is the multichannel optical receiver photonic hybrid (MORPH), a high performance 16-channel laser radar receiver module which uses an array of InGaAs avalanche photodiodes for eyesafe operation. The MORPH provides high downrange resolution, multihit range data for each detector on a compact circuit card. Optical flux is transferred from the receiver focal plane to each MORPH via a fiber optic ribbon cable. An array of MORPHs are plugged into a compact passive backplane, along with a single digital control card (DCC). The DCC, which is the same form factor as the MORPH, synchronizes the MORPHs and transfers the digital range information to the host processor over a standard parallel data interface cable. The system described here illustrates one approach to integrating and packaging high-density photonic arrays and their associated signal processing electronics to yield a compact, low power, scannerless, high performance imaging laser radar receiver, using existing technology.

  7. Blue-green eggshell coloration is not a sexually selected signal of female quality in an open-nesting polygynous passerine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honza, Marcel; Požgayová, Milica; Procházka, Petr; Cherry, Michael I.

    2011-06-01

    It has been proposed that blue-green egg colours have evolved as a post-mating signal of female quality, selected by males allocating their parental effort in response to the strength of this signal. We tested two main assumptions of the sexually selected egg coloration hypothesis: (1) whether the intensity of eggshell blue-green chroma (BGC) reflects female quality; and (2) whether males make their decisions on the level of parental care that they provide according to the intensity of eggshell BGC. As a model species, we chose the facultatively polygynous great reed warbler ( Acrocephalus arundinaceus). In this species, females simultaneously paired with the same male, compete for his nest attendance and could benefit from signalling their quality through egg coloration. However, we found no association between the variation in eggshell BGC and the measures of female quality (physical condition, mean egg volume and age). Moreover, great reed warbler males did not adjust their investment (as measured in terms of nest defence against a brood parasite) in relation to the eggshell BGC. We conclude that blue-green egg coloration in this open-nesting passerine is unlikely to have a signalling function. Rather, the large colour variation among clutches of individual females may depend on yearly fluctuations in environmental conditions.

  8. A second conserved GAF domain cysteine is required for the blue/green photoreversibility of cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Njuguna, Stephanie Lane; Roberts, Laurel; Castillo, Elenor; Parson, Victoria L.; Dwojak, Sunshine; Lagarias, J. Clark; Spiller, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely occurring red/far-red photoreceptors that utilize a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore covalently bound within a knotted PAS-GAF domain pair. Cyanobacteria also contain more distant relatives of phytochromes that lack this knot, such as the phytochrome-related cyanobacteriochromes implicated to function as blue/green switchable photoreceptors. In this study, we characterize the cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Full-length Tlr0924 exhibits blue/green photoconversion across a broad range of temperatures, including physiologically relevant temperatures for this organism. Spectroscopic characterization of Tlr0924 demonstrates that its green-absorbing state is in equilibrium with a labile, spectrally distinct blue-absorbing species. The photochemically generated blue-absorbing state is in equilibrium with another species absorbing at longer wavelengths, giving a total of 4 states. Cys499 is essential for this behavior, because mutagenesis of this residue results in red-absorbing mutant biliproteins. Characterization of the C499D mutant protein by absorbance and CD spectroscopy supports the conclusion that its bilin chromophore adopts a similar conformation to the red-light-absorbing Pr form of phytochrome. We propose a model photocycle in which Z/E photoisomerization of the 15/16 bond modulates formation of a reversible thioether linkage between Cys499 and C10 of the chromophore, providing the basis for the blue/green switching of cyanobacteriochromes. PMID:18549244

  9. Two-dimensional material-based saturable absorbers: towards compact visible-wavelength all-fiber pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhengqian; Wu, Duanduan; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Xu, Shuo; Zhu, Chunhui; Wang, Fengqiu; Sun, Zhipei; Zhang, Han

    2016-01-14

    Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber-two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr(3+))-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ∼200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible region, as well as the compact and all-fibre laser-cavity design by coating a dielectric mirror on the fibre end facet. This work may open a new route for next-generation high-performance pulsed laser sources in the visible (even ultraviolet) range. PMID:26658877

  10. Femtosecond laser clocked compact X-band high gradient photoinjector and accelerator for Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefano, Christopher A.

    High brightness and low emittance electron beams have found application throughout a variety of scientific research. The ability to produce such beams in the MeV range has previously been restricted to National Laboratory size facilities. While these sources have been successful, the reduction in size could provide valuable access for further scientific endeavors. One such application is the production of monochromatic x-rays through Compton scattering with a high intensity laser pulse. These x-rays would be tunable from 10 keV to more than 100 keV. A compact source of synchrotron type radiation capable of installation in medical institutions would be desirable for further investigation. A combination of X-band microwave and vacuum technologies developed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) was assembled. The system uses a pair of X-band klystrons. The first provides the microwave drive power for a 5.5 cell RF gun capable of operating with an accelerating gradient of 200 MV/m. Following the RF gun is a 1.05 m linac capable of accelerating the electron bunches to over 60 MeV with an energy spread of less than 1%. Using a novel frequency selection scheme a Titantium:Sapphire femtosecond laser oscillator serves as both the master clock for the microwave components and optical seed for the following amplifiers. This insures the tabletop laser amplifiers are inherently synchronized to the RF sources. A regenerative amplifier provides the first boost in energy. Half of the output is used for producing UV light for photo injection of the RF gun. The other half is sent to a multi-pass amplifier capable of producing 100 mJ pulses compressed to 50 fs for the Compton scattering. This interaction laser is then focused inside the electron beam vacuum system. The final timing between the optical pulses and the electron beam is achieved with a physical delay line placed after the final amplifier compressor. Background Bremsstrahlung radiation due to interception of

  11. High-brightness diode lasers for blue-green applications. Interim technical report, 1 July 1987-31 December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, R.A.; Pepper, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the physics of self-pumped photo-refractive phase-conjugators were performed. Particular emphasis was placed on studying the properties of backward stimulated photo-refractive scattering (BSPS) conjugators in BaTiO/sub 3/, and on attempts to demonstrate self-pumped phaseconjugation in GaAs. The phase-conjugate reflectivity of BSPS conjugations in BaTiO/sub 3/ is shown to be significantly enhanced by the use of feedback. An experimental comparison of three distinctly different geometries for feedback-enhanced backward-stimulated photorefractive scattering (FE-BSPS) is made. In one case, the feedback is found to stabilize the reflectivity, while in the other case, it greatly enhances the peak reflectivity.

  12. Effect of Distance and Duration of Illumination on Retinal Ganglion Cells Exposed to Varying Concentrations of Brilliant Blue Green

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, Kakarla V.; Li, Wenhua; Koushan, Keyvan; Grover, Sandeep; Balaiya, Sankarathi

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to determine the safety parameters of using brilliant blue green (BBG) for chromovitrectomy by assessing the cytotoxicity of BBG on cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) exposed to illumination. Methods RGCs were exposed to two concentrations of BBG (0.25 and 0.5 mg/mL) under metal halide illumination at varying distances (1 and 2.5 cm), intensities (990 and 2,000 Fc), and durations (1, 5 and 15 minutes). Cell viability was assessed using the WST-1 and CellTiter 96® AQueous One solution cell proliferation assays. Results Using the WST-1 assay, with high-intensity illumination, viability of RGCs ranged from 97.5±16.4% of controls with minimum BBG and light exposure (0.25 mg/mL BBG and illuminated for 1 minute at 2.5 cm distance) to 53.1±11.3% of controls with maximum BBG and light exposure (0.50 mg/mL and illuminated for 15 minutes at 1 cm distance; P < 0.01). With medium-intensity illumination, RGCs showed better viability, ranging from 95.1±7.2% of controls with minimum BBG and light exposure to 72.3±12.8% of controls with maximum BBG and light exposure. CellTiter 96® AQueous One assay showed similar results. Conclusion RGCs seem to safely tolerate up to 5 minutes of exposure to 0.5 mg/mL BBG under diffuse medium-intensity illumination (990 Fc). PMID:26015816

  13. Anti-cancer effects of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, a natural source of bilirubin-like tetrapyrrolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Koníčková, Renata; Vaňková, Kateřina; Vaníková, Jana; Váňová, Kateřina; Muchová, Lucie; Subhanová, Iva; Zadinová, Marie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Dvořák, Aleš; Kolář, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Rimpelová, Silvie; Ruml, Tomáš; J Wong, Ronald; Vítek, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Spirulina platensis is a blue-green alga used as a dietary supplement because of its hypocholesterolemic properties. Among other bioactive substances, it is also rich in tetrapyrrolic compounds closely related to bilirubin molecule, a potent antioxidant and anti-proliferative agent. The aim of our study was to evaluate possible anticancer effects of S. platensis and S. platensis-derived tetrapyrroles using an experimental model of pancreatic cancer. The anti-proliferative effects of S. platensis and its tetrapyrrolic components [phycocyanobilin (PCB) and chlorophyllin, a surrogate molecule for chlorophyll A] were tested on several human pancreatic cancer cell lines and xenotransplanted nude mice. The effects of experimental therapeutics on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and glutathione redox status were also evaluated. Compared to untreated cells, experimental therapeutics significantly decreased proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.16 g•L-1 [S. platensis], 60 μM [PCB], and 125 μM [chlorophyllin], p<0.05). The anti-proliferative effects of S. platensis were also shown in vivo, where inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth was evidenced since the third day of treatment (p < 0.05). All tested compounds decreased generation of mitochondrial ROS and glutathione redox status (p = 0.0006; 0.016; and 0.006 for S. platensis, PCB, and chlorophyllin, respectively). In conclusion, S. platensis and its tetrapyrrolic components substantially decreased the proliferation of experimental pancreatic cancer. These data support a chemopreventive role of this edible alga. Furthermore, it seems that dietary supplementation with this alga might enhance systemic pool of tetrapyrroles, known to be higher in subjects with Gilbert syndrome. PMID:24552870

  14. Promotive effect of se on the growth and antioxidation of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Gang, Zhou; Zhi-Li, Liu

    1998-12-01

    Cultures of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima (Setch. et Gard.) Geitler with various concentrations of Se in Zarrouk's medium showed that not higher than 40 mg/L Se could promote its growth. The present experiments showed that S. maxima grown under normal conditions, has an oxidant stress defence system for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) removal, which is the Halliwell-Asada pathway. When 4 to 20 mg/L Se was added to the algal medium, this pathway was replaced by a so-called Sestressed pathway containing GSH peroxidase (GSH-POD). As a result of the occurrence of both higher activity of GSH-POD and lower levels of hydroxyl radical (OH·), the Se-stressed pathway scavenged H2O2 so effectively that the growth of S. maxima was promoted by 4 to 20 mg/L Se. While GSH-POD activity of the alga disappeared at 40 mg/L Se, the recovery of ascorbate peroxidase was observed. The lower levels of ascorbic acid and GSH made the Halliwell-Asada pathway for scavenging H2O2 less effective, while the highest activity of catalase might be responsible in part for the H2O2 removal, causing the level of OH· in S. maxima grown at 40 mg/L Se to be much higher than the OH· level in this alga grown at 4 to 20 mg/L Se, but lower than that in the control. The OH· level changes caused the growth of S. maxima cultured at 40 mg/L Se to increase slightly to close to that of the control.

  15. Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an ethanol production process based on blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dexin; Hu, Zushou; Choi, Dong Gu; Thomas, Valerie M; Realff, Matthew J; Chance, Ronald R

    2010-11-15

    Ethanol can be produced via an intracellular photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), excreted through the cell walls, collected from closed photobioreactors as a dilute ethanol-in-water solution, and purified to fuel grade ethanol. This sequence forms the basis for a biofuel production process that is currently being examined for its commercial potential. In this paper, we calculate the life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for three different system scenarios for this proposed ethanol production process, using process simulations and thermodynamic calculations. The energy required for ethanol separation increases rapidly for low initial concentrations of ethanol, and, unlike other biofuel systems, there is little waste biomass available to provide process heat and electricity to offset those energy requirements. The ethanol purification process is a major consumer of energy and a significant contributor to the carbon footprint. With a lead scenario based on a natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power system to provide process electricity and extra heat and conservative assumptions around the ethanol separation process, the net life cycle energy consumption, excluding photosynthesis, ranges from 0.55 MJ/MJ(EtOH) down to 0.20 MJ/ MJ(EtOH), and the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions range from 29.8 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) down to 12.3 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) for initial ethanol concentrations from 0.5 wt % to 5 wt %. In comparison to gasoline, these predicted values represent 67% and 87% reductions in the carbon footprint for this ethanol fuel on a energy equivalent basis. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions can be further reduced via employment of higher efficiency heat exchangers in ethanol purification and/ or with use of solar thermal for some of the process heat. PMID:20968295

  16. Recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green, blue-green, and diatom algae after exposure to atrazine.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Arnie, Joshua R; Porch, John R; Hosmer, Alan J

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), blue-green (Anabaena flos-aquae), and diatom (Navicula pelliculosa) algae after pulsed exposure to atrazine. Subsequent to a grow-up period of 24 to 72 h to establish requisite cell density for adequate signal strength to measure photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield, algae were exposed to a pulse of atrazine for 48 h followed by a 48-h recovery period in control media. Photosynthesis was measured at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h of the exposure and recovery phases using pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry; growth rate and cell density were also concomitantly measured at these time points. Exposure to atrazine resulted in immediate, but temporary, inhibition of photosynthesis and growth; however, these effects were transient and fully reversible in the tested species of algae. For all three algal species, no statistically significant reductions (p ≤ 0.05) in growth rate or PSII quantum yield were detected at any of the treatment concentrations 48 h after atrazine was removed from the test system. Effects at test levels up to the highest tested exposure levels were consequently determined to be algistatic (reversible). Both biochemically and physiologically, recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate occur immediately, reaching control levels within hours following exposure. Therefore, pulsed exposure profiles of atrazine typically measured in Midwestern U.S. streams are unlikely to result in biologically meaningful changes in primary production given that the effects of atrazine are temporary and fully reversible in species representative of native populations.

  17. Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an ethanol production process based on blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dexin; Hu, Zushou; Choi, Dong Gu; Thomas, Valerie M; Realff, Matthew J; Chance, Ronald R

    2010-11-15

    Ethanol can be produced via an intracellular photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), excreted through the cell walls, collected from closed photobioreactors as a dilute ethanol-in-water solution, and purified to fuel grade ethanol. This sequence forms the basis for a biofuel production process that is currently being examined for its commercial potential. In this paper, we calculate the life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for three different system scenarios for this proposed ethanol production process, using process simulations and thermodynamic calculations. The energy required for ethanol separation increases rapidly for low initial concentrations of ethanol, and, unlike other biofuel systems, there is little waste biomass available to provide process heat and electricity to offset those energy requirements. The ethanol purification process is a major consumer of energy and a significant contributor to the carbon footprint. With a lead scenario based on a natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power system to provide process electricity and extra heat and conservative assumptions around the ethanol separation process, the net life cycle energy consumption, excluding photosynthesis, ranges from 0.55 MJ/MJ(EtOH) down to 0.20 MJ/ MJ(EtOH), and the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions range from 29.8 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) down to 12.3 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) for initial ethanol concentrations from 0.5 wt % to 5 wt %. In comparison to gasoline, these predicted values represent 67% and 87% reductions in the carbon footprint for this ethanol fuel on a energy equivalent basis. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions can be further reduced via employment of higher efficiency heat exchangers in ethanol purification and/ or with use of solar thermal for some of the process heat.

  18. Friction and wear behaviors of compacted graphite iron with different biomimetic units fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Na; Shan, Hongyu; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Darong; Li, Xiaoyan; Xia, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-07-01

    Mimicking the biological characters on the cuticles of pangolin scales, biomimetic units were fabricated on the surfaces of compacted graphite cast iron (CGI) with different unit materials using laser cladding process. The influences of various unit materials including TiC, WC, B4C and Al2O3 powders on the friction and wear behaviors of CGI were investigated. The wear resistance mechanism of biomimetic specimens was discussed. The results indicated that the wear resistance of biomimetic specimens cladding TiC was the best; the specimens cladding WC or B4C were in the middle; and the specimens cladding Al2O3 was the worst. The sequence of friction coefficient values of biomimetic specimens cladding different ceramic powders from high to low was B4C, TiC, WC and Al2O3. The wear mechanism of untreated specimen was mainly adhesion wear, abrasive wear as well as the oxidation wear, whereas the adhesive wear and abrasive wear was the main wear mechanism of the regions of substrate in biomimetic specimens and slight adhesion, abrasive wear and fatigue wear on the regions of biomimetic units.

  19. High performance compact magnetic spectrometers for energetic ion and electron measurement in ultra intense short pulse laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Link, A; van Maren, R; Patel, P; Shepherd, R; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-05-08

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets can generate relativistic electrons that then accelerate energetic protons and ions. These fast electrons and ions can effectively heat the solid target, beyond the region of direct laser interaction, and are vital to realizing the fast ignition concept. To study these energetic ions and electrons produced from the laser-target interactions, we have developed a range of spectrometers that can cover a large energy range (from less than 0.1 MeV to above 100 MeV). They are physically compact and feature high performance and low cost. We will present the basic design of these spectrometers and their test results from recent laser experiments.

  20. Compact, efficient diode-end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 slab continuous-wave 912-nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Gong, Ma-Li

    2012-02-01

    A fiber-coupled laser-diode (LD) end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 slab continuous-wave (CW) 912-nm laser and an LD bar end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 slab CW 912-nm laser are both demonstrated in this paper. Using the fiber-coupled LD of end-pumped type, a highest CW 912-nm laser output power of 10.17 W is obtained with a high optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24.6% and a slope efficiency of 34.5%. The measured M2 factors of beam quality in x and y directions are 5.3 and 5.1, respectively. Besides, an LD bar of end-pumped type is used to realize CW 912-nm laser output, which has the advantages of compactness and low cost. When the pump power is 38.8 W, the output power is 8.87 W and the measured M2 factors of beam quality in x and y directions are 16 and 1.31, respectively. In order to improve the beam quality of the 912-nm laser at x direction, a new quasi-concentric laser resonator will be designed, and an LD bar end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 slab high-power CW 912-nm TEM00 laser will be realized in the future.

  1. Compact optical displacement sensing by detection of microwave signals generated from a monolithic passively mode-locked laser under feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Christos; Simos, Hercules; Nikas, Thomas; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    A monolithic passively mode-locked laser is proposed as a compact optical sensor for displacements and vibrations of a reflecting object. The sensing principle relies on the change of the laser repetition frequency that is induced by optical feedback from the object under measurement. It has been previously observed that, when a semiconductor passively mode locked laser receives a sufficient level of optical feedback from an external reflecting surface it exhibits a repetition frequency that is no more determined by the mode-locking rule of the free-running operation but is imposed by the length of the external cavity. Therefore measurement of the resulting laser repetition frequency under self-injection permits the accurate and straightforward determination of the relative position of the reflecting object. The system has an inherent wireless capability since the repetition rate of the laser can be wirelessly detected by means of a simple antenna which captures the microwave signal generated by the saturable absorber and is emitted through the wiring of the laser. The sensor setup is very simple as it requires few optical components besides the laser itself. Furthermore, the deduction of the relative position of the reflecting object is straightforward and does not require any processing of the detected signal. The proposed sensor has a theoretical sub-wavelength resolution and its performance depends on the RF linewidth of the laser and the resolution of the repetition frequency measurement. Other physical parameters that induce phase changes of the external cavity could also be quantified.

  2. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  3. Laser experiments to simulate coronal mass ejection driven magnetospheres and astrophysical plasma winds on compact magnetized stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Ditmire, T.; Zakharov, Yu. P.

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory experiments using a plasma wind generated by laser-target interaction are proposed to investigate the creation of a shock in front of the magnetosphere and the dynamo mechanism for creating plasma currents and voltages. Preliminary experiments are shown where measurements of the electron density gradients surrounding the obstacles are recorded to infer the plasma winds. The proposed experiments are relevant to understanding the electron acceleration mechanisms taking place in shock-driven magnetic dipole confined plasmas surrounding compact magnetized stars and planets. Exploratory experiments have been published [P. Brady, T. Ditmire, W. Horton, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 043112 (2009)] with the one Joule Yoga laser and centimeter sized permanent magnets.

  4. An ultra compact laser diode source for integration in a handheld point-of-care photoacoustic scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, A.; Canal, C.; Laugustin, A.; Rabot, O.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustics is a novel medical imaging technique with high potential for early detection of different diseases such as skin cancer or rheumatology. It is a hybrid modality with pulsed laser light for excitation of the tissue, and ultrasound as response. One of the hurdles for its introduction into the clinic, or even in clinical pilot studies and larger trials, is the bulkiness and price of existing photoacoustic systems. This presentation describes how recent developments in diode laser technology lead to a compact ultrasound scanner with built-in photoacoustic functionality. This is a key for the introduction of photoacoustic technology in the clinic and future point of care systems. We have developed a diode laser system and driver that deliver pulse energies which up to now were only achievable with Nd:YAG lasers. The efficiency and compactness allows integration in a handheld probe. The paper will highlights the laser technology and its radical integration with a medical ultrasound scanner, leading to a first prototype for clinical pilot studies.

  5. Design and operational characteristics of a compact relativistic electron beam generator for the excitation of short wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Murakami, H.; Saito, Y.; Yamagishi, A.; Inaba, H.

    1980-11-01

    A compact and simple high current relativistic electron beam (REB) generator for the excitation of lasers in the short wavelength region has been designed and constructed. The REB generator which includes a Tesla transformer-type high-voltage generator, a water pulse forming line, and a cold cathode electron gun, generates 250 keV, 15 kA, and 15 ns pulsed electron beams.

  6. Compact-beam stable-unstable resonator for free-electron laser. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, A.H.; White, C.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Schmitt, M.J.; Aldrich, C.H.

    1991-10-01

    A significant problem in the design of high-energy free-electron lasers (FELs) centers on the technique for outcoupling the output beam. FELs with currently achievable output power usually include a conventional stable resonator with output through a partially transmitting mirror which will not work for arbitrarily high average power. An alternate scheme must be found for high-energy FELs. A high- efficiency grating outcoupler is an attractive possibility, but it is difficult to manufacture. Other suggestions include unstable resonators with an intracavity focus and unstable resonators with an intracavity focus and beam rotation. The intensity distribution at the intracavity focus of a negative-branch unstable resonator has side-lobes that would be scraped off by the faces of the wiggler magnets or by the beam tube through the wiggler. The resulting power loss would be significant. Therefore, it is desirable to develop another type of resonator for use with FELs. The resonator that we have developed is the compact-beam stable-unstable ring resonator. It is a stable resonator in one transverse dimension and an unstable resonator with an intracavity focus in the orthogonal transverse dimension. A scraper mirror outcouples the output beam from one side of the mode only. The resonator can be configured so that it has a small beam waist at the center of the wiggler in the stable direction and has an intracavity focus in the unstable direction. The half- width of the central lobe of the focus is approximately the size of the stable beam waist. In the stable direction, the Gaussian amplitude distribution results in a small loss on the wiggler magnets, or on a beam tube that will fit within the wiggler, if one is used. The beam tube can have an elliptical shape to permit the passage of several side lobes in the unstable dimension. A mode of the CBSUR is a product of the mode of a strip stable resonator with a strip compact-beam negative-branch unstable resonator.

  7. Visible upconversion lasers in praseodymium-ytterbium-doped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, H.; Riedel, P.; Tünnermann, A.

    We report on a ZBLAN-fiber-based praseodymium-ytterbium-doped upconversion fiber laser operating in the blue-green with diffraction-limited beam quality. cw output powers of more than 150 mW at 491 nm are achieved for several hours without degradation. The spectroscopic data of the active material and laser parameters including the amplitude noise are discussed.

  8. Focusing and transport of high-intensity multi-MeV proton bunches from a compact laser-driven source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Frydrych, S.; Kroll, F.; Joost, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Blažević, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hofmann, I.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Roth, M.

    2013-10-01

    Laser ion acceleration provides for compact, high-intensity ion sources in the multi-MeV range. Using a pulsed high-field solenoid, for the first time high-intensity laser-accelerated proton bunches could be selected from the continuous exponential spectrum and delivered to large distances, containing more than 109 particles in a narrow energy interval around a central energy of 9.4 MeV and showing ≤30mrad envelope divergence. The bunches of only a few nanoseconds bunch duration were characterized 2.2 m behind the laser-plasma source with respect to arrival time, energy width, and intensity as well as spatial and temporal bunch profile.

  9. Monolithic integration of InGaN segments emitting in the blue, green, and red spectral range in single ordered nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2013-05-06

    This work reports on the selective area growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar heterostructures. The optimization of the In/Ga and total III/V ratios, as well as the growth temperature, provides control on the emission wavelength, either in the blue, green, or red spectral range. An adequate structure tailoring and monolithic integration in a single nanocolumnar heterostructure of three InGaN portions emitting in the red-green-blue colors lead to white light emission.

  10. Characterization and optimization of hydrogen production by a salt water blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. II - Use of immobilization for enhancement of hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phlips, E. J.; Mitsui, A.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of cellular immobilization was applied to the process of hydrogen photoproduction of nonheterocystous, filamentous marine blue-green alga, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. Immobilization with agar significantly improved the rate and longevity of hydrogen production, compared to free cell suspensions. Rates of H2 production in excess of 13 microliters H2 mg dry/wt h were observed and hydrogen production was sustained for three weeks. Immobilization also provided some stabilization to environmental variability and was adaptable to outdoor light conditions. In general, immobilization provides significant advantages for the production and maintenance of hydrogen photoproduction for this strain.

  11. Compact KGd(WO4)2 picosecond pulse-train synchronously pumped broadband Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao Qiang; Long, Ming Liang; Meng, Chen

    2016-08-20

    We demonstrate an efficient approach to realizing an extra-cavity, synchronously pumped, stimulated Raman cascaded process under low repetition frequency (1 kHz) pump conditions. We also construct a compact KGd(WO4)2 (KGW) crystal picosecond Raman laser that has been configured as the developed method. A pulse-train green laser pumped the corresponding 70 mm long KGW crystal Raman cavity. The pulse train contains six pulses, about 800 ps separated, for every millisecond; thus, it can realize synchronous pumping between pump pulse and the pumped Raman cavity. The investigated system produced a collinear Raman laser output that includes six laser lines covering the 532 to 800 nm spectra. This is the first report on an all-solid-state, high-average-power picosecond collinear multi-wavelength (more than three laser components) laser to our knowledge. This method has never been reported on before in the synchronously pumped stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) realm. PMID:27556971

  12. A compact diode-pumped pulsed Nd:YAG slab laser based on a master oscillator power amplifier configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, A.; Kavosh Tehrani, M.; Saghafifar, H.; Moghtader Dindarlu, M. H.; Ebadian, H.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the design and construction of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is described. The structure of this laser is based on a master oscillator power amplifier system. A master oscillator is an electro-optical Q-switched Nd:YAG rod laser. Face-pumping is used for the excitation of the slab structure, and a double-pass method is designed for the amplification stages. Two Nd:YAG zigzag slabs are utilized as power amplification stages in this laser. The laser diodes are stacked in a compact configuration and are used for rod and slabs pumping. The total pump energy in the amplifier stages is 3200 mJ at 808 nm. The output pulse energy achieved at 1064 nm is about 850 mJ of 10 ns pulse duration corresponding to 26.5% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. Moreover, this laser can generate pulse energies around 430 mJ at 532 nm. The dependence of the output energy of MOPA and second harmonic generation operations on different pulse repetition rates (PRRs) from 1 to 100 Hz has been investigated. Experimental results show that the maximum fluctuations of the output energies are about 2.5 and 4% for 1064 and 532 nm, respectively.

  13. Polymer optical waveguide composed of europium-aluminum-acrylate composite core for compact optical amplifier and laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, Marina; Yamashita, Kenichi; Fukui, Toshimi; Ishigure, Takaaki

    2015-02-01

    We successfully fabricate polymer waveguides with Europium-Aluminum (Eu-Al) polymer composite core using the Mosquito method that utilizes a microdispenser for realizing a compact waveguide optical amplifiers and lasers. Rareearth (RE) ions are widely used as the gain medium for fiber lasers and optical fiber amplifiers. However, high concentration doping of rare-earth-ion leads to the concentration quenching resulting in observing less gain in optical amplification. For addressing the concentration quenching problem, a rare-earth metal (RE-M) polymer composite has been proposed by KRI, Inc. to be a waveguide core material. Actually, 10-wt% RE doping into organic polymer materials was already achieved. Hence, realization of compact and high-efficiency waveguide amplifiers and lasers have been anticipated using the RE-M polymer composite. In this paper, a microdispenser is adopted to fabricate a Eu-doped polymer waveguide. Then, it is experimentally confirmed that the low-loss waveguides are fabricated with a high reproducibility. Optical gain is estimated by measuring the amplified spontaneous emission using the variable stripe length method. The fabricated waveguide exhibits an optical gain as high as 7.1 dB/cm at 616-nm wavelength.

  14. Method and system for compact, multi-pass pulsed laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Erlandson, Alvin Charles

    2014-11-25

    A laser amplifier includes an input aperture operable to receive laser radiation having a first polarization, an output aperture coupled to the input aperture by an optical path, and a polarizer disposed along an optical path. A transmission axis of the polarizer is aligned with the first polarization. The laser amplifier also includes n optical switch disposed along the optical path. The optical switch is operable to pass the laser radiation when operated in a first state and to reflect the laser radiation when operated in a second state. The laser amplifier further includes an optical gain element disposed along the optical path and a polarization rotation device disposed along the optical path.

  15. Compact TDLAS based sensor design using interband cascade lasers for mid-IR trace gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Tittel, Frank K; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P; Wu, Hongpeng; Zheng, Chuantao; Yu, Yajun; Sampaolo, Angelo; Griffin, Robert J

    2016-03-21

    Two compact TDLAS sensor systems based on different structural optical cores were developed. The two optical cores combine two recent developments, gallium antimonide (GaSb)-based ICL and a compact multipass gas cell (MPGC) with the goal to create compact TDLAS based sensors for the mid-IR gas detection with high detection sensitivity and low power consumption. The sensors achieved minimum detection limits of ~5 ppbv and ~8 ppbv, respectively, for CH4 and C2H6 concentration measurements with a 3.7-W power consumption. PMID:27136873

  16. Label-free multi-photon imaging using a compact femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    PubMed Central

    Kieu, K.; Mehravar, S.; Gowda, R.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate label-free multi-photon imaging of biological samples using a compact Er3+-doped femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). These compact and low cost lasers have been developed by various groups but they have not been exploited for multiphoton microscopy. Here, it is shown that various multiphoton imaging modalities (e.g. second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and three-photon excitation fluorescence (3PEF)) can be effectively performed on various biological samples using a compact handheld CNT mode-locked femtosecond fiber laser operating in the telecommunication window near 1560nm. We also show for the first time that chlorophyll fluorescence in plant leaves and diatoms can be observed using 1560nm laser excitation via three-photon absorption. PMID:24156074

  17. Label-free multi-photon imaging using a compact femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Kieu, K; Mehravar, S; Gowda, R; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate label-free multi-photon imaging of biological samples using a compact Er(3+)-doped femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). These compact and low cost lasers have been developed by various groups but they have not been exploited for multiphoton microscopy. Here, it is shown that various multiphoton imaging modalities (e.g. second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and three-photon excitation fluorescence (3PEF)) can be effectively performed on various biological samples using a compact handheld CNT mode-locked femtosecond fiber laser operating in the telecommunication window near 1560nm. We also show for the first time that chlorophyll fluorescence in plant leaves and diatoms can be observed using 1560nm laser excitation via three-photon absorption.

  18. System Responses to Equal Doses of Photosynthetically Usable Radiation of Blue, Green, and Red Light in the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions. PMID:25470731

  19. Development and Validation of a Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for the Quantitation of Microcystins in Blue-Green Algal Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Parker, Christine H; Stutts, Whitney L; DeGrasse, Stacey L

    2015-12-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of seven microcystin congeners (1-7) and nodularin-R (8) in blue-green algal dietary supplements. Single-laboratory method validation data were collected in four supplement matrices (capsule, liquid, powder, and tablet) fortified at toxin concentrations from 0.25-2.00 μg/g (ppm). Average recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSD) using matrix-corrected solvent calibration curves were 101% (6% RSD) for all congeners and supplements investigated. Limits of detection (0.006-0.028 μg/g) and quantitation (0.018-0.084 μg/g) were sufficient to confirm the presence of microcystin contamination at the Oregon-mandated guidance concentration of 1.0 μg of microcystin-LReq/g. Quantitated concentrations of microcystin contamination in market-available Aphanizomenon flos-aquae blue-green algal supplements ranged from 0.18-1.87 μg of microcystin-LReq/g for detected congeners microcystin-LR, microcystin-LA, and microcystin-LY (3-5). Microcystin-RR, -YR, -LW, and -LF and nodularin-R (1, 2, and 6-8) were not detected in the supplements examined.

  20. A Photo-Labile Thioether Linkage to Phycoviolobilin Provides the Foundation for the Blue/Green Photocycles in DXCF-Cyanobacteriochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Burgie, E. Sethe; Walker, Joseph M.; George N. Phillips Jr.; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2013-01-08

    The phytochrome superfamily encompasses a diverse collection of photochromic photoreceptors in plants and microorganisms that employ a covalently linked bilin cradled in a cGMP-phosphodiesterase/adenylyl-cyclase/FhlA (GAF) domain to detect light. Whereas most interconvert between red- and far-red-light-absorbing states, cyanobacteria also express variants called cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that modify bilin absorption to collectively perceive the entire visible spectrum. Here, we present two X-ray crystallographic structures of the GAF domain from the blue/green photochromic CBCR PixJ from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, these structures confirm the hypothesis that CBCRs variably manipulate the chromophore π-conjugation system through isomerization and a second thioether linkage, in this case involving the bilin C10 carbon and Cys494 within a DXCF sequence characteristic of blue/green CBCRs. Biochemical studies support a mechanism for photoconversion whereby the second linkage ruptures on route to the green-light-absorbing state. All together, theTePixJ(GAF) models illustrate the remarkable structural and photochemical versatility among phytochromes and CBCRs in driving light perception.

  1. Thickness and annealing effects on thermally evaporated InZnO thin films for gas sensors and blue, green and yellow emissive optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumaran, Sathish; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Bellan, Chandar Shekar; Sivaraj, Manoj

    2016-08-01

    Indium zinc oxide (InZnO) thin films with thicknesses of 100 nm and 200 nm were deposited on glass plate by thermal evaporation technique. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed a strong metal-oxide bond. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed amorphous nature for as-deposited film whereas polycrystalline structure for annealed films. Scanning electron microscope images showed a uniform distribution of spherical shape grains. Grain size was found to be higher for 200 nm film than 100 nm film. The presence of elements (In, Zn and O) was confirmed from energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Photoluminescence study of 200 nm film showed a blue, blue-green and blue-yellow emission whereas 100 nm film showed a broad green and green-yellow emissions. Both 100 nm and 200 nm films showed good oxygen sensitivity from room temperature to 400 °C. The observed optical and sensor results indicated that the prepared InZnO films are highly potential for room temperature gas sensor and blue, green and yellow emissive opto-electronic devices.

  2. Development of highly compact and low power consumption athermal military laser designators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijan, A.

    2012-10-01

    The utility of military lasers, particularly in the area of laser designation for laser-guided weapons, is well understood. Laser systems based on Nd:YAG have been fielded since the 1980's and over the last three decades have introduced incremental technology steps to improve performance and weight. The most recent technology step has been the introduction of athermal lasers based on laser-diode pumping of Nd:YAG and products are now emerging for use on the battlefield. The technical performance, efficiency, size, weight and power for these lasers, has been key to driving the new production designs. In this paper, we review the development of the laser designs and their introduction since the advent of laser designation. In particular, we compare the relative performance and characteristics over the evolution of fielded laser designators. Moreover, we will review the key building blocks for the design of athermal lasers and describe some critical design issues for engineering and productionisation of a military laser system, including removal of thermal lensing, novel diode-pumping schemes and robustness over the environment. These will be exemplified using results from the development of the SELEX Galileo Type 163 Laser Target Designators. These will cover not only technical performance, power and efficiency, but also thermal management, mass, volume, cost and overall complexity for manufacture.

  3. Compact high power barium nitrite crystal-based Raman laser at 1197 nm for photoacoustic imaging of fat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Pu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic imaging employing molecular overtone vibration as a contrast mechanism opens a new avenue for bond-selective imaging of deep tissues. Broad use of this modality is, however, hampered by the extremely low conversion efficiency of optical parametric oscillators at the overtone transition wavelengths. To overcome such a barrier, we demonstrate the construction and use of a compact, barium nitrite crystal-based Raman laser for photoacoustic imaging of C–H overtone vibrations. Using a 5-ns Nd∶YAG laser as the pumping source, up to 21.4 mJ pulse energy at 1197 nm was generated, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 34.8%. Using the 1197 nm pulses, three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging of intramuscular fat was demonstrated. PMID:23536057

  4. 260 fs and 1 nJ pulse generation from a compact, mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2015-11-30

    We report on generation of 260 fs-short pulses with energy of 1.1 nJ from a fully fiberized, monolithic Tm-doped fiber laser system. The design comprises a simple, graphene-based ultrafast oscillator and an integrated all-fiber chirped pulse amplifier (CPA). The system generates 110 mW of average power at 100.25 MHz repetition rate and central wavelength of 1968 nm. This is, to our knowledge, the highest pulse energy generated from a fully fiberized sub-300 fs Tm-doped laser, without the necessity of using grating-based dispersion compensation. Such compact, robust and cost-effective system might serve as a seed source for nonlinear frequency conversion or mid-infrared supercontinuum generation. PMID:26698769

  5. A compact and efficient four-wavelength Q-switched Nd:YAP laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. H.; Zhang, G.; Wei, Y.; Zhu, H. Y.; Huang, L. X.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a four-wavelength electro-optic (E-O) Q-switched solid-state laser system was presented. This laser system only use one Nd:YAP laser crystal, which irradiates 1079.5 nm and 1341.4 nm fundamental wavelengths. Both of these wavelength lasers and their second harmonic generation (SHG) compose a four-wavelength Nd:YAP Q-switched laser. The Q-switched output energies of 277 mJ for 1079.5 nm and 61 mJ for 539.8 nm and that of 190 mJ for 1341.4 nm and 51 mJ for 670.7 nm wavelengths were achieved. The pulse durations of 1079.5 and 539.8 nm lasers and that of 1341.4 and 670.7 nm lasers are 20 and 40 ns, respectively. Due to this laser system has the larger chance and convenience for selecting the wavelengths and operation modes by moving a stepping motor and controlling the Q-switched devices, it will broaden applications in the fields of laser cosmetology, dermatotis therapy, material processing and laser display etc.

  6. Lasers '83. Proceedings of the international conference

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of the semiconductor diode laser, laser material processing, nonlinear spectroscopy, recent advancements in diode lasers, laser-driven particle accelerators, laser applications in the atmospheric sciences, laser-assisted collisions, novel (garnet and alexandrite) solid state laser materials, IR molecular lasers, devices and components for fiber-optic communications, free-electron lasers and masers, and picosecond optical phenomena. Also covered are laser-stimulated materials surface processes, color center laser developments, blue-green and metal vapor lasers, laser chemistry, nonlinear effects, high energy lasers, excimer lasers, laser trapping of ions, optical cavities and propagation, laser isotope separation, laser trapping of atoms, laser applications in biochemistry, tunable coherent short wavelength radiation, laser spectroscopy, picosecond studies of condensed phase molecular systems, and combustion and plasma diagnostics.

  7. A compact, robust, and transportable ultra-stable laser with a fractional frequency instability of 1 × 10(-15.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun-Feng; Nevsky, Alexander; Cardace, Marco; Schiller, Stephan; Legero, Thomas; Häfner, Sebastian; Uhde, Andre; Sterr, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    We present a compact and robust transportable ultra-stable laser system with minimum fractional frequency instability of 1 × 10(-15) at integration times between 1 and 10 s. The system was conceived as a prototype of a subsystem of a microwave-optical local oscillator to be used on the satellite mission Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) (http://sci.esa.int/ste-quest/). It was therefore designed to be compact, to sustain accelerations occurring during rocket launch, to exhibit low vibration sensitivity, and to reach a low frequency instability. Overall dimensions of the optical system are 40 cm × 20 cm × 30 cm. The acceleration sensitivities of the optical frequency in the three directions were measured to be 1.7 × 10(-11)/g, 8.0 × 10(-11)/g, and 3.9 × 10(-10)/g, and the absolute frequency instability was determined via a three-cornered hat measurement. Two additional cavity-stabilized lasers were used for this purpose, one of which had an instability σy < 4 × 10(-16) at 1 s integration time. The design is also appropriate and useful for terrestrial applications.

  8. A compact, continuous-wave terahertz source based on a quantum-cascade laser and a miniature cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Richter, H; Greiner-Bär, M; Pavlov, S G; Semenov, A D; Wienold, M; Schrottke, L; Giehler, M; Hey, R; Grahn, H T; Hübers, H-W

    2010-05-10

    We report on the development of a compact, easy-to-use terahertz radiation source, which combines a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) operating at 3.1 THz with a compact, low-input-power Stirling cooler. The QCL, which is based on a two-miniband design, has been developed for high output and low electrical pump power. The amount of generated heat complies with the nominal cooling capacity of the Stirling cooler of 7 W at 65 K with 240 W of electrical input power. Special care has been taken to achieve a good thermal coupling between the QCL and the cold finger of the cooler. The whole system weighs less than 15 kg including the cooler and power supplies. The maximum output power is 8 mW at 3.1 THz. With an appropriate optical beam shaping, the emission profile of the laser is fundamental Gaussian. The applicability of the system is demonstrated by imaging and molecular-spectroscopy experiments.

  9. Compact non-cascaded all-fiber Raman laser operating at 1174 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiachen; Lee, Sang Bae; Lee, Kwanil

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a non-cascaded, all-fiber, single-mode Raman fiber laser (RFL) operating at 1174 nm with an optical slope efficiency of 68%. An ~1-km commercial single-mode fiber is used as the Raman gain medium. The RFL cavity is formed between a high reflectivity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a perpendicularly-cleaved fiber facet. The laser is pumped by using a homemade ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL) and can be frequency doubled to generate yellow light. Under the optimum condition, A 6.9-W 1174-nm laser is obtained at maximum available power (24 W) of a laser diode pump. The optical conversion efficiency and the net slope efficiency of the RFL were respectively, 29% and 38%, with respect to launched diode laser power. We also demonstrate yellow-light generation by frequency doubling of the RFL.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  11. Comparative effects of the blue green algae Nodularia spumigena and a lysed extract on detoxification and antioxidant enzymes in the green lipped mussel (Perna viridis).

    PubMed

    Davies, Warren R; Siu, William H L; Jack, Ralph W; Wu, Rudolf S S; Lam, Paul K S; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2005-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena periodically proliferates to cause toxic algal blooms with some aquatic animals enduring and consuming high densities of the blue green algae or toxic lysis. N. spumigena contains toxic compounds such as nodularin and lipopolysaccharides. This current work investigates physiological effects of exposure from bloom conditions of N. spumigena cells and a post-bloom lysis. Biochemical and antioxidative biomarkers were comparatively studied over an acute 3-day exposure. In general, a post-bloom N. spumigena lysis caused opposite physiological responses to bloom densities of N. spumigena. Specifically, increases in glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and decreases in glutathione S-transferase (GST) were observed from the N. spumigena lysis. In contrast, N. spumigena cell densities decreased GSH and increased GST and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in mussels. Findings also suggest that at different stages of a toxic bloom, exposure may result in toxic stress to specific organs in the mussel. PMID:16291202

  12. CW room temperature upconversion lasing at blue, green and red wavelengths in infrared-pumped Pr(3+)-doped fluoride fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, R. G.; Hanna, D. C.; Tropper, A. C.; Davey, S. T.; Carter, S. F.

    1991-07-01

    Continuous-wave, room temperature laser oscillation at 491 nm, 520 nm, 605 nm and 635 nm in a Pr(3+)-doped fluorozirconate fiber pumped simultaneously at 1.01 micron and 0.835 micron is reported. An output power of 185 mW has been measured for the 635 nm transition. The thresholds obtained suggest that laser diode-pumped operation of all four transitions should be possible in an optimized fiber.

  13. Laser ablation synthesis and spectral characterization of ruby nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, M. S.; Bardina, A. A.; Savelyev, A. G.; Khramov, V. N.; Khaydukov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The laser ablation method was implemented for synthesis of ruby nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were obtained by nanosecond ablation of bulk ruby crystal in 10% ethanol water solution. The nanoparticles enable water colloid stability and exhibit narrow photoluminescent line at 694 nm when pumped at blue-green spectral range. The ruby nanoparticles were characterized by SEM and Z-sizer.

  14. Blue-green emitting cationic iridium complexes with 1,3,4-oxadiazole cyclometallating ligands: synthesis, photophysical and electrochemical properties, theoretical investigation and electroluminescent devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; He, Lei; Duan, Lian; Yan, Jun; Tang, Ruiren; Pan, Chunyue; Song, Xiangzhi

    2015-09-28

    Two cationic iridium complexes, namely [Ir(dph-oxd)2(bpy)]PF6 (1) and [Ir(dph-oxd)2(pzpy)]PF6 (2), using 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (dph-oxd) as the cyclometallating ligand and 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) or 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine (pzpy) as the ancillary ligands, have been synthesized, and their photophysical and electrochemical properties have been comprehensively investigated. In solution, both complexes emit efficient blue-green light. For complex 1, the light emission in a neat film is remarkably red-shifted; in solid state, it gives an intriguing piezochromic phenomenon. Compared with archetype [Ir(ppy)2(bpy)]PF6 (ppy is 2-phenylpyridine), complex 1 shows a largely stabilized HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) level, induced by the electron-deficient 1,3,4-oxadiazole (oxd) heterocycle of dph-oxd, which results in an enlarged energy gap and blue-shifted emission. Compared with complex 1, complex 2 shows an enhanced LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) level, caused by the electron-rich pzpy ancillary ligand, but they exhibit similar emission energy in solution. For both complexes, theoretical calculations reveal that their blue-green emission in solution arises primarily from the (3)π-π* states centered on dph-oxd; moreover, complex 1 bears close-lying (3)π-π* and (3)CT (charge-transfer) states, underlying its remarkably red-shifted emission in the neat film and unique piezochromic behavior in the solid state. Solid state light emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) based on complexes 1 and 2 give efficient yellow and green-blue light, with peak current efficiencies of 18.3 and 5.2 cd A(-1), respectively. It is demonstrated that oxd-type cyclometallating ligands are promising as an avenue to stabilize the HOMOs and tune emission properties of cationic iridium complexes to a large extent. PMID:26279263

  15. FM characteristics and compact modules for coherent semiconductor lasers coupled to an external cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.H.; Teshima, M.; Ohtsu, M. ); Imai, T.; Yoshida, J.; Nishide, K. )

    1990-03-01

    FM responses of a semiconductor laser optically coupled off-axis to a confocal Fabry--Perot cavity were measured. It is reported that this cavity acted as a frequency discriminator and as a phase comparator for slow and fast frequency fluctuations, respectively. The crossover between them was determined by a half linewidth of the cavity. Based on these investigations, we made two kinds of coherent semiconductor laser modules. External FP cavities were made by using an optical fiber and a hemispherical micro-lens, respectively. Linewidths of these lasers were less than 25 kHz.

  16. Bidirectional operation of 100 fs bound solitons in an ultra-compact mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Ruan, Qiujun; Yang, Runhua; Zhao, Luming; Luo, Zhengqian

    2016-09-01

    We report on the experimental observation of bidirectional 100-fs bound solitons from a nanotube-mode-locked dispersion-managed Er-fiber laser with an ultra-simple linear cavity. Two mode-locked pulse trains in opposite directions are delivered simultaneously from the linear cavity. Under the pump power of <74 mW, both the bidirectional outputs of the laser work at the single-soliton state with pulse duration of 173 fs and 182 fs, respectively. Once the pump power is more than 74 mW, both the bidirectional outputs evolve into the two-soliton bound states with soliton separation of 1.53 ps. Interestingly, the bidirectional operations can show the different bound states, i.e. the forward bound solitons with phase difference of + π/2, and the backward ones with phase difference of -π/2. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of such compact bidirectional soliton fiber laser with the sub-200 fs pulses. PMID:27607705

  17. Non-metal elemental analysis by a compact low-energy high-repetition rate laser-induced-breakdown spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Ewald, Johannes; Ankerhold, Georg; Kohns, Peter

    2009-06-01

    A compact laser-induced-breakdown-spectroscopy (LIBS) system for surface elemental analysis using a low-energy, high-repetition rate Nd:YAG laser as excitation source has been developed. Elemental analyses were performed on various samples including non-metallic compounds and metal alloys. Fluorine and chlorine could be detected well qualitatively in different organic materials like Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) or PVC (polyvinyl chloride). Furthermore, low concentrations of silicon, magnesium and copper in aluminum have been measured and could be backed up by EDX and XPS analysis. Results were confirmed with a conventional LIBS system using a high-energy, low-repetition rate Nd:YAG SHG laser operating at 10 Hz with a pulse energy of 200 mJ. Especially the results with fluorine containing samples are very promising and show that LIBS measurements of non-metallic samples are possible even at very low pulse energies with a manageable trade-off in signal strength.

  18. Bidirectional operation of 100 fs bound solitons in an ultra-compact mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Ruan, Qiujun; Yang, Runhua; Zhao, Luming; Luo, Zhengqian

    2016-09-01

    We report on the experimental observation of bidirectional 100-fs bound solitons from a nanotube-mode-locked dispersion-managed Er-fiber laser with an ultra-simple linear cavity. Two mode-locked pulse trains in opposite directions are delivered simultaneously from the linear cavity. Under the pump power of <74 mW, both the bidirectional outputs of the laser work at the single-soliton state with pulse duration of 173 fs and 182 fs, respectively. Once the pump power is more than 74 mW, both the bidirectional outputs evolve into the two-soliton bound states with soliton separation of 1.53 ps. Interestingly, the bidirectional operations can show the different bound states, i.e. the forward bound solitons with phase difference of + π/2, and the backward ones with phase difference of -π/2. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of such compact bidirectional soliton fiber laser with the sub-200 fs pulses.

  19. A compact, high-performance all optical atomic clock based on telecom lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, John H.; Lemke, Nathan D.; Phelps, Gretchen R.; Martin, Kyle W.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss an optical atomic clock based on a two-photon transition at 778 nm in rubidium. In particular, we discuss the fundamental limitations to the short-term stability of a system based on a commercial C-band telecom laser as opposed to a near infrared laser. We show that this system is fundamentally capable of besting a hydrogen MASER in frequency stability and size.

  20. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone toward space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology, is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 l and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technological maturity by remaining frequency stabilized throughout the mission including the rocket's boost phase.

  1. A compact laser-based spectrometer for detection of C2H2 in exhaled breath and HCN in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, D.; Neerincx, A. H.; Mandon, J.; Zhang, J.; Boerkamp, M.; Mink, J.; Cristescu, S. M.; Hekkert, S. te Lintel; Harren, F. J. M.

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a compact prototype near-infrared DBR laser-based spectrometer employing off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. The spectrometer is capable of simultaneous detection of acetylene (C2H2) and CO2 at 1,529.2 nm as well as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) at 1,533.5 nm. The detection limits of 8 ppbv for C2H2 and 80 ppbv for HCN are achieved for the acquisition time of 1 s. The setup has been tested for online measurements of C2H2 in exhaled breath of a smoking subject and HCN resulting from the metabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in vitro. Further improvements of the performance of the spectrometer are discussed.

  2. Compact, rapid, and rugged detector of military and improvised explosives based on external grating cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekoun, Alexei; Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Maulini, Richard; Barron-Jimenez, Rodolfo; Lyakh, Arkadiy; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2009-08-01

    Early detection of explosive substances is the first and most difficult step in defeating explosive devices. Many currently available methods suffer from fundamental failure modes limiting their realworld suitability. Infrared spectroscopy is ideal for reliable identification of explosives since it probes the chemical composition of molecules. Quantum cascade lasers rapidly became the light source of choice of IR spectroscopy due to their wavelength agility, relatively high output power, and small size and weight. Our compact, rapid, and rugged multi-explosives sensor based on external grating cavity QCLs simultaneously detects TNT, TATP, and acetone while being immune to ammonium nitrate interference. The instrument features low false alarm rate, and low probability of false negatives. Receiver operation characteristics curves are presented.

  3. First lasing of the KAERI compact far-infrared free-electron laser driven by a magnetron-based microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Young U.; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Cho, Sung Oh; Cha, Byung Heon; Lee, Jongmin; Kazakevitch, Grigori M.; Vobly, Pavel D.; Gavrilov, Nicolai G.; Kubarev, Vitaly V.; Kulipanov, Gennady N.

    2001-12-01

    The KAERI compact far-infrared (FIR) free-electron laser (FEL) has been operated successfully in the wavelength range of 97-150 μm. It is the first demonstration of FEL lasing by using a magnetron-based classical microtron. We developed a high precision undulator consisting of 80 periods, with each period being 25 mm. The field strength of the undulator can be changed from 4.5 to 6.8 kG with an amplitude deviation of only 0.05% in r.m.s value. The kinetic energy of the electron beam is 6.5 MeV. The average current and pulse duration of the electron beam macropulses are 45 mA and 5.5 μs, respectively. The measured power of the FEL with the electron beam parameters was more than 50 W for a FIR macropulse having a duration of 4 μs. The spectral width of the FEL was measured to be 0.5% of the central wavelength. The FEL system, aside from the racks for the controlling units, is compact enough to be located inside an area of 3×4 m 2.

  4. Towards novel compact laser sources for non-invasive diagnostics and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Edik U.; Litvinova, Karina S.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.

    2015-08-01

    An important field of application of lasers is biomedical optics. Here, they offer great utility for diagnosis, therapy and surgery. For the development of novel methods of laser-based biomedical diagnostics careful study of light propagation in biological tissues is necessary to enhance our understanding of the optical measurements undertaken, increase research and development capacity and the diagnostic reliability of optical technologies. Ultimately, fulfilling these requirements will increase uptake in clinical applications of laser based diagnostics and therapeutics. To address these challenges informative biomarkers relevant to the biological and physiological function or disease state of the organism must be selected. These indicators are the results of the analysis of tissues and cells, such as blood. For non-invasive diagnostics peripheral blood, cells and tissue can potentially provide comprehensive information on the condition of the human organism. A detailed study of the light scattering and absorption characteristics can quickly detect physiological and morphological changes in the cells due to thermal, chemical, antibiotic treatments, etc [1-5]. The selection of a laser source to study the structure of biological particles also benefits from the fact that gross pathological changes are not induced and diagnostics make effective use of the monochromatic directional coherence properties of laser radiation.

  5. Compact 498-nm light source based on intracavity sum-frequency Nd:GGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A. G.; Li, Y. L.

    2011-08-01

    We report a coherent cyan radiation at 498 nm by intracavity sum-frequency generation of the 937 and 1062 nm laser-lines of the Nd:GGG crystal. With a diode pump power of 18.2 W, the maximum cyan output power of 186 mW is obtained. The beam quality M2 value is 1.22 in the horizontal plane. The output power stability over 30 min is better than 5%. To the best of our knowledge, this is first work on intracavity sum-frequency generation of a diode pumped Nd:GGG laser at 498 nm.

  6. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  7. Compact Laser-Based Sensors for Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Jeffries, Jay B.

    2003-01-01

    Research is reported on the development of sensors for gas turbine combustor applications that measure real-time gas temperature using near-infrared water vapor absorption and concentration in the combustor exhaust of trace quantities of pollutant NO and CO using mid-infrared absorption. Gas temperature is extracted from the relative absorption strength of two near-infrared transitions of water vapor. From a survey of the water vapor absorption spectrum, two overtone transitions near 1800 nm were selected that can be rapidly scanned in wavelength by injection current tuning a single DFB diode laser. From the ratio of the absorbances on these selected transitions, a path-integrated gas temperature can be extracted in near-real time. Demonstration measurements with this new temperature sensor showed that combustor instabilities could be identified in the power spectrum of the temperature versus time record. These results suggest that this strategy is extremely promising for gas turbine combustor control applications. Measurements of the concentration of NO and CO in the combustor exhaust are demonstrated with mid-infrared transitions using thermo-electrically cooled, quantum cascade lasers operating near 5.26 and 4.62 microns respectively. Measurements of NO are performed in an insulated exhaust duct of a C2H4-air flame at temperatures of approximately 600 K. CO measurements are performed above a rich H2-air flame seeded with CO2 and cooled with excess N2 to 1150 K. Using a balanced ratiometric detection technique a sensitivity of 0.36 ppm-m was achieved for NO and 0.21 ppm-m for CO. Comparisons between measured and predicted water-vapor and CO2 interference are discussed. The mid-infrared laser quantum cascade laser technology is in its infancy; however, these measurements demonstrate the potential for pollutant monitoring in exhaust gases with mid-IR laser absorption.

  8. A Compact Tandem Two-Step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for In Situ Analysis of Non-Volatile Organics on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Li, Xiang; Elsila, Jamie; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Two-step laser desorption mass spectrometry is a well suited technique to the analysis of high priority classes of organics, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, present in complex samples. The use of decoupled desorption and ionization laser pulses allows for sensitive and selective detection of structurally intact organic species. We have recently demonstrated the implementation of this advancement in laser mass spectrometry in a compact, flight-compatible instrument that could feasibly be the centerpiece of an analytical science payload as part of a future spaceflight mission to a small body or icy moon.

  9. Compact self-Q-switched green upconversion Er:ZBLAN all-fiber laser operating at 543.4  nm.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhengqian; Ruan, Qiujun; Zhong, Min; Cheng, Yongjie; Yang, Runhua; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2016-05-15

    We report the demonstration of a compact self-Q-switched green upconversion Er3+:ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fiber laser operating at 543.4 nm. The all-fiber green laser simply consists of a 45 cm high-concentration Er3+:ZBLAN fiber, a 976 nm pump source, and a pair of fiber end-facet mirrors. Under the strong excitation of the 976 nm pump laser, green upconversion lasing at 543.4 nm is achieved from the compact Er3+:ZBLAN fiber laser. Interestingly, the green laser exhibits stable self-Q-switching operation. As the 976 nm pump power is increased, the pulse repetition rate linearly increases from 25.9 to 50.8 kHz and the pulse width narrows from 7.2 to 1.95 μs. The Q-switched green laser has a pump threshold of 118 mW and a maximum output power of 6.9 mW with a slope efficiency of 30%. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the shortest-wavelength operation of a self-started or passively Q-switched fiber laser. PMID:27176977

  10. Observation of gigawatt-class THz pulses from a compact laser-driven particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gopal, A; Herzer, S; Schmidt, A; Singh, P; Reinhard, A; Ziegler, W; Brömmel, D; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P; Dillner, U; May, T; Meyer, H-G; Paulus, G G

    2013-08-16

    We report the observation of subpicosecond terahertz (T-ray) pulses with energies ≥460 μJ from a laser-driven ion accelerator, thus rendering the peak power of the source higher even than that of state-of-the-art synchrotrons. Experiments were performed with intense laser pulses (up to 5×10(19) W/cm(2)) to irradiate thin metal foil targets. Ion spectra measured simultaneously showed a square law dependence of the T-ray yield on particle number. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show the presence of transient currents at the target rear surface which could be responsible for the strong T-ray emission.

  11. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.

    2015-02-15

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a{sub 0} ∼ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic “denting” of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75–200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (∼6 × 10{sup −12}) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  12. A novel compact three-dimensional laser-sintered collimator for neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Christopher J; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Kirichek, Oleg; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2015-09-01

    Improvements in the available flux at neutron sources are making it increasingly feasible to obtain refineable neutron diffraction data from samples smaller than 1 mm(3). The signal is typically too weak to introduce any further sample environment in the 30-50 mm diameter surrounding the sample (such as the walls of a pressure cell) due to the high ratio of background to sample signal, such that even longer count times fail to reveal reflections from the sample. Many neutron instruments incorporate collimators to reduce parasitic scattering from the instrument and from any surrounding material and larger pieces of sample environment, such as cryostats. However, conventional collimation is limited in the volume it can focus on due to difficulties in producing tightly spaced neutron-absorbing foils close to the sample and in integrating this into neutron instruments. Here we present the design of a novel compact 3D rapid-prototyped (or "printed") collimator which reduces these limitations and is shown to improve the ratio of signal to background, opening up the feasibility of using additional sample environment for neutron diffraction from small sample volumes. The compactness and ease of customisation of the design allows this concept to be integrated with existing sample environment and with designs that can be tailored to individual detector geometries without the need to alter the setup of the instrument. Results from online testing of a prototype collimator are presented. The proof of concept shows that there are many additional collimator designs which may be manufactured relatively inexpensively, with a broad range of customisation, and geometries otherwise impossible to manufacture by conventional techniques. PMID:26429487

  13. A novel compact three-dimensional laser-sintered collimator for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, Christopher J.; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Kirichek, Oleg; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2015-09-15

    Improvements in the available flux at neutron sources are making it increasingly feasible to obtain refineable neutron diffraction data from samples smaller than 1 mm{sup 3}. The signal is typically too weak to introduce any further sample environment in the 30–50 mm diameter surrounding the sample (such as the walls of a pressure cell) due to the high ratio of background to sample signal, such that even longer count times fail to reveal reflections from the sample. Many neutron instruments incorporate collimators to reduce parasitic scattering from the instrument and from any surrounding material and larger pieces of sample environment, such as cryostats. However, conventional collimation is limited in the volume it can focus on due to difficulties in producing tightly spaced neutron-absorbing foils close to the sample and in integrating this into neutron instruments. Here we present the design of a novel compact 3D rapid-prototyped (or “printed”) collimator which reduces these limitations and is shown to improve the ratio of signal to background, opening up the feasibility of using additional sample environment for neutron diffraction from small sample volumes. The compactness and ease of customisation of the design allows this concept to be integrated with existing sample environment and with designs that can be tailored to individual detector geometries without the need to alter the setup of the instrument. Results from online testing of a prototype collimator are presented. The proof of concept shows that there are many additional collimator designs which may be manufactured relatively inexpensively, with a broad range of customisation, and geometries otherwise impossible to manufacture by conventional techniques.

  14. Compact, High Power, Multi-Spectral Mid-Infrared Semiconductor Laser Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bujin; Hwang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Chich-Hsiang

    2001-10-01

    Through a vertically integrated effort involving atomic level material engineering, advanced device processing development, state-of-the-art optomechanical packaging, and thermal management, Applied Optoelectronics, Inc. (AOI), University of Houston (U H), and Physical Science, Inc. (PSI) have made progress in both Sb-based type-II semiconductor material and in P-based type-I laser device development. We have achieved record performance on inP based quantum cascade continuous wave (CW) laser (with more than 5 mW CW power at 210 K). Grating-coupled external-cavity quantum cascade lasers were studied for temperatures from 20 to 230 K. A tuning range of 88 nm has been obtained at 80 K. The technology can be made commercially available and represents a significant milestone with regard to the Dual Use Science and Technology (DUST) intention of fostering dual use commercial technology for defense need. AOI is the first commercial company to ship products of this licensed technology.

  15. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  16. High-power 2.04  μm laser in an ultra-compact Ho-doped lead germanate fiber.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Pei-Wen; Fan, Xiaokang; Li, Xia; Li, Dahai; Li, Kefeng; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Chunlei; Hu, Lili

    2016-07-01

    A highly Ho-doped single-mode lead germanate glass fiber is developed for compact ∼2  μm lasers. Over 600 mW of laser output operating at 2.04 μm is demonstrated in a 2 cm-long active fiber. The slope efficiency reaches ∼34.9% with respect to the launched 1.94 μm laser pump power. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest laser output power demonstrated within a few centimeters of a Ho-doped fiber. This result shows that the fiber is highly promising for high-power single-frequency laser applications. PMID:27367060

  17. Lasing characteristics of gas mixtures involving UFG: Application to nuclear pumping of lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdeyen, J. T.; Eden, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Intense blue-green fluorescence from a structured band centered at lambda approximately 484 nm was observed from Ar, CF3I and NF3 gas mixtures excited by an electron beam. This emission was tentatively assigned to the E yields A transition of the iodine monofluoride (IF) molecule. The fluorescence efficiency of the IF(E yields A) band and the IF (E) state radiative lifetime were estimated to be approximately 6% and 15 ns, respectively. The emission band structure, the short IF(E) radiative lifetime and the Franck-Condon shift between the E and A states suggest that IF is an attractive candidate for a blue-green laser.

  18. Development of a kilowatt-class, joule-level ultrafast laser for driving compact high average power coherent EUV/soft x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Brendan A.; Baumgarten, Cory M.; Pedicone, Michael A.; Bravo, Herman; Yin, Liang; Woolston, Mark; Wang, Hanchen; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2016-03-01

    Our recent progress in the development of high energy / high average power, chirped pulse amplification laser systems based on diode-pumped, cryogenically-cooled Yb:YAG amplifiers is discussed, including the demonstration of a laser that produces 1 Joule, sub-10 picosecond duration, λ = 1.03μm pulses at 500 Hz repetition rate. This compact, all-diodepumped laser combines a mode-locked Yb:KYW oscillator and a water-cooled Yb:YAG preamplifer with two cryogenic power amplification stages to produce 1.5 Joule pulses with high beam quality which are subsequently compressed. This laser system occupies an optical table area of less than 1.5x3m2. This laser was employed to pump plasma-based soft x-ray lasers at λ = 10-20nm at repetition rates >=100 Hz. To accomplish this, temporally-shaped pulses were focused at grazing incidence into a high aspect ratio line focus using cylindrical optics on a high shot capacity rotating metal target. This results in an elongated plasma amplifier that produces microjoule pulses at several narrow-linewidth EUV wavelengths between λ = 109Å and 189Å. The resulting fraction of a milliwatt average powers are the highest reported to date for a compact, coherent source operating at these wavelengths, to the best of our knowledge.

  19. Tuning of a high magnification compact parabolic telescope for centimeter-scale laser beams.

    PubMed

    Tacca, Matteo; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Buy, Christelle; Laporte, Matthieu; Pillant, Gabriel; Genin, Eric; La Penna, Paolo; Barsuglia, Matteo

    2016-02-20

    Off-axis parabolic telescopes, widely used in astronomy and laser optics, if perfectly tuned, are virtually free from aberrations along the parabola's axis direction, but their alignment is very critical. We present a detailed method to align a high magnification off-axis afocal parabolic telescope. The method is composed of two steps: an initial pre-alignment using autocollimators, followed by a fine tuning with a collimated laser beam. Due to the large telescope magnification, the outcoming beam cannot be measured without being refocused. The beam is therefore reflected on a flat mirror and sent back through the telescope. This double-pass configuration allows the measurement of the beam quality without the need for large additional optics. In the fine-tuning step, a numerical simulation is also used to identify the degrees of freedom to be adjusted. The experimental results presented are obtained with one of the mode-matching parabolic telescopes of the gravitational wave interferometric detector Advanced Virgo. PMID:26906579

  20. Tuning of a high magnification compact parabolic telescope for centimeter-scale laser beams.

    PubMed

    Tacca, Matteo; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Buy, Christelle; Laporte, Matthieu; Pillant, Gabriel; Genin, Eric; La Penna, Paolo; Barsuglia, Matteo

    2016-02-20

    Off-axis parabolic telescopes, widely used in astronomy and laser optics, if perfectly tuned, are virtually free from aberrations along the parabola's axis direction, but their alignment is very critical. We present a detailed method to align a high magnification off-axis afocal parabolic telescope. The method is composed of two steps: an initial pre-alignment using autocollimators, followed by a fine tuning with a collimated laser beam. Due to the large telescope magnification, the outcoming beam cannot be measured without being refocused. The beam is therefore reflected on a flat mirror and sent back through the telescope. This double-pass configuration allows the measurement of the beam quality without the need for large additional optics. In the fine-tuning step, a numerical simulation is also used to identify the degrees of freedom to be adjusted. The experimental results presented are obtained with one of the mode-matching parabolic telescopes of the gravitational wave interferometric detector Advanced Virgo.

  1. Advanced compact laser scanning system enhancements for gear and thread measurements. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    McKeethan, W.M.; Maxey, L.C.; Bernacki, B.E.; Castore, G.

    1997-04-04

    The measurement, or metrology, of physical objects is a fundamental requirement for industrial progress. Dimensional measurement capability lies at the heart of ones ability to produce objects within the required technical specifications. Dimensional metrology systems are presently dominated by touch-probe technologies, which are mature and reliable. Due to the intricate geometries required in certain fields of manufacturing, these contract probes cannot be physically brought in proximity to the measurement surface, or lack sufficient lateral resolution to satisfactorily determine the surface profile, which can occur in the measurement of gears, splines and thread. Optical probes are viable candidates to supplement the contact probes, since light can be focused to less than one micron (40 microinches), no contact occurs that can mar highly finished surfaces, and no probes must be replaced due to wear. However, optical probes typically excel only on one type of surface: mirror-like or diffuse, and the optical stylus itself is oftentimes not as compact as its contact probe counterpart. Apeiron, Inc. has pioneered the use of optical non-contact sensors to measure machined parts, especially threads, gears and splines. The Oak Ridge Metrology Center at Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are world-class experts in dimensional metrology. The goal of this CRADA is to tap the expertise in Oak Ridge to evaluate Apeiron`s platform, and to suggest new or novel methods of optical surface sensing, if appropriate.

  2. Contamination by Microcystis and microcystins of blue-green algae food supplements (BGAS) on the Italian market and possible risk for the exposed population.

    PubMed

    Vichi, Susanna; Lavorini, Paolo; Funari, Enzo; Scardala, Simona; Testai, Emanuela

    2012-12-01

    Blue green algae supplements (BGAS) are generally proposed as health-promoting natural products for their purported beneficial effects. Spirulina spp. and Aphanizomenon flos aquae are mainly used in BGAS production. They are usually collected from the natural environment, where other potentially toxic cyanobacteria can be present, making possible BGAS contamination by cyanotoxins, with potential risk for human health. In this work we apply a combined approach, by using chemical and molecular techniques, on BGAS of 17 brands available in Italy. Samples containing Spirulina-only were free of contamination. The Aphanizomenon flos aquae-based samples were contaminated by highly variable levels of microcystins (MC-LR and MC-LA congeners), up to 5.2 μg MC-LR equivalents per gram product. The highest variability (up to 50 fold) was among batches of the same brand, although intra-batch differences were also evidenced. PCR analyses were positive only for the presence of Microcystis sp., identified as the toxin-producing species responsible for contamination. At the maximum contamination levels found, a risk for consumers can be expected following chronic or sub-chronic exposure to a reasonable daily BGAS consumption of 4 g. The need for a strict monitoring by producers and Health Authority to assure an adequate protection for consumers is underscored. PMID:23036452

  3. Blue-green tunable color of Ce(3+)/Tb(3+) coactivated NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphor via energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhen; Xia, Mingjun

    2016-09-15

    A series of color tunable phosphors NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce(3+), Tb(3+) were synthesized via the high-temperature solid-state method. NaBa3La3Si6O20 crystallizes in noncentrosymmetric space group Ama2 with the cell parameters of a = 14.9226(4) Å, b = 24.5215(5) Å and c = 5.6241(2) Å by the Rietveld refinement method. The Ce(3+) ions doped NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphors have a strong absorption band from 260 to 360 nm and show near ultraviolet emission light centered at 378 nm. The Ce(3+) and Tb(3+) ions coactivated phosphors exhibit color tunable emission light from deep blue to green by adjusting the concentration of the Tb(3+) ions. An energy transfer of Ce(3+) → Tb(3+) investigated by the photoluminescence properties and lifetime decay, is demonstrated to be dipole-quadrupole interaction. These results indicate the NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce(3+), Tb(3+) phosphors can be considered as potential candidates for blue-green components for white light emitting diodes.

  4. Blue-green tunable color of Ce3+/Tb3+ coactivated NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphor via energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhen; Xia, Mingjun

    2016-09-01

    A series of color tunable phosphors NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce3+, Tb3+ were synthesized via the high-temperature solid-state method. NaBa3La3Si6O20 crystallizes in noncentrosymmetric space group Ama2 with the cell parameters of a = 14.9226(4) Å, b = 24.5215(5) Å and c = 5.6241(2) Å by the Rietveld refinement method. The Ce3+ ions doped NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphors have a strong absorption band from 260 to 360 nm and show near ultraviolet emission light centered at 378 nm. The Ce3+ and Tb3+ ions coactivated phosphors exhibit color tunable emission light from deep blue to green by adjusting the concentration of the Tb3+ ions. An energy transfer of Ce3+ → Tb3+ investigated by the photoluminescence properties and lifetime decay, is demonstrated to be dipole–quadrupole interaction. These results indicate the NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce3+, Tb3+ phosphors can be considered as potential candidates for blue-green components for white light emitting diodes.

  5. Mycosporine-like Amino Acids and Other Phytochemicals Directly Detected by High-Resolution NMR on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) Blue-Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2016-09-01

    This study describes for the first time the use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, AFA) blue-green algae directly on powder suspension. These algae are considered to be a "superfood", due to their complete nutritional profile that has proved to have important therapeutic effects. The main advantage of NMR spectroscopy is that it permits the detection of a number of metabolites all at once. The Klamath alga metabolome was revealed to be quite complex, and the most peculiar phytochemicals that can be detected directly on algae by NMR are mycosporine-like amino acids (porphyra-334, P334; shinorine, Shi) and low molecular weight glycosides (glyceryl β-d-galactopyranoside, GalpG; glyceryl 6-amino-6-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside, ADG), all compounds with a high nutraceutical value. The presence of cis-3,4-DhLys was revealed for the first time. This molecule could be involved in the anticancer properties ascribed to AFA.

  6. Blue-green tunable color of Ce3+/Tb3+ coactivated NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphor via energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhen; Xia, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    A series of color tunable phosphors NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce3+, Tb3+ were synthesized via the high-temperature solid-state method. NaBa3La3Si6O20 crystallizes in noncentrosymmetric space group Ama2 with the cell parameters of a = 14.9226(4) Å, b = 24.5215(5) Å and c = 5.6241(2) Å by the Rietveld refinement method. The Ce3+ ions doped NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphors have a strong absorption band from 260 to 360 nm and show near ultraviolet emission light centered at 378 nm. The Ce3+ and Tb3+ ions coactivated phosphors exhibit color tunable emission light from deep blue to green by adjusting the concentration of the Tb3+ ions. An energy transfer of Ce3+ → Tb3+ investigated by the photoluminescence properties and lifetime decay, is demonstrated to be dipole–quadrupole interaction. These results indicate the NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce3+, Tb3+ phosphors can be considered as potential candidates for blue-green components for white light emitting diodes. PMID:27628111

  7. Mycosporine-like Amino Acids and Other Phytochemicals Directly Detected by High-Resolution NMR on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) Blue-Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2016-09-01

    This study describes for the first time the use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, AFA) blue-green algae directly on powder suspension. These algae are considered to be a "superfood", due to their complete nutritional profile that has proved to have important therapeutic effects. The main advantage of NMR spectroscopy is that it permits the detection of a number of metabolites all at once. The Klamath alga metabolome was revealed to be quite complex, and the most peculiar phytochemicals that can be detected directly on algae by NMR are mycosporine-like amino acids (porphyra-334, P334; shinorine, Shi) and low molecular weight glycosides (glyceryl β-d-galactopyranoside, GalpG; glyceryl 6-amino-6-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside, ADG), all compounds with a high nutraceutical value. The presence of cis-3,4-DhLys was revealed for the first time. This molecule could be involved in the anticancer properties ascribed to AFA. PMID:27537083

  8. Blue-green tunable color of Ce(3+)/Tb(3+) coactivated NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphor via energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhen; Xia, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    A series of color tunable phosphors NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce(3+), Tb(3+) were synthesized via the high-temperature solid-state method. NaBa3La3Si6O20 crystallizes in noncentrosymmetric space group Ama2 with the cell parameters of a = 14.9226(4) Å, b = 24.5215(5) Å and c = 5.6241(2) Å by the Rietveld refinement method. The Ce(3+) ions doped NaBa3La3Si6O20 phosphors have a strong absorption band from 260 to 360 nm and show near ultraviolet emission light centered at 378 nm. The Ce(3+) and Tb(3+) ions coactivated phosphors exhibit color tunable emission light from deep blue to green by adjusting the concentration of the Tb(3+) ions. An energy transfer of Ce(3+) → Tb(3+) investigated by the photoluminescence properties and lifetime decay, is demonstrated to be dipole-quadrupole interaction. These results indicate the NaBa3La3Si6O20:Ce(3+), Tb(3+) phosphors can be considered as potential candidates for blue-green components for white light emitting diodes. PMID:27628111

  9. Light-emitting properties of cationic iridium complexes containing phenanthroline based ancillary ligand with blue-green and green emission colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yiseul; Sunesh, Chozhidakath Damodharan; Choe, Youngson

    2015-01-01

    We report here two new cationic iridium(III) complexes with phenanthroline-based ancillary ligands, [Ir(dfppy)2(dibutyl-phen)]PF6 (Complex 1) and [Ir(ppz)2(dibutyl-phen)]PF6 (Complex 2) and their uses in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs). The design is based on 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (dfppy) and 1-phenylpyrazole (ppz) as the cyclometalating ligands and 2,9-dibutyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dibutyl-phen) as the ancillary ligand. The photophysical and electrochemical properties of the complexes were studied and the results obtained were corroborated with theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. LECs were fabricated incorporating each complexes which resulted in blue-green light emission (502 nm) with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.26, 0.49) for Complex 1 and green (530 nm) electroluminescence with CIE coordinates of (0.33, 0.54) for Complex 2. The luminance and the current efficiency of the LECs based on Complex 1 are 947 cd m-2 and 0.25 cd A-1, respectively, which are relatively higher than that of Complex 2 with a maximum luminance of 773 cd m-2 and an efficiency of 0.16 cd A-1.

  10. In vitro and in vivo safety assessment of edible blue-green algae, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing and Spirulina plantensis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Cassada, David A.; Snow, Daniel D.; Rogers, Douglas G.; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) have been consumed as food and herbal medicine for centuries. However, safety for their consumption has not been well investigated. This study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro and in vivo toxicity of cultivated Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP). Neither NO nor SP contained detectable levels of microcystin (MC)-LA, MC-RR, MC-LW and MC-LR by LC/MS/MS. Cell viability remained ~70-80% when HepG2 cells were incubated with 0-500 μg/ml of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water-extractable fractions of NO and SP. Four-week-old male and female C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93G/M diet supplemented with 0, 2.5% or 5% of NO and SP (wt/wt) for 6 months. For both genders, BGA-rich diets did not induce noticeable abnormality in weight gain and plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations except a significant increase in plasma ALT levels by 2.5% NO supplementation in male mice at 6 month. Histopathological analysis of livers, however, indicated that BGA did not cause significant liver damage compared with controls. In conclusion, our results suggest that NO and SP are free of MC and the long-term dietary supplementation of up to 5% of the BGA may be consumed without evident toxic side-effects. PMID:21473896

  11. Note: Fast compact laser shutter using a direct current motor and three-dimensional printing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Grace H. Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-12-15

    We present a mechanical laser shutter design that utilizes a direct current electric motor to rotate a blade which blocks and unblocks a light beam. The blade and the main body of the shutter are modeled with computer aided design (CAD) and are produced by 3D printing. Rubber flaps are used to limit the blade’s range of motion, reducing vibrations and preventing undesirable blade oscillations. At its nominal operating voltage, the shutter achieves a switching speed of (1.22 ± 0.02) m/s with 1 ms activation delay and 10 μs jitter in its timing performance. The shutter design is simple, easy to replicate, and highly reliable, showing no failure or degradation in performance over more than 10{sup 8} cycles.

  12. Note: Fast compact laser shutter using a direct current motor and three-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Grace H.; Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-12-01

    We present a mechanical laser shutter design that utilizes a direct current electric motor to rotate a blade which blocks and unblocks a light beam. The blade and the main body of the shutter are modeled with computer aided design (CAD) and are produced by 3D printing. Rubber flaps are used to limit the blade's range of motion, reducing vibrations and preventing undesirable blade oscillations. At its nominal operating voltage, the shutter achieves a switching speed of (1.22 ± 0.02) m/s with 1 ms activation delay and 10 μs jitter in its timing performance. The shutter design is simple, easy to replicate, and highly reliable, showing no failure or degradation in performance over more than 108 cycles.

  13. Applications of compact laser-driven EUV/XUV plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Döring, Stefan; Flöter, Bernhard; Großmann, Peter; Peth, Christian; Reese, Michael; Mann, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, technological developments in the area of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) have experienced great improvements. So far, intense light sources based on discharge or laser plasmas, beam steering and imaging optics as well as sensitive detectors are available. Currently, applications of EUV radiation apart from microlithography, such as metrology, high-resolution microscopy, or surface analysis come more and more into focus. In this contribution we present an overview on the EUV/XUV activities of the Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen based on table-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources. As target materials gaseous or liquid jets of noble gases or solid Gold are employed. Depending on the applications, the very clean but low intense gaseous targets are mainly used for metrology, whereas the targets for high brilliances (liquid, solid) are used for microscopy and direct structuring. For the determination of interaction mechanisms between EUV radiation and matter, currently the solid Gold target is used. In order to obtain a small focal spot resulting in high EUV fluence, a modified Schwarzschild objective consisting of two spherical mirrors with Mo/Si multilayer coatings is adapted to this source. By demagnified (10x) imaging of the Au plasma an EUV spot of 3 μm diameter with a maximum energy density of ~1.3 J/cm2 is generated (pulse duration 8.8 ns). First applications of this integrated source and optics system reveal its potential for high-resolution modification and direct structuring of solid surfaces. For chemical analysis of various samples a NEXAFS setup was developed. It consists of a LPP, using gaseous Krypton as a broadband emitter in the water-window range, as well as a flat field spectrograph. The laboratory system is set to the XUV spectral range around the carbon K-edge (4.4 nm). The table-top setup allows measurements with spectral accuracy comparable to synchrotron experiments. NEXAFS-experiments in transmission and reflection are

  14. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  15. Compact Laser Doppler Flowmeter (LDF) Fundus Camera for the Assessment of Retinal Blood Perfusion in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Christophe; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Amoos, Serge; Loeuillet, Corinne; Bernabei, Mario; Geiser, Martial

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive techniques for ocular blood perfusion assessment are of crucial importance for exploring microvascular alterations related to systemic and ocular diseases. However, few techniques adapted to rodents are available and most are invasive or not specifically focused on the optic nerve head (ONH), choroid or retinal circulation. Here we present the results obtained with a new rodent-adapted compact fundus camera based on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Methods A confocal miniature flowmeter was fixed to a specially designed 3D rotating mechanical arm and adjusted on a rodent stereotaxic table in order to accurately point the laser beam at the retinal region of interest. The linearity of the LDF measurements was assessed using a rotating Teflon wheel and a flow of microspheres in a glass capillary. In vivo reproducibility was assessed in Wistar rats with repeated measurements (inter-session and inter-day) of retinal arteries and ONH blood velocity in six and ten rats, respectively. These parameters were also recorded during an acute intraocular pressure increase to 150 mmHg and after heart arrest (n = 5 rats). Results The perfusion measurements showed perfect linearity between LDF velocity and Teflon wheel or microsphere speed. Intraclass correlation coefficients for retinal arteries and ONH velocity (0.82 and 0.86, respectively) indicated strong inter-session repeatability and stability. Inter-day reproducibility was good (0.79 and 0.7, respectively). Upon ocular blood flow cessation, the retinal artery velocity signal substantially decreased, whereas the ONH signal did not significantly vary, suggesting that it could mostly be attributed to tissue light scattering. Conclusion We have demonstrated that, while not adapted for ONH blood perfusion assessment, this device allows pertinent, stable and repeatable measurements of retinal blood perfusion in rats. PMID:26226150

  16. Compact Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for in Situ Analyses of Aromatic Organics on Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, Stephanie; Brickerhoff, William; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Floyd, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE A miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been adapted to demonstrate two-step laser desorption-ionization (LOI) in a compact instrument package for enhanced organics detection. Two-step LDI decouples the desorption and ionization processes, relative to traditional laser ionization-desorption, in order to produce low-fragmentation conditions for complex organic analytes. Tuning UV ionization laser energy allowed control ofthe degree of fragmentation, which may enable better identification of constituent species. METHODS A reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer prototype measuring 20 cm in length was adapted to a two-laser configuration, with IR (1064 nm) desorption followed by UV (266 nm) postionization. A relatively low ion extraction voltage of 5 kV was applied at the sample inlet. Instrument capabilities and performance were demonstrated with analysis of a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, representing a class of compounds important to the fields of Earth and planetary science. RESULTS L2MS analysis of a model PAH standard, pyrene, has been demonstrated, including parent mass identification and the onset o(tunable fragmentation as a function of ionizing laser energy. Mass resolution m/llm = 380 at full width at half-maximum was achieved which is notable for gas-phase ionization of desorbed neutrals in a highly-compact mass analyzer. CONCLUSIONS Achieving two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) in a highly-miniature instrument enables a powerful approach to the detection and characterization of aromatic organics in remote terrestrial and planetary applications. Tunable detection of parent and fragment ions with high mass resolution, diagnostic of molecular structure, is possible on such a compact L2MS instrument. Selectivity of L2MS against low-mass inorganic salt interferences is a key advantage when working with unprocessed, natural samples, and a mechanism for the observed selectivity is presented.

  17. A Diode Laser Based Cavity Ring-Down Instrument for Simultaneous, Compact, Sensitive, Rapid Measurement of NO2 and NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N.; Fuchs, H.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    NO2 and NOx (=NO2+NO) measurements are essential for monitoring air-quality. Cavity ring- down spectroscopy (CRDS) is a highly sensitive technique to detect small concentrations of atmospheric trace gases such as NO2. Laser diode light sources enable the development of compact, lightweight instruments with minimal requirements for power and consumables. NO2 can be detected directly by absorption near 405 nm where ozone absorption and water absorption, which are the major concerns with respect to interferences, are small compared to that of NO2. Here, NOx is detected in a second cavity in addition to ambient NO2 by oxidation of ambient NO with excess ozone so that the sum of NO2 and NO is measured as NO2. This presentation will compare the performance of the CRDS instrument for NO and NO2 detection to standard instruments based on chemiluminescence for sensitivity, accuracy, linearity and dynamic range, and potential interferences using data from both laboratory and in-field comparisons.

  18. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Shankar Pant, K. K.

    2014-12-15

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  19. Compact quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor system for detection of carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Waclawek, Johannes P; Moser, Harald; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-03-21

    A compact gas sensor system based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) employing a continuous wave (CW) distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) operating at 4.59 µm was developed for detection of carbon disulfide (CS2) in air at trace concentration. The influence of water vapor on monitored QEPAS signal was investigated to enable compensation of this dependence by independent moisture sensing. A 1 σ limit of detection of 28 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for a 1 s lock-in amplifier time constant was obtained for the CS2 line centered at 2178.69 cm-1 when the gas sample was moisturized with 2.3 vol% H2O. The work reports the suitability of the system for monitoring CS2 with high selectivity and sensitivity, as well as low sample gas volume requirements and fast sensor response for applications such as workplace air and process monitoring at industry.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray imaging with compact, table top laser plasma EUV and SXR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Bartnik, A.; Kostecki, J.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fok, T.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present a few examples of imaging experiments, which were possible using a compact laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) source, based on a double stream gas puff target. This debris-free source was used in full-field EUV imaging to obtain magnified images of test samples, ZnO nanofibers and images of the membranes coated with salt crystals. The source was also employed for SXR microscopy in the "water-window" spectral range using grazing incidence Wolter type-I objective to image test samples and to perform the initial studies of biological objects. Gas puff target EUV source, spectrally tuned for 13.5 nm wavelength with multilayer mirror and thin film filters, was also used in variety of shadowgraphy experiments to study the density of newly developed modulated density gas puff targets. Finally, the source was also employed in EUV tomography experiments of low density objects with the goal to measure and optimize the density of the targets dedicated to high harmonic generation.

  1. Design of a Compact, Bimorph Deformable Mirror-Based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Deng, Guohua; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Yang, Jinsheng; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) using a bimorph mirror. The simulated AOSLO system achieves diffraction-limited criterion through all the raster scanning fields (6.4 mm pupil, 3° × 3° on pupil). The bimorph mirror-based AOSLO corrected ocular aberrations in model eyes to less than 0.1 μm RMS wavefront error with a closed-loop bandwidth of a few Hz. Facilitated with a bimorph mirror at a stroke of ±15 μm with 35 elements and an aperture of 20 mm, the new AOSLO system has a size only half that of the first-generation AOSLO system. The significant increase in stroke allows for large ocular aberrations such as defocus in the range of ±600° and astigmatism in the range of ±200°, thereby fully exploiting the AO correcting capabilities for diseased human eyes in the future.

  2. Design of a Compact, Bimorph Deformable Mirror-Based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Deng, Guohua; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Yang, Jinsheng; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) using a bimorph mirror. The simulated AOSLO system achieves diffraction-limited criterion through all the raster scanning fields (6.4 mm pupil, 3° × 3° on pupil). The bimorph mirror-based AOSLO corrected ocular aberrations in model eyes to less than 0.1 μm RMS wavefront error with a closed-loop bandwidth of a few Hz. Facilitated with a bimorph mirror at a stroke of ±15 μm with 35 elements and an aperture of 20 mm, the new AOSLO system has a size only half that of the first-generation AOSLO system. The significant increase in stroke allows for large ocular aberrations such as defocus in the range of ±600° and astigmatism in the range of ±200°, thereby fully exploiting the AO correcting capabilities for diseased human eyes in the future. PMID:27526166

  3. Compact 35μm fiber coupled diode laser module based on dense wavelength division multiplexing of NBA mini-bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, U.; Traub, M.; Di Meo, A.; Hamann, M.; Rubel, D.; Hengesbach, S.; Hoffmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a compact, modular and cross talk free approach for dense wavelength division multiplexing of high power diode lasers based on ultra-steep dielectric filters. The mini bars consist of 5 narrow stripe broad area emitters with a beam parameter product in the range of 2 mm mrad and a wavelength spacing of 2.5 nm between 2 adjacent emitters. Experimental results for fiber coupling (35 μm core diameter, NA < 0.2) of internally and externally stabilized diode lasers are presented. Optical losses are analyzed and alternative optical designs to overcome the current limitations of the setup are discussed.

  4. Compact CH4 sensor based on difference frequency mixing of diode lasers in quasi-phasematched LiNbO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Weidner, R.; Richter, D.; Tittel, F. K.; Limpert, J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact, portable and robust room temperature CH4 sensor is reported. By difference frequency mixing a 500 mW alpha-DFB diode laser at 1066 nm and an erbium-doped fiber amplified 1574 nm DFB diode laser in periodically poled lithium niobate up to 7 (mu)W of narrowband radiation at 3.3 microns is generated. Real-time monitoring of CH4 over a 7 day period using direct absorption in an open-path multipass cell (L = 36 m) demonstrates a detection precision of +/- 14 ppb.

  5. Compact CH4 sensor based on difference frequency mixing of diode lasers in quasi-phasematched LiNbO3.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, D G; Weidner, R; Richter, D; Tittel, F K; Limpert, J

    2000-03-01

    A compact, portable and robust room temperature CH4 sensor is reported. By difference frequency mixing a 500 mW alpha-DFB diode laser at 1066 nm and an erbium-doped fiber amplified 1574 nm DFB diode laser in periodically poled lithium niobate up to 7 (mu)W of narrowband radiation at 3.3 microns is generated. Real-time monitoring of CH4 over a 7 day period using direct absorption in an open-path multipass cell (L = 36 m) demonstrates a detection precision of +/- 14 ppb.

  6. Compact high power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator pumped by a gain-switched fiber laser with "figure-of-h" pulse shape.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peipei; Chen, Tao; Wu, Bo; Yang, Dingzhong; Hu, Chengzhi; Wu, Pinghui; Shen, Yonghang

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a compact high power mid-infrared (MIR) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a gain-switched linearly polarized, pulsed fiber laser. The gain-switched fiber laser was constructed with a piece of Yb doped polarization maintaining (PM) fiber, a pair of fiber Bragg gratings written into the matched passive PM fiber and 6 pigtailed pump laser diodes working at 915 nm with 30 W output peak power each. By modulating the pulse width of the pump laser diode, simple pedestal-free pulse shape or pedestal-free trailing pulse shape ("figure-of-h" as we call it) could be achieved from the gain-switched fiber laser. The laser was employed as the pump of a two-channel, periodically poled magnesium oxide lithium niobate-based OPO system. High power MIR emission was generated with average output power of 5.15 W at 3.8 μm channel and 8.54 W at 3.3 μm channel under the highest pump power of 45 W. The corresponding pump-to-idler conversion efficiency was computed to be 11.7% and 19.1%, respectively. Experimental results verify a significant improvement to signal-to-idler conversion efficiency by using "figure-of-h" pulses over simple pedestal-free pulses. Compared to the master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) fiber laser counterpart, the presented gain switched fiber laser is more attractive in OPO pumping due to its compactness and simplicity which are beneficial to construction of OPO systems for practical MIR applications. PMID:25836126

  7. Hypolipidemic Effect of a Blue-Green Alga (Nostoc commune) Is Attributed to Its Nonlipid Fraction by Decreasing Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chai Siah; Kim, Bohkyung; Pham, Tho X; Yang, Yue; Weller, Curtis L; Carr, Timothy P; Park, Young-Ki; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that Nostoc commune var. sphaeroids Kützing (NO), a blue-green alga (BGA), exerts a hypolipidemic effect in vivo and its lipid extract regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism in vitro. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the hypolipidemic effect of NO is attributed to an algal lipid or a delipidated fraction in vivo compared with Spirulina platensis (SP). Male C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93M diet containing 2.5% or 5% of BGA (w/w) or a lipid extract equivalent to 5% of BGA for 4 weeks to measure plasma and liver lipids, hepatic gene expression, intestinal cholesterol absorption, and fecal sterol excretion. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) was significantly lower in 2.5% and 5% NO-fed groups, while plasma triglyceride (TG) levels were decreased in the 5% NO group compared with controls. However, neither NO organic extract (NOE) nor SP-fed groups altered plasma lipids. Hepatic mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 were induced in 5% NO-fed mice, while there were no significant changes in hepatic lipogenic gene expression between groups. NO, but not NOE and SP groups, significantly decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption. When HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes were incubated with NOE and SP organic extract (SPE), there were marked decreases in protein levels of HMGR, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and fatty acid synthase. In conclusion, the nonlipid fraction of NO exerts TC and TG-lowering effects primarily by inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption and by increasing hepatic fatty acid oxidation, respectively. PMID:26161942

  8. Effect of phosphorus fluctuation caused by river water dilution in eutrophic lake on competition between blue-green alga Microcystis aeruginosa and diatom Cyclotella sp.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Yusuke; Sekiya, Takumi; Takeya, Kimitaka; Taki, Kazuo; Machida, Motoi

    2010-01-01

    Tega-numa (Lake Tega) is one of the eutrophic lakes in Japan. For the improvement of water quality in Lake Tega, the North-chiba Water Conveyance Channel was constructed in 2000, which transfer water from Tone River into the lake. After 2000, the dominant species of diatoms, mainly Cyclotella sp., have been replacing blue-green algae, mainly Microcystis aeruginosa in Lake Tega. This transition of dominant species would be due to the dilution, but the detail mechanism has not been understood yet. This study examined the relationship between phosphorus fluctuation caused by river water dilution to Lake Tega and dominance of algal species, M. aeruginosa or Cyclotella sp. based on the single-species and the mixed-species culture experiments. The single-species culture experiment showed that the half-saturation constant and uptake rate of phosphorus were one order lower and seven times higher for M. aeruginosa than those for Cyclotella sp. These findings implied that M. aeruginosa would possess a potential for the growth and survival over Cyclotella sp. in the phosphorus limited condition. The superiority of M. aeruginosa was reflected in the outcome of the mixed-species culture experiment, i.e., dominance of M. aeruginosa, even phosphorus concentration was lowered to 0.01 mg-P/L. Therefore, it could be concluded that the decrease in phosphorus concentration due to the river water dilution to Lake Tega would be interpreted as a minor factor for the transition of dominant species from M. aeruginosa to Cyclotella sp. PMID:21235152

  9. Evaluation of disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) during chlorination of two algae species--Blue-green Microcystis aeruginosa and diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaobin; Liu, Jinjin; Yang, Mingli; Ma, Hongfang; Yuan, Baoling; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa (blue-green alga) commonly blooms in summer and Cyclotella meneghiniana (diatom) outbreaks in fall in the reservoirs that serve as drinking water sources in Southeast China. Herein, an evaluation of disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) from them during chlorination should be conducted. Five DBPs including trichloromethane (TCM), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), 1,1-dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP) and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) were monitored. The formation potential of TCM and TCNM was enhanced with the increase of reaction time and chlorine dosage, whereas that of DCAN, 1,1-DCP and 1,1,1-TCP increased first and then fell with continuing reaction time. M. aeruginosa showed higher DBPFP than C. meneghiniana, the yield of DBPs varied with components of algal cells. The DBPFP order from components of M. aeruginosa was cell suspension (CS) ≈ intracellular organic matter (IOM) > extracellular organic matter (EOM) > cell debris (CD), which indicated that IOM was the main DBP precursors for M. aeruginosa. The yields of DBPs from components of C. meneghiniana were in the order of CS>IOM≈ CD ≈ EOM, suggesting that three components made similar contributions to the total DBP formation. The amount of IOM with higher DBPFP leaked from both algae species increased with the chlorine dosage, indicating that chlorine dosage should be considered carefully in the treatment of eutrophic water for less destroying of the cell integrity. Though fluorescence substances contained in both algae species varied significantly, the soluble microbial products (SMPs) and aromatic protein-like substances were the main cellular components that contributed to DBP formation for both algae.

  10. Underwater green laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Kozioł, Paweł; Wąż, Adam T.; Sotor, Jarosław Z.; Dudzik, Grzegorz; Kaczmarek, Paweł R.; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a laser vibrometer based on an monolithic single-frequency green laser operating at 532 nm. This wavelength can be particularly useful in the case of underwater vibrometry, especially with regard to the minimum of water absorption for this wavelength range (blue-green window). Using polarizing optics, we proposed a configuration that allows the elimination of parasitic reflections at the air-glass-water boundary. A measurement of heterodyne signals as a mixing result of scattered and reference beams has been performed. The study was conducted in aqueous medium for the scattering waterproof paper and retro-reflective surface. In both configurations we have obtained signals with a relatively high S/N ratio > 20 dB (for scattering surface) and > 31 dB (for retro-reflective tape) with the Resolution Bandwidth RBW 10 kHz for a vibrometer output power of 5 mW and the distance to the moving object 1.2 m (including 0.3 m in air). In our opinion, laser Doppler vibrometry LDV based on high-performance single frequency solid-state lasers with a wavelength range corresponding to the blue-green window allows effective measurement of vibration in the underwater environment.

  11. A Compact Ti:Sapphire Laser With its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an Airborne Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonic at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After being experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (beta - BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5 x 5 x 20 cu mm) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900 nm and its third harmonic at 300 nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30 mJ at 300 nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900 nm to 300 nm is 30%.

  12. Compact diode-pumped continuous-wave and passively Q-switched Nd:GYSO laser at 1.07 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhi; Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Cui, Shengwei; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Luo, Zhengqian; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    We report diode-pumped continuous-wave (CW) and Q-switched Nd:GYSO lasers using a compact two-mirror linear laser cavity. Single-wavelength laser emissions at 1074.11 nm with 4.1-W power and at 1058.27 nm with 1.47-W power have been obtained in CW mode. The slope efficiencies with respect to the absorbed pump powers are 48.5% and 22.9%, respectively. Wavelength tunability is also demonstrated with range of about 8 nm. Using a MoS2 saturable absorber, maximum average output power up to 410 mW at 1074 nm can be yielded with absorbed pump power 6.41 W and the maximum pulse energy reaches 1.20 μJ with pulse repetition rate of 342.5 kHz and shortest pulse width of 810 ns. The CW laser results represent the best laser performance and the Q-switching also present the highest output power for Q-switched Nd3+ lasers with MoS2 as saturable absorber.

  13. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, M.

    1994-11-15

    Practical limitations with underwater imaging systems area reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the visible spectrum (oceanic transmission window) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging. Range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence properties of laser radiation, respectively, to overcome the deleterious effects of common volume back scatter.

  14. Next generation paradigm for urban pluvial flood modelling, prediction, management and vulnerability reduction - Interaction between RainGain and Blue Green Dream projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, C.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of climate change and increasing urbanisation call for a new paradigm for efficient planning, management and retrofitting of urban developments to increase resilience to climate change and to maximize ecosystem services. Improved management of urban floods from all sources in required. Time scale for well documented fluvial and coastal floods allows for timely response but surface (pluvial) flooding caused by intense local storms had not been given appropriate attention, Pitt Review (UK). Urban surface floods predictions require fine scale data and model resolutions. They have to be tackled locally by combining central inputs (meteorological services) with the efforts of the local entities. Although significant breakthrough in modelling of pluvial flooding was made there is a need to further enhance short term prediction of both rainfall and surface flooding. These issues are dealt with in the EU Iterreg project Rain Gain (RG). Breakthrough in urban flood mitigation can only be achieved by combined effects of advanced planning design, construction and management of urban water (blue) assets in interaction with urban vegetated areas' (green) assets. Changes in design and operation of blue and green assets, currently operating as two separate systems, is urgently required. Gaps in knowledge and technology will be introduced by EIT's Climate-KIC Blue Green Dream (BGD) project. The RG and BGD projects provide synergy of the "decoupled" blue and green systems to enhance multiple benefits to: urban amenity, flood management, heat island, biodiversity, resilience to drought thus energy requirements, thus increased quality of urban life at lower costs. Urban pluvial flood management will address two priority areas: Short Term rainfall Forecast and Short term flood surface forecast. Spatial resolution of short term rainfall forecast below 0.5 km2 and lead time of a few hours are needed. Improvements are achievable by combining data sources of raingauge networks

  15. Osmolarity and spectrophotometric property of brilliant blue green define the degree of toxicity on retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to surgical endoilluminator

    PubMed Central

    Balaiya, Sankarathi; Sambhav, Kumar; Cook, William B; Chalam, Kakarla V

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of varying concentrations of brilliant blue green (BBG) and their different biochemical characteristics on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under xenon light source illumination at varying distances to identify safe parameters for intraoperative use. Methods Human retinal RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to two concentrations (0.25 and 0.50 mg/mL) of BBG and illuminated with a xenon surgical illuminator at varying distances (10 and 25 mm), intensity levels, and time intervals (1, 5, and 15 minutes). Additionally, the effect of osmolarity was examined by diluting BBG in different concentrations of glucose. Cytotoxicity of BBG and osmolarity effects on cell viability were evaluated using a WST-1 assay. Light absorption and emission characteristic of BBG in different solvents were measured using a plate reader at different wavelengths. Lastly, the activity of caspase-3 was also studied. Results Cell viability of ARPE-19 cells was 77.4%±12.7%, 78.7%±17.0%, and 65.0%±19.7% at 1, 5, and 15 minutes to exposure of high illumination xenon light at 10 mm (P<0.05) compared to controls. At both distances of illumination (10 and 25 mm), similar cell viabilities were seen between 1 and 5 minutes of exposure. However, there was a decline in viability when the illumination was carried out to 15 minutes in all groups (P<0.05). There was no significant reduction in cell viability in presence or absence of xenon light in different osmolar solutions concentrations of glucose (P>0.05). Maximal light absorption of BBG was noted between 540 and 680 nm. Activated caspase-3 level was not significant in both the concentrations of BBG (P>0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBG at 0.25 mg/mL during vitreoretinal surgery is safe and not toxic to RPE cells up to 5 minutes under focal high illumination (10 mm) and up to 15 minutes under medium diffuse illumination (25 mm). BBG was safe to be mixed with isotonic glucose solution at the

  16. Compact High-Repetition-Rate Monochromatic Terahertz Source Based on Difference Frequency Generation from a Dual-Wavelength Nd:YAG Laser and DAST Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kai; Mei, Jialin; Wang, Maorong; Liu, Pengxiang; Xu, Degang; Wang, Yuye; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan; Teng, Bing; Xiao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Although high-repetition-rate dual-wavelength Nd:YAG lasers at 1319 and 1338 nm have been realized for quite a long time, we have employed it in generating monochromatic terahertz (THz) wave in this paper for the first time. The dual-wavelength laser was LD-end-pumped and acousto-optically (AO) Q-switched with the output power of watt level operating at different repetition rates from 5.5 to 30 kHz. Using a 0.6-mm-thick organic nonlinear crystal DAST for difference frequency generation (DFG), a compact terahertz source was achieved at 3.28 THz. The maximum average output power was about 0.58 μW obtained at a repetition rate of 5.5 kHz, corresponding to the conversion efficiency of about 6.4 × 10-7. The output power scaling is still feasible with higher pump power and a longer nonlinear DFG crystal. Owing to the compactness of the dual-wavelength laser and the nonlinear crystal, a palm-top terahertz source is expected for portable applications such as imaging and so on.

  17. Krypton red laser photocoagulation of the ocular fundus. 1982.

    PubMed

    Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Shakin, Jeffrey L

    2012-02-01

    The theoretical rationale, the histopathologic evidence, and the preliminary clinical studies related to krypton red laser (KRL) photocoagulation of the ocular fundus are reviewed. The authors report on their experience with currently available laser systems using this wavelength (647.1 nm) for photocoagulation of retinal vascular proliferative diseases and chorioretinal diseases associated with exudative manifestations. A histopathologic and clinical comparison of argon blue-green laser (ABGL), the pure argon green laser (AGL), and the krypton yellow laser (KYL), with reference to photocoagulation treatment of the ocular fundus is also discussed.

  18. Use of a compact fiber optic spectrometer for spectral feedback during the laser ablation of dental hard tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joyce Y.; Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    One perceived disadvantage of caries removal using lasers is the loss of the tactile feedback associated with the handpiece. However, alternative methods of acoustic and optical feedback become available with the laser that can be exploited to provide information about the chemical composition of the material ablated, the ablation efficiency and rate, the depth of the incision, and the surface and plume temperature during ablation. Such information can be used to increase the selectivity of ablation, avoid peripheral thermal damage and excessive heat deposition in the tooth, and provide a mechanism of robotic automation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a compact fiberoptic spectrometer could be used to differentiate between the ablation of sound and carious enamel and dentin and between dental hard tissues and composite. Sound and carious tooth surfaces along with composite restorative materials were scanned with λ=0.355, 2.79 and 9.3 μm laser pulses at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.5-100 J/cm2 and spectra were acquired from λ=250-900-nm using a compact fiber-optic spectrometer. Emission spectra varied markedly with the laser wavelength and pulse duration. Optical feedback was not successful in differentiating between sound and carious enamel and dentin even with the addition of various chromophores to carious lesion areas. However, the spectral feedback was successfully used to differentiate between composites and sound enamel and dentin enabling the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces using a computer controlled λ=9.3-μm pulsed CO II laser and scanning system.

  19. A compact spin-exchange optical pumping system for 3He polarization based on a solenoid coil, a VBG laser diode, and a cosine theta RF coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungman; Kim, Jongyul; Moon, Myung Kook; Lee, Kye Hong; Lee, Seung Wook; Ino, Takashi; Skoy, Vadim R.; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Guinyun

    2013-02-01

    For use as a neutron spin polarizer or analyzer in the neutron beam lines of the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) nuclear research reactor, a 3He polarizer was designed based on both a compact solenoid coil and a VBG (volume Bragg grating) diode laser with a narrow spectral linewidth of 25 GHz. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal was measured and analyzed using both a built-in cosine radio-frequency (RF) coil and a pick-up coil. Using a neutron transmission measurement, we estimated the polarization ratio of the 3He cell as 18% for an optical pumping time of 8 hours.

  20. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  1. CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection of ethane using a novel compact multipass gas absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzempek, Karol; Jahjah, Mohammad; Lewicki, Rafał; Stefański, Przemysław; So, Stephen; Thomazy, David; Tittel, Frank K.

    2013-09-01

    The development of a continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra-sensitive and selective ethane (C2H6) concentration measurements is reported. The sensor platform used tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy as the detection technique. TDLAS was performed using an ultra-compact 57.6 m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass cell capable of 459 passes between two mirrors separated by 12.5 cm and optimized for the 2.5-4 μm range TEC mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. For an interference-free C2H6 absorption line located at 2,976.8 cm-1, a 1 σ minimum detection limit of 740 pptv with a 1 s lock-in amplifier time constant was achieved.

  2. Compact electro-absorption modulator integrated with vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalir, Hamed; Ahmed, Moustafa; Bakry, Ahmed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate a compact electro-absorption slow-light modulator laterally-integrated with an 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), which enables highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation. We found a strong leaky travelling wave in the lateral direction between the two cavities via widening the waveguide width with a taper shape. The small signal response of the fabricated device shows a large enhancement of over 55 dB in the modulation amplitude at frequencies beyond 35 GHz; thanks to the photon-photon resonance. A large group index of over 150 in a Bragg reflector waveguide enables the resonance at millimeter wave frequencies for 25 μm long compact modulator. Based on the modeling, we expect a resonant modulation at a higher frequency of 70 GHz. The resonant modulation in a compact slow-light modulator plays a significant key role for high efficient narrow-band modulation in the millimeter wave range far beyond the intrinsic modulation bandwidth of VCSELs.

  3. High power gain switched laser diodes using a novel compact picosecond switch based on a GaAs bipolar junction transistor structure for pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Sergey; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2006-04-01

    A number of up-to-date applications, including advanced optical radars with high single-shot resolution, precise 3 D imaging, laser tomography, time imaging spectroscopy, etc., require low-cost, compact, reliable sources enabling the generation of high-power (1-100 W) single optical pulses in the picosecond range. The well-known technique of using the gain-switching operation mode of laser diodes to generate single picosecond pulses in the mW range fails to generate high-power single picosecond pulses because of a lack of high-current switches operating in the picosecond range. We report here on the achieving of optical pulses of 45W / 70ps, or alternatively 5W / 40ps, with gain-switched commercial quantum well (QW) laser diodes having emitting areas of 250 × 200 μm and 75 × 2 μm, respectively. This was made possible by the use of a novel high-current avalanche switch based on a GaAs bipolar junction transistor (BJT) structure with a switching time (<200ps) comparable to the lasing delay. (The extremely fast transient in this switch is caused by the generation and spread of a comb of powerfully avalanching Gunn domains of ultra-high amplitude in the transistor structure.) A simulation code developed earlier but modified and carefully verified here allowed detailed comparison of the experimental and simulated laser responses and the transient spectrum.

  4. A new fiber-optic non-contact compact laser-ultrasound scanner for fast non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites

    PubMed Central

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic (LU) inspection represents an attractive, non-contact method to evaluate composite materials. Current non-contact systems, however, have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact piezoelectric detection. They are also difficult to adjust, very expensive, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Here, we demonstrate that most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe scheme. In particular, a new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of an all-optical LU pump-probe system for non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites. The performance of the LU system is demonstrated on a composite sample with known defects. Wide-band ultrasound probe signals are generated directly at the sample surface with a pulsed fiber laser delivering nanosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate up to 76 kHz rate with a pulse energy of 0.6 mJ. A balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is employed to detect pressure signals at the same point on the composite surface. A- and B-scans obtained with the Sagnac interferometer are compared to those made with a contact wide-band polyvinylidene fluoride transducer. PMID:24737921

  5. Low-power laser-based carbon monoxide sensor for fire and post-fire detection using a compact Herriott multipass cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomazy, David; So, Stephen; Kosterev, Anatoliy; Lewicki, Rafal; Dong, Lei; Sani, Ardalan A.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2010-01-01

    With the anticipated retirement of Space Shuttles in the next few years, the re-supplying of short-lifetime sensors on the International Space Station (ISS) will be logistically more difficult. Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a well-known combustion product and its absence in a fire and post-fire environment is a reliable indicator for mission specialists that the air quality is at a safe to breathe level. We report on the development and performance of a prototype compact CO sensor, based on the PHOTONS platform [1], developed for the ISS based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). A CO absorption line at ~4285 cm-1 is targeted using a distributed-feedback (DFB) laser diode operating at room temperature. A custom designed Herriott multipass cell 16cm long, with an effective path length of 3.7 m is employed. Mechanical, optical and electronics systems are integrated into a compact package of dimensions measuring 12.4"x 3.4"x 5". Power consumption is less than 1 W, enabling prolonged battery life. A detection limit of 3 ppm is achieved when performing 40 second long temperature scans. A recent initial test at NASA-JSC was successful. Future improvements include the reduction of the sampling volume, scan time and an improved CO minimum detection limit.

  6. A compact, robust, and transportable ultra-stable laser with a fractional frequency instability of 1 × 10{sup −15}

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qun-Feng; Nevsky, Alexander; Cardace, Marco; Schiller, Stephan; Legero, Thomas; Häfner, Sebastian; Uhde, Andre; Sterr, Uwe

    2014-11-15

    We present a compact and robust transportable ultra-stable laser system with minimum fractional frequency instability of 1 × 10{sup −15} at integration times between 1 and 10 s. The system was conceived as a prototype of a subsystem of a microwave-optical local oscillator to be used on the satellite mission Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) ( http://sci.esa.int/ste-quest/ ). It was therefore designed to be compact, to sustain accelerations occurring during rocket launch, to exhibit low vibration sensitivity, and to reach a low frequency instability. Overall dimensions of the optical system are 40 cm × 20 cm × 30 cm. The acceleration sensitivities of the optical frequency in the three directions were measured to be 1.7 × 10{sup −11}/g, 8.0 × 10{sup −11}/g, and 3.9 × 10{sup −10}/g, and the absolute frequency instability was determined via a three-cornered hat measurement. Two additional cavity-stabilized lasers were used for this purpose, one of which had an instability σ{sub y} < 4 × 10{sup −16} at 1 s integration time. The design is also appropriate and useful for terrestrial applications.

  7. Time-resolved spectral studies of blue-green fluorescence of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. Var. Scolymus) leaves: identification of chlorogenic acid as one of the major fluorophores and age-mediated changes.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fermín; Cartelat, Aurélie; Alvarez-Fernández, Ana; Moya, Ismael; Cerovic, Zoran G

    2005-12-14

    Synchrotron radiation and the time-correlated single-photon counting technique were used to investigate the spectral and time-resolved characteristics of blue-green fluorescence (BGF) of artichoke leaves. Leaves emitted BGF under ultraviolet (UV) excitation; the abaxial side was much more fluorescent than the adaxial side, and in both cases, the youngest leaves were much more fluorescent than the oldest ones. The BGF of artichoke leaves was dominated by the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids. A decrease in the percentage of BGF attributable to the very short kinetic component (from 42 to 20%), in the shape of the BGF excitation spectra, and chlorogenic acid concentrations indicate that there is a loss of hydroxycinnamic acid with leaf age. Studies on excitation, emission, and synchronized fluorescence spectra of leaves and trichomes and chlorogenic acid contents indicate that chlorogenic acid is one of the main blue-green fluorophores in artichoke leaves. Results of the present study indicate that 20-42% (i.e., the very short kinetic component) of the overall BGF is emitted by chlorogenic acid. Time-resolved BGF measurements could be a means to extract information on chlorogenic acid fluorescence from the overall leaf BGF.

  8. A novel tunable blue-green-emitting CaGdGaAl2O7:Ce(3+),Tb(3+) phosphor via energy transfer for UV-excited white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chao; You, Hongpeng; Fu, Yibing; Teng, Xiaoming; Liu, Kai; He, Jinhua

    2015-05-01

    CaGdGaAl2O7 and CaGdGaAl2O7:Ce(3+),Tb(3+) have been synthesized by a traditional solid state reaction for the first time. The Rietveld refinement confirmed that CaGdGaAl2O7 has a tetragonal crystal system with the space group P4[combining macron]21m. The photoluminescence properties show that the obtained phosphors can be efficiently excited in the range from 330 to 400 nm, which matches perfectly with commercial UV LED chips. A tunable blue-green emitting CaGdGaAl2O7:Ce(3+),Tb(3+) phosphor has been obtained, by codoping Ce(3+) and Tb(3+) ions into the host and varying their relative ratios, and may be a good candidate for blue-green components in UV white LEDs. The luminescence properties and lifetimes reveal an efficient energy transfer from the Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) ions. The energy transfer is demonstrated to be a dipole-quadrupole mechanism, and the critical distance for Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) calculated by the concentration quenching is 12.25 Å.

  9. A novel tunable blue-green-emitting CaGdGaAl2O7:Ce(3+),Tb(3+) phosphor via energy transfer for UV-excited white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chao; You, Hongpeng; Fu, Yibing; Teng, Xiaoming; Liu, Kai; He, Jinhua

    2015-05-01

    CaGdGaAl2O7 and CaGdGaAl2O7:Ce(3+),Tb(3+) have been synthesized by a traditional solid state reaction for the first time. The Rietveld refinement confirmed that CaGdGaAl2O7 has a tetragonal crystal system with the space group P4[combining macron]21m. The photoluminescence properties show that the obtained phosphors can be efficiently excited in the range from 330 to 400 nm, which matches perfectly with commercial UV LED chips. A tunable blue-green emitting CaGdGaAl2O7:Ce(3+),Tb(3+) phosphor has been obtained, by codoping Ce(3+) and Tb(3+) ions into the host and varying their relative ratios, and may be a good candidate for blue-green components in UV white LEDs. The luminescence properties and lifetimes reveal an efficient energy transfer from the Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) ions. The energy transfer is demonstrated to be a dipole-quadrupole mechanism, and the critical distance for Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) calculated by the concentration quenching is 12.25 Å. PMID:25833815

  10. LIBS system with compact fiber spectrometer, head mounted spectra display and hand held eye-safe erbium glass laser gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.; Sarracino, John T.; Hardy, Christopher R.; Guo, Baoping; Christian, Sean M.; Myers, Jeffrey A.; Roth, Franziska; Myers, Abbey G.

    2010-02-01

    LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) systems are capable of real-time chemical analysis with little or no sample preparation. A Q-switched laser is configured such that laser induced plasma is produced on targeted material. Chemical element line spectra are created, collected and analyzed by a fiber spectrometer. Line spectra emission data is instantly viewed on a head mounted display. "Eye-safe" Class I erbium glass lasers provide for insitu LIBS applications without the need for eye-protection goggles. This is due to the fact that Megawatt peak power Q-switched lasers operating in the narrow spectral window between 1.5um and 1.6um are approximately 8000 times more "eye-safe" than other laser devices operating in the UV, visible and near infrared. In this work we construct and demonstrate a LIBS system that includes a hand held eye-safe laser gun. The laser gun is fitted with a micro-integrating sphere in-situ target interface and is designed to facilitate chemical analysis in remote locations. The laser power supply, battery pack, computer controller and spectrophotometer components are packaged into a utility belt. A head mounted display is employed for "hands free" viewing of the emitted line spectra. The system demonstrates that instant qualitative and semi-quantitative chemical analyses may be performed in remote locations utilizing lightweight commercially available system components ergonomically fitted to the operator.

  11. A compact diode laser cavity ring-down spectrometer for atmospheric measurements of NO3 and N2O5 with automated zeroing and calibration.

    PubMed

    Odame-Ankrah, Charles A; Osthoff, Hans D

    2011-11-01

    A compact rack-mounted cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) for simultaneous measurements of the nocturnal nitrogen oxides NO(3) and N(2)O(5) in ambient air is described. The instrument uses a red diode laser to quantify mixing ratios of NO(3) (at its absorption maximum at 662 nm) and of N(2)O(5) following its thermal dissociation to NO(3) in a second detection channel. The spectrometer is equipped with an automated zeroing and calibration setup to determine effective NO(3) absorption cross-sections and NO(3) and N(2)O(5) inlet transmission efficiencies. The instrument response was calibrated using simultaneous measurements of NO(2), generated by thermal dissociation of N(2)O(5) and/or by titration of NO(3) with excess NO, using blue diode laser CRDS at 405 nm. When measuring ambient air, the (2σ, 10 s) precision of the red diode CRDS varied between 5 and 8 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv), which sufficed to quantify N(2)O(5) concentrations under moderately polluted conditions. Sample N(2)O(5) measurements made on a rooftop on the University of Calgary campus in August 2010 are presented. A maximum N(2)O(5) mixing ratio of 130 pptv was observed, corresponding to a steady-state lifetime of less than 50 min. The NO(3) mixing ratios were below the detection limit, consistent with their predicted values based on equilibrium calculations. During the measurement period, the instrument response for N(2)O(5) was 70% of the theoretical maximum, rationalized by a slight mismatch of the laser diode output with the NO(3) absorption line and a N(2)O(5) inlet transmission efficiency less than unity. Advantages and limitations of the instrument's compact design are discussed.

  12. Study on a compact and adaptable Thomson Spectrometer for laser-initiated 11B(p,α)8Be reactions and low-medium energy particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Bonasera, A.; Sura, J.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Cipriani, M.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Barbarino, M.; Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Yahia, V.

    2016-05-01

    Thomson Spectrometers are of primary importance in the discrimination of particles produced by laser-plasma interaction, according to their energy and charge-mass ratio. We describe here a detailed study on a set of Thomson Spectrometers, adaptable to different experimental situations, with the aim of being placed directly within the experimental chamber, rather than in additional extensions, in order to increase the solid angle of observation. These instruments are suitable for detection of low-medium energy particles and can be effectively employed in laser-plasma experiments of 11B(p,α)8Be fusion. They are provided with permanent magnets, have small dimensions and compact design. In these small configurations electric and magnetic fringing fields play a primary role for particle deflection, and their accurate characterization is required. It was accomplished by means of COMSOL electromagnetic solver coupled to an effective analytical model, very suitable for practical use of the spectrometers. Data from experimental measurements of the magnetic fields have been also used. We describe the application of the spectrometers to an experiment of laser-plasma interaction, coupled to Imaging Plate detectors. Data analysis for spectrum and yield of the detected radiation is discussed in detail.

  13. Coupling of a high-power tapered diode laser beam into a single-mode-fiber within a compact module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejczyk, D.; Sahm, A.; Carstens, C.; Urban, G.; Pulka, M.; Eppich, B.; Scholz, F.; Paschke, K.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, coupling of radiation generated by a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) tapered diode laser around 1064 nm into a single-mode-fiber (SMF) within a butterfly module with a footprint < 10 cm2 is demonstrated. The module comprises temperature stabilizing components, a brightness maintaining micro optical assembly mounted with submicrometer precision and a standard FC/APC output connector. The aim of the introduced concept is to improve the beam quality and to eliminate the current dependent beam astigmatism, characteristic for tapered diode lasers and amplifiers, and, thus, provide an efficient, multi-Watt laser light source characterized by a narrow-band spectrum and a stigmatic, nearly Gaussian laser beam independent of the operating point. A maximum power ex SMF of 2.5 W at a coupling efficiency of 57 % is reached in the presented butterfly module.

  14. A compact high-gradient 25 MeV 17 GHz RF linac for free-electron laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.; Chen, S.C.; Kreischer, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    A new compact high-gradient (60 MeV/m) high-frequency (17.136 GHz) RF linac is presently under construction by Haimson Research Corp. (HRC) for installation at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center in the High-Gradient Accelerator and High Power Microwave Laboratory. This accelerator will utilize an existing traveling-wave relativistic klystron (TWRK) which is now operation at MIT with 25 MW power, 67 dB gain, and 52% efficiency at 17.136 GHz.

  15. Overview of recent advances in excimer laser technology at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.; Sze, R.C.; Taylor, A.J.; Gibson, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    From among the areas of excimer laser development at Los Alamos two are selected for further discussion: ultra-high brightness excimer laser systems and discharge-pumped XeF(C..-->..A) lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the spectrum. Two different high brightness systems are described. One is based on small-aperture KrF amplifiers, while the other is based on a large-aperture XeCl amplifier. The XeF(C..-->..A) laser is tunable from 435 to 525 nm, and may one day become a viable alternative to pulsed dye lasers for many applications. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  16. A tuneable ultra-compact high-power, ultra-short pulsed, bright gamma-ray source based on bremsstrahlung radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Vieux, G.; Issac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M. P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Shea, V. O.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Bendoyro, R. A.; Dias, J. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Ibbotson, T. P. A.; and others

    2012-03-15

    The laser driven plasma wakefield accelerator is a very compact source of high energy electrons. When the quasi-monoenergetic beam from these accelerators passes through dense material, high energy bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a collimated beam with high flux. We show how a source based on this emission process can produce more than 10{sup 9} photons per pulse with a mean energy of 10 MeV. We present experimental results that show the feasibility of this method of producing high energy photons and compare the experimental results with GEANT4 Montecarlo simulations, which also give the scaling required to evaluate its suitability as method to produce radioisotopes via photo-nuclear reactions or for imaging applications.

  17. DFG-based mid-IR generation using a compact dual-wavelength all-fiber amplifier for laser spectroscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Krzempek, Karol; Sobon, Grzegorz; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2013-08-26

    We demonstrate a compact mid-infrared (mid-IR) radiation source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The system incorporates a dual-wavelength master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) source capable of simultaneous amplification of 1064 nm and 1548 nm signals in a common active fiber co-doped with erbium and ytterbium ions. Two low-power seed lasers were amplified by a factor of 14.4 dB and 23.7 dB for 1064 nm and 1548 nm, respectively and used in a nonlinear DFG setup to generate 1.14 mW of radiation centered at 3.4 μm. The system allowed for open-path detection of methane (CH(4)) in ambient air with estimated minimum detectable concentration at a level of 26 ppbv. PMID:24105549

  18. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-31

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  19. Water-window microscopy using compact, laser-plasma source based on Ar/He double stream gas-puff target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W.; Skorupka, Marcin; Bartnik, Andrzej; Kostecki, Jerzy; Jarocki, Roman; Szczurek, Mirosław; Wegrzynski, Lukasz; Fok, Tomasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2013-05-01

    Photon-based (bosonic-type) imaging at short wavelength vs. electron, or recently neutron, imaging has additional advantages due to different interaction of photons with matter and thus high resolution photon-based imaging is still of high interest to the scientific community. In this work we try to combine the advantages of employing compact, laboratory type laser-plasma short wavelength source, based on Ar/He gas puff target, emitting incoherent radiation, with the "water-window" spectral range. This unique combination is highly suitable for biological imaging, and allows developing a small size microscopy setup, which might be used in various fields of science and technology. Thus, in this paper we report on recent advances in "water-window" desk-top microscopy setup employing a laser-plasma SXR source based on a double stream gas puff target and Wolter type-I objective. The system allows capturing magnified images of the objects with ~1 μm spatial resolution up to ~40 μm thickness and single SXR pulse exposure time as low as 3 ns. For the SXR microscope Ar plasma was produced by focusing of the pumping laser pulses, from Nd:YAG laser (Eksma), by a lens onto a gas puff target. EUV radiation from the plasma was collected and focused by an ellipsoidal, axi-symmetrical nickel coated condenser mirror, developed by Rigaku, Inc. The condenser is a broad-band optic, capable of efficiently reflecting radiation from the EUV range down to SXR region with energy cut-off of ~800 eV. To spectrally narrow the emission from argon plasma a free-standing titanium filter (Lebow) was used. Spectrally filtered radiation illuminates the sample. Then the sample was imaged onto a SXR sensitive back-illuminated, CCD camera (Andor) by a Wolter type-I reflective objective. A characterization and optimization of both the source and the microscope setups are presented and discussed.

  20. Flash pyrolysis of coal by an argon ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, M.S.; Egsgaard, H.

    1994-12-31

    A novel approach to laser induced pyrolysis of coal by using the visible blue-green emission from an argon ion laser is presented. The gaseous pyrolysis products are identified by on-line gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Five different subbituminous to bituminous coals have been studied and results for the low-molecular weight hydrocarbons up to C{sub 3} are discussed. Mechanisms for the formation of the unsaturated hydrocarbons, ethylene and acetylene, during laser pyrolysis of coal have been disclosed utilizing deuterium as a buffer gas in the pyrolysis cell.

  1. Frequency-doubled monolithic master oscillator power amplifier laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Waarts, R.; Sanders, S.; Parke, R.; Mehuys, D.; Lang, R.; O'Brien, S.; Dzurko, K.; Welch, D.; Scifres, D. )

    1993-10-01

    Single-pass frequency doubling of laser diodes extends the wavelength range of infrared laser diodes to blue-green wavelengths. The authors describe the first experiments of frequency doubling of a coherent, high-power, monolithic master oscillator power amplifier (M-MOPA) laser diode. The output from a 1-W M-MOPA is frequency doubled in a single pass through an 8.2-mm-long KNbO[sub 3] crystal. They obtained 3.7-mW diffraction-limited output power at a wavelength of 491 nm and demonstrated modulation at 20 MHz.

  2. Tunable blue-green-emitting Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F:Eu2+,Tb3+ phosphor with energy transfer for near-UV white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Mengmeng; Guo, Ning; Lü, Wei; Jia, Yongchao; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhao, Qi; Shao, Baiqi; You, Hongpeng

    2013-09-16

    A series of Eu(2+) and Eu(2+)/Tb(3+) activated novel Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F phosphors have been synthesized by traditional solid state reaction. Rietveld structure refinement of the obtained phosphor indicates that the Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F host contains three kinds of Ba sites. The photoluminescence properties exhibit that the obtained phosphors can be efficiently excited in the range from 320 to 430 nm, which matches perfectly with the commercial n-UV LED chips. The critical distance of the Eu(2+) ions in Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F:Eu(2+) is calculated and the energy quenching mechanism is proven to be dipole-dipole interaction. Tunable blue-green emitting Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F:Eu(2+),Tb(3+) phosphor has been obtained by co-doping Eu(2+) and Tb(3+) ions into the host and varying their relative ratios. Compared with the Tb(3+) singly doped phosphor, the codoped phosphors have more intense absorption in the n-UV range and stronger emission of the Tb(3+) ions, which are attributed to the effective energy transfer from the Eu(2+) to Tb(3+) ions. The energy transfer from the Eu(2+) to Tb(3+) ions is demonstrated to be a dipole-quadrupole mechanism by the Inokuti-Hirayama (I-H) model. The Eu(2+) and Tb(3+) activated phosphor may be good candidates for blue-green components in n-UV white LEDs.

  3. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  4. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  5. Azacoumarin dye lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue-green to near ultraviolet region.

  6. Sensitive measurements of trace gas of formaldehyde using a mid-infrared laser spectrometer with a compact multi-pass cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kotaro; Miyamura, Kai; Akishima, Kazushi; Tonokura, Kenichi; Konno, Mitsuru

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-pass cell with a pair of cylindrical mirrors for sensitive detection of trace gases in emission from combustion was constructed. The cell path-length was 9.8 m and its volume was 0.13 L. Each mirror shape was a square with a side length of 25.4 mm and the mirrors were placed 100 mm apart. The cell was applied to detection of formaldehyde (HCHO), which is formed during fuel combustion and is harmful to the environment. The direct absorption spectrum in the range 2979.06-2981.2 cm-1 was recorded with a mid-infrared distributed feedback (DFB) interband cascade laser. The recorded spectrum of HCHO was in good agreement with a spectrum simulated using the HITRAN 2012 database. An absorption line at 2979.663 cm-1 (4.26 × 10-21 cm2 molecule-1 cm-1, ν5, 1184-1073), which showed the strongest absorption in the emission frequency range of the DFB interband cascade laser, was selected for HCHO detection. We also confirmed that there were no interferences of absorption peaks of major combustion products in the selected HCHO absorption peaks. At a signal-to-noise ratio of two and 3 kPa using 2f wavelength modulation spectroscopy at less than 1 MHz bandwidth, the limit of detection for HCHO was 73 ppb by volume.

  7. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  8. A Compact, Solid-State UV (266 nm) Laser System Capable of Burst-Mode Operation for Laser Ablation Desorption Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arevalo, Ricardo, Jr.; Coyle, Barry; Paulios, Demetrios; Stysley, Paul; Feng, Steve; Getty, Stephanie; Binkerhoff, William

    2015-01-01

    Compared to wet chemistry and pyrolysis techniques, in situ laser-based methods of chemical analysis provide an ideal way to characterize precious planetary materials without requiring extensive sample processing. In particular, laser desorption and ablation techniques allow for rapid, reproducible and robust data acquisition over a wide mass range, plus: Quantitative, spatially-resolved measurements of elemental and molecular (organic and inorganic) abundances; Low analytical blanks and limits-of-detection ( ng g-1); and, the destruction of minimal quantities of sample ( g) compared to traditional solution and/or pyrolysis analyses (mg).

  9. Efficient and compact intracavity-frequency-doubled Nd:LuVO4/LBO laser at 538 nm end-pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Li, Y. L.; Jiang, H. L.

    2011-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped Nd:LuVO4 laser emitting at 1076 nm, based on the 4 F 3/2-4 I 11/2 transition, generally used for a 1066 nm emission. A power of 689 mW at 1076 nm has been achieved in continuous-wave (CW) operation with a fiber-coupled laser diode emitting 17.8 W at 809 nm. Intracavity second-harmonic generation (SHG) in CW mode has also been demonstrated with a power of 105 mW at 538 nm by using a LiB3O5 (LBO) nonlinear crystal.

  10. Compact CH4 sensor system based on a continuous-wave, low power consumption, room temperature interband cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Gluszek, Aleksander K.; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-01-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based methane sensor, employing a dense-pattern multi-pass gas cell and a 3.3 μm, CW, DFB, room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL), is reported. The optical integration based on an advanced folded optical path design and an efficient ICL control system with appropriate electrical power management resulted in a CH4 sensor with a small footprint (32 × 20 × 17 cm3) and low-power consumption (6 W). Polynomial and least-squares fit algorithms are employed to remove the baseline of the spectral scan and retrieve CH4 concentrations, respectively. An Allan-Werle deviation analysis shows that the measurement precision can reach 1.4 ppb for a 60 s averaging time. Continuous measurements covering a seven-day period were performed to demonstrate the stability and robustness of the reported CH4 sensor system.

  11. In vitro effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) using a 660 nm laser and malachite green dye in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms arranged on compact and cancellous bone specimens.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Nader, Sumaia Alves; Meira, Giselle Andrade; Viana, Magda Souza

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) using a 660 nm visible laser combined with malachite green (MG) dye in the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilms formed within compact and cancellous bone specimens. Specimens of 80 compact bones and 80 cancellous bones were contaminated with a standard suspension of S. aureus and incubated for 14 days at 37 °C to allow for the formation of biofilms. The specimens were divided into the following groups (n = 10) according to the treatment conditions: PS-L - (control - no treatment), PS+L - (only MG for 5 min), PS-L + 90 (only laser irradiation for 90 s), PS-L + 180 (only laser irradiation for 180 s), PS-L + 300 (only laser irradiation for 300 s), APDT90 (APDT for 90 s), APDT180 (APDT for 180 s), and APDT300 (APDT for 300 s). The findings were statistically analyzed using an ANOVA 5%. All of the experimental groups were significantly different from the control group for both the compact and cancellous bone specimens. The compact bone specimens that received APDT treatment (for either 90, 180, or 300 s) showed reductions in the log10 CFU/ml of S. aureus by a magnitude of 4 log10. Cancellous bone specimens treated with 300 s of APDT showed the highest efficacy, and these specimens had a reduction in S. aureus CFU/ml by a factor of 3 log10. APDT treatment using these proposed parameters in combination with MG was effective at inactivating S. aureus biofilms in compact and cancellous bone specimens.

  12. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  13. Compact, transmissive two-dimensional spatial disperser design with application in simultaneous endoscopic imaging and laser microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Metz, Philipp; Adam, Jost; Gerken, Martina; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-01-20

    Minimally invasive surgery procedures benefit from a reduced size of endoscopic devices. A prospective path to implement miniaturized endoscopy is single optical-fiber-based spectrally encoded imaging. While simultaneous spectrally encoded inertial-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery have been successfully demonstrated in a large table setup, a highly miniaturized optical design would promote the development of multipurpose endoscope heads. This paper presents a highly scalable, entirely transmissive axial design for a spectral 2D spatial disperser. The proposed design employs a grating prism and a virtual imaged phased array (VIPA). Based on semi-analytical device modeling, we performed a systematic parameter analysis to assess the spectral disperser's manufacturability and to obtain an optimum application-specific design. We found that, in particular, a low grating period combined with a high optical input bandwidth and low VIPA tilt showed favorable results in terms of a high spatial resolution, a small device diameter, and a large field of view. Our calculations reveal that a reasonable imaging performance can be achieved with system diameters of below 5 mm, which renders the proposed 2D spatial disperser design highly suitable for use in future endoscope heads that combine mechanical-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery. PMID:24514122

  14. Laser-plasma interactions from thin tapes for high-energy electron accelerators and seeding compact FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Brian Henry

    This thesis comprises a detailed investigation of the physics of using a plasma mirror (PM) from a tape by reflecting ultrashort pulses from a laser-triggered surface plasma. The tapes used in the characterization of the PM are VHS and computer data storage tape. The tapes are 6.6 m (computer storage tape) and 15 m (VHS) thick. Each tape is 0.5 inches wide, and 10s of meters of tape are spooled using a tape drive; providing thousands of shots on a single reel of tape. The amount of reflected energy of the PM was studied for different input intensities. The fluence was varied by translating the focus of the laser upstream and downstream of the tape, which changed the spot size on the tape surface and hence changed the fluence. This study measured reflectances from both sides of the two tapes, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. Lastly, an analytic model was developed to understand the reflectance as a function of fluence for each tape material and polarization. Another application that benefits from the advancements of LPA technology is an LPAbased FEL. By sending a high quality electron bunch through an undulator (a periodic structure of positive and negative magnetic poles), the electrons oscillate transversely to the propagation axis and produce radiation. The 1.5 m THUNDER undulator at the BELLA Center has been commissioned using electron beams of 400MeV beams with broad energy spread (35%). To produce a coherent LPA-based FEL, the beam quality would need to improve to sub-percent level energy spread. A seed source could be used to help induce bunching of the electron beam within the undulator. This thesis described the experimental investigation of the physics of using solid-based surface high-harmonic generation (SHHG) from a thin tape as a possible seed source for an FEL. A thin tape placed within centimeters of the undulator's entrance could act as a harmonic generating source, while simultaneously transmitting an electron beam. This removes

  15. The science and technology case for a global network of compact, low cost ground-based laser heterodyne radiometers for column measurements of CO2 and CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Clarke, G.; Wilson, E. L.; Palmer, P. I.; Feng, L.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Ott, L. E.; Duncan, B. N.; Melroy, H.; McLinden, M.; DiGregorio, A.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in determining Earth's climate is well established. Recent technological developments in space-borne instrumentation have enabled us to observe changes in these gases to a precision necessary to infer for the responsible geographical fluxes. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON), comprising a network of upward-looking Fourier transform spectrometers, was established to provide an accurate ground truth and minimize regional systematic bias. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a compact, low-cost laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) for global column measurements CO2 and CH4. This Mini-LHR is a passive instrument that uses sunlight as the primary light source to measure absorption of CO2 and CH4in the shortwave infrared near 1.6 microns. It uses compact telecommunications lasers to offer a low cost (<$30K/unit), suitcase sized, highly sensitive (< 1 ppm for CO2 and <20 ppb for CH4) measurement solution to supplement TCCON measurements. We will deploy Mini-LHR instruments to accompany the NASA AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) which has more than 500 sites worldwide. In addition, the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) provides both column and vertically resolved aerosol and cloud data in active remote sensing at nearly 50 sites worldwide. Tandem operation with AERONET/MPLNET provides a clear pathway for the Mini-LHR to be expanded into a global monitoring network for carbon cycle science and satellite data validation, offering coverage in cloudy regions (e.g., Amazon basin) and key regions such as the Arctic where accelerated warming due to the release of CO2 and CH4from thawing tundra and permafrost is a concern. These vulnerable geographic regions are not well covered by current space-based CO2 and CH4 measurements. We will present an overview of our instrument development and the implementation of a network based on current and future resources. We will also present

  16. A compact ground-based laser heterodyne radiometer for global column measurements of CO2 and CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, Emily; Clarke, Gregory; Ramanathan, Anand; Mao, Jianping; Ott, Lesley; Duncan, Bryan; Melroy, Hilary; McLinden, Matthew; Holben, Brent; Houston Miller, J.

    2015-04-01

    Implementing effective global strategies to understand climate change is hindered by a lack of understanding of both anthropogenic emissions and land and ocean carbon reservoirs. Though in situ surface measurements and satellites provide valuable information for estimating carbon fluxes, areas not well covered by current observing systems (e.g. high latitude regions, tropical forests and wetlands) remain poorly understood. Deficiencies in understanding the processes governing carbon flux introduce considerable uncertainty to predictions of climate change over the coming century. Our vision is to enhance worldwide carbon monitoring by developing a low-cost ground network of miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer (Mini-LHR) instruments that measure CO2 and CH4 in the atmospheric column. Ground-based remote sensing has the potential to fill gaps in the satellite data record while providing a complementary long-term observational record. This uninterrupted data record, would both bridge gaps in data sets and offer validation for key flight missions such as OCO-2, OCO-3 and ASCENDS. Mini-LHR instruments will be deployed as an accompaniment to AERONET. In addition to the complementary aerosol optical depth measurement, tandem operation with AERONET provides a clear pathway for the Mini-LHR to be expanded into a global monitoring network. AERONET has more than 500 instruments worldwide offering coverage in key arctic regions (not covered by OCO-2) where accelerated warming due to the release of CO2 and CH4 from thawing tundra and permafrost is a concern. Mini-LHR instruments at AERONET locations could also greatly improve data coverage in regions with large flux uncertainties such as North America and Western Europe, and under-sampled areas such as South America and Asia. Currently, the only ground global network that routinely measures multiple greenhouse gases in the atmospheric column is TCCON with 18 operational sites worldwide and two in the US. Cost and size of

  17. Design, development, and operation of a fiber-based Cherenkov beam loss monitor at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, X.-M.; Asano, Y.; Itoga, T.

    2012-05-01

    A fiber-based Cherenkov beam loss monitor (CBLM) consisting of large core (400 μm), long (≥150 m) multimode fibers, has been developed as an online long-range detection tool with high sensitivity and good position resolution for the 8 GeV SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser: primarily designed for radiation safety in order to limit the dose outside the shielding of the machine, this monitor also serves as an early warning tool to avoid radiation damages done by lost electrons to the undulator magnets. This paper presents the approach chosen to insure that the required sensitivity (≤1 pC) could be obtained over more than 100 m. A beam-based approach was used to characterize (attenuation and signal strength) different fibers (diameter, index profile, and numerical aperture) and to select the most appropriate one. The response of the detector has also been studied numerically for different geometries (vacuum pipe and in-vacuum type undulators), beam energies, and beam loss scenarios, to determine the optimum number of fibers and their position in order to achieve the required detection limit. The results of the first few months of operation show that the SPring-8 CBLM can detect beam losses of less than 0.5 pC over the full 150 m length of the fiber.

  18. Compact and portable open-path sensor for simultaneous measurements of atmospheric N2O and CO using a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lei; Sun, Kang; Khan, M Amir; Miller, David J; Zondlo, Mark A

    2012-12-17

    A compact and portable open-path sensor for simultaneous detection of atmospheric N(2)O and CO has been developed with a 4.5 μm quantum cascade laser (QCL). An in-line acetylene (C(2)H(2)) gas reference cell allows for continuous monitoring of the sensor drift and calibration in rapidly changing field environments and thereby allows for open-path detection at high precision and stability. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is used to detect simultaneously both the second and fourth harmonic absorption spectra with an optimized dual modulation amplitude scheme. Multi-harmonic spectra containing atmospheric N(2)O, CO, and the reference C(2)H(2) signals are fit in real-time (10 Hz) by combining a software-based lock-in amplifier with a computationally fast numerical model for WMS. The sensor consumes ~50 W of power and has a mass of ~15 kg. Precision of 0.15 ppbv N(2)O and 0.36 ppbv CO at 10 Hz under laboratory conditions was demonstrated. The sensor has been deployed for extended periods in the field. Simultaneous N(2)O and CO measurements distinguished between natural and fossil fuel combustion sources of N(2)O, an important greenhouse gas with poorly quantified emissions in space and time.

  19. Study of beam transverse properties of a thermionic electron gun for application to a compact THz free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tongning; Pei, Yuanji; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Chen, Qushan; Yang, Lei; Li, Ji

    2014-10-01

    A novel thermionic electron gun adopted for use in a high power THz free electron laser (FEL) is proposed in this paper. By optimization of the structural and radiofrequency (RF) parameters, the physical design of the gun is performed using dynamic calculations. Velocity bunching is used to minimize the bunch's energy spread, and the dynamic calculation results indicate that high quality beams can be provided. The transverse properties of the beams generated by the gun are also analyzed. The novel RF focusing effects of the resonance cavity are investigated precisely and are used to establish emittance compensation, which enables the injector length to be reduced. In addition, the causes of the extrema of the beam radius and the normalized transverse emittance are analyzed and interpreted, respectively, and slice simulations are performed to illustrate how the RF focusing varies along the bunch length and to determine the effects of that variation on the emittance compensation. Finally, by observation of the variations of the beam properties in the drift tube behind the electron gun, prospective assembly scenarios for the complete THz-FEL injector are discussed, and a joint-debugging process for the injector is implemented.

  20. Study of beam transverse properties of a thermionic electron gun for application to a compact THz free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Tongning E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Chen, Qushan; Yang, Lei; Pei, Yuanji E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Ji

    2014-10-15

    A novel thermionic electron gun adopted for use in a high power THz free electron laser (FEL) is proposed in this paper. By optimization of the structural and radiofrequency (RF) parameters, the physical design of the gun is performed using dynamic calculations. Velocity bunching is used to minimize the bunch's energy spread, and the dynamic calculation results indicate that high quality beams can be provided. The transverse properties of the beams generated by the gun are also analyzed. The novel RF focusing effects of the resonance cavity are investigated precisely and are used to establish emittance compensation, which enables the injector length to be reduced. In addition, the causes of the extrema of the beam radius and the normalized transverse emittance are analyzed and interpreted, respectively, and slice simulations are performed to illustrate how the RF focusing varies along the bunch length and to determine the effects of that variation on the emittance compensation. Finally, by observation of the variations of the beam properties in the drift tube behind the electron gun, prospective assembly scenarios for the complete THz-FEL injector are discussed, and a joint-debugging process for the injector is implemented.

  1. Successful demonstration of a compact laser-pumped vector helium magnetometer on the Daytime Dynamo sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pierce, D.; Dawson, O.; Bernal, I.; Leinweber, H. K.; Shaffer, C.; Plaschke, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Daytime Dynamo sounding rocket mission is a Goddard Space Flight Center led experiment (PI, Rob Pfaff) to study the dayside ionospheric dynamo with a suite of instruments that measure electromagnetic fields, upper atmospheric winds, and the ambient charged and neutral particle populations. Two Dynamo launches have taken place, the first on July 10th, 2011, the second on July 4th 2013. The primary objective of the mission is to determine the constituents of the dynamo current equation and to determine the degree to which the dynamo current is sustained via neutral winds, DC electric fields, or both. Dynamo carries a magnetometer developed by a JPL/UCLA collaboration that measures the vector magnetic field, and from its variation with altitude, allows us to deduce the horizontal current density. The low-mass instrument uses a laser pumped helium sensor developed at JPL, combined with digital electronics based on recent developments in fluxgate magnetometer electronics at UCLA. We will present an overview of the magnetometer design and the instrument performance.

  2. Underwater laser detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Walid; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2015-02-01

    The conventional method used to detect an underwater target is by sending and receiving some form of acoustic energy. But the acoustic systems have limitations in the range resolution and accuracy; while, the potential benefits of a laserbased underwater target detection include high directionality, high response, and high range accuracy. Lasers operating in the blue-green region of the light spectrum(420 : 570nm)have a several applications in the area of detection and ranging of submersible targets due to minimum attenuation through water ( less than 0.1 m-1) and maximum laser reflection from estimated target (like mines or submarines) to provide a long range of detection. In this paper laser attenuation in water was measured experimentally by new simple method by using high resolution spectrometer. The laser echoes from different targets (metal, plastic, wood, and rubber) were detected using high resolution CCD camera; the position of detection camera was optimized to provide a high reflection laser from target and low backscattering noise from the water medium, digital image processing techniques were applied to detect and discriminate the echoes from the metal target and subtract the echoes from other objects. Extraction the image of target from the scattering noise is done by background subtraction and edge detection techniques. As a conclusion, we present a high response laser imaging system to detect and discriminate small size, like-mine underwater targets.

  3. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  4. Monitoring uranium, hydrogen, and lithium and their isotopes using a compact laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) probe and high-resolution spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Cremers, David A; Beddingfield, Alan; Smithwick, Robert; Chinni, Rosemarie C; Jones, C Randy; Beardsley, Burt; Karch, Larry

    2012-03-01

    The development of field-deployable instruments to monitor radiological, nuclear, and explosive (RNE) threats is of current interest for a number of assessment needs such as the on-site screening of suspect facilities and nuclear forensics. The presence of uranium and plutonium and radiological materials can be determined through monitoring the elemental emission spectrum using relatively low-resolution spectrometers. In addition, uranium compounds, explosives, and chemicals used in nuclear fuel processing (e.g., tributyl-phosphate) can be identified by applying chemometric analysis to the laser-induced breakdown (LIBS) spectrum recorded by these spectrometers. For nuclear forensic applications, however, isotopes of U and Pu and other elements (e.g., H and Li) must also be determined, requiring higher resolution spectrometers given the small magnitude of the isotope shifts for some of these elements (e.g., 25 pm for U and 13 pm for Pu). High-resolution spectrometers will be preferred for several reasons but these must fit into realistic field-based analysis scenarios. To address the need for field instrumentation, we evaluated a previously developed field-deployable hand-held LIBS interrogation probe combined with two relatively new high-resolution spectrometers (λ/Δλ ~75,000 and ~44,000) that have the potential to meet field-based analysis needs. These spectrometers are significantly smaller and lighter in weight than those previously used for isotopic analysis and one unit can provide simultaneous wide spectral coverage and high resolution in a relatively small package. The LIBS interrogation probe was developed initially for use with low resolution compact spectrometers in a person-portable backpack LIBS instrument. Here we present the results of an evaluation of the LIBS probe combined with a high-resolution spectrometer and demonstrate rapid detection of isotopes of uranium and hydrogen and highly enriched samples of (6)Li and (7)Li.

  5. Purification and characterization of the blue-green rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) tyrosine hydroxylase with a dopamine-Fe(III) complex. Reversal of the endogenous feedback inhibition by phosphorylation of serine-40.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, K K; Vassort, C; Brennan, B A; Que, L; Haavik, J; Flatmark, T; Gros, F; Thibault, J

    1992-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was purified from tumours of rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells by a three-step purification procedure giving 30 mg of pure enzyme in 3 days. The enzyme sedimented with an S(eo),w value of 9.2 S and revealed an apparent subunit molecular mass of 62 kDa with a minor 60 kDa component. Two-dimensional gel isoelectric focusing/electrophoresis and tryptic digestion revealed that the heterogeneity could be accounted for by limited proteolysis of the 62 kDa component and the presence of covalently bound phosphate. The enzyme had a strong blue-green colour (epsilon 700 = 3.1 +/- 0.2 mM-iron-1.cm-1). The resonance Raman spectrum obtained with lambda excitation = 605 nm revealed the presence of an Fe(III)-catecholamine complex in the isolate enzyme, similar to that observed in the bovine adrenal enzyme [Andersson, Cox, Que, Flatmark & Haavik (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 18621-18626]. In the rat PC12 enzyme, all of the iron present (0.53 +/- 0.03 atom per subunit) seems to be chelated by the feedback inhibitors (0.49 +/- 0.05 mol of dopamine and 0.10 +/- 0.03 mol of noradrenaline per mol of subunit). The e.p.r. spectra at 3.6 K show g-values at 7.0, 5.2 and 1.9 as observed for other catecholate-complexed enzymes. After phosphorylation of serine-40 and addition of L-tyrosine a new rhombic (magnitude of E/D = 0.33) e.p.r. species could be observed. Phosphorylation of serine-40 by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase increased the catalytic activity; depending on assay conditions, up to 80-110-fold activation could be observed when measured at high TH (i.e. high endogenous catecholamine) concentration. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1352446

  6. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  7. Noninvasive laser Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; McClane, Robert W.

    2001-05-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel non- invasive optical technology to measure carotenoid antioxidants in human skin of healthy volunteers. Using blue-green laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra are obtained which are superimposed on a large skin autofluorescence background. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 30 seconds, and the required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Our technique can be used for rapid screening of carotenoid antioxidant levels in large populations and may have applications for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  8. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  9. Integrated Photonics Research: Post-deadline papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Jarus W.

    1993-03-01

    The symposium was held on the following topics: advanced solid state lasers, compact blue-green lasers, integrated photonics research, nonlinear guide-wave optics, optical amplifiers and their applications, optical design for photonics, photonics in switching, quantum optoelectronics, short-wavelength -- physics with intense-laser pulses, soft x-ray protection lithography, ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics, optical computing, and spatial light modulators.

  10. Pathway to a compact SASE FEL device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Petrillo, V.; Rau, Julietta V.; Sabia, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Biedron, S. G.; Einstein, J.; Milton, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Newly developed high peak power lasers have opened the possibilities of driving coherent light sources operating with laser plasma accelerated beams and wave undulators. We speculate on the combination of these two concepts and show that the merging of the underlying technologies could lead to new and interesting possibilities to achieve truly compact, coherent radiator devices.

  11. Watts-level super-compact narrow-linewidth Tm-doped silica all-fiber laser near 1707 nm with fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X. S.; Guo, H. T.; Lu, M.; Yan, Z. J.; Wang, H. S.; Wang, Y. S.; Xu, Y. T.; Gao, C. X.; Cui, X. X.; Guo, Q.; Peng, B.

    2016-11-01

    Watts-level ultra-short wavelength operation of a Tm-doped all fiber laser was developed by using a 1550 nm Er-doped fiber laser pump source and a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The laser yielded 1.28 W of continuous-wave output at 1707.01 nm with a narrow linewidth of ~44 pm by means of a 20 cm Tm-doped fiber. The dependencies of the slope efficiencies and pump threshold of the Tm-doped fiber laser versus the length of active fiber and reflectivity of the output mirror (FBG) were investigated in detail, in which the maximum average slope efficiency was 36.1%. There is no doubt that this all fiber laser will be a perfect pump source for mid-IR laser output.

  12. Information computer program for laser therapy and laser puncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badovets, Nadegda N.; Medvedev, Andrei V.

    1995-03-01

    An informative computer program containing laser therapy and puncture methods has been developed. It was used successfully in connection with the compact Russian medical laser apparatus HELIOS-O1M in laser treatment and the education process.

  13. High Image Quality Laser Color Printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Kimitoshi; Morimoto, Yoshinori

    1989-07-01

    A laser color printer has been developed to depict continuous tone color images on a photographic color film or color paper with high resolution and fidelity. We have used three lasers, He-Cd (441.6 nm), Ar4+ (514.5 nm), and He-Ne (632.8 nm) for blue, green, and red exposures. We have employed a drum scanner for two dimensional scanning. The maximum resolution of our system is 40 c/mm (80 lines/mm) and the accuracy of density reproduction is within 1.0 when measured in color difference, where most observers can not distinguish the difference. The scanning artifacts and noise are diminished to a visually negligible level. The image quality of output images compares well to that of actual color photographs, and is suitable for photographic image simulations.

  14. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators as an add-on for tunable Ti:sapphire lasers extend the range of applications towards multimodal imaging and optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon (2P) microscopy based on tunable Ti:sapphire lasers has become a widespread tool for 3D imaging with sub-cellular resolution in living tissues. In recent years multi-photon microscopy with simpler fixed-wavelength femtosecond oscillators using Yb-doped tungstenates as gain material has raised increasing interest in life-sciences, because these lasers offer one order of magnitude more average power than Ti:sapphire lasers in the wavelength range around 1040 nm: Two-photon (2P) excitation of mainly red or yellow fluorescent dyes and proteins (e.g. YFP, mFruit series) simultaneously has been proven with a single IR laser wavelength. A new approach is to extend the usability of existing tunable Titanium sapphire lasers by adding a fixed IR wavelength with an Yb femtosecond oscillator. By that means a multitude of applications for multimodal imaging and optogenetics can be supported. Furthermore fs Yb-lasers are available with a repetition rate of typically 10 MHz and an average power of typically 5 W resulting in pulse energy of typically 500 nJ, which is comparably high for fs-oscillators. This makes them an ideal tool for two-photon spinning disk laser scanning microscopy and holographic patterning for simultaneous photoactivation of large cell populations. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint Yb fixed-wavelength lasers can present an interesting add-on to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy. The Yb fs-lasers hereby offer higher power for imaging of red fluorescent dyes and proteins, are ideally enhancing existing Ti:sapphire lasers with more power in the IR, and are supporting pulse energy and power hungry applications such as spinning disk microscopy and holographic patterning.

  15. Performance of an array of plasma pinches as a new optical pumping source for dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rieger, H.; Kim, K.

    1983-11-01

    A new optical pumping source consisting of an array of plasma pinches in the hypocycloidal-pinch geometry is employed to pump a variety of dye lasers. A dye cuvette is inserted along the symmetry axis of the plasma device such that it may be surrounded by the plasma pinch. The light from the plasma pinch is very intense and rich in ultraviolet, which makes it an attractive optical pumping source for dye lasers, particularly in the blue-green spectral region. Control of the plasma fluorescence is achieved by the choice of gas, its fill pressure, and the capacitor bank voltage and its stored energy. The rise time of this ''plasma flashlamp'' depends mainly on the gas species and the fill pressure. Output energy of approx.2 mJ per cm/sup 3/ of lasing medium, or 2 kW/cm/sup 3/ for a 1-..mu..s laser pulse, is obtained from rhodamine 6G, coumarin 480, LD 490, and coumarin 504 dyes. That both the coumarin 480 and rhodamine 6G lasers have the comparable output power is a direct proof that the present optical pumping source is more efficient than the commercial xenon flashlamps in pumping lasers in the blue-green spectral region.

  16. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occurring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Nd/sup 3+/ in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  17. Excited-state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occuring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelength resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed form the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  18. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliewer, Michael L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics in laser-pumped, rare-earth-doped, solid-state laser materials are investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It is found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited-state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process is an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  19. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  20. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  1. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  2. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  3. The theory and design of a chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser: An innovative, compact, high-energy, vacuum-based, electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troha, Anthony Lawrence

    As current high-energy accelerator facilities continue to increase in both size and cost, there is a growing need for a relatively small and inexpensive alternative. Numerous experiments over the past decade have shown the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) to be a feasible laser-driven particle accelerator. In the present work, a new variant of the IFEL is proposed, which uses a short-duration, chirped laser pulse to greatly increase the energy exchange from the drive-laser pulse to the electron bunch. An extensive investigation is then conducted, starting with analytical and numerical studies of the dynamics of an electron interacting with a high-intensity, focused laser pulse. Following a review of the physics behind a free-electron laser (FEL), a detailed analysis of several variants of the IFEL is performed, from which it is determined that an IFEL driven by a chirped laser pulse will not suffer the detrimental effects experienced by other IFEL schemes. The design specifications for the chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser (CPIFEL) are then obtained from theoretical and computational models of the interaction, which culminates in a device that has an acceleration gradient approaching 1 GeV/m over an interaction distance of less than 5 cm. The acceleration mechanism is very efficient, providing a nearly uniform acceleration to a picosecond-duration charge bunch. The demands on laser technology are stringent, but not extreme. The laser must produce chirped-pulse durations only a few optical cycles long and intensities near 9 x 1016 W/cm2 at the focal plane. The IFEL is also an appealing choice, because it is essentially an FEL functioning in a different operational mode. FEL's are a well-established, familiar technology, routinely and reliably employed in a variety of research facilities throughout the world. Thus, the development of the IFEL has a strong foundation upon which to build, a heritage that will hopefully hasten the realization of a CPIFEL

  4. Evaluation of phototoxic retinal damage after argon laser iridotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.R.; Knighton, R.W.; Feuer, W.J.

    1989-04-15

    We performed several visual function tests in 17 eyes (ten patients) before and after argon laser iridotomy in an effort to detect diffuse photochemical damage to photoreceptors caused by exposure to the intense, blue-green light that is transmitted into the posterior segment as the iridotomy is created and enlarged. No change was detected in static threshold sensitivity in the central 30 degrees of the field (Octopus perimeter), color sensitivity (Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test), or visual acuity. Contrast sensitivity showed a small increase at low spatial frequencies and a small decrease at high spatial frequencies. The latter change was small and not necessarily laser related, but precautions to limit laser exposure of the posterior pole are prudent.

  5. Using argon laser blue light reduces ophthalmologists' color contrast sensitivity. Argon blue and surgeons' vision

    SciTech Connect

    Berninger, T.A.; Canning, C.R.; Guenduez, K.St.; Strong, N.; Arden, G.B. )

    1989-10-01

    Color contrast sensitivity was measured in laser operators before and after laser use. After argon blue-green laser treatment sessions, sensitivity was reduced for colors lying along a tritan color-confusion line for several hours. This acute effect is due to specular flash-backs from the aiming beam off the surface of the contact lens. It is caused only by argon 488-nm light, when the aiming beam intensity is high. In addition, a correlation has been demonstrated between the number of years of laser experience and a chronic reduction in tritan color contrast sensitivity. It is suggested that repeated acute changes caused by the argon lasers may cause cumulative effects and produce a chronic threshold elevation. A simple method of eliminating the acute effect is documented.

  6. Injection control of an XeF (C-A) laser - A simple scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollins, R. C.; Jordan, D. J.; Feltman, A.

    1987-07-01

    Enhancement of the efficiency of a blue-green discharge laser is demonstrated using a simple dye laser which is excited by the UV output of the XeF medium itself. The 350-nm output is harnessed to excite a small dye laser which acts as an injection source. The occurrence of optical gain on the C-A transition (440-520 nm) is delayed with respect to the UV output due to the initial presence of visible absorbing species, resulting in the automatic injection of dye-laser radiation into the XeF laser cavity at the appropriate time. With selection of the oscillation wavelength by the choice of dye, improvement of the efficiency by a factor of 30 is possible with the present self-excited injection scheme.

  7. Laser and Optical Properties of Green-Emitting ZnCdSe Quantum Dot Based Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainilovich, Aliaksei G.; Lutsenko, E. V.; Yablonskii, G. P.; Sedova, I. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    Green-emitting laser diodes are in great demand for mobile projection media (pico-projector), navigation, underwater communication but they are still absent on the market. InGaN/GaN-based quantum well structures are approaching green spectral region by use of polar, semipolar as well as free-standing GaN substrates. However such heterostructures suffer from high laser thresholds with increase of indium content. A promising alternative way is the use of highly efficient green-emitting undoped ZnCdSe based quantum dot (QD) laser heterostructures optically pumped by blue InGaN laser diodes. Operation of blue-green laser converter based on MBE grown heterostructure with two ZnCdSe QD layers was shown for the first time in [1].

  8. Compact high-pulse-energy passively Q-switched Nd:YLF laser with an ultra-low-magnification unstable resonator: application for efficient optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Cho, C Y; Huang, Y P; Huang, Y J; Chen, Y C; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2013-01-28

    We exploit an ultra-low-magnification unstable resonator to develop a high-pulse-energy side-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YLF/Cr⁴⁺:YAG laser with improving beam quality. A wedged laser crystal is employed in the cavity to control the emissions at 1047 nm and 1053 nm independently through the cavity alignment. The pulse energies at 1047 nm and 1053 nm are found to be 19 mJ and 23 mJ, respectively. The peak powers for both wavelengths are higher than 2 MW. Furthermore, the developed Nd:YLF lasers are employed to pump a monolithic optical parametric oscillator for confirming the applicability in nonlinear wavelength conversions. PMID:23389131

  9. High-efficiency and compact semiconductor lasers with monolithically integrated switches for generation of high-power nanosecond pulses in time-of-flight (TOF) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipchenko, Sergey; Podoskin, Aleksandr; Soboleva, Olga; Zakharov, Maxim S.; Bakhvalov, Kirill; Romanovich, Dmitrii; Pikhtin, Nikita; Tarasov, Il`ya; Bagaev, Timur; Ladugin, Maxim; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr; Simakov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    We present a new approach based on the integration of the functions of a high-efficiency current switch and a laser emitter into a single heterostructure as elements of time-of-flight (TOF) systems. The approach being developed employs the effect of an electrical bistability, which occurs in the general case in thyristor structures. We report recent results obtained in a study of the dynamic electrical and optical characteristics of the pulsed sources we developed. An effective generation of 2- to 100-ns laser pulses at a wavelength of 905 nm is demonstrated. The possibility of generating laser pulses shorter than 1 ns is considered. The maximum peak power reached values of 7 and 50 W for 10- and 100-ns pulses, respectively.

  10. A Compact Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer to Monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm Wavelength in Hypersonic Flows

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship’s Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow. PMID:22219703

  11. A compact tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer to monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm wavelength in hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship's Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow.

  12. Compact repetitively Q-switched Yb:YCa4O(BO3)3 laser with an acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Xu, Honghao; Han, Wenjuan; Yi, Hongying; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Junhai

    2015-07-01

    Repetitively Q-switched operation was achieved with a Yb:YCa4O(BO3)3 laser in a wide repetition rate range from 20 down to 0.1 kHz. An output power of 6.81 W at 20 kHz was generated with pulse duration of 42 ns; while operated at a low repetition rate of 0.1 kHz, the laser produced 0.53 W of output power with pulse width of 21 ns, the resulting pulse energy and peak power amounted respectively to 5.3 mJ and 252.4 kW.

  13. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  14. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  15. A compact 10 kW, 476 MHz solid state radio frequency amplifier for pre-buncher cavity of free electron laser injector linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mohania, Praveen; Mahawar, Ashish; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-09-15

    A 10 kW, 476 MHz, 0.1% duty cycle solid state RF amplifier system for driving sub-harmonic, pre-buncher cavity of IR-FEL injector LINAC, has been developed at RRCAT. The 10 kW power is achieved by combining output of eight 1400 W amplifier modules using 8-way planar corporate combiner. The solid state amplifier modules have been developed using 50 V RF LDMOS transistors which although meant for push-pull operation are being used in single ended configuration with matching circuit developed on a thin (25 mils), high dielectric constant (9.7), low loss microwave laminate with an aim to have a compact structure. Ease of fabrication, modularity, small size, and low cost are the important features of this design which could be used as a template for low duty cycle medium to high pulsed power UHF amplifier system.

  16. Efficient plant growth using automatic position-feedback laser light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinoki, Yoshiaki; Kato, Yuya; Ogawa, Kosuke; Nakao, Akira; Okai, Zenshiro; Katsuyama, Toshio

    2013-05-01

    The plant growth based on the scanning laser beam is newly developed. Three semiconductor lasers with three primary colors, i.e., blue, green and red are used. Here, the laser scanned position is restricted only to the plant leaves, where the light illumination is needed. The feedback system based on the perspective projection is developed. The system consists of the automatic position correction from the camera image. The automatic image extraction of the leaf parts is also introduced. The electric power needed for this system is as small as 6.25% compared with the traditional white fluorescent lamp. Furthermore, experimental results show that the red-color laser light is particularly efficient for the growth of the radish sprouts.

  17. Repetitive highly collimated intense proton beam with sub-MeV energy range driven by a compact few terawatt femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Kado, M.; Yogo, A.; Mori, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Bulanov, S.; Fukumi, A.; Li, Z.; Noda, A.; Nakamura, S.

    2007-06-01

    A highly collimated sub-MeV proton beam with the divergence angle of 10 degrees is obtained during the interaction of a few terawatt pulse from a table-top Ti:sapphire laser with a thin metallic foil. This beam is used for proton shadowgraphy. The quality of the 107 laminar protons per bunch is sufficient for good quality projection imaging of a micrometer size mesh structure, giving a quantitative characterization of the proton beam, such as the transverse emittance of less than 0.1 π mm mrad. These experimental results open up a new perspective in imaging techniques.

  18. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  19. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  20. 4.8 Gbit/s 16-QAM-OFDM transmission based on compact 450-nm laser for underwater wireless optical communication.

    PubMed

    Oubei, Hassan M; Duran, Jose R; Janjua, Bilal; Wang, Huai-Yung; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Chi, Yu-Cheih; Ng, Tien Khee; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He, Jr-Hau; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Lin, Gong-Ru; Ooi, Boon S

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an underwater wireless optical communications (UWOC) employing 450-nm TO-9 packaged and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (LD) directly encoded with an orthogonal frequency division multiplexed quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM-OFDM) data. A record data rate of up to 4.8 Gbit/s over 5.4-m transmission distance is achieved. By encoding the full 1.2-GHz bandwidth of the 450-nm LD with a 16-QAM-OFDM data, an error vector magnitude (EVM) of 16.5%, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 15.63 dB and a bit error rate (BER) of 2.6 × 10(-3), well pass the forward error correction (FEC) criterion, were obtained.

  1. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kneip, S.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J.

    2011-08-29

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  2. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  3. Laser-induced autofluorescence for medical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koenig, K; Schneckenburger, H

    1994-03-01

    The naturally occurring autofluorescence of cells and tissues is based on biomolecules containing intrinsic fluorophores, such as porphyrins, the amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, and the coenzymes NADH, NADPH, and flavins. Coenzymes fluoresce in the blue/green spectral region (fluorecence lifetimes: 0.5-6 ns) and are highly sensitive indicators of metabolic function. Steadystate and time-resolved blue-green autofluorescence is, therefore, an appropriate measure of the function of the respiratory chain as well as of cellular and tissue damage. Autofluorescence in the yellow/red spectral region is based mainly on endogenous porphyrins and metalloporphyrins, such as coproporphyrin, protoporphyrin (fluorescence lifetime of porphyrin monomers: >10 ns), and Zn-protoporphyrin (2 ns). Various pathological microorganisms such asPropionibacterium acnes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, andSaccharomyces cerevisiae are able to synthesize large amounts of these fluorophores and can therefore be located. This permits fluorescence-based detection of a variety of diseases, including early-stage dental caries, dental plaque, acne vulgaris, otitis externa, and squamous cell carcinoma. The sensitivity of noninvasive autofluorescence diagnostics can be enhanced by time-gated fluorescence measurements using an appropriate time delay between ultrashort laser excitation and detection. For example, videocameras with ultrafast shutters, in the nanosecond region, can be used to create "caries images" of the teeth. Alternatively, autofluorescence can be enhanced by stimulating protoporphyrin biosynthesis with the exogenously administered porphyrin precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The fluorophore protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) is photolabile and photodynamically active. Irradiation of PP IX-containing tissue results in cytotoxic reactions which correlate with modifications in fluorescence due to photobleaching and singlet oxygen

  4. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  5. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V. Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  6. Hollow fibers for compact infrared gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, A.; Hartwig, S.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.

    2008-02-01

    Hollow fibers can be used for compact infrared gas sensors. The guided light is absorbed by the gas introduced into the hollow core. High sensitivity and a very small sampling volume can be achieved depending on fiber parameters i.e. attenuation, flexibility, and gas exchange rates. Different types of infrared hollow fibers including photonic bandgap fibers were characterized using quantum cascade lasers and thermal radiation sources. Obtained data are compared with available product specifications. Measurements with a compact fiber based ethanol sensor are compared with a system simulation. First results on the detection of trace amounts of the explosive material TATP using hollow fibers and QCL will be shown.

  7. Compact, Robust Chips Integrate Optical Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Located in Bozeman, Montana, AdvR Inc. has been an active partner in NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Langley Research Center engineers partnered with AdvR through the SBIR program to develop new, compact, lightweight electro-optic components for remote sensing systems. While the primary customer for this technology will be NASA, AdvR foresees additional uses for its NASA-derived circuit chip in the fields of academic and industrial research anywhere that compact, low-cost, stabilized single-frequency lasers are needed.

  8. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    PubMed

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  9. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  11. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Laser induced surface damage, thermal transport and microhardness studies on certain organic and semiorganic nonlinear optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, S.; Dhanuskodi, S.; Tiwari, S. K.; Philip, J.

    2008-03-01

    N-alkyl-2,6-dimethyl-4(1H)-pyridinones, salts of 4-dimethylaminopyridine and 2-amino-5-nitropyridine are considered to be potential candidates for nonlinear optical (NLO) applications, in particular for the generation of blue-green laser radiation. Single crystals were grown following the slow evaporation technique at constant temperature. Single-shot laser-induced surface damage thresholds in the range 3-10 GW/cm2 were measured using a 18 ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The surface morphologies of the damaged crystals were examined under an optical microscope and the nature of damage identified. The Vicker’s microhardness was determined at a load of 98.07 mN. The thermal transport properties, thermal diffusivity (α), thermal effusivity (e), thermal conductivity (K) and heat capacity (Cp), of the grown crystals were measured by an improved photopyroelectric technique at room temperature. All the results are presented and discussed.

  13. Compact, holographic correction of aberrated telescopes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, G; Munch, J; Veitch, P

    1997-03-01

    We demonstrate a compact reflector telescope design that incorporates the holographic correction of a large, low-quality primary spherical mirror by using a laser beacon located at the center of curvature. The simple design makes use of conventional optics and is easily scalable to much larger apertures. Experimental results indicate diffraction-limited performance from a heavily aberrated 0.5-m-diameter spherical mirror.

  14. A compact versatile femtosecond spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, V.; Johnson, E.; Schellenberg, P.; Parson, W.; Windeler, R.

    2002-12-01

    A compact apparatus for femtosecond pump-probe experiments is described. The apparatus is based on a cavity-dumped titanium:sapphire laser. Probe pulses are generated by focusing weak (˜1 nJ) pulses into a microstructure fiber that produces broadband continuum pulses with high efficiency. With the pump pulses compressed and probe pulses uncompressed, the rise time of the pump-probe signals is <100 fs. The 830 nm pump pulses are also frequency doubled to generate light for excitation at 415 nm. The versatility of the spectrometer is demonstrated by exciting molecules at either 830 or 415 nm, and probing at wavelengths ranging from 500 to 950 nm. Some results on the green fluorescent protein are presented.

  15. Multispectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for large biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2003-07-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system developed to capture multispectral fluorescence emission images simultaneously from a relatively large target object is described. With an expanded, 355-nm Nd:YAG laser as the excitation source, the system captures fluorescence emission images in the blue, green, red, and far-red regions of the spectrum centered at 450, 550, 678, and 730 nm, respectively, from a 30-cm-diameter target area in ambient light. Images of apples and of pork meat artificially contaminated with diluted animal feces have demonstrated the versatility of fluorescence imaging techniques for potential applications in food safety inspection. Regions of contamination, including sites that were not readily visible to the human eye, could easily be identified from the images.

  16. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, M.L.; Kulp, T.J.

    1995-03-10

    Practical limitations of underwater imaging systems are reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and the resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the oceanic transmission window of the visible spectrum (blue-green portion) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging The properties of laser bearm in range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence effect of common volume back scatter to reduce or eliminate noise, increase signal to noise levels. Synchronously scanned systems rely on the highly collimated nature of the laser beam for spatial rejection of common volume back scatter. A synchronous, raster-scanning underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS) has been developed at Lawrence liver-more National Laboratory. The present UWLIS system differs from earlier synchronous scanners in its ability to scan in two dimensions at conventional video frame rate (30 Hz). The imaging performance of the present UWLIS was measured at distances of up to 6.3 AL (at a physical distance of 15.2 meters) during an in-water tank test and 4.5 to 5.0 AL (at a physical distance of 30 meters) during open water oceanic testing. The test results indicate that the UWLIS system is already capable of extending the underwater imaging range beyond that of conventional floodlight illuminated SIT cameras. The real or near real time frame rates of the UWLIS make possible operations in a mode in which the platform speed is randomly varied. This is typical of the operational environment in which the platform is often maneuvered above and around rugged seafloor terrain`s and obstacles.

  17. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  18. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  19. Compact turbidity meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  20. Metal Vapour Lasers: Physics, Engineering and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1999-03-01

    Metal Vapour Lasers Christopher E. Little University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland Since the first successful demonstration of a metal vapour laser (MVL) in 1962, this class of laser has become widely used in a broad range of fields including precision materials processing, isotope separation and medicine. The MVLs that are used today have a range of impressive characteristics that are not readily available using other technologies. In particular, the combination of high average output powers, pulse recurrence frequencies and beam quality available from green/yellow Cu vapour lasers (CVLs) and Cu bromide lasers, coupled with the high-quality, multiwatt ultraviolet (265-289 nm) radiation that can be produced using simple nonlinear optical techniques, means that Cu lasers will continue to be important for many years. Metal Vapour Lasers covers all the most commercially important and scientifically interesting pulsed and continuous wave (CW) gas-discharge MVLs, and includes device histories, operating characteristics, engineering, kinetics, commercial exploitation and applications. Short descriptions of gas discharges and excitation techniques make this volume self-consistent. A comprehensive bibliography is also provided. The greater part of this book is devoted to CVLs and their variants, including new sealed-off, high-power 'kinetically enhanced' CVLs and Cu bromide lasers. However, many other self-terminating MVLs are also discussed, including the red AuVL, green/infrared MnVL and infrared BaVL. Pulsed, high-gain, high average power lasers in the UV/violet (373.7, 430.5 nm) spectral regions are represented by Sr¯+ and Ca¯+ discharge-afterglow recombination lasers. The most commercially successful of the MVLs - the CW, UV/blue cataphoretic He-Cd¯+ ion laser - is described. Hollow cathode lasers are represented in two guises: 'white light' (blue/green/red) He-Cd¯+ ion lasers and UV/infrared Ne/He-Cu¯+ ion lasers. This unique volume is an

  1. Medical applications of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancha, Sylvia D.; Keipert, Andreas; Prairie, Michael W.

    1994-06-01

    The High Power Semiconductor Laser Technology (HPSLT) program is currently developing, in-house, a belt pack medical laser. This compact semiconductor laser device provides the field paramedic or physician a unique portable laser capability. The pack consists of a completely self-contained laser system that fits inside a belt pack. Several other medical applications being investigated by the HPSLT program include urological applications, photodynamic therapy, and ophthalmic applications.

  2. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  3. Diode laser applications in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Richard C.; Esch, Victor C.

    1995-05-01

    Diode lasers are air-cooled, efficient, compact devices which have the potential of very low cost when produced in quantity. The characteristics of diode lasers are discussed. Their applications in interstitial thermal treatment of the prostate, and laser ablation of prostate tissues, will be presented.

  4. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  5. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  6. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  7. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  8. Compact ultradense matter impactors.

    PubMed

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Birrell, Jeremiah

    2013-03-15

    We study interactions of meteorlike compact ultradense objects (CUDO), having nuclear or greater density, with Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System as a possible source of information about novel forms of matter. We study the energy loss in CUDO puncture of the body and discuss differences between regular matter and CUDO impacts.

  9. Liquid crystalline chromophores for photonic band-edge laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephen M.; Qasim, Malik M.; Gardiner, Damian J.; Hands, Philip J. W.; Castles, Flynn; Tu, Gouli; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.; Friend, Richard H.; Coles, Harry J.

    2013-03-01

    We present results on laser action from liquid crystal compounds whereby one sub-unit of the molecular structure consists of the cyano-substituted chromophore, {phenylene-bis (2-cyanopropene)}, similar to the basic unit of the semiconducting polymer structure poly(cyanoterephthalylidene). These compounds were found to exhibit nematic liquid crystal phases. In addition, by virtue of the liquid crystalline properties, the compounds were found to be highly miscible in wide temperature range commercial nematogen mixtures. When optically excited at λ = 355 nm, laser emission was observed in the blue/green region of the visible spectrum (480-530 nm) and at larger concentrations by weight than is achievable using conventional laser dyes. Upon increasing the concentration of dye from 2 to 5 wt.% the threshold was found to increase from Eth = 0.42 ± 0.02 μJ/pulse (≈20 mJ/cm2) to Eth = 0.66 ± 0.03 μJ/pulse (≈34 mJ/cm2). Laser emission was also observed at concentrations of 10 wt.% but was less stable than that observed for lower concentrations of the chromophore.

  10. Compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Hamdan, Khaled; Hewett, Jacqueline; Makaryceva, Juljia; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Padgett, Miles J.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for in vivo point monitoring of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence, as a non-invasive method of differentiating normal and cancerous tissue. This instrument incorporates a 405nm diode laser with a shutter to prevent exposure of tissue to harmful light doses and reduce photobleaching, a bifurcated optical fibre to allow illumination of tissue and collection of fluorescence with a single fibre, a compact grating spectrometer for collection of spectra and a PC for system control. We present spectra obtained using this system both during routine gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy for cancer detection and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) for monitoring of treatment progress. These results illustrate the potential of the system to be used for fluorescence monitoring in a variety of clinical applications.

  11. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  12. Q-switched laser prelase detection circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, George E.

    1991-01-01

    A compact electronic circuit was developed to detect prelasing in Q-swithed pulsed laser systems and once detected to shut down the laser before the next laser pulse occurs. The circuit is small, compact, and uses a minimum of components which makes it quite economical, thus readily lending itself to commercial applications. It can easily be incorporated into virtually any Q-switched laser system or reliability of a laser system by reducing a source of possible costly optical damage. The circuit operation and instrument requirements necessary to incorporate the circuit into a laser system are discussed.

  13. Blue-green phosphor for fluorescent lighting applications

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-03-15

    A fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer including Sr.sub.4 Al.sub.14 O.sub.25 :Eu.sup.2+ (SAE) and at least one of each of a red, green and blue emitting phosphor. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional, deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of SAE in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over, the course of the lamp life.

  14. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  15. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  16. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  17. Compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R/sub 0/ = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R/sub 0/ approx. = 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  19. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  20. Laser neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, O.G.

    1986-06-17

    Laser photodetachment of the excess electron to neutralize relativistic ions offers many advantages over the more conventional collisional methods using gases or thin foils as the neutralization agents. Probably the two most important advantages of laser photodetachment are the generation of a compact and low divergence beam, and the production of intense neutral beams at very high efficiency (approximately 90%). The high intensities or high current densities of the neutral beam result from the fixed maximum divergence that can be added to the beam by photodetachment of the charge using laser intensity of fixed wavelength and incident angle. The high neutralization efficiency is possible because there is no theoretical maximum to the neutralization efficiency, although higher efficiencies require higher laser powers and, therefore, costs. Additional advantages include focusability of the laser light onto the ion beam to maximize its efficacy. There certainly is no residual gas left in the particle beam path as is typical with gas neutralizers. The photodetachment process leaves the neutral atoms in the ground state so there is no excited state fluorescence to interfere with the subsequent beam sensing. Finally, since the beams to be neutralized are very high powered, for a large range of neutralization efficiencies the neutral beam can be increased more by increasing the power to the laser neutralizer than by adding an equal amount of power to the primary accelerator. 26 figs.

  1. Free-space and underwater GHz data transmission using AlGaInN laser diode technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Boćkowski, M.; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Kucharski, R.; Targowski, G.; Watson, S.; Kelly, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    Laser diodes fabricated from the AlGaInN material system is an emerging technology for defence and security applications; in particular for free space laser communication. Conventional underwater communication is done acoustically with very slow data rates, short reach, and vulnurable for interception. AlGaInN blue-green laser diode technology allows the possibility of both airbourne links and underwater telecom that operate at very fast data rates (GHz), long reach (100's of metres underwater) and can also be quantum encrypted. The latest developments in AlGaInN laser diode technology are reviewed for defence and security applications. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Ridge waveguide laser diode structures are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with optical powers of <100mW. Visible light communications at high frequency (up to 2.5 Gbit/s) using a directly modulated 422nm Galliumnitride (GaN) blue laser diode is reported in free-space and underwater.

  2. Compact Ozone Lidar for Atmospheric Ozone and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcia, Joel; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2007-01-01

    A small compact ozone differential absorption lidar capable of being deployed on a small aircraft or unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) has been tested. The Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser is pumped by a quadrupled Nd:YLF laser. Test results on the laser transmitter demonstrated 1.4 W in the IR and 240 mW in the green at 1000 Hz. The receiver consists of three photon-counting channels, which are a far field PMT, a near field UV PMT, and a green PMT. Each channel was tested for their saturation characteristics.

  3. Double-modulation CPT cesium compact clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Peter; Mejri, Sinda; Tricot, Francois; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Boudot, Rodolphe; de Clercq, Emeric; Guérandel, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Double-modulation coherent population trapping (CPT) is based on a synchronous modulation of Raman phase and laser polarization, which allows the atomic population to accumulate in a common dark state. The high contrast signal obtained on the clock transition with a relative compact and robust laser system is interesting as basis of a high performance microwave clock. Here we study the parameters of a double-modulation CPT Cs clock working in cw mode. The optimal polarization modulation frequency and cell temperature for maximum contrast of clock transition are investigated. The parameters of the detection are also studied. With the optimal parameters, we observe a CPT signal with contrast of 10% and linewidth of 492 Hz, which is well suited for implementing a cw atomic clock.

  4. Collective Deceleration: Toward a Compact Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.-C.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D.; Chao, A.W.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst. Quantenopt.

    2011-11-28

    With the increasing development of laser accelerators, the electron energy is already beyond GeV and even higher in near future. Conventional beam dump based on ionization or radiation loss mechanism is cumbersome and costly, also has radiological hazards. We revisit the stopping power of high-energy charged particles in matter and discuss the associated problem of beam dump from the point of view of collective deceleration. The collective stopping length in an ionized gas can be several orders of magnitude shorter than the Bethe-Bloch and multiple electromagnetic cascades stopping length in solid. At the mean time, the tenuous density of the gas makes the radioactivation negligible. Such a compact and non-radioactivating beam dump works well for short and dense bunches, which is typically generated from laser wakefield accelerator.

  5. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  6. Bright High Average Power Table-top Soft X-Ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, Jorge; Reagan, Brendon; Wernsing, Keith; Luther, Brad; Curtis, Alden; Nichols,, Anthony; Wang, Yong; Alessi, David; Martz, Dale; Yin, Liang; Wang, Shoujun; Berrill, Mark A; Furch, Federico; Woolston, Mark; Patel, Dinesh; Marconi, Mario; Menoni, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by ultrafast solid state lasers. These lasers have numerous applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  7. A compact semiconductor digital interferometer and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britsky, Oleksander I.; Gorbov, Ivan V.; Petrov, Viacheslav V.; Balagura, Iryna V.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility of using semiconductor laser interferometers to measure displacements at the nanometer scale was demonstrated. The creation principles of miniature digital Michelson interferometers based on semiconductor lasers were proposed. The advanced processing algorithm for the interferometer quadrature signals was designed. It enabled to reduce restrictions on speed of measured movements. A miniature semiconductor digital Michelson interferometer was developed. Designing of the precision temperature stability system for miniature low-cost semiconductor laser with 0.01ºС accuracy enabled to use it for creation of compact interferometer rather than a helium-neon one. Proper firmware and software was designed for the interferometer signals real-time processing and conversion in to respective shifts. In the result the relative displacement between 0-500 mm was measured with a resolution of better than 1 nm. Advantages and disadvantages of practical use of the compact semiconductor digital interferometer in seismometers for the measurement of shifts were shown.

  8. Compact high-speed scanning lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Cameron; Hussein, Marwan; Tripp, Jeff; Nimelman, Manny; Koujelev, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The compact High Speed Scanning Lidar (HSSL) was designed to meet the requirements for a rover GN&C sensor. The eye-safe HSSL's fast scanning speed, low volume and low power, make it the ideal choice for a variety of real-time and non-real-time applications including: 3D Mapping; Vehicle guidance and Navigation; Obstacle Detection; Orbiter Rendezvous; Spacecraft Landing / Hazard Avoidance. The HSSL comprises two main hardware units: Sensor Head and Control Unit. In a rover application, the Sensor Head mounts on the top of the rover while the Control Unit can be mounted on the rover deck or within its avionics bay. An Operator Computer is used to command the lidar and immediately display the acquired scan data. The innovative lidar design concept was a result of an extensive trade study conducted during the initial phase of an exploration rover program. The lidar utilizes an innovative scanner coupled with a compact fiber laser and high-speed timing electronics. Compared to existing compact lidar systems, distinguishing features of the HSSL include its high accuracy, high resolution, high refresh rate and large field of view. Other benefits of this design include the capability to quickly configure scan settings to fit various operational modes.

  9. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  10. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  11. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  12. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  13. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  14. Expanding the plasmonic response of bimetallic nanoparticles by laser seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, R. J.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2016-03-01

    This work explores a cost-effective route to enhance the tuning range of the optical response of metal nanostructures on substrates beyond the ranges that are achievable through the nanostructure dimensions, composition or dewetting processes. The new route (laser seeding) uses single nanosecond laser pulses to induce dewetting in regions of a metal layer deposited on a glass substrate followed by the deposition of a second metal layer, both layers being deposited by pulsed laser deposition. In order to show the possibilities of this new route, we have chosen that the two metals were different, namely Ag and Au. The comparison of the optical response of these regions to those that were laser irradiated after deposition of the second metal layer shows that while nanoalloyed nanoparticles (NPs) are formed in the latter case, the NPs produced in the former case have a heterogeneous structure. The interface between the two metals is either sharp or a narrow region where they have mixed depending on the laser fluence used. While the nanoalloyed NPs exhibit a single, narrow surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the heterogeneous NPs show broader SPRs that peak in the near infrared and depending on conditions exhibit even two clear SPRs. The laser seeding approach in the conditions used in this work allows for the expansion of the tuning range of the color to the blue-green region, i.e. beyond the region that can be achieved through nanoalloyed NPs (yellow-red region). In addition, the results presented foresee the laser seeding route as a means to produce round and almost isolated NPs in an enhanced range of diameters.

  15. A compact SADM family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  16. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  17. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  18. Compact and low-cost THz QTDS system.

    PubMed

    Probst, Thorsten; Rehn, Arno; Koch, Martin

    2015-08-24

    We present a terahertz quasi time domain spectroscopy (QTDS) system setup which is improved regarding cost and compactness. The diode laser is mounted directly onto the optical delay line, making the optical setup more compact. The system is operated using a Raspberry Pi and an additional sound card. This combination replaces the desktop/laptop computer, the lock-in-amplifier, the stage controller and the signal generator. We examined not only a commercially available stepper motor driven delay line, but also the repurposed internal mechanics from a DVD drive. We characterize the performance of the new system concept.

  19. Compact and low-cost THz QTDS system.

    PubMed

    Probst, Thorsten; Rehn, Arno; Koch, Martin

    2015-08-24

    We present a terahertz quasi time domain spectroscopy (QTDS) system setup which is improved regarding cost and compactness. The diode laser is mounted directly onto the optical delay line, making the optical setup more compact. The system is operated using a Raspberry Pi and an additional sound card. This combination replaces the desktop/laptop computer, the lock-in-amplifier, the stage controller and the signal generator. We examined not only a commercially available stepper motor driven delay line, but also the repurposed internal mechanics from a DVD drive. We characterize the performance of the new system concept. PMID:26368172

  20. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  1. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  4. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  5. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  6. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bočarov, Viktor; Čermák, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  7. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  9. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  10. Compact reactor design automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassersharif, Bahram; Gaeta, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual compact reactor design automation experiment was performed using the real-time expert system G2. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the utility of an expert system in design; in particular, reactor design. The experiment consisted of the automation and integration of two design phases: reactor neutronic design and fuel pin design. The utility of this approach is shown using simple examples of formulating rules to ensure design parameter consistency between the two design phases. The ability of G2 to communicate with external programs even across networks provides the system with the capability of supplementing the knowledge processing features with conventional canned programs with possible applications for realistic iterative design tools.

  11. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  12. Compaction-based VLSI layout

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiao-Ming.

    1989-01-01

    Generally speaking, a compaction based VLSI layout system consists of two major parts: (1) a symbolic editor which maintains explicit connectivity and structural information about the circuit; (2) a compactor which translates the high level description of a circuit to the detailed layout needed for fabrication and tries to make as compact a layout as Possible without violating any design rules. Instead of developing a complete compaction based VLSI layout system, this thesis presents some theoretical concepts and several new compaction techniques, such as scan line based approach, which can either cooperate with a symbolic editor to form a layout system or work as a post-process step to improve the results obtained by an existing layout system. Also, some compaction related problems are solved and proposed. Based on the special property of channel routing, the author presents a geometric method for channel compaction. For a given channel routing topology, the minimum channel height is always achieved with the incorporation of sliding contacts and automatically inserting necessary jogs. The geometric compaction approach is then generalized and applied to compact the entire VLSI chip at the building-block level. With a systematic way of automatic jog insertion, he proves that under the given layout topology and design rules, the lower bound of one dimensional compaction with automatic jog insertion is achieved by the geometric compaction algorithm. A new simultaneous two-dimensional compaction algorithm is developed primarily for placement refinement of building-block layout. The algorithm is based on a set of defined graph operations on a mixed adjacency graph for a given placement. The mixed-adjacency graph can be updated efficiently if the placement is represented by tiles in the geometric domain.

  13. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  14. The Meaning of a Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  15. Multiple pulse resonantly enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, L.; Walczak, R.; Nevay, L. J.; Dann, S.; Hooker, S. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Cowley, J.

    2012-12-21

    We present an outline of experiments being conducted at Oxford University on multiple-pulse, resonantly-enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration. This method of laser plasma acceleration uses trains of optimally spaced low energy short pulses to drive plasma oscillations and may enable laser plasma accelerators to be driven by compact and efficient fibre laser sources operating at high repetition rates.

  16. Semiconductor Lasers and Their Application in Optical Fiber Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Govind P.

    1985-01-01

    Working principles and operating characteristics of the extremely compact and highly efficient semiconductor lasers are explained. Topics include: the p-n junction; Fabry-Perot cavity; heterostructure semiconductor lasers; materials; emission characteristics; and single-frequency semiconductor lasers. Applications for semiconductor lasers include…

  17. Compact, low power consumption methane sensor based on a novel miniature multipass gas cell and a CW, room temperature interband cascade laser emitting at 3.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Gluszek, Aleksander K.; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-02-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)-based methane sensor, employing a miniature dense-pattern multi-pass gas cell (MPGC) and a continuous wave, room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL), is reported. The optical integration based on an advanced folded optical path design and an efficient ICL control system with appropriate electrical power management results in a methane sensor with a small footprint (32 × 20 × 17 cm3) and low-power consumption (6W). The direct absorption measurement strategy allows absolute quantitative assessments without any calibration. Polynomial and least-squares fit algorithms are employed to remove the baseline of the spectral scan and retrieve CH4 concentrations, respectively. An Allan-Werle deviation analysis shows that the measurement precision can reach 1.4 ppb for a 60 s averaging time. Continuous measurements lasting seven days were performed to demonstrate the stability and robustness of the reported methane sensor.

  18. Compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Pocha, Michael D.; Larson, Michael C.; Garrett, Henry E.

    2002-01-01

    A compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable, which couples light from an M.times.N array of emitters onto N fibers, where the M wavelength may be distributed across two or more vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) chips, and combining emitters and multiplexer into a compact package that is compatible with placement on a printed circuit board. A key feature is bringing together two emitter arrays fabricated on different substrates--each array designed for a different wavelength--into close physical proximity. Another key feature is to compactly and efficiently combine the light from two or more clusters of optical emitters, each in a different wavelength band, into a fiber ribbon.

  19. Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

    2009-09-25

    This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

  20. Laser remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    The properties and advantages of remote sensing lasers are discussed. The theory of nonresonant techniques, which is based on the lidar equation and elastic backscatter, and their applications to aerosol and meteorological parameters are examined. The characteristics and applications of the differential absorption lidar technique, the fluorescence technique, and Raman scattering are described. The use of a laser heterodyne radiometer and fiber optics for remote sensing is studied. Future developments in the field of remote sensing, in particular the improvement of laser sources, the fabrication of compact remote sensing instruments, and space-borne applications for lidar, are considered.

  1. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  3. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  4. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  5. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  6. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  7. The halogen atom/metal trimer CW laser-engineering concept overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, G.; Jacobs, T. A.

    1992-07-01

    A halogen atom/metal vapor laser is discussed in terms of CW power and performance. Fluorine and sodium represent surrogates for the halogen and metal species; other combinations are possible. Since lasing may occur from a variety of excited electronic states, operation is expected to be broadly dispersed over the visible and near UV wavelength regions. The device is a low pressure, supersonic mixing laser that resembles the HF/DF CW laser, e.g., separate plenums are utilized for the fluorine and sodium vapors, and each plenum feeds a nozzle array. Sodium trimer formation begins in the nozzle and continues inside the laser cavity. The design of this nozzle is particularly important; the concept of controlled condensation is introduced. Downstream of the nozzle bank, the two vapor streams mix and the F-Na3 reaction pumps several electronically excited states that have gain in the blue-green region. Estimates are given for power per unit mass flow rate and power per unit nozzle bank cross-sectional area.

  8. A new airborne formaldehyde instrument: Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Bailey, S. A.; Swanson, A. K.; Wolfe, G. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We present the operating principles of a new instrument designed for operation on small aircraft. The instrument uses a new non-resonant fluorescence technique to take advantage of compact industrial lasers to make a small, robust package that can measure formaldehyde at sensitivities better than 100 ppt in 1 second integration. The instrument is designed to fly on the Alphajet at NASA Ames but can be modified to fly on other small aircraft.

  9. Compact Magneto-optical Trap for Rubidium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Chapovsky, P.L.

    2005-05-01

    The characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) using small-diameter cooling laser beams are considered. Trapping and cooling of Rb atoms from the surrounding gas of warm atoms takes place in the trap. A compact (140 {mu}m) and stable atomic cloud is obtained with a density of 7 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, which is three orders of magnitude higher than the density of the surrounding gas.

  10. 5 W frequency stabilized 976 nm tapered diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, Patrick; Gilly, Jürgen; Moritz, Stefan; Ostendorf, Ralf; Kelemen, Márc T.

    2008-02-01

    More and more applications, like tunable frequency doubling of diode lasers for blue-green outputs, non linear spectroscopy, or pump laser sources for fiber lasers necessitate diffraction-limited tunable narrow linewidths and high output powers in the multiwatt regime. For these applications, tapered lasers based on a tapered amplifier with gain-guided design can be used in an external cavity set up to guarantee both - frequency stabilization and tunability. We have realized frequency stabilized high-power ridge-waveguide tapered diode lasers with more than 4W of cw output power. These low modal gain, single quantum well InGaAs/AlGaAs devices emitting between 920nm and 1064nm were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Tapered single emitters consist of an index-guided ridge section and a gain-guided taper section with an overall length of 3.5mm. The taper angle was 6°. With a high-reflectivity coating on the rear facet and an antireflection coating on the front facet more than 10W of output power have been demonstrated. To optimize the beam quality at higher output power the two different sections have been operated by different operation currents. For this purpose the tapered diodes have been mounted p-side down on structured submounts. For wavelength tunability and frequency stabilization the tapered diodes, provided with AR coatings on both facets, have been used in external cavity setup in Littrow configuration. The influence of the different operation currents on the electrooptical and beam characteristics has been carefully investigated in detail. Within this operation mode a nearly diffraction limited behavior up to 5W has been established.

  11. Compact 6-DOF Stage for Optical Adjustments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafaat, Syed; Chang, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) stage for mechanical adjustment of an optical component. The six degrees of freedom are translations along the Cartesian axes (x, y, and z) and rotations about these axes (theta x, theta y, and theta z, respectively). Relative to prior such stages, this stage offers advantages of compactness, stability, and robustness, plus other advantages as described below. The stage was designed specifically as part of a laser velocimeter and altimeter in which light reflected by a distant object is collected by a Cassegrainian telescope and focused into a single-mode, polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The stage is used to position and orient the input end of the optical fiber with respect to the focal point of the telescope. Stages like this one can also be adapted for use in positioning and orienting other optical components, including lenses, prisms, apertures, and photodetectors.

  12. Compact and stable multibeam fiber injector

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. F., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    A compact and stable 20-beam injector was built for launching laser light into fibers for Fabry Perot velocity measurements of shock-driven surfaces. The fiber injector uses commercial mounts on mini-rails. Dielectric-coated beamsplitters provide accurate amplitude division. Minimal adjustments for stable operation are permitted by the use of a real-time video-viewer. The video system includes a non-linear camera for CW alignment and a linearized camera with a frame grabber for pulsed measurement and analysis. All 20-injection points are displayed on a single monitor. Optical requirements are given for image relay and magnification. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations on high-power are quantified.

  13. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  14. A compact holographic optical tweezers instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, G. M.; Bowman, R. W.; Linnenberger, A.; Dienerowitz, M.; Phillips, D. B.; Carberry, D. M.; Miles, M. J.; Padgett, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    Holographic optical tweezers have found many applications including the construction of complex micron-scale 3D structures and the control of tools and probes for position, force, and viscosity measurement. We have developed a compact, stable, holographic optical tweezers instrument which can be easily transported and is compatible with a wide range of microscopy techniques, making it a valuable tool for collaborative research. The instrument measures approximately 30×30×35 cm and is designed around a custom inverted microscope, incorporating a fibre laser operating at 1070 nm. We designed the control software to be easily accessible for the non-specialist, and have further improved its ease of use with a multi-touch iPad interface. A high-speed camera allows multiple trapped objects to be tracked simultaneously. We demonstrate that the compact instrument is stable to 0.5 nm for a 10 s measurement time by plotting the Allan variance of the measured position of a trapped 2 μm silica bead. We also present a range of objects that have been successfully manipulated.

  15. Compact spatial multiplexers for mode division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haoshuo; van Uden, Roy; Okonkwo, Chigo; Koonen, Ton

    2014-12-29

    Spatial multiplexer (SMUX) for mode division multiplexing (MDM) has evolved from mode-selective excitation, multiple-spot and photonic-lantern based solutions in order to minimize both mode-dependent loss (MDL) and coupler insertion loss (CIL). This paper discusses the implementation of all the three solutions by compact components in a small footprint. Moreover, the compact SMUX can be manufactured in mass production and packaged to assure high reliability. First, push-pull scheme and center launch based SMUXes are demonstrated on two mostly-popular photonic integration platforms: Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and Indium Phosphide (InP) for selectively exciting LP01 and LP11 modes. 2-dimensional (2D) top-coupling by using vertical emitters is explored to provide a coupling interface between a few-mode fiber (FMF) and the photonic integrated SMUX. SOI-based grating couplers and InP-based 45° vertical mirrors are proposed and researched as vertical emitters in each platform. Second, a 3-spot SMUX is realized on an InP-based circuit through employing 45° vertical mirrors. Third, as a newly-emerging photonic integration platform, laser-inscribed 3D waveguide (3DW) technology is applied for a fully-packaged dual-channel 6-mode SMUX including two 6-core photonic lantern structures as mode multiplexer and demultiplexer, respectively.

  16. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on compact x-ray sources, to appear in the winter of 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. The potential for high-brilliance x- and gamma-ray sources driven by advanced, compact accelerators has gained increasing attention in recent years. These novel sources—sometimes dubbed 'fifth generation sources'—will build on the revolutionary advance of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). New radiation sources of this type have widespread applications, including in ultra-fast imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, and studies of matter under extreme conditions. Rapid advances in compact accelerators and in FEL techniques make this an opportune moment to consider the opportunities which could be realized by bringing these two fields together. Further, the successful development of compact radiation sources driven by compact accelerators will be a significant milestone on the road to the development of high-gradient colliders able to operate at the frontiers of particle physics. Thus the time is right to publish a peer-reviewed collection of contributions concerning the state-of-the-art in: advanced and novel acceleration techniques; sophisticated physics at the frontier of FELs; and the underlying and enabling techniques of high brightness electron beam physics. Interdisciplinary research connecting two or more of these fields is also increasingly represented, as exemplified by entirely new concepts such as plasma based electron beam sources, and coherent imaging with fs-class electron beams. We hope that in producing this special edition of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (iopscience.iop.org/0953-4075/) we may help further a challenging mission and ongoing intellectual adventure: the harnessing of newly emergent, compact advanced accelerators to the creation of new, agile light sources with unprecedented capabilities

  17. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  18. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  19. In Vivo Non Linear Optical (NLO) Imaging in Live Rabbit Eyes Using the Heidelberg Two-Photon Laser Ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ming; Flynn, Kevin; Nien-Shy, Chyong; Jester, Bryan E.; Winkler, Moritz; Brown, Donald J.; La Schiazza, Olivier; Bille, Josef; Jester, James V.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging of non-linear optical (NLO) signals generated from the eye using ultrafast pulsed lasers has been limited to the study of ex vivo tissues because of the use of conventional microscopes with slow scan speeds. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a novel, high scan rate ophthalmoscope to generate NLO signals using an attached femtosecond laser. NLO signals were generated and imaged in live, anesthetized albino rabbits using a newly designed Heidelberg Two-Photon Laser Ophthalmoscope with attached 25 mW femtosecond laser having a central wavelength of 780 nm, pulsewidth of 75 fs, and a repetition rate of 50 MHz. To assess two-photon excited fluorescent (TPEF) signal generation, cultured rabbit corneal fibroblasts (RCF) were first labeled by Blue-green fluorescent FluoSpheres (1 μm diameter) and then cells were micro-injected into the central cornea. Clumps of RCF cells could be detected by both reflectance and TPEF imaging at 6 hours after injection. By 6 days, RCF containing fluorescent microspheres confirmed by TPEF showed a more spread morphology and had migrated from the original injection site. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of using NLO microscopy to sequentially detect TPEF signals from live, intact corneas. We conclude that further refinement of the Two-photon laser Ophthalmoscope should lead to the development of an important, new clinical instrument capable of detecting NLO signals from patient corneas. PMID:20558159

  20. In vivo non-linear optical (NLO) imaging in live rabbit eyes using the Heidelberg Two-Photon Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ming; Flynn, Kevin; Nien-Shy, Chyong; Jester, Bryan E; Winkler, Moritz; Brown, Donald J; La Schiazza, Olivier; Bille, Josef; Jester, James V

    2010-08-01

    Imaging of non-linear optical (NLO) signals generated from the eye using ultrafast pulsed lasers has been limited to the study of ex vivo tissues because of the use of conventional microscopes with slow scan speeds. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a novel, high scan rate ophthalmoscope to generate NLO signals using an attached femtosecond laser. NLO signals were generated and imaged in live, anesthetized albino rabbits using a newly designed Heidelberg Two-Photon Laser Ophthalmoscope with attached 25 mW fs laser having a central wavelength of 780 nm, pulsewidth of 75 fs, and a repetition rate of 50 MHz. To assess two-photon excited fluorescent (TPEF) signal generation, cultured rabbit corneal fibroblasts (RCF) were first labeled by Blue-green fluorescent FluoSpheres (1 mum diameter) and then cells were micro-injected into the central cornea. Clumps of RCF cells could be detected by both reflectance and TPEF imaging at 6 h after injection. By 6 days, RCF containing fluorescent microspheres confirmed by TPEF showed a more spread morphology and had migrated from the original injection site. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of using NLO microscopy to sequentially detect TPEF signals from live, intact corneas. We conclude that further refinement of the Two-photon laser Ophthalmoscope should lead to the development of an important, new clinical instrument capable of detecting NLO signals from patient corneas.